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NOTES ON PADDLING WITH ALLIGATORS BEAT THE HEAT

11 THINGS TO DO INSIDE IN JULY

PLUS SPECIAL HEALTH & WELLNESS SECTION FEATURING:

MEET THE DOCTORS ANGER MANAGEMENT ARE YOU GETTING ENOUGH SLEEP? STEM CELL THERAPY

ON SET WITH DENIM RICHARDS CH2 GETS THE INSIDE SCOOP FROM ONE OF HOLLYWOOD’S RISING STARS

JULY 2019

VINTAGE WEDDING GOWNS

BRIDAL FASHION FROM 1940 THROUGH 2010

WHAT TO WEAR TO A SUMMER WEDDING IN THE SOUTH (AS A GUEST!)

MUSICIANS IN BATHROOMS FEATURING THE LOWCOUNTRY BOIL BAND


32 ON SET WITH DENIM RICHARDS C2 GETS THE INSIDE SCOOP FROM ONE OF HOLLYWOOD’S RISING STARS

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A WORD FROM OUR MAYORS

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FIVE DRINKS WITH MIKE WAGNER OF SHORE BEACH SERVICES

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TEN THINGS TO DO INSIDE WHEN THE SUMMER HEATS UP

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NOTES ON PADDLING WITH ALLIGATORS

LIFE IS TOO SHORT TO SKIP DESSERT

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GOLF AND OCEAN VIEWS INSPIRE STORYBOOK WEDDING

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WHAT TO WEAR TO A SUMMER WEDDING

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HILTON HEAD HEARING SERVICES: WE’RE LISTENING!

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ANGER MANAGEMENT AND WOMEN OVER FORTY

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UNDERSTANDING STEM CELL THERAPY

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ARE YOU GETTING ENOUGH SLEEP?

O N O U R C OV E R S BEAT THE HEAT 11 THINGS TO DO INSIDE IN JULY

NOTES ON PADDLING WITH ALLIGATORS

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STARRING THE LOWCOUNTRY BOIL BAND

YELLOWSTONE’S DENIM RICHARDS PHOTOGRAPHY BY KRISZTIAN LONAYI CLOTHING BY PALMETTOES IN SEA PINES CENTER

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JULY 2019

CH2 GETS THE INSIDE SCOOP FROM ONE OF HOLLYWOOD’S RISING STARS

PLUS MEET THE DOCTORS

(AS A GUEST!)

ANGER MANAGEMENT ARE YOU GETTING ENOUGH SLEEP?

O N SET WITH DEN IM RICHA RDS

VINTAGE WEDDING GOWNS MUSICIANS IN BATHROOMS

STEM CELL THERAPY

MEET THE DOCTORS ANGER MANAGEMENT ARE YOU GETTING ENOUGH SLEEP? STEM CELL THERAPY

(AS A GUEST!)

JULY 2019

VINTAGE WEDDING GOWNS

BRIDAL FASHION FROM 1940 THROUGH 2010

SPECIAL HEALTH & WELLNESS SECTION FEATURING:

PLUS SPECIAL HEALTH & WELLNESS SECTION FEATURING:

WEDDING GOWNS FROM 1940 T0 2010

11 THINGS TO DO INSIDE IN JULY

vintage

BEAT THE HEAT

WHAT TO WEAR TO A SUMMER WEDDING

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NOTES ON PADDLING WITH ALLIGATORS

INDULGE YOUR SWEET TOOTH WITHOUT THE SIDE OF GUILT.

59 ROAD TRIPPIN’ BARRY KAUFMAN TAKES ADVICE FROM TOM SELLECK AND HEADS OUT WEST WITH THE FAMILY – IN SEARCH OF AN RV AND YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK.

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CB2 CELEBRATE BLUFFTON & BEYOND

CH2 CELEBRATE HILTON HEAD!

ON SET WITH DENIM RICHARDS

CB2 GETS THE INSIDE SCOOP FROM ONE OF HOLLYWOOD’S RISING STARS

1970S GOWN MODELED BY OXANA STYLED BY KAILA JEFFCOAT HAIR AND MAKEUP BY COURTNEY MARINE PHOTOGRAPHY BY M.KAT

WEDDING GOWNS THROUGH THE DECADES IN PREPARING FOR OUR BRIDAL ISSUE THIS YEAR, CH2 & CB2 STYLIST KAILA JEFFCOAT THOUGHT IT MIGHT BE FUN TO TRACK DOWN VINTAGE BRIDAL GOWNS FROM VARIOUS DECADES TO SEE HOW THE FASHIONS HAVE CHANGED WITH THE PASSING OF TIME.


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HE’S DRINKING: PEANUT BUTTER AND BANANA SMOOTHIE I’M DRINKING: STRAWBERRY AND BANANA SMOOTHIE


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images sourced from dreamstime.com

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Beat the Heat!

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NOTES ON PADDLING WITH ALLIGATORS


Gators fleeing at my approach—gliding away silently in the blackwater, slipping discreetly down banks into the deep, submerging slowly with a few bubbles and that “you can’t see me, I’m invisible” look—has generally been my experience. But wildlife is by nature unpredictable, so there are always exceptions; in fact, some exceptions are predictable. Individuals I don’t count on retreating are mommas with babies, humongous granddaddies, and any animal that feels trapped or cornered. And if a gator has been fed by humans, forget it; all bets are off—steer clear before good behavior flies out the window.

GATORS WANT TO RETREAT (USUALLY) It’s a beautiful sunny day in the Lowcountry. I am alone, floating atop mirror calm waters in a brackish estuary, miles from the nearest house or dock. Nothing breaks the stillness but the salty cries of seabirds and the dip of my paddle in the creek. Suddenly, I come around a bend in the marsh and SPLASH! An alligator has slid down the bank with a frantic start that soon gives way to a palpable sense of relief as he enters his watery safe-zone; that characteristic profile of eye and nose bumps breaking the surface is visible for a few moments before he disappears completely in the direct path of my boat. A sneak attack? I think not. This fellow became aware of me long before I spotted him and chose withdrawal rather than confrontation.

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GIVE GATORS FAIR WARNING Once I was hiking in the ACE Basin, toward the end of a long and exhausting loop, when I saw a massive gator up ahead. Stretched completely across the path with his head in the reeds on one side and his tail in the canal on the other, he was blocking my way and could have stayed like that for hours. I really did not want to backtrack, so I gave a loud whistle to alert him of my presence. To my surprise, he obliged by crawling into the reeds and disappearing down the canal! Another time, I was riding my bike in the Savannah Wildlife Refuge when I came around a sharp turn and had to slam on the brakes because I nearly crashed with a gator. We both froze in terror and found ourselves at an impasse. Finally, I eased backward ever so slowly with the bike, and as soon as I was out of sight around the bend, again, I heard the telltale splash of his escape. I learned that sometimes animals won’t retreat while you’re still locked into a visual with them. Later, I found a way to apply these lessons on water. I was paddling the New River upstream from the Highway 170 Bridge, venturing way back into the headwaters (a huge swamp behind Sun City.) Every time I thought I was to the end of the navigable channel, it just kept going. At one point, I crossed under a


powerline right-of-way and began to enter a wide pooling area that was evidently the gathering point of the gator nation. In these situations, I’m nearly always alone, it’s silent, and things feel elemental. So, it occurred to me to beat the side of my boat with the oar—lo, the congregation of gators began to part before me! I paddled right through the center without incident. Now, when in doubt, I use the oar trick, as I imagine gators feel intimidated by a sound they don’t recognize and want to get away.

PEOPLE WHO SPEND THEIR LIVES AROUND ALLIGATORS AVOW THEY REALLY ONLY ATTACK DOGS AND BABIES, NOT FULL-GROWN HUMANS; AND THEY DEFINITELY DON’T ATTACK UNKNOWN SEA BEASTS WITH 10-14-FOOT-LONG PROFILES. SO, WHEN VENTURING OUT IN MY KAYAK I TRY TO OWN THAT.

SIZE MATTERS There is a world of difference between a six-foot juvenile and 14-foot granddaddy. The former I would venture close enough for a photo op; the latter has no natural predators on earth, and he knows it. Basically, anything over 10 feet, I steer as wide away as possible, but anything under that I don’t worry about too much. That’s just my personal precedent. Once I was paddling a spring run outside Orlando when I spied a little guy in the shallows, maybe five-foot. I eased up closer and closer, snapping photos and eventually getting within intimate portrait range. I had just clicked the last image and was starting my respectful retreat with tiny backstrokes when suddenly he lost patience and flipped out, rolling over in a spray of mud that covered me. I guess I deserved it. It took many years for this to occur to me and I don’t know how verifiable it is, but the logic seems sound: As far as a gator knows, my boat and I are the same—one creature. So, if my kayak is 10 feet long—nearly double my height—so am I! Little thoughts like that go a long way toward empowerment by taking the fear factor out, looking at things logically and realizing that in nature nobody wants to tangle with somebody bigger than them. People who spend their lives around alligators avow they really only attack dogs and babies, not full-grown humans; and they definitely don’t attack unknown sea beasts with 10-14-foot-long profiles. So, when venturing out in my kayak I try to own that. MOMMAS WITH BABIES Everyone knows that when it comes to wild animals, you don’t mess with the baby unless you want to mess with momma. A companion and I were boarding a canoe in the Okefenokee when the local outfitter gave us some advice: “Now y’all are probly gonna see some li’l baby gators out there—if momma tries to rush the boat, just whack her over the head with the paddle. She’ll get back.” Luckily, that never came to pass. On another occasion I was kayaking Florida’s Wekiva River and had meandered into a little side lagoon where I leaned back and allowed myself to drift contentedly in the sun. I was starting to doze off when I heard the gentle croaking of a baby gator— an adorable sound, but a dangerous one. I looked up and saw that I had been drifting right into their nest! Jeez, thanks for the warning little guy. So, get to know the sound, people. YouTube it. It might save your life one day. 

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PH OTO GRA PH Y BY M. K AT A RT I C L E BY L I N DA S . H O PK I N S


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Go RVing!

D A RO rippin’ t


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Wedding

ARTWORK BY PAM WHITE

Section

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WEDDING GOWNS THROUGH THE DECADES

PG. 74

GOLF AND OCEAN VIEWS INSPIRE STORYBOOK WEDDING

PG. 81

WHAT TO WEAR TO A SUMMER WEDDING IN THE SOUTH

“THE BEST LOVE IS THE KIND THAT AWAKENS THE SOUL AND MAKES US REACH FOR MORE, THAT PLANTS A FIRE IN OUR HEARTS AND BRINGS PEACE TO OUR MINDS AND THAT’S WHAT YOU’VE GIVEN ME.” — NICHOLAS SPARKS, THE NOTEBOOK


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VaNDIT SARDANA, MD, FRCS B E A U F O R T M E M O R I A L O R T H O PA E D I C S P E C I A L I S T S What is your field of expertise? I’m an orthopedic surgeon specializing in joint reconstruction and joint preservation. I treat knee and hip pain with modern non-operative techniques. Once non-surgical treatment options have failed, I perform minimally invasive knee/hip replacement surgery. Where did you study medicine? I grew up in Canada and did my undergraduate and master’s degrees at the University of Toronto and completed my medical degree at the University of Ottawa. I did my residency training in orthopedic surgery at McMaster University, which is the home of evidence-based medicine, and pursued my fellowship training at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, studying with the pioneers of knee and hip replacement. This fellowship gave me the opportunity to work with worldrenowned surgeons, performing over 500 cases and getting direct feedback to learn new tips and techniques.

What is exciting to you about your field right now? The direct anterior approach to hip replacement is an exciting new technique that allows the patient to get back to their previous activities sooner than any other approach. It is a muscle-sparing approach that does not require the need for hip precautions post-operatively. Currently, I am one of the few orthopedic surgeons in the Southeast performing this innovative surgery and am grateful to be able to offer this to my patients. What inspires you in your practice? I enjoy knee and hip replacement as these procedures are challenging and require both an art and science of restoring normal joint kinematics. What truly inspires me is the ability to help my patients alleviate their suffering and resume active lifestyles. The instant gratification of my patients’ satisfaction and enhancement of their quality of life is what makes everything I do feel worthwhile.

When you have 30 minutes of free time, how do you spend it? I love to spend time with my family. My wife and I are blessed with a daughter, Sophia, and I cannot imagine my days being spent without her. We are looking forward to another addition to our family in August. We go for walks and dance together—Sophia loves to dance. We also enjoy watching Raptors’ games and playing table tennis as a family. Aside from spending time with my family, I read the Journal of Arthroplasty to keep myself up-to-date with modern techniques and research in the field of knee and hip replacement. This keeps my knowledge fresh, helping me provide the best care to my patients with the most current evidence. Beaufort Memorial Orthopaedic Specialists 11 Arley Way, Bluffton, SC 29910 1251 Ribaut Road, Beaufort, SC 29902 (843) 524-3015 BeaufortMemorial.org


GREGORY GLOVER, MD, FACOG, FPMRS W E R N E R A N D G L O V E R W O M E N ’ S H E A LT H What is your field of expertise? Urogynecology (formally, female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery), which involves treatment of women with bladder control issues, dropped uterus and vagina (prolapse, cystocele, rectocele, and enterocoele); painful bladder conditions; complications from mesh surgery; and bowel control problems. I also practice general gynecology, with special training in minimally-invasive surgery (MIS), which allows for small or no visible incisions and shorter recovery times for those women who do require surgery. Why were you attracted to this field? I was a general OB/GYN for the first part of my career and was always interested in treating pelvic floor problems, which often resulted from pregnancy and childbirth. Sub-specializing in the field of urogynecology has allowed me to develop and hone skills which help improve quality of life for women with pelvic floor problems, while enabling my patients to regain and maintain a healthy, active lifestyle.

What is exciting to you about your field now? Much has improved in diagnosing and treating problems that almost half of all women face. Patients can be treated with more accuracy, less disruption to their lives, and with better outcomes than what was available in the past. It enables me to offer a wide range of nonsurgical and surgical options that are proven to be effective and have minimal complications. My goal is to help each woman choose the most appropriate treatment to relieve her symptoms and restore her quality of life. Where did you receive your training? Originally from Alabama, I completed my undergraduate work in biology, cum laude, at Birmingham-Southern College, and obtained my Doctor of Medicine from The University of Alabama School of Medicine. Internship and residency followed at the Alton Ochsner Medical Foundation in New Orleans, and after completing my medical training, I served for three years in the National Health

Service Corps. Prior to moving to the Lowcountry last year, I was in private practice in Knoxville for several years, and was one of the first gynecologists in the U.S. to receive board-certification in the sub-specialty of female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery. What do you like to do outside of work? Spending time with family, volunteering, golfing, rowing, cycling, cooking, and traveling. Werner & Glover Women’s Health 1264 Ribaut Road, #200 Beaufort, SC 29902 (843) 524-2466 www.wernerandglover.org

Werner & Glover Women’s Health


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I S C MUin bathroomsIANS


Profile for CH2/ CB2

Celebrate Hilton Head Magazine - July 2019  

Editor's Note, A Word from our Mayor Lisa Sulka from Bluffton, 5 Drinks with Mike Wagner, This and That, Musicians In Bathrooms featuring Th...

Celebrate Hilton Head Magazine - July 2019  

Editor's Note, A Word from our Mayor Lisa Sulka from Bluffton, 5 Drinks with Mike Wagner, This and That, Musicians In Bathrooms featuring Th...

Profile for celebrat