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Annual Report 2016


Annual Report 2016


Copyright @ 2017 Center for Disaster Preparedness All rights reserved. Any part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, even without permission of the publisher as long as it will be properly cited.


Table of Contents

2

Introduction

7

CDP Program Milestones

8 9 10 10 12 13 13

Advocacy, Partnership, and Networking Program Enhancing legislation in DRR Putting local actors in the center of the new humanitarian agenda Making DRR a priority Agenda of the new administration Putting local actors in the center of the new humanitarian agenda Influencing the development of the SFDRR Asia Regional Implementation Plan Moving Forward

14 14 16 16 18 18 19 20

Research, Knowledge Exchange, and Management Program (RKEM) Research Knowledge Exchange Knowledge Management Monitoring and Evaluation Capacity Building Activities Advocacy Activities Onwards to 2017

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Training and Capacity Development

34 34 36

38 38 39 40

Projects and Partnerships Program Strengthening Resilience to Disasters among Vulnerable Urban Poor Communities in Metro Manila Towards Resilience and Development for Bohol Communities in the Aftermath of Earthquake and Typhoon Haiyan Building Inclusive, Resilient Community; Better Shared Local Risk Governance in Giporlos, Quinapondan and Salcedo, Eastern Samar Be Secure Project: Water Security for Resilient Economic Growth and Stability TRIP to THRIVE Disability-inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction Project Moving Forward

41 41 42 42 43 43 43 44

Humanitarian Preparedness and Response Program (HPRP) Consortium for Humanitarian Action and Protection (CHAP) Capacity Development Advocacy Knowledge Product Development Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Organizational Contributions Gearing Towards 2017

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Introduction As Center for Disaster Preparedness (CDP) marks its 17th year, the organization continuously builds the benchmark of Philippine disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM) and remains as a key actor in leading the trail towards achieving resilience and sustainable development across the globe. This year, CDP has elevated its commitment in DRRM by adding a new program on its current institutional structure. The Humanitarian Preparedness and Response Program (HPRP) was established to complement the initiatives of the core programs of the institution namely: Training and Capacity Development (TCD); Research, Knowledge Exchange, and Management (RKEM); Advocacy, Partnership, and Networking (APN); and, Projects and Partnerships Program (PPP). The new program contributes to building the capacities of frontliners and communities in emergency preparedness and humanitarian response. It supports the core humanitarian standards in its program implementation and evaluation. More so, the program advocates for the localization of humanitarian aid and response and the promotion of ethical partnership in humanitarian action. Apart from its new program, the center continually sets the trend in carrying out DRRM advocacy among different sectors. Through the APN program of CDP, it spearheads the global and national level advocacy through its continuous commitment as the lead convenor of the Disaster Risk Reduction Network- Philippines (DRRNetPhils) and as a council member, alternate to the Sectoral Representative and leader of different committees of the Victims of Disaster and Calamities Sector of the National Anti-Poverty Commission under the Office of the President of the Philippines. Its involvement in the

network enabled it to carry out institutional advocacy objectives that also echo the network agenda which include: • Advocacy for the implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (SFDRR); • Full implementation of the Republic Act 10121 also known as the Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (DRRM) Act of 2010; and, • Community-based mechanisms for disaster risk reduction and management. Other than advocacy engagements, CDP carries out the institutionalization of CommunityBased Disaster Risk Reduction (CBDRRM) through its research, training, project and humanitarian engagements in line with its institutional advocacy objectives. Its five (5) core programs were able to accomplish the following under each institutional advocacy: • Implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (SFDRR) a. Participation on the World Humanitarian Summit and conduct of fora for the localization of humanitarian response; b. To further support humanitarian response, CDP also completed the translation of the Core Humanitarian standard in Philippine languages such as Filipino and Cebuano;


c. CDP through the RKEM program led the Frontline project as part of its commitment as the national coordinating organization of the Philippines for the Global Network of Civil Society Organizations for Disaster Reduction (GNDR); and, d. Involvement in knowledge exchange events at the international level e.g. conferences such as Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (AMCDRR), the Shanghai Forum 2016 and 2016 Annual Conference on Southeast Asian Studies in Taiwan and national scale e.g. Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)-organized conference, Christian Aid Conference, University of the Philippines College of Social Sciences and Philosophy Graduate Student Research, National Research and Development Conference of the Department of Science and Technology, and workshop on SFDRR with the New Castle University in Australia. • Full implementation of Republic Act 10121 also known as the Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (DRRM) Act of 2010 a. Continuous participation in the Technical Working Group (TWG) of the review of R.A. 10121 Implementing Rules and Regulations

(IRR); b. Drafting and distribution of a DRRNetPhils Position Paper on the Sunset Review to key duty-bearers and stakeholders; c. Proposal of an IRR rule on the inclusion of civil society in terms of representation and participation;

d. Launching of Barangay 911 (9 calls, 1 agenda, and 1 resilient Philippines) campaign with DRRNetPhils to influence policymakers and duty-bearers of the current administration during the first 100 days in office of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte; e. Lobbying of activities to promote the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund (NDRRMF) and the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Authority (NDRRMA); f. Research on the utilization of the NDRRMF; g. Conduct of accountability research with the support of Making All Voices Count under RKEM; and, h. Partnership with the private sector through the implementation of projects in collaboration with Philippine Disaster Recovery Foundation like “Negosyong Pitogo, Negosyong Nagpapatuloy: Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction and Management with Business Continuity Planning Integration”, and “Building Resilient and Economically Adept Communities and Households”; and engagement with Regional Capacity Development Technical Assistance (R-CDTA) of Japan Fund for Poverty Reduction with the project entitled, “Applying Space-Based Technology and Information and Communication Technology to Strengthen Disaster Resilience in the Philippines led by the TCD program”. • Community-based mechanisms for disaster risk reduction and management a. Accomplishment of DRRM- related capacity- building activities as follows: eighty-eight (88) project-related trainings, twenty-nine (29) external engagements, and eighty (80) inter-program activities like courses on Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation, Emergency Response, Risk and Assessment (Hazard, Capacity and Vulnerability Assessment) and CBDRRM trainings that include

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the development of early warning systems, simulation exercises, and drills; b. Leading of child-centered researches under the RKEM program and child-centered trainings with TCD, both in partnership with UNICEF and Plan International; c. Implementation of disability- inclusion research of RKEM together with CBM; capacity- building initiatives through the partnership of TCD, PPP, and RKEM such as CBM and Partners Project Inception Workshop and Training of Trainers (ToT), and “Prospect in Retrospect: Mainstreaming Disability-Inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction in Programming Framework of Engaged Partners”; and PPP-led projects entitled, “Building Inclusive, Resilient Community; Better Shared Local Risk Governance in Giporlos, Quinapondan and Salcedo, Eastern Samar”; and, Project Persons with Disabilities: Empowered, Engaged and its second phase, Project Elevate: Marig-on Estehanon!; d. Promotion of urban resilience through the implementation of projects such as Strengthening Urban Communities’ Capacity to Endure Severe Shocks (SUCCESS 2) under TCD and Strengthening Resilience to Disasters among Vulnerable Urban Poor Communities in Metro Manila through PPP; e. Advancement of long-term water security along with improvement of access to water and wastewater treatment services, and develop more resilient communities through the Be Secure Project: Water Security for Resilient Economic Growth and Stability led by TCD and PPP in collaboration with AECOM and USAID. f. Conduct of project baseline and endline studies for institutional projects led by PPP through the RKEM program to better implement projects on CBDRRM; g. Completion of institutional publications and researches such as “Stories from the Ground: A Collection of Inspiring Stories of Resilience”, which features the good practices, challenges, and lessons learned of CDP’s partners, research on media in reporting DRRM-related news and article for World Disaster Report of 2016 called “Waves of Resilience”, published by the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies; h. Institutional capacity building on monitoring and evaluation channeled in RKEM program through its participation in the “Strengthening Urban Communities’ Capacity to Endure Severe Shocks” (SUCCESS) with Catholic Relief Services; i. Leading of drills such as Typhoon-Storm Surge Drill under the Planning for Resilience and Effective Preparedness

Annual Report 2016

(PREP) project of TCD with CRS along with other projects; and, j. Implementation of manifold projects under PPP for people’s recovery like “Towards Resilience and Development for Bohol Communities in the Aftermath of Earthquake and Typhoon Haiyan”, and “Trip to Thrive Project” in partnership with Oxfam to support the implementation of durable solutions for internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Tacloban City from the gains of the Tacloban Resettlement Integrated Program (TRIP) undertaken in 2015.


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Truly, CDP has been a significant player in Philippine DRRM practice in the year 2016. With the expertise extended by its five (5) core programs to its lifelong partners from the community up to the global level, it has proven to be a fervent servant and ally towards building sustainable and resilient communities, not just in the Philippines, but also across the globe. The institution will carry on what is has started in the coming year of 2017 and beyond given its ongoing projects and commitments. These engagements are not just within the bounds of the project timeframe,

Annual Report 2016

but these partnerships are guided by an unwritten pact of camaraderie and solidarity. CDP is not just teaching communities to be free from harm but it provides them opportunities to lead and live a life in a world that is safe from disasters and climate change impacts.

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Core Program Milestones


Advocacy, Partnership, and Networking Program (APN) One of the core strengths of CDP is its ability to forge partnerships with different stakeholders from the international to the local level. CDP recognizes the importance of collaborating with national and local governments, civil society organizations (CSOs), the private sector, academe, and vulnerable groups in advancing and influencing the creation of inclusive policies in DRRM. Making sure that all levels are engaged helps CDP create more targeted responses, assures that future and existing programs are more responsive to the needs of marginalized and vulnerable groups, and makes sure that no one gets left behind in the process of development. CDP also provides a venue for dialogue and communication to help ensure that partners are updated and informed regarding recent developments policies, and other government or CSO-led interventions in the country. Currently, CDP serves as the Lead Convenor of the Disaster Risk Reduction Network-Philippines (DRRNetPhils) and hosts its Secretariat. Formed in 2008, DRRNetPhils is composed of CSOs, people’s organizations, and practitioners that adheres to the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (SFDRR) and institutionalization of community-based disaster risk reduction and management. As the Lead Convenor, CDP facilitates discussions and manages the network’s advocacy engagements in line with the its vision, mission and goals. It also consolidates and pushes for the CSOs’ positions on policy issues as a member of the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC). In 2016, CDP participated in various policymaking activities; organized dialogues, campaigns, and other advocacy activities with different sectors including vulnerable groups such as persons with disabilities, women, and youth; as well as lobbying activities that aimed to improve disaster


governance in the country at the national and local level. • Local Government Units (LGUs) are The following are among CDP’s most valuable contributions mandated to identify build / evacuation centers in DRR advocacy this year: • Guidelines for mandatory/forced evacuation • Emergency procurement • Creation of DRRMA Regional Grievance Desk Enhancing legislation in DRR • Revised Prohibited Acts and Penalties, which includes enumeration of acts that are considered as LGUs’ As the CSO Representative for People’s Organizations and dereliction of duty Foundations, CDP’s active participation in the NDRRMC’s review process of the Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act (R.A. 10121) has helped push for the CDP continued to provide policy input as a new inclusion of significant provisions in the draft R.A. 10121 administration transitioned in the second half of the year. It has even initiated to host a dinner for the new Amendatory Bill, such as the following: • Creation of a National DRRM Authority attached NDRRMC Executive Director/OCD Chief Administrator Undersecretary Ricardo Jalad to introduce DRRNetPhils to the Office of the President • Mainstreaming of DRR and CCA in the NDRRM members and CSO partners. This also provided a space for Usec. Jalad to discuss his vision for the Framework • Prevention, mitigation and preparedness fund NDRRMC and DRR work in the country under his leadership. for 4th to 6th class municipalities • Multi-hazard early warning and risk communication standards • Declaration of State of Imminent Danger

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Annual Report 2016

Putting local actors in the center of the new humanitarian agenda Through its leadership in DRRNetPhils, CDP supported the conduct of a National Pre-World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) CSO Forum last April 21, 2016 in collaboration with the following organizations and stakeholders: Peoples’ Disaster Risk Reduction Network (PDRRN), National Council of Churches in the Philippines (NCCP), National Secretariat for Social Action (NASSA)/Caritas Philippines, Caucus of Development NGO Networks (CODE-NGO), Partnership of Philippine Support Service Agencies (PHILSSA), and Aksyon sa Kahandaan sa Kalamidad at Klima (AKKMA). This initiative was funded by Christian Aid and hosted by the Quezon City DRRM Office through CDP’s long-time partnership with the latter. Dubbed as the “Balik-Bayan” or “Return-to-the-homeland” Campaign, the national forum called for localization of humanitarian response, shedding light on the imbalance of power and resources between international and local actors. This is evident in the current trend of less than 2% of humanitarian funding being channeled to national and local CSOs. This is counter-intuitive as the effectivity of every humanitarian response lies in local CSOs’ capacity in working with the economic, social, political and cultural landscape that must be factored in during such interventions. Balik- Official Philippine Statement in the WHS. Bayan served as a platform to discuss among Philippine CSOs their issues and recommendations leading to the WHS. Through active media engagement, the forum was caught Making DRR a priority Agenda of the new by media outlets such as Rappler/Project Agos, Philippine administration Information Agency, and CNN Philippines, among others. CDP also took the lead in mobilizing DRRNetPhils to launch its During the WHS, CDP was represented by Nikki De Vera, Barangay 911 Campaign to call on President Rodrigo Duterte Head of Training and Capacity Development Program. Also and his Cabinet members to make DRR a priority agenda. in attendance were CDP’s Deputy Executive Directors, Maria From organizing the first ever Presidential Forum on DRRFellizar-Cagay and Mayfourth Luneta, the former representing CCA back in 2015, the network launched the 911 Campaign DRRNetPhils. This was made possible through the support of (9 Calls, 1 Agenda, 1 Resilient Philippines) as a response to Mercy Malaysia, Christian Aid and Asian Disaster Preparedness Pres. Duterte’s first State of the Nation Address. This was a Center. All served as speakers during side-events and earned modification of Pres. Duterte’s call to institutionalize 911 as the praise of CSOs from other regions with the inspiration an emergency hotline throughout the country. In contrast that their sharing of good practices has brought. CDP’s active DRRNetPhils’ 911 are calls towards institutionalizing proinvolvement in the NDRRMC preparatory meetings to the WHS active measures in DRR that the current administration also helped ensure the inclusion of, “capacitating of local must take within the first 100 days. This included his actors as part of the Philippine Government commitment to certification as urgent the passage of an amendatory bill accelerating reduction of disaster and climate-risk” in the to R.A. 10121 that will establish an independent National


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Annual Report 2016

the event. CDP also facilitated DRRNetPhils’ partnership with Cycling Advocates (CYCAD) who helped organized the cycling event in the morning of the launch to raise awareness on the nine (9) calls. More than a hundred cyclists from all over the National Capital Regional participated in the bike ride.

Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Authority and directing the National Economic Development Authority (NEDA) to immediately act on Yolanda reconstruction and recovery issues, among others. This was highly appreciated by Usec. Jalad and other Senior Officers of the Office of Civil Defense who said that they will strive their best to attain All these efforts paid off as the Philippine Development Plan 2017-2022 included the establishment of the these objectives. NDRRMA through an amendment of R.A. 10121 as one of The 911 Call eventually evolved into the Barangay 911 its priority legislation in Chapter 18: Ensuring Security, Campaign, which was launched on October 13 in time for the Public Order, and Safety. As CDP celebrates this success International Day for Disaster Reduction at Barangay Bagong together with other stakeholders, it continues to engage Silangan, Quezon City. Using the “barangay” or “village” as the executive and legislative bodies to ensure that the part of the campaign signifies that change begins with the necessary provisions in the draft bill will be carried active participation of communities and emphasizes that forward. national policies and plans must have a positive impact on CDP is also currently one of the elected council members the lives of communities. of the Victims of Disaster and Calamities (VDC) Sector of Barangay 911 slightly modified its initial calls to sets out a the National Anti- Poverty Commission (NAPC) under the 9-point agenda throughout the President’s six-year term. Office of the President of the Philippines. Being in the The launch was well attended by NGAs, LGUs, private sector council provides CDP a way to further advocate for DRRM and various CSOs with the Chairperson of the NDRRMC, DND under the current administration. CDP representative Secretary Delfin Lorenzana, other Vice-chairs of the NDRRMC, in the council continues to serve as the alternate of Chief-of-Staff of Vice President Leni Robredo, and DRR the elected Sectoral Representative (SR) and leads the Champion, Bicol Representative Joey Salceda, speaking at Executive Committee of the sector and represents the

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sector in national level engagements. Further, CDP was able to assist the VDC sector and other sectors of NAPC through the conduct of CBDRRM trainings and sharing of the developments of the Sunset Review of RA 10121 to advocate for the participation of different sectors in DRRM policy and governance.

Putting local actors in the center of the new humanitarian agenda Increasing access and utilization of high-risk and low-income municipalities to the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund (NDRRMF) The National DRRM Framework indicates that the country should move towards greater allocation for prevention and mitigation interventions. However, the current utilization of the NDRRM Fund shows greater prioritization on relief, recovery, and reconstruction

Annual Report 2016

efforts. Thus, CDP lobbied for enhanced guidelines on the access of the NDRRMF or the updating of Memorandum Order No. 2 series of 1999 through the support of The Asia Foundation. To support its lobbying efforts, CDP conducted regional-wide consultations and researches in Visayas and Mindanao with LGUs that were able to access the fund for the last five (5) years. The enhanced guidelines serve as an important means for local governments, especially 4th-6th class municipalities whose local DRRM fund (LDRRMF) may not be enough to implement prevention and mitigation projects in their localities. The guidelines help mainstream the process of accessing the NDRRMF, stipulating that LGUs should be able to access the fund in just 30 days, previously at 3-5 months. In addition, the process has now become more localized and efficient with the Regional Team composed of some members of the Regional DRRMC (RDRRMC), which should include a CSO representative, taking the lead in assessing the request from their covered areas and recommending it to the NDRRMC. The NDRRMC then endorses it to the Office of the President for final


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approval. This cuts down on the processing time as requests will not be reverted back to the RDRRMC after having passed through the NDRRMC, OP and relevant National Government Agency for further validation. Such process improvement can contribute to the fulfillment of the mandate of LGUs to build safe and resilient communities.

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displaced due to disasters and climate change; (iv) ensure that DRR plans and development strategies are disaster and climate risk-informed; and (v) uphold the right to development of marginalized and vulnerable communities and sectors. The statement was disseminated during the 7th AMCDRR through DRRNetPhils whose participation was supported by Oxfam.

Influencing the development of the SFDRR Moving Forward Asia Regional Implementation Plan CDP also took the lead in gathering inputs from DRRNetPhils’ members for the drafting of the Asia Regional Implementation Plan which was adopted in the 7th Asian Ministerial Conference (AMCDRR) on DRR last November in New Delhi, India. This was submitted to the NDRRMC and Asian Disaster Reduction and Response Network, where CDP serves as the Vice-Chair. CDP was also part of ADRRN’s drafting committee for its CSO Group Statement. It also reached out to its fellow Aksyon Klima members in the drafting of the Philippine DRRCCA CSO Statement to the AMCDRR where it called on States and other stakeholders to: (i) address underlying risk drivers; (ii) increase investment in disaster prevention and climate adaptation activities; (iii) protect the rights of persons

Through its Advocacy, Partnership and Networking Program, CDP was able to fulfill its role as a conduit of vulnerable groups to the duty-bearers, capturing the experiences and struggles of communities and bringing them to the policymaking table. Given new and emerging spaces to conduct advocacies such as social media and web-based platforms, CDP also innovates its methods to reach the greater public in the course of its information dissemination and influencing. Indeed, the future is rife with possibilities on how the political landscape will unfold in the Philippines. Throughout this, CDP will remain vigilant and continue to push for spaces where communities can meaningfully participate to determine their path towards sustainable development and resilience.


Research, Knowledge Exchange, and Management Program (RKEM) The Research, Knowledge Exchange, and Management (RKEM) Program works toward conducting relevant research to develop and institutionalize CBDRRM at multiple levels of engagement—from local to global—and with several sectors of society. It undertakes projects for knowledge sharing and management to advance and promote CBDRRM. 2016 saw the start and continuation of several research projects, as well as initiatives for knowledge exchange and management to mainstream awareness of helpful and empowering CBDRRM practices, in line with the organization’s goals and advocacies. It engaged with multiple strands of society—from local government units to civil society organizations—to strengthen linkages among the different stakeholders in DRRM. RKEM’s primary mandate within the organization is to create, disseminate, and manage a body of research and knowledge dedicated to developing and strengthening CBDRRM and its related concepts. Thus, the program efforts for the year were mainly directed towards achieving this goal.

Research Frontline Project In January, RKEM entered its second year of engagement with the Frontline project under the Global Network of Civil Society Organizations for Disaster Reduction (GNDR), which aimed to collate the various views, threats, and perceptions of local communities, and turn these into activities which would address their vulnerabilities to disasters. With CDP serving as the National Coordinating Organization in the Philippines, RKEM partnered with local civil society organizations (CSOs) and people’s organizations (POs) including Buklod Tao, Caritas Manila, Ecosystems Work for Essential Benefits (ECOWEB), Research Group for Alternatives to Development, Inc. (A2D), University of the Philippines Visayas Foundation, Inc. (UPVFI), and Tri-people’s Organization Against Disasters (TRIPOD) to gather data for the development of case studies in San Mateo, Rizal; Calauan, Laguna; Guiuan, Eastern Samar; Tabogon, Cebu; and Carles, Iloilo. In February, RKEM presented its research findings which were used to develop information materials, as well as a video documentary on the local situation in San Mateo, Rizal and Carles, Iloilo. To end the year’s engagement under Frontline, RKEM accomplished the National Report and Final Report for Year 2 which were submitted to GNDR.


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Annual Report 2015

Child-centered researches For this year, RKEM engaged in two child-centered researches. One of these is a continuation of the previous year’s engagement with Plan International. For the second year of research for the project entitled “Strengthening Resilience to Disasters among Vulnerable Urban Poor Communities in Metro Manila”, the aim was to study the localization of child-protection mechanisms in the covered cities of the project: Quezon City, San Juan City, and Valenzuela City. RKEM conducted a review of child-centered DRRM toolkits, creation of a review of related literature, and carried out data-gathering initiatives in the covered cities of the project. RKEM’s other child-centered research engagement was for CDP’s project with United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) entitled, “Disaster Risk Reduction through Education and Managing Barangay Integrated Goals toward Disaster Resilient Communities and Schools” (DRREAM BIG) in the municipalities of Dalnac and Paracale in the province of Camarines Norte. Through key informant interviews and focus group discussions in the communities in Dalnac and Paracale, RKEM developed the project’s final report and wrote three case stories highlighting the role of the municipal duty bearers, teachers, and children and youth in DRRM. Disability-inclusion research Furthering its advocacy towards inclusion, CDP forged a partnership with CBM International in the project entitled, “CBM and Partners Capacity Development on Disability-Inclusive Disaster Risk Preparedness and Emergency Response”. Lodged under RKEM in tandem with TCD, the project involved two main components: capacity building and research and knowledge exchange. Its capacity building component aimed to build and enhance the capacity of CBM Country Team and its strategic partners to raise their commitment towards preparing for planning and designing programs that contribute to preventing and responding to crisis on the basis of capacity development undertaken. The project’s research and knowledge exchange component aimed to facilitate knowledge generation and sharing through thematic learning events, documentation of good practices, and lessons learned workshop.

As one of its tasks for the year, RKEM commenced with the documentation of good practices of CBM and its partner organizations. RKEM has started with desk reviews and some initial data gathering, while plans have been set for the next year to visit the partners in their covered areas, and conduct key informant interviews and focus group discussions with stakeholders. Accountability research Delving into the realm of accountability, RKEM researchers worked under the global initiative, Making All Voices Count, dedicated to advocating for transparency and accountability in the public and private sectors. RKEM participated in a research design workshop for the project “Revisiting tools and platforms that support accountability to affected population during emergencies in the Philippines” to prepare 15


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Annual Report 2016

for next year’s data gathering activities, and already com- BIRC project and the partnership project with the American menced with several key informant interviews and focus Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) entitled, “Towards group discussions in Metro Manila and Tacloban, Leyte. Resilience and Building Back Better for Bohol Communities in the Aftermath of Earthquake and Supertyphoon Haiyan”. Advocacy research Internal Research Tasks RKEM collaborated with the APN Program on several research engagements. One was an investigation of the mechanisms Aside from its deliverables under its covered projects and and utilization of the National Disaster Risk Reduction and activities, RKEM has conducted meaningful internally-driven Management Fund in different regions in the country, while researches that delve into the current critical issues in the the other was an exploration of the participation of CSOs in realm of DRRM. DRRM. RKEM has carried out a comparative study on the role of the Humanitarian research media in reporting DRRM-related news, taking a close look at news coverages of typhoons over the years. RKEM also One of CDP’s most recent area of concentration is in the penned an article called “Waves of Resilience”, which was realm of humanitarian work. Through a project with Chris- included in the World Disaster Report of 2016 published by tian Aid, RKEM assisted in the translation and layout of the the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Core Humanitarian Standards in Filipino and Cebuano. In Societies. addition, RKEM developed fourteen case stories spanning a wide array of themes: humanitarian principles, culture and Knowledge Exchange diversity, women’s rights, accountability and participation, people management, working with others, and stress and As part of the knowledge exchange component of the prowell-being. gram, RKEM organized several learning events for the year. Baseline and Endline Studies RKEM ushered the start and end to several projects in CDP through its conduct of baseline and endline studies. RKEM completed baseline studies for two projects: “Building Inclusive, Resilient Community; Better Shared Local Risk Governance in Giporlos, Quinapondan and Salcedo” (BIRC Project) and “Project Elevate: Marig-on Estehanon,” both conducted in Eastern Samar. It also completed the endline study for the

Under the Frontline project, RKEM led a series of workshops covering various issues in DRRM. The first was the National Report presentation wherein speakers from the partner CSOs discussed the results of the conducted data-gathering activities in their regional areas. The next event was a forum under the Sendai Spring Campaign, wherein stakeholders from different sectors—women, children, persons with disability, older persons—were able to voice out feasible action steps to reduce communities’ risks to hazards and


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Annual Report 2016

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enhance their sustainability. The next two workshops under Frontline were dubbed “Talakayan para sa Kaalamang Wasto tungo sa Ligtas na Pamayanan”, or “Talakawayan” for short. One involved a showcase of Disability- Inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction (DiDRR) good practices of Buklod Tao and a family preparedness orientation in Barangay Banaba, San Mateo, Rizal; this was also the venue for launching the Frontline case stories. The other learning event under Talakawayan aimed to showcase the good practices of at-risk communities in their existing disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM) projects and programs; and also launch the compilation of CDP case stories called, “Stories from the Ground: A Collection of Inspiring Stories of Resilience”. The last learning event participated in by RKEM was under the BIRC Project. In the LGU Forum on Participatory Budgeting and Resource Mobilization, distinguished resource speakers came to share their knowledge and experiences regarding the role of government units in participatory budgeting and resource mobilization, the good practices in DRR participatory budgeting, factors to be considered in participatory budgeting, as well as corresponding challenges and lessons learned.

Graduate Student Research Conference and the College of Mass Communication. RKEM also got to partake in international conferences such as the Shanghai Forum 2016, with the theme, “Economic Globalization and the Choice of Asia: Interconnectivity, Integration, and Innovation: Building Community of Common Destiny in Asia and 2016 Annual Conference on Southeast Asian Studies in Taiwan that focused on, “The Politics of Transformation in Southeast Asia: Towards A People-centered Agenda.”

Aside from these learning events, RKEM also took part in external engagements. RKEM presented their studies in academic conference presentations in the University of the Philippines College of Social Sciences and Philosophy

RKEM also came to represent CDP in conferences and workshops such as the National Research and Development Conference of the Department of Science and Technology, and workshop on the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction with the New Castle University in Australia. Similarly under the knowledge exchange component, RKEM aimed to strengthen the organization and its advocacies’ visibility through the development of a module on public awareness under the DRREAM BIG project, and the showcasing of the CDP Poster in Frontline learning events, Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG) Oplan Handa exhibit, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)-organized conference, Christian Aid Conference, and the Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (AMCDRR). As part of its mandate to develop and exchange knowledge


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locally and internationally, RKEM supervised two interns from The Netherlands and Australia in their undergraduate researches.

Knowledge Management RKEM’s role under the knowledge management component is to manage and maintain the institution’s knowledge products and resources. For this year, RKEM was able to develop institutional publications such as the CDP 2015 Annual Report, and a compilation of drafts for the upcoming CDP Anniversary Book. Likewise, it was able to publish the “Stories from the Ground: A Collection of Inspiring Stories of Resilience”, which features the good practices, challenges, and lessons learned of CDP’s partners in realizing safe, resilient, and developed communities. RKEM also undertook an inventory of CDP researches and program activities to internally manage and organize CDP’s activities. Additionally, RKEM assisted other projects under PPP and TCD in the creative packaging of their reports. What’s more, RKEM was able to produce video documentaries for various projects such as for Frontline, the JDC Bohol Project, BIRC, and Barangay 911.

Monitoring and Evaluation The RKEM team worked with the Training and Capacity Development Program to conduct multiple monitoring and evaluation (M&E) workshops for partner communities under the second phase of the project “Strengthening Urban Communities’ Capacity to Endure Severe Shocks” (SUCCESS) with Catholic Relief Services. The first phase of the M&E workshops was conducted in June, while the second phase of the workshops for partner communities was conducted in November, and worked towards creating a module for M&E.

Capacity Building Activities RKEM participated in numerous internal training sessions to improve their capabilities to serve and capacitate communities. They attended workshops on gender sensitivity, monitoring and evaluation (M&E), communication work, advocacy work, planning, humanitarian action, project development, strategic and inclusive DRRM, module development, and the basics of finance. Members of the RKEM staff also conducted several capacity building sessions. RKEM, in partnership with TCD, led several training-workshop activities, the first of which was the CBM and Partners Project Inception Workshop and Training of Trainers in September. The Project Inception Workshop aimed to orient the participants regarding the project objectives, activities, and expectations and to set their commitments for future project activities. The Training of Trainers, utilizing the

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Lahat Handa module as guide, capacitated partners with the concepts, tools and application of disability inclusive disaster risk reduction and management and climate change adaptation. Partner organizations in attendance during these activities include: Adaptive Technology for Rehabilitation, Integration and Empowerment of the Visually Impaired (ATRIEV), Bethsaida CBR Services for the Disabled Inc., Kasamaka CBR Foundation Inc., Loving Presence Foundation Inc, Philippine Coordinating Center for Inclusive Development Inc. (PCCID), Sorsogon Integrated Health Services Foundation, Inc. (SIHSFI), Tahanang Walang Hagdanan, Inc., and Center for Disaster Preparedness (CDP). The second capacity building under the partnership project was “Prospect in Retrospect: Mainstreaming Disability-Inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction in Programming Framework of Engaged Partners,” held at Tiaong, Quezon in November. In this 5-day training-workshop, three focal partner organizations of CBM—Bethsaida CBR Services for the Disabled Inc., Sorsogon Integrated Health Services Foundation Inc. and Loving Presence Foundation Inc.—underwent an organizational development process of mainstreaming DIDRRM in their programming framework through visioning activities, organizational assessment, policy review and formulation, and planning for mainstreaming and organizational continuity. Aside from these, RKEM also assisted HPRP in developing the modules and carrying out the sessions for the “49 HOPE Christian Aid Rapid Response and Assessment Team (CARRAT) Training”, which aimed to strengthen the capacity of Christian Aid partners in humanitarian preparedness and response.

Advocacy Activities Throughout the year, RKEM spearheaded and took part in various activities which strengthened its relationship with entities on a national and international level. As participants, RKEM members were involved in a workshop on nationwide surveys on disaster preparedness and resilience with the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, a meeting with the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) for the development of a National DRRM Status Report, the Project Elevate Inception Workshop in Tacloban City, and the summit of the Global Network of Civil Society Organizations for Disaster Risk Reduction (GNDR). RKEM likewise participated as documentors in the launch of “Barangay 911: Tugon sa Tawag ng Panahon,” an advocacy campaign that aims to raise awareness on the nine (9) calls-for-action towards addressing key issues on the DRRM system in the Philippines.


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2016 saw a significant increase in the Center for Disaster Preparedness’ online presence especially in the social media sphere. Facebook and Twitter were the primary online channels for campaigns, news, and online content used by the organization, these two being the platforms most widely used by Filipinos who top the ranking worldwide for the longest average time spent on social media at 4.17 hours (Digital in 2017). CDP shared news about the organization and updates about its projects using images, videos, .GIFs, and PDFs reaching up to 288,985 unique users and delivered 596,796 times to user’s news feeds in Facebook.

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A closer look at the audience engaged by CDP’s Facebook Page reveals that women from the 25-34 age group were the online users most engaged by the page’s posts. They read and shared content, and visited the page more compared to users from the opposite sex and other age groups.

This is consistent with the people CDP engages in its grassroots endeavors because the same age and sex group are also the usual targets in community trainings of the organization in disaster preparedness. CDP recognizes the role of women in disaster risk reduction, especially in the dissemination of knowledge and skills in DRR to other members From just 3,140 Page Likes in Facebook in 2015, CDP had 7,856 of their family that empower them to prepare for hazards, Page Likes at the end of 2016. That’s an increase of 4,716 or 13 manage risks, and build resilience. new page likes a day. Its Twitter page also tweeted more and acquired new contacts or followers the same year.

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The story that received the most number of reactions, comments, and engagement was posted on June 20, 2016, which featured the organization’s dedicated and passionate staff in ’17 and counting’ filter. Everyone in the organization contributed to the wider reach of the post by linking it to their profile picture and adding an important message from the executive director, Ms. Loreine Dela Cruz:

“If we do not empower our partners to act toward their resilience, then all our efforts will have been for naught.”


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Efforts to sustain social media presence will all be in vain as well in the absence of a good, effective, user-friendly, and updated online space that is a website. So towards the tail end of 2016, a newer, fresher, and hip CDP website was conceptualized, developed, and launched. It features everything that online users, stakeholders, donors, and funders would need to know about the organization and its work with communities — VMG and history, staff profiles, its core programs, and featured projects. From the predominantly green and bamboo-laden website developed in 2011 by student members of UP CURSOR, a student organization of computer science majors from the University of the Philippines - Diliman, the new website now comes in clean and slick white backgrounds and highlights images from CDP’s various engagements from local implementation of DRR projects to global DRR conferences.

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The website also now maintains a news page where updates and activities are published regularly, enabling its donors and partners to access relevant information on projects and activities as they happen. In addition to this, it features a page where anyone could sign up as volunteer and play a key role in simulation drills, advocacy, learning events, training and mentoring sessions, IEC materials development, data gathering, and/or relief operations carried out by its various programs. Visit http://cdp.org.ph to find out more about how you can get involved. The communications team of CDP continues to come up with ways to better relay important messages and lessons in resilience. These lessons come from the people in the community we partner with, from the experience of CDP’s core programs, and from the ever-growing network of CSOs and LGUs working together in DRR where we are involved in. CDP ramped up its social media presence in 2016. CDP will try to reach even wider online audience and innovate in developing CDP’s knowledge materials so as to enjoin and encourage everyone in the culture of safety and preparedness this 2017.


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Onwards to 2017 As RKEM faces 2017, it aims to strengthen its mandate in producing relevant researches and publications, by beefing up both its external and internal research engagements. While it continues with research activities for current projects, and also looks forward to the commencement of new projects such as the New York University Research on Storm Surge Communication, RKEM endeavors to bolster its program-driven research specific to critical issues in development: disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction and management, humanitarian response, governance, climate change, poverty and livelihood. RKEM shall likewise sustain its assistance to other CDP programs in scoping studies, module writing, and capacity building activities pertinent to RKEM’s staffs’ expertise. RKEM is also priming for several knowledge exchange activities, particularly learning events such as the National Advocacy Workshop for the first part of the year, round table discussion and lessons learned workshop under the partnership project with CBM in the second quarter, and the National Conference on DIDRR in the second half of the year. Moreover, RKEM shall undertake continuous representation in round table discussions, conferences, and speaking engagements. RKEM aspires to attain two major milestones for the following year. Under its knowledge management component, RKEM intends to development its own public awareness materials and knowledge products to enhance CDP’s visibility and be able to spread the organization’s cause to a wider audience. Under its monitoring and evaluation mandate, it endeavors to finally develop an institutional monitoring and evaluation strategy to check the status of core programs and assess whether they are meeting their objectives vis-a-vis CDP’s vision, mission, and goals. Indeed, for 2017, RKEM remains hopeful and driven to accomplish more meaningful initiatives, looking to gain institutional priority in developmental endeavors which will not only improve and optimize the organizational flow and operations, but will certainly help in attaining a robust Philippines. Indeed, RKEM team has conveyed its readiness to face coming tasks, challenges, and difficulties that entail the journey toward a safe, resilient, and sustainable Philippines.  

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Training and Capacity Development A wave of change is moving throughout the Philippines and the world. In its wake, the Filipino family not only has to learn to adapt to the country’s erratic seasonal changes but to its evolving political and social climate as well. In light of these natural and social hazards and as a front-runner in the practice of CBDRRM, CDP continues to place the safety, resilience, and development of local communities at the forefront. In 2016, with the goal of adjusting to the changing needs of both right-holders and duty-bearers, the TCD program responded through further enriching its core competency of capacity building in CBDRRM. This was achieved through the adaptation of new proficiencies such as the development of Local Climate Change Action Plans, the acquisition of new technologies and tools, and the enhancement of modules and training guides. In total, the program was able to conduct eighty-eight (88) project-related trainings, twenty-nine (29) external engagements, and eighty (80) inter-program activities. These engagements with multi-level and multi-sectoral stakeholders provided the opportunity for the dedicated members of the TCD program to exercise their ingenuity and notable skills in capacity development to create comprehensive and inclusive learning environments for local and international partners. Some of the engagements conducted by the program include courses on Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation, Emergency Response, Risk and Assessment (Hazard, Capacity and Vulnerability Assessment); CBDRRM trainings that include the development of Early Warning Systems, simulation exercises and drills, and DRRM Planning and Contingency Planning; specialized capacity building in DRRM such as child-centered DRRM and inclusive DRRM with a focus on people with disability; training management; capacity-building in climate change adaptation; and scoping exercises. The following are the capacity-building DRRM projects lodged under the management of the TCD program for the year 2016: Planning for Resilience and Effective Preparedness (PREP) CDP maintains its role in strengthening the DRRM capacities of partners and local actors through the project Planning for Resilience and Effective Preparedness (PREP). The project, a product of the continuous engagement between CDP and Catholic Relief Services (CRS), began in June 2015 and focused on the Yolanda-stricken municipalities of Palo and Tanauan in the province of Leyte. Through a series of training-of-trainers workshops, CDP provided technical assistance and capacity development on all aspects of CBDRRM to CRS social mobilization officers, field assistants, and members of the two Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Councils (MDRRMCs). The latter half of the eighteen-month project was implemented during the first and second quarter of 2016. The project activities during this time were designed with the goal of enhancing the existing capacities of local government leaders and MDRRMCs in resolution writing, public awareness, development of IEC campaigns, early warning system, and school risk assessment. CRS staff, representatives of the Palo and Tanauan MDRRMCs, and representatives from Handicap International were taught through a series of comprehensive training-of-trainers workshops that would eventually prepare them for the practicum sessions in the field, which were conducted in the barangays of the two municipalities.


One of the major undertakings of the project was the Typhoon-Storm Surge Drill that was conducted in the village of San Joaquin, Palo, on April 24, 2016. During the activity, the team, in coordination with the BDRRMC, was able to mobilize local responders and a majority of the families residing in the target areas to participate in the simulation exercise. Another remarkable milestone for TCD was the development and implementation of the Household Preparedness Plan. The guiding principle for the program has always been capacitating and strengthening localities through community-based methods. Returning to this approach, the team understood that the strength and resilience of a community begins in the household. Furthermore, higher level planning and decision-making can be rooted from the data and insight gathered from this level. As the project winded to a close in June 2016, it was imperative to the PREP project team that the leaps and gains achieved throughout the course of the undertaking not go to waste. TCD took several steps as a means of ensuring sustainability of these gains. Through the workshop in resolution writing, the project was able to provide insight in the creation of local legislation as a means of strengthening DRRM efforts. The project team is also aware of the value of knowledge management and documenting new approaches that can be used in future capacity-building activities. Because of this, the team provided the enhancement and layout of all seven PREP modules (HHPP, ZLRA, BDRRMP-CP, Public Awareness, and Simulation Exercise) that can serve as a guide for similar undertakings. Lastly, the team conducted several monitoring visits to coach and mentor the members of the CRS staff and to provide further input on best practices and strategies in CBDRRM.

Strengthening Urban Communities’ Capacity to Endure Severe Shocks (SUCCESS 2)

The TCD program has always held up a banner for continuous growth and adaptation through the improvement of its training strategies and the acquisition of new tools. SUCCESS 2 is a testament to this belief. Phase two of the project Strengthening Urban Communities’ Capacity to Endure Severe Shocks (SUCCESS) ran from April 15 to December 15, 2016. As with the first phase, SUCCESS 2 is funded by OFDA-USAID and implemented through a partnership between CRS and Diocesan Social Action Center (DSAC). CDP was once again tapped to provide technical guidance and comprehensive capacity building for the four (4) DSAC partner staff and to strengthen the DRRM capacity of eight (8) new project barangays, amounting to a total of twenty-two (22) barangays (including the fourteen [14] from phase one). 27


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The project aimed to enhance the resilience of communities in and around Metro Manila that are vulnerable to the onslaught of flooding, typhoons, and other hazards. In order to ensure sustainability and mainstreaming, the project engaged with local duty-bearers such as the barangay DRR committee, barangay council, and local CSOs. Local champions and right-holders in the community were also encouraged to actively participate in the activities. The project sites include Brgys 101 and 160 in Manila, Brgy. Sta. Ana in Taytay, Rizal, Brgy. Poblacion Ibaba in Angono, Rizal, Brgy. Tanza in Navotas City, Brgy. Longos in Malabon City, Brgy. Arkong Nato in Valenzuela, Brgy. Bayugo in Meycauayan, and Brgy. San Pascual in Obando, Bulacan. SUCCESS 2 provided an opportunity for the organization to build on the gains achieved during the previous phase. The project team, composed of select members of the TCD program, wanted to ensure that the communities would be able to understand the highly technical concepts being transferred. In order to do so, technical topics regarding risk assessment and analysis were simplified. The training team also made use of creative and participatory facilitation techniques that encouraged participation. One such strategy is the Problem Tree, a CRA analysis tool used to root out the main causes of issues in the community. Other tools introduced were Town Watching for the Community Risk Assessment, SWOC analysis for the CRA analysis, and Monitoring and Evaluation tools like Puno ng Kahandaan, Mapa ng Kaunlaran, and Community Score Card. CDP also capacitated the CRS DSAC partners through the development of a How-to Guide to facilitate the analysis and processing of CRA results into planning templates. The new contingency plan forms provided by the Office of the Civil Defense were also introduced during the workshops. By the end of the timeline, the project was able to produce barangay DRRM plans and craft initial monitoring and evaluation plans for the communities. Through the interactive training sessions, support of the partners, and guidance from the TCD team, the project was able to develop a rich, inclusive learning environment as well as change the perspective of community members from mere participants to stakeholders committed to change and resilience.

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Philippine Disaster Recovery Foundation-Negosyong Pitogo, Negosyong Nagpapatuloy In 2016, the Center for Disaster Preparedness entered into two separate engagements with Philippine Disaster Recovery Foundation (PDRF). The first is project Negosyong Pitogo, Negosyong Nagpapatuloy: Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction and Management with Business Continuity Planning Integration. The project, named after its target area, Brgy. Pitogo in Makati City, is funded by Hong Kong Shanghai Banking Corporation (HSBC). Phase one of the project, which began in April 2016, aimed to boost the resilience of Brgy. Pitogo through enhancing its measures for response, early recovery, and reconstruction. Negosyong Pitogo sought to strengthen the community’s economic capacities against disasters by developing Business Continuity Plans (BCPs) that are integrated with existing DRR plans. A “Whole of Society” approach to DRRM advocates that the active involvement of all sectors is necessary in achieving heightened community resilience. As main implementer of the project, PDRF recognized the importance of the private sector’s contribution in disaster risk reduction. In order to enhance the capacities of the sector, CDP was engaged to increase the risk management awareness of the members of the Pitogo Business Association, Barangay DRRM Committee, and local government partners through workshops on basic risk assessment tools that integrate BCP and CBDRRM. As a front liner in the practices of community-based disaster risk reduction and management, CDP has had numerous experiences in capacitating local barangay and LGUs. The engagement with PDRF gave CDP an opportunity to learn beyond its usual engagements with the community. Through the project, the team gained knowledge in the development of the Business Continuity Plan and how it can be integrated with CRA tools through participatory and community-based processes. The workshop experience with small and medium business owners also provided CDP a different perspective on how BCP works at the community level and how it can be used to enrich the existing DRR plans and measures in a barangay. Despite being the first engagement that the organization had with PDRF, the training team from the TCD program was able to deliver accomplishments beyond initial expectations. The team facilitated the development of Business Continuity Plans


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and its integration onto existing DRR Plans in the barangay. They also conducted six (6) batches of CRA-BCP trainings for all seven (7) puroks and a three-day Contingency Planning Workshop for the identified BCP champions of each purok. Other activities include a two-day planning workshop, simulation exercises planning session, and actual Tabletop Simulation Exercise.

Building Resilient and Economically Adept Communities and Households The second engagement with PDRF began on June 2016 and ended in October of the same year. Project BREACH stands for Building Resilient and Economically Adept Communities and Households. The project, which is funded by USAID and U-Freight, was developed as a form of intervention for some of the survivors of Super Typhoon Haiyan, which struck in 2013. After the super typhoon hit Tacloban City, thousands were displaced from their homes close to the areas that were dubbed danger zones. Some of these communities were chosen as beneficiaries awaiting resettlement in city-selected areas in Tacloban North. Despite the efforts of government and non-government agencies to remove internally displaced persons (IDP) from high-risk areas, the fact remains that risks still exist and can affect the welfare, livelihood, and overall safety of these communities. Because of this, CBDRRM is especially significant for IDPs in order to strengthen their resilience and improve their odds against future disasters.

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The project BREACH has three major components: (1) safe, adequate, and appropriate transitional shelters with access to basic facilities provided; (2) more resilient jobs, livelihoods, and value chains established; and (3) strengthened community capacity on disaster preparedness. Having proved its forte in capacity development, CDP was once again engaged by PDRF for the last component of project BREACH. The TCD program sent in a team of trainers to conduct a two-day CBDRRM orientation for six batches of beneficiaries from the areas of Magallanes, Anibong, and Sagkahan. These trainings were conducted over the course of several months from July to October 2016. In order to design the workshop to the specific needs of the beneficiaries, the team integrated UNOCHA’s Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement into the basic CBDRRM module used for the trainings. These innovations created a distinct learning atmosphere for the training in comparison to the other engagements of the organization. Aside from teaching, the participants about disaster preparedness, the workshops doubled as venues for survivors to voice their experiences as disaster survivors and their concerns for their wellbeing. Upon completion of the training series, the participants were able to have a more comprehensive understanding of disasters and the state and risk level of their own communities. Their knowledge regarding DRRM has significantly increased as seen in the pre and post-test means. The CBDRRM Orientation series has been enough as a starting point for an initial capacity building that will hopefully lead to longer and more sustainable engagements and initiatives. Perhaps a connection between the LGU and the community can be established so as to prepare for the relocation of the families. Resettlement and relocation pose great challenges toward the IDP families of Tacloban City. In spite of this hardship, the communities have gained a perspective on the importance of preparedness against risks and potential disasters. At the end of the training series, the communities of Project


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BREACH displayed an increase in their awareness—and ultimately—their capacities when it comes to DRRM and improving the safety of communities and families.

Applying Space-Based Technology and Information and Communication Technology to Strengthen Disaster Resilience in the Philippines Engagements with the private sector have provided CDP with opportunities for learning and technological innovation. One such engagement is the project entitled Applying Space-Based Technology and Information and Communication Technology to Strengthen Disaster Resilience in the Philippines. The project is part of the program Regional Capacity Development Technical Assistance (R-CDTA), which is initiated by The Asian Development Bank and funded by Japan Fund for Poverty Reduction. The goal of R-CDTA is to strengthen the local capacity to efficiently gather and share reliable disaster-related data using Space-Based technology (SBT) and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) at the National, Regional, and Community level. To achieve this goal, the program has sought the technical assistance of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Asian Disaster Reduction Center (ADRC), Remote Sensing Technology Center, and Geothings. ADB has also partnered with the Geoinformatics Center at The Asian Institute of Technology to implement the project in four pilot countries: Armenia, Bangladesh, Fiji, and The Philippines. In the Philippines, the project was implemented in two provinces. In Agusan del Sur, Barangays Awao and Sayon in Sta. Josefa were the chosen sites while Barangays Walay and Rizal in Padre Burgos were picked in Quezon province. The project, which is expected to run from December 2015 to June 2017, has a national project team composed of sev-

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eral private, non-government, and government entities. Asian Development Bank has taken up the role of team leader, SRDP Consulting Incorporated as mapping consultant, CDP as consultant on CBDRRM, and Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) through the KALAHI-CIDSS program as the implementing government agency. CDP, through its TCD program, has fulfilled its role of providing technical assistance and guidance through the conduct of CBDRRM activities such as Community Risk Assessment, Contingency Planning, BDRRM Planning, and Simulation Exercise. During the implementation of these activities, CDP has ensured that the new technology being introduced is properly integrated in the CBDRRM practices at the barangay level. TCD has contributed largely to the success of the project by providing knowledge about CBDRRM, which was used in the development of the methodology for the integration of SBT and ICT tools in DRRM. Apart from this, the team also provided support in the development of the strategy and the policy guidelines for SBT and ICT applications in CBDRRM. TCD has also utilized its primary competency as a program by spearheading the training activities of the project at the national, regional, and local government scales. Among the notable trainings that TCD facilitated are the Contingency Planning and Town Watching Training of Trainers for the staff of the National DSWD, Training of Trainers in Community Simulation Exercise for Regional staff of DSWD in Region IV-A and CARAGA Region, and community trainings on the conduct of community risk assessment, contingency planning, and BDRRM planning. TCD also assisted the mapping consultant in community trainings such as OSM mapping, geo mapping, town watching, and crisis mapping. Certainly, CDP’s most notable milestones in this project lie in the integration of its time-tested concepts and practices


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with technological advancements in DRRM. Using the risk assessment data generated from the ICT and community risk assessment tools, CDP was able to adapt the technological innovations of the project by helping the pilot communities integrate crisis mapping in their contingency plans. As a result, Barangays Sayon, Awao, and Walay were able to formulate their flood contingency plans while Barangay Rizal formulated its first contingency plan in storm surge. These contingency plans were tested in the four pilot communities through barangay tabletop simulation and drill exercises using software 2 (mobile applications—crisis mapping) and software 3 (web GIS). Finally, TCD also assisted these four areas in formulating their 2018-2020 Barangay DRRM plans with technology and science-based projects, programs, and activities in the four thematic areas of DRRM.

Disaster Risk Reduction through Education and Managing Barangay Integrated Goals Towards Disaster Resilient Communities (DRREAM BIG)

It is the belief of CDP that children play an integral part in the process of strengthening more sustainable communities and harnessing the capacity and participation of young people is essential to develop more holistic approaches to risk management. Founded on this belief, CDP partnered with UNICEF to implement Disaster Risk Reduction through Education and Managing Barangay Integrated Goals Towards Disaster Resilient Communities, more aptly known as the DRREAM BIG project. Phase one of the two-year undertaking was lodged under the TCD program and ran from April 2014 to July 2016. The project, which is funded by UNIQLO and the Margaret A. Cargill (MAC) Foundation, is currently in its second phase. DRREAM BIG was implemented in the municipali-

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ties of Basud and Paracale in Camarines Norte. Two focus schools and two barangays per municipality were chosen— barangay Taba-Taba and San Felipe in Basud and barangay Dalnac and Labnig in Paracale. DRREAM BIG anchored on two main objectives. The first was to assist the local government units (LGUs) in integrating child risk and vulnerability assessments in their local planning processes and ensure the involvement of young people in risk management. The second was to assist project communities in their pursuit for appropriate resources and capacitate them with the necessary knowledge, skills, and systems that will help these communities to adopt, promote, and sustain behaviors and practices that improve safety and increase resilience to stresses and shocks. In 2016, the activities of DRREAM BIG mainly focused on the completion of activities from the previous year. The implementation of several DRR activities, which were composed of prevention, mitigation, and preparedness measures, were completed during the first quarter of 2016. These activities were implemented with the goal of strengthening the existing capacities of the project sites. Some of these measures include the construction of restrooms and streetlights for Taba-Taba, drainage de-clogging for barangay Dalnac, the establishment of a DRR clinic for San Felipe, and the construction of comfort rooms and water systems for Labnig. Another notable endeavor were the efforts of the Sangguniang Bayan of Paracale to lobby for the passage of a municipal ordinance prioritizing the participation and representation of young people in venues for decision-making bodies. This would ensure the involvement of children and youth in BDRRM council sessions, meetings, and other decision-making processes. The ordinance passed three readings before being disrupted by the 2016 elections. Champions from the municipality continue to push for the agenda


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of young people and for the sustainability of the project gains despite unforeseen setbacks and challenges. However, above all these, the most noteworthy activity of that year was the conduct of the tabletop simulation and flood drills. These simulation exercises served as a testing ground for the knowledge and skills that the communities gained throughout their trainings and workshops. Phase one of DRREAM BIG ended with a culminating activity that served as a venue for showcasing the project’s lessons learned, best practices, and achievements. The activity allowed members of the project and training team, duty-holders from the project areas, and various stakeholders to celebrate the victories achieved and learn from the challenges they encountered during the two-year undertaking. Phase one of DRREAM BIG not only achieved the myriad of goals it set to accomplish but also allowed CDP to build a strong bond of partnership and commitment with the province of Camarines Sur toward the joint vision of safer, child-centered, and more resilient communities.

Other engagements of the program Major undertakings such as the projects stated above can take a great amount of time and manpower from the program. In spite of this, TCD still manages to stay true to its vision of strengthening the capacities of multi-level and multi-sectoral partners through other minor short-term commitments. The variety of the engagements TCD partakes in has helped the program develop a rich and diverse menu of capacity building activities that can be custom-fit to address the needs of its recipients. The year saw TCD engage in three capacity-building engagements with the Office of Civil Defense in Region 2 and NCR. These activities mainly focused on CBDRRM and BIG module

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training. Other engagements include pro-bono services for Lingap Pangkabataan and Adventist Community Service, BIG training for Philippine Public Safety College, and CSWCD BDRRRM planning lecture. One of the unique highlights for the year was an engagement with the government of Islamabad, Pakistan through a Training of Trainers on Inclusive Community Risk Assessment. Like the Philippines, Pakistan is no stranger to high-risk situations; the country and its communities are vulnerable to natural disasters, armed conflict, and climate change. In the light of this disaster context, Concern Worldwide (CW) and its consortium partners (International Rescue Committee, Welthungerhilfe, and ACTED) have implemented the Building Disaster Resilience in Pakistan Programme (BDRP) with funding support from DFID. The overall goal of the BDRP Programme is “ increased capacity to reduce disaster risk, through better planning, preparedness, response, and resource allocation at community levels” through Community-Based Disaster Risk Management.


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CDP, a technical partner in the BDRP Programme, was tapped by CW Concern Worldwide for the ToT on Inclusive Community Risk Assessment (ICRA). The training was especially timely in preparation for the Risk and Resiliency Profiling Tool, which was being finalized for uptake in the union councils and villages in project areas in the Punjab and Sindh provinces. The TCD program originally planned to conduct the trainings in person in Islamabad; however, constraints over logistics and manpower proved a challenge to this plan. Despite this, the program was able to form a CDP Training Team in Pakistan (NDMP), which the CDP team in Manila mentored and guided through online platforms such as Skype. Once again, modern technology proves a strong ally for the program as it pushes the boundaries in typical capacity building practices.

Inter-program engagements In order to continue serving the country and the welfare of its people, CDP puts great importance in the development of its programs. One measure towards this is the improving the cooperation and synergy between the different programs of the organization. As a capacitating body, TCD is often looked upon to augment some of the projects that fall under the other programs of CDP. In 2016, TCD conducted forty-five (45) inter-program engagements. Most of the projects that TCD supplemented are lodged under Projects, Partnerships, and Programs. Some of these notable engagements are Project Persons with Disabilities: Empowered, Engaged; Building Inclusive, Resilient Community—Better Shared Local Risk Governance in Giporlos, Quinapondan and Salcedo, Eastern Samar; Trip2THRIVE; Strengthening Resilience to Disasters among Vulnerable Urban Poor Communities in Metro Manila; Towards Resilience and Development for Bohol Communities in the Aftermath of Earthquake and Typhoon Haiyan; and Be Secure Project: Water Security for Resilient Economic Growth and Stability.

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TCD also provided support in the project and training management of the engagement CBM and Partners Capacity Development on Disability-Inclusive Disaster Risk Preparedness and Emergency Response, which is lodged under the program Research, Knowledge Exchange and Management. The project, which began in September 2016, gave CDP an opportunity to exercise its growing techniques in disability inclusive DRRM facilitation and training.

Moving forward Tackling the constant stream of both internal and external needs from its partners can be daunting for TCD. This is especially true since, at the end of the day, the powerhouse of a program is composed of individuals grappling through their own trials and developing their own strengths. Despite the constant milieu of challenge and change, the members of TCD are committed to improving their craft, innovating their practices, and expanding their competencies to meet these tests head on. It is this dedication that continues to push the TCD program as an arbiter for change and as an integral part of CDP.


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Projects and Partnerships Program

The year 2016 has provided the Projects and Partnerships Program (PPP) another significant opportunity to fulfill its commitment in working with diverse stakeholders at all levels to advance the wellbeing of the most vulnerable in disaster risk reduction and resilience building. The program has continuously embarked on engagements that propelled CDP’s advocacy on inclusion, human rights, multi-stakeholder participation, disaster and climate resilience, and sustainable development. Through the implementation of various projects and activities across the Philippines, in both urban and rural contexts, PPP has played a valuable role in empowering different sectors, such as women, children and youth, older persons, persons with disabilities, and urban poor to claim their right to survival and development. On its third year as one of CDP’s core programs, PPP has led the implementation of seven (7) projects, which became instrumental in promoting children and youth empowerment, disability inclusion, sustainable livelihoods, adaptation, and resilience. The project teams under PPP, with the support of other CDP programs, engaged in capacity building activities, advocacy initiatives, community organizing efforts, and monitoring and evaluation. Such activities were carried out in partnership with actors from the government, civil society, private organizations, academia, and communities in the islands of Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao. The dedication of the PPP staff, along with the capacity building support provided to the program and the guidance of CDP’s

management, paved the way towards successful project implementation and meeting of desired outcomes. Among the disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM) and climate change adaptation (CCA) related projects lodged under the leadership and management of PPP are as follows:

Strengthening Resilience to Disasters among Vulnerable Urban Poor Communities in Metro Manila The project Strengthening Resilience to Disasters among Vulnerable Urban Poor Communities in Metro Manila is a three-year child-centered urban DRRM engagement which aims to uphold children and youth participation in


Beginning July, the project entered its last year of implementation. Re-entry orientation meetings were arranged with the three cities and such provided an avenue for the formation of a technical working group (TWG) in each city. The TWG was created as one of the sustainability mechanisms and is comprised of representatives from the city government and pilot barangays. As the project progressed, awareness-raising activities were continuously held through conduct of public fora and seminars.

DRR and CCA agenda in the cities of Quezon, San Juan, and Valenzuela. In the first half of 2016, the project organized workshops on the formulation and enhancement of community risk assessment, contingency plan, and barangay disaster risk reduction and management plan in the pilot barangays. As part of the small-scale project implementation of the youth, capacity building activities were also implemented and one of these was the Basic Life Support (BLS) training in Quezon City. Besides BLS, the project was also instrumental in organizing youth leadership training, seminar on child protection, gender equality, climate change, family preparedness, and DRR Olympics. Such activities were designed not only to bolster the DRRM knowledge and skills of children and youth, but of adults as well.

Apart from the abovementioned, a research on localizing child protection mechanisms was carried out as one of the project’s key components. This engagement was implemented by PPP in partnership with the RKEM program. Specifically, the study sought to identify platforms and avenues that would help localize child protection mechanisms in the three cities. Data gathering activities through online platforms and in the field were conducted from September until December. The three-year project involved the participation of national and local government agencies, village councils, parents, teachers, civil society organizations, and children and youth groups since its commencement in 2014. The project implementation was guided by Plan InternationalPhilippines.

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Towards Resilience and Development for Bohol Communities in the Aftermath of Earthquake and Typhoon Haiyan The two-year recovery and rehabilitation project dubbed Towards Resilience and Development for Bohol Communities in the Aftermath of Earthquake and Typhoon Haiyan has concluded in 2016. Funded by the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, it was originally designed as a 6-month intervention in 2014 focused on awareness raising and capacity building in CBDRRM for the survivors from two select barangays in the municipality of Antequera, namely Mag-aso and Sto. Rosario. Eventually, the project shifted its approach to resilience building through capacity development in sustainable livelihood and agricultural practices. Specifically, the project focused on the following components: rebuilding of social capital, increasing community competence, community planning for risk reduction, and economic development. The beneficiaries of the project were formally organized which led to the establishment of the Sto. Rosario Organic Farmers Association (SOFA) and Mag-aso Organic Farmers Livelihood Organization (MOFALO), both registered at the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE). Organizational strengthening towards sustainability became a priority of CDP in 2016. Through the guidance of PPP, trainings on cooperative management, leadership, entrepreneurship, bookkeeping, sustainable agriculture, and CBDRRM were organized for the beneficiaries to be equipped with knowledge, skills, and attitude necessary to sustain their economic activities. Furthermore, a learning visit at Maribojoc Organic Demo Farm was also arranged for the SOFA and MOFALO members to be exposed to various good practices in sustainable agriculture. The project also provided first aid kits to the beneficiaries as part of their emergency preparedness efforts.

Annual Report 2016

To formally end the project, a lessons learned workshop was held back-to-back with a culmination activity in October. This provided an avenue to facilitate the sharing of good practices and lessons learned from the project implementation among beneficiaries from Barangays Sto. Rosario and Mag-aso, members of the barangay councils, staff from the LGU, the municipal mayor of Antequera, and representatives from the different local and provincial offices. The event also enabled stakeholders and partners at various levels to explore and reflect on the possible actions to sustain the gains of the project.

Building Inclusive, Resilient Community; Better Shared Local Risk Governance in Giporlos, Quinapondan and Salcedo, Eastern Samar In response to CDP’s commitment to rural resilience, PPP has engaged in an eight-month-long project named Building Inclusive, Resilient Community; Better Shared Local Risk Governance in Giporlos, Quinapondan and Salcedo, Eastern Samar from January to October 2016. Specifically, the project intended to strengthen resilience, preparedness, and adaptive capacities of the communities and municipalities towards responsive adaptation and risk reduction plans. This undertaking is one of the projects under the flagship program of Oxfam dubbed Transformation of HaiyanAffected Regions through Humanitarian Innovations and Economic Empowerment (THRIVE). Through the leadership of a Project Manager and three area coordinators, the project was carried out focusing on three major components namely, capacity building, development planning, and advocacy.


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Conduct of trainings and workshops, organizing of learning events, DRRM planning sessions, provision of early warning devices, simulation and tabletop exercises, and partnership building were among the activities undertaken throughout the course of project implementation. In particular, these activities delved on topics such as CBDRRM, climate change adaptation, El NiĂąo, participatory budgeting, and resource mobilization. To officially conclude the engagement, a two-day lessons learned workshop was organized in September and this provided an opportunity to share lessons gained from the project; to verify the enabling and limiting factors, as well as areas for improvement in the project implementation and strategies; and lastly, to identify sustainability measures to build on the project gains. Besides the pilot barangays from the three covered municipalities, the project facilitated collaboration and worked with different actors from the regional government agencies, local government units, civil society organizations, and communities towards resilience and development.

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and climate risks in their localities; (2) barangays have increased capacities to anticipate, prevent, adapt, respond and recover from shocks and stresses to reduce community vulnerabilities; protect and promote child rights; and (3) improve the knowledge and skills of the DRR and planning officers at the municipal LGU level to develop integrated, multi-sectoral, and child-centered DRR and CCA plans and programs for action. A manager, training coordinator, and two (2) community organizers from PPP ensure that major interventions are implemented accordingly such as awareness raising, capacity building, children and youth-led activities and humanitarian services. The two-year engagement formally started in the third quarter of 2016 through meetings with donor and partners and courtesy calls to relevant stakeholders in the municipality of Paracale, the project site in the province of Camarines Norte. One of the initial activities undertaken was a ToT on ChildCentered CBDRRM. Select UNICEF partners namely, Citizens Disaster Response Center, TABI Masbate, Cordillera Disaster Response and Development Services (CorDisRDs), UP Visayas Foundation, and Philippine Geographical Society (PGS), attended the said training in November.

Disaster Risk Reduction through Education and Managing Barangay Integrated Goals toward Disaster Before the year ended, a one-day project inception Resilient Communities and Schools in workshop was held in December to have an opportunity among stakeholders from all levels Paracale (DRREAM BIG) - Phase 2 to develop a common understanding of childWith the support from UNICEF, CDP has centered approach to DRRM and sustainable exhibited its continued commitment to development; to foster an appreciation of the creating an enabling environment for gains and opportunities from DRREAM BIG project’s children and youth in DRRM, through the phase 1 implementation; and to collectively define implementation of DRREAM BIG –Phase opportunities for multi-stakeholder collaboration 2 Project. The first phase of the project within and after the project period through setting was managed by the Training and Capacity of commitment and formation of a working group. Development Program of CDP from 2014 to Participants to the workshop were the provincial mid-2016. Presently assigned under the and municipal office heads and staff, officials of management of PPP, the second phase aims barangay Labnig and Dalnac, teachers from the to achieve the following outputs: (1) girls, local elementary and secondary schools, Bureau boys, adolescents, and youth have improved of Fire Protection (BFP), coast guard, and other knowledge, skills and behaviors to participate sectoral representatives. in the discussion, implementation of activities and planning of initiatives to reduce disaster


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Be Secure Project: Water Security for Resilient Economic Growth and Stability In partnership with AECOM, CDP has manifested its strong commitment to promoting resilience by partaking in the implementation of the Be Secure Project. Specifically, the project endeavored to advance good governance and develop capacity for long-term water security, improve access to water and wastewater treatment services, and develop more resilient communities. To realize the project’s set goals, PPP has worked closely with the TCD program in conducting capacity building activities for the target stakeholders in Mindanao. A series of consultations were held among CDP, AECOM, and other relevant individuals (i.e. DRR and CCA specialists) and groups to ensure that the activities are designed appropriately. In particular, PPP led the implementation of the enhancement of local climate change action plan (LCCAP) and local disaster risk reduction and management plan (LDRRMP) in Zamboanga City, together with the TWG members from the local government. A curriculum for mainstreaming workshop was also drafted for the said city. Such would aid in the integration of climate change into local development and planning processes, specifically in the Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP). On the other hand, a participatory vulnerability assessment (PVA) was carried out for the core and local teams in Cotabato City. A validation activity and ocular visit to confirm the PVA results were done as well. The Be Secure project was funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

TRIP to THRIVE Building on the gains of the Tacloban Resettlement Integrated Program (TRIP) undertaken in 2015, the Trip to Thrive project provided an

opportunity for CDP, in partnership with Oxfam, to support the implementation of durable solutions for internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Tacloban City as they move through resettlement processes. Specifically, the engagement endeavored to ensure the resettlement meets standards and empowers communities to be disaster resilient. The eight-month project became a mechanism for the following outputs to materialize: (a) engagement of IDPs in the implementation of DRRM and resettlement plans; (b) gain participation and support of stakeholders in Tacloban City in the whole process of DRRM; (c) strengthen CBDRRM in the resettlement areas; and (d) improve CDRRMC capacities. To achieve the targets of the project, adaptation and risk reduction measures such as DRRM planning with CCA integration and early warning system were carried out at the city level. On the other hand, conduct of community risk assessment, BDRRM planning, setting up of BDRMMC structure, early warning systems, and public awareness campaign were initiated in the 12 barangays namely 88, 89, 90, Tagpuro, Sta. Elena, Old Kawayan, New Kawayan, San Isidro, Sto. Nino, Cabalawan, Camansihay, and Bagacay. Capacity building and advocacy interventions were the primary strategies employed by CDP to achieve the set targets from February to October 2016. To ensure that the project activities are responsive to the needs of the beneficiaries, a baseline study was conducted along with consultations and meetings. The project was concluded through organizing a learning event wherein good practices in DRR were showcased. Resource persons from Camarines Norte and Dagupan City were invited to share their outstanding DRRM activities and mechanisms in the field of CBDRRM and governance.

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Disability-inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction Project Project Persons with Empowered, Engaged

Lahat Handa Module. The project team was able to impart their knowledge and experience to the National Council on Disability Affairs (NCDA), Norfil Foundation, and municipal LGUs and DPOs in the Disabilities: province of Oriental Mindoro.

The activities in the first six months of 2016 were part of the first phase implementation of CDP’s disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction (DiDRR) project supported by Arbeiter Samariter Bund (ASB) in the municipalities of Balangiga and Lawaan, Eastern Samar. PPP, with the support from the TCD program, led the conduct of contingency planning workshops in the pilot barangays. Disabled people’s organizations (DPOs), barangay council members, health workers, barangay police, women, and older persons were engaged in these workshops. At the LGU level, enhancement of contingency plans was done together with the members of the local DRRM councils in both municipalities.

Project Elevate: Marig-on Estehanon! The second phase of the DiDRR engagement of CDP began in the month of July and was named Project Elevate. Targeting the same municipalities, Project Elevate aims to build on the gains from the previous phase by raising the commitment of duty bearers and rights holders towards upholding and sustaining DiDRR. Primarily, the second phase intended to upscale the capacities of the communities, barangays, municipalities, and DPOs in DiDRR.

To have a clear understanding on the context of the two municipalities in terms of disability inclusion and DRR, a baseline study was conducted. Furthermore, capacity needs assessment of DPOs in Balangiga and Lawaan was also carried out to know the strengths and areas for improvement of the To test the effectiveness of the communities’ said organizations. contingency plans, which include the early warning system, evacuation plan, The project was formally launched on August 13, and communication protocol, tabletop 2016. Key stakeholders from both municipalities simulation exercises and drills were held at were invited to the activity and were briefed about the barangay level. These activities became the engagement. To formalize the partnership, MOA a venue for various actors to gather together signing was done between CDP and the Mayors of and practice their existing mechanisms in the municipalities. Such also served as a venue for response to flood and typhoon hazards. As commitment setting which is vital to successfully part of the culminating activities, a one-day implement the targets of the project. lessons learned workshop was organized in May 2016 gathering individuals and groups To realize the set goals, various capacity building from the barangay and municipal levels to activities were organized such as DiDRR orientation identify the good practices and challenges and training for newly-elected officials, 1st DPO from the implementation. The next steps leadership training, training on Washington Group were also discussed towards sustaining the of Questions (WGQ), and ToT on DiDRR. The DPOs project gains. and LGUs were the primary participants to these Given the rich experience of the DiDRR activities. Towards the end of 2016, the project team project team in working with persons also convened the DPOs of Balangiga and Lawaan to with disabilities, they were invited as formulate their consitution and by-laws. facilitators/ resource persons in a training of trainers on inclusive CBDRRM using the On the other hand, internal capacity building also


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became a priority of the PPP. Through this project, a oneday sensitization activity on disability inclusion for CDP staff was organized. The core and support programs were oriented on different disability-inclusive approaches and terminologies. Furthermore, a two-day training on the WGQ was also carried out for CDP personnel. A dry run to pre-test the questionnaire was one of the highlights of the training since it enabled the staff to assess the tool.

Annual Report 2016

Moving Forward As PPP continue to take on its role as the lead in project management and implementation, it remains passionate and driven to put forward the people-centered and rightsbased principles and advocacies of CDP as an institution. Equipped with the lessons and experiences from past engagements, as well as the commitment manifested by its staff working across the country, PPP as a program will continue to offer a meaningful venue where it can truly put forward CDP’s vision of promoting safe, resilient, and developed communities in the coming year and beyond.


Humanitarian Preparedness and Response Program (HPRP) With the increasing frequency and severity of hazards in the country in the past few years, the need for humanitarian interventions continues to grow. CDP sought to respond to this need through the inception of a new program that would cater to building the capacities of frontliners and communities in emergency preparedness and humanitarian response. CDP’s newest program, the Humanitarian Preparedness and Response Program (HPRP), was formed in July 2016. Through consolidation of CDP’s experience in responding to past disasters since the 1990s, HPRP sought to formulate programs and mechanisms that would utilize the core humanitarian standards in implementation, advocate for the localization of humanitarian aid and response, and promote ethical partnerships in humanitarian action. Given these goals, HPRP developed its training competencies under the following areas of specialty: Sphere Standard, Rights-Based Approach, Humanitarian Action and Protection, Surge Capacity, Emergency Response Assessment, and Mental Health and Psychosocial Support.

Consortium for Humanitarian Action and Protection (CHAP) HPRP’s capabilities were immediately tested when the Consortium for Humanitarian Action and Protection (CHAP) was formed under the Financial Enablers project. Four established organizations in their own field of expertise and operation came together to forge a strong partnership that would enrich the good praxis models that they have developed as organizations. CDP, through HPRP, serves as the lead agency, assigned to cover the municipalities of Quinapondan and Salcedo in the Visayas Islands. Other members of CHAP include the Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office (PDRRMO) of Camarines Norte, assigned to cover the municipalities of Labo and Capalonga in the island of Luzon; Balay Rehabilitation Centre, assigned to the municipalities of Sharif Aguak and Mamasapano in the island of Mindanao; and Buklod Tao, designated to complement and support the three partners bringing in their grassroots expertise and their positive collaboration with local civil society organizations and local government units.


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From July to December 2016, CHAP, led by CDP’s HPRP, proactively carried out activities towards the achievement of its three major project outcomes: capacity development of partners, advocacy for humanitarian protection in humanitarian action, and knowledge products development.

Capacity Development As a major part of its capacity development initiatives, CHAP was able to craft the first draft of the Module on the Rights Based Approach to Humanitarian Action and Protection, which aimed to address conflict-sensitive governance brought about by human-induced hazard and shared risk governance in the context of natural hazards. The module was enhanced through the conduct of a Rights-based Approach on Humanitarian Action and Protection Training of Trainers, which fostered the synergy of ideas and practice of the members of the consortium. Along with this, HPRP led several CHAP initiatives aiming to strengthen the capacities of the Consortium and its partners. From October to November, HPRP spearheaded the following activities: • Community-based Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Training of Trainers and Orientation on Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) - This training aimed to provide context for IDP protection and emergency response for conflict areas. • CBDRRM Training for partners of ECOWEB - This training aimed to increase the capacity of local government units in terms of emergency preparedness, humanitarian principles, and ecosystem approach. • Child-centered CBDRRM Training of Trainers for UNICEF partners - This training tackled the roles of children in DRRM four thematic areas and paved the way for the discussion of the minimum standards for the humanitarian sectors (WASH, food security, etc). • Surge Capacity Training – This training served to build the capacity of HPRP as mentors during the conduct, as well as build on-call surge for humanitarian work. This activity was monumental due to HPRP being part of the First All-Filipino facilitators pool using the Start Network Module. • Bridging Education and Training Workshop on Integration of Framework for DRR into the Education System – This workshop, conducted in partnership with New Castle, Australia and University of the Philippines Diliman, involved

Annual Report 2016

the inclusion of humanitarian principles on the ongoing formulation of the International Course on DRR integrating the Sendai Framework. Aside from these, HPRP also pushed for the integration of health services in disaster response through the conduct of Emergency Preparedness seminar for mothers and birthing clinics, and Disaster Preparedness and Health Continuity Seminar. These initiatives highlighted the importance of the role of health professionals in disaster risk reduction especially in emergency response. Catering to the humanitarian principle of ‘Do No Harm’, HPRP likewise spearheaded the relief distribution to survivors of the NIA, Quezon City fire incident as well as those of Typhoon Nina (Haima). In this endeavor, HPRP members mobilized and called out for relief support among partners, and led the collection and sorting of goods.

Advocacy Apart from capacity development activities, the first six months of the project addressed the Consortium’s advocacy goals. HPRP attended meetings with the National Anti-Poverty Commission Victims of Disasters and Ca-


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lamities (NAPC-VDC) to ensure the participation and support Knowledge Product Development of NAPC in the conduct of CHAP trainings. HPRP also met with the Asian Development Bank to discuss the integration As the project’s last outcome, the knowledge product develof space-based technology in CBDRRM that would bolster opment component covers the survey and data gathering on the emergency response mechanisms of communities. the existing situation of identified focus areas with regards to Humanitarian Action and Protection. An initial survey was Further propagating its advocacies to a wider network, CDP, conducted in the partner areas to appraise the status of through HPRP, engaged in an interview with the UNTV Chan- partner local government units (LGUs) in the humanitarian nel under its Aksyon Bago Balita segment. HPRP promoted arena. the 911 Call of Disaster Risk Reduction Network (DRRNet) Philippines which captures nine policy calls guided by one Mental Health and Psychosocial Support agenda towards building one resilient Philippines. The campaign seeks to highlight model communities to demonstrate On top of its responsibilities as part of the Consortium, in how political will and the involvement of all sectors of so2016, HPRP independently laid the groundwork towards a ciety go hand-in-hand in dealing with disasters. This advoseries of psychosocial support workshops in Isabela, under cacy includes several goals of CHAP pertaining to IDPs and a partnership project with the Jewish Distribution Commitstrengthening of local disaster risk reduction and managetee (JDC). As its first step, HPRP conducted an assessment ment offices (LDRRMOs). of Ilagan, Isabela’s condition after the onslaught of Typhoon Nina (Haima). Through continuous partnership and networking activities, HPRP was also successful in forging new partnerships among the academe, private sector, local government units, Organizational Contributions CSOs, and the media. Internally, HPRP is tasked to tend to the humanitarian needs within the orLocal ganization, such as putting up systems Academe Private Sector Government CSOs Media including the contingency plan of the Units office and emergency response mech• Simon of • UNTV • Unilab • Brgy. • University of anism and structure. Cyrene Santo Tomas • Safe Birth Pinyahan • TESDA Clinics BDRRMC • Dios Thus, in the month of October and NoMabalos • New Castle • Camarines vember, as part of the operationalizaNorte • Ecoweb University tion of CDP’s humanitarian structure • CDRC • Public Municipalities and in fulfillment of its mandate of beSchools in (12) • TABI ing part of the National Disaster Risk • Cordis Camarines • PDRRMO Reduction and Management Council Isabela • Philippine Norte (NDRRMC), HPRP organized the moniGeographical • University • MDRRMO toring and coordination of Typhoon Karof the Tumauini Society en and Typhoon Lawin at the Operation • CDRRMO Philippines Center of the NDRRMC. In tandem with Ilagan City Diliman other CDP programs and DRRNet-Phils, • University HPRP contributed to the gathering and of the monitoring of information from partner Philippines communities, and the assessment and Visayas validation of situation reports from local partners.


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Annual Report 2016

In the month of December, through the conduct of organizational workshops, HPRP facilitated the set-up of CDP’s Early Warning System for earthquake and typhoon. These endeavors have been able to significantly contribute to the improvement of CDP’s internal mechanisms for emergency response.

Gearing Towards 2017 While still in its early phase, HPRP has already encountered some challenges. Efforts during the last two quarters of the year were focused on internal consolidation and unification processes for all partner-stakeholders involved at the consortium level, and engagement of partners at the municipal and CSO levels. As such, for the coming year, HPRP endeavors to strengthen current and existing partnerships while continuously building on new partnerships both within the Consortium and outside. 2017 already has a lot in store for HPRP. As part of CHAP, HPRP still has a half a year to go in achieving its capacity development, advocacy, and knowledge product development outcomes. Moreover, HPRP is priming for the implementation of the psychosocial support workshops for typhoon survivors in Isabela under the JDC partnership project, and conduct of a Sphere Standard Training with CBM International. As part of its organizational responsibilities, HPRP is also warming up for the internal capacity enhancement of CDP’s office emergency program. Indeed, the year 2016 has been a fruitful start for HPRP, and 2017 looks to be a promising, dynamic continuance of its mandate.


Center for Disaster Preparedness Block 31 Lot 19 A, A. Bonifacio St., New Capitol Estates 1, 1126 Batasan Hills, Quezon City, Philippines Fax: +63 2 361 2243 Phone: +63 2 361 2191 http://www.cdp.org.ph

Profile for Center for Disaster Preparedness

CDP Annual Report 2016  

This year, CDP has elevated its commitment in DRRM by adding a new program on its current institutional structure. The Humanitarian Prepared...

CDP Annual Report 2016  

This year, CDP has elevated its commitment in DRRM by adding a new program on its current institutional structure. The Humanitarian Prepared...

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