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CH2 CELEBRATE HILTON HEAD! APRIL 2015

QUALITIES ALL ENTREPRENEURS SHARE A PEEK INSIDE POSEIDON APRIL 2015

A LINE IN THE SAND: SHOULD MARIJUANA BE LEGAL?

RBC HERITAGE 2015 SEA PINES RESORT REDUX


CB2 CELEBRATE BLUFFTON & BEYOND

CH2 CELEBRATE HILTON HEAD!

2 CELEBRATE BLUFFTON & BEYOND APRIL 2015

APRIL 2015

QUALITIES ALL ENTREPRENEURS SHARE

QUALITIES ALL ENTREPRENEURS SHARE A PEEK INSIDE POSEIDON

SEA PINES RESORT REDUX

APRIL 2015

APRIL 2015

A LINE IN THE SAND: SHOULD MARIJUANA BE LEGAL?

BLUFFTON CRAB PROJECT SEEKS SPONSORS

RBC HERITAGE 2015

A LINE IN THE SAND: SHOULD MARIJUANA BE LEGAL?

RBC HERITAGE 2015 SEA PINES RESORT REDUX


APR

GENIUSES AT WORK play

IL • 2015

FROM THE

Audience Response Analyst Maggie Marie Washo Head of Covert Operations Catherine Ann Davies Office Historian George Thomas Staebler Assistant Director of Strategic Planning Carolyn Hunter Kostylo Long Range Economic Planner, Thailand Division Marion Elizabeth Bowser Employee Orientation Specialist Ashton Kelley Fons Work and Leisure Time Coach Kim Conrad Crouch The Sales Machine Kaity Elizabeth Robinson Tinder Queen “Just Kandace” Wightman Master of Recycling Bailey Marie Atkinson Public Appearances Coordinator Lucille Rosita Gonzalez Washo IQ Evaluator Greta Von Bowser

Writing Specialists David Bennett, Greg Bennett, Paul deVere, Frank Dunne Jr., Rebecca Edwards, Courtney Hampson, Courtney Hillis, Linda S. Hopkins, Laura Jacobi, Barry Kaufman, Clayton Rollison, Lisa Sulka, Debbie Szpanka, Kent Thune

Lighting Experts John Brackett Photography Mark Staff Photography M.Kat Photography Photography by Anne

Find Us HERE PO Box 22949 Hilton Head Island, SC 29925 843.689.2658 m.washo@celebratehiltonhead.com

A

s I saw my neighbor in passing last week, he stopped to tell me how much he enjoyed the March issue, specifically calling out all of the photographic spreads on local homes. While I was pleased to hear that, I commented that it wasn’t necessarily one of my favorites. Issues are not like children; you are allowed to have favorites. This one, however, will hold a special place in my memory for a while to come, as it seems the stars aligned to cover a lot of things I personally find interesting. The big news this month is, of course, the return of the RBC Heritage, back to entertain visitors and locals alike. There are some changes with regards to parking (see page 40 for details), but the real story (IMHO) is the complete transformation of the Harbour Town Clubhouse, which happened in less than a year. Writer Paul deVere talks to the architect, Grady Woods, CEO Matthew Goodwin and other longtime Sea Pines Resort players in Sea Pines Resort Redux. If you haven’t been to the resort in a while, you’ll be in awe of all of their recent renovations, with the crowning achievement being completed just in time to host the PGA players. Speaking of new island developments, we take a peek inside the SERG group’s latest destination, Poseidon. I actually stayed up past 10 p.m. on a Saturday night a few weeks ago to check out the Rooftop Bar for myself. The night I was there it was pleasantly packed and played host to cheery partygoers on the dance floor, private conversations on the deck overlooking Broad Creek and a birthday party in the VIP area. My hat is off to the SERG brain trust, as they seem to have successfully created a place for the 30 to 60 set to play after hours. Did I mention it’s a restaurant too? Which brings me to another hot spot on the Island, Reilly’s Plaza, where we will be partnering with John Cranford and Swampfire Records to show off local musical talent on May 8, when we “Rock the Triangle.” Of course, every good local event has a beneficiary, and it should surprise no one that all of this partying is to raise money for the Island Rec Center while the Bachelor of the

DITOR Year contest is on hiatus for a year. Read all about it on page 114, and vote for your favorite local musicians before April 15 by going to www.celebratehiltonhead. com. You determine which six bands play at our party (and battle it out for $2,000 and the cover of our June issue) by how many times their original songs are played. Finally, I love this issue because it features local entrepreneurs (and after this month I can finally spell that word without spell check). I had the privilege of being mentored by a well-loved local entrepreneur, Pierce Lowrey. It is because of his vision and work ethic that you are even reading this magazine today. I have the utmost respect for anyone who has the courage to start their own business. It’s a leap of faith, a lot of blood, sweat and tears (and money!). This country was built on small business owners. Remember that when choosing where to spend your money. I could go on, but I’m running out of room! Have a fantastic April, and I hope to see you at the tournament.

M. WASHO PUBLISHER /EDITOR IN CHIEF

R “HEY! THAT’S ME.”

á “It’s your page mom.”


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I DUUUDE

APRIL 2015

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ber em t ty m e re R ep ? s e h t es dam

C2 FASHION 04·2015

Special thanks to Emily Novitski

ALL DAY HERITAGE WEAR

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Ž JADE Geo Border Pullover - $92 DL Jeans - $178 Hobo Robin Wallet - $88 Chain Necklace - $27 Sacha London Deron Peep Toe - $156 Melinda Maria Earrings - $198 (All items from Gigi’s Boutique)

m

Œ

Karlie White Ruffle Bottom Cami Dress - $67 (Copper Penny) Tory Burch Mignon Rings Flat Sandal - $275 (The Porcupine) Zip Wallet - $118 (The Porcupine) Whitley V Gold Chain Necklace - $78 (Copper Penny) Betsy Pittard Earrings - $48 (Copper Penny)

KIM MOLLOY, STYLIST EXTRAORDINAIRE FOR CH2/CB2 MAGAZINE “Heritage has become our little island’s fashion/social sporting event. No matter what age you are or size you wear, these ideas can help get you thinking about your best Heritage look. There are lots of fabulous choices out there! Grab a friend and treat yourselves to perusing all the boutiques our island has to offer.”

Lilly Pulitzer Gold Metallic Clutch - $88 Jack Rogers Fire Coral Gold Thongs - $110 Lilly Pulitzer Resort White Chipper Short in Finders Keepers - $78 Lilly Pulitzer Elsa Top in Palm Party - $168 Lilly Pulitzer Shorley Blue Earrings - $40 (All items from Belk)

COASTAL MUST: LIGHTWEIGHT DENIM Flowy lightweight denim is all the rage for spring. Shown here are track style shorts, but also look for flowy pants, tops and skirts. A great “basic” add-on piece for spring.


Serve the soft shell crabs over chilled grilled spring vegetables that can be cooked earlier in the day, allowing you to spend time with your guests. Some things are worth the wait, and soft shell crabs are definitely one of them.

FOOD & WINE COLUMN

SOFT SHELL CRABS ARTICLE BY CLAYTON ROLLISON

LAST MONTH WE ROMANTICIZED ABOUT SPRING. NOW SPRING IS REALLY HERE, AND LET’S GET DOWN TO THE NITTY AND THE GRITTY OF IT. SOFT SHELL CRABS ARE HERE! If you don’t eat these things, you probably cheered for Ivan Drago in Rocky IV. Today, I will explain how soft shell crabs happen and how to cook them at home without a deep fat fryer. Blue crabs are arthropods, so they have to “molt” their shell to grow. Once the water warms, their bodies start a unique process to shed their hard shell. Five to 10 days before the crabs are ready to molt, a thin white line begins to glow on the final two joints of their swimming fins. These crabs are known as peeler crabs. Peeler crabs are caught by fisherman in the wild. They are then sold to fisheries or seafood mongers to monitor the last few important steps. The crabs are kept in shallow holding pens and monitored constantly. The crabs begin to go through another visual change as that white line formed on the back fin now becomes red, and white, wrinkly lines form on the claws. At this point, the crab is ready to back out of the

shell. The back of the shell then begins to split, and the gel coating begins to separate the crab and the old shell. The crab begins to back out of its shell, which only takes a few hours. Once out of their shells, the crabs are completely defenseless; they then hide in mud along river bottoms and are impossible to catch. The process of the shell hardening begins immediately. It takes only a few hours before they become “leathery” and only a day or two for the shell to become hard. They grow from 20-30 percent in size after they back out of their shell. You can see the whole process on the back dock at Hudson’s. Now the fun part. Let’s eat. But first you have to clean the crabs. All you will need is a pair of kitchen shears. The first step is to remove the abdomen under the crab. Second step is to lift up what should be the shell on top of the crab, exposing the lungs. You will want to cut those out as well. The third step is to snip off the face. At this

point, the crab is cleaned and ready to eat. If you have not done this before, simply watch a video on YouTube. Most of the time you see soft shell crabs fried in one manner or another. At home, it can be messy or dangerous if you are unsure of yourself. At Lucky Rooster, we serve them off the Plancha, simply seasoned with salt and pepper, with no breading. At home, grilling them is an excellent alternative to frying. It’s a healthier alternative, and you won’t splatter grease everywhere. Serve the soft shell crabs over chilled grilled spring vegetables that can be cooked earlier in the day, allowing you to spend time with your guests. Some things are worth the wait, and soft shell crabs are definitely one of them.

LIVELY LIBATIONS! GOOSE MELON MOJITO: • • • •

1.5oz Grey Goose Le Melon .5oz Of Triple Sec Muddled Fresh Mint and Fresh Limes Soda Water and a Splash of Sprite

Special thanks to Adam and Kelly Nemetz (from Electric Piano in Park Plaza) for their refresshing Heritage cocktail. Make the EP Lounge a post-Heritage destination.

Special thanks to Hudson’s On The Docks for their delicious Beet salad and Soft Shell Crab Recipe.

BEET SALAD WITH SAUTEED SOFT SHELL CRAB SOFT SHELL PREPARATION: Remove belly plate, lungs and eyes. Dip in egg wash* mixture. Cover the crab thoroughly without pushing out the juices. Pan sauté until golden brown. Be careful not to cook too long as soft shells have a tendency to pop if overcooked. EGG WASH Whisk together: 6 whole eggs, 4 egg yolks and 6 tablespoons buttermilk BEET SALAD INGREDIENTS: 6 beets (3 red, 3 gold) 2 c. loosely packed arugula 1 c. loosely packed mixed greens 1/4 c. goat cheese Black pepper & kosher salt to taste Your favorite balsamic dressing 2 tablespoons EVOO PREPARATION: Preheat oven to 350. Rub beets with olive oil, salt and pepper. Place on a baking sheet and roast for 2 hours or until soft. Place beets in a paper grocery bag and close top so it is air tight. Peel beets and discard skin. Cut into desired size cubes. Season with salt to taste. Arrange arugula and mixed greens on a plate, top with beets, goat cheese and soft shell crab.


M A Y O R

Hilton Head Island Mayor

A Note from David Bennett

TASK FORCE, TEXAS AND “TEE” TIME IN WONDERLAND

W

hat can we add to April on Hilton Head Island? Beautiful weather, nature in bloom, spectacular events and tourism all abound. The 47th annual RBC Heritage presented by Boeing begins to roaring cheers broadcasted worldwide. Our RBC Heritage presented by Boeing is arguably one of the most enjoyed tournaments on the PGA tour, as evidenced by its enormous economic impact on our community, over $96 million in 2014 alone. With its iconic setting, the talented golf

< Bluffton Mayor

A Note from Lisa Sulka

IS BLUFFTON THE SAFEST COMMUNITY FOR PETS? PLUS: A DON RYAN CENTER FOR INNOVATION UPDATE

D

ave Ropes doesn’t want anyone else to experience what Richmond Hill, Georgia. resident Kathy White did when her Maltese-Poodle mix, Ellie, went missing in Bluffton. Her story is among the reasons why he is re-launching mobiPET’s services so more people can access this “Amber-Alert” system for their pets. White was visiting Bluffton when Ellie got loose and was lost in the woods near Palmetto Bluff for 13 days. More than 50 Bluffton residents searched for Ellie several times until a woman found her in the woods near Palmetto Bluff.

M AY O R

Ropes, who has owned mobiPET for two and a half years, is re-launching his services so people can sign up for free. A free, lifetime subscription with mobiPET will allow the user to receive all alerts, send one alert regarding a lost pet and use the database for his or her pet. MobiPET can make any pet search easier by alerting all animal shelters and veterinarians in a 30-mile radius. Ropes, who is a business owner at the Don Ryan Center for Innovation, wants to make Bluffton his pilot market for his product/services as he also makes it the safest community for pets. Non-pet owners can become a part of the network for free by visiting the web site at mobipet.me and clicking on Become a Pet Finder. According to David Nelems, executive director of the Don Ryan Center for Innovation, mobiPET is the only lost pet recovery company in the nation that offers a program allowing pet owners to instantaneously send out a photo “Amber Alert” of missing pets. “MobiPET is a company that will experience tremendous growth but will stay headquartered in Bluffton as it introduces the service nationwide,” he said. If a registered pet goes missing, the owner sends an alert from his or her phone app (received after registration) or by simply texting the word “Lost” to mypet@agm.tw; almost instantaneously, it reaches the local network of people registered with mobiPET.

ABOUT THE DON RYAN CENTER FOR INNOVATION: Located in the CareCore National building in Buckwalter Place, the Don Ryan Center provides regional start-up companies with consulting, resources and office space to accelerate their business growth. Currently, the Center has nine innovators. Since opening in May 2012, the Center has incubated 19 local companies. The current and graduate companies that have been a part of the Center collectively employ 64 people with an annual payroll of $2,975,000. 

professionals, and the electric energy of the crowds, you would believe the event to be complete. What could possibly be added? And yet, each and every year, more volunteers and organizations, more spectators, and community gatherings combine to make this great occasion increasingly grand. Sea Pines Resort has premiered not only the Beach House and Plantation House, but on March 27, the curtain was raised on the new centerpiece, the Harbour Town Clubhouse. Congratulations! The same is quite true of Hilton Head Island. Our unique and significant history has been veritably established. Now it’s time to cultivate and foster dynamic ways for islanders and visitors from near and far to enjoy and appreciate it. The heritage of our lovely island is deeply rooted in the richness of our historical and cultural identity. I’m working with Town Council to create a task force charged with the goal of establishing a vision for heritage tourism, highlighting such features as the early Indians, Captain William Hilton’s discovery, Mitchelville, the Gullah Geechee Corridor, the Underground Railroad, the Civil War battles and, in these contemporary times, the


Our RBC Heritage presented by Boeing is arguably one of the most enjoyed tournaments on the PGA tour, as evidenced by its enormous economic impact on our community, over $96 million in 2014 alone. With its iconic setting, the talented golf professionals, and the electric energy of the crowds, you would believe the event to be complete.

blueprint for modern planned resort communities together with all the representative art and culture. Since we’re in Wonderland and it’s “tee” time, does that mean it’s also Texas tea time? I’ve heard there may be oil found off our shores, but does that mean we should extract it, just because it’s there? If we seek to make everything serve the same purpose, what unique purpose do we have? So, hot or iced, sweet or un’, a little cream, a slice of lemon, this or that to suit your taste, but do our islanders overwhelmingly agree…don’t add that Texas tea? Your Town Council is aware and active on this important issue. Hilton Head Island contributes to the world our miles of magnificent beaches and waterways, our multitude of wildlife species and vegetation, and our historical culture augmented by the arts. Should we strive to be the premier resort, retirement and business community on the East Coast? As was recently suggested by a task force of our citizens, let’s be earnestly committed to preserving our splendid barrier island as a naturally endowed sanctuary for future generations to experience with delight. We’ve received our Heritage; now let’s leave our legacy!  APRIL 2015

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C2

ARTICLE BY PAUL DEVERE / ILLUSTRATION BY ROBERT BATES

HOW TO ESCAPE THE

[ HORRIBLY ]

[ BORING ]

[ GOLFER ]


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PLANTATION GOLF CLUB SERVING HERON POINT BY PETE DYE AND OCEAN COURSE


ARTICLE BY PAUL DEVERE . PHOTOS COURTESY OF SEA PINES RESORT


OCEAN LOUNGE AT THE SEA PINES BEACH CLUB


SEA PINES BEACH CLUB


Photography by Mark Staff


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HARBOUR TOWN CLUBHOUSE

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MEN’S LOCKER ROOM AT THE HARBOUR TOWN CLUBHOUSE

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SEA PINES RESORT CHAIRMAN, MATTHEW GOODWIN


FOYER AT THE HARBOUR TOWN CLUBHOUSE


If You Go: NEW GENERAL ADMISSION PARKING Parking for general admission spectators will be located at the Coastal Discovery Museum, 70 Honey Horn Drive, Hilton Head Island. Shuttle service begins at 6 a.m. and ends one hour after play ends. The parking area will have 24-hour security. Spectators with tournament issued hang tags, Sea Pines residents and resort guests may park inside Sea Pines. Handicapped parking will also remain the same. NEW WILL CALL LOCATION Will Call will also be located at the Coastal Discover Museum at Honey Horn. Last minute ticket sales, pick-up and redistribution of tournament badges are a service of Will Call. The Ticket Trailer remains at Harbour Town Golf Links parking lot. BICYCLE PARKING Complimentary parking is available inside Sea Pines at the tennis courts next to Harbour Town Golf Links clubhouse parking lot. Cyclists must have a tournament ticket to be admitted into Sea Pines. TICKET PRICES Clubhouse Badge: $225 Grounds Badge (weeklong access): $170 Daily Grounds Ticket: Thursday, Sunday - $75 per day Friday, Saturday - $85 per day Practice Round Ticket (Mon-Wed) - $50 For details on the features of each type of ticket and online sales, visit rbcheritage.com/tickets.

APRIL 2015

Matt Kuchar poses with the championâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trophy on the 18th green of Harbour Town Golf Links

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843.686.4166 or 843.686.4176 WWW.WBYRD.COM


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UE TTE t i q u e

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANNE · HAIR AND MAKEUP BY SKINZIN · ADULT MODEL PROVIDED BY HALO MODEL AND TALENT AGENCY SPECIAL THANKS TO CHUCK MERRICK AND HIS DAFFODIL FARM (UPickDaffodils.com) and DAN BOWSER FOR HIS BRIGHT BLUE ‘62 CHEVY


On Ella Grace: L’Oved Baby Organic Headband $8.75 L’Oved Baby Organic Onesie $24 Lounge Pants $22 On Tiffani: Ribbon Crusher Sunhat $42 Summer Floral Infinity Scarf $29.50 Isis Maxi Dress $98 Little Fish Boateak Upper Deck Bracelets $35 ea.


On Ella Grace: L’Oved Baby Organic Headband $8.75 L’Oved Baby Organic Jumper $29.50 L’Oved Baby Organic Leggings $18.50 On Tiffani: Red Haute Chiffon Back Tank $75 AG Stilt Jean White $164 Bella Tunno Diaper Bag $79 Little Fish Boateak Necklace $58 Background: Recycled Barnboard Frame $20-$55 You are My Sunshine Wooden Sign $30


On Tiffani: Amour Vert Organic Cotton Fedra Dress $128 Joy Straw Fedora $28 Ceri Hoover Hadley Crossover $198 Little Fish Boateak Druzy Bracelet $50 LOUETTE BOUTIQUE IS LOCATED AT 32 PALMETTO BAY ROAD, SUITE 9A (The Village Exchange) 843.686.4141 LOUETTEBOUTIQUE.COM


ENTREPRENEURS WELCOME LOCAL

THIS ONE’S FOR YOU!

PAGE 53 TOP TEN QUALITIES OF HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL ENTREPRENEURS

PAGE 58 LOCAL ENTREPRENEUR PROFILES

PAGE 83 THE PHENONMENON OF CROWDFUNDING

PAGE 87 DEFINING SUCCESS

PAGE 88 BUSINESS OWNERS BORN AND RAISED IN THE AREA

PAGE 97 DUDE, WHY AREN’T YOU PODCASTING?


ARTICLE BY KENT THUNE

T O P

T E N

T R A I T S

O F

H I G H L Y

SUCCESSFUL ENTREPRENEURS SO YOU WANT TO BE YOUR OWN BOSS? MANY SUCCESSFUL ENTREPRENEURS GOT THEIR START WITH MUCH MORE THAN MONEY AND A GOOD IDEA. IN FACT, THE SIZE OF THE BANK ACCOUNT AND THE BRILLIANCE OF THE IDEA MATTER LESS THAN THESE COMMON ATTRIBUTES AND PIECES OF ADVICE TO THOSE INTERESTED IN FINDING THEIR OWN PATH TO SUCCESS IN THE BUSINESS WORLD.

TOP TEN CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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Have a vision and keep moving toward it. Not every successful entrepreneur is a planner by nature, but the vast majority began with a business plan.

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SUCCESSFUL ENTREPRENEURS

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DEBBIE KELLEY

WORDS TO LIVE BY

PETE BERNSTEIN

WORDS TO LIVE BY

KELLEY DESIGNS INC

“DON’T BE SO BUSY MAKING A LIVING THAT YOU FORGET TO MAKE A LIFE.”

FAT BABY’S PIZZA

“PLAY NICE” IT’S EVEN ON OUR T-SHIRTS.

30 YEARS IN BUSINESS

SOUTH ISLAND SQUARE, 841 WILLIAM HILTON PKWY (843) 785-6911 WWW.KELLEYDESIGNSINC.COM

What inspired you to start your own business? The encouragement of family and friends to “chart my own course.” What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? I would say juggling work and family. Both are extremely important, and I want to make certain that I give 100 percent to each. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? Flexibility… I love being able to set my own schedule. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Be passionate about what you are doing… don’t be afraid to take chances. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? As many as it takes! Were there any books or educational resources that helped you along your path? Studying design in college was the first step. Fortunately, there are so many resources

that are available to the design trade and to clients. It is important to stay on top of the trends. After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you wouldn’t make it, and if so, what did you do to make it work? Of course! I think everyone goes through a period where they question the wisdom of hanging in there. It is important to have the courage, strength and drive to believe in yourself. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? We work as a “team” on our projects. Clients love being part of this creative decisionmaking. I am also fortunate to have Gregory Vaughan as part of this team. He is such a creative talent, and we work great together. We have worked together for 25 years. What would you say is the secret to success? Being a good listener, being open-minded and surrounding myself with “like-minded” people.

9 YEARS IN BUSINESS

1034 WILLIAM HILTON PARKWAY (843) 842-4200 WWW.FATBABYSPIZZA.COM

What’s the best part about owning your own business? The sense of pride and accomplishment gained by running a successful business is amazing. However, being able to set my own hours is the ultimate. I never miss my kids’ sporting events or school activities—the feeling is unmatched. Were there any books or educational resources that helped you along your path? No, not at first. My past work experience in food and beverage was my best resource. Now, I read every Internet article and trade publication I can get my hands on. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? Beside the fact that we use only the best ingredients and make most of our dishes from scratch, I believe our staff is what truly stands out. What would you say is the secret to success? There’s no one secret to any business’ success. Hard work, good attitude, great staff and a little luck are all requirements. The most

important trait for success is to simply be nice. People will always remember how you make them feel. What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? The most difficult part of owning a business is budgeting time. During the start-up phase, every minute is dedicated to getting the business running. It’s hard to balance family and business. Even now, after 9 years, there rarely seems to be enough hours in the day. Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha moment” that brought you to the decision? The “aha” moment for Fat Baby’s came while I was a stay-at-home dad. Although my wife is an excellent teacher with many accolades (two-time Teacher of the Year), her salary just wasn’t enough for a family of four. Out of necessity, it was time to get back to work and the restaurant business is what I know best.


What inspired you to start your own business? From a young age, I knew I was going to one day own my own construction company. While I was growing up, my parents owned their own construction company, and I could see first-hand the benefits of being self-employed.

N AT H A N C A M E R O N CAMERON & CAMERON CUSTOM HOMES 6 YEARS IN BUSINESS

In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? My clients become my extended family, not just another house in my portfolio.

What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? The pros vastly outweigh the cons. I think the most difficult thing is that if something doesn’t go as I planned, I feel responsible to make it right.

What would you say is the secret to success? Trust in yourself and your talents. Sometimes you need to take a risk and push through the obstacles.

What’s the best part about owning your own company? Being able to have a vision and then working to achieve it. It is an amazing feeling to accomplish your goals! What advice can you give a young entrepreneur? Surround yourself with successful people who are willing to share their knowledge and experiences. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? Balancing work and family time can be challenging but my sons are very important to me. I keep myself available to my clients seven days a week.

After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you wouldn’t make it – and if so, what did you do to make it work? Even through the economic downturn, I feel very fortunate to have been able to sustain Cameron & Cameron and use that time to grow my business gradually.

29 PLANTATION PARK DRIVE, SUITE 703 843-837-9300 CAMERONCUSTOMBUILDER.COM

WORDS TO LIVE BY SET GOALS, TAKE RISKS, FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION.

Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? Shortly before I began Cameron & Cameron, a dear friend and neighbor encouraged me to look at the bigger picture—making the best life I could for my family! Ever since then, I have never looked back. What does being an entrepreneur mean to you? I keep making new goals for myself. Some for the near future and others for the years to come. There are so many local business opportunities that present themselves and I’m excited about choosing the ones that will suit me best for the future.


KAT E KN I S E LY

WORDS TO LIVE BY

CATHERINE SHANAHAN

HILTON HEAD ICE CREAM

“DON’T LET ANYONE EVER DULL YOUR SPARKLE.”

CSM DIVORCE SOLUTIONS

SHOP OPENED IN 1982. I TOOK OVER JUNE 17, 2014

55 NEW ORLEANS ROAD (843) 842-6333 HILTONHEADICECREAMSHOP.COM

What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? The fact that the shop’s success or failure is a direct reflection of my ability to pull everything together. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? Making people smile. The world can be draining, but when you come into the shop, we want you to forget your worries, feel like a kid again and find your yumm! How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? It’s a 24/7 job, even when I’m not at work, I have to be prepared to work. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar?

We never compromise the product! Cream prices are rising, so our competitors buy product one third of the quality. We buy and use the best cream, real Oreos, lots of cookie dough along with all the other best ingredients. What would you say is the secret to success? Take deep breaths, don’t let the employees see you cry, and always believe in yourself. Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? My family is my dream team. My parents are always my sources of strength and wisdom. My sister and brother-in-law own Adventure Cove, so I always call them with small business questions. I wouldn’t be where I am today without them.

4 YEARS IN BUSINESS

WORDS TO LIVE BY

1705 NEWTOWN-LANGHORNE ROAD, SUITE 5, LANGHORNE, PA PRACTICES IN SOUTH CAROLINA (215) 486-8347 CSMDIVORCESOLUTIONS.COM

What inspired you to start your own business? After 25 years in the financial industry and my own personal experience with divorce, I realized how many people needed someone to help them take the emotions out of some difficult decisions that needed to be made today that would have a huge impact on their future. What is the BEST part about owning your own business? The best part about owning my own business is that I get to choose my own clients and my own schedule. It’s very inspiring to me to help individuals based on the individual’s needs and not the needs of a company that I am working for. What must-have- advice can you give to budding entrepreneurs? Do what you love and love what you do! Were there any books or educations resources that helped you along your path? Acquiring my designation as a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst and trained mediator has been invaluable to me. However, my path has been enriched by my past, my children (who have been my biggest supporters), my friends and most of all my clients. My clients remind me how invaluable the service that I provide is. When I see them move through this process and go on to become empowered productive people, I am in returned empowered! Yesterday I received a message from a client that said, “Thank you for our meeting and for being so

DO ONE POSITIVE THING TODAY TO MOVE YOU FORWARD WITH CONFIDENCE.

supportive and a gift for women in need of good supportive advice!” That made my day! Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha moment” that brought you to the decision? My aha moment was finding myself feeling scared and confused when faced with my own divorce. I am a confident, strong women who raised a blended family and was married for 20 years. I have a financial degree and have done many things on my own; however, I was scared and confused when I got separated, and it hit me that I was not alone. It occurred to me that if I felt that way, then I could only imagine how many others felt that way. At that moment, I vowed to help as many people through this process as I could, in a positive way. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? I feel that I am different in that I have experienced divorce myself, so I can relate to what my clients are going through. I am not negative about marriage or anyone’s experiences. I am a financial neutral in the divorce process and am always working towards what is fair. What would say is the secret to success? The secret to success is being the person you always hoped you would be. Surround yourself by people who inspire you and keep moving forward in a positive direction.


What inspired you to start your own business? I knew that I could make the building experience truly enjoyable for my clients by providing much better services. There are so many decisions to make with building a home, it can seem very daunting at times. I’ve accomplished this by being organized, involved, and I’ve been able to put fun into the process. It really ends up being a win-win situation for both me and my clients. What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? It’s not really a difficult part, but because I have the commitment to truly assist my clients on a daily basis, it seems sometimes there aren’t enough hours in the day; and yet I’ve been very successful at doing so. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? Being able to share my talents with my clients— very early on, they understand the devotion I have for making their dream come true. I’m in control to make sure that it happens. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? We’ve all heard it before… You will never work as hard for anyone else as you will for yourself. You must be truly committed and passionate about what you’re going to do, in order to succeed. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? I’ve never thought of it on an hourly basis; you just have to do what you have to do, pretty much 24/7. Were there any books or educational resources that helped you along your path? I really enjoy motivational books on entrepreneurship—gives me inspiration! I’ve read several of them. Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha moment”

LISA AND DAVE CORNELIUS

SIMPLY SOUTHERN HOMEBUILDERS, LLC 4.5 YEARS IN BUSINESS

181 BLUFFTON ROAD, UNIT B-102 (843) 757-5253 SIMPLYSOUTHERNHOMEBUILDER.COM

WORDS TO LIVE BY “WHERE THERE’S A WILL, THERE’S A WAY!”

that brought you to your decision? I guess I would have to say I had that “aha moment” 35 years ago. My husband and I have always been very business oriented, and our experiences, discussions, etc. have enabled us to be very good at problem solving, growth, and handling all daily activities that arise in owning your own business. After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you wouldn’t make it, and if so, what did you do to make it work? Not one minute! I always say worry is wasteful and it blurs your vision. We’re very motivated individuals. Back to where there’s a will there’s a way! In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? This would go back to sharing my time and talents as an “owner” with my clients, through daily communication, selection shopping, job site visits 2-3 times a day. I’m my clients’ advocate; being personally involved like this is not common practice in this industry. What would you say is the secret to success? We are both very in tune with being people pleasers. Dave and I enjoy sharing the process of building a home with our clients and ensuring they’re not let down. Turning over the keys often is bitter sweet, but knowing they are thrilled with their new home makes it okay. Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? I would say both of our parents were extremely hard working. They raised us to believe that anything is possible if you put your mind to it. They were wonderful role models, and there’s a great comfort we have knowing that we made them extremely proud of our accomplishments.


AMANDA RUSS

WORDS TO LIVE BY

POMODORI ITALIAN EATERY 3 YEARS IN BUSINESS

1 NEW ORLEANS ROAD (843) 686-3100 WWW.GOPOMODORI.COM

What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? Regardless of whether or not you are within the walls of your establishment, you are working. You never leave it and it never leaves you. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? I love it when people stop by my kitchen window after they’ve had a great meal and tell me to “Keep it up.” That really makes all of the tougher moments worth it. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Keep your eyes open and observe everything. There is enormous value in learning what NOT to do. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? As many as it takes. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar?

“EAT DESSERT FIRST, LIFE IS UNCERTAIN.”

When you walk into our tiny little eatery, you are walking into our home. We are a family here and we welcome you as a part of it. What would you say is the secret to success? I would say that success is established through a genuine desire to serve others. I find that I gravitate toward local businesses who operate with sincerity and humility. There is no such thing as making it on your own, it takes a village to support a venture. Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? I certainly would not be where I am without the love and support of my “large Italian family!” My mother and father, Fran and Joe and my brother Ben have been by my side since day one, painting, rolling gnocchi, making sausage, drinking all of my wine...the success of this restaurant would not be possible without them. And, of course, the other 30 family members on the island!

RITA KNEZOVICH RITA MANLEY AGENCY, LLC 11 YEARS IN BUSINESS

Serving the Lowcountry’s insurance needs for over 30 years 4 OFFICE WAY, SUITE C (2ND FLOOR) (843) 785-9002 WWW.RITAMANLEYAGENCY.COM

What inspired you to start your own business? After working for 21 years in the insurance business, both agency and corporate, I realized I had the knowledge and stamina to start my own independent agency. I wanted the opportunity to make the decisions and not have my future be a result of others’ decisions. What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? I did not buy an existing agency. The most difficult part was to get companies to contract with a startup agency. Developing the client base was easy. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? Having flexibility with my time. Being the decision maker and seeing the results of my labors. Also the interaction with insureds on a daily basis. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? As many as it requires. As a business develops, you learn what it takes, though family comes first.

WORDS TO LIVE BY “THE ONLY WAY TO DO GREAT WORK, IS TO LOVE WHAT YOU DO.”

Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha moment” that brought you to the decision? I never pictured myself where I am today. I was a relocated woman from the Midwest trying to make a living working for others. It all changed February 2004 when I took charge of my future and started my own business. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? The agency is solely owned by a female. I am surprised by the number of people who request to work with a female when they call my office. We still do everything in house. You have one agent through the whole process, including claims. What would you say is the secret to success? Every insured is equally important and contacted every year to update insurance. We shop our multiple carriers, assuring the best package for the client. I am constantly looking for new companies entering South Carolina to contract with.


What inspired you to start your own business? They say necessity is the mother of invention. I was bored of college and returned home without a degree. Once I got home, my parents politely told me they loved me and that I had six months to get my SH*$% together and move out. So I guess in this case, my necessity was to get a life. Having a construction background and not wanting to work directly for my parents, I put the time in to get my mechanical license and start Superior. What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? I would have to say the constant pressure to make the right choices and to stay profitable. I have two families: my wife and three beautiful kids and my Superior Family, which seems to grow by the week. I don’t want to let either family down, so this weighs heavily on my mind every day. What is the BEST part about owning your own business? It is nice not punching a clock every day. However, I say that and still put in more hours than most. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? I do not qualify to give advice yet. I’m still learning. Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha moment” that brought you to the decision? When I started, it was more of “owning a job” than a business. It has morphed into a business since then. So in my case it sort of just happened. After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you wouldn’t make it? If so, what did you do to make it work? I am not sure if “wouldn’t make it” crossed my mind, but there have been a lot of times where

D AV E M I L L E R SUPERIOR HEATING & AIR 15.5 YEARS IN BUSINESS

36 PERSIMMON RD. UNIT 202 (800) 828-COOL (2665) WWW.SUPERIOR.AC

WORDS TO LIVE BY “IF YOU FIND A PATH WITHOUT ANY OBSTACLES IT PROBABLY DOESN’T LEAD ANYWHERE.”

I was stressed out trying to figure out how to keep things moving. To quote William Feather, “Success seems largely a matter of hanging on after others let go.” In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? Hilton Head is surrounded by the cream of the crop. What would separate us in most other parts of the country is standard operating procedure for most of our competition around here. With that being said, I can honestly say Superior was one of the first to have a completely digital and mobile service fleet. Being digital and printing in the field has cut down on overhead, streamlined our procedures, increased our productivity as well as improved the overall customer experience. What would you say is the secret to success? The secret is there is no secret or magic bullet. Owning or running a business takes hard work, long hours, training, determination and skill to succeed. If you do not have all of those items, coupled with thick skin and being able to swallow your pride, since the customer is always right, then I suggest you play the lottery. Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? I have so many mentors. The first and foremost are my parents. They pointed me in the right directions, pushed me when I needed a push and picked me up when I needed a hand. I would not be here without George Lee who helped me start Superior and put us on the map. I understand that I do not know everything, so I try my best to surround myself with teammates that are smarter than me. This way, I learn every day I am at work, allowing me to change and adapt faster than most.


O RGA N

N I Z AT I O

I Z AT O RGA N

ION

ALLY MARTIN

WORDS TO LIVE BY

ATTENTION SOLUTIONS 1.5YEARS IN BUSINESS

12 LAFAYETTE PLACE, SUITE B (843)368-4437 WWW.ATTENTION-SOLUTIONS.COM

What inspired you to start your own business? After my daughter and I were diagnosed with ADHD, I realized there was a desperate need for ADHD resources and support, especially in the Lowcountry. I didn’t want anyone else to go through the frustration and confusion we did, and when I learned about ADHD coaching, I knew I had found my calling. What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? Having ADHD myself, I have always relied on the structure that goes along with working for someone else. Developing my own structure has been a struggle at times, and you can be sure that I relied on coaching to help me out. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? You have to be passionate about what you do. That passion makes the difference between getting by and being truly successful. Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha moment” that brought you to the decision? There was definitely an “Aha

"WHAT YOU PAY ATTENTION TO GROWS."

moment.” When I started getting phone calls from friends asking questions about their ADHD children, I knew I had to do something. So, I went back to school to complete my BA in psychology and I enrolled in an ADHD coach training program. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? My training definitely sets me apart. I completed advanced coach training through the ADD Coach Academy (ADDCA), which is the only ADHD-specific coach training program that is accredited by the International Coach Federation (ICF), the ADHD Coaches Organization (ACO), and the Center for Credentialing and Education (CCE). Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? I don’t think I would be where I am now without David Giwerc and the entire staff at the ADDCA. They provided excellent coach training in such a supportive and empowering atmosphere. My mentor coach, Laurie Dupar, was also a huge influence.

JACQUELYN & CHRIS SANKOWSKI VACATION HOMES OF HILTON HEAD 8YEARS IN BUSINESS

WORDS TO LIVE BY

28 SHELTER COVE LANE UNIT 112A. (843) 715-2208

“ALWAYS DELIVER MORE THAN EXPECTED.”

www.vacationhomesofhiltonhead.com

What inspired you to start your own business? We were coming out of college during a recession, which was an unnerving time. Being passionate about real estate, we figured there was no better time to start our own business. We both loved the idea of being in control of our future. Being raised on Hilton Head Island definitely contributed to our love for the area and has enabled our ability to provide excellent service to our vacationers. What is the BEST part about owning your own business? The best part about owning our own business is getting to watch our ideas come to life. It’s amazing to see our business grow before our eyes and see how we have progressed over the years. We also love getting to know our clients and seeing how those relationships develop. We get to see our vacation rental guests come back to us year after year, making memories with their families in our beautiful beach homes. This is really special to us! What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? “A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new.”—Albert Einstein, physicist. You must put yourself out there and take risks if you ever want to be a successful entrepreneur. For most people, that is the hardest part; so if you can do that, you are already ahead of your competition. Were there any books or education resources that helped you along your path? Being around other business owners

helps us to expand our minds constantly. We are always trying to learn from other people’s experiences. We also love reading Entrepreneur magazine, and our favorite inspirational book is Rich Dad, Poor Dad, by Robert Kiyosaki. Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha moment” that brought you to the decision? Growing up with families that are ambitious and entrepreneurial in nature, we both figured we would have our own business at some point. We didn’t think it would be right out of college, but things happen for a reason. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? I think we offer a one-stop-shop. We offer property management, luxury vacation rentals and real estate sales. We both are very passionate about what we do. Our property owners and clients are extremely important to us, and we feel that shows. We also stay on the cutting edge when it come to new technology pertaining to vacation rentals and real estate sales. We are not afraid of change, which in this industry can be hard to come by. A great example of this is that we had been wanting to change our name for some time now. We were formerly Hilton Head Rent Direct, and now we are Vacation Homes of Hilton Head. It was a little bit of work, but we are very happy with the outcome. What would you say is the secret to success? Our secrets to success are hard work and creativity. Also, be ever-changing, never be stagnate.


What inspired you to start your own business? Wanting to create something unique, something that was a reflection of my creative side but also acknowledged my belief that the customer truly drives your business. What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? Being solely responsible for so many things, knowing so many people depend on me. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? Happy customers. That may seem simplistic, but it is true. When I get compliments on our showroom, our service or even our ads, it is so invigorating. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Get up and do it again—every day, every time. Sometimes you have to find a new way, but you always have to keep trying to do better, be better. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? Hmm. My Fitbit says I average five hours of sleep a night, so I am awake 133 hours a week. I guess I work 133 hours per week on my business… Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha moment” that brought

KAT H L E E N M AY E R S

KPM FLOORING 7.5 YEARS IN BUSINESS

35 NORTH MAIN STREET #110 (843) 342-4955 WWW.KPMFLOORING.COM

FAVORITE QUOTE: “LIFE BEGINS AT THE END OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE.”— NEALE DONALD WALSCH

you to the decision? Actually, my first boss in the flooring business pushed me to do it. After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you would not make it, and if so, what did you do to make it work? Ha, I think I wake up every day in varying degrees of panic over KPM. I take it as a good thing though. It motivates me to find a way to make KPM better every day. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? Product selection and our commitment to finding the best flooring solutions for each customer. We offer so much because our customers are like snowflakes—no two the same. What would you say is the secret to success? I heard someone on the radio say that to be successful your desire to succeed has to be as innate, as strong, as your desire to breathe. I think that’s true. Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? Maybe not a mentor, but my family: my daughters who look at me like I can do anything; their father, Mick, who told me to start KPM because I was truly as good or better than many in my line of work; and my mother and siblings who have believed in me since the day I was born.


JEREMIAH SPIRES

WORDS TO LIVE BY

PERFORMANCE COACHING LLC

LIFE IS A JOURNEY. AMBITION, DESIRE, DETERMINATION, DEDICATION AND COMPASSION ARE GUARANTEED FOR SUCCESS.

OVER 8 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE

At Home l In Gym

l

Outside

(843) 540-7264 jeremiahspires@gmail.com www.xpfitness.com

What inspired you to start your own business? My passion for taking care of my mind and body has translated into inspiring others to work towards a healthier lifestyle. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? As an owner, the responsibility is mine. I make all the decisions in my company. I plan the day, work with clients, prospect new business and manage the business affairs. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Experience is the best teacher. Be passionate, dedicated, focused, and confident and have strong communication skills. Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha moment” that brought you to your decision? Yes, I always wanted to own my own business, but my “aha moment” occurred at age 19, when my mother passed away. That was the first day of the rest of my life. After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you wouldn’t make it

– and if so, what did you do to make it work? Any entrepreneur would have this thought, but my positive attitude, determination and interest to learn from the experiences of other successful individuals has guided me to make it work. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? I don’t compare, but I have an ongoing commitment to my clients, ranging from studentathletes, individuals and active seniors, to be professional and help them achieve their health and wellness goals. What would you say is the secret to success? Hard work, dedication and passion to help others improve their health and wellness. Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? I have been fortunate throughout my life to have the opportunity to learn from extraordinary mentors who have helped guide me during different stages in both my personal and professional lives.

DALE AKINS 24 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE

WORDS TO LIVE BY “Il faut de l’avdace, encore de l’avdace, toujours de l’avdace,” POST OFFICE BOX 1547 meaning “One must dare, dare again, 6 JOHNSTON WAY, UNIT A always dare,” from BLUFFTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 29910 Danton, Frederick TELEPHONE: (843) 757-7574 the Great and General Patton. www.daleakinslaw.com

What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? The ability to take on cases that I truly believe in, even if they are not popular, and simply being able to help people. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? My courtroom experiences are vast and varied. Our small firm allows us to give highly personal service. Also, I practice in both South Carolina and Georgia. How many hours a week do you work as a successful business owner? It can vary greatly, depending on trial schedules, depositions, etc. It is always out of my control. After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you wouldn’t make it, and if so, what did you do to make it work? At first, there was apprehension that there would not be enough clients, but I have been fortunate that many of my colleagues have sent me cases and have associated me to work with them collaboratively. What would you say is the most difficult part about being

in business for yourself? Time management. Were there any books or educational resources that helped you along your path? Von Clausewitz’ “On War,” F. Lee Bailey’s “To be a Trial Lawyer,” Robert Bolt’s “A Man for All Seasons” and Clarence Darrow’s “The Story of My Life.” Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? My former partners, Charles Scarminach and Herb Novit, taught me a great deal about honor and decorum. They are very traditional lawyers, and I try to keep my practice operating in the same vein. My father always taught me courage and honesty. What would you say is the secret to your success? Integrity, hard work and perspective. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Don’t take counsel of your fears—believe in yourself. Treat everyone with dignity and respect, and you will usually receive the same.


What inspired you to start your own business? Starting my own business enabled me to expand the horizons of my medical practice beyond the conventional model. What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? Trying to balance patients’ needs with the financial realities (restrictions) of insurance companies is a challenge. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? Owning my own business affords me the flexibility of spending as much time with patients as they and I need, instead of being restricted by a limited time frame. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Always have integrity and put your clients (patients) first. If your motives are in the right place, everything will work out. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? I spend about 50 hours per week in the office and spend additional time outside of the office researching and studying. Were there any books or educational resources that helped you along your path? Textbook of Toxicology & Metals; The Message of the Divine Iliad (Walter Russell); Think and Grow Rich (Napoleon Hill) Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden

JOSEPH HICKEY, MD HICKEY WELLNESS CENTER 30+ YEARS IN BUSINESS

30 NEW ORLEANS ROAD HILTON HEAD ISLAND, SC (843) 842-9960 DRJOSEPHHICKEY.COM

WORDS TO LIVE BY “YOU CAN MAKE YOUR BODY INHOSPITABLE TO DISEASE.”

“aha moment” that brought you to the decision? I always knew that I would be my own boss. After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you wouldn’t make it, and if so, what did you do to make it work? Like many business owners, I felt some concern a few years ago during our recession. But if you are persistent and faithful, God opens doors. Perseverance is the key. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? I take a collaborative medicine approach and enjoy working with my patients as a team. I also enjoy uncovering and applying international research to help my patients. What would you say is the secret to success? My patients know that I will spend as much time as necessary to help solve their issues and that I am passionate about working together and doing whatever I can to help them identify solutions and live well. Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? Dr. Robert Atkins (Atkins Diet) and Dr. Russell Jaffe (preventive healthcare pioneer), who helped me realize that the body can be rebalanced nutritionally, rather than with pharmaceuticals, are among my mentors.


WORDS TO LIVE BY

ERICA WELLIVER ELEVATOR LIFT SYSTEMS, INC. 35 YEARS IN BUSINESS

365 RED CEDAR ST, SUITE 104 (843) 837-7900 WWW.ELEVATORLIFT.COM

What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? I think the most difficult part is knowing when to turn it off. I am part of a family business, so it seems like someone is always talking about the ups and downs of the elevator world! What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? The best part is when you hear from a customer that they have had a good experience with your company. It is really rewarding to know you had a part in making someone’s day a little better. How many hours a week do you work? As many as it takes! I’m always on call. Were there any books or educational resources that helped you along your path?

YOU CANNOT HAVE A POSITIVE LIFE AND A NEGATIVE MIND.

During my time at the University of South Carolina, a business class had me read Suze Orman’s The Money Book for the Young, Fabulous and Broke and Mike Gerber’s The E Myth. I still turn to those books for advice today. What separates your business from other that are similar? Elevator Lift Systems, Inc. is celebrating its 35th anniversary this year. I believe our commitment to product dependability and customer service separates Elevator Lift Systems. Our customers know that when they choose Elevator Lift Systems, Inc. they are choosing a company they can depend on. What would you say is the secret to success? Getting up every day and doing the best you can. Over all the days, I believe, you will find you have reached success.

WORDS TO LIVE BY

ANDREW AMBLER N HANCE WOOD RENEWAL 3 YEARS IN BUSINESS

“The remarkable position in which we find ourselves is that we don’t actually know SERVING HILTON HEAD/ SAVANNAH what we actually (843) 715-8420 know.” WWW.NHANCE.COM/LOWCOUNTRY

What inspired you to start your own business? The freedom to create my own path through life has always appealed to me. What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? Not letting work interfere with your personal life. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? Having the ability to be creative, motivating others towards a common goal, and seeing the look on a satisfied customer’s face when we are done. Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha moment” that brought you to the decision? I got a bachelor’s degree in entrepreneurship, so I think it was something that I always wanted to do. I was just waiting for the right time to present itself. In your opinion, what separates your business

from others that are similar? We fill a niche in the market by restoring your existing cabinetry for basically one-fifth the cost of new ones. We also offer a nontraditional sandless floor refinishing, which eliminates the dust and mess in people’s homes. Last, the knowledge and quality of work. What would you say is the secret to success? I don’t know if it is a secret, but there is no substitute for hard work. You must also find an effective way to market yourself and generate leads. Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? My parents John and Elizabeth have supported me through every path in life. In business and in life, you have your ups and downs. When you have a good support team behind you, it makes getting through those hard times a lot easier.


What inspired you to start your own business? As I arrived on Hilton Head Island in the early ’70s, it was apparent I needed to pave my own way. There were not a lot of jobs here. Starting at home stringing shells, beads and semiprecious stones, selling jewelry, I needed a storefront. It soon escalated into clothing and accessories. What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business or yourself? Turning the business switch off. Even after hours, an owner’s job is never truly complete. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? Having a vision and watching it grow, enthusiastic employees and returning customers. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Go for it; don’t hold back, but surround yourself with smart energetic people. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? The clock never stops. There are always thoughts going through my head: how to do it better, how many more shoes to buy, how to motivate. I can be cutting flowers in my yard and think about how to change a display. My business never stops. Were there any books or educational resources that helped you along your path? Harvard Business Essentials, Manager’s Tool Kit, 1001 Ways to Energize Employees, One Minute Manager. Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha moment” that brought you to the decision?

AVI S R O L L I S O N T H E PORCUPINE ALMOST 40 YEARS IN BUSINESS

THE VILLAGE AT WEXFORD 1000 WILLIAM HILTON PARKWAY, UNIT E4 (843) 785-2779 WWW.PORCUPINESTYLE.COM

WORDS TO LIVE BY “FASHION IS AN ATTITUDE, NOT AN AGE.”

I worked well independently, and whenever I worked, I always thought I could do it better. I am sure I was destined to be on my own. After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you wouldn’t make it, and if so, what did you do to make it work? Yes, there were many times I felt like I was falling off the cliff: UPS went on strike; Sea Pines, the driving force of our economy had its issues; the Gallery of Shops caught on fire. Survival was problem solving. I always had Plan A and a Plan B. I had to recognize fast when to switch to Plan B and never put my head down. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? The Porcupine has a large selection of clothing, shoes and accessories, both European and American, many recognized and many rising stars. Most important, we have an experienced and professional staff to accommodate your personal style. What would you say is the secret to success? In this business, team building. I try to hire the best people out there and treat them well. They will do a good job for me and my customers. They are my #1 asset. Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? My parents. As an entrepreneur, my father taught me very early that hard work, ambition and perseverance is necessary if you are entrepreneurial. I discovered my niche for style from my mother, a fashion plate; our hobby was shopping!


WORDS TO LIVE BY

MJ HENNESY DISCOUNT FURNITURE & MATTRESS OUTLET 26 YEARS IN BUSINESS

“WORK HARD, LAUGH OFTEN, SURROUND YOURSELF WITH HILTON HEAD: 118 MATHEWS DR. WONDERFUL (843) 681-4620 PEOPLE AND NEVER BLUFFTON: 1504B FORDING ISLAND RD. TAKE YOURSELF (843) 837-4620 TOO SERIOUSLY.” WWW.HILTONHEADFURNITURE.COM

What inspired you to start your own business? It was 1988 and I was working in Boston in a very wonderful corporate job, but I was traveling way too much with three teenagers at home. Plus, I wanted my children to have their grandparents back in their lives, so my husband and I quit our jobs and moved to Hilton Head. He went to work for the airlines, and I bought a tiny startup furniture company, and the rest is history. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? You don’t really want to know… I don’t really want to know! Every business owner knows that you take your work home every night and weekends! It is what it is—part of business ownership. Were there any books or educational resources that helped you along your path? I read books, attend seminars, and take courses whenever I can. I’ve been in sales my whole life and enjoy helping people. After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you wouldn’t make it? If so, what did you do to make it work? The first time was after 9-11 and

the most recent was when the economy tanked in ’07. I prayed a lot! We also reinvented ourselves and did whatever it took. We started doing free in-home decorator service, ramped up our customer care and lowered our margins. I’m grateful for our wonderful customers and my fabulous staff. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? We give exceptional service in all situations, especially when problems pop up. That’s really the area that separates a good business from a great business! EVERYONE has occasional problems. We make sure we solve the problem to the customer’s satisfaction 100 percent when the dust settles. What would you say is the secret to success? People don’t generally go browsing in furniture or mattress stores for no reason, so we do everything we can to help them find exactly what they’re looking for at a great price. You only accomplish this efficiently by listening carefully to your customer and asking the right questions. Then, their search is over and everyone is happy.

WORDS TO LIVE BY

BOB ENGLER BUDGET BLINDS OF THE LOWCOUNTRY 9 YEARS IN BUSINESS

880 FORDING ISLAND RD UNIT 8 (843) 837-4060 WWW.BUDGETBLINDS.COM/ HILTONHEADISLAND

What inspired you to start your own business? Always wanted to own my own business. What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? As a business owner, you wear a lot of hats and have a lot of demands on your time and attention. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? Being able to provide jobs to our great staff who have contributed to the success of business along with me. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Be prepared for anything, and always be open and ready to learn. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? 55-60 hours Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha

“THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS FREE LUNCH.”

moment” that brought you to the decision? I wanted to, but didn’t know if I would or could. Wasn’t until I was ready for a huge change when I really thought, “This is going to happen.” After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you wouldn’t make it? If so, what did you do to make it work? No specific time, but I think I underestimated the amount of hours and decisions that needed to go into it. I questioned if I could handle everything to make it happen the way I wanted it to. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? We have an outstanding team. Everyone shares in our common goal to exceed our customers’ expectations. What would you say is the secret to success? I hate to lose. I’m willing to do whatever it takes to succeed. I have a very solid work ethic, and love what I do.


What inspired you to start your own business? My first job in physical therapy was in a clinic where there were so many patients being treated at one time that it was difficult to provide good care. In starting Cornerstone Physical Therapy, my dream was to change the way physical therapy clinics operate. I want to make it more about patient outcomes and less about patient volume. That is why all our therapists treat each patient one-to-one. What separates Cornerstone Physical Therapy from other physical therapy clinics? First, Cornerstone’s business philosophy is to provide each patient with one-to-one care; that is rare in outpatient physical therapy. Second, we do not use physical therapy technicians and only treat our patients with licensed therapists. Finally, we have a world class staff that understands the importance of providing patients with the attention they deserve. How are physical therapists at Cornerstone different from other clinics? We have expert therapists that make my job in providing care much easier. Dr. Jonathan Cole PT, DPT, CMTPT is our chronic pain specialist. He is the only physical therapist in Bluffton certified in dry needling and specializes in soft tissue injury. Dr. Andrew Heffern PT, DPT, SCS, Cert MDT is our sports specialist. He is the only Sports Certified Specialist recognized by the American Physical Therapy Association in our area.

DR. C. DAVID STALLINGS III PT, DPT CORNERSTONE PHYSICAL THERAPY AND WELLNESS 1 YEAR IN BUSINESS

4 HAMPTON HALL BLVD (843) 837-1930 WWW.CORNERSTONEPTW.COM

WORDS TO LIVE BY “PEOPLE WILL FORGET WHAT YOU SAID, PEOPLE WILL FORGET WHAT YOU DID, BUT PEOPLE WILL NEVER FORGET HOW YOU MADE THEM FEEL.”

What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? When you own a small business, you have to wear many hats: finance, marketing, networking, HR, etc. You have to find time to run the business while maintaining a full patient load. What is the BEST part about owning your own business? Owning a business is a challenge. I wake up every day with a goal in mind for my day and for the week. Owning a business keeps you sharp and focused. Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha moment” that brought you to the decision? I have always had the “ultimate goal” of owning my own company. Even in college, I was taking business classes as electives before I had even decided that I wanted to pursue a career in physical therapy. Where would you like to see Cornerstone Physical Therapy in 10 years? We definitely have plans of opening other locations in the Lowcountry. I know this business model will be successful wherever we take it, because patients will drive the demand for one-to-one therapy. They simply have to know it’s available to them. What would you say is the secret to success? Everyone says “hard work.” I believe that when you are in a business in a profession that you are passionate about, the hard work comes naturally. For me, it is helping people accomplish their goals, both physical and functional. If I can do that each day, then it’s already a success.


MARSHALL SAMPSON & SEAN CROSBY

WORDS TO LIVE BY

SANTA FE CAFÉ

CONSISTENCY IS THE NAME OF THE GAME!

8 YEARS IN BUSINESS

807 WILLIAM HILTON PKWY (843) 785-3838 WWW.SANTAFEHHI.COM

MARSHALL SAMPSON: What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? You always make mistakes and have times you fail when taking risks; but success will come from those mistakes and failures if you can learn from them, and it will take you to places you never imagined. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? MY STAFF! This restaurant is only as good as the people working in it. Everyone here from top to bottom has a genuine desire to see this place succeed. We are a very tight knit group which makes for a very comfortable atmosphere, which customer can feel. What would you say is the secret to success? I would say the secret to success is… There is no secret! Be prepared to work very hard with passion and determination, and be patient for success and persistent through downfalls. Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? I recently had an “aha” moment in regard to inspiration. It came when I was watching my kids

one day. They have limitless possibilities of where life might take them, and they believe that any of those possibilities are reachable. Somewhere along the road of life, people let life start telling them there are limits and limitations to how far they can go. I think it’s the people who hold on to that “anything is possible” view of a child that find success in life and truly enjoy what life has to offer.

SEAN CROSBY: What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? It might not be the most difficult part of the business, but it’s always a challenge: keeping up with new trends and finding a way to incorporate them with our style. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Keep the passion alive; don’t give up on what you want. A career is more than just a job. Were there any books or educational resources that helped you along your path? I attended Johnson & Wales University, and it gave me the background I needed to understand all the facets of the restaurant.

DAVID B. MEEDER

WORDS TO LIVE BY

SUPERIOR CLEANERS

“NOTHING IN THE WORLD CAN TAKE THE PLACE OF PERSISTENCE.”

23 YEARS IN BUSINESS

437 WILLIAM HILTON PKWY (843) 689-2004 124 ARROW RD (843) 842-3440 SUPERIORCLEANERSSC.COM

What inspired you to start your own business? I always knew I would start my own business as it started early with mowing yards, washing cars etc. I am still starting or advising the startup of new businesses. What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? There is always something to be done. It can be difficult to keep the proper balance in life. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? Flexibility. It allows me to balance work and my family time (well most of the time anyway)! Satisfaction for your efforts and a comfort that you did this. Easy analogy: I love to play singles in tennis! It’s all on me. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Entrepreneurs by definition are headstrong and have a strong dose of self-confidence. Now when I am in start-up mode of a new venture or project I listen more and seek the advice of those who might know more than me. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? When is a small business owner not working or thinking about work?! I am much more flexible

now in when I work and when I don’t. After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you wouldn’t make it – and if so, what did you do to make it work? After several years of steady growth, we came to a point where not only our physical plant was feeling the strain but also staff and myself. We had grown to a level that traditional mom-and-pop cleaners never see. I was fortunate enough to network with several other large cleaners and meet an engineer/consultant. We broke it down, laid out a plan, adapted on the fly (within constraints) and solved the problem. He remains my friend and confidant to this day. What would you say is the secret to success? Same thing I tell my kids. Each day, each week, just try and be a better person and do a better job than before. Take your lumps and learn from them. Respect everyone; and the hardest one and last one I learned to grasp: listen better! Last, Be Tireless as many are smarter or have an advantage. I just outwork them! Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? Yes! God—so much more than a mentor. I am and have been blessed in so many ways.


What inspired you to start your own business? Working long hours for another restaurant owner and my parents who gave me the confidence to start my own.

AMIE BAIMA SKILLETS CAFÉ & GRILL 21 YEAR IN BUSINESS

What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? Always being “on,” even when you are away from your business. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? Living with yourself, knowing that your success and accomplishments and your mistakes and failures are all your own. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Don’t be afraid to try, and if you should fail, get back up and try again. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? 60-80 and always on call 24/7. What would you say is the secret to success? Learning to have patience and as I grow older...wisdom. Also surrounding yourself with the best staff—those who are like you and those who are different from you..

Skillets Café & Grill Breakfast

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Lunch

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Dinner

1 N FOREST BEACH DR J1 (843) 785-3131 WWW.SKILLETSCAFE.COM

WORDS TO LIVE BY “CUSTOMERS ARE ALWAYS RIGHT. BUT NOT ALWAYS.”

Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on yourpath? My parents! They have been a strong part of my success, and I am where I am because of their support and help. Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha moment” that brought you to the decision? Well since I owned my first business at age 23, I guess the realization came early on, that if I was going to work this many hours, I should own the business. After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you would not make it, and if so, what did you do to make it work? When circumstances beyond my control (our building burning down in 2002) made me reprioritize, I decided to sell off my other businesses to rebuild Skillets. That was a scary time – I had a lot of doubt about whether I was making the right decision. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? I really think it’s the fact that we are family-owned and we have a presence a the restaurant every day. Even if it isn’t ME specifically, I think customers like to see the owner involved.


WORDS TO LIVE BY

MARC MCDOUGALL PALMETTO SECURITY SYSTEMS IN BUSINESS SINCE 1999

SERVING SC AND GA (843) 208-2880 WWW.PSS.SOLUTIONS

What inspired you to start your own business? The utility going back to their core business, it was only natural for me to continue to manage, secure and monitor the commitment to our community. What’s the best part about owning your own business? Providing the customer the service they deserve while supporting my team in their professional and personal journey. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Have the passion, be willing to work, fail, get up, and modify to win. Dream it, plan it, do it. Know your numbers and trust your team. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? Kidding, we don’t work; we produce results—that’s 24/7.

“PROTECT WHAT YOU VALUE MOST… FROM A LOCAL NAME YOU KNOW AND TRUST!”

Were there any books or educational resources that helped you along your path? Not really. People are my most valuable resources. Know your industry seek out the top producers, and they will mentor you. Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha moment” that brought you to the decision? My peers always told me I would be doing this. All good things come to those who wait—very fortunate, the timing was perfect at age 55. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? We are here for you! Are they? What would you say is the secret to success? No secret: hard work, planning, positioning, trust and a little luck.

SHEILA STEPHENS, PHARM.D.

WORDS TO LIVE BY

STEPHENS COMPOUNDING PHARMACY

“LIFE GIVES TO THE GIVERS AND TAKES FROM THE TAKERS “

5 YEARS IN BUSINESS

55 MATHEWS DR. STE 215 (843) 686-3040 STEPHENSCOMPOUNDINGPHARMACY.COM

What inspired you to start your own business? My previous practice in pharmacy had been in hospital and oncology. When I had the opportunity to create a healing and restorative business, I didn’t hesitate. Stephens Compounding Pharmacy is a problem-solving pharmacy that works with the client, physician and pharmacist to create personalized medications. Each prescription is crafted to the specific need of the client. There is not a “one-size” fits all approach. What is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? The culture we embrace is “Feel Fabulous.” This is the mission of the business for our clients as well as team members. The challenge rests in the dance to create a business where laughter is part of the medicine, embracing change as a positive and something to be desired. There is both a high level of creativity and science that is called upon. Living into our company values is the highest call. What is the BEST part about owning your own business? The best part of our business is our clients, who become our friends and family. Many have been on an extended health journey before

we engage with them. As health problems are resolved, the joy in seeing wholeness and healing is beyond compare. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? I had a young pharmacy owner once say to me “I have bought myself a $150,000 job.” Working for yourself does not grant freedom without a careful plan to systemize and quantify the business. A must read is The E-Myth: Why most small businesses don’t work, by Michael E. Gerber. What would you say is the secret to success? The secret sauce is to always have the heart of a servant. It is as if each team member wears a big badge: “YES, now what was the question?” There is no question too big, that the Stephens Compounding team will not attempt. What separates your business from others? What defines Stephens Compounding Pharmacy is the experience. This is the place where the client’s need is the only priority. The pharmacist is a champion and advocate to help each client sort through the myriad of voices to find the solution that best fits.


What inspired you to start your own business? If you believe in what you do and you believe in how it should be done, then you should believe in yourself to get it done your way. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? Having the opportunity to represent a wide range of individuals in and around Beaufort County, which allows me to get to know them on both a professional and personal level. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? I am a trial attorney, with offices in both Beaufort and Bluffton, and concentrate my civil litigation practice on representing individuals who have been seriously injured due to the fault of others or on the job. In my experience from litigating all kinds of civil matters, I have learned that the most important thing that people often forget is that the focus must be on the client, not you as the lawyer. My clients’ lives often have been drastically changed as the result of an injury, and as their advocate, I have to learn all the details of their life, both minor and significant, so that I can tell their story in a way that a judge or jury can understand the impact that an event can have on their daily well-being. Therefore, I pride myself on taking extra time to get to know my client’s story and finding out the aspects of their life that other attorneys might not consider. This allows me to make the crucial connection with the jury so they can relate to my client’s difficult situation.

SA M M Y SVA L I N A SVALINA LAW FIRM HELPING THE PEOPLE OF BEAUFORT COUNTY FOR 40 YEARS

BLUFFTON: 2 WESTBURY PKWY # 201 (843) 837-7800 BEAUFORT: 601 BLADEN ST (843) 524-0333 WWW.SVALINALAWFIRM.COM

WORDS TO LIVE BY “THERE ARE THOSE WHO LOOK AT THINGS THE WAY THEY ARE, AND ASK WHY... I DREAM OF THINGS THAT NEVER WERE, AND ASK WHY NOT?”

Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? My father always inspired me to approach any challenge the way I believed in my heart that it should be undertaken and accomplished. If you stick with that philosophy, you cannot go wrong. Were there any books or educational resources that helped you along your path? As an attorney, law school is obviously a very important educational experience filled with many books… But one unique aspect about my background is that during my undergraduate studies at Washington & Lee University, I was a psychology major which I think has greatly benefited me in the practice of law and dealing with people. Moreover, growing up around my father and watching him and many of the other great trial lawyers of Beaufort really made a lasting impression on me and served as a great educational resource. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? In my business, I do not think success is necessarily dependent upon the number of hours worked each week. I think the most important thing is to always be thinking about your clients and their respective cases and how to do the best for them. Sometimes your best ideas come to you while you are taking a shower. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Pay attention to details - work hard and just when you think you’ve done enough, review the details again and work harder.


D O N NA CO U D ES

WORDS TO LIVE BY

INTERIORS BY DONNA COUDES

OVER 25 YEARS IN BUSINESS

INTERIORSBYDCOUDES@GMAIL.COM (828) 775-4399 WWW.INTERIORSBYDONNA.COM

What inspired you to start your own business? My family and friends had encouraged me for years to go out on my own. I finally made the plunge in 1991. I rented space on New Orleans Road and the rest is history. What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? Often people ask me about difficult clients. They imagine all kinds of awful scenarios. Honestly, for me, it’s the paperwork. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? I am responsible for EVERYTHING and my clients know it. My worth is reflected in the finished product and happy clients. This of course delights me. Your home is like a painting we do together; your input is necessary. I am very fortunate to be able to join in these harmonies with people. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? I always advise a student going into interior design to consider becoming an architect. They will be able to increase their earning power and can do both.

“SHARE HAPPINESS; GRIN BIG”

In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? My clients have told me in the past that they knew when they met me, I was the one to hire. After the professionalism is established, it’s chemistry. What would you say is the secret to success? To be a hopeless people pleaser! Ha! Taking the client’s taste and making it, “better, stronger, faster” —yep a bionic home. After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you wouldn’t make it – and if so, what did you do to make it work? I remember talking with my friends throughout different down turns in the economy. Joking that I may need to work at a grocery store. Who am I kidding? I don’t know anything about produce! Seriously, I am thankful I have stayed busy. Were there any books or educational resources that helped you along your path? Idea books on Interior Design. I used to bring them on second appointments to see if I could get my client to see something she/he liked. This would help me analyze their taste. Now we have Houzz and many more design magazines.

WORDS TO LIVE BY

MICHAEL HOSTILO ATTOURNEY AT LAW 23 YEARS IN BUSINESS

Offices in Savannah, Pooler, Macon, Augusta and Atlanta. Able to also serve personal injury victims in GA and SC. (912) 748-MIKE (6453)

What inspired you to start your own business? Autonomy and power to make a difference! What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? Taxes (ha ha). What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? Freedom. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Don’t be afraid to take a chance; believe in yourself! How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? Nonstop—phones sewn to my face (even in the shower) LOL. Were there any books or educational resources that helped you along your path? Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell.

“You don’t have to be better than everyone else; you just have to be better than you ever thought you would be.”

Did you always think you would own your own business or was there an “aha” moment? Yes, I always thought I would own my own business. After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you wouldn’t make it, and if so, what did you do to make it work? There is always doubt, but I believed in what we were doing. I was not afraid to take risks. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? Customer service separates our business from others. What would you say is the secret to success? Creativity and being a regular guy. Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? My father is my mentor—best guy I’ve ever met. His life is devoted to service, country and family.


What inspired you to start your own business? I believe starting any business as an entrepreneur is about following your passion. For me personally, I love to travel and eat great food. So I think getting into the restaurant business was very natural for me. As a restaurateur, I thrive on the process of finding inspiration in my own experiences and then using that inspiration to conceptualize something that doesn’t yet exist, that I think the public will appreciate. Ultimately in our restaurant businesses, this about creating unique brands and memorable dining experiences, that absorb people in all the right ways, with a laser focus on being the very best at a narrowly defined culinary craft. For our restaurant Charbar Co. it was all about delivering the most amazing gourmet burger you have ever tasted, in an entertaining and relaxing atmosphere that pays homage to the history of music in American culture. Whereas for Holy Tequila, it was about delivering the feeling of sitting in a seaside taqueria or tequila bar on a beach off the Pacific coast of Mexico, while enjoying the most delicious, creative Mexican street food, tacos and tequila you have ever tasted in a fun, festive and authentic open air atmosphere. What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? I’d have to say in the restaurant business specifically, finding a true work-life balance is nearly impossible. At the end of the day, life is work and work is life. That and the fact that you are usually your own biggest critic, so it’s important to always keep things in perspective. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Be bold, be first, be different. Don’t dwell in the past. Focus on the customer, not the

N I C K B E R G E LT CHARBAR CO. & HOLY TEQUILA OWNER/OPERATOR SINCE 2008

CHARBAR CO. 33 OFFICE PARK RD (843) 785-2427 . CHARBAR.CO

HOLY TEQUILA 33 OFFICE PARK RD (843) 681-8226 . HOLYTEQUILA.COM

WORDS TO LIVE BY “THERE’S MORE UPSIDE IN BEING AN OPTIMIST THAT’S SOMETIMES WRONG, THAN BEING A PESSIMIST THAT’S ALWAYS RIGHT.”

competition. Be persistent, yet flexible. Get used to and embrace constraints; limited resources force you to “make do” with creativity and less waste. Lastly, quality over quantity, always. Did you always think you would own your own business or was there an “aha” moment? I grew up in a family of entrepreneurs, so it really was all I knew from a very young age. I’ve never been the ideal job candidate, as I don’t follow rules well and walk to the beat of my own drum. As a result, I’ve been an entrepreneur for as long as I can remember. I even went to college for entrepreneurship, so it really is all I’ve ever known and it’s in my DNA. I wouldn’t have it any other way, because I love bringing together teams of talented people and building cool things. In your opinion what separates your business from others that are similar? Laser like focus, superior product quality and attention to detail. We aim not to be everything to everyone, but instead set out to be the best of the best at our respective niche. For us, this translates into superior food & beverage quality and unique dining experiences that people appreciate and remember. As a result, our award-winning burgers at Charbar have been voted in the top 20 best in the world, and at Holy Tequila, we are redefining modern Mexican and what a gourmet street food experience can be, while delivering unparalleled flavor profiles on a tortilla! What would you say is the secret to success? It all depends on how you define success... I personally define “success” as the ability to focus the full power of all your efforts on what you have a burning desire to achieve. For me, the secret to success boils down to always doing something you are proud of, bringing talented people together, following your passion and creating value.


NICHOLAS WELLIVER HILTON HEAD LANDSCAPES OVER 5 YEARS IN BUSINESS

31 MATHEWS DRIVE (843) 681-2889 HILTONHEADLANDSCAPES.COM

What inspired you to start your own business? My friend, Ben Dunning and I decided to start our own business in 2008 because we knew that there was an opportunity, in this market, for a quality landscape service provider. My marketing professors at USCB were very inspirational and encouraging as well. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? “Know your numbers.” Make sure you effectively manage expenses and stay conservative. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? 50-60 hours per week, but I’m never truly “off” work. In your opinion, what separates your business form others that are similar? We believe in proactive management of our properties. We provide a higher quality service that gives our customers more value for their dollar.

WORDS TO LIVE BY

MICHAEL LUPI

WORDS TO LIVE BY

“SOMETIMES YOU WIN, SOMETIMES YOU LEARN.”

DESIGN 9INETEEN

“KEEP IT SIMPLE. KEEP IT FUN. GET IT DONE!”

What would you say is the secret to success? I don’t think there is one “Secret to Success.” Hilton Head Landscapes is a successful company because we have a good team of motivated employees. Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? My entire family has been very encouraging. Especially my mother, Marianne Welliver, who owned LandCare South, Inc. LandCare South was the largest woman-owned business in the state of South Carolina, at the time. My Father, Jay Welliver, has taught me how to be a leader. My wife Megan has supported me through all of the challenges & victories that are associated with owning a business. Additional acknowledgements: Running a business is a team effort. I would like to thank Ben Dunning, Aaron Welliver, Allen Tillman & Caroline Welliver for all of their hard work and dedication.

6 YEARS IN BUSINESS

(413) 636-3769 DESIGN9INETEEN.COM

What inspired you to start your own business? Really it was a push from friends and family to put myself out there. It was my uncle who said to me, “The worst that will happen is you go out for the next five years and make every possible mistake. Then you’ll know what not to do for the next five.” What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? Working with really great clients that love the work we do. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Keep in touch with clients. Make sure you’re on their mind the next time they need or want to refer your service. After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you wouldn’t make it, and if so, what did you do to make it work? Sure. I think every entrepreneur has those jitters. For me, contractor work through an agency was a huge help. And then I had a business coach/ mentor for the transition after. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar?

We’re about building brand relationships. It’s that relationship we create with our clients that makes us approachable. The connection we make with the audience from the work we create is the reason our clients stay. What would you say is the secret to success? Be an eternal learner. Always have something new to teach your clients. Becoming stagnant and complacent are business killers. Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? Yes, three actually. Jeremy Casey, founder of Name Net Worth. He’s been a great friend and someone who has helped me develop important networking channels. Rick Forgey, CEO of Business Leadership Mastery. He’s taught me about having a solid business plan and finding my growth opportunities. And the Marketing Mentor herself, Ilise Benun, and her conferences for creatives on marketing their businesses.


WORDS TO LIVE BY

STUART & BRECKEN CAMPAGNA SOUTHPAW PET RESORT 5 YEARS IN BUSINESS THIS APRIL

10 FISH HAUL RD (843) 342-7200 WWW.SOUTHPAWPETRESORT.COM

What inspired you to start your own business? We felt it was a calling—that we were meant to go into business together doing something we both loved. We inspired each other to follow our passions and, in doing so, realized that we both had very strong entrepreneurial spirits. We each have our own unique strengths, so we balance each other out well. What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? As a married couple with two young children, it is very difficult to separate our working relationship from our personal one. It can be hard, and sometimes nearly impossible, to put work aside and focus on ourselves and our family. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? Constantly learning something new. Things are always changing and evolving, which keeps it interesting (and keeps us on our toes!). It’s exciting to know that the possibilities for growth are endless. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Never take no for an answer. You will hear it so many times, and it can be disheartening; but keep believing in what you are doing, and don’t let anyone hold you back from pursuing it. Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha moment” that brought

DON’T WAIT FOR SUCCESS. START AHEAD WITHOUT IT. (FOUND INSIDE A FORTUNE COOKIE!)

you to your decision? It was more of an aha moment. We both had steady jobs, but shortly after we got married, we were discussing our goals and where we wanted to go with our “new” life together. That was when it dawned on us that we wanted to go into business together doing something that we both loved…taking care of animals. After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you wouldn’t make it – and if so, what did you do to make it work? There were more scary moments than we care to recall. Although we had a huge demand, we were too small to fulfill it, and we couldn’t get the funding to grow and thrive. We were fortunate enough to find someone who truly believed in what we were doing to help us along the way. Without their assistance, and a large dose of faith in us, we wouldn’t be where we are today. And for that, we are forever grateful. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? Our passion for providing the very best service and attention to detail, in addition to a terrific and extremely dedicated staff. It was also important to us to limit our size so that we would be able to develop lasting relationships with our clients and provide a very individualized level of service. We love what we do, and the dogs that board with us are like extended family members that we’ve come to know and love as our own.

WORDS TO LIVE BY

KARI S. MILLER ALARM FIRE & SECURITY 5 YEARS IN BUSINESS

9 HUNTER ROAD 843) 842-6100 WWW.ALARMFIRESECURITY.COM

What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? This business isn’t a simple business; it’s a life safety issue, and it’s extremely important. Our technicians have been working in the business for most of their lives. It is rewarding to know that our staff has a hundred years of combined experience. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? For me, the best part is customer satisfaction. This is a very small island and everyone knows everyone. It can be a hard market to break into. I went from business to business asking people to trust me. So I try very hard to show them that their trust has not been misplaced. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? Honestly, I don’t count hours. As an owner, you make yourself available and do what needs to be done. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? The people who work for me.

“DO WHAT IS RIGHT, NOT WHAT IS EASY.”

We have been together for a long time and are like family. The respect we have for each other carries over to our clients. We all take our jobs very seriously and it becomes personal. If a client is not happy, we all chip in and make the situation right. What would you say is the secret to success? Honesty and selflessness. In business, your customers and their needs come first. If you get a call at 2 a.m., you take it. If they need you in 10 minutes, you find a way. Most important, always follow through on your words. Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? My father; he has always been hard working and driven to succeed. He started out doing sales and cold calls in the water meter business. He worked his way from the very bottom. I have always admired and looked up to him. We aim to make our parents proud. Success through hard work, with my father as a role model, has been my ultimate accomplishment.


WORDS TO LIVE BY

MIKE WILSON COASTAL EVENT RENTALS, INC. 2 YEARS IN BUSINESS

3 BLUEJAY WAY (843) 342-9338 WWW.COASTALEVENTRENTALS.COM

What inspired you to start your own business? After 16 years in the industry and watching the changes it’s undergone locally, regionally and nationally, I saw a huge opportunity. We aren’t actually renting a table, chair or fork, we’re helping with something bigger than that. The party rental industry is emotion-driven; it’s a wedding, an anniversary party or another significant event. We want to help guide our clients through that; they don’t do this every day, and they deserve our expertise to help guide them through the process. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? The ability and flexibility to make the decisions on your own. Not being tied to a corporate decisionmaking process that misses opportunity because every decision has to be run up a flagpole. I believe that empowering employees to make decisions on the fly is one of the best things a company can do to succeed. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? Access, convenience, experience and service. When you call, you get the owner. You get personal service. We’re the only rental company with

“The key to a winning season is focusing on one opponent at a time.”

a warehouse and office located right here on Hilton Head and Southern Beaufort County, for that matter. What would you say is the secret to success? Don’t take yourself too seriously. Create win/win situations. Don’t be afraid to make money; opening your own business is a huge risk and deserves to be rewarded. Do what you do well and focus on that. Don’t worry about your competition. Be aware, but don’t lose sleep over what they’re doing; you can’t control it. You can control what you and your team do each and every day. Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? I’ve been very fortunate to learn a lot from many people both in and out of this industry. Two stand out above the others: Mike Davis. I had the good fortune to work for him when he started his own business. It was like getting an MBA in the Event Rental Business (although I’d be remiss in not acknowledging his wife, Jeanette too!) Secondly, Erich Schmid, who has been a business broker for more years than I can count. I talk to both of them regularly and appreciate and value their advice more than they probably know.

JENNY GREEN-BAZZLE

WORDS TO LIVE BY

AFFORDABLE HEALTH CARE

“YOU ONLY HAVE ONE CHANCE TO MAKE A FIRST IMPRESSION.”

8 YEARS IN BUSINESS

25 SHERINGTON DR., SUITE D (843) 757-5559 WWW.AHCBLUFFTON.COM

What inspired you to start your own business? I worked for another very busy practice, and the physician was out a lot. I felt like I was already running a practice, so the transition was easy. What would you say is the most difficult part about being in business for yourself? Finding the perfect people to be on your team. What’s the BEST part about owning your own business? I like that I represent women in business and nurse practitioners everywhere. What must-have advice can you give to young budding entrepreneurs? Keep costs low, but pay your staff well. Surround yourself with positive people. How many hours a week do you work, as a successful business owner? 80-plus hours a week. Were there any books or educational resources that helped you along your path? Articles from The Wall Street Journal; The Secret, Setting the Table and The Purpose Driven Life. Did you always think you would own your own business, or was there a sudden “aha moment” that brought you to the decision?

My mother was an esthetician and we use to dream about owning a medical spa together. After starting your company, was there ever a time when you thought you wouldn’t make it, and if so, what did you do to make it work? Of course, you always worry about money and covering payroll. Once Medicaid didn’t pay me for nine months, and I thought I was going to have to shut down. In your opinion, what separates your business from others that are similar? We pride ourselves on caring for everyone with kindness, respect and compassion. I envision myself as a family member of my patient. I treat them like I would care for my own family. What would you say is the secret to success? Never give up. Never take a no from anyone who could have given you a yes. Did you have a mentor you would like to acknowledge? How did they encourage you on your path? My mother started her own small business, and I always admired her for that; but it was my love for my daughter that drove my need for success. My professional idols are Dr. Anita Nivens of Armstrong State University and Stephanie Burgess of USC.


Article by

Kent Thune FUN FACT: Since the launch of KICKSTARTER in April 2009, the company has helped to fund over 77,000 creative projects by more than 7 million people.

THE PHENOMENON OF

CROWD

FUNDING


CROWD FUNDING

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ARTICLE BY LINDA S. HOPKINS

success

E

DEFINING

OF TS HA

H

ats off to anyone who starts a business. If you have a niggling of desire and you go after that dream, you are a success in my book. Most people have no clue what it takes to own a business. I found out the hard way. Approximately seven years ago, I got a tap on the shoulder (from God, I suppose) to do something new or make a different mark on the world. It was a nudge on my heart that sent me to Boulder, Colorado for general training as a life coach. I had no clue what I really wanted to do except that I specifically wanted to reach women. As a former chubby girl turned fitness fanatic, “What better entrée than through the area of weight loss and body image?” I thought. I went on to take three more trainings specific to weight loss coaching before hanging my shingle. (For the record, I have a husband who owns a business and pays the mortgage, so it wasn’t a huge risk for me to explore a new path.) It was one of those situations where I didn’t know what I didn’t know. I learned, first of all, that I was bad at business but good at coaching. Right out of the gate, I was fortunate to connect with and work with some smart, savvy women who were ready and willing to do what it would take to turn their lives around. Through a combination of pertinent questions, unfailing belief and constant encouragement, I witnessed miracles. My excitement couldn’t be contained as I saw women shedding pounds, gaining confidence, learning to love themselves and engaging more fully in life. I worked hard at creating relationships with my clients and at serving them in a loving, compassionate way. My good fortune continued when one of the nation’s premier weight loss spas came knocking at my door. I was hired as an independent contractor to coach their guests through an at-home after care program. The pay wasn’t great, but the payoff was huge, quickly quadrupling my reach and allowing me to gain a broad range of experience much faster than I ever could have on my own. But after two years of leaving most of the money in someone else’s pocket, I decided to strike out on my own again. I continued in business for two more years and am now in the process of phasing out. APRIL 2015

O FT

What stopped me? Wearing all the hats. When you own a business, unless you can afford to hire out all the grunt work, guess what? You get to do it all. Suddenly, you are not only frying the bacon in the pan; you are wallowing in the pig pen. You are the butcher, the baker and the candlestick maker… or to be more precise, the marketing director, the salesman and the bookkeeper. While it would be easy to look at my business experience and assign myself a big “F” for Fail, I gained a new perspective on success. I learned that I don’t have to be in business to spread kindness, to encourage and uplift others or to make a difference. My success isn’t measured by

T

EN HE

TR

E

E PR

NE

UR

S

the title on my business card or the size of my paycheck. To me, the bottom line is the sum total of what I contribute to the world. If I can help one person have a brighter outlook, I am a success today. We all have to make a living, and your career choice will play an enormous role in shaping your life. Ideally, you can do work that you love and wear the hat or hats that suit you. Whether you are the street sweeper or a Wall Street executive, a small business owner or the CEO of a Fortune 500 company, what matters is that you show up and do your best. But what will ultimately define you will be less about your résumé and more about your eulogy. How will you be remembered? If you knew that you would die suddenly and soon, what would you change about the way you are currently living? Therein lies your legacy and your personal definition of success. 

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:

S R U E N E R P E ENTR W BUSINESS O

REA

ED IN THE A

AND RAIS NERS BORN


article by courtney hillis photography by anne

EMILY BURDEN AND ANNA HEWET Owners of Gigiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Boutique

W


CLAYTON ROLLISON Co-Owner and executive chef of Lucky Rooster Kitchen + Bar

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK STAFF


BRIAN LARSEN Owner of Larsenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Heating & Air

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URS:

E ENTREPREN

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AREN’T YOU PODCASTIN Y H W , E G? DUD

ARTICLE BY GREG BENNETT


DUDE, WHY AREN’T YOU PODCASTING?

FOR CREATING YOUR OWN POD S P I T K CAST QUIC :

GREG BENNETT • Pick a topic. Your podcast could be about any area of personal or professional interest. The more passionate you are about the topic, the more interesting the podcast will be. • Decide on a production style. You’ll need to decide the type of podcast you want to do: an interview format, just you talking, two or more people talking, etc. • Determine how often you’ll produce the podcast. Committing to a daily podcast, as we have done, takes a great deal of time and energy. You might start with a weekly or even monthly production to get started. • Select the level of recording quality you’ll need. You can record an MP3 audio segment by simply using your laptop microphone, or upgrade and use a professional recording studio. You can even find background music and sound effects online if you want to dress up the recording. • Explore recording and mixing options. The best online recording software is Audacity. You can download it free, and it’s super easy to use for mixing two or three voices, along with sound effects and music. • Promote your podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. Getting your podcast hosted on iTunes or Stitcher (for non-apple products) doesn’t cost anything, but you’ll need to go through the submission process, which includes certain steps and protocols that will take a few weeks. • Monetize your podcast. It will take a while to get your podcast and website into a position to make money. You’ll need several thousand listeners and subscribers before you can offer advertisers something of value. An initial strategy may be to offer a VIP, or backstage pass, for a nominal fee and then provide these people with extra value or additional services.

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ARTICLE BY TIM DORION

BETTER FITNESS & GAME

T

here’s no ignoring the fact that the game of golf has changed over the years. A lot of people point to the evolution of equipment, from composite shafts and oversized heads to improved ball manufacturing processes, and there’s no denying their impact. But among professional players and coaches, it’s commonly agreed that the biggest change of all has been player conditioning and fitness. Beer bellies have been replaced by sixpack abs as today’s top golfers split their time between on- and off-the-course training. They’ve invested in personal trainers, customized programs, and state-of-the-art equipment in pursuit of better play and bigger paydays. And it’s working. But what about the amateur golfer—the weekend warrior who just wants to take his game up a notch or two, or the club player looking to get his or her name on that championship plaque? Until recently, access to professional-style training and personalized golf-focused fitness programs has been limited by both availability and cost. But all of that is changing, and the Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) program at Horizon is helping to drive that change. As a TPI-certified facility, Horizon provides pro-style training and conditioning to anyone who plays the game and wants to improve. We’ve seen golfers of virtually every type—young, old, high and low handicap—experience significant improvement in their physical conditioning that has translated directly into improved play. What many amateur golfers fail to realize is that one of the key obstacles that keeps them from playing more like a pro is the breakdown of their sequence at some point during the swing. This is most often caused by physical limitations that can be addressed and overcome with the proper intervention. For instance, a weak “core” (abdomen and back) will prevent a golfer from staying in his or her posture through the golf swing, resulting in inconsistent ball striking. Backswing and follow through can also be severely limited. Our evaluation method measures all facets affecting performance, including strength, flexibility, neuromuscular control, joint mobility, balance, and power. Once we have gathered and reviewed that data, we develop a customized program that addresses the player’s issues and gives him the tools and methods to overcome and correct those weaknesses. Without exception, as the player’s conditioning has improved, so has his performance on the golf course. The TPI evaluation leads to a personalized exercise prescription designed to address the golfer’s physical limitations as they relate to his or her golf swing. For most players, that means working on things like improved balance and coordination and golf posture, along with increased range of motion, strength, flexibility, stability and power. I’ve played and loved the game of golf for 35 years, and this program is one of the most exciting advances I’ve seen. Not every player is cut out to be a Tour player, and TPI won’t change that. But no matter what your level of play, there are ways to improve your game. The Titleist Performance Institute at Horizon is all about giving every player the fitness and conditioning tools to help achieve his or her potential. The rest is up to you.  Tim Dorion is a licensed physical therapist, an avid golfer, and a certified TPI instructor at Horizon Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine, Hilton Head, SC. For additional information, visit horizonrehabilitation.com. APRIL 2015

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IT COULD BE YOUR AGE

ARTICLE BY REBECCA EDWARDS


25 MOST COMMON SYMPTOMS OF STRESS 1. Excessive fatigue 2. Weakness 3. Nervousness/irritability 4. Mental depression 5. Apprehensions 6. Inability to concentrate 7. Moments of confusion or poor memory 8. Feelings of frustration or light-headedness 9. Insomnia 10. Cravings for sweets 11. Headaches 12. Hypoglycemia 13. Excessive hunger

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14. Dyspepsia (indigestion) 15. Alternate diarrhea and constipation 16. Palpitation (heart fluttering) 17. Food and inhalant allergies 18. Dry and thin skin 19. Low body temperature 20. Unexplained hair loss 21. Difficulty building muscles 22. Weight control problems 23. Tendency to inflammation 24. Increased susceptibility to cancer 25. Increased susceptibility to osteoporosis

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Ñ ination

ACTUAL FIDDLER CRAB “MODEL”

Imag

AND

education...

A BLUFFTON PUBLIC ART PROJECT HIGHLIGHTS CRABBY CREATURES

article b y debbie

szpanka


THE FIDDLER CRABS

WILL BE SCULPTED BY SAVANNAH ARTIST SUSIE CHISHOLM.

Fun Fiddler Facts • You can tell the difference between a female and male crab by their claws. A male crab has two claws; however one is much larger than the other. A female crab’s claws are the same size. • Fiddler crabs shed their shells as they grow; they are more reclusive when they shed their shell. They are protecting themselves as they wait for their new shell to harden. • Fiddler crabs communicate by a sequence of waves or gestures. • Fiddler crabs live for about two years.

About the Hilton Head Island-Bluffton Chamber of Commerce Leadership Class The Hilton Head Island–Bluffton Chamber of Commerce Leadership program is celebrating its thirtieth anniversary this year, as it began in 1985. The program selects members through an intensive interview process. The nine-month class dedicates one day a month to learn various facets of the community, such as the education system, local government, law enforcement, cultural offerings and more. The program is designed to develop a corps of informed residents of the region who are prepared to be leaders for non-profit boards, community organizations and public office.


n a M o N Is an and Isl

AN LIVE

C (BUT HE

)

ON ONE

ARTICLE BY KENT THUNE


No IMs aann nd Is la

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THOMAS REILLEY, KAITY ROBINSON, JOHN CRANFORD, ASHTON FONS

Article by Frank Dunne, jr. Photography by Mark Staff

ROCKS the

triangle

ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE BE DAMNED...THIS PARTY IS ON!


“MUSICIANS HERE ARE NEVER COMPETING WITH EACH OTHER, THEY’RE ALWAYS SUPPORTING EACH OTHER.” JOS VICARS AND JEVON DALY (OF THE WICKEDLY TALENTED BAND MEMBERS THAT MAKE UP UNICORN MEAT) RECORD AN ORIGINAL SONG FOR CH2 ROCKS THE TRIANGLE CONTEST WITH JOHN CRANFORD AT SWAMPFIRE RECORDS.


IMPORTANT INFORMATION!

WHO: CH2, Swampfire Records, You and all your favorite local bands WHAT: CH2 Rocks the Triangle, 6 Different Bands/1 Wild Night WHEN: Friday, May 8, 2014, 7:30-11:30 p.m. WHERE: Reilleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Plaza (The Triangle), 4 Greenwood Drive, Hilton Head Island (Just off the Sea Pines Circle) WHY: To benefit Island Rec Center


inside

PEEK

ARTICLE BY FRANK DUNNE, JR. • PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANNE


“IT’S MEANT TO BE A DESTINATION EXPERIENCE AS OPPOSED TO JUST CREATING A BAR OR RESTAURANT.”


HIS WEAPON WAS A TRIDENT, WITH WHICH HE COULD MAKE THE EARTH SHAKE, CAUSING EARTHQUAKES, AND SHATTER ANY OBJECT. HE WAS SECOND TO ZEUS IN POWER AMONGST THE GODS. HE WAS CONSIDERED BY GREEKS TO HAVE A DIFFICULT QUARRELSOME PERSONALITY. COMBINED WITH HIS GREED, HE HAD A SERIES OF DISPUTES WITH OTHER GODS DURING HIS VARIOUS ATTEMPTS TO TAKE OVER THE CITIES THEY WERE PATRONS OF.

POSEIDON IS THE GOD OF THE SEA AND PROTECTOR OF ALL AQUATIC FEATURES. BROTHER OF ZEUS AND HADES, AFTER THE OVERTHROW OF THEIR FATHER, CRONUS, HE DREW LOTS WITH THEM TO SHARE THE UNIVERSE. HE ENDED UP BECOMING LORD OF THE SEA. HE WAS WIDELY WORSHIPPED BY SEAMEN. HE MARRIED AMPHITRITE, ONE OF THE GRANDDAUGHTERS OF THE TITAN OCEANUS.

THIS IS THE GUY!

LEARN THE MYTHOLOGY:

http://www.greekmythology.com/ Olympians/Poseidon/poseidon.html


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Clockwise from left: Northeastern Salmon Burger, Ringing in the weekend at Poseidon. Evening cocktails at the Rooftop Bar, and DJ Dance party

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the

Boat Show


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Offerings include quality beer, proprietary cocktails and select wines with accompanying charcuterie, cheeses and small plates.


At Porter and Pig, the ambiance is cozy, with several alcoves for intimate conversation while enjoying wine and shared plates.

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WEATHER WEATHER QUEEN QUEEN SHADES SHADES

GOT POLLEN?

The solution to your screened-in porch problem

article by courtney hillis


RAVING FANS OF WEATHER QUEEN SHADES:

“We wanted to build a porch cabin reminiscent of the 1930’s with a screened porch filled with rocking chairs, a porch swing, bed, soft blankets, pillows, and a fireplace. It was to be a place for our family and friends to relax, visit, play games and enjoy the fresh air. Our one challenge was finding a way to close up our screened porch to keep the screens and all of our furnishings clean and dry. We are so thankful we found Weather Queen Shades! When we leave our cabin, we simply lower our shades, keeping all of our cushions, blankets, books and games where they are, knowing they will be protected while we are gone. When we return, we raise our shades and begin another memorable visit at our cabin!” ~ Katie, Lino Lakes, MN

“[We] are truly delighted with the aesthetics and quality of the screen porch window and door coverings you designed and installed in our cabin. The color of the covering absolutely matches the siding, the ability to open and close the awnings from the inside of the screen porch makes it very easy to use and the quality is amazing. The awnings protect the screen porch furniture and interior from rain, snow and wind very well. It’s a great investment and we recommend it highly to anyone building a screen porch.” ~ Siren, WI “We saw Weather Queen’s shades installed on a house and knew we had to have them. There is no comparable solution for keeping the weather out while maintaining aesthetic appeal. The quality, style options, functionality and passion of the Weather Queen team exceeded our expectations.” ~ Eric, Hayward, WI


WEATHER WEATHER QUEEN QUEEN SHADES SHADES

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Venus Williams at Playerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World of Sports


ARTICLE BY KENT THUNE PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN BRACKETT


Hilton

head

BOATHOUSE J U S T A D D WAT E R !


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Ç AN AERIAL VIEW OF HILTON

HEAD BOATHOUSE’S LOCATION ON SKULL CREEK.

Å GRANT KAPLE ABOARD ONE OF THE MANY BOATS THAT ARE OFFERED.

SHOWROOM AT THE Å THE LOCATION ON SQUIRE POPE ROAD.

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for the

FUN

of it

MUSIC AND TASTE RETURNS TO

SHELTER COVE HARBOUR & MARINA

ARTICLE BY LINDA S. HOPKINS PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANNE


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é

é

é Target the Band performs for a crowd of people at last year’s Music and Taste on the Harbour. Andy Pitts of Lowcountry Boil Band performs in front of the King Neptune statue. The sun sets over pretty white boats docked in Shelter Cove Marina

ENTERTAINMENT SCHEDULE FOR MUSIC AND TASTE ON THE HARBOUR April 2: Deas Guyz, All Restaurants April 9: Target, the Band April 16: The Headliners April 23: Candace Woodson & the Domino Theory Band April 30: Target, the Band May 7: Deas Guyz May 14: The Chilly Willy Band May 21: The Headliners, All Restaurants All events are weather permitting and subject to change. Limited seating available. Bring canned goods for donation to the Deep Well Project. No coolers, please.

CALLING ALL ART LOVERS AND CRAFTY PEOPLE On April 11, Nash Gallery will host its 7th annual local crafts fair from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. According to gallery owner Lynn Alexander, anywhere from 14-20 local artists—all from Hilton Head Island and Bluffton— will be on hand to show and sell their wares. A variety of mediums will be represented including pottery, jewelry, wood, clay and photography. The art will be displayed near the Neptune statue at Shelter Cove Harbour, rain or shine. Admission is free. For more information, call Nash Gallery at (843) 785-6424.

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WH

YD OE S


A R T I C L E B Y B E C C A E D W A R D S

D A

N O

E H

T L

N O

I H


why does dating on hilton head "suck"

Top 5 Complaints

about Dating on Hilton Head Island: 1. Because the island is small, people are hesitant to date in fear that, if it doesn’t work out, they will feel awkward if they bump into the other person. 2. Young professionals are in the minority. 3. Many people are gun shy about pulling the trigger and going out with someone in the food and beverage industry. 4. There are few places and/or opportunities to meet people. 5. Everybody knows everybody—and their business.

10 Funny

Online dating terms: ADDY: Address AFK: Away From Keyboard DDF: Drug and Disease Free F2F: Face to Face (Which is not to be confused with F4F which means “Female for Female.”)

LS: Light Smoker (Or Legally Separated)

NB: No Baggage (Children, ex-spouses)

NIFOC: Nude in Front of Computer RL: Real Life SWAK: Sealed with a Kiss XOXO: Hugs & Kisses

Tips

For Dating in the area: 1. When setting up a date, take advantage of the Lowcountry: a sunset boat ride, mountain biking via hidden island spots, or a trip to Daufuskie. 2. When dating online, avoid men pictured with dead fish, in camouflage or shirtless—or with wordless profiles. 3. Remember we live in a small town. Don’t worry about gossip but don’t be the reason for gossip, either. 4. Be fair and upfront with people. 5. Though opposites tend to attract, make sure you date someone with similar interests and goals.

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SPARTINA

449 releases

SP

S

RIN

G 2015 COLLECT

IO

N

partina 449, recently listed on Inc. magazine’s 5,000 list of fastest growing companies in America, has released its new spring 2015 collection, The Sea Islands Collection, now available in stores and at Spartina449.com. The collection features five new patterns, plus multiple new handbag shapes, accessories and additional products, all inspired by “sister” sea islands to Daufuskie Island, South Carolina, namely Kiawah, Hilton Head, Tybee, St. Simons and Amelia islands. “This season we looked beyond the shores of Daufuskie Island, the primary source of our inspiration, to other sea islands along the South Carolina, Georgia and Florida coast,” said Kay Stanley, Spartina 449 company founder and owner. “We thought naming our newest collection after these islands would resonate with our loyal customers, many of whom have heard of or enjoy visiting these beautiful destinations.” Like Daufuskie, Kiawah, Hilton Head, Tybee, St. Simons and Amelia are all considered part of the Lowcountry environment that’s characteristic of the southeastern coastline of the United States. These islands boast beautiful beaches, lush coastal marshes, live-oaks draped in Spanish moss, diverse wildlife, world-class resorts, charming lighthouses, as well as unique cultural and historic resources. “Collectively, these islands offered us a wealth of inspiration,” Stanley said. Since the company’s inception, each season has spun forth unique linen and leather collections, a prismatic array of attractive, eye-catching prints and shapes. “Our customers wait with bated breath for each new season,” Stanley said. “Since the beginning, our creative team has worked hard to weave our inspirational sources, such as the character and beauty of the Sea Islands, with the latest in fashion. We believe it’s that combination of colorful stories and on-trend designs that resonate with our audience.” THE SEA ISLANDS COLLECTION: Kiawah. This pattern is named after Kiawah Island, S.C., which is located two hours north of Daufuskie and is close to Conde’ Nast’s top-rated Charleston, S.C. This on-trend black-and-white pattern exemplifies Kiawah as an upscale, sophisticated destination, heralded for championship golf and five-star resorts. Hilton Head. Just one nautical mile from Daufuskie Island, world-famous Hilton Head Island is home to the Harbour Town Yacht Basin, backdrop of the annual “Heritage” PGA TOUR golf tournament. Hilton Head is also known for its beautiful beaches, and this blue and white pattern is meant to evoke a nautical and coastal feel, a pervasive spring trend. Tybee. Across the Savannah River from Daufuskie is Tybee Island, Georgia, a quintessential beach town that is embodied with bright, vivid hues. New shapes in this pattern include the drawstring and high-tied buckets, oversized bags that are on trend and practical. St. Simons. The Golden Isles of Georgia are well-known as gorgeous getaways. St. Simons Island is reminisced in chic soft blue and natural tones, with a paisley print. Amelia. This colorful damask pattern personifies the rich history of Amelia Island, Florida, with French, Spanish, Native American Indian and English roots.  Spartina 449 is available in stores nationwide and online. Find it locally at the Spartina 449 Flagship Store in Bluffton, S.C., and at the following stores on Hilton Head Island: Currents, Fresh Produce, Gifted, Pelican’s Pouch, and Lettrs.


E C2 A SERIES OF

FORTUNATE EVENTS

The new Le Spa of Sea Pines, now has new owners, a fresh look, and enhanced spa and salon services. (In Photo: Mike and Karen Sileck, new owners of Le Spa of Sea Pines)

The Joan Kelly Group of Keller Williams Realty is proud to announce and welcome the addition of LaTisha Foote to their administrative support team as listing coordinator.

Beach Properties of Hilton Head will be celebrating their twentieth year in business this April. As a part of this celebration, the company will be holding a 20 Days of Giving program to highlight their continued support of local not-for-profit organizations on Hilton Head Island. For 20 days in April, the company will be donating or volunteering at 20 different organizations on Hilton Head Island. They will also be holding drives to collect books, food or art supplies. If you are interested in donating to one of the drives, please drop off donated items at the Beach Properties office located at 64 Arrow Road.

Janet Tarrant, professional pet groomer of 20 years, opened Groomalon Pet Salon within the Southpaw Pet Resort at 10 Fish Haul Rd. on Hilton Head Island.

Dunes Real Estate welcomes Realtors, Michael Caffery, Cecil Guerrero, and Lynne Harris. Caffrey combines experience as an Army Ranger, residential developer, builder and inspector into his real estate sales philosophy; Guerrero brings varied backgrounds including service in the Army, project management for strategic programs at Motorola and a 15-year real estate career in Arizona; Harris is a former corporate training manager, teacher, health care director and North Carolina Realtor.

The Indigo Spa at Hilton Head Health is now open. The brand new spa has seven treatment rooms plus a full salon with more than 50 experiences and six Hilton Head Health exclusive services, available to guests as well as the public.

APRIL 2015

www.celebratehiltonhead.com 157


E C2 A SERIES OF

FORTUNATE EVENTS

BB&T Carswell Insurance Services has promoted Kristin Walker to assistant vice president. Walker is a Family Risk manager in the Personal Lines department at BB&T Carswell Insurance Services in Bluffton and has been in the insurance industry for over 15 years.

BB&T Carswell Insurance Services has promoted Russell Stuart Bedenbaugh to assistant vice president. Bedenbaugh is an account executive in the Employee Benefits Department at BB&T Carswell Insurance Services, Bluffton.

Dr. Jeri Lawrence, D.C., has opened a new chiropractic clinic at 39 Persimmon Street, Ste. 603,Bluffton with weekend appointments available on Hilton Head Island. Lawrence, who has over 15 years of experience locally, has recently returned from living abroad in Israel, Europe, and Hawaii and looks forward to bringing a fresh chiropractic experience to her patients.

Wood+Partners Inc., a regional land planning and landscape architecture firm, recently added Kathleen Duncan as project manager. She brings over nine years of design and planning experience to the firm and is president elect of the South Carolina Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architecture.

Coastal Signature Homes has announced a new partner, David Renaker. Having worked 25+ years in banking, at the Executive and Senior levels, David brings his extensive financial experience to the corporation.

Dave Ropes, one of the top branding experts in the country, has joined group46 as a powerhouse partner; he brings more than 30 years of experience as a senior marketing and advertising executive working at the top of premier multinational consumer product companies, including Ford Motor Company, Reebok, Pepsi Cola, Pizza Hut and Philip Morris.

ď&#x20AC;´ Send your submissions to hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com

APRIL 2015

www.celebratehiltonhead.com 159


It’s

5

O’CLOCK

SOMEWHERE!

M

S Chow Daddy’sHappy Hour Daily! (4-6PM) ELA’s Blu Water Grille- Easter Sunday: Chef Alpaugh will feature special offerings in addition to our regular menu items from (11-8PM) The Crazy Crab(Jarvis Creek)April 19: Mike Wilson (6-9PM) Kingfisher (Pelican’s Point)-Mentalist Bill Gladwell (Sundays)

San Miguels-Happy Hour (4-6) Chris Jones (Tuesdays; 5-9PM) Chow Daddy’sHappy Hour (4-6PM)

T Charbar Co.Reid Richmond (6-9PM) Hudson’s- Happy Hour! Beer, cocktails & bites (Daily 3-6PM) Street Meet- Kitchen is Open til 1AM- Full Menu! (All Week) Lucky Rooster- Will Snyder (7-10PM Tuesdays) San Miguel’s- Mike Korbar (Tuesdays 5-9PM)

Charbar Co.- Mike & Leo Duo (6-9PM)

Rooftop BarCoastal Country Night & Happy Hour (4-7PM) Charbar Co.- Whitley Deputy (7-10PM) Kingfisher (Pelican’s Point)- Mike Wilson (Wednesdays 6-9PM) April 1-4: Mike Armstrong April 8-11: Collin Moulton

Holy Tequila- Happy Hour! $2.50 select liquors, beers, tacos & bar snacks! & MORE! (Daily 4-7PM) Kingfisher (Pelican’s Point)- Mentalist Bill Gladwell (Mondays 7:30PM)

W

Kingfisher (Pelican’s Point)Mentalist Bill Gladwell (7:30PM) Comedy Club of Hilton Head (Tuesdays @ 8PM)

Send your event/entertainment listing to hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com

Mellow MushroomTrivia Night (9PM, Hilton Head) Electric Piano Bar-R&B, Motown, Top 40 with Laiken Love and Willie Jones (Wednesdays)


T

F

S

Electric Piano-Dueling Pianos with Sterlin Colvin and Eddie Wilson (Starts at 9PM) Kingfisher (Pelican’s Point)Earl Williams - Motown, Jazz & Blues (Fridays @ 6PM) April 15-18: Kier April 22-25: Bengt Washburn April 29-May 2: Louis Ramey

The Crazy Crab (Jarvis ELA’s Blu Water Grille- John Creek)- April 16: Mike Wilson Wasem (Fridays 7-10PM) (6-9PM) Street Meet- Kitchen is Open til 1AM- Full Menu! (7 Days A Week) Charbar Co.- Zack Stiltner (7-10PM) ELA’s Blu Water Grille- Reid Richmond ( Thursdays, 7-10PM) April 2: Join ELA’S for “Music on the Harbour @ Shelter Cove” w/ Deaz Guys Electric Piano Bar-Smirnoff Vodka Ladies Night with The Simpson Brothers (9PM; Thursdays) April 16: Dueling Pianos with Eddie and Sterlin. Kingfisher (Pelican’s Point)David Wingo (Thursdays 6PM)

Charbar Co. -Tommy Sims (7-10PM) The Crazy Crab (Jarvis Creek)- April 17: Heritage After Party- BYOG performing - Drink Specials and Giveaways (5-10PM) Street Meet: April 3: Fish Fry Friday. Two pieces of fried fish, coleslaw and fries for $16.95!

The Electric PianoDueling Pianos with Dallas Reese and Charlie Denison. April 4: The Simpson Brothers Dance Party Rooftop Bar- DJ Scoobie’s Dance Party (Sat. Nights) & Dress to Impress Charbar Co. -Summer Acoustic (7-10PM) The Crazy Crab (Jarvis Creek)- April 18: Tye Miller (6-9PM)

The Jazz Corner- April 3&4: The ALLAN VACHE Quintet ELA’s Blu Water Grille- John “Stompin’ at the Savoy” Wasem (Saturdays; 7-10PM) A Salute to Benny Goodman


APRIL

2015 SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

MARCH 1-7 DATE! SAVE THE

THURSDAYS

11TH ANNUAL YACHT HOP OF HILTON HEAD Sunday May 3, 2015 5:30pm - 9:00pm Harbour Town Yacht Basin Visit beautiful yachts, while sampling the gourmet offerings of our area’s finest chefs. Live music, auctions, champagne toast, dessert and a glorious sunset add to the special atmosphere of the evening.Tickets $110 Call 843-706-2296

5 Happy easter

6-10

7

GREGG RUSSELL CONCERTS Under the Liberty Oak in Harbour Town; 7:30PM His concerts are not to be missed. Shows are free.

12

FARMERS MARKET IN OLD TOWN BLUFFTON 2-7PM Calhoun Street farmersmarket bluffton.org

SPRING “MUSIC & TASTE ON THE HARBOUR; 6:00 – 9:00 pm. April 2 – Deas Guyz (Opening night, all restaurants set up) April 9 - Target Band April 16 – The Headliners

21

SEA PINES MIXED MEDIA FARMERS MARKET LAYERS AND PRESENTED BY TEXTURES LOWCOUNTRY April 7, 14, 21, 28; 9:30am – 12:30pm PRODUCE Cost: $120/members; 10AM-2PM $140/non-members Runs through www.sobagallery.com December

26

27

SATURDAY

3-5 EASTER BUNNY WAGON RIDES! Sea Pines Forest Preserve ;3:30PM A. $15/adults and $10/children12 and under. (843) 842-1979.

April 23 – Candace Woodson & the Domino Theory Band April 30 – Target Band

FURNITURE PAINTING CLASSES 2-4PM; Revival Design & Decor RevivalDesignsHHI. com/schedule 843-785-5557

www.palmettodunes.com/resort/hilton-head-events/

13-19

TUESDAYS

FRIDAY

9

THURSDAY NIGHTS

WEDNESDAYS

47TH ANNUAL RBC HERITAGE POOLSIDE MOVIE HARBOUR TOWN GOLF LINKS Harbour Town Pool For additional information regarding April 1-15; 7:30pm staying at The Sea Pines Resort, please 16/adult, $13/ call 1.800.SEAPINES or visit seapines.com. child (ages 12 & To learn more about the RBC Heritage younger) and available ticket packages, please call (843) 842-1979 (843) 671-2448 or visit rbcheritage.com.

19

THURSDAY

22 EARTH DAY ACTIVITIES AT PALMETTO BLUFF 8AM: Nature walk; 1PM: Family sidewalk chalk contest; 2PM: Around the world Basketball

APRIL 29-MAY 24 THE ARTS CENTER OF COASTAL CAROLINA PRESENTS GYPSY Gypsy tells the backstage tale of vaudeville entertainer-turned-stripper Gypsy Rose Lee and her domineering stage mother, Rose. 8 p.m. & 2 p.m., Sunday Matinees. 14 Shelter Cove Lane. (843) 842-2787 or artshhi.com

16 PALMETTO QUILT GUILD MONTHLY MEETING HH Beach & Tennis 1:00PM Guests are welcome for a $5 visit fee. (843) 689-1922

23-26 THE WEDDING SINGER SeaHawk Cultural Center; 7:00PM Tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for students wwwseahawk theatreguild.org

30 ZEMI ZEN: LIVE ART PERFORMANCE Windows on the Waterway 6PM- Fine Art Opening 7PM- Food and Fashion

17

25 HAPPY BIRTHDAY CATHERINE! THE BIG 30!

4 EASTER EGGSTRAVAGANZA Shelter Cove Community Park 10AM-1PM Admission is $10 for children Age 2-10 and No Charge for Adults “PARTY IN THE PINES” FUNDRAISER Sea Pines Forest Preserve 4:30–7:30pm picnic themed menu including BBQ, chicken and hot dogs, live music and fun for the whole family. $40/adult, $15/child (ages 12 & younger) (843) 671-1343

18

25-26 THE ART MARKET AT HONEY HORN 11:00AM Free admission. Parking is $6 per car, benefiting the Coastal Discovery Museum. coastaldiscovery.org.

MAY RIVER HH HUMANE CLEAN-UP ASSOCIATION’S April 25, 2015 18TH ANNUAL Palmetto Bluff DOG WALK ON 9AM-12PM THE BEACH April 25, 2015 FURNITURE 8:30AM; Coligny PAINTING CLASSES Beach April 25 ;12-2PM DJ Alan Palchak Revival Design & Decor returns as MC and RevivalDesignsHHI. entertainer. com/schedule www.hhhumane.org. 843-785-5557


CH2 / CB2 April Issue  

Poseidon, Weather Queen Shades, Hilton Head Boathouse, Porter and Pig, The Boatshow, The Phenomenon of Crowdfunding, Defining Success, Dude,...

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