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Summer Newsletter 2012 Charity No 1071660

Helping Orphans to be Heard We are delighted to announce a three year grant from Comic Relief, which started in May 2012. This grant will begin to build a bridge between the orphans we support and the policy makers in Zambia.

especially to its most vulnerable constituents; the orphans. Peer Health Educators (PHEs) will help local communities to form effective parent teacher committees. These committees will be best placed to monitor the progress of orphans through school We have called this project ‘Hands on Learning’ as it extends the work of our and other local services, and will local Zambian partners Hodi and CHEP present findings to local government to petition for changes. Our partners to improve the quality of services available to orphans. It is a significant already know that holistic orphan care is severely lacking - this grant enables investment of £500,000 over three local communities to participate in years. finding relevant, long lasting solutions.

Where are they now? Joseph Zimba was supported at school by Cecily’s Fund after both his parents died. In Grade 12 he won an award as Zambia's best science student of the year and was then awarded a scholarship by Pestalozzi to study for the International Baccalaureate in the UK– which he completed earlier this year.

At his graduation last month he was the first speaker for the The grant is also a challenge. We must student body and presented a match fund a proportion of this grant; cheque that had been raised for meaning we need to find £57,000 from Cecily’s Fund to Cecily’s father, Basil Eastwood. Joseph will go alternative sources. on to Jacobs University in Bremen to study economics Thank You and business studies.

Regular supporters are a tremendously important part of this The grant is an exciting leap forward for grant. Your support to date helped Cecily’s Fund. We will continue to help us to win it, and your contribution to thousands of orphans directly, but will the match funding will see your money now also focus on improving go even further – each £1 donated will government interventions. Hands on release almost £9 of Comic Relief Learning is about the government money. Now is the time to become a meeting local communities half way, Friend of Cecily’s Fund so you can and becoming more responsive, really see your donation grow.

Joseph told us: “My fellow students and I really cherish the work that Cecily's Fund does. Cecily's Fund came to me at the time I needed it most. Had it not been for Cecily's Fund I might not have reached this far in my life. “Thank you so much for the wonderful work you are doing for vulnerable children.”

You can contact us on tel: 01993 869005 email: admin@cecilysfund.org website: www.cecilysfund.org 1


Cecily’s Fund Summer Newsletter 2012

A Day in the Life of BISO Teacher Patrick Mukuka

Patrick Mukuka is a Grade 4 teacher at BISO community school. He is relatively new to the job as he only started in January 2012. His day holds many challenges. We asked him about some of the issues he faces on a day to day basis. Can you tell us about yourself? I am one of five children, both my parents died at exam time when I was in grade 7. It was a very, very difficult time for me and our family really struggled to manage. I lived with my older brother who did not work, in fact no one in the family was employed and life was very hard. How did you manage? I started selling fritters to make some money. Then later I would bake things in the evenings to sell in the market after school. Paying school fees was very difficult and I could not find any support. I was lucky that one of my teachers paid my debt for grade 10 otherwise I would not have been able to get my results. Then luckily I was introduced to Hodi and they supported me until I graduated from school in 2008. How did you come to be a teacher?

After school I was lucky enough to BISO Achievements 2011 get a place as a CHEP peer health educator. Whilst there, Paul (the  106 pre-school children CHEP co-ordinator) talked to me  756 children in grades 1-4 about training as a teacher with  1,746 children supported by Hodi’s support and as I had no BISO in government schools in other options for further education grades 1-12 I decided to go for it. After I completed my initial teacher training I was introduced to BISO. Mr Kataso (Head of education at BISO) was keen to employ Cecily’s Fund supported teachers and I started working here in January this year. What does your Patrick Mukuka outside BISO Community School teaching day entail?: I teach two classes. The first runs from 7am until 10:30am and has 60 What have you done to overcome these issues? children in it, the second from I try to create activities that will 10:30am until 12:30pm and there are 75 in this one. It can be quite a engage and motivate the children in challenge as there is a wide range of their lessons. For example I might start a lesson with a game that ages and educational levels in my groups. Many children start late so they will enjoy and participate in. my classes have children from 9-17 If problems continue, I may contact their family. If their parents or years old. guardians are committed to the What do you think are the main child’s education they can adjust issues in enabling vulnerable their routines or encourage the child children to stay in school? to not be late. There are many children in my class who are committed to school I may also use the BISO support but unfortunately some are often structures that are in place by referring the case to the support absent or late. This can be for a office. The team may then visit the number of reasons but the main ones are that they have a number home and provide counselling. This of chores to complete before they process works and helps to change come to school or they may have behaviour. Occasionally there may be problems if the parents are not child-minding responsibilities. interested, but most appreciate the support.

Child in BISO classroom

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Cecily’s Fund Summer Newsletter 2012

A day in the life (cont) What do you see for your future? I would like to go back to further education as I am keen to specialise in Special Educational Needs. I already have a certificate in sign language. I am also aware that I will need to get a degree to stay in teaching. The government have announced that by 2013 teachers must have a degree or a diploma so I must advance my certificate. I will have to do this in my spare time as the government do not plan to provide any support for this extra training.

Pre-school at BISO We are delighted to announce that we have been granted funding by Open Society Initiative for Southern Africa (OSISA) to develop a new early years programme at BISO. This will mean that BISO will run one of only three Early Years Development Programmes in the whole country. It is a very positive step, as the earlier children are brought into education, the better. Children will be properly prepared for grade 1 as they will learn the basics in pre-school. Reading at BISO

Elsie and Edina: An Update In 2009 we introduced you to Elsie and her sister Edina. At that time Elsie was 11 and lived with her sister, cousins and grandmother in one room in an impoverished suburb of Lusaka. When she first came to BISO at the age of six, Elsie’s teacher noticed she kept falling asleep in lessons. She learned that since Elsie’s parents had died, she had been forced to stay up all night to look after her aunt’s baby. Her teacher arranged for Elsie to live with her grandmother who, though very poor herself, could take better care of her. We have followed Elsie and Edina’s progress. In the 2010 summer newsletter we were pleased to report that both girls were doing well and Elsie was among the children who received a new school bag as a prize for getting average marks of over 70% and that she was ready to go on to government school.

and their story took a tragic turn earlier this year when their grandmother passed away. This has had a huge impact on both girls, both emotionally and financially, as their grandmother was the family’s main breadwinner. We caught up with Edina in May 2012. Her sadness was striking. She was clearly still very much affected by the loss of her grandmother. When we asked how she was she said:

“We are doing fine –

social counselling and the medical support the girls have received is a particular strength of BISO’s holistic approach.

Edina pictured at home whilst childminding

life goes on. Things are moving slowly – it is not easy”

Since we visited, we have heard that one of the girls’ aunts is planning to Eddie, the social worker at BISO, continue the pot-making business has worked hard to support Elsie and Edina during their bereavement. that their grandmother was The girls have managed to maintain developing (supported by a private donor) – and this will provide an Sadly, life in Zambia is all too fragile their attendance at school. The income for the family. 3


Cecily’s Fund Summer Newsletter 2012

Peer Health Education: Change for the Better Their messages are poignant, as can be seen in the lyrics of their song which they performed for us during our visit in May 2012:

PHE Group Song

Students presenting a poem in peer health session in Natwenge Basic School, Kitwe

We have been working with CHEP to support a peer health education programme since 2003. Peer Health Educators (PHEs) deliver health information and build knowledge using drama, songs and games, to children in schools. Young people are empowered through this to stay in school, develop safer behaviour regarding HIV and to realise their rights.

PHEs told us during our visit how actions speak louder than words:

“In Zambia we have a saying ‘Don’t

Change for the better Change for the better for the children of tomorrow Today’s children are tomorrow’s future Change for the better for the children of tomorrow Hey it is coming It’s coming like a bush fire

do what I do – do what I say. That I am a vulnerable child, my parents is a concept that many Zambians died many years ago use. [But] as peer health educators I never went to school until I met a we have come to realise we cannot woman, a white lady teach what we are not putting into She bought me books, shoes and a practice.” uniform and I am now at school “Even in other organisations, I thank you for your support and others will recognise: ‘that is a peer would want you to continue helping The concept of peer education is health educator’ and will notice our us as education is important and important in developing behaviour and will learn something. because children are future leaders understanding and abolishing the of tomorrow “In short, we are not only imparting myths that abound about HIV. Change for the better knowledge in school but also in the Stigma is still the biggest barrier to community”. Change for the better for the progress and young people find it children of tomorrow hard to discuss the issues, let alone We are proud of what our PHEs Today’s children are tomorrow’s achieve each year. future “…usually the advantage we have Peer health sessions inspire Change for the better for the as Peer Health Educators is that confidence. They are lively and children of tomorrow hugely interactive. At Natwenge Hey it is coming we are more like them – of the Basic School they have been It’s coming like a bush fire same age group as them – so inspired to develop their songs in HIV is a killer disease they easily open up”. the local language as well as English It has killed my parents and my so that they can themselves Gift Kunda, PHE 2012 close friend influence their local community. This But I know how to prevent myself ‘go public’ by visiting a local health is a level of confidence that would It’s by using the letter ABC which have been unimaginable prior to the clinic. As role models, how they means conduct themselves is something Peer Health Education programme. Abstinence, Being faithful to one the PHE’s now take very seriously. sexual partner and by using a Jedidiah Bwalya one of this year’s Condom 4


Cecily’s Fund Summer Newsletter 2012

Change for the better (cont) The confidence of pupils in the sessions is apparent. They are clear that they have learned some valuable lessons. During our visit they told us:

“We have learnt [one way] HIV is

spread, through sexual intercourse” “We have been having PHE sessions for two years. We have learned about abstinence and using a condom.” “I learned a lot from the role play. Drug abuse is bad, you can die from drugs. If you take drugs it will make you do bad things and you can also get things like ulcers.”

2011, less than half went through with the appointment at the clinic.

CHEP Achievements 2011 

We asked the PHEs why this is. They were unanimous that stigma is a  very big issue – and is the main cause for young people not  accessing clinics. Other barriers include the age of the clinic staff as young people will not open up to older staff members; fear of HIV – they are afraid of finding out their status; fear of being exposed – what if their parents or neighbours are at the clinic and see them? And embarrassment – these are not easy subjects to talk about!

50 peer health educators reaching 10,999 children 45 Anti– AIDS clubs delivering 247 after-school sessions 497 students referred to health clinics for advice, treatment and medication

In 2012/13, with your support, we aim to establish accessible, stigmafree, ‘youth friendly health corners’ in six health clinics that provide services for the 25 schools in the PHE programme. We will provide PHE song in Twashuka Basic School extra training, additional materials Despite this, young people most at and the support of former PHEs as project which will develop structures risk are not always accessing health to enable orphans themselves to mentors for young people. This services. Of 497 youngsters influence decisions about how complements the Comic Relief identified as needing services in services are developed to help them. “(In the future) we will avoid people who take drugs and alcohol. In this school someone might try to use peer pressure to make you take drugs. It’s hard to say no.”

A PHE demonstrates a health message.

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Cecily’s Fund Summer Newsletter 2012

Supporting Orphans to Achieve their Potential Hodi Achievements 2011   

7,084 enrolled in 58 schools in and around Kitwe 1,360 uniforms, and 2,036 pairs of shoes distributed 39 students funded in teacher training

children have already done well to protect her. Zambia has a high rate of teenage pregnancy, often due to defilement or through a need for poorer girls to sell their bodies to earn food. When asked how they would most like to be helped, they replied: Spencer and Hayley at home in Kitwe

Being an orphan is never easy. Being an orphan in Zambia; a country where there are no social services, limited health services, no government benefits and often little adult support, is unbelievably hard. Spencer and his sister Hayley live with the issues this creates daily, yet despite this they are determined to complete their education, with Hodi’s support. We interviewed Spencer and Hayley earlier this year in their ‘home’; essentially, a half-built room with no windows or doors and an old piece of sacking half covering one window. The cold must be extreme at night as there is little protection from the elements; no floor, no heat, no light and no means of cooking unless they can afford to buy charcoal for their charcoal fire. Their belongings consist of two cooking pots and some plastic containers that they use to sit on. Despite often being hungry and

tired, they are very focused. They support themselves as best they can and endeavour to work hard at school to finish their education, as a means of having a better future.

Spencer: “Food. I’d like food. [And] To finish my education to grade 12”. Hayley: “To finish building this house”.

Their house– a half derelict plot is not theirs but actually belongs to a friend of their aunt, their only Spencer leaves for school at 6.00am. It takes him over an hour relative, who lives 700 kilometres away. They can live on the site to walk there and he is in school without paying rent, as long as they from 7.30am until 3.00pm. In the continue with the building. Clearly in evenings he works an eight hour shift as a taxi driver for a friend. He their present circumstances this is has no driving license so this work is near impossible. The owner could turn them out at any time and has illegal and he only gets paid if his friend can afford to give him some of told them ‘if you do not finish this the takings. This is the only money building you must go’. Spencer and Hayley have for food. If We were struck by Hayley and he does not get any money, they do Spencer’s quiet dignity, their lack of not eat. He returns home at 4 am. self-pity and their commitment to Spencer remains very committed to each other and to their future. his schoolwork – he works hard and Hodi works with a number of children is getting merits – of which he is like Spencer and Hayley to provide clearly proud. He would like to study school fees, uniforms and equipment engineering. and ensure that they get the Hodi is very concerned about Hayley education they need to escape a life and how she can be protected in the of poverty. local Zambian society. The two 6


Cecily’s Fund Summer Newsletter 2012 New team for Hodi

Supporter News

We are pleased to announce the new team recently recruited to Hodi Kitwe. A big thank you to all our supporters who have organised and taken part in Charlene Bangwe Shama took over as events so far this year. We couldn’t do it without you! Programme Manager in March. Like her counterpart in Lusaka, Richard Mwape, she understands how important Cecily’s Fund support is, as both she and Earlier this year Leo Findlater Richard are themselves orphans who were supported by Cecily’s Fund. We wish climbed Mount Kilimanjaro – an the new team the best of luck! amazing 6 day trek through some

Peak of Success

Hodi Tertiary Profile “I feel blessed. Without Cecily’s Fund I couldn’t have been here. I couldn’t have managed. I don’t know what I would be doing.” Name: Barbara Lunga College: COSETCO College Studying: 2nd year teacher training Family: One of seven children. Barbara’s father lost his job in 1986 and has not worked since. By Grade 11 they could no longer afford Barbara’s school fees. “It was terrible. I used to cry, my mother used to cry, everyone did. There was lots of pressure on me as I was the first born” At this point Barbara was introduced to Hodi and Cecily’s Fund who supported her through school and now funds her teacher training. What the future holds: Barbara is honest that teaching is a stop gap for her. She will work as a teacher for a few years to earn money and then hopes to retrain as a doctor. “ Employment is much easier once you have a degree. I know that when I complete I will be someone in the future and at least I can help my family. It’s a blessing to me.” Barbara and fellow students

The Oxfordshire Bake-Off

of Africa’s most stunning scenery. 5,895m later she had not only climbed Africa’s highest mountain but also raised over £900 in the process for Cecily’s Fund. Leo told us: “I can safely say it is one of the hardest, most gruelling experiences of my life, however not for one moment did I think of turning back.”

In March 2012 Kate Kellaway-Moore, a Cecily’s Fund volunteer, held the Oxfordshire Bake-Off. As well as the baking competitions there were stalls, demonstrations and, of course, lots and lots of cake. It was a glorious hot sunny day and people flocked to the event. The bake-off made £1,000 for the four charities (including Cecily’s Fund). Copies of the bake-off book can still be bought to raise even more at http:// oxfordbakeoff.wordpress.com/the-book/

Run, Supporters, Run! Congratulations to the amazing supporters running for Cecily’s Fund so far this year. Dan Wheeler ran the London marathon in 3 hours and 41 minutes and raised an amazing £4,500 for Cecily’s Fund. Meanwhile down on the south coast three runners ran the Brighton marathon: John Dupre, Tracy Vause and Lesley Jugoo raised over £1,250. The money raised by these runners will make a significant difference to the lives of the children we support in Zambia. We are keen to encourage more people to do sponsored events so if you would like to run, cycle, swim or climb for Cecily’s Fund please contact us at admin@cecilysfund.org or call (01993) 869005 7


Cecily’s Fund Summer Newsletter 2012

Carol Concert

Cecily’s Day 2012

Whilst the sun continues to hide, start planning your Christmas Please come along to our annual countdown with Cecily’s Fund’s carol concert at St Luke’s Church in picnic on Saturday 8th September at 1pm. The occasion is informal and Chelsea on Monday 10th December. The evening will feature the voices of is held in the grounds of Stonesfield ‘Vox Cordis’; a choir that have received rave reviews from Classic FM. Manor, in Stonesfield near Witney For information on either of these events please contact us at (OX29 8QB). Please bring a picnic admin@cecilysfund.org, on (01993) 869005 or go to www.cecilysfund.org together with rugs and chairs.

Sign me up as a friend of Cecily’s Fund Being a Friend of Cecily's Fund entitles you to the following: To become a Friend of Cecily’s

 An invitation to an annual gathering with guest speakers and Fund use the Donation and discussions on Cecily’s Fund’s work and other relevant topics Gift Aid form to set up a regular payment to Cecily’s - plus the chance to meet (and make) other Friends Fund of £12 a month or more and tick the appropriate box below.  Programme updates twice a year - including profiles of I wish to become a Friend of Cecily’s Fund children and young people you are helping to support, updates on our work and other Zambian news I already give/intend to give £12 or more a month but do  A smart, enamel ‘Friend of Cecily’s Fund’ lapel pin not wish to become a Friend of Cecily’s Fund

... and more.

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Please return the form to Cecily’s Fund, C6 New Yatt Business Centre, New Yatt, Witney, OX29 6TJ

Cecily’s Fund is a UK registered charity number 1071660

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Cecily's Fund Summer newsletter 2012