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GRADUATE SCHOOL | LAUNCH DIRECTORY 2009

GRADUATE SCHOOL LAUNCH DIRECTORY 2009

I S B N 978 - 0 - 9 5 5 8 6 2 8 -1- 6

C-C-W

C-C-W

CAMBERWELL CHELSEA WIMBLEDON


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Graduate School Launch Directory 2009


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Graduate School Launch Directory 2009

C-C-W camberwell Chelsea wimbledon


Contents

7

Welcome

9

Introduction

12

stud en t o p p o rt u n ­ ities

38 P e o p le

40

people

Professors

41

Baddeley Oriana

14

Research Degrees

44

Bamford Anne

14

MPhil / PhD

46

Coldwell Paul

A collaborative endeavour

50

Cummings Neil

53

Drew Linda

15

18

Taught Postgraduate courses

56

Elwes Catherine

Camberwell

59

Farthing Stephen

62

Garcia David

Conservation

64

Newman Avis

20

MA Conservation

67

Pickwoad Nicholas

21

MA Visual Arts (Book Arts)

69

Politowicz Kay

22

MA Visual Arts (Designer-Maker)

72

Scrivener Stephen

23

MA Visual Arts (Digital Arts)

75

Slee Richard

24

MA Visual Arts

78

Wainwright Chris

(Digital Arts Online)

82

Watanabe Toshio

25

MA Visual Arts (Fine Art)

84

Woolley Janet

19

Postgraduate Diploma

26

MA Visual Arts (Graphic Design)

27

MA Visual Arts (Illustration)

88

Asbury Michael

28

MA Visual Arts (Print Making)

92

Baseman Jordan

29

MA Visual Arts

96

Biswas Sutapa

(Transnational Arts)

100

Collins Jane

102

Cross David

Chelsea

Readers

30

Postgraduate Diploma Fine Art

110

Earley Rebecca

31

MA Critical Writing and

114

Fairnington Mark

Curatorial Practice

116

Faure Walker James

32

MA Fine Art

119

Fortnum Rebecca

33

MA Graphic Design Communication

123

Kikuchi Yuko

34

MA Interior and Spatial Design

125

Newman Hayley

35

MA Textile Design

128

Pavelka Michael

131

Quinn Malcolm Tulloch Carol

Wimbledon

36

MA Fine Art

134

37

MA Visual Language

of Performance

Fellows

142

Francis Mary Anne

145

O’Riley Timothy

147

Salter Rebecca

150

Sandino Linda


152

Stair Julian

154

Velios Athanasios

246 Res earch En viron men t

156

Walsh Maria

248

Research at Camberwell, Chelsea

158

Whitelegg Isobel

and Wimbledon

161

Wilder Kenneth

Course Directors and

256

Pathway leaders

257

Centre for Drawing

Beech Amanda

258

Ligatus

164

research Centres

167

Bircham Lorna

260

SCIRIA

169

Chalkley Brian

262

TrAIN

171

Fitzpatrick Edwina

174

Ghazi Babak

176

Johanknecht Susan

179

O’Connell Douglas

182

Sandy Mark

184

Stiff Andrew

269

HOW TO APPLY and ENTRY

186

Taylor Finlay

REQUIREMENTS

188

Waller Tracey

270

Contact Details

190

Current Research Degree

Supervisors

192

Selected Papers and interviews

193

Who? Me?: Confessions of a casual

transnationalist, by Michael Asbury

200

In conversation, Jordan Baseman and

Roger Wilson 205

Performing Identity on the

international Stage, Jane Collins and

Roger Wilson 212

Museum Futures: Live, Recorded,

Distributed, by Neil Cummings 223

Drawn Identities: Pepsi, Shakers

and Tattoos, by Stephen Farthing

228

Art and Knowledge Workshops

in the Age of Networks, by David Garcia

234

Lines of Enquiry, by Chris Wainwright

264

Graduate School Partnerships

266 Appen dix


Welcome

7

Professor Chris Wainwright, Head of Colleges Camberwell, Chelsea, wimbledon

I would like to take this opportunity to welcome and introduce you to this launch publication marking the creation of the Graduate School here at Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon colleges. It is the first in our series of Bright publications that will appear in various formats over time as a dissemination mechanism that captures key debates and the diverse range of work taking place in the Graduate School. The effective academic and structural alliance between Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon colleges (C-C-W), has created an opportunity for a number of new and innovative developments in The University of the Arts London and more broadly within the sphere of arts education. The creation of the C-C-W Graduate School is our first major initiative and reflects an academic vision that is predicated on profiling and celebrating the conditions and ethos that characterise these three specialist art colleges. The rationale of the Graduate School is founded upon the reputations and strong traditions in all three colleges for a well established, high quality, postgraduate provision and mature research cultures that are equally comfortable and experienced in supporting practice led and theoretical based research in art and design areas. What the Graduate School brings to the current postgraduate and research provision is a set of challenges and questions that address the relationship of research to the broader academic and cultural communities and an assertion that consideration is given to a broader thematic context that reflects issues of our time that in turn influences our practices. There are two key aspects of the Graduate School that define its distinctiveness: the first is a commitment to create and maintain a direct relation足ship between research focused activity and teaching and a requirement that all research staff, our professors, readers and fellows in particular, play an active role in teaching and supervision and that their research forms a crucial aspect of our student learning experience. The second is the commitment to providing a series of overarching thematic reference points that form a catalyst for cross disciplinary exchange and collaboration and as a means of responding to broader social and cultural agendas that transcend subject specific concerns. In this respect for the coming year we have identified the three areas of Climate Change, Identities and Technologies as themes that will be explored in our Graduate School Festival and at other points during the year when we


8

Welcome

will be bringing together our research communities and external partners in focused projects and events. There has been considerable thought and effort put into the creation of the Graduate School by an experienced and committed group of staff and students with much encouragement from the cultural and academic sectors. I am grateful to everybody who has supported and contributed to what I am confident will be a new, hopefully provocative and highly attractive research and postgraduate experience at C-C-W. I also believe that we have created a tangible and innovative example of what is possible when we combine the experience, distinctiveness and ambitions of the three colleges that results in more than just the sum of their parts. We have created the conditions for a challenging, critical but bright future, so now, please enjoy Bright 1.


Introduction

9

professor Linda Drew, Dean of Graduate school

The Graduate School at C-C-W is the culmination of an innovative process of collaborative thinking and co-creation that has involved students, staff groups and opinion formers in the design and planning process. We have created a structure that dissolves the divide between our taught postgraduate courses and research degrees. What this means in effect is the Graduate School will bring together the taught postgraduate, research postgraduate and research cultures from each of the three art and design colleges. We feel we are embarking on something of a milestone in postgraduate education in art and design in the UK with this model and creating a new paradigm for the relationship between teaching, subject development and research. The Graduate School currently consists of over 80 research degree students, over 450 taught postgraduate students, 39 professors, readers and fellows and an equally impressive group of full time, part time and visiting tutors and other research supervisors as well as established research centres, units and research networks. Central to the success of the Graduate School is the quality of its research provision, the calibre of staff and students and the existence of real and sustainable partnerships and collaborative arrange足 ments with external institutions, organisations and key individuals in the cultural sector and beyond. Our London location provide students with a fantastic range of resources, libraries, museums and collections, while the extraordinary range of exhibitions and events provides a rich context for the study of contemporary art and design. Beyond the UK the three colleges of C-C-W have built up many influential international partnerships that the Graduate School will benefit from in the form collaborations, internships, exchanges and joint projects. At the start of each academic year the Graduate School will host a three-day Festival. This will be no ordinary event; there will be film screenings, music, performances and will be open to all members of the Graduate School community. The aim is to discover and share information and in an atmos足 phere of creativity, festivity and celebration. It will be an opportunity to find out about current projects and research being undertaken and to profile the work of the specialist, research centres, units and networks within the three colleges. The Festival will also play an important role in introducing our integrated thematic approach that aims to create a cross disciplinary platform of


10

introduction

context and debate. These will form the basis for a series of talks and events in conjunction with our partners and are intended to enhance, provoke and inform the core areas of individual and subject based study. The Graduate School will play an important role in creating and informing a future generation of artists, designers, opinion formers and leaders by providing the creative and intellectual freedom underpinned by a critical rigor needed to think, respond, and act creatively. It will equip its members with the confidence and potential to comment on, influence and change our world.


student opportu足n ities


13

14

Research Degrees

14

15

18

MPhil / PhD A collaborative endeavour

Taught Postgraduate courses

Camberwell 19

Postgraduate Diploma Conservation

20

MA Conservation

21

MA Visual Arts (Book Arts)

22

MA Visual Arts (Designer-Maker)

23

MA Visual Arts (Digital Arts)

24

MA Visual Arts (Digital Arts Online)

25

MA Visual Arts (Fine Art)

26

MA Visual Arts (Graphic Design)

27

MA Visual Arts (Illustration)

28

MA Visual Arts (PrintMaking)

29

MA Visual Arts (Transnational Arts)

Chelsea 30

Postgraduate Diploma Fine Art

31

MA Critical Writing and Curatorial Practice

32

MA Fine Art

33

MA Graphic Design Communication

34

MA Interior and Spatial Design

35

MA Textile Design

Wimbledon 36

MA Fine Art

37

MA Visual Language of Performance


14

Research Degrees

The University of the Arts London offers the following research degrees in full and part time modes: > Master of Philosphy (MPhil) full time: 1 year 3 months – 3 years part time: 2 years – 6 years > Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) full time: 2 years – 4 years part time: 3 years – 8 years


A collaborative endeavour

15

professor Stephen Scrivener, Director of Doctoral Programmes

Education can often seem like a one-way street along which knowledge is transferred from teacher to student. Of course, this is not really the case and at its best education is learning in both directions. This reciprocity tends to increase with educational level, reaching its pinnacle with the doctoral studies. Indeed, the culmination of doctoral study, the PhD, amounts to a reversal of transfer. The supervisor must learn from the student: if the supervisor learns nothing new, then the student has found nothing new to learn. Hence, undertaking a doctoral programme of study is more than the acquisition of knowledge and competencies: it is a process in which new knowledge is made. It is also a process in which the student enters a community of researchers whose members are committed to learning from each other. So our task is clear to see: our task is not simply to tell you how to be a researcher and how to do research, it is also to empower you as an active member of the research community. We will prepare you to be a researcher by deepening your understanding of your field and your powers of critical evaluation and synthesis. We will introduce you to ways of understanding research, research methodologies and modes of research communication. We will do this at a number of levels: generic, subject specific and as an active participant in a research culture. We will do this in a number of ways: through one-to-one supervision; through the university wide Research Network University of the Arts London (RNUAL ) programme; through C-C-W training workshops and seminars; and through active participation in the Graduate School research student and staff community and the external research communities. We will empower you as an active member of a research community. First, you will be accepted as a voice in the Graduate School research community. This means that you will be given the opportunity to participate in the shaping of this community and, in particular, the shaping of your own experience as a doctoral student within it. Indeed, this is not simply an offer, it is an expectation: if your only interest is your interests then the C-C-W Graduate School is probably not for you and you are probably not for it. Second, we invite you to help us to make the C-C-W Graduate School doctoral programme a field of excellence in art and design research. Third, we will support your participation in and influencing of the wider research communities in which your research interests are located.


16

A collaborative endeavour

And, finally, you will be aware the art and design research is a developing field. From my own experience, the position is not unlike the field of computer science research, which in the late 1960s and early 1970s was also shaping its own identity. To be part of this moment as a doctoral student was incredibly exciting, but also daunting as the rules of engagement were not clearly defined in relation older fields of research. Being a computer science doctoral student was not simply about learning how to do computer science research, it was also about defining what it meant to do it. Hence, computer science doctoral students did not simply apply the practices of their field; they were instrumental in shaping them. We, the Graduate School staff and student researchers and the art and design research com足 munity as a whole, find ourselves in a similar position. We believe that the Graduate School is making, and will continue to make, a significant contribution to the shaping of a pluralistic and emancipating understanding of art and design research. And when I say we, I include you.


18

Taught Postgraduate courses

C-C-W offers the following taught postgraduate courses:

Camberwell

19

Postgraduate Diploma Conservation

20

MA Conservation

21

MA Visual Arts (Book Arts)

22

MA Visual Arts (Designer-Maker)

23

MA Visual Arts (Digital Arts)

24

MA Visual Arts (Digital Arts Online)

25

MA Visual Arts (Fine Art)

26

MA Visual Arts (Graphic Design)

27

MA Visual Arts (Illustration)

28

MA Visual Arts (PrintMaking)

29

MA Visual Arts (Transnational Arts)

Chelsea

30

Postgraduate Diploma Fine Art

31

MA Critical Writing and Curatorial Practice

32

MA Fine Art

33

MA Graphic Design Communication

34

MA Interior and Spatial Design

35

MA Textile Design

Wimbledon

36

MA Fine Art

37

MA Visual Language of Performance


Postgraduate Diploma Conservation

19

Camberwell College of Arts

The Postgraduate Diploma in Conservation is designed for students who wish to study Conservation at postgraduate level, but who do not have the specialist degree qualification needed for an MA. The course is open to applicants who have no previous experience of paper conservation. It will enable students from diverse academic or professional back­ grounds to develop specialist skills, knowledge and focus in preparation for practice in the field or further study at MA level.

Many graduates from the Postgraduate Diploma in Conservation have gone on to study on the MA in Conservation at Camberwell or at the Royal College of Art, the Courtauld Institute of Art, the Textile Conservation Centre and the University of Northumbria. Other graduates have attended conservation internships or employ­ ment as conservators with various institutions including the London Metropolitan Archive and Hampton Court Palace. How to apply see p. 269.

The Postgraduate Diploma is an intensive introduction to the theory and practice of paper conservation, and relevant areas of conservation science and museology. Teaching consists of practical classes, lectures and seminars in paper conservation techniques, conservation of parchment, basic bookbinding, conservation science and museology. A programme of visits to curatorial and conservation departments in London is also part of the course.


20

MA Conservation Camberwell College of Arts

Conservators help to preserve the world’s memory by caring for a wide range of works of art, artefacts and structures which have significance for the local, national and global community. Conservators are skilled professionals who undertake a wide range of activities including developing preservation strategies, undertaking interventive conservation (such as repair or chemical treatments), liaising with other museum professionals and being advocates for conservation to the wider community. This course has a successful track record of producing award winning students, such as Erica Kotze who recently won the prestigious Pilgrim Trust Student Conservator of the Year Award for her MA Conservation project completed at

Camberwell – The Conservation of a Thai Samut Khao Buddhist Medical Manuscript. Students from this course are widely recognised as being well trained and prepared for employment. Recent graduates are now working at the British Library, the Wellcome Trust, The National Maritime Museum and Benaki Museum in Athens. Other graduates have attended internships with the Joint Archive Service in London, the Library of Congress in Washington and the New York Botanic Gardens and some are pursuing doctoral research with University of the Arts London. How to apply see p. 269.


MA Visual Arts (Book Arts)

21

Camberwell College of Arts

subjects. This helps the development of research skills and offers enhanced opportunities for career development. There is also a shared lecture programme, which draws upon the richness of research within the College and across the Graduate School. We are able to offer our students many outstanding opportunities outside of the College, such as participation on course stands at the London Artists’ Book Fair held at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, and Leeds International Book Fair. Students also visit special collections such as those at the Tate and the National Art Library at the Victoria & Albert Museum. A public exhibition at the end of the final unit gives students the possibility to explore the expanded book in a display or installation.

Camberwell was the first college in the UK to provide specialist postgraduate study in the emerging field of Book Arts. Fuelled by advances in electronic information media and online publishing, the book has been freed from the traditional role as a container of information.

The skills and knowledge developed on this course have led graduates to careers as book artists, curators, freelance designers, workshop leaders and teachers. Our graduates have won many prizes including; Sovereign Asian Art Prize, Craft Council Development Awards, the Seoul Book Fair Prize and the London Book Fair Prize. How to apply see p. 269.

On this course you will be asked to research the content, materials and technical skills, then produce written and practical work exploring your subject in relationship to contemporary practice. You should be well grounded in relevant aspects of Book Arts and be able to define and debate your study proposal. MA Visual Arts (Book Arts) is part of the post­ graduate community at Camberwell and benefits from the interaction with the pathways of other


22

MA Visual Arts (Designer-Maker) Camberwell College of Arts

This pathway engages with the renewed interest and status of the craft object and small batch production and its role in design. The role of designer-maker is undergoing an evaluation, away from a marginal activity to one which engages with other disciplines, Fine Art and Design. The value of the one off or short run production product has been brought to the attention of a broad audience of makers, collectors and industry. The course welcomes applicants from both Fine Art and Design backgrounds, including archi­ tecture, craft production, makers involved with one-off or small batch production, ceramicists, prototype designers, jewelry designers and metal workers. MA Visual Arts (Designer-Maker) is part of the postgraduate community at Camberwell and there are a number of ways in which the pathways interact, most notably through research skills and career development. There is also a shared lecture programme, which draws upon the richness of research within the College and across the Graduate School. We offer our students many opportunities to attend industry events, visit special collections and network with the creative industry. A public exhibition at the end of the second unit gives students the possibility to explore the location of their work in a professional context.

The skills and knowledge developed on this course lead to careers as practitioners, creative industry professionals, curators, freelance designers, workshop leaders and teachers with a potential to progress to PhD study. How to apply see p. 269.


MA Visual Arts (Digital Arts)

23

Camberwell College of Arts

The 21st century has seen digital technology rapidly expand into mainstream culture, with the internet offering a truly global audience. Art now exists outside the gallery and the accompanying critical debate has made the same transition. Our environment has changed beyond recognition, as public, private, commercial and artistic data floats around us in a digital state. It is this challenge of understanding and interpreting ‘the digital’ in our contemporary environment that is the focus of the course. The pathway does not focus on technology, but presents it as a tool to facilitate ideas, placing emphasis upon its creative use. MA Visual Arts (Digital Arts) is part of the post­ graduate community at Camberwell and there are a number of ways in which the pathways interact, most notably through research skills and career development. There is also a shared lecture programme, which draws upon the richness of research within the College and throughout the Graduate School. This course attracts students from diverse backgrounds, which reflects the role of Digital Arts in the 21st century. Students on the course are encouraged to engage at all levels of professional development, from showcasing work in venues around the College, as well as participating in themed gallery events within the College.

Students actively work with the Research Department of the College so they get to develop an understanding of research in an academic context, and also develop an understanding of the role of research in industry. Our students are employed in the design, graphic and moving image industries. There are a number who are self employed, running their own creative businesses, and also arts based practi­ tioners, who are regularly exhibiting in galleries and moving image festivals. How to apply see p. 269.


24

MA Visual Arts (Digital Arts Online) Camberwell College of Arts

This popular course offers students the chance to study for the MA Visual Arts course online. For many students this offers the advantage that they can develop their careers whilst remaining employed. Digital technology has embedded itself so deeply in creative practice, that it is no longer questioned as a tool or medium. In response, our students are encouraged to challenge, question and explore the theoretical implications of this technology. They examine the digital production of, and digital interaction with, artworks. A project proposal allows students to embark on detailed research into their chosen area. The use of blogs and wikis by all students and staff is vital to encouraging collaboration and building a dynamic cohort, based across the UK, Europe and the globe. Themed exhibitions and events are aimed at developing communication and encouraging students to explore the possibilities of communication in the digital era. Weekly chat sessions form the basis of engagement between students and the College.

These real time chat sessions will also become the centre of collaborative presentations between the face-to-face and the online pathway. Blogs will be used to supply weekly updates on project progress, and also form the basis for chat, tutorials and assessment. Students have become very inventive in the tools they are using to communi­ cate, ranging from blogs and wikis to podcasting. Students join this course from all creative backgrounds: Graphics, Fine Art, Illustration and Architecture. The projects they develop range from motion graphics, moving image and animation, to sensor based interaction and web based interaction. Our students are employed in the design, graphic and moving image industries. There are a number who are self employed, running their own crea­ tive businesses, and also arts based practitioners, who are regularly exhibiting in galleries and moving image festivals. How to apply see p. 269.


MA Visual Arts (Fine Art)

25

Camberwell College of Arts

This pathway takes an interdisciplinary approach to Fine Art practice. Drawing upon local, national and international contexts, it focuses on Fine Art practice and how it can address social agendas such as regeneration and environ­ mental sustainability. The pathway also considers the role of Fine Art practice in the public domain, especially work that is innovative in terms of how the work is produced via collaborative partnerships. Studies are complemented by lectures, seminars and workshops designed to help you develop wider contextual understanding, research skills and awareness of professional issues. MA Visual Arts (Fine Art) is part of the post­ graduate community at Camberwell and there are a number of ways in which the pathways interact, most notably through research skills and career development. There is also a shared lecture programme, which draws upon the richness of research within the College and across the Graduate School. We give our students many opportunities to engage with the local creative partnerships, visit special archives and collections such as John Latham’s flat-time house nearby and network within the creative industry.

A public exhibition at the end of the second unit gives students the opportunity to explore the location of their work in a professional context. The skills and knowledge developed on this course can lead to careers as practitioners, creative industry professionals, curators, freelance designers, workshop leaders and teachers with a potential to progress to PhD study. How to apply see p. 269.


26

MA Visual Arts (Graphic Design) Camberwell College of Arts

to exhibitions, production facilities and creative environments. You define and develop your own project, to combine your ideas, experience and interests and connect with a particular audience or group of people. The pathway in Graphic Design at Camberwell helps you prepare for high-level professional practice. With a research oriented and socially engaged ethos, the focus is on delivering outcomes in the public domain. We encourage you to collaborate with external organisations and we help you realise your potential to get the best results.

At Camberwell we challenge the idea that visual communication is a neutral activity. By studying at Camberwell, you will take issue with the content and the context of your design work. Our aim is to help you develop research skills and generate concepts to support visual communication. Information, skills and ideas at the beginning of the course, gradually allow you to develop your project independently. Our staff team includes practicing profes­sionals who exhibit work in moving image, typography and contem­ porary art; comple­mented by guest lectures from contempo­rary practitioners. Workshops are available in design for print, photography, video, and letterpress typography. We also use London as an expanded learning environment for creative and critical interaction, with study visits

By exhibiting your work in the end of year show you complete your postgraduate study and prepare for professional practice. Successful graduates from this course have won awards including a silver, gold and Grand Prix at the Communication Exhibition in Brazil, exhibited work at the Barbican, been awarded scholarships and won places on the Student Associates Scheme of the Institute of Education in London. How to apply see p. 269.


MA Visual Arts (Illustration)

27

Camberwell College of Arts

Illustration in the 21st century demands strong voices: entrepreneurial image-makers who can tell their own stories. Camberwell College of Arts has a long tradition of imaginative illustrative art, and this pathway builds on this strength.

pathways interact, most notably through research skills and career development. There is also a shared lecture programme, which draws upon the richness of research within the College and across the Graduate School.

A series of seminars, workshop inductions, research time and field trips, will familiarise you with the College environment, the city of London, and the work of fellow students and staff. You will begin to develop your proposal: an ambitious and engaging project to sustain you throughout the pathway. We offer you time to implement both critical and practical skills. The development of your personal project is also a time in which to consider how your practice continues and the directions you may choose to take.

Trips to museums and galleries around London are a vital part of the pathway. There are visits to the Association of Illustrators, and in the spring students visit Italy for the Bologna Book Fair. Students also exhibit throughout the year at Waterloo Gallery, XHIBIT and the Designers Block. A number of students have worked on commissions for web sites, corporate identities and book commissions.

Many students choose to participate in external ventures, competitions or exhibitions and form their own discussion groups. MA Visual Arts (Illustration) is part of the postgraduate community at Camberwell and there are a number of ways in which the

The range of creative destinations is wide and former students have had a number of successes including book contracts, comic strip work for Flicking Publishing and work with the Thames Festival. Recent graduates have gone on to work for Rave Magazine in Bombay and Samsung Advertising in Europe. How to apply see p. 269.


28

MA Visual Arts (PrintMaking) Camberwell College of Arts

Camberwell is widely regarded as the place to study printmaking, boasting an international reputation for the quality of work and teaching. The artist Mike Marshall known for his photo­ graphy and film works made his first etching at Camberwell. This was created under guidance from Brian Hodgson, the master printer (for artists including the Chapman Brothers) and editioned with a Camberwell printmaking student in the College printmaking workshops. The success of the pathway is due to its explora­ tion of printmaking as a medium in its own right and its relationship to wider contemporary practices. It responds to current debates about the role of skill and authorship in the creation of artworks, and about the notion of the unique work of art. Printmaking technologies are being utilised by artists in more varied and experi­ mental approaches than ever before which is why Camberwell is investing in both traditional and digital methods to enable development of ideas through print media. You will be encouraged to develop technical skills, sharpen your critical and contextual thinking and widen your professional knowledge. The course promotes an innovative approach to traditional and digital media, and introduces all forms of autographic printmaking including intaglio, lithographic (plate and stone), relief, screen-printing and computer-generated processes.

Students are encouraged to exhibit work both across the Graduate School and externally in London. In 2006 students took part in the Victoria & Albert Museum’s Prints on the Run symposium and this was followed by visits to the museum’s print collection and talks with the curator Gill Saunders. Printmaking students will have a wide range of creative career destinations open to them, from practicing artist or freelance designer, to working in education or research. Graduates go on to teach in higher education at graduate and postgraduate level, establish successful print workshops such as Artichoke Print Workshop and East London Printmakers, work in editioning prints and exhibit both in the UK and abroad. How to apply see p. 269.


MA Visual Arts (Transnational Arts)

29

Camberwell College of Arts

Central to the pathway is the impact of identity on the production and consumption of artworks and artefacts. Students develop an understanding of the impact of artefacts on the practice, history and pedagogy of Art and Design. Individual study is complemented by lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials delivered by scholars, artists and curators. These are designed to help you develop wider contextual understanding, research skills and awareness of professional issues. Lectures and seminars will be organised under general themes including: Exhibiting the Nation; Identity, Authenticity, Material, Migration and the Context of the Transnational. A final series on Methodologies of the Transnational provides the necessary tools for the production of your final submission. A series of museum and gallery visits will be an integral part of the course with related assignments focusing on reviews and critiques of curatorial practices.

The movement of peoples and artefacts is break­ ing down borders and producing new identities outside and beyond those of the nation state. It is no longer easy to define the nature of the local and the international, and many cultural interactions now operate on the level of the transnational. This pathway benefits from its Graduate School links with the dedicated Univer­ sity research centre based at Chelsea College of Art and Design. It explores a range of issues relating to the theme of practice in relation to dissemination of visual languages and cultural identity.

The MA is a qualification in itself, but also pre­ pares you for further research at MPhil and PhD level and future academic careers. The historical / theoretical path will prepare you for careers within museums, galleries or other related insti­ tutions. The practice path will provide a solid contextual and conceptual understanding of the production of art that, beyond informing one’s own practice, will benefit those inclined towards pedagogy. How to apply see p. 269.


30

Postgraduate Diploma Fine Art Chelsea College of Art and Design

This course encourages a challenge to, and expansion of fine art practice. It explores a range of approaches and procedures within a context of group initiated shows and independent learning. By developing a range of learning skills the course encourages a re-thinking of practice and develop­ ment of theoretical understanding. A lively and ongoing group dynamic is central to the teaching methods and philosophy of this course. Students work intensely, and as part of a culturally diverse group with potentially radical outcomes for practice.

The course consists of a programme of individual and group tutorials, seminars and workshops. Emphasis is placed on development, experimen­ tation and the critical discussion of your ideas with tutors and peers, and the introduction of aspects of professional practice and further study.

Many of our graduates go on to study at MA level, particularly in progressing to the MA Fine Art course at Chelsea. Alternatively, previous graduates work with galleries, set up studio spaces or have undertaken art-related careers. Former graduates consistently take part in Taught by staff from across the world, all of whom group exhibitions and solo exhibitions. Recent exhibitions include Carl Freedman Gallery, are current practitioners, the course covers a range of disciplines and methods. Students attend London and Neue Alte Brucke, Frankfurt. special seminar sessions with contemporary professional practitioners and there is a close peer How to apply see p. 269. relationship to the MA Fine Art course and its students.


MA Critical Writing and Curatorial Practice

31

Chelsea College of Art and Design

Taking an open approach to curation and its forms, this research-led course offers a challenging theoretical curriculum. It focuses on current cultural debates, sustained through an emphasis on bringing practice-based critique together with reading, writing and discussion. A diverse and creative staff team and visiting lecturers reflect this approach. Staff work unites and crosses the fields of writing, arts publishing, curation and art production. A visiting lecturer programme, a series of contemporary aesthetics seminars, writing workshops, professional practice lectures and seminars, visits to galleries and overseas projects, and collaborative events all support the course. Over the duration of the course, students are encouraged to curate exhibitions in project spaces and produce work collaboratively and independently in galleries or other spaces outside the College. Final assessment comprises of a Research Journal and a Project Portfolio that includes a Project Proposal for future curatorial activity arising from study and enquiry. The course benefits greatly from the College’s close relation to Tate Britain, providing students with an additional educational and archival resource. There is the opportunity for curation of Late at Tate events and public presentations in the galleries. The course also organises visits to significant international events and exhibitions, including most recently the Venice Biennale, Italy, 2009; and the Whitney Biennial, New York, 2008.

The course develops independent research projects and prepares you with knowledge, understanding and confidence in entering the professional sphere. The programme also equips you for progression to PhD research and other forms of research inquiry. Graduates of the course have established employ­ ment in international museums, and developed their independent work in organising and work­ ing with curatorial collectives. They have also represented artists through curation, as well as worked in writing and publishing and the arts. How to apply see p. 269.


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MA Fine Art Chelsea College of Art and Design

The MA Fine Art at Chelsea is one of the longest established postgraduate fine art courses in the UK. Our staff are current practitioners with international reputations. Graduates from MA Fine Art at Chelsea include internationally reputable artists and Turner Prize winners and nominees such as: Anish Kapoor, Mike Nelson, Peter Doig, Stephen Pippin, Rebecca Warren, Kimio Tsuchiya, Mariella Neudecker and Andreas Oelhert. This is an intensive taught course providing a valuable bridge between studentship and professional practice. The course is distinctive thanks to its commitment to developing the dialogue across the whole spectrum of fine art practice. We aim to provide a stimulating and challenging learning environment for ambitious students drawn from a wide inter­national application. One of the central aims is to promote and generate discourse between students, encouraging re-evaluation of practice. Underpinned by a challenging theoretical curriculum and instruction in approaches to research methodology, the course demands a high level of commitment to independent productive activity. Students are supported by a strong postgraduate community. The course, tutors and peers encourage students to intensify, challenge and contextualise their work. This enables them to locate their work in relation to contemporary fine art practice and develop potential to operate as professional artists and conduct further research. The course is primarily aimed at graduates of fine art, who wish to develop their practice to a professional level within a research context. We welcome applications from those who

see the practice of fine art as central to their professional aspirations and individual develop­ ment and who wish to challenge, intensify and contextualise their practice. The course develops your potential to operate as a professional artist within an international art community, or to progress to further academic research at PhD level. Many students go on to establishing their own studio practice, developing strong professional links with galleries and curators at a national and international level. How to apply see p. 269.


MA Graphic Design Communication

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Chelsea College of Art and Design

This course is aimed at applicants looking to be authors of their own practice. The course recog­nises the need for different voices and approaches. We are open to individual definitions of authorship, encouraging exploration and realisation of a singular perspective by providing a supportive and flexible approach to new modes of generating, presenting and disseminating work. This could encompass innovative uses of process or technology, the development of a signature style or an investigation into new models of working.

Throughout the course students participate in individual and group tutorials, attend workshops with outside writers, designers, and artists. They develop skills through Personal Professional Development and on-line resources. Postgraduate talks introduce students to a range of visiting artists and practitioners.

Collaborative projects and workshops have been practiced with the Design Museum, E4 and Jonathan Barnbook. Workshops have been held with Dylan Kendal of Tomato, Billy Bragg of Le Gun magazine, the artist Chad McCail, Nick At the same time students are expected to examine Roberts of Wordsalad and writer Anna Gerber. Recent graduates have exhibited work at their practice within a broader cultural context, The Courtauld Institute of Art, and been awarded considering the roles and responsibilities of a a fellowship by the Royal Society of the Arts, designer in relation to societal, environmental, and ethical issues. Whilst this may challenge and London. redefine existing boundaries, the primary concern of the course is to develop work that has integrity The course’s focus is on practice, supporting students to be forward thinking about their and autonomy. application either on to professional practice or in pursuing research to the level of PhD. The course is studio based, practice led, and underpinned by a theoretical framework that How to apply see p. 269. aims to promote lively, autonomous and reflective learners who have their own creative position on contemporary debates and society.


34

MA Interior and Spatial Design Chelsea College of Art and Design

Professional practice orientated This area of study emphasises site investigation and spatial resolution, where you bring your research concerns to a site context set by staff. Here the outcomes are focused on the detail design resolution of interventions into existing architectural or built conditions, and on the developing of challenging social programmes that engage with a wide cultural environment. The course encourages applications from graduates of interior design, interior architecture or architecture, and also from fine art graduates who want to pursue a more spatial aspect of their practice. We are interested in candidates who are keen to push the boundaries between disciplines and are looking to develop a deeper theoretical understanding of their practice. This course investigates the design of interior/ architectural spaces and architectural furniture. We encourage students to intensify, challenge and contextualise work in relation to contemporary interior and spatial design practice. We facilitate a critical awareness of current problems and new insights within the interior and spatial design practice. The course is underpinned by a challenging theoretical curriculum. It offers the possibility to pursue two areas of concern: Research orientated Here you will develop your own research proposal, developing projects that question the boundaries between architecture, design and fine art. You are encouraged to establish a connection between your theoretical concerns and your studio practice. This mode is parti­ cularly appropriate for students coming from a fine art or architectural background wishing to explore more conceptual spatial or furniture concerns within an architectural remit.

The course has direct links with a College research unit, the Spaces and Narrations research group. They organise a series of talks with architectural themes, and students are encour­ aged to participate in the group. Last year speakers included Shin Egashira and Peter Salter. This course provides graduates with a valuable bridge between studentship and professional practice. You will engage with leading practi­ tioners enabling you to redefine your current and future practice. Graduates have gone on to have architectural books published and films made, and have exhibited internationally. How to apply see p. 269.


MA Textile Design

35

Chelsea College of Art and Design

Throughout the course you participate in indi­ vidual and group tutorials, develop skills through workshops, on-line resources and postgraduate talks designed to introduce you to a range of visiting artists/designers and practitioners.

This is a studio-based, practice led course that demands a high level of commitment and motivation. Underpinned by a supportive theoretical framework and instruction in professional contemporary practice, it allows for collaborative opportunities for developing pioneering work within the textile industry. Concern and debate regarding the roles and responsibilities of the designer towards environ­ mental issues is key to the course. It actively responds to the growing awareness of selecting raw materials, the impact of production and the ultimate life cycle of the product, especially concerning its disposal or re-use. Through investigation and innovation you are encouraged to develop solutions which challenge convention and merge design with function. The course encourages applications from students with a high level of practical textile skills, design development methodologies and encourages an ambition directed towards different aspects of the textile industry. To succeed on the course you will need a high level of commitment and confidence in your abilities.

The Textile Environment Design (TED ) project at Chelsea is a unique research unit investigating the role designer’s play in the field of eco design. It is a resource that students, researchers and designers all benefit from and contribute to. A recent student used TED ’s extensive library of contacts to establish a unique sustainable craft design project based in Thailand. The unit also encourages MA students to attend conferences in this growing area and report their findings back to the College. Graduates have gone on to careers as textiles practitioners and designer-makers either working with, or establishing their own, major and independent fashion labels. Recent employment has included working as print designer for Ralph Lauren in New York, working on sustain­ able craft design projects in India and as an in-house designer for Heritage Cashmere. Other opportunities include freelance design work, interior product design or other industry related careers. Graduates are also well placed to go on to undertake further research. How to apply see p. 269.


36

MA Fine Art Wimbledon College of Art

Finally, the course creates a network of critical debates, peer learning, interaction and collaboration. The programme of research led presentations involving PhD students and supervisors, generate a range of debates within the Wimbledon graduate community (which includes the Centre for Drawing) and throughout the Graduate School. The course is also outward Practice-led research is used as a form of investiga­ looking and engages with a range of cultural, educational and social communities- including tion in terms of media, processes, meanings and context. As Studio and Critical Practice are viewed events or projects organised between the Colleges. holistically, you are encouraged to conceptualise How to apply see p. 269. your art practice as a project of research. This course asks you to rigorously re-examine your Studio, Critical and Professional Practices. These areas of research will cross reference to create a new level of understanding in terms of both your current practice, and its future possibilities. We call this practice-led research, and it underpins all aspects of your study.

This course places great emphasis on profes­ sionalism and developing your career aspirations. The professional practice lectures and seminars run alongside practical events, which involve exhibiting and promoting your work both within and outside College. These help you to define a clearer sense of your authorship, and an understanding of how you can effectively and confidently contribute to today’s fine art debates and activities.


MA Visual Language of Performance

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Wimbledon College of Art

tools you need to create your own work. By identifying, developing and strengthening your unique area of specialism you will be prepared to work not only independently, but also provide a confident, informed and inventive perspective to any creative team.

This course provides an innovative environment and a unique opportunity to define contemporary performance practice through the investigation, incorporation, and fusion of a range of art practices. You will learn to work across conventional boundaries to gain a broader vision and experi­ ence of contemporary artistic practices. You will develop a critical awareness of the creative processes that are vital to world cultures and traditions. On this course you will examine the role of spectator, space and action. You will aim to unravel innovative ways of realising ideas using a variety of performance models, materials and influences with which to express a unique point of view. Most importantly, you will acquire the

The course is project led and the curriculum is largely developed to support your individual practice and research through a series of selfinitiated projects. A substantial amount of the course is dedicated to your participation in debates surrounding a wide range of artistic media including video art, film, digital design, painting, sculpture, installation, as well as various genres of performance-making such as live art, site specific and cyber performance. You will utilise innovative technologies and networking tools such as blogs, broadband streaming, mobile technology and other web interfaces in order to forge new connections, facilitate debates, share ideas and network with a universal community of diverse practitioners. You will be tutored by artists who work in a wide range of art practices as well as receiving support from the range of disciplines provided by staff across the Graduate School. The Visual Language of Performance pro­gramme will prepare you to work as an independent creative artist in the increasingly interdisciplinary and intercultural performance world. How to apply see p. 269.


People


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40

people

152

Stair Julian

Professors

154

Velios Athanasios

41

Baddeley Oriana

156

Walsh Maria

44

Bamford Anne

158

Whitelegg Isobel

46

Coldwell Paul

161

Wilder Kenneth

50

Cummings Neil

Course Directors and

53

Drew Linda

56

Elwes Catherine

164

59

Farthing Stephen

167

Bircham Lorna

62

Garcia David

169

Chalkley Brian

64

Newman Avis

171

Fitzpatrick Edwina

67

Pickwoad Nicholas

174

Ghazi Babak

69

Politowicz Kay

176

Johanknecht Susan

72

Scrivener Stephen

179

O’Connell Douglas

75

Slee Richard

182

Sandy Mark

78

Wainwright Chris

184

Stiff Andrew

82

Watanabe Toshio

186

Taylor Finlay

84

Woolley Janet

188

Waller Tracey

Asbury Michael

190

Current Research Degree

92

Baseman Jordan

Supervisors

96

Biswas Sutapa

100

Collins Jane

192

102

Cross David

193

110

Earley Rebecca

transnationalist, by Michael Asbury

114

Fairnington Mark

200

In conversation, Jordan Baseman and

Pathway leaders Beech Amanda

Readers 88

Selected Papers and interviews Who? Me?: Confessions of a casual

116

Faure Walker James

Roger Wilson

119

Fortnum Rebecca

205

Performing Identity on the

123

Kikuchi Yuko

international Stage, Jane Collins and

125

Newman Hayley

Roger Wilson

128

Pavelka Michael

212

131

Quinn Malcolm

Distributed, by Neal Cummings

134

Tulloch Carol

Fellows

Museum Futures: Live, Recorded,

223

Drawn Identities: Pepsi, Shakers

and Tattoos, by Stephen Farthing

142

Francis Mary Anne

228

Art and Knowledge Workshops

145

O’Riley Timothy

in the Age of Networks, by David Garcia

147

Salter Rebecca

234

Lines of Enquiry, by Chris Wainwright

150

Sandino Linda


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people

(photo by O. Baddeley)


Baddeley Oriana

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Professor

Biog r a p h y   Professor Baddeley is Director of Research at C-C-W and Deputy-Director of the research centre for Transnational Art, Identity and Nation (TrAIN ). She studied History and Theory of Art at the Univer­sity of Essex. Her doctoral subject, researching the historiography of definitions of ‘art’ in relation to Ancient Mexico, formed the basis for work on the 1992 Hayward exhibition The Art of Ancient Mexico. She has written extensively on contemporary Latin American art, including Drawing the Line: Art and Cultural Identity in Contemporary Latin America (Verso 1989, co-author Valerie Fraser) and collaborated with Gerardo Mosquera to produce Beyond the Fantastic: Art Criticism from Contempo­ rary Latin America (inIVA/MIT 1996). With Toshio Watanabe and Partha Mitter, (2001–04), she worked on a major AHRC funded project ‘Nation, Identity and Modernity: Visual Culture of India, Japan and Mexico, 1860s–1940’. Arising from this project she contributed to the Victoria & Albert Museum’s Art Deco (2003) looking at the influence of ideas of Mexican culture on modern design. Other key publications include an essay on contemporary responses to Frida Kahlo in the catalogue to the Tate Modern exhibition 2005, for which she organised a major international conference on related themes. She is on the Inter­ national Advisory Committee of the University of Essex Collection of Latin American Art, the editorial board of Art History and a Trustee of the St Catherine Foundation.

context of globalisation, identity studies and contemporary art practice. My earlier doctoral research grew out of attempting to understand the values and meanings of the ancient cultures of the Americas and the ways colonisation and the discourses of post- colonialism had impacted on the interpretation of those cultures. With a focus on Mexico and Latin America I have also worked in detail on the histories of ‘exhibiting’ the art of these regions and how traditions of display and categorisation have been responded to within the global structures of contemporary art expositions. Running through­out much of my writing has been a fascination with the ways different geographic contexts impact on definitions of creative practice and how such definitions are then interpreted.

Rese a r c h S tat e m e nt   I am an art historian and cultural commentator working to understand the ways that history and identity intersect with practice in art and design. As a co-founder of the UAL research centre for Transnational Art, Identity and Nation (TrAIN – www.transnational. org.uk) my research is undertaken within the

Recent Publications 2007 ‘Teresa Margolles and the Pathology of Everyday Death’ in Dardo Magazine, #5, Santiago de Compostela, Rio de Janeiro. 2007 ‘The Relocation of Authenticity and Transnational Dilemmas, Rio de Janeiro’ in Asbury, M., and Ferreira, G. (eds), Transnational Correspondence (Special Edition of Arte and Ensaios, #14), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro.

In recent years my publications have included a comparative discussion of the work of Ernesto Neto and Gabriel Orozco (‘Re-Locating Authenticity and the Transnational Dilema’ in Transnational Correspondences, 2007) and an exploration of the work of Teresa Margolles in relation to stereo­types of Mexican identity (‘Teresa Margolles and the Pathology of Everyday Death’ Dardo Magazine 5, 2007). I am continuing to explore issues around cultural stereotype and ideas of authenticity, particularly looking at the associations of death, gender and danger with cultural otherness. S e lect ed Ou t pu t s an d Ach ievemen t s


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Baddeley Oriana

Ernesto Neto, Leviathan Thot, site specific installation, Pantheon, Paris, 2006 (photo by O. Baddeley)


Baddeley Oriana

2005 ‘Reflecting on Kahlo: Mirrors, Masquerade and the Politics of Identification’, in: Frida Kahlo, exhibition catalogue, Tate Modern, London 2004 ‘The Beautiful South: Fantasies of Mexicanness’, in: Imagined Modernities, University of Coimbra, Portugal 2003 ‘Ancient Mexican Sources of Art Deco’, in: Art Deco, catalogue, Victoria & Albert Museum, London. Selected Conferences / Presentations 2009 Co-organiser, and Chair / panellist with Charles Esche: Exhibitions and the World at Large, Tate Britain, London. 2009 Panel discussion with Julian Stallabrass and Rosina Cazali at Performing Localities, inIVA, London. 2008 Panel discussion with Gabriela Salgado, Curator of Public Programmes at Tate Modern at A State of Exchange, inIVA, London 2008 Paper presented at A,B,C… D Symposium, Victoria & Albert Museum. 2008 Co-organiser and paper presented at 28th Sao Paulo Bienal Conference, Parque Ibirapuera, Sao Paulo. 2008 Teresa Margolles and the Pathology of Everyday Death, lecture at the Institute of American Studies. 2007 ‘The Re-Location of Authenticity and Transnational Dilemmas’ – paper presented at Transnational Correspondence, Tate Modern.

Street mural, Chicano Park, San Diego, California, USA (photo by O. Baddeley)

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2007 ‘Re-locating Authenticity and the Transnational’ First International Symposium of Graduate Studies in Art History and Related Programs, 1–4 October 2007, Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico City. 2006 The Transformation of a National Museum, Instituto Tomie Otake, Sao Paulo. 2006 Henry Moore and Myths of Primitiveness, Museo Eva Klabin, Rio de Janeiro, British Council organised lecture. 2005 The Many Faces of Frida, Tate Modern, London, coorganiser and speaker. 2004 Nation, Identity & Modernity: Visual Culture of India, Japan & Mexico, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, co-organiser and speaker. Key positions Editorial board member, Art History, journal of the Association of Art Historians. Member of the International Advisory Committee of UECLAA (University of Essex Collection of Latin American Art). Advisory Editor of the Oxford Art Journal. Trustee of the St Catherine Foundation.


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Bamford Anne Professor

Biography   Professor Anne Bamford is Director of Enterprise at C-C-W and formerly Director of the Engine Room and Director of Cultural Programmes at Creativity, Culture and Education, UK. She has been recognised nationally and internationally for her research in arts and cultural education, emerging literacies and visual communication. Through her research, she has pursued issues of innovation, social impact and equity and diversity. As a World Scholar for UNESCO , Bamford researched and wrote The Wow Factor: Global research compendium on the impact of the arts in education (2006) published by Waxmann. She has conducted major national impact and evaluation studies for the govern­ ments of Denmark, The Netherlands, Belgium, Iceland and Australia, was awarded the Australian Institute for Educational Research Outstanding Educational Research Award for 2002, and short listed for the British Female Innovator of the Year in 2006. Professor Bamford was elected as a Freeman of the Guild of Educators in 2008 in recognition of her contribution to global change in education. R e search S tat e m e n t   My career in arts education and impact evaluation in the arts, cultural and design area extends over 30 years and includes major national and international commissioned policy evaluation research. As the first Director of the Engine Room established at Wimbledon School of Art, my research fosters collaborative projects and provides opportunities for learning in and through the arts. The Engine Room acknowledges the importance of art as a catalyst for social learning and values artistic encounters and creative opportunities for all people. With a strong focus on working with the arts in the community at both local and inter­ national levels, my projects push the boundaries

of research, enterprise, diversity, and community through innovative and creative collaborations. I have supervised and examined numerous stu­ dents at the masters and doctoral levels. Through the adoption of a community of research approach, I encourage researchers to work within collaborative research projects and to use practice, arts-based and aesthetic methods to explore complex social, educational and cultural ques­tions. This work has particularly focused on empirical measurement on intangible as well as tangible impacts, and has developed ways of identifying changes in the so-called ‘hard to measure’ aspects of human engagement in creative and cultural activity. S e le c t e d Ou t pu t s an d Ach ievemen t s

Selected Research Grants 2008 Research Director, Domestic and General: Public engagement evaluation. 2008 Research Director, Creativity Connects: The role of cultural capital in raising aspirations of Looked After Children Arts Council England, John Lyons Trust. 2008 Research Director, Artists research unit: Arts Council England. 2007–08 Research Director, Impact of the Sciart scheme: Wellcome Trust. 2006–07 Research Director, Impact of the ING education and arts museum partnership. 2007 Chief investigator, Creative Partnerships artists train­ ing programme pilot research, Arts Council London West. 2006–08 Chief Investigator, Creativity Matters: Bringing professional artists into early years and family learning in marginalised urban communities. 2006 Chief Investigator, Higher Education Innovation Fund Knowledge Transfer Fund (HEIF 3), HEFKE. 2006 Chief Investigator, An Evaluation of Arts, Culture and Design education in Flanders, Ministry for Education. 2006 Chief Investigator, The Impact of Arts and Cultural Education in The Netherlands, Arts Ministry Netherlands and Cultura Network. 2006–07 Chief Investigator, European Arts and Cultural Education and summit. French Ministry for Culture and Centre Pompidou. 2006–2008 Chief Investigator, Visual Artists research unit, Arts Council England.


Bamford Anne

2006 Chief Investigator Anne Peaker Centre for Arts and Criminal Justice: Scoping review of arts with black and ethnic minority prisoners. 2005–06 Chief Investigator, 21st Century Education: The role of Creativity, Adobe Systems International, Macromedia. 2005–06 Chief Investigator, Creativity Matters: Impact of the arts in early childhood education, Ealing Council, London. 2005–07 Chief Investigator, Symposium on research carried out into evaluating the impact of arts education, French Ministry of Culture, French Ministry of Education, Centre Pompidou. 2005–06 Chief Investigator, Danish impact of the arts on educational quality, Danish Arts Council, Danish Ministry of education. 2005–06 Chief Investigator, Visual Artist research unit, Arts Council England. 2004–05 Chief Investigator, UNESCO Global Impact of the Arts in Education. Australia Council, IFACCA, UNESCO. Selected Publications 2007 ‘Image Ready: Die Bedeutung der visuellen Bildung’ in Niehoff, R. and Wenrich, R. (eds), Denken und Lernen mit Bildren: Interdisziplinäre Zugänge zur ästhetischen Bildung Kopaed, München. 2007 With Qvortrup, M., The politics of the soul: Eudmonia for the future Zed Books, London (under review). 2006 ‘Into the future: The challenges for quality arts and design education’ in Davies, A. 2006 Enhancing curricula: Contributing to the future, meeting the challenges of the 21st century in the disciplines of art, design and communication, The Centre for Learning and Teaching in Art and Design (cltad), London. 2006 The Wow Factor: The global research compendium on the impact of arts in education, Waxmann Münster, Berlin (also published in Korean and Spanish). 2006 ‘Building innovation: The impact of education in and through the arts’ in Oakley, K. et al. 2006 How are we going? Directions for the Arts in the Creative Age, Cambridge Scholars Press, London. 2004 The Visual Arts Book, Heinemann, Sydney. Selected Commissioned Reports/Documents 2008 Creative Partnerships Artists Training Programme, Arts Council England, London. 2007 An evaluative report of arts in prisons, Anne Peaker Centre for Arts in Criminal Justice (APC), Canterbury. 2007 Netwerken en verbindingen: Arts and Cultural Education in The Netherlands, Dutch Ministry for Education, Culture and Sport.

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2007 Kwaliteit en Consistentie: Arts and Cultural Education in Flanders, CANON Cultural Unit, Ministry for Education Flanders. 2007 Creativity Matters: The Arts in Early Years, London Borough of Ealing. 2006 With Qvortrup M. An Ildsjæl in the Classroom, Copenhagen, The Danish Arts Council. 2005 The Global Research Compendium on the Impact of the arts in Education, in UNESCO Asia-Pacific Regional Conference Report. 2004 Education and Arts Partnership Initiative: National Report, Australia Council for the Arts. Selected Journal Articles 2007 ‘Elke leerling een culturelle rugzak’, Cultuureducatie Magazine, winter 07/08 (www.cjp.nl/docenten) 2007 ‘Het Delen van Verbindingen’, Courant : Dossier Onderwijs en Cultuur, vol.83. 2006 ‘L’éducation artistique en Australie’, Revue Internationale D’Education, #42. 2006 ‘L’éducation artistique dans le monde’, Revue Internationale D’Education, #42. 2006 With Qvortrup, M. Book Review: ‘Jacques Ranciére: The politics of aesthetics: The distribution of the Sensible’, Millennium – Journal of International Studies, vol.34. 2006 ‘Adolescent identity, cyber bullying and ethics in information communication technologies’, International Journal of the Humanities, vol.2. 2005 With Hernandez, F. ‘Las artes son un pilar básico de la educación del futuro’, Cuadernos de Pedagogia, #351. 2005 With Thompson, D. ‘Transforming student assessment to liberate pedagogy’, Snapshots: Journal of Innovation in Education, vol.3, #2. 2005 With Brown I. ‘Deconstructing strategies students apply to view, interpret and make visual images’, International Visual Literacy Association Book of Selected Readings, 2004 Annual IVLA Conference.


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Coldwell Paul Professor

Biography   Professor Paul Coldwell is Acting Director of the University research centre SCIRIA . He has recently led a two-year AHRC funded project, The Personal­ised Surface within Fine Art Digital Printmaking. He has taught in numerous colleges throughout UK and abroad and contributed to many interna­tional conferences and symposia on Printmaking.

His art practice includes prints, book works, sculptures and installations. He has exhibited widely, his work is included in numerous public collections, including Tate, Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A), British Museum and the Arts Council of England, has been selected to represent UK at the Ljubljana Print Biennial in 2005 and 1997, selected for the International Print Triennial, Cracow in 2000, 2003, 2006 and 2009, and the Northern Print Biennial in 2009. His most recent solo exhibition was I called while you were out at Kettle’s Yard Cambridge, 2008–09. He has curated a number of exhibitions including Computers & Printmaking, Birmingham Museum & Art Galleries, Digital Responses, V&A and most recently, Morandi’s Legacy; Influences on British Art at the Estorick Collection London, accompanied by a book published by Philip Wilson. His work is featured in the recent book Prints Now (Saunders & Miles) and is currently preparing a major new book on contemporary printmaking for Black Dog Publishers due February 2010. R e search S tat e m e n t   My research is focused on a practiced-based approach and located within fine art. Through printmaking, sculpture, installation and writing, I explore issues around absence and loss, with ideas crossing between media. A recurring question for me is how the new technologies impact on previous processes,

in particular within printmaking and how digital technologies can inform and rejuvenate older technologies such as etching and screen-print. This fits in to my broader commitment to print­ making both as a practitioner but also through raising awareness of the value and quality of print over and beyond its role as a reproducible media. I have written on a number of artists including Ardizzone, Rego, Morandi, Caulfield and CraigMartin and I am currently the contributing editor for a forthcoming book Printmaking – A Contem­ porary Perspective to be published by Black Dog Publishing in February 2010. I have just concluded a two year AHRC funded project, The Personalised Surface within Fine Art Digital Printmaking which considered a range of approaches that artists have adopted to ensure a haptic relationship with their work when working with and through digital technologies. This is part of my broader research within printmaking and I am now in the process of developing a new project with Susan Johanknecht, which will consider the Folio and Artists book as sites of inquiry. I have often used collections as locations for my research and practice. These have included, the V&A, Kettle’s Yard and a current project that I am developing with the John Soane Museum. Writing has increasingly played an important role in my research, looking for ways of using a narrative language to explore and articulate ideas. My recent projects and exhibition at The Estorick Collection, Morandi’s Legacy; Influences on British Art, and at Kettles Yard, I called while you were out, were both accompanied by substantial narrative essays in which I attempted to show how I gather material and how this relates to my working process.


Coldwell Paul

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Paul Coldwell, Man and Nature-Jacket, digital inkjet print, 65 × 90 cm, 2008

Sele c t e d O u t p u t s a n d Ac h i e v e m e n t s

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2008–09 I called while you were out, Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge. 2008 Graphic Work, An-Dan-Te Gallery, Korea. 2007 Kafka’s Doll and Other Works, Eagle Gallery. 2005 Paul Coldwell – Recent Prints, Edinburgh Printmakers. 2002 ‘Case Studies’, London Print Studio; Queens Gallery, New Delhi, India; Gallerie 88, Kolkata, India. Selected Group Exhibitions 2009 Points of Contact, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. 2008 Close to the Surface: Digital Presence, ICA, London. 2007 International Multiple Art Exhibition, Gyeongnam International Art Festival, Korea. 2007 Territories, Study Centre Poole. 2007 14th Tallinn Print Triennial. 2006 International Print Triennial, Cracow, Poland. 2006 Prints Now, Victoria & Albert Museum, London. 2006 International Print Triennial, Cracow, Poland. 2005 Sculpture; Time & Process, Study Gallery Poole. 2005 New Works; Paul Coldwell – Richard Slee, Camberwell.

2005 Ljubljana Biennial, invited artist, Slovenia. 2003 International Print Triennial, Cracow, Contemporary Art Palace, Cracow; Horst Janssen Museum, Oldenburg. 2003 4th Egyptian International Print Triennale, Cairo, Egypt. Selected Curatorial Projects 2006 Moriandi’s Legacy: Influences on British Art, Abbott Hall, Cumbria. 2004 Beyond The Digital Surface, Ewah Gallery, Seoul. 2002–03 Digital Responses, Victoria & Albert Museum. Books 2009 Personalised Surface; New Approaches to Digital Printmaking, Publication concluding two year AHRC research project. 2006 Morandi’s Legacy: Influences on British Art, London, Philip Wilson Publishers. 2005 Paula Rego – Printmaker, London, Marlborough Graphics. 2005 Finding Spaces between Shadows, London, Camberwell Press.


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Coldwell Paul

Paul Coldwell, Framing Nature-Trees, screenprint, 75 × 100 cm, 2008

Selected Published Writings 2008 ‘Between Digital & Physical’, in Journal of the New Media Caucus, vol.4, #02. 2008 Guest editor of Journal of the New Media Caucus, vol.04, #02. 2008 Essay in I called when you were out, Kettle’s Yard. 2006 Moriandi’s Legacy; Influences on Biritish Art, Philip Wilson. 2005 ‘Ceramic as Canvas Collaboration with Spode has proved to be a fruitful relationship for Charlotte Hodes’, in Ceramic Review, #213. 2003 ‘Paula Rego’s Graphic Technique’, in Paula Rego – The Complete Graphic work, London,Thames & Hudson. 2003 ‘Born with a Silver Spoon’, in Digital Responses, CD-ROM, London Victoria & Albert Museum. 2003 ‘Negotiating the Surface’, in Digital Surface within Fine Art Practice (CDRom), Dublin, NCAD, UIAH+LI. Presentations/Conference Contributions 2007 ‘Three Bookworks – Memory and Identity’, at Impact International Printmaking Conference, Tallinn. 2007 ‘The personalised surface within fine art digital printmaking’, at Impact International Printmaking Conference, Tallinn.

2004 ‘Integrating the Computer’, at Pixel Raiders 2, Sheffield Hallam University, April. 2004 ‘The Surface as Meaning’, at Beyond the Digital Surface – Conference Proceedings, Seoul, Ewha Womans University. 2003 ‘Making Historie’, at Southern Graphics Council Conference, Boston. 2003 ‘Preservation and Conservation Issues Related to Digital Printing and Photography’, at conference at Institute of Physics, Heriot Watt University Edinburgh. 2003 ‘The Digital Surface’, at Culture 2000 Conference, Tate Britain. 2003 ‘An exploration of Aesthetics in a Digital Age’, at Southern Graphics Council Conference, Boston April, Boston, USA. Selected Awards 2008 AHRC Practice-led and Applied Grant: ‘Absence and Presence.’ 2007 Principal Investigator, 2 year AHRC research grant for the project ‘Personalised Surface within Fine Art Digital Print Making’. 2005 AHRB Small award for work relating to potential use of haptic technology for digital engraving (in collabo­ ration with Dr Angie Geary).


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Paul Coldwell, Seven Familiar Objects, bronze, 29 × 14 × 200 cm, 2008

2004 AHRB Small Grant: Morandi; themes in British Contemporary Art. 2002 Project leader, Digital Surface within Fine Art Practice, EU funded project through Culture 2000 with London Institute, National College of Art and Design, Dublin, and University of Art and Design, Helsink Selected lectures/talks 2008 Paul Coldwell and Roger Wilson in conversation, Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge. 2007 Paula Rego – Printmaker, Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery. 2007 Paul Coldwell – The Role of Printmaking, Original Print Fair, RA, London. 2007 Multi-Print Symposium, Bradford. 2007 Kafka’s Doll, Eagle Gallery London. 2007 Morandi’s Prints, British Museum. 2006 Moriandi’s Legacy; Influences on British Art, Abbot Hall, Museo Morandi Bologna, Italian Cultural Institute, London. 2006 Paula Rego – Printmaker, RCA. 2006 Sites of Memory, inaugral lecture, University of Northampton. 2005 Paula Rego – Printmaker, Talbot Rice Edinburgh, Brighton Museum & Art Gallery.

2005 The Condition of Print, Impact International Print Conference, Berlin/Poznan. 2005 Imagined Journey’s, Impact 1V, Berlin–Poznan. 2005 The artist as curator, Institute of Curatorship and Education, Edinburgh College of Art. 2002 Case Studies, British High Commission, Delhi and Gallerie 88, Calcutta.


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Cummings Neil Professor

Biography   Neil Cummings is Professor of Critical Practice at Chelsea. He was born in Wales, and lives in London. (www.neilcummings.com). R e search S tat e m e n t   I have evolved a multidisciplinary art practice that often requires an intense period of research within the specific contexts in which art is produced, distributed and encounters its audiences. Principally this has meant working directly with Museums, Galleries (both public and commercial) Archives and Art Schools.

I often work collaboratively with other artists, curators, academics researchers or producers, to create artworks, exhibitions and events from existing collections or contexts. Each artwork or event finds the appropriate form, and these are as varied as creating exhibitions – Enthusiasm at the Whitechapel Gallery, curating film programmes – Social Cinema at several temporary locations in central London, writing and editing films – Museum Futures; Distributed, books – The Value of Things, and convening participatory conferences – Open Congress at Tate. Currently I am interested in the political economy of creativity, and how art is instituted. While at Chelsea I contribute to the research cluster Critical Practice (www.criticalpracticechelsea.org). Selected O u t p u t s a n d Ac h i e v e m e nt s

Selected Exhibitions and Projects 2009 Lapdogs installed at the Arnolfini in Bristol as part of Lapdogs of the Bourgeoisie. 2008 Lapdogs screened at the Townhouse Gallery in Cairo, Egypt. 2008 Post production a special programme curated from The Enthusiasts Archive (www.enthusiastsarchive.net) for Manifesta 7, installed in the ex-Alumix factory in Bolzano, Italy.

2008 Museum Futures: live recorded distributed project commissioned by Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden, as part of their Jubilee celebrations. 2007 Parade, commissioned for the Contour Film Biennial, exhibited in Mechelen, Belgium, and ArtLife a simultaneous project for Transit Gallery, Belgium. 2006 Generosity as part of Protections, Kunsthaus Graz, Austria. 2006 Launch of The Enthusiasts Archive (www.enthusiastsarchive.net), an on-line extension of Enthusiasm. 2005–06 Industrialtownfurturism: 100 years of Wolfsburg and Nowa Huta, opened at the Kunstverein Wolfsburg in December 2005 and closed in Nowa Huta, Cracow in November 2006, commissioned by the London Architecture Biennale. 2005–06 Screen Test 1/4, exhibited as part of The British Art Show Six, touring exhibition with catalogue. 2005 Enthusiasm, major exhibition at the Whitechapel Art Gallery, London and touring to Kunst Werke, Berlin and the Tapies Foundation, Barcelona, accompanying trilingual publication. 2004 Enthusiasts, The Centre for Contemporary Art, Warsaw, Poland, bi-lingual publication. 2004 The Commons, a distributed artwork at key sites in Liverpool, commissioned as part of the International section of The Liverpool Biennial. 2003 Free Trade, Manchester Art Gallery, Manchester, UK. Selected Texts 2008 Selection of texts, The History Book: On Moderna Museet 1958–2008, Moderna Museet and Steidl Verlag, Germany. 2007 ‘From Capital to Enthusiasm’. in Macdonald, S. and Basu, P. (eds) Exhibition Experiments, Blackwell Publishing, Oxford. 2006 ‘A shadow of Marx’, in Jones, A. (ed.) A Companion to Art Since 1945, Blackwell Publishing, Oxford. 2005 ‘Relations Audiences, Institutions and Values’, in British Art Show Six catalogue, Hayward Gallery Publishing, London. 2004 ‘An Economy of Love’, in Cox, G., Krysa, J. and Lewin, A. (eds) Economising Culture: on the Digital Culture Industry, autonomedia, New York. 2004 ‘From Things to Flows’, in Stahel, U., Seelig, T. (eds) The Ecstacy of Things, Steidl Verlag, Gottingen. 2004 ‘Collision’, in Preziosi, D. and Fargo, C. (eds) Grasping the World: the Idea of the Museum, Ashgate, London. 2003 ‘Reprise’, published as part of Independence, South London Gallery, London.


Cummings Neil

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Neil Cummings, Lapdogs (installation), for Lapdogs of the Bourgeoisie Arnolfini Bristol, 2008–09 (image outside of copyright, and creative commons license)

Selected Presentations and Conference Papers 2006 Keynote presentation on Screen Tests, at CIMAM Annual Conference, Tate Modern, London. 2006 ‘Virtual Communities versus Physical Realities’, at Future of Community Festival, London. 2006 Paper presented at Anticipating the Past: Artist: Archive: Film, Tate Modern, London. 2005 Co-organiser as part of Critical Practice, Open Congress, Tate Britain, London. 2005 ‘Introduction of Enthusiast: archive’ at Remix Culture: Creative Commons and Creativity, University of Sussex. 2004 Keynote presentation ‘A Joy Forever (and its place in the market)’ at 30th Annual Conference of the Association of Art Historians, Nottingham. 2004 ‘New Paradigms of Contemporary Art’, at CaixaForum, Barcelona, Spain.

2003 Presentation at Fieldworks; dialogues between Art and Anthropology, conference organized by Tate Modern and the University of London, in association with Goldsmiths College and University College London. Tate Modern, London. 2003 ‘Collections Cultures Change’, contributed to a threeday conference organized by the Centre for Museology & the Manchester Museum, University of Manchester. 2003 ‘The Gift: generous offerings, threatening hospitality’, Bronx Museum, New York. 2002 ‘From Material Things: Art and Artifact in the 21st Century’, The British Museum, London. 2002 ‘Polyphony of Voices’ Contemporary Curatorial Strategies and Practices conference, at Bunkier Sztuki Centre for Contemporary Art, Cracow, Poland.


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Neil Cummings and Marysia Lewandowska, Post Production (installation), a special programme curated from the Enthusiasts: archive for Manifesta 7, Bolzano, Italy, 2008 (images outside of copyright, and creative commons license)

Places on committees and selection panels 2009 Peer review college member, AHRC. 2007 Trustee, Nottingham Contemporary. 2006 Member of Editorial Board, Documents in Contemporary Art. 2002 Member of Tate / Chelsea Liaison Group. Visiting Fellowships 2004 Visiting Professor, Grinnell College, Iowa, USA. 2005 Visiting Scholar, University of the Arts in Boulder, Colorado, USA


Drew Linda

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Professor

Biog r a p h y   Professor, Dr Linda Drew, is Dean of the Graduate School at C-C-W . Professor Drew was previously Head of College (acting 2006–07) and Dean (2003–06) at Chelsea College of Art and Design and Co-Direc­tor of the Art, Design and Communication subject centre, (2000–03) based at the University of Brighton. She is editor of the peer-reviewed journal Art, Design and Commu­ nication in Higher Education published by Intellect and maintains a lively interest in all matters relating to publishing and research capacity building in this field.

Her research interests focus on conceptions of, and approaches to, learning and teaching situated within the context of practice-based disciplines. In this regard she is one of a growing clutch of active design researchers working with both phenomenographic and social constructivist approaches to research. Professor Drew is currently engaged by the Singaporean Ministry of Education as a member of its AQAF (Arts Quality Assurance Framework) External Review Panel which is reviewing arts higher education provision in Singapore (2008–10). She has represented the University of the Arts London on the Singapore British Business Council since 2005. Linda is an alumna of Saint Martins School of Art and a Fellow of the Design Research Society (FDRS ). My research interests are concerned with understanding the experience of learning and teaching, particularly in creative practice domains. I have attained a national and international profile in this area, through publishing papers and presenting at international research conferences in art and design, particu­ larly in learning and teaching. I have a high quality publication record, with more than ten Rese a r c h S tat e m e nt  

papers in peer-reviewed journals or edited collections. This is supplemented with over twenty conference papers, some of which are published in proceedings, some electronically (i.e. CD/DVD ) or available on the web. On the basis of this research and my wider leader­ ship activities I have been involved in conference steering committees and have acted as a referee for conferences, highly respected journals and nationally funded projects (National Teaching Fellowship Scheme, individual and project strand). I have a wide understanding of the field of art and design research developed through my own research and the review and/or development of the work of others. In 2007 I was made a fellow of the Design Research Society (DRS ), an honour bestowed on a very small number of design researchers. I am the founding Editor of the international refereed journal Art, Design and Communication in Higher Education, which, from experience, reflects a significant amount of development time. I have nurtured an international editorial board from development meetings in September 2000 to the launch in April 2002. The journal is one of a small number of art and design journals that is helping to shape the art and design research discourse of the future. The issue of developing research quality and capability in art and design pedagogic research was the topic of my address to the DRS Rising Stars Symposium in July 2005, a platform provided in recognition of my standing within the international design research community Recent development themes include the relation­ ship between research and teaching which has been a focus for many UK HEIs. I have given


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several keynote addresses at events around this theme (eg. Design Education Forum of South Africa, 2007). I have secured significant funding for the pursu­ ance of pedagogic development and research at the University through the CLIP CETL (Creative Learning in Practice – Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching), representing HEFCE total funding of £4.85 million over five years. S elected O u t p u t s a n d Ach i e v e m e n t s

Selected Publications 2008 With Shreeve, A. and Wareing, S. ‘Key aspects of teaching and learning in the visual arts’, in A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: Enhancing Academic Practice, Fry, S., Ketteridge, S. and Marshall, S. (eds), London: Routledge. 2008 Editor and contributor, The student experience in art and design higher education: drivers for change, Cambridge: Jill Rogers Associates. 2007 ‘Designing the interface between research, learning and teaching’, in Design Research Quarterly, 2 (3). 2006 With Shreeve, A. ‘Assessment as participation in practice’, in Rust, C. (ed.) Improving Student Learning: Improving Student Learning through Assessment, Oxford: Oxford Brookes University, Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development. 2005 ‘Variation in approaches to learning and teaching in disciplinary contexts: how to accommodate diversity?’, in Rust, C. (ed.) Improving Student Learning: Diversity and Inclusivity, Oxford: Oxford Brookes University, Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development. 2004 ‘The Experience of Teaching Creative Practices: Conceptions and Approaches to Teaching in the Community Practice Dimensions’, in Davies, A. (ed.) Enhancing Curricula: Towards the Scholarship of Teaching Art, Design and Communication in Higher Education, CLTAD, London. 2004 With Breslow, L., Healey, M., Matthew, R. and Norton, L., ‘Intellectual Curiosity: A Catalyst for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and Education’, in Elvidge, L. (ed.) Exploring Academic Development in Higher Education: Issues of Engagement. 2004 With Bailey, S. and Shreeve, A. ‘Students’ approaches to the “research” component in the fashion design project: Variation in students’ experience of the research process.’, in Art Design and Communication in Higher Education, vol.2/3.

Selected Conference Papers 2006 With Last, J. ‘Evaluating the student experience in art and design.’, paper presented at 3rd Biennial CLTAD Conference: Enhancing Curricula: contributing to the future, meeting the challenges of the 21st century in the disciplines of art, design and communication, Lisbon, Portugal. 2005 ‘Open Source technology as a learning tool to enhance students’ critical and conceptual abilities.’, paper presented at Open Congress, Tate Britain, London, UK. 2004 ‘Variation in the experience of teaching design: the community of practice dimension’ at Design Research Society International Conference, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. 2004 ‘The experience of teaching creative practices: the community of practice dimension.’, at Enhancing the Curricula: Towards the Scholarship of Teaching in Art, Design and Communication, Barcelona, Spain. 2003 ‘Approaches to teaching: extending “theory” in the context of art, design and communication.’, paper presented at Improving Student Learning: Theory, Research and Scholarship, The 11th International Improving Student Learning Symposium, Hinckley, Leicestershire. 2003 ‘Qualitative differences in approaches to teaching, teacher satisfaction and communities of practice in art, design and communication courses’, at 10th Biennial EARLI (European Association for Research in Learning and Instruction) Conference, Padova, Italy. Keynote presentations 2009 Key-note speaker at Inaugural Design Pedagogy SIG (DRS), Coventry School of Art and Design, Coventry University. 2007 Key-note speaker at DEFSA (Design Education Forum of South Africa) FLUX ‘07, Cape Town, South Africa. 2005 ‘Designing pedagogic research: Learning and teaching practice, scholarship and research.’, at Design Research Society: Rising Stars, Institute of Pharmacists, London, UK. Membership of professional bodies 2006 Elected Vice-Chair, Design Research Society (DRS). 2002 Design Research Society (DRS), elected to Council July 2005. 2000 GLAD Secretary (Group for Learning in Art and Design). Editorial positions 2007– Member of Editorial Board, Design Studies. 2006– Member of Editorial Board, Journal of Writing in Creative Practice.


Drew Linda

Art, Design and Communication in Higher Education (international peerreviewed journal), edited by Professor Linda Drew

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Elwes Catherine Professor

Biography   Catherine Elwes is a Professor at Camberwell. She studied Fine Art at the Slade School of Art, and graduated with an MA in Environmental Media from the Royal College of Art, London in 1983. In the late 1970s she was a member of the Women Artists’ Collective and co-curated two landmark feminist exhibitions, Women’s Images of Men and About Time, both held at the ICA in London in 1980. From the early 1980s she specialised in video, exploring representation and the body, gender and identity. As an artist, she has participated in multiple international festivals, recently including the British Art Show in Australia; Video Brazil in Sao Paulo, Brazil; Recent British Video in New York, USA. Her tapes have been shown on Channel 4 as well as Spanish, Canadian and French networks . Her work is archived at LUXONLINE and REWIND .

curatorial project has been Figuring Landscapes, a collection of 55 works on themes of landscape from the UK and Australia, currently touring both countries. Her own practice as a video artist continues to inform both her writing and her curating. R e s e a r c h Stat emen t   I continue to investigate the social, cultural and aesthetic dimensions of moving image art through my writings and my curatorial work. I am particularly interested in the historical evolution of moving image and its ability to elaborate issues around identity, political activism, visual pleasure and landscape. Further, I am concerned to create textual portraits of individual practitioners in order to deepen insight into the creative process and the range and ambition that currently animates moving image art.

An internationally established artist, critic and expert in early moving image culture, Elwes’ diverse practice includes video and installation, writing, curating and teaching. She is the author of Video Loupe (KT Press, 2000) and Video Art – A guided Tour (I.B. Tauris, 2005), and writes for publications such as Filmwaves & Vertigo, Third Text, Contemporary Magazine, and Art Monthly. She has written monographs on individual artists, and numerous book chapters and catalogue essays. She is currently writing Installation and the Moving Image and Landscape and the Moving Image for Wallflower Press.

My current practice as an artist is rooted in an investigation of masculinity as it solidifies and dissolves around the image of the war hero. The relationship of the individual combatant to both history and the artist who attempts to retell his story in the present, operates in an area of ethical and practical difficulty and necessitates substantial experimentation and tact. My most recent video, Pam’s War (2008) focuses on a woman’s experience of WW2 and is currently touring Australia and the UK as part of Figuring Landscapes.

From 2000, she was Director of the UK /Canadian Video Exchange, a biennial event that featured video from across Canada and the UK, and in 2006, she co-curated ANALOGUE , an inter­ national exhibition of pioneering video art from the UK, Canada and Poland. Her most recent

I have embarked on a new area of research around issues of Landscape in the Moving Image. Land­ scape represents a major theme in artists’ film and video, both historically and in contempo­rary practice. This is an under-researched area that nonetheless encompasses a wide range of


Elwes Catherine

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6–8 February 2009, The audience at the Tate Modern screenings and symposium for Figuring Landscapes, an international touring exhibition of 55 artists’ film and video from Australia and the UK, devised by Catherine Elwes and Steven Ball

concerns from the lyrical, romantic tradition inherited from painting to the activation of the narrative backdrop that derives from mainstream film. The politics of space is also of concern particularly in the context of Australia where Aboriginal land rights are still in dispute. However, the relationship of ownership to representation is an issue in post-colonial as well as indigenous imaging traditions. Landscape and memory inform my own practice and the use of landscape as a cypher of the human imagi­ nation intersects with all other aspects of the theory and practice of landscape film and video.

S e lect ed Ou t pu t s an d Ach ievemen t s

Authored Books 2005 Elwes, C.,Video Art – a guided tour, London: I.B.Tauris. 2000 Elwes, C., Video Loupe: A collection of Essays by and about the Videomaker and Critic Catherine Elwes, London: KT Press, 2000. Selected Curatorial Projects 2008–10 Figuring Landscapes, touring exhibition. 2006 Analogue: Pioneering Video from the UK, Canada and Poland (1968–88), Tate Modern and Tate Britain, toured nationally and internationally. 1998–03 Co-curator, UK/Canadian Film & Video Exchange, South London Gallery, and Canadian venues. Selected Exhibitions 2008–10 Pam’s War, exhibited at Figuring Landscapes, touring exhibition. 2008 Travelling Shots, exhibited at Transcentric, Lethaby Gallery, CSM, London.


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2008 Re-Reading Pam, exhibited at One-Minute, Volume 2, touring to various venues including Contemporary Art Fair, Essen, Germany; Proxy NoD, Prague, Czech Republic; The Marseille Project Gallery, France; Artprojx, London. 2008 Travelling Shots, exhibited at Drawn Encounters, The Gallery at Wimbledon College of Art, London. 2004 Out of Conflict, Catherine Elwes and Cornford & Cross, ArtSway Centre, New Forest; Lethaby Gallery, London; and Hat Factory, Luton. 2003 A Century of Artists’ Film, Tate Britain, London Selected Essays and Articles 2009 ‘In the Perceptible Field’, in Vertigo Magazine, vol.4, #3. 2008 ‘Kate Adams: Feeling and Knowing’, Vertigo Magazine, vol.4, #1. 2006 ‘Tamara Krikorian, Defending the Frontier’ and ‘War Stories, or why I made videos about old soldiers’, in Film & Video Anthology, Hatfield, J. (ed.), London: John Libbey Publishing. 2005 ‘A Meeting of Minds’, in Talking Back to Science, Art, Science and the Personal, Wellcome Foundation, UK. 2005 ‘Thoughts on Screen, the films of William Raban’, Vertigo magazine, vol.2, #8. 2005 ‘A Polemical History of Video, in brief’, Contemporary magazine, #71.

2005 ‘The Blood Red Heart of Johanna Darke’, in Gunilla Josephson, exhibition catalogue, Centre Culturel Canadien, Paris. 2004 ‘On Performance and Performativity’, in Third Text, vol.18, #2. Selected Presentations and Conference Papers 2009 ‘The Domestic Spaces of Video Installation – Television, the Gallery and Online’, at Expanded Cinema, Tate Modern. 2009 ‘Drawing and the Moving Image’, at Drawn Encounters, British School at Rome. 2009 ‘Drawing and the Moving Image’, at Drawn Encounters, Forum for Drawing, London College of Fashion. 2005 Video Art – From the Margins to the Mainstream: A Symposium Curated by Three Artists, co-curator and speaker, Tate Britain, London. 2005 ‘Practice-based Research, some niggling concerns’, paper for conference: Practice-based Research in the Audiovisual and Digital Field, AHRB Centre for British Film & Television Studies, Birkbeck College, London. 2004 ‘A Parallel Universe: The UK/Canadian Film & Video Exchange 98–04 and the ICA shows of Women’s Art in 1980’, paper for conference: Curatorial Strategy as Critical Intervention, Kent Institute of Art & Design, Kent.

Catherine Elwes, Telling Tales Aboard Bluefin, DVD, 22 min, installation shot, Box 38 gallery, Ostend, Belgium, 2007


Farthing Stephen

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Professor

Biog r a p h y   Professor Stephen Farthing is the Rootstein Hopkins Chair of Drawing at the University of the Arts London and Director of the Centre for Drawing based a Wimbledon. He is currently writing A Practical Guide to Drawing for Tate Gallery Publications, London, developing a drawing education project for the British Museum and The Life Room an exhibition for Chelsea Space, London for autumn 2009. His book, 501 Great Artists has been chosen by the New York Public Library as one of the top 25 reference books published last year. As Director of the Centre for Drawing, a research centre based at Wimbledon that co-ordinates and stimulates cross disciplinary research into drawing. Farthing is involved with a number of projects with overseas institutions, which include: RMIT and Monash Universities in Melbourne, The University of Auckland and the National Art School Sydney. Recently his practice as an artist has involved completing commissions for Villa Park stadium in Birmingham as well as participating in exhibitions at The Drawing Gallery, the Hong Kong University and the Royal Academy. He has an upcoming solo show at Purdy Hicks Gallery in London, November 2009. Rese a r c h S tat e m e nt   All my research is geared towards establishing, first a definition of drawing, then a more complete understanding of drawing as an aspect of general literacy and finally effec­ tive ways of teaching drawing today.

In the first instance most of my research is collections and archive based, for the most part this involves visiting collections then trying to make sense of what I see, this is done by a mix of drawing and writing. Currently I am focusing on two primary areas; modern American drawing and the drawings made after first contact by pre literate societies.

At a more physical level I am working with Aston Villa FC exploring links between sports skill and drawing skill acquisition. In two projects developed with the British Museum and Tate Gallery, London, I am using historical drawing collections as a means of assessing the value of redrawing fine examples as a part of the process of improving participants drawing skills. All projects are based on a process of working with professional artists, students and school children in qualitative assessment studies. Finally, there is no strong separation between my activities as a painter and my research as a Professor of Drawing, one feeds the other, archival work on drawing informs my painting just as practical research projects in drawing serve to inform my painting. S e lected Outputs and Achievements

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2008 Stephen Farthing RA (20 Years of Painting), Passmore Gallery, London. 2007 Man Reading a News Paper, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. 2003 The Modern Affair, Amangansett Applied Arts, Amangansett, New York, USA. Selected Group Exhibitions 2009 Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, Royal Academy of Art, London. 2008 When Photography and Drawing Meet Fashion, Fashion and Textiles Resource Centre, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. 2008 40 Artists 80 Drawings, The Drawing Gallery, Shropshire. 2008 Free Art Fair, 4, 19, 21 New Quebec Street and 5, 8, 16 Seymour Place, Portman Village, London. 2008 In Drawing, Purdy Hicks Gallery, London. 2008 Drawn Encounters, The Gallery at Wimbledon College of Art, London. 2007 Drawing Breath, National Art SchoSydney, Australia. 2007 Drawing Breath, Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts. 2007 Stranger Geography, Palazzo Vaj, Prato, Italy. 2007 Stranger Geography, Kingsgate Gallery, London.


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Stephen Farthing, The Bigger Picture of Drawing, image title: A Tonal Drawing of a lion in water vapour, Location: Amagansett NY, looking west, 6 pm, 5.7.08, photograph, 3 km × 2km (approx.), 2008

2007 Drawing Towards Fashion, Fashion Space Gallery, London College of Fashion, London. 2006 Drawing Breath, The Gallery at Wimbledon College of Art, London. 2006–07 After Turner: Ely Cathedral: The Interior of the Octagon exhibited at Drawing from Turner, Clore Galleries, Tate Britain. Selected Curatorial Projects 2007 Leaf & Leopard: An analysis of The Elements of Drawing, Gus Fischer Art Gallery, The University of Auckland, New Zealand. 2006–07 Drawing from Turner, Clore Galleries, Tate Britain. Selected Published Books 2008 Editor, 501 Great Artists, Barron’s Educational Series (UK) and Penguin (New Zealand). 2007 Editor, 1001 Paintings You Must See Before You Die, UK: Cassel, Australia: ABC Books, USA: Rizzoli.

2004 A Curriculum for Artists, The Laboratory at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, and the New York Academy of Art. Selected Published Writings 2009 ‘On Drawing a Man reading a Newspaper’ in Visual Communication, vol.8, #2. 2008 Chapter in Garner, S. (ed.) Writing on Drawing, Intellect Books (UK). 2008 ‘A New Poetry in Painting’, in Jerwood Young Painters Awards Catalogue. 2008 ‘Catalogue essay’, in The Whiteness of Paper, Wimbledon School of Art Gallery. 2006 ‘Drawing from Turner’, in Turner Society News, #104. Selected Conference presentations 2008 ‘Performing Marks’, at Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Research, University of Harvard, Cambridge MA.


Farthing Stephen

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Stephen Farthing, The Bigger Picture of Drawing, image title: The stars don’t have numbers, asterism drawing from Pleiades, pencil on paper, 50 × 50 cm, 2009

2008 ‘Drawing Australia’, at Drawn Encounters: Complex Identities, BSR, Rome. 2007 Key-note speaker at Drawing Breath, National Arts School, Sydney, Australia. 2007 Key-note speaker at Transcription Conference, Monash University, Melbourne Australia. 2002 Key-note speaker at CLTAD Conference: Enhancing Curricula, RIB, London.

Stephen Farthing, The Bigger Picture of Drawing, A Tonal Drawing in dark and light granite of America, Location: Washington DC, photograph, 1000 × 1000 cm, 2009


62

Garcia David Professor

Biography   Professor David Garcia is Dean of Chelsea College of Art and Design and previously Professor of Design for Digital Cultures, research programme based at Hogeschool voor de Kunsten, Utrecht and the University of Portsmouth.

In 1983 he co-founded Time Based Arts, which went on to become one of the premier venues for international media arts in the Netherlands. From this basis he went on to develop a series of high profile international media arts events the most significant being The Next 5 Minutes (1994–2003) a series of international conferences and exhibi­ tions on electronic communications and political culture. Recently (since 2006 as part of the Digital Cultures program) he initiated (Un)common Ground a research programme consisting of structured expert meetings and publications, investigating the new role of art and design as a catalyst for collaboration across sectors and disciplines. In 2007 he edited and contributed to the book (Un)common Ground, Creative Encounters Across Sectors and Disciplines, which was launched in spring 2007 at the Enter Festival, Cambridge. The focus of my work is what I call tactical media – the impact of the rise of small scale DIY media and tools and networks in art, social and political activism and the rise of new social movements. The research involves making personal installations, video tapes, TV programmes, and curating exhibitions along with an extensive output of published theoretical writing on critical media and internet culture. R e search S tat e m e n t  

S e lec t e d Outputs and Ac hievements

Selected Publications 2008 ‘(Un)realtime Media’, in Lovink, G. and Niederer, S. (eds), Video Vortex Reader: Responses to YouTube, Amsterdam: Institute of Network Cultures. 2008 ‘Alternative TV platforms and breakout section on tactical media’, in Alternative Media Handbook, Routledge. 2007 Co-editor and contributor (Un)common Ground: Creative Encounters Across Sectors and Disciplines, Book Industry Services. 2006 ‘Learning the Right Lessons’, in Mute: Journal of Culture and Politics After the Internet. Selected Curatorial Projects 2007 Faith in Exposure, Dutch Media Institute, Amsterdam. 1996–04 Initiated and led The Next 5 Minutes, a series of international conferences and exhibitions on electronic communications and new social movements Selected Screenings 2005 Museum of Modern Art, Shanghai, China. 2004 SESC for Finde/Autolabs festival, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Selected Awards 2007 Arts Council UK + Virtuel Platform: funding for (Un) common Ground. 1994–03 Mondrian Foundation, Soros Foundation, Amsterdam Fonds Voor De Kunst: funding for The Next 5 Minutes. Recent Papers and Presentations 2009 Key-note speaker at LCASE Conference for English Arts Council Officers. 2007 Presentation on Coolmedia Hot Talk Show, De Balie Center for Culture and Politics, Amsterdam. 2007 Two lectures on the new cultures of ‘real-time data bases’, Dutch Electronic Arts Festival, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. 2007 Organisation and moderation seminar on ‘(Un)common Ground’, Enter Unknown Territories Festival, Cambridge. 2007 ‘Diminishing Freedom’ at Engaging the Impossible, Central Saint Martins, London.


Garcia David

Book about (Un)common Ground, research project initiated by David Garcia

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64

Newman Avis Professor

Biography   Avis Newman is a Professor at Wimbledon. Her work has featured in numerous national and international solo and group exhibitions.

Her canvas works, objects and works on paper show a longstanding preoccupation with notions of origin, memory and representation as embodied in the initial moment of tracing and with the genesis of the mark. To this end drawing has figured as a central concern. Since 2002 Avis Newman has also been concerned with contextualising ideas in contemporary drawing practice beyond her individual practice. She selected the exhibition of works from Tate Collection – The Stage of Drawing: Gesture and Art shown at The Drawing Center New York, Tate Liverpool, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney and Tate Britain (2003–04) and organised the symposium on Drawing Theory and Practice – With a Single Mark … (2006) held at Tate Britain. A co-editor of the journals on artists’ practice, Documents published by RvBK (2004–08) Newman is also editor of Notes (2005–) the series of publications documenting artists’ residencies in The Centre for Drawing Project Space, UAL . Her work is in private and public collections, notably The Arts Council England, the British Council, Hirshorn Museum Washington, The Metropolitan Museum New York, and Tate UK.

S e le c t e d Ou t pu t s an d Ach ievemen t s

Selected Exhibitions 2004 Ten Artists, group exhibition by tutors and MA students from Wimbledon School of Art (M.K.C. Iulionis National Musuem of Art, Kaunas Lithuathia). 2003 Descriptions, solo exhibition, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, Australia. 2003 In Good Form – Recent Sculpture from Arts Council Collection, Longside Gallery, Yorkshire Sculpture Park. 2002 Back Space, Matt’s Gallery, London Editorial positions Editor, Notes, published by The Centre for Drawing UAL. Curatorial Projects 2006 With a Single Mark, exhibition and symposium at Tate Britain. Selected Publications 2004 Women Artists in the Tate Collection, Tate Gallery Publications. 2003 Vampire in the Text Narratives of Contemporary Art – collected essays by Jean Fisher, Institute of International Visual Arts, London. 2003 The Stage of Drawing: Gesture and Act – texts by Norman Bryson, Jean Fisher, Michael Newman, Avis Newman and Catherine de Segher, Tate Gallery Publications. 2003 Drawing Papers: The stage of drawing: Gesture and Act, The Drawing Centre, New York 2003.


Newman Avis

Avis Newman, Aporia XV, acrylic on Linen, two part work – left: 25 × 25 cm, right: 25 × 25 cm, 2007–08

Avis Newman, Aporia X, acrylic on Linen, two part work – left: 25 × 25 cm, right: 30 × 30 cm, 2007–08

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Newman Avis

Avis Newman, Elsewhere, wood, glass, paper, two part work – left (framed drawing): 88 × 68 cm, right (ladder): 180 × 40 cm


Pickwoad Nicholas

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Professor

Biog r a p h y   Nicholas Pickwoad is a Professor at Camberwell. He has a doctorate in English Literature from Oxford University. He trained with Roger Powell, and ran his own workshop from 1977 to 1989. He has been Adviser on book conservation to the National Trust of Great Britain from 1978, and was Editor of the Paper Conservator. He taught book conservation at Columbia University Library School in New York from 1989 to 1992 and was Chief Conservator in the Harvard University Library from 1992 to 1995. He is now project leader of the St Catherine’s Monastery Library Project based at the University of the Arts London and is Director of the Ligatus research unit, which is dedicated to the history of bookbinding. He gave the 2008 Panizzi Lectures at the British Library, was awarded the 2009 Plowden medal for Conservation and is a Fellow of the IIC and of the Society of Antiquaries. He also teaches courses in the UK, Europe and America on the history of European bookbinding in the era of the hand printing press, and has published widely on the subject. Rese a r c h S tat e m e nt   My major current research centres on the construction of a mulit-lingual glossary of bookbinding terms, to be illustrated with photographs, drawings and diagrams. My colleague Athanasios Velios and I have used an XML database to hold the terms and their definitions, in which the hierarchies are based on the structure of a book, allowing the user to navigate the structure to find terms which are not known to them. The glossary will also serve as the basis for a descriptive process which will allow consistent records of historic bindings to be compiled by different researchers in different languages, which can then contribute to an international database to provide source

material for further analytical research into the development of bookbinding. I am also continuing in my research into the history of bookbinding, with particular reference to structure and materials and how a more complete understanding of bookbinding can contribute to a better understanding of the culture of the book. A new project is aimed at encouraging the incorporation of descriptions of bookbindings into mainstream bibliography, as interest in copy-specific cataloguing grows. Our work on the glossary is an essential pre-requisite for such a development, and discussions are now underway to hold a conference in late 2010 to initiate international debate on the subject. S e lected Outputs and Achievements

Selected Publications 2009 Chapter on Bookbinding in Michael, F., Suarez, S.J. and Turner, M.L. (eds) The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, vol.5, 1695–1830. 2008 ‘How Greek is Greek: Western European imitations of Greek-style bindings’, Vivlioamphiastis 3, Tsironis, N. (ed.), Athens: Hellenic Society for Bookbinding & the Instititute for Byzantine Research. 2005 ‘Research Projects on Historic Bookbindings’, in Atti della Conferanza Internazionale: Scelte e Strategie per la Conservazione della Memoria, Dobbiaco, Bolzano: Archivio di Stato. 2004 ‘Recording medieval bindings – The role of the conservation survey, with reference to work currently under way in the library of the monastery of St Catherine on Mount Sinai’, in Colloque Reliure, Paris: CNRS. 2004 ‘The History of the False Raised Band’, in Against the Law, Myers (ed.), Harris and Mandelbrote, London: British Library and Oak Knoll Books. 2004 ‘The condition survey of the manuscripts in the monastery of St Catherine on Mount Sinai’, Paper Conservator, vol.28.


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Pickwoad Nicholas

Selected Awards 2005 Principal Invesigator, An English/Greek terminology for the structures and materials of Byzantine and Greek bookbinding, AHRC Research Standard Grant. Key Professional Positions 1978– Advisor to the National Trust on Book Conservation. 1977– Member of the IIC until its incorporation into ICON.

Detail of a pink-stained, alum-tawed, split-strap, double sewing support on an Italian binding on a Venice edition of 1493. The conventional straight, packed sewing has the addition of a small horizontal stitch between the two elements of the double support at its left end, intended to prevent the sewing thread falling off the cut end of the support. This tells us that the binder originally intended that the book should have a limp parchment cover and that the current cover of slotted, second-use parchment over boards is a later replacement.


Politowicz Kay

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Professor

Biog r a p h y   Kay Politowicz is Professor of Textile Design, co-founder and Project Director for the Textiles Environment Design (TED ) research group at Chelsea, with a direct interest in all contemporary interpretations of the subject. She has been instrumental in establishing the post of Research Fellow and the TED Resource. This has contributed significantly to the development of the thinking in sustainable textile design.

Previously, as Course Director for BA (Hons) Textile Design at Chelsea, Politowicz has developed a course known for a high-level of achievement in specialist material processes and for an environmental focus to curriculum developments within the subject. Design contexts have been introduced for students to see environmental problems as opportunities for innovative design thinking in processes, products and systems. Professor Politowicz has been instrumental in hosting Texprint: First View exhibition annually at Chelsea since 2005. In collaboration with Texprint in 2008, Chelsea hosted a seminar on sustainability involving speakers and delegates from industry and education. She is an experienced external examiner and international juror for competitions within the subject and is currently acting as Associate Director of the Textile Futures research group (TFRG ) and is an active member of the UK Association of Fashion and Textiles Courses. Professor Politowicz has supervised three PhD students to successful completion: Rese a r c h S tat e m e nt   In leading the TED research cluster, I have encouraged staff, students and graduate designers to collaborate in the

development of projects and events which propose to explore the potential for fabrics to change or define an environment. In my research I explore fabrics which work from principles inherent in life-cycle analysis of a product for interior and exterior spaces. Developments include the ability of fabrics to carry light technologies as well as colour and pattern, often transferring low/ medium- technologies from other industries into textile design and manufacture. Experiments include the use of long-life, synthetic fabrics with natural dyes and mechanical patterning to produce prototypes for installation. The use of industrially produced ‘multiples’ and ‘flat-pack’ production has enabled fabrics to be used as temporary and reusable environments. In Particle Fabrics exhibition, Milan (2002), part of Signatures of the Invisible (Sci-Art exhibitions in four European centres), I explored the potential of fabric to change and define an environment. In Artists at Work, Museo del Tessuto Prato, Italy (2003), and Ever and Again: Rethinking Recycled Textiles (2007), I proposed the production and re-use of ‘flat-pack lanterns’ using magnets as fixings. This ongoing development of products currently includes the use of electro-luminescent print paste to produce glowing patterns in interior spaces. Current projects include Creative Connections (2009) a TED group project linking small craft businesses in India with digital print production to increase and sustain markets for their fabrics. Cultural Collage (2009) is a research project exploring cultural collabo­ ration in three locations, UK (University


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Politowicz Kay

of the Arts London/Chelsea College of Art and Design), Australia (University of Technology, Sydney) and Chile (Universidad Diego Portales, Santiago). S elected O u t p u t s a n d Ach i e v e m e n t s

Selected Conference Contributions 2009 ‘Testing the Theories with Design’ (co-author Rebecca Earley) at Sustainability and Enterprise, Creating Competitive Advantage Conference (Beijing and Shanghai), HIFE Funded. In collaboration with The Economist Intelligence Unit. 2009 ‘Shared Strategies’, at Foresight – Mapping the Territory Conference, Liverpool, UK, Fashion Textiles Association.

Academic Contributions 2008 PhD external examiner, Uppsala, Sweden, 2008 MA external examiner, Swedish School of Textiles, Boras, Sweden. 2008 External assessor for revalidation of MA Constructed Textiles Course and MA Printed Textiles, Royal College of Art. 2007 Istanbul Textile and Apparel Exporters’ Association Istanbul. Invited international jury member Turkish Textile Award for Innovation. 2001–05 BA (Hons) Textile Design external examiner, Manchester Metropolitan University.


Politowicz Kay

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Scrivener Stephen Professor

Biography   Professor Stephen Scrivener is Director of Doctoral Programme at C-C-W . He studied Fine Art at undergraduate and master levels, the latter at the Slade School of Fine Art, University College London, where he began to use the computer as a means of art production. Subsequent to the Slade, Scrivener completed his PhD in a computer science department and, thereafter, worked as a lecturer and researcher in various university computer science depart­ments. Up to 1992, his research focused on the design and development of interactive systems for artists and designers and on how such systems are used. During this period he undertook many funded design-focused research projects (supported by grants in excess of £2 million) almost all of which involved academic, commercial and industrial collabora­ tion. Scrivener moved back into an art and design department in 1992, and since then his research has focused on the theory and practice of what is often called practice-based research. During his research career, he has completed funded research projects; produced over 175 research outcomes; supervised more than 30 research degree students to completion and examined over 40. Scrivener has participated in the research context in a range of functions; he is the founding editor of the International Journal of Co-Design, published by Taylor and Francis and an elected fellow of the Design Research Society. R e search S tat e m e n t   My research is concerned with the theory and practice of practice-based research, which has been reported in a series of journal and book chapters. My thinking on this topic is, perhaps, distinguished from other authors in the field in that it progresses from the proposition that the activities of art, design, etc.,

already contain the activity of research, understood as that function which expands each field’s potential and relevance. S e lec t e d Outputs and Ac hievements

Selected Funded Projects 2005–07 Consolidating understanding and experience of practice-based research, funded by AHRC under the Small Grant Scheme, designed to advance current understanding of theory and experience of practice-based research in art and design. 2005–07 Managing breakdowns in international distributed design projects, funded by The British Academy and the National Science Council (NSC) grants scheme to support joint projects between British and Taiwan scholars, in the fields of the humanities and social sciences. 2000–04 UNITE – Ubiquitous and Integrated Teamwork Environment, an international project funded by the EC under the 1st programme in collaboration with IBM (France and Israel), GMD , FGH , ADETTI , Penta Scope, and TESCI . The project was shortlisted for the 1st prize. Selected Publications 2009 ‘The roles of art and design process and object in research’, in Reflections and Connections: On the relationship between creative production and academic research, Helsinki: University of Art and Design Helsinki. 2009 ‘Connections: A personal history of computer art making from 1971 to 1981’, in White Heat Cold Logic: British Computer Art 1960–1980, Massachusetts, USA and London: MIT Press. 2007 ‘Visual art practice reconsidered: transformational practice and the academy’, in The Art of Research, University of Art and Design Helsinki: Helsinki. 2004 ‘The practical implications of applying a theory of practice based research: a case study’, in Working Papers in Design, #3. 2003 ‘The design implications of user selection between communication resources’, in Digital Creativity, 14 (4). 2003 ‘Managing Breakdowns in International Distributed Design Projects’, in Human Behaviour in Design: Individuals, Teams, Tools, Heidelberg. 2002 ‘The art object does not embody a form of knowledge’, in Working Papers in Design, #2. 2002 ‘Characterising creative-production doctoral projects in art and design’, in International Journal of Design Sciences and Technology, 10 ( 2, 10(2). Keynote presentations 2009 ‘Applying for a Practice-led Research Project’, at practice-led research seminar, AHRC, London.


Scrivener Stephen

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2009 ‘Research by Design’, at New Norwegian Architecture Policy Conference, Norsk Form, Oslo. 2009 ‘Articulated Transformational Practice’, at New Forms of Doctorate: An ESRC Seminar, London Knowledge Lab, London. 2009 ‘The Roles of Art and Design in Research’, at The Danish Doctoral Design School Conference, Copenhagen. 2008 Art and Research: HOW?, Academy of Arts, Tallinn, Estonia. 2007 ‘Practice-based Research’, at The Art of Research, University of Art and Design, Helsinki. 2005 ‘Practice-based Research’, at International Practicebased Research Conference, University of Art and Design, Helsinki, Finland. Key committee and panel memberships 2009–10 Chair of Peer Review Panel B, AHRC. 2009 Appointed as external member, Kunsthogskolen: Bergen National Academy of the Arts, Research Committee. 2007 Member, AHRC Peer Review College. 2007–08 Advisory Board, The Third International Conference on Design Computing and Cognition. 2006 Commissioning Board member, EPSRC/AHRC, Phase 2 of the Design for 21st Century programme. 2005–06 Chair, EPSRC Peer Review Panel. 2005 Invited by EPSRC to be a member of the Advisory Group for the funding programme entitled Design for the 21st Century. 2005 Selected Member of Sub-panel 63, RAE. 2004–05 Member, EPSRC/AHRB Design for 21st Century Programme Panel, Phase 1. 2003–04 Member, EPSRC Peer Review Panel. 2002–03 Invited member, EPSRC, working group to develop a funding programme entitled, Design for the 21st Century. 2001–05 Member, AHRB Peer Review Panel 2: Visual Arts and Media. Editorial positions 2007– Member of Editorial Board, Leonardo Transactions. 2005– Editor in chief, International Journal of Co-Design, Taylor and Francis.

Stephen A.R. Scrivener, The Machine, perspex, light-emitting diodes, switches and electronic components, 50 × 26 cm, 1974


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Scrivener Stephen

Stephen A.R. Scrivener, The Machine – view of the electronics stack comprising hard-wired homeostatic system, electronic components, component stack and wiring, 1974


Slee Richard

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Professor

Biog r a p h y   Born in 1946 in Cumbria, Richard Slee is a Professor at Camberwell. He attended Carlisle College of Art and graduated in Ceramics from the Central School of Art and Design in 1970. His early career consisted of part-time teaching and practice as a studio ceramicist; he was awarded an MA in Design (Degree by Project) from the Royal College of Art in 1988.

Slee started teaching at Camberwell in 1990, and was made a Professor in 1992. Throughout his career Richard has built an international presence in the USA, Canada, Korea, Japan, Australia and Europe. His work is represented in numerous collections world-wide. Rese a r c h S tat e m e nt   Specialising in ceramics as the medium, my interests and practice has evolved from Studio Pottery to a contemporary craft debate with reference to the current positioning of material specialisations in visual creativity. Recent developments in my output have seen the use of both the found and non-ceramic materials in works questioning past loyalties towards a single material.

2004 Richard Slee, Barrett Marsden Gallery, London. 2004 Panoramas, The Pier Arts Centre, Stromness, Orkney, Scotland 2003 Panorama, Tate St Ives and Ruthin Crafts Centre, Wales (catalogue) Selected recent Group Exhibitions 2009 Our Objects, Glasgow School of Art and U.K. tour. 2008 Masterpieces in Ceramics from the Victoria & Albert Museum, The Korea Foundation Cultural Center, Seoul and Hetjens Museum, Dussldorf (catalogue) 2007 END, Danish Museum of Art and Design, Copenhagen and Bomuldsfabrikken Kunsthall, Oslo (catalogue). 2007 Making and Meaning, Object Gallery, Sydney, Australia. 2007 Cult Fiction, Curated by Hayward Gallery (touring, catalogue). 2005 Trans-Ceramic Art, World Ceramic Center, Icheon, Korea (catalogue). 2004 Voodoo Shit, Hales Gallery, London. 2004 Strange Relationship, Keith Talent Gallery, London. 2004 A Secret History of Clay, Tate Liverpool (catalogue). 2003 Good Bad Taste, Keith Talent Gallery, London. 2003 Hypercrafting, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia (catalogue). 2002 The Uncanny Room, Pittshanger Manor, Ealing and Bowes Museum, Co Durham (catalogue).

A formal exploration of the creative use of fired enamels onto metal has been recently under­ taken, to expand my personal craft knowledge. The resulting works challenge both the place and purpose of individually produced and crafted works. Sele c t e d O u t p u t s a n d Ac h i e v e m e n t s

Selected recent Solo Exhibitions 2008 Richard Slee, Recent Works, Barrett Marsden Gallery, London. 2007 Richard Slee, Garth Clark Gallery, New York. 2006 Richard Slee at Barrett Marsden, Barrett Marsden Gallery, London.

Richard Slee, Whistle Blower, ceramic, rubber, silicone, 45 × 50 × 30 cm, 2006


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Slee Richard

Richard Slee, Trowel, ceramic, enameled metal, textile, 10 × 40 × 20 cm, 2006


Slee Richard

Richard Slee, Hook, ceramic, 30 × 20 × 20 cm, 2007

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Wainwright Chris Professor

Biography   Professor Chris Wainwright is the Head of Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon Colleges. He is also President of The European League of Institutes of the Arts (ELIA ), an organisation representing over 350 European Higher Arts Institutions, and former Chair of the National Association for Fine Art Education in the UK. He is currently a member of The Tate Britain Council and a board member of Cape Farewell, an artist run organisation that promotes a cultural response to climate change.

Chris Wainwright is also an active professional artist and curator working in photography and video whose recent exhibitions include The Moons of Higashiyama at Kodai-ji Temple, Kyoto, Japan and Trauma at the Culturcentrum in Brugge, Belgium. His work is currently being shown as part of the UK touring exhibition Fleeting Arcadias – Thirty Years of British Landscape Photography from the Arts Council Collection. He is currently cocurating Unfold, a Cape Farewell international touring exhibition of work by artists addressing climate change. His time based work Capital has been shown at File 2002 and Channel 14 at File 2005 in Sao Paulo, Brazil and video projections at the Champ Libre Festival of Electronic Arts, Montreal, Canada, 2004 and 2005. Channel 14 was also selected for the Media and Architecture Biennial, Graz, Austria, 2005. Chris Wainwright’s photographic work is held in many major collections including the Victoria & Albert Museum, London; The Arts Council of England; Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris; the Polaroid Corporation, Boston, USA, and Unilever, London.

R e s e a r c h Stat emen t   I work primarily through photography and video as a means of addressing issues related to the effects of light, both natural and artificial, in urban and remote environments. The work is informed by a direct response to place and is often the result of an intervention, a temporary action or construction made for the camera as a unique form of witness for recording light. I am interested in the cause and effect relationship between urban and unpopulated spaces and the way light is deployed as a form of illumination, communication, invasion and pollution. Overall I have a concern for representing the issues and effects of environ­ mental change though my direct presence, actions and journeys, always undertaken in dark­ ness, and the way this can be part of a strategy of image making that does not rely on journalistic or didactic approaches but has its roots more in the pictorial traditions of painting. S e lec t e d Outputs and Ac hievements

Selected Exhibitions 2009 Cape Farewell Exhibition: Art and Climate Change, as part of the Salisbury Festival (group exhibition). 2008 The Moons of Higashiyama, Kodai-ji temple, Kyoto, Japan (group exhibition, with catalogue). 2007 Between Land and Sea, Box 38, Ostende, Belgium. 2007 T/raum(a)68, Hallen van de het Belfort, Brugge, Belgium (group exhibition, with catalogue). 2005 Channel 14, video screening, Biennale of Media and Architecture, Graz, Austria (catalogue). 2005 Channel 14, video external site projection, National Library, Montréal, Canada (catalogue). 2005 Channel 14, video screening, File 2005, Media Arts Festival, Sao Paulo, Brazil. 2004 Strange Things, the Aine Art Museum, Tornio, Lapland, Finland (group exhibition with catalogue). 2004 Wainwright + Bickerstaff, The Drawing Room, London (catalogue). 2004 Channel 14, 6th Manifestation Internationale Vidéo et Art Électronique, Montréal, Canada.


Wainwright Chris

Here Comes The Sun, Semaphore performance with Robyn Hitchcock, off the Northwest of Greenland, 2008 (photos by N. Gallagher)

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Wainwright Chris

Chris Wainwright, Red Ice, colour photograph, Disko Bay, Greenland, 2008

Curatorial Projects 2009 ‘Unfold’, Cape Farewell exhibition on climate change, Co-Curator, exhibition planned to tour UK, Europe and worldwide, beginning in Vienna in April 2010. Publications 2009 Co-editor with Professor James Powell OBE, Universities for Modern Renaissance, University of Salford. 2008 Author, Strategy Paper on Research in Art and Design, European League of Institutes of the Arts.

Key Positions and Memberships 2009–11 Board Member, Cape Farewell. 2008–09 Member of the Sensuous Knowledge Editorial Board for research publications, National Academy of Art, Bergen, Norway. 2009 Chair of Jury, European Commission photography competition for The Year of Culture and Creativity. 2008–10 President, The European League of Institutes of the Arts (ELIA ) 2008–10 Member, Tate Britain Council. 2008 Chair of Jury, European Commission photography competition Cultures On My Street in the Year of Intercultural Dialogue.


Wainwright Chris

Chris Wainwright, White Ice, colour photograph, Disko Bay, Greenland 2008

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Watanabe Toshio Professor

Biography   Professor Toshio Watanabe is Director of the Transnational Art, Identity and Nation (TrAIN) research centre. He studied at the Universities of Sophia, Tokyo, Courtauld Institute of Art, London and in Basel, where he completed his PhD. He taught at the City of Birmingham Polytechnic, where he ran the MA in History of Art and Design course. At Chelsea since 1986, initially as the Head of Art History and later became Head of Research.

Professor Watanabe is an art historian, studying mostly the period 1850–1950, and is interested in exploring how art of different places and culture intermingle and affect each other. He has worked in the field of Anglo-Japanese relationships in art, and publications in this field include High Victorian Japonisme (1991, winner of the Prize of the Society for the Study of Japonisme), Japan and Britain: An Aesthetic Dialogue 1850–1930 (1991, Japanese edition 1992, co-edited), and Ruskin in Japan 1890–1940: Nature for art, art for life, (1997, winner of 1998 Japan Festival Prize and of 1999 Gesner Gold Award). Currently President of the Japan Art History Forum (USA ) and Chair of International Jury of Künstlerhaus Schloss Balmoral, Bad Ems, Germany. He was Chair of the Association of Art Historians (1998–2001) and member of the Tate Britain Council (2002–05). R e search S tat e m e n t   The main focus of my current research is transnational interactions of art with an emphasis on the issue of modernity and identity. I am particularly interested in exploring this, not just in bilateral, but in multilateral relationships, such as those between, Japan, China, Taiwan, India, Britain or the USA within the time span between 1850 and 1950.

My interest in transnational relationships covers all media, but particularly architecture, garden design, watercolour painting, photography and popular graphics. Particular emphasis is put on the consumption of these art forms locally and globally. Projects being undertaken include following themes: the theory of modern landscape and imperial architecture in Japan, 1880s–1940s; history and reception of modern Japanese garden; construction of Japanese Art History; British Japonisme. I am Principal Investigator for the AHRC funded research project ‘Forgotten Japonisme: Taste for Japanese Art in Britain and the USA, 1920s–1950s’ (2004–10), which explores a previously neglected period in the study of Western attitudes towards Japanese art from the 1920s to the 1950s. I am also a member of a Japanese government-funded research project ‘Comparative Study of Historio­graphy of Japanese Art History in Japan, Britain and the USA in the Context of the Appreciation of Yamato-e’, which is based at University of Kagoshima in collaboration with TrAIN research centre. I was also the Principal Investigator for the AHRC -funded research project ‘Modernity and Identity in Art: India, Japan and Mexico 1860s–1940s’ (2001–05), a collaborative project with University of Sussex. S e lec t e d Outputs and Ac hievements

Selected Publications (Selection from last four years) 2008 ‘Modernism: Self and Other represented in (or by incorporating) other’s style’, in exhibition catalogue Self and Other: Portraits from Asia and Europe, National Museum of Ethnology, Osaka.


Watanabe Toshio

2007 ‘Vicissitudes of the value of Englishness in 19th century Hamburg: Nikolaikirche, the Town Hall and the Waterworks’, in Arte & Ensaios, special issue: ‘Trans­ national Correspondence’, PPGAV-UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, #14. 2007 ‘Japanese Landscape Painting and Taiwan: Modernity, colonialism and national identity’, in Refracted Colonial Modernity: Taiwanese Art and Design, University of Hawaii Press. 2007 ‘The British design world during the stay of the Japanese designer Moriya Nobuo’, in Moriya Nobuo, Sakura City Museum of Art, Japan. 2006 ‘Japanese Imperial Architecture: From Thomas Roger Smith to Itô Chûta’, in Conant, Ellen P. (ed.) Challenging Past and Present: The Metamorphosis of NineteenthCentury Japanese Art, University of Hawaii Press. Selected Presentations and Conference Papers (selection from last three years) 2009 ‘The Historiography of the Study of American and British Japonisme.’, symposium on American and British Japonisme, Bunka Women’s College, Tokyo. Organised jointly by the Society for the Study of Japonisme and TrAIN research centre. 2008 ‘Modern Urban Environment and identity: the case of Hamburg.’, lecture to Aoyama Gakuen University students. 2008 ‘The Creativity of Modern Urban Parks: Tokyo and London.’ Public lecture given at the Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo as part of the Sensing Cities project. 2007 ‘The Modern Japanese Garden: A transnational art form?’, Oxford Brookes University. 2007 ‘Japanese Landscape Painting and Taiwan: Modernity, colonialism and national identity’, book launch symposium in Taipei. 2007 ‘The Reception History of Tradition: The Case of Kyoto Gardens’, at symposium on Kyoto Craft, SOAS. 2007 ‘Loss of historicity as Identity: The Theory of Japanese Garden by Josiah Conder’, at Traditional Arts and Crafts in the 21st Century: Reconsidering the Future from an International Perspective, International Research Centre for Japanese Studies. 2007 ‘Clamoring at the Gates or Tearing Down the Walls: Dealing with Canonicity’, paper for roundtable discussion at College Art Association Annual Conference, New York. 2007 ‘How could North American scholars improve Art History teaching in Japan?’ for roundtable discussion at Teaching Japanese Art: New Challenges in the 21st Century, organised by Japan Art History Forum at the Association of Asian Studies at Boston. 2007 ‘China and the Historiography of Sculpture in Meiji Japan’, at The Status of and Market for Chinese Sculpture in the Late Qing, at the Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

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2007 ‘Forgotten Japonisme: Investigating Japanese taste in Britain and the USA 1920s–1950s’, at Reconsidering Japonisme, symposium in Tokyo organised by the Society for the Study of Japonisme. 2007 ‘How did Japanese art become a museum object? Aesthetic value, national identity and historicity’, at Museums Today: Contemporary Challenges, University of Sao Paulo. Selected Awards 2008–09 Anglo-Japanese Daiwa Foundation, Sensing Cities project with Aoyama Gakuin Univerisity (PI) and Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL. 2008–11 Ministry of Culture and Science, Japan: ‘Comparative Study of Historiography of Japanese Art History in Japan, Britain and the USA in the Context of the Appreciation of Yamato-e’, project submitted by Professor Miho Shimohara, University of Kagoshima (PI) in collaboration with TrAIN research centre. 2007–10 AHRC grant: ‘Forgotten Japonisme’, major three year research project. 2001–04 AHRB grant: Modernity and Identity in Art: India, Japan and Mexico 1860s–1940s. Membership of professional bodies and other external activities 2009– Chair of Jury, Künstlerhaus Schloss Balmoral, Bad Ems, Germany 2005–09 Member, RAE sub-panel 64. 2005– President, Japan Art History Forum (USA). 2003– Member of the AHRC Diaspora, Migration and Identity Steering Group. 2003– Membre titulaire and Acting Chair, British Committee of Comité International d’Histoire de l’Art. 2002–05 Member, Tate Britain council. 2002– Jury member, Chino Kaori memorial essay prize (JAHF, USA ). 2002–08 Reviewer, J. Paul Getty postdoctoral fellowship in the History of Art and the Humanities. 1999–01 Member, Board of Historians of British Art (USA). 1998–01 Chair, Association of Art Historians. Editorial positions 2003– Member of the Editorial Advisory Board, Design History Japan (Japan). 2002– Member of advisory board, Journal of Design History. 2002– Member of editorial advisory board, 19th Century Art Worldwide. Book referee: Curzon Press, Blackwell, University of California Press, University of Hawaii Press.


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Woolley Janet Professor, Pathway Leader

Biography   Professor Janet Woolley is a Pathway Leader in MA Visual Arts (Illustration) at Camberwell. She is an award-winning illustrator who has worked for numer­ous publications worldwide. She studied Art and Design at Brighton College of Art (1970–73), and graduated from the Royal College of Art, London in 1976. After exhibiting for several years after graduation, including at the Royal Academy and taking part in the European Illustration exhibition, Woolley’s work changed direction in 1990 when she started experimenting in montage and introducing elements of photography in her illustrations. She was amongst the first artists to use photographic imagery, and her practice was instrumental in promoting the art form to reach the wide level of acceptance it holds today.

In 2000, Woolley switched from photomontage executed by hand to working digitally. Rich in detail and visual narrative, her artworks are multi-layered, often fusing dark and intense moods with humorous elements and a sense of playfulness. A freelance illustrator for over 30 years, Woolley has taught in higher education since 1986. Her work has been shown in numerous international exhibitions, including The United Nations, New York, The Museum of American Illustration, Rhode Island and The Royal Academy, London. Well-known for her work as long term contri­ butor to BBC ’s Radio Times magazine, Woolley is regularly commissioned in the UK and USA in the areas of editorial and advertising illustration; notable past clients have included MTV , BBC , Illustrated London News, Sunday Telegraph, Ogilvy and Mather, Bloomberg Magazine, Sports Illustrated, Fitch and Fitch, Walt Disney (The Art Of Mickey Mouse), Rolling Stone Magazine, Elle Magazine,

Walker Books, Penguin USA , Guardian, Observer, and the Sunday Times. Following the events of 9/11, Woolley was invited to partake in Prevailing the Human Spirit, a memorial exhibition organised by the Society of Illustrators and the Museum of American Illustration (2002). The exhibition was held at the United Nations building in New York. She has recently won the Gold award for Promotional Art by the Association of Illustration, UK (2006). R e s e a r c h Stat emen t   My recent projects have included a commission for Playboy magazine, a part-painted and part-collaged image to illustrate the degeneration of the city of Detroit, Communi­ cation Arts, New York – a panel judged illustra­ tion book (2005–06), a public poster exhibit for ‘Earthday Canada’ environmental project in Toronto, Canada (2006), as well as a cover illustration for an UCL Los Angeles University Publication (2006) and a series of illustrations for UCLA Medical Research into Diabetes. In 2009 I completed of a number of murals for the ‘Royal Institute of Science’ new extension. S e le c t e d Ou t pu t s an d Ach ievemen t s

Selected Recent Exhibitions 2006 Images, Mall Gallery, London. 2003 A Historical Look, The Museum of York County, North Carolina. 2003 Urbanities, Camberwell College of Arts, London and Stackhouse Gallery, New York. 2002 Prevailing the Human Spirit, Society of Illustrators, NY and United Nations, NY. Professional Recognition Patron of the Association of Illustration. Member of the Society of Illustration, New York. External examiner at Liverpool College of Art. 2006 Gold award for Promotional Art, Association of Illustrators, UK. 2002 ADIT Award of Distinction – Creativity 31.


Woolley Janet

Janet Woolley, People Wall, 270 × 330 cm, collage, paint and digital

The Queen at Royal Institute opening

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Woolley Janet

Janet Woolley, Ariel, 30 × 57 cm, collage, paint and digital


Woolley Janet

Janet Woolley, Monkey Nuts, 25 × 33 cm, collage, paint and digital

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Asbury Michael Reader, Pathway Leader

Biography   Dr Michael Asbury is a Reader in the history and theory of art and Pathway Leader for MA Visual Arts (Transnational Art) at Camberwell. He is also a core member of the research centre for Transnational Art, Identity and Nation (TrAIN ). Michael has published widely and has curated several exhibitions. He was associate-curator for the ‘Rio de Janeiro 1950– 1964’ section of ‘Century City: Art and Culture in the Modern Metropolis’, the inaugural temporary exhibition at Tate Modern in 2001. More recently, he curated solo exhibitions by artists Antonio Manuel, Detanico + Lain, Anna Maria Maiolino, Sutapa Biswas, José Patricio, Cao Guimarães as well as other group exhibitions. He acted as curatorial consultant for the Espaço Aberto / Espaço Fechado: Sites for Sculpture in Modern Brazil exhibition at the Henry Moore Institute, 2006. His writing on modern and contemporary art in Brazil has been published by: Arte e Ensaios, Art History Journal, Art Nexus, Dardo, Documenta 12, Editora Perspectiva, Henry Moore Institute, inIVA/MIT , Liverpool University Press, Parasol Unit, Pharos Centre for Contemporary Art, Rodopi, Tate Publishers, Third Text, Untitled, among others. R e search S tat e m e n t   What is the relevance of contemporary art practice for an art historian and how can art history inform critical and curatorial engagement in contemporary art? These are questions that my work over the last decade has attempted to respond to. I find myself in a paradoxical situation in which as a specialist in a subject area seemingly limited by nationality, my drive has been to question essentialist readings of Brazilian culture with a knowledge of the specificity of context, its relation to the wider history of art and its undeniable transnationality. My writing has thus drawn on revisionist, historiographic and sometimes comparative

methods while my curatorial practice questions the mechanisms through which certain artists reach international notoriety through a subtle exotic gaze which at once emphasises the relation to the local while emptying such practices of any significant contextual ambivalence in terms of their relation to both the local and the global. There is no longer such an urgency in arguing the lack of visibility of art emerging from outside Euro-America, instead there is a need to engage in processes in which that visibility is given com­ plexity and consequently a greater significance. S e le c t e d Ou t pu t s an d Ach ievemen t s

Selected Publications 2009 Catalogue text in Cao Guimarães: Memória e Outros Esquecimentos, Galeria Nara Roesler, Sao Paulo. 2009 ‘Introduction’ and ‘Order and Subjectivity’, in Asbury, M., Keheyan, G. (eds) Anna Maria Maiolino, Pharos Publishers, Nicosia. 2008 ‘Parisienses no Brasil, Brasileiros em Paris: Relatos de Viagem e Modernismos Nacionais’, in Concinnitas, #12, UERJ, Rio de Janeiro. 2008 ‘Antonio Manuel’, in Art Nexus, #68, V. 7, Miami. 2008 ‘Catalogue text’, in José Patricio: Painting by Numbers / Pinturas Numerosas, Galeria Nara Roesler, Sao Paulo. 2008 ‘Made in Brazil’, in The Art History Journal, #1, vol.31, February, London, pp.103–113. 2008 ‘O Hélio não tinha Ginga / Hélio Couldn’t Dance’, in Braga, P. (ed.) Fios Soltos do Experimental: a arte de Hélio Oiticica, Editora Perspectiva, Sao Paulo, pp.27–65. 2007 ‘Shadows / Sombras’, in Revista Arte & Ensaios, (guest editor, Special TrAIN edition), PPGAV-EBA, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, pp.52–67. 2007 ‘The Perversions of Practice’ in The Intricate Journey: Berlin, Colombia, Berlin, NGBK, Berlin, pp.94–101. 2007 ‘This Other Eden: Hélio Oiticica and Subterranean London 1969’, in Brett, G., Figueiredo, L. (eds) Oiticica in London, Tate Publishers, London, pp.35–39. 2007 ‘Detanico & Lain After Utopia: Art in the Age of Information Technology’, in Asbury, M., Keheyan, G. (eds) Detanico & Lain: After Utopia, Pharos Centre for Contemporary Art, Nicosia, pp.62–88. 2007 ‘Ricardo Basbaum: ‘Would you like to participate in an artistic experience?’, in Documenta 12, Taschen GmbH, Köln, Kassel, pp.220–221. 2006 ‘Anna Maria Maiolino’, in Dardo, #3, Santiago de Compostela & Rio de Janeiro, pp.152–173.


Asbury Michael

Antonio Manuel’s Studio, Rio de Janeiro, April 2008

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Asbury Michael

2006 ‘Antonio Manuel: Occupations/Discoveries’ in Asbury, M., Keheyan, G. (eds) Antonio Manuel, The Pharos Centre for Contemporary Art, Nicosia, pp.20–51. 2006 ‘The Bienal de São Paulo: Between nationalism and internationalism’, in Curtis, P., Feeke, S. (eds) Espaço Aberto/ Espaço Fechado: Sites for Sculpture in Modern Brazil, The Henry Moore Institute: Leeds, pp.72–83. 2005 ‘Neoconcretism and Minimalism: On Ferreira Gullar’s Theory of the Non-Object’, in Mercer, K. (ed.) ‘Cosmopolitan Modernisms’, inIVA/MIT, London, pp.168–189.

2005 ‘Changing Perceptions of National Identity in Brazilian Art and Architecture’, in Hernandez, F. (ed.) Transculturation: Cities, space and Architecture in Latin America, Amsterdam & Atlanta, pp.56–71. 2004 ‘Marvellous Perversions’, in Unbound: Installations by Seven Artists from Rio de Janeiro, exhibition catalogue, Parasol Unit, London, 2004, pp.24–40. 2003 ‘Tracing Hybrid Strategies in Brazilian Modern Art’, in Harris, J. (ed.) Critical Perspectives on Contemporary Painting, Critical Forum Series 6, Tate Gallery Liverpool and University of Liverpool Press, 2003, pp.139–170.

Rosangela Rennó’s Studio, Rio de Janeiro, April 2008


Asbury Michael

Selected Curatorial Projects 2009 Rosangela Rennó, The Pharos Centre for Contemporary Art, Nicosia. 2008 José Patricio, The Pharos Centre for Contemporary Art, Nicosia. 2008 Pharos = 10, Group Exhibition, Nicosia Municipal Arts Centre / Pierides Foundation, Nicosia. 2008 Sutapa Biswas, Nara Roesler Gallery, Sao Paulo. 2008 Cildo Meireles ‘Occasion’, Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground, Chelsea College of Art and Design, London. 2008 Cao Guimarães, The Pharos Centre for Contemporary Art, Nicosia. 2007 Anna Maria Maiolino, The Pharos Centre for Contemporary Art, Nicosia. 2006 Detanico & Lain: After Utopia, The Pharos Centre for Contemporary Art, Nicosia. 2005 Antonio Manuel, The Pharos Centre for Contemporary Art, Nicosia. Recent Conference Papers 2009 ‘Mário Pedrosa and Herbert Read: Paradigms on Art and Political Ideologies in the mid-20th Century’ at Meeting Margins, University of Essex. 2008 Panel discussion ‘Cildo Meireles’ retrospective at Tate Modern’, Chelsea College of Art and Design. (Convener, speaker and Chair). 2008 ‘A Arte Brasileira no Exterior, I Congresso do Brasil na Europa’, Universidad de Salamanca. 2008 ‘Some Thoughts on a Historiography of Recent Exhibitions of Brazilian Art in the UK and Beyond’, University of Essex, Departement Art History. 2008 ‘From Constructivism to Pop’, 32nd International Congress of Art Historians (CIHA ), University of Melbourne. 2008 ‘The Bienal de São Paulo between the National and the International’, 28th Bienal de São Paulo conference, Parque Ibirapuera, Sao Paulo. (Convenor, speaker and Chair). 2007 ‘Espaços de Circulação para Novas Propostas Artísticas’, Museu de Ciencias Naturais in conjunction with the exhibition Anteciparte 2007, Lisbon. 2007 ‘The Transnationality of Concrete Art’, Transnational Correspondence, Tate Modern. (Convenor and speaker). 2007 ‘Exhibiting Oiticica: an issue of conceptual conservation’, at Hélio Oiticica: The Body of Colour, Tate Modern (speaker and Chair). 2006 ‘Art in Brazil from the 1950s to the 1960s’, at accompanying the exhibition ‘Espaço Aberto / Espaço Fechado: sites for sculpture in modern Brazil’, Henry Moore Institute, Leeds.

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Selected Awards 2009 Meeting Margins in partnership with University of Essex, AHRC Research Standard Grant. 2003 Award to research and propose an exhibition and conference on current Brazilian Artists’ Groups, Arts Council of Great Britain. 2003 Award to research contemporary artists in five Brazilian cities (Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Brasilia and Recife), and report findings at a conference in conjunction with A Bigger Splash: At from the Tate Gallery Collection, held in Sao Paulo, funded by the British Council. Editorial and Refereeing Positions 2010 Peer Review College Member, AHRC. 2008 International Editorial Board, Risco, Journal of Architecture and Design, Faculty of Architecture, University of Sao Paulo (USP), São Carlos. 2008 (Founding member) International Editorial Board, World Art Journal, University of East Anglia, Norwich. 2008 Exhibition Advisory Committee, Gallery 32, Brazilian Embassy. 2007 Selection Committee, TrAIN / Gasworks annual residency programme. 2003 Member of the editorial advisory board, Concinnitas Journal, published by the Instituto de Artes da Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ). 2002 Editor, Visual Arts Section, Brazil Network (NGO).


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Baseman Jordan Reader

Biography   Jordan Baseman is a Reader in Time Based Media at Wimbledon. He is also a Lecturer at the Royal College of Art Sculpture School. Baseman received a BFA from Tyler School of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and an MA from Goldsmith’s College, University of London. He has a long history of carrying out projects in collaboration with various public institutions. These have included fellowships, residencies and commis­sions for: Arts Council England, Papworth Hospital (Heart and Lung Transplant Unit) Cambridge, The Science Museum, London, Dundee Contemporary Arts, Grizedale Arts, London Arts, Camden Arts Centre, The Serpentine Gallery, Collective Gallery Edinburgh, Book Works, National Sculpture Factory, Cork, Ireland, British School at Rome, the Wellcome Trust, London, ArtSway, Monash University, Melbourne Australia, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia, the Photographers’ Gallery London, Matt’s Gallery London and The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He has received grants from Arts Council England, the Arts Humanities Research Council, the British Council, the Henry Moore Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, and London Arts Board. (www.jordanbaseman.co.uk) R e search S tat e m e n t   I have been observing, filming, recording and working with people in order to create highly edited, semi-narrative, documentary-like films.

My current work investigates ideas around contemporary portraiture, narrative structure, the manipulation of recorded information, animation, authenticity and documentary. The foundations of my film projects centre on events and experiences that are rooted

in the unpredictable nature of the interview/ observation processes. The narratives within the films are culled from many hours of intimate interviews. My practice focuses primarily on belief systems, the motivation of the human spirit and lived experience. I am seeking to create meaning through the collection of recorded material, which is then edited and turned into constructed narratives that result in single screen films. Through the interview, recording, editing and creative processes, my work seeks to deal with ideas of portraiture, identity, hope, aspiration, belief, success and failure. S e lec t e d Outputs and Ac hievements

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2009 Blue Movie, Matt’s Gallery London. 2009 A Hypnotic Effect, Collective Gallery Edinburgh. 2008–09 Dark is the Night, ArtSway, New Forest; Photographers’ Gallery London. 2008 The Documentary Imperative, Manchester Museum. 2008 Inside Man, Aberystwyth Arts Centre, University of Wales. 2007 (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction, Hatton Gallery, Newcastle. 2007 Nature’s Great Experiment, Wellcome Collection, London. 2007 Tape 1 Tape 2, Monash University Gallery, Melbourne, Australia. 2006 luv is gonna get you someday, Maus Habitos, Porto, Portugal. 2006 Sunday Morning, Site Gallery, Sheffield. 2005 don’t stop ‘til you get enough, Matt’s Gallery, London. 2004 July The Twelfth 1984, Kaliman Gallery, Sydney, Australia. 2003 City of Angels, Triskel Arts Centre, Cork, Ireland. 2003 EF103 603, University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland. 2002 1 + 1 = 1 / Under the Blood, Royal Pump Rooms, Leamington Spa. 2002 Under the Blood / 1 + 1 = 1, Wysing Arts, Cambridge. Selected Group Exhibitions 2009 Animate Projects, BFI, London. 2009 53rd Venice Biennale, ArtSway’s New Forest Pavilion. 2009 Talk Show/Speakeasy, ICA, London.


Baseman Jordan

Jordan Baseman, The Dandy Doctrine, 16 mm film, 2009

Jordan Baseman, dark is the night, 16 mm film, 2009

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Baseman Jordan

Jordan Baseman, dark is the night, 16 mm film, 2009

2008 Alchemy, Manchester Museum, University of Manchester. 2007 Grain, Isle of Grain, Kent. 2007 Heart, Wellcome Trust, London. 2007 The Sun Always Shines on the Righteous, Purescreen, Manchester. 2007 Alchemy Artists, Manchester Museum, Manchester. 2006 Open Video Library, Zaim, Yokahama, Japan. 2006 Hospitality, Accademia Tedesca, Villa Massimo, Rome. 2006 No Place Like Home, Beacon Art Project, Lincolnshire. 2006 Arcade, ACAVA Studios, London. 2006 Vox Pop, Star and Shadow Cinema, Newcastle. 2006 Contingency Plan, C.A.S.T., Tasmania, Hobart, Australia. 2006 Et Tu Tribute, Embassy Rooms, Edinburgh. 2005 Variety, De la Warr Pavilion, Bexhill on Sea. 2005 Crossing Borders, Berwick Film Festival. 2005 Our Surroundings, Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee. 2005 Size Matters, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Yorkshire. 2004 Six Thousand Chairs, Crystal Palace, London. 2004 Bad Behavior, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Yorkshire. 2004 AGORA , Transition Gallery, London.

2004 Feast of Silenus, Embassy Rooms, Edinburgh. 2004 Island Art Film/Video Festival, UGC Cinema, Docklands, London. 2004 Wonderful/Visions of the Near Future, Arnolfini, Bristol. 2004 Volume, Moving Pictures, St Georges, Bristol. 2004 Brides of March, Embassy Rooms, Edinburgh. 2003 La Mostra, British School at Rome, Rome. 2003 Radio Radio, The International 3, Manchester. 2003 Animality, Blue Oyster Gallery, Auckland, N.Z. 2003 The Human Zoo, University of Newcastle, Newcastle. 2003 Further Up In The Air, Linosa Close, Liverpool. Selected Commissions and Awards 2009 Blue Movie, Grants for the Arts, Arts Council England, Henry Moore Foundation and Matt’s Gallery London. 2009 Commonwealth Suite, a hypnotic effect, Collective, Edinburgh. 2008–09 dark is the night, ArtSway and Photographers’ Gallery Commission. 2008 Stop.Watch., Animate Projects and RSA film commission.


Baseman Jordan

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Jordan Baseman, dark is the night, 16 mm film, 2009

2007 Perfume Disco Coma, Widnes Waterfront Commission, Widnes. 2007 (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction, Hatton Gallery, Univ. of Newcastle. 2007 Tape 1 Tape 2, Monash University Gallery, Melbourne, Australia. 2006–08 Alchemy Fellowship, Manchester Museum, University of Manchester. 2006 I Hate Boston, Boston Hates Me, Beacon Art Project, Lincolnshire. 2006 Nature’s Great Experiment, Research and Development Award, Wellcome Trust and Arts Humanities Research Council. 2006 Visiting Artist Fellowship, University of Tasmania, Australia. 2006 Sunday Morning, Site Gallery, Sheffield. 2005 don’t stop ’til you get enough, Matt’s Gallery, London. 2005 Grants to Artists, British Council, London. 2005 Life All Over It and More Than Religion, DCA, Dundee, Scotland. 2004 Visiting Artist Fellowship, Monash Univ., Melbourne, Australia.

2003 Henry Moore Sculpture Fellow, British School at Rome. 2003 CACTASIA!, Eden Project, Cornwall. 2003 City of Angels, National Sculpture Factory, Cork, Ireland. 2002 How to Hover, Further Up In The Air, Liverpool. 2002 1 + 1 = 1 and Under the Blood, Papworth Hospital, Cambridge. 2002 THRILLER, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Selected Publications 2009 Dark is the Night, Photographers’ Gallery London. 2008 4 Films / Jordan Baseman, Manchester Museum, University of Manchester. 2008 Sunday Morning, Site Gallery Sheffield.


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Biswas Sutapa Reader

performance and installation. My works are conceptual, and from the beginning have been informed by an interest and background in art history, and equally, have been absorbed with formal and aesthetic concerns which I have explored within the context of the image. My work reflects on the personal space, and through this, I articulate a ‘new’ space, in which the viewer becomes immersed in a seemingly familiar, yet often disturbing narrative. For example, in my seminal film installation, Birdsong, 2004 (16mm film transferred onto DVD , dual screen Sutapa Biswas studied Fine Art and Art History at projection), shot in a recreated Victorian parlour, the University of Leeds until 1985, at the Slade I researched the work of 17th century British School of Art (1988–90), and at the Royal College landscape artists, in particular the painting Lord of Art between 1996–98. Venues in which Biswas’ Holland and Lord Albermarle Shooting at Goodwood works have been exhibited, include: Tate Modern, (c.1759) by George Stubbs, as well as various London, UK, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 19th century literature and poetry. The film work Canada, Angel Row Gallery, Nottingham, UK, and is a tableau, based on a conversation between the Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery, Reed myself and my son, who at eighteen months of College, Portland, Oregon, USA, Nara Roesler age, expressed his desire to have a horse living in Gallery, Sao Paulo, Brazil, 6th Havana Biennale, his living room, and is also the central character Cuba (1997), Yale University Art Gallery, USA, within the film. The resulting film installation Whitechapel Art Gallery, UK, Institute of explores the relationship between mother Contemporary Art (ICA), London, UK, Arnolfini, and child, but works on multiple levels of almost UK, Gallery of Modern Art, Queensland, Australia, Bunuelesque visual poetry. As the curator and Henie Onstad Kunstsenter, Oslo, Norway, Pinta critic Guy Brett writes: ‘Biswas’ recent works is a Art Fair, New York, USA, ARCO, Madrid, Spain, device for awakening memory, gaining a foothold Gallery Espace, Delhi, India. in the flux of time and conveying an insight into human lives’. R e search S tat e m e n t   Soon after graduating in In another film, Magnesium Bird (2004), set in the the mid 1980s, my works were exhibited at the ‘safe haven’ of the walled gardens of Harewood ICA , London, UK , as part of a seminal exhibition titled, The Thin Black Line (1985), and thereafter in, House, Yorkshire, UK, the set is transformed into an almost apocalyptic scene, where, in torrential State of The Art: Ideas and Images in the 1980s, weather conditions, birds sculpted out of mag­ curated by Sandy Nairne in collaboration with nesium ribbon dotted about the landscape, appear Channel 4 television (UK ). to burst spontaneously into flames whilst in the background, a group of children (my son, nieces I have always worked in a wide range of media and nephews) continue to play. ‘Magnesium Bird’ including drawing and painting, film and video, Biography   Sutapa Biswas is a Reader in Fine Art and Cultural Studies at Chelsea, and an established international artist whose poignant films and poetic artworks have been shown in museums and art galleries worldwide. Biswas works in a wide range of media including installation, film, video, drawing and painting. Since the mid 1990s Biswas has been interested in exploring themes of time, space, gender and subjectivity and their relationship to art history, and other systems of knowledge and power.


Biswas Sutapa

is an homage to my father who died in 2000, and whose last conversation with me, just before he died, was in reference to Marcel Proust’s writing about birds. That the artist J.M.W. Turner stayed at Harewood House, and during his visit, created a series of bird drawings, or that the wealth of the Harewood Estate was founded on the exploits of the slave trade, and the first foundations of the landscaped gardens laid in 1759, the same year that Stubbs painted his work Lord Holland and Lord Albermarle Shooting at Goodwood, is no coin­ cidence. Rather, these things becomes part of the taxonomy of the evocative and haunting imagery.

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S e lected Outputs and Achievements

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2008 Sutapa Biswas, Nara Roesler Gallery, Sao Paolo, Brazil. 2006 Sutapa Biswas – Recent Works, The Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery, Reed College, Portland, Oregon, USA (touring exhibition). 2006 Magnesium Dreams, PICA (Portland Institute of Contemporary Art), TBA:2006 , Portland Oregon, USA. 2004 Sutapa Biswas Recent Works, Café Gallery Projects, London, UK (touring exhibition), also showing at Angel Row Gallery, Nottingham and Leeds City Art Gallery, UK. 2004 Sutapa Biswas, Recent works exhibited in situ with drawings by Joseph Turner and Edward Lear, Harewood House, Yorkshire, UK. 2000 Sutapa Biswas, Untitled (woman in blue, weeping), Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Canada (video installation). Selected Group Exhibitions 2009 ARCO Madrid, Madrid, Spain. 2008 States of the Nation: Art and Politics in Britain in the 1980s, City Art Gallery, Leeds, UK.

Sutapa Biswas, Birdsong, 16 mm film transferred onto DVD, dual-screen projection, colour, 2004


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Biswas Sutapa

Sutapa Biswas, Birdsong, 16 mm film transferred onto DVD, dual-screen projection, colour, 2004

2008 Moving Beyond the Frame, Gallery Espace, Delhi, India. 2008 Exhibition of a series of drawings at Pinta Art Fair, Metropolitan Pavilion and Altman Building, New York, USA. 2006 Melbourne International Arts Festival 2006, Australia. 2006 Elizabeth Leach, Aqua Art, Miami Basel, USA. 2006 Elizabeth Leach, Portland, Oregon, USA. 2006 Migratory Aesthetics, curated by Griselda Pollock and Judith Tucker, Parkinson Gallery, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. 2005 3rd Clerkenwell Film and Video Festival, curated by Emma Mahony, Hayward Gallery, London, UK. 2005 Launch of Contemporary Patrons, Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK. 2002–03 From Tarzan to Rambo, Tate Modern, London, UK.

Selected Contributions to Edited Publications 2007 ‘Books, Boats and Birds – Sutapa Biswas’ in Arte & Ensaios, special issue: ‘Transnational Correspondence’, PPGAV-UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, #14. 2007 In e-mail conversation with M. Roth, ‘Sutapa Biswas: Flights of Memory / Rites of Passage / Assertions of Culture’, in The Back Room – An Anthology, Clear Cut Press: Portland, Oregon. 2005 In e-mail conversation with M. Roth, ‘Sutapa Biswas: Flights of Memory / Rites of Passage / Assertions of Culture’, in Changing States: Contemporary Art and Ideas in an Era of Globalisation, iNIVA. 2004 In e-mail conversation with M. Roth: ‘Sutapa Biswas: Flights of Memory / Rites of Passage / Assertions of Culture’ and artists statement: ‘To Kill Two Birds With One Stone’, in Campell, S. (ed.) Sutapa Biswas, iNIVA,


Biswas Sutapa

London and Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery, Reed College, Oregon, USA. Published Monograph 2004 Sutapa Biswas, an anthology of essays on the work of the artist Sutapa Biswas, published by the Institute of International Visual Arts (inIVA), London, and The Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery, Reed College, USA. Selected Lectures and Conference Activities 2009 Key lecture for Visual Cultures of British India, Yale Centre for British Art in collaboration with Yale University, New Haven, USA. 2008 Selected co-convenor and panel organiser: ‘Monuments and Memorials’ at Location: Museum, Academy, Studio – 34th Annual Art Historians Conference, Tate Britain and Tate Modern, London, UK. 2007 Symposium Panel Respondent at Transnational Correspondence, Tate Modern, London, UK. 2007 Panel Speaker at ‘Open Market: Investigating the International. A Professional Development Day for Visual Artists’, Bristol Arts Consortium & Arts Matrix Ltd, Bristol, UK. 2006 ‘God, Heroes and Monsters’, at Portland Institute of Contemporary Art, Portland, Oregon, USA. 2004 ‘The Owl and the Pussycat: the concept of travel’, part of a series of lectures, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, UK, October 2004 – April 2005. Selected Awards and Commissions 2008–09 Commissioned permanent artwork for The New Art Exchange, Nottingham, UK. 2008 London Artists Film and Video Award (LAFVA) . 2004 AHRC small grant: Pre-production, research and development, making a new film installation. 2004 Arts Council of England, Recipient of National Touring Awards in support of exhibition, ‘Birdsong’, cocommissioned by inIVA, London, and Film and Video Umbrella, London, UK. 2002 AHRC Research Leave: Developing works towards solo exhibition in collaboration with inIVA. 2001 AHRC small grant: Film and video production for purposes of installation at the gallery SPACE, New York, USA. Selected Curatorial Projects 2009 Leading Residency Programme Poetry and Practice, Balmoral, Bad Ems, Germany, as part of TrAIN research centre, University of the Arts London.

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Collins Jane Reader

Biography   Jane Collins is a Reader in Theatre and Contextual Studies Co-ordinator for Theatre at Wimbledon. She is a writer, Director and theatre maker who works all over the UK and internationally. She has a long association with the continent of Africa and for The Royal Court, with the National Theatre of Uganda, she codirected Maama Nalukalala N_dezze Lye (Mother Courage and her Children) by Bertolt Brecht, with a Ugandan cast in Kampala. This production, which was the first official translation of a play by Brecht into an African language, toured internationally. Her AHRC funded research into ‘performing identities’ resulted in a new work for the stage The Story of the African Choir which was developed in conjunction with the Market Theatre Laboratory in Johannesburg and performed at the Grahamstown International Festival in 2007. Throughout 2008–09 her research has mainly been engaged with coediting Theatre and Performance Design: a reader in scenography, to be published by Routledge in January 2010. This book, with over 52 texts is the first of its kind in this field. In addition, in 2009, her practice based performance research included re-staging the award winning Ten Thousand Several Doors for the Brighton International Festival. R e search S tat e m e n t   My research continues to focus on performance and practise based research methodologies which re-engage the ‘theatrical’ as a means of interrogating contemporary society. In 2007 I wrote an article for Studies in Theatre and Performance which examined the efficacy of performance as a means of investigating the construction of post colonial identities through the ‘staging’ of an African ‘past’. One aspect of this research was an analysis of the scenographic framing of

these performances for western audiences. Among the many outcomes of this process was the identification of a dearth of material with which to interrogate critically the visual aspects of performance in particular and the scenographic in general. Concurrent with this, in my role as Contextual Studies Coordinator for Theatre at Wimbledon, I was also concerned that students of theatre design did not have a com­prehensive body of accessible written texts to help them situate their own work and analyse the work of others. Theatre and Performance Design, a reader in scenography aims to fulfil this need and has been the primary focus of my research over the past eighteen months. S e le c t e d Ou t pu t s an d Ach ievemen t s

Selected Performances 2007 ‘The Story of the African Choir,’ Grahamstown International Festival, South Africa. 2007 Devised and Directed Ten Thousand Several Doors the Brighton International Festival. Best Production of the Festival Joint Winner. 2005–06 Wrote and Directed The Voyages of Harriet Herring ING Bank. 2005–06 Wrote and directed workshop performance: The Story of the African Choir, The Market Theatre, Johannesburg, South Africa. 2005–06 ‘Bright Angel Point’ Selected Finalist The Croydon Warehouse International Playwriting Festival. 2005 Bright Angel Point shortlist finalist; The Croydon Warehouse International Playwriting Festival. 2003–04 Completed draft Bright Angel Point. Reading at the Royal Shakespeare Company, ‘The Other Place’, Lawrence Boswell (dir). 2003–04 Shakespeare’s Dream on Sea, performance development project including workshop production, Northbrook Theatre, W. Sussex. Selected Conference presentations 2009 International Federation of Theatre Research, Lisbon. 2007 Rhodes University Summer School Guest Speaker. 2007 Royal National Theatre ‘Agendas’ Seminar with John Carni. 2007 National Maritime Museum / Tate Gallery Travel and Narrative (paper).


Collins Jane

Award winning ‘Ten Thousand Several Doors’ re-staged for the Brighton Festival May 2009 (photo by M. Andrews)

2006 Theatre and Performance Research Association TAPRA (paper). 2006 The International Federation of Theatre Research Helsinki (paper). Selected Awards 2007 AHRC Practice-led and Applied Research grant 2005 AHRB Small Grant in the Creative and Performing Arts. Selected Publications 2007 ‘“Umuntu, Ngumuntu, Ngabantu”: The Story of the African Choir’ in Studies in Theatre and Performance, 27.2. Selected Exhibitions 2007 ‘Stages Calling’ Ruphin Coudyzer, Thirty Years of Stage Photography, The Market Theatre Johannesburg; Royal National Theatre (co-curated by Michael Pavelka)

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Cross David Reader, Pathway Leader

Biography   David Cross is a Reader and Pathway Leader for MA Visual Arts (Graphic Design) at Camberwell. Since setting up the MA in 2004, David has challenged the notion of professional neutrality in graphic design, encouraging instead an ethos that is interdisciplinary, research oriented and socially engaged.

As an artist, David works with Matthew Cornford. Cornford & Cross began collaborating while studying at Saint Martin’s School of Art in 1987, and graduated from the Royal College of Art in 1991. Their work responds to the problems that arise out of particular contexts or situations. Accordingly, each of their projects has been different in both form and content. They have carried out an Arts Council residency at the London School of Economics, and a British Council residency at Vitamin in Guangzhou, China. In Europe, they have exhibited in Bologna, Rome, and Stockholm; in the USA in San Fran­cisco, Philadelphia and New York. In London their work has been exhibited at the Camden Arts Centre, the ICA , Photographers’ Gallery and South London Gallery. They have just completed a book about their practice, published by Black Dog. R e search S tat e m e n t   As an artist with Cornford & Cross I make critical and satirical art projects that connect with civic participatory processes. Moving between photography, sculp­ tural installation and performance, our projects engage with the physical, temporal and social aspects of particular places. The involvement of different groups of people is essential: the projects aim to stimulate discussion on issues of public concern, including consumerism, resource scarcity and territorial conflict.

Since my student days at St Martins School of Art, I have studied the relationship between visual culture and the contested ideal of ‘sustainable development’; recently, my focus has been on the compound issues of fossil energy dependency and climate breakdown. My focus is now shifting to the obstacles to collective behavioural change, and stimulating the transition to a post-carbon society. In addition to producing aesthetic experiences, I maintain that a key function of contemporary art is to test concepts, assumptions and bounda­ ries. In public debate, I aim to focus attention on the ‘instrumental’ potential of contemporary art – not as a channel for didactic messages, but as a space for dialectical propositions. In making such propositions, my aim is to set up encounters of difference, so as to stimulate the kind of debate that is at the heart of active social agency. The ecological crisis consists of issues that have been overlooked because ‘nature’ has been pictured as a timeless backdrop to social experi­ ence, and ‘the environment’ is only visible when it is quantified and priced. To challenge this paradigm, I advocate an interdisciplinary approach that connects the latest developments in scientific and economic understanding with the creative, critical and self-reflexive tendencies of contemporary art. Work I have undertaken in this field includes a set of lectures and a communication art and design project titled ‘Endgame: energy crisis, climate damage and visual culture’ delivered at the Royal College of Art, and featured on the RSA Arts and Ecology website. For ‘Extreme Pasts, Absolute Presents’ at Kings College, I gave a presentation on place and culture in terms of the obliteration


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of landscape through industrial consumerism. For ‘Grassroots’ with Hayley Newman and Edwina Fitzpatrick, I examined the tensions between measurement and value in ecological footprinting exercises. For ‘Difference Exchange’ at Chelsea, I gave a presentation on the literal and symbolic potential of water, as a universal primary need and also as a metaphor for moving beyond objects and commodities towards systems and flows. Sele c t e d O u t p u t s a n d Ac h i e v e m e n t s

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2008–09 The Lion and the Unicorn, Wolverhampton Art Gallery. 2007 Cornford & Cross, Aspex Gallery, Portsmouth. 2005–06 Where is the Work?, Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art, Sunderland. 2003 The Lost Horizon, London School of Economics. 2002 Unrealised: Projects 1997–2002, Nylon Gallery, London. Selected Group Exhibitions 2008–09 Give Me Shelter, Attingham Park, Shropshire. 2005 Tra Monti, Rome, Italy. 2004 Values, 11th Biennial of Pancevo, Serbia and Montenegro. 2004 Perfectly Placed, South London Gallery, London. 2003 A Period Eye, Norwich Castle Museum and Art Gallery. Selected Publications 2009 Cornford & Cross, Black Dog Publishing, London. 2004 ‘Inside Outside.’, in Third Text, vol.18, issue 6. 2004 ‘Unrealised: Projects 1997–2002.’, in Miles, M. (ed.) New Practices/New Pedagogies, Routledge London and New York.

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Cornford & Cross, The Lion and the Unicorn, Maximum safe load of coal on gallery floor, emergency lighting, Wolverhampton Art Gallery, 2008 It is generally accepted that the Industrial Revolution originated in the West Midlands. This revolution was at first powered by renewable energy. But it was coal that provided the phenomenal power that allowed people to overcome many physical limitations of the body and the environment. The result has been the most radical transformation of our

economy, society and culture since history began. The physical form of this installation, The Lion and the Unicorn, was an expression of limitations: the maximum safe load on the gallery floor is 14000kg, and the minimum legal width for a safety access way is 1500mm. By extension, the work pointed to a limitation so large that it seems beyond our frame of vision: the limit to industrial growth. This is determined by the earth’s ‘ecological carrying capacity’, the ability of all living systems to absorb the waste products of human activity. The earth’s climate

system is being destroyed by burning fossil fuels, including the coal used to generate the electricity that powers the gallery lights. We switched off the lights. ‘The Lion and the Unicorn: Socialism and the English Genius’, is an essay written by George Orwell during the Second World War. In it, Orwell tested the limits of social obligation in terms of the bonds between people of different classes, and the continuity of collective identity between generations.


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Cornford & Cross, The Once and Future King, Well, ‘crowned’ by razor wire, The Walled Garden, Attingham Park, Shropshire, 2008 In the landscaped grounds of a stately home is an imposing brick wall, which forms an enclosure. Passing through a heavy wooden door, visitors enter a great square of level ground laid to lawn and intersected by two broad paths. Where the paths meet in the centre of the garden is a large circular pool, brick lined and capped with stone but left open to the sky. Next to this lies buried the original well, which has recently been the subject of an archaeological dig. The conjunction of an enclosed garden, crossed paths and water source is rich with significance from classical mythology to Christian

faith. The barrier, route and source that define the space are also open to psychoanalytic interpretation. This place was once the kitchen garden, which in its heyday would have provided enough food to support the whole household. For many decades, it stood as an empty, unproductive space while fossil fuel, industrial agriculture, and supermarkets dominated global food production. With the coming energy crisis, food and water look set to become desperately scarce. If so, this fertile ground, which is sheltered from the elements and secured against intruders, would become a vital and contested territory. It is now being put back into production through a volunteer-led National Trust initiative. Over the well, we made a distorted globe of security wire. The galvanized

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‘tangle wire’ that forms the surface of the globe was specially developed by a local firm to safely keep protestors out of the grounds of the Gleneagles Hotel during the 2005 G8 summit. Beneath the surface, the structure of the globe is a lethal bundle of stainless steel razor wire. Like a thorn bush in a fable, the loops and swirls of shimmering steel may draw the viewer near, yet hold them off in an encounter that is at once threatening and fascinating. ‘The Once and Future King’ is a novel by T.H. White, which retells the myth of King Arthur interwoven with elements of 20th century warfare, psychoanalysis and time travel. The narrative opens with a youthful clarity of style and character, gradually rises in complexity and paradox, before closing with a portrayal of subtle insight hard won against a backdrop of epic change.


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Cornford & Cross, Trance Nation, Helicopter and searchlight over summer solstice gathering, Willen Park, Milton Keynes, England, 2007 The year 2007 marked the 40th anniversary of the founding of Milton Keynes, a town remarkable for its combination of urban grid and utopian origins. Sleek corporate head offices line broad avenues whose names evoke the sites or mystic rituals of ancient religion: Silbury, Avebury, Midsummer...

At midnight on the eve of the summer Solstice, a helicopter crew prepared for a flight along a path marking a great logarithmic spiral across the darkened countryside. As the helicopter approached the centre of the spiral, its searchlight fixed on a gathering of Druids and New Age revellers celebrating under the night sky as they awaited the new day. Two visions arose: the surveillance of the video camera on board the heli­ copter, counterpointed by the souvenir images captured by the revellers. Poised between Antonio Gramsci’s

‘pessimism of the intellect and optimism of the will’, Trance Nation offered a fleeting moment of reflection, as the power of the searchlight was met by the sunlight. The title ‘Trance Nation’ refers to a genre of dance music marketed by the global media conglomerate Ministry of Sound, owned and controlled by James Palumbo, son of property developer Lord Peter Palumbo.


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Cornford & Cross, Words Are Not Enough, Temporary peace garden over abandoned nuclear bunker, Peckham, London, 2007 In a vacant plot of land, a shaft drops down to a concrete stairway leading into deep shadows. A corridor gives onto a network of flooded chambers echoing with the sound of dripping water. Power generators, an air filtration system, communications equipment, maps, charts and plans are still in place, but obsolete, decaying and forgotten in total darkness. Built to accommodate council staff in the event of a nuclear attack, the bunker is a relic of the Cold War era.

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To recall the time when the world lived in the shadow of a nuclear holocaust, and to question the idea of closure, we created a temporary peace garden over the entrance to the bunker. The installation consisted simply of three trees: one palm, one laurel and one olive.

If words are not enough, then action is required. But what action, and by whom?

Clearly, the attempt to symbolise a universal, lasting peace would be to deny reality and court failure. Instead, Words are not Enough posited a contingent, temporary peace, located on the threshold of credibility. We kept the trees in their plastic transit tubs to emphasize their status as commodities, to heighten the temporary, contingent nature of the garden and of the peace it symbolised.

As Southwark Council was unable to accommodate the debate, we staged a public address on the site of the installation opposite the Town Hall. Paul Gough gave a speech on memorial representations of peace and victory, and explored the history of peace gardens in relation to the Greater London Council during the Cold War.

The project aimed to leave visitors with a restless sense of insecurity or dissatisfaction, a mental space in which the desire for change might grow.


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Cornford & Cross, The Abolition of Work, Artists’ fee and budget in one-penny coins laid on gallery floor, Exchange Gallery, Penzance, 2007

copper-plated steel for the bronze, thus debasing the coin.

Cornwall is known for its history of copper and tin mining, while Newlyn is famous for its 19th century copper industry. The principal use of copper is as a conduit for water, electricity and telecommunications. This gallery was once a telephone exchange.

We asked for our artists’ fee and production budget to be delivered to the gallery in one-penny coins. With a team of helpers, we arranged the coins by hand – heads or tails upward as they came – to cover the gallery floor. The labour of laying the coins did not transform their material properties. After the exhibition they were returned into circulation.

Today’s one-penny coin was initially minted in 1971 from bronze, an alloy of copper and tin. It is the lowest denomination of currency in the UK, barely worth picking up. World copper prices rose, making the ‘use value’ of the metal greater than the exchange value of the coin. By 1992 the penny was worth less than its weight in copper, and the Royal Mint substituted

Though the multitude of coins does not represent anything, it may resemble many things. The installation can be viewed as a vast puzzle, but one in which all the pieces are the same. The ‘picture’ formed invites reflection on the definition of labour and the paradoxes of the relationship between art, money, and the value of time.

‘The Abolition of Work’ is the title of an anarchist pamphlet by Bob Black, who asserts that ‘work is the source of nearly all the misery in the world’ and advocates the complete transformation of society towards a way of life based on play. For helping us lay the coins, we would like to thank the following people: Simon Jaques and Lucy Willow, with Claire Benson, Rachel Campbell, Cat Gibbard, James Green, Rebecca Griffiths, Ann Haycock, Louise Hodges, Yasmin Ineson, Liam, Victoria Lingard, Jess Morgan, Jane Pitts, Judi Rea, Jo Tabone, Karen Thomas and Blair Todd.


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Cornford & Cross, Why Read the Classics?, Film and television lamp reflector on marble statue, Gardens of the Villa Aldobrandini, Rome, Italy, 2005 Why Read The Classics? was a work made around a damaged classical statue in a public garden in Rome. A flight of stone steps leads past ancient ruins up to palms and orange trees, in a garden, which, though beautiful, is rather used and neglected. Near the top of the stairway stands the marble figure of a young woman, on a pedestal in an alcove in the wall. Like so many statues in Rome, the head of the figure is missing.

Behind the space of the figure’s head we positioned a golden disc, of the kind used to reflect light onto the faces of actors and models. Opposite the figure we installed a powerful film and television lamp, so its beam of light reflected from the disc to create an aura or halo. Visitors to the garden found their gaze drawn by the dazzling light to the iconic vision of a mythical woman. Yet the lamp and electric cables that produced the light anchored the scene firmly in the moment.

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In Why Read the Classics? three conceptions of femininity converge: the classical goddess, the Christian Madonna, and the contemporary film star. Depending on the viewer’s position, their co-existence in the present may focus the mind on issues around the representation of gender, or contemplation of the wider ideological mechanisms of belief. Why Read the Classics? refers to a book of the same title by the great writer Italo Calvino, who answers his own question with characteristic erudition, insight and wit.


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Earley Rebecca Reader

Biography   Becky Earley is a Reader in Textiles Environment Design (TED ) at Chelsea. She is a textile designer and academic whose research work and creative practice has sought to develop strategies for the designer to employ in seeking to reduce the environmental impact of textile production, consumption and disposal.

In 2006 she curated the Crafts Council’s Well Fashioned: Eco Style in the UK exhibition and this year chaired the selection panel for the Jerwood Contemporary Makers 2009 exhibition, which addressed the theme of ‘impact’. She is currently completing an AHRC funded project, ‘Ever and Again: Rethinking Recycled Textiles’. Rebecca’s own-label award-winning collections – B. Earley – explore an exhaust printing process that she developed in 1998. More recently Rebecca has been working on the Top 100 project, upcycling polyester shirts using heat photogram and digital technologies. This work, spanning a ten-year period, will be shown in the Taking Time: Craft and the Slow Revolution exhibition, in October 2009. Rebecca has worked as a research and design consultant for organisations such as the Eden Project, and has also designed to commission for companies and individuals including Levi’s, Damian Hirst, Bjork and Kylie Minogue. (www.beckyearley.com, www.tedresearch.net, www.everandagain.info) R e search S tat e m e n t   I can be described as a practice-based design researcher in that my research integrates designing both as a mode of investigation and communication of research outcomes. This practice component encompasses a wide range of design related activities. For example, I produce hand and digitally printed

textiles for my own label, undertake public art projects and commissions and am an educator, facilitator and curator. I work within the Textiles Environment Design (TED ) research cluster at Chelsea. This unique project, established in 1996, was the first research cluster in the UK that focused on the environ­ mental impacts created at the design stage of textiles. TED places the individual textile practitioner centre stage, where ‘80–90% of the total lifecycle costs of any product (environ­ mental and economic) are determined by the product design before production even begins’ (More For Less, Design Council Report, 1998). Through personal and group research at TED , we’ve developed a series of ‘Design Stories’ – combining environmentally positive principles and possible strategic solutions – intended to help individuals and small and medium enterprises make more informed design decisions. These are being explored through a broad portfolio of projects and workshop scenarios, which ask the designer to consider up to seven of TED ’s strategies at any one time. The resulting textile product ideas generated at the end point uniquely combine theoretical thinking as well as material, technical, and social concepts. My interest in the environment emerged as I analysed my own studio design and production practices in 1997. I subsequently developed an exhaust printing technique, which produced hand printed textiles with no water pollution and minimal chemical usage. Since then I have continued to investigate new techniques and theoretical approaches to textile design, working on a variety of research projects including: an installation relating to natural indigo at the Eden


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Project (2000–02); Well Fashioned, an exhibition dedicated to eco fashion, Crafts Council Gallery (2006–07); establishing the TED Resource, a facility for designers that draws together samples, products, imagery and information about eco textiles and fashion (2003–); and leading the Ever & Again: Rethinking Recycled Textiles project, an AHRC funded collaborative practicebased research project (2005–09). Sele c t e d O u t p u t s a n d Ac h i e v e m e n t s

Selected Curatorial Projects 2009 Co-curator and panel Chair, Jerwood Contemporary Makers 2009, The Jerwood Space, London and The Dovecote Studios, Edinburgh. 2007 Ever and Again, Triangle Gallery, Chelsea College of Art and Design, London. 2006 TED website, www.tedresearch.net. 2004–07 Well Fashioned: Eco Style in the UK, 2004–2007, The City Gallery, Leicester; City Museum & Records Office, Portsmouth; Crafts Councils Gallery, London.

Selected Group Exhibitions 2009–11 Taking Time: Craft and the Slow Movement, Birmingham Museum (Craftspace touring). 2008–09 Imaginative Qualities of Actual Things, 3-logy Triennial 2008, Price Tower Arts Centre, Oklahoma, USA (August 2008 – January 2009) (with Kate Goldsworthy). 2008 Evolution/Revolution: the Arts and Crafts in Contemporary Fashion and Textiles, Rhode Island School of Design, USA. 2008 TechnoThreads: What Fashion Did Next, Science Gallery, Dublin Ireland. 2007 Refashioned: From Waste to Wear, Science Museum’s Dana Centre, London (Catwalk). 2007 Hometime, British Council exhibition, Shanghai; Beijing, China. 2004 Ethical Fashion, Paris. 2003 Hometime, Chongqing and Guangzhou, China. 2002 Indigo Exhibit 2002, Eden Project, St Austell, Cornwall. 2002 The New Knitting, London College of Fashion, London. 2002 Fabric of Fashion, British Council (Touring). 2002 East London Design Show, London. 2002 Peugeot Design Awards Exhibition, OXO Tower Wharf, London. 2001–02 Great Expectations, Design Council, New York.

Becky Earley, Eden Project Shirt Collection from the Top 100 Project, heat photogram plant print onto recycled polyester shirt, size 10, 2002


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Selected Awards 2006 Morgan Stanley Great Britons Award (shortlisted). 2005 Arts and Humanities Research Council, award for Ever and Again (www.everandagain.info). 2003 Peugeot Design Awards, Textiles (shortlisted). 2002 Arts and Humanities Research Board, Small Grant (5 ways project, www.5ways.info). Selected Conference Papers and talks 2009 ‘Sustainability and Enterprise. Creating Competitive Advantage: British design innovation for Chinese businesses and designers.’, China (co-author with Professor Kay Politowicz). 2009 ‘Sustainability and Craft’, Meet The Makers event, Jerwood Contemporary Makers 2009 exhibition, Jerwood Space, London, (presenter and Chair). 2008 ‘Upcycling Fashion & Textiles: Technology, Ethics, Systems and Appropriateness’, Institute of Mining and Materials; Royal Academy of Engineering, London. 2008 ‘The New Designers: Working Towards Our Eco-Fashion Future’, SOURCE , IM Masters, Design Academy Eindhoven, Holland. 2008 ‘TED at Techno Threads’, Science Gallery, Dublin. 2008 ‘Textiles and the Environment: The Role and Responsibilities of the Textile Designers of the Future’, Stroudwater International Textiles Festival, 21st Century Textiles Symposium.

Rebecca Earley, Disco Plant Print Collection for Barneys New York, heat photogram print scanned and digitally printed onto Wild Eco silk, 100 × 160 cm, 2006

2007 ‘Textile Futures Salon 2: What Future for Eco Textile Design?’, Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA), London (co-curator and presenter). 2007 ‘Sometimes You Just Have To Do It Yourself’, at Annual Design Conference, Tasmeen Doha, Virginia Commonwealth University School of the Arts. 2007 ‘The New Designers: Working Towards our Eco Fashion Future’, Dressing Rooms: Current Perspectives on Fashion and Textiles conference, Oslo University College, Norway (paper). 2007 Texprint Symposium, London. 2006 ‘Enterprise, Innovation and Environmental Concerns’ at National Enterprise Week, Innovation Centre, Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, London. 2006 ‘Making (it) Work Together: Creative Collaborations Between Makers, Thinkers, Researchers’, at Intersection / Artquest conference, University of the Arts London. 2005 ‘Eco Fashion Design: Reduce, Recycle, Rethink, Interrogating Fashion’, AHRC research cluster, London College of Fashion. 2005 ‘Eco Fashion Design’, Middlesex University. 2004 ‘Creating a Happy Future’, London Metropolitan University.


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Rebecca Earley, Ever and Again: Rethinking Recycled Textiles, heat photogram and digital dye sublimation print onto recycled polyester shirt, size 12, 2007

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Fairnington Mark Reader

Biography   Mark Fairnington is a Reader at Wimbledon. His practice is founded on painting as its primary method of research and explores an interest in the lineage of animal painting and its relation to the history of collecting within the natural sciences, probing the image of natural history specimens in collections, in storage and in displays. For a number of years Fairnington has focused his research on the large number of specimens housed in the Natural History Museum, London. The project has been fuelled by a fascination in the way that visual language has been used to describe the specimens and discoveries of the 19th century, when naturalists and collectors were involved in a race to explore and possess the natural world. Fairnington was born in Newcastle in 1957 he now lives and works in London.

He is represented by Fred (London), Art Agents, Hamburg and Peter Zimmermann, Mannheim. R e search S tat e m e n t   ‘The subjects of Fairnington’s paintings are made more singular through being painted. He is building a sort of ark – a raft of individual creatures and typologies of painting, which probes the possibility of realism. Despite his finely wrought brushwork and scrupulous pictorial research, there is a sense that he revels in the tendrils of ignorance that still permeate the natural and psychological worlds. Like the vitrines and bell jars that house these specimens, we are all kept in a perpetual bubble of partial truths and convenient lies. The natural world is like raw footage that the artist can script and reframe into a narrative of his own, using the syntax of the fantasist with as much veracity as that of the scientist.’ —Sally O’Reilly, Mark Fairnington, Galerie Peter Zimmermann, 2005

S e lec t e d Outputs and Ac hievements

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2007 Dynasty, Art Agents, Hamburg. 2006 The Raft, Fred, London. 2005 Galerie Peter Zimmermann, Frankfurt Art Fair. 2004 Galerie Peter Zimmermann, Mannheim, Germany. 2004 Wunderkammer II, Kunsthalle Mannheim, Germany. 2004 Artlab, Imperial College, London. 2003 Mobile Home Gallery, London. 2002 Dead or Alive, Oxford University Museum of Natural History; Harewood House, Leeds. Selected Group Exhibitions 2009 40 Artists – 80 Drawings, The Drawing Gallery, Powys. 2009 A Duck for Mr Darwin, Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, touring to The Mead Gallery, Warwickshire. 2008–09 War and Medicine, The Wellcome Collection, London. 2008 Farmer’s Market, Handel Street Projects. 2008–09 The Artist’s Studio, Compton Verney. 2007–08 Bloedmoo, The Historic Museum Rotterdam. 2005 Young Masters, 148a John Street, London. 2005 Blumenstück.Künstlers Glück, Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen, Germany. 2005 Infallible in Search of the Real George Eliot, Hatton Gallery, Newcastle. 2004 John Moores 23, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool. 2004 Fabulous Beasts, The Natural History Museum, London. 2004 The Goat, Medieval Modern, with Olivier Richon. 2004 Transmission Portfolio, Domo Baal Gallery, London. 2003 Transmission Portfolio, Site Gallery, Sheffield. 2003 The Human Zoo, Hatton Gallery, Newcastle. 2003 Infallible in Search of the Real George Eliot, APT Gallery, London. 2003 Mead Gallery, Warwick Arts Centre. 2003 Chockerfuckingblocked, Jeffrey Charles Gallery, London. 2002 Like gold dust, Angel Row Gallery, Nottingham. 2002 Alessandra Bonomo Gallery, Rome. 2002 History Revision, Plymouth Arts Centre. 2002 No One Begins a Lunatic, Jeffrey Charles Gallery, London. 2002 Intimacy, Russel-Cotes Museum, Bournmouth.


Fairnington Mark

Mark Fairnington, Meardy Tally, oil on canvas, 235 × 367 cm, 2009 (This painting was included in the Baltic exhibition)

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Faure Walker James Reader

Biography   James Faure Walker is a Reader at Camberwell and is a painter, digital artist and writer. He studied at St Martins School of Art (1966–70) and the Royal College of Art (1970–72). He has been incorporating computer graphics in his painting since 1988. In 1998 he won the ‘Golden Plotter’ at Computerkunst, Gladbeck, Germany. One-person exhibitions include Galerie Wolf Lieser, Berlin (2003), Galerie der Gegenwart, Wiesbaden, Germany (2000, 2001), Colville Place Gallery, London (1998, 2000), the Whitworth, Manchester (1985). Group exhibitions include Imaging by Numbers, Block Museum, Illinois, USA (2008), Siggraph, USA (eight times 1995–2007), John Moores (1982, 2002), DAM Gallery (2003, 2005, 2009), Bloomberg Space (2005), Digital Salon, New York (2001), Serpentine Summer Show (1982), Hayward Annual (1979). He has eleven works in the collection of the Victoria & Albert Museum. He co-founded Artscribe magazine in 1976, and edited it for eight years. His writings have appeared in Studio International, Modern Painters, Mute, Computer Generated Imaging, Wired, Garageland, and catalogues for the Tate, Barbican, Computerkunst and Siggraph. His book, Painting the Digital River: How an Artist Learned to Love the Computer, was published by Prentice Hall (USA ) in 2006, and was awarded a New England Book Show Award. R e search S tat e m e n t   I have become fascinated by how-to-draw books of the 1920s, and wondered whether I could connect these with the drawing software of our own time. Having published a book on digital painting, a book on digital drawing seemed the obvious next step. The idea of ‘digital drawing’, however, caused some disquiet in drawing circles, and for my part, I cannot think of it as a coherent concept. Equally, a study of assumptions about drawing common in the 1920s

suggests that what now passes as ‘traditional’, or ‘human-centred’ in drawing, would not have been recognised as such by the drawing gurus of that time. I have touched on this in a series of essays and book chapters – ‘Pride, Prejudice and the Pencil’, and ‘Drawing Lessons for Ants’ for example – but shaping the ideas into one book format with an appeal both to a technologically minded readership and to the drawing enthusiasts is quite a problem. That is long-term. Much of my research is also improvised according to exhibitions and opportunities that come up. I am currently working on a project for the South African World Cup 2010, to produce a print that evokes the event without being too specific – because of copyright issues. The research for that consists – or is an excuse for – watching parts of the Confederations Cup. Normally, however, I gather images or ideas less methodically. I regularly photograph the Olympic Site, close to my studio. Another sports theme, I realise. I have been using paint software in combination with regular painting methods for over twenty years, and this still throws up its surprises week by week. I would not argue that painting was necessarily ‘research’, but it is probably the best way of understanding the impact of digital methods, and the structures possible in abstract painting. The drawing books of the early 20th century – derided as book academies – were banned from the Royal Academy because they might undermine the Professors’ teaching. In comparison today art education has become


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James Faure Walker, Villa Dora, archival Epson inkjet print, 104 × 86 cm, 2008

impersonal, over-regulated and uncertain. A book that laid down core principles, whether for drawing, digital art, or installation, would seem out of place. I have no ambitions in that direction, but I do find it stimulating to study obsolete methods and processes, with their helpful illustrations. Sele c t e d O u t p u t s a n d Ac h i e v e m e n t s

Publications 2008 Faure Walker, J. ‘Pride, Prejudice and the Pencil’, Garner, S., (ed.) Writing on Drawing, Intellect/ University of Chicago.

2006 Faure Walker, J. Painting the Digital River: How an Artist Learned to Love the Computer, Prentice Hall, USA . Selected Solo Exhibitions 2009 Window Galleries, Canary Wharf. 2006 Fosterart, London. 2003 Galerie Wolf Lieser, Berlin. Selected Group Exhibitions 2010 FIFA South African World Cup International Fine Art Print Project, (worldwide). 2009 The Best of Digital Art, DAM Gallery, Berlin. 2009 Mini-Meta, Beardsmore Gallery, London. 2008 Meta, Ruskin Gallery, Cambridge. 2008 Digital Eyes, Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, USA. 2008 Space Now (40 years of Space Studios), Triangle Gallery, London.


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James Faure Walker, Dutch Waltz, oil on canvas, 142 × 163 cm, 2009

2008 The Digital View, Arti et Amicitiae Gallery, Amsterdam, Holland. 2008 11th Japan Media Arts Festival, Tokyo, Japan. 2008 Imaging By Numbers: A Historical View of the Computer Print exhibition, the Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art, Illinois, USA. 2007 Graphite 2007, Digital Art Exhibition, Perth, AU, December. 2007 London Group, (invited window project), Bridge Art Fair, Trafalgar Square, London. 2007 Dark Filament exhibited, Siggraph Art Gallery, San Diego, USA, August. 2007–09 Siggraph travelling Art Show (worldwide). 2007 CADE, Perth, AU. 2006 IDEAS 2006, San Diego, USA. 2006 Computerkunst, Gladbeck, Germany. 2006 London Group, Arti et Amicitiae’s Salon, Amsterdam. 2005 ‘1979’, Bloomberg Space, London. 2003 Siggraph Art Gallery, San Diego. Selected Conference Papers and Articles 2009 Paper and forthcoming publication ‘Digital Art and Painting’, Computer Space conference, Sofia, Bulgaria (invited speaker). 2009 Paper and forthcoming publication ‘Drawing Lessons for Ants’, ISEA conference, Belfast 2009 Paper ‘The Origins of Artscribe’, at the Artists’ Writings conference, Courtauld Institute.

2008 ‘A Drawing Book for a Digital World?’, 100 years of Fine Art, Helwan University, Cairo, Egypt. 2008 Paper and forthcoming publication ‘Machines, Drawing and Vision: Notes towards a Book on Digital Drawing’, CHArt conference, London. 2007 Magazine Article, ‘Translation, Translation, Oh Translation’, Garageland magazine. 2007 Paper ‘Painting Digital, Letting Go’, in BentkowskaKafel, A., Cashen, T., Gardiner, T. Futures Past: Twenty Years of Arts Computing, Intellect. 2006 ‘Painting in a Digital World: I told you so’, Siggraph conference, Boston, USA (published in the Electronic Art and Animation Catalogue). 2006 Panel member, ‘Drawing the Future’, Drawing Symposium, National Gallery, London (published by University of the Arts, Farthing, S. (ed.)). 2004 Invited Keynote Speaker, ‘The reckless and the artless: practical research and digital painting’, paper presented at University of Hertfordshire Research into Practice conference (published in Working Papers in Art and Design, refereed journal). 2004 ‘Painting Digital and Letting Go’, paper given at CHArt conference Futures Past: Twenty Years of Arts Computing, Birkbeck, University of London (published online).


Fortnum Rebecca

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Reader, Pathway Leader

Biog r a p h y   Rebecca Fortnum is a Reader and MA Visual Arts (Fine Art) Pathway Leader at Camberwell. She has been an Associate Lecturer at Bath Spa, Central Saint Martins and Chelsea College of Art and Design, a Visiting Fellow in Painting at Plymouth University and at Winchester School of Art, a Research Fellow at Lancaster University, a visiting artist at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a Senior Lecturer at Norwich School of Art and Wimbledon College of Art. Awards include the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, the British Council, the Arts Council of England, the British School in Rome and the AHRC . She has had solo shows at the Collective Gallery, Edinburgh, Spacex Gallery, Exeter, Kapil Jariwala Gallery, London, Angel Row Gallery, Nottingham, The Drawing Gallery, London and Gallery 33, Berlin. She was instrumental in founding the artistrun spaces Cubitt Gallery and Gasworks Gallery, both in London. She is currently participating in Method, a pilot programme for artist/ practitioner leadership development, supported by the Cultural Leadership Programme. Rese a r c h S tat e m e nt   My research falls into four related areas; fine artists’ processes and their documentation; a visual art practice; fine art pedagogy; contemporary women artists and feminist theory.

My research into visual artists’ making processes has led me to work with many leading British artists including Vong Phaophanit, Michael Ginsborg and Paula Kane, finding creative ways to document and reflect on their making processes Much of this research stems from my research project, Visual Intelligences at the Lancaster Institute for Contemporary Arts where I was a research fellow from 2004–09 and my

current project How Art Thinks, based at the International Centre for Fine Art Research (ICFAR) at University of the Arts London (UAL ). Some of this research is available on visualintelligences.com including an AHRC funded pilot study to test the methodologies for documentation of artist’s processes. This website also includes the documentation of two research symposia that I organised including Did Hans Namuth Kill Jackson Pollock? The Problem of Documenting the Creative Process held at Chelsea College of Art and Design in 2007. Research seminars/talks on this subject have been given at The Royal College of Art, Loyola University, New Orleans, California State University, Stanislas, and Hertfordshire University amongst others. This research led to my appointment as international lead artist at the TRADE programme in Ireland where I worked with 5 Irish artists finding ways they could record and reflect on their own processes of making and thinking (www.roscommonarts.com/artsoffice/ programmes/trade.htm). Most recently I have begun to write on the role of ‘not knowing’ within the creative process in several conference contributions and organised a symposium called On Not Knowing; How Artists Think at Kettle’s Yard in Cambridge this year. My visual art practice includes painting, drawing, print-making and photographic practice as well as curating. Curatorial projects include Fluent, Painting & Words that included work by Peter Davies, Simon Linke and Maria Chevska (2005) and Unframed which included Rosa Lee, Jo Bruton and Katie Pratt and was funded by the Arts Council (2006). I have exhibited with The Draw­ ing gallery (Shropshire and London) since its inception in 2005. In 2008 I was an artist in residence at London Print Studios as part of the Space for 10 programme (www.spacefor10.org.uk).


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Rebecca Fortnum, work from ‘blind’ series, photo etching, 9 × 12 cm, 2008

Most recently I have received a commission to contribute to a drawing ‘conversation’ for Th:Ink cahier of drawing research, published by Ghent Art Academy and will be speaking at their first symposium in September 2009. My current work is principally within painting and uses text, portraiture and pattern making to reflect on issues of empathy and communication. I have recently convened Paint Club, an open research network within UAL .

I am currently the CLIP CETL co-ordinator for Camberwell and lead the MA Fine Art pathway of the MA Visual Art. I have written on the use of the studio within the art academy and (with Katrine Hjelde) the recent development of fine art practice towards the ‘educational turn’. I am particularly interested in the relationship between contemporary art practice and how the subject is taught at HE level. I have recently undertaken pedagogical research including


Fortnum Rebecca

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Rebecca Fortnum, work from ‘blind’ series, photo etching, 9 × 12 cm, 2008

working on UAL’s project The Teaching Landscape in Creative Subjects in which I co-wrote the Fine Art report (www.arts.ac.uk/clipcetl-landscapes.htm). I have just completed a University Teaching Fellowship, examining the written feedback in assessment reports at undergraduate level. I have a long held interest and activity in feminist art theory and contemporary art practices by women artists. I contributed a chapter to

Unframed, the politics and practices of women’s contemporary painting edited by Rosemary Betterton 2004 and curated a symposium at Camberwell of the same name in 2005. My book, Contemporary British Women Artists, in their own words, was published in 2007 and received AHRC and Arts Council Funding. Recent activity includes writing for several all women exhibitions and interviewing artists for BBC Radio 4 Women’s Hour.


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S elected O u t p u t s a n d Ach i e v e m e n t s

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2007 Contemporary British women artists, Camberwell College of Arts, London. 2006 False Sentiment, Gallery 33, Berlin (two person). 2005 June Fitzpatrick Gallery, Maine, USA (two person). 2005 Rebecca Fortnum, The Drawing Gallery, London. Selected Group Exhibitions 2009 40 Artists – 80 Drawings, The Drawing Gallery, Shropshire. 2008 The Walls in Three Places, White Nave, Dover. 2008 Life’s a Gas, Beverley Knowles Fine Art, London. 2008 The Notebook Project, Festival of Ideas, Cambridge University. 2006 Inspiration to Order, California State University Stanislaus Gallery, USA & The Winchester Gallery, UK and the Wimbledon Gallery, UAL. 2006 Wish You Were Here, A.I.R. Gallery, New York. 2004 Unframed, Standpoint Gallery, Hoxton, London. Selected Publications 2009 ‘Paula Kane: Studio Wall’, editor, eyeseefar the publishing imprint of ICFAR & RGAP. 2007 Journal of Visual Art Practice edition (6.3), on the documentation of artists processes, co-editor (with Chris Smith). 2006 Contemporary British women artists: in their own words, I.B. Tauris (NY & London). 2004 ‘Seeing and feeling’ (chapter), in Betterton, R. (ed.), Unframed, the practices and politics of women’s contemporary painting, I.B. Tauris, 2004, pp.138–61. Recent Conference Presentations 2009 Conference introduction at The Processes of Painting symposium, UAL and ICFAR. 2009 ‘Fine Art’s Pedagogic Turn’, at GLAD conference 2009, with Katrine Hjelde. 2009 Conference introduction at On Not Knowing; how artists think, interdisciplinary symposium Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge. 2008 ‘On Not Knowing What You Are Doing; the importance of the studio to fine art’, at AAH conference, Tate Britain. 2008 ‘On Not Knowing; the Creative Process and the Academy’, at European League of Institute of the Arts (ELIA) Research Meeting, Zurich. 2008 ‘The Internal Quality Audit; how artists judge themselves’, with Dr Claire MacDonald at Sensuous Knowledge 5, Bergen Art Academy, Norway.

Awards 2009 METHOD, Cultural Leadership Programme. 2007 Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Research Award. 2006 Lancaster University, Small Research Grant. 2005 AHRC Small Grant in the Creative Arts. 2005 Oppenheim-John Downes Award. 2004 Arts Council Individual Award. 2004 AHRB Small Grant in the Creative Arts. Recent Residencies 2007 Space for 10 – The Art House residency / creative development programme. 2007 TRADE residency programme (lead artist with Alfredo Jaar), Roscommon, Ireland.


Kikuchi Yuko

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Biog r a p h y   Dr Yuko Kikuchi is a Reader at Camberwell. She was born in Tokyo and educated in Japan, the USA and UK . After completing a BA in English and American literature and an MA in American Studies, she worked at the School of East Asian Studies, University of Sheffield. Kikuchi joined the University of the Arts London in 1994 and currently teaches and supervises research degree students and conducts research as a core member of the TrAIN research centre. Kikuchi’s research interest lies in crosscultural and transnational issues in relation to non-western modernities in art/design. Her PhD study on the Japanese folkcrafts (Mingei) movement opened her eyes not only to the complexity of modernity and national identity in Japan, but also to multiple modernities and interregional relations in East Asia. Subsequently, it led to a project on Taiwanese visual culture during Japanese colonisation. She is currently leading a new international joint project ‘“Orien­ tal” Modernity: Modern Design Development in East Asia, 1920–1990’ to investigate regional and inter-regional development of modern design in Japan, Korea, China/Taiwan/Hong Kong. She is also involved in the AHRC funded inter­ national project ‘Forgotten Japonisme: The Taste for Japanese Art in Britain and the USA , 1920s– 1950s’, for which she is investigating 1950–60s American Japonisme in relation to the Cold War.

My current research interest is on modernities in art and design in East Asia. The post-colonial cultural debate has shifted from the binary relations of West over East, to inter-relations between East and West, followed by, more recently, East within East and the transnational. Accordingly, my interest has also shifted from Japanese modernity in relation to Euro-american modernity (such as my study on

Mingei) to multilateral cultural analysis on East Asian modernities in relation to Euro-american modernity and Japanese modernity (as exempli­ fied by my study on colonial modernity in Taiwanese visual culture and current research). East Asia has been a historically and geoculturally shared area, but due to the political disruption and fragmentation brought about by EuroAmerican and Japanese colonisation, followed by civil wars and finally the Cold War, crossregional studies in art and design in the area have not been undertaken. I am currently leading a new international joint project ‘“Oriental” Modernity: Modern Design Development in East Asia, 1920–1990’ to investigate regional and interregional development of modern design in Japan, Korea, China/Taiwan/Hong Kong. Together with local experts in East Asia, this project aims to create a multilateral critical framework for identifying regional differences between East Asian modernities in a shared and refracted EuroAmerican modernity. I’m also involved in the AHRC funded project ‘Forgotten Japonisme: The Taste for Japanese Art in Britain and the USA, 1920s–1950s’ led by Professor Toshio Watanabe, Director of the TrAIN research centre. In this project, I am investigating 1950’s–60’s American Japonisme through American designer Russel Wright’s intervention in Asia during the Cold War period. In each of these, my research is primarily in the area of craft/product design.

Rese a r c h S tat e m e nt  

S e lected Outputs and Achievements

Published Books 2004 Japanese Modernisation and Mingei Theory: Cultural Nationalism and Oriental Orientalism, London: Routledge/ Curzon. 2007 Refracted Modernity: Visual Culture and Identity in Colonial Taiwan, University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu (nominated for the 2009 Charles Rufus Morey Book Award).


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Published Book Chapters/Journal Articles 2008 ‘Yanagi Soetsu and Korean crafts within the Mingei movement’, in Hoare, J.E. and Pares S. (eds), ‘Korea: The Past and the Present: Selected Papers from the British Association for Korean Studies BAKS Papers series, 1991–2004’, Folkestone, Kent: Global Oriental. 2008 ‘Russel Wright and Japan: Bridging Japonisme and Good Design through Craft Design’, in Journal of Modern Craft, 1–3. 2006 ‘From Representation to Subjectivity: Taiwanese ‘Vernacular’ Crafts’, The Proceedings of the Papers at International Conference on History and Culture of Taiwan. 2005 ‘Japan and the Mingei movement’, in Livingstone, K. and Parry, L. (eds), International Arts and Crafts, London: Victoria & Albert Publications. 2005 ‘Yanagi Soetsu et l’artisanat traditionnel japonais’, Dossier de l’Art, 118. 2002 ‘The British Discovery of Japanese Art’, in Daniels, G. and Tsuzuki, C. (eds), The History of Anglo-Japanese Relations 1600–2000, vol.5, Tokyo: University of Tokyo Press (Japanese version) and Palgrave (English version). Curation 2005–06 ‘International Arts and Crafts’ (Japan Section) at the Victoria & Albert Museum; Indianapolis Museum of Art; and Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

Yuko Kikuchi, Japanese Modernisation and Mingei Theory: Cultural Nationalism and Oriental Orientalism, London: RoutledgeCurzon, 2004

Yuko Kikuchi, Refracted Modernity: Visual Culture and Identity in Colonial Taiwan, Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2007


Newman Hayley

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Reader

Biog r a p h y   Hayley Newman is a Reader at Chelsea. She received a BA at Middlesex University before gaining a Higher Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Art at the Slade School of Art. In 1995 she took up a DAAD scholarship in the class of Marina Abramovi ´c at the Hochschule für Bildende Künste, Hamburg after which she was awarded the Stanley Burton practice-based research scholarship at the University of Leeds, completing her PhD in 2001. In 2004/05, she was the recipient of the Helen Chadwick Arts Council of England Fellowship at the British School at Rome and the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, Oxford. She has performed and exhibited widely and has had solo shows at Matt’s Gallery, London, The Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, Centre d’Art Contemporain, Geneva and The Longside Gallery at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park. She has performed at Camden Arts Centre, South London Gallery, Barbican Art Gallery and The Hayward Gallery. Group exhibitions include Her Noise, South London Gallery, London; Documentary Creations, Kunstmuseum, Lucerne; Camera/Action, Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago and Live Culture, Tate Modern, London. She lives and works in London and is represented by Matt’s Gallery. Rese a r c h S tat e m e nt   I am interested in performance and performativity, with particular relation to documentary practices, subjectivity, intervention and fiction. My work is often performative and explores ways that context shapes language and action. Recent work has taken the form of a series of public interventions that have served as frameworks for dialogue between participants. Each work encourages conversation to be performed within its given context.

Milton Keynes Vertical Horizontal (MKVH, 2006)

was a public event in which volunteers were driven around the Milton Keynes road grid until their coach ran out of diesel. The book MKVH (The Screenplay), 2008, is based on this journey. Written in the style of the original Easy Rider screenplay from 1969, the book is an edited transcript of conversations that took place on the original 39 hour trip. It includes diary entries, photos, drawings, radio interviews, local and national news stories and employs a cut-up technique that mixes fact and fiction into an occasionally seamless narrative. The screenplay builds on ideas around inter-subjectivity, memory and narrative and comments on peak oil with particular relation to the car dependent culture of the new city of Milton Keynes. In 2009 the writer Andrea Mason and I inaugu­ rated the self-help group Capitalists Anonymous (C.A. ), which is a forum for people to come and confess their capitalist tendencies. Originally set up for bankers in the wake of the economic crash, C.A. was seen as a therapeutic intervention that provided ‘a supportive environment in which to share… stories of greed, excess consump­ tion, shopping addiction and explore … fears or excitement about what’s next?’ The inaugural C.A. meetings took place in June 2009 on the steps of the Royal Exchange in the City of London. The work is part of ongoing interest in economics, the environment and the effects of climate change on people around the world. S e lected Outputs and Achievements

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2008 MiniFlux, Alt Gallery, Newcastle. 2007 Catch This – New Works from the Arts Council Collection, Longside Gallery, Yorkshire Sculpture Park. 2003 Hayley Newman, Centre d’Art Contemporain, Geneva. 2002 Hayley Newman, Ikon Gallery, Birmingham.


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Hayley Newman, MKVH (Milton Keynes Vertical Horizontal), public artwork, 2006

Selected Group Exhibitions 2009–10 Emporte-moi / Sweep Me Off My Feet, Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Canada and MAC/ VAL , Paris. 2007 Smoke, Pumphouse Gallery, London. 2007 I am Making Art – Chapter 4 Feminism, Centre d’Art Contemporain Genève. 2006 Responding to Rome, Estorick Collection, London. 2006 Für die Ewigkeit, Jet, Berlin. 2006 International Exhibitionist, Curzon Cinema, London. 2005 Chronic Epoch, Beaconsfield, London. 2005 There is Always an Alternative, Temporary Contemporary and Work and Leisure International London and Manchester. 2005 Plural 2, British School at Rome. 2005 Resonance, Montevideo, Amsterdam. 2005 Documentary Creations, Kunstmuseum Lucerne. 2005 Resonance, Netherlands Media Art Institute, Motevideo, Amsterdam. 2005 Showcase – New works from the Arts Council Collection, South London Gallery, London. 2004 Camera/Action, Museums of Contemporary Photography, Chicago.

2004 Britannia Works, British Council group show, Athens. 2003 Art, Lies and Videotape, Tate Liverpool. 2003 Live Culture, Tate Modern, London. 2002 A Short History of Performance, Whitechapel Gallery, London. 2002 ‘Superhero Artstaar – Beyond Good and Evil’, Gertrude Street 200, Melbourne, Australia. Selected Performances and Projects 2009 C.R.A.S.H culture, Arts Admin, London. 2007 Luck be a Lady Tonight, Alma Enterprises, London. 2006 How to Improve the World; 50 years of the Arts Council Collection, Hayward Gallery, London. 2005 Karaoke Record Cutting, Barbican Art Gallery, London. 2005 Moscio, Rialto, Rome. 2004 ‘Come On’ and Drawing Performance (drawing in collaboration with Yang Zhichao), Soho, Beijing. Authored books 2008 MKVH , Milton Keynes Gallery, Milton Keynes 2004 The Daily Hayley, Matt’s Gallery, London.


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Selected Texts 2007 ‘A Secret Sculpture’, in Art U Need – my part in the public art revolution, Bob and Roberta Smith, Black Dog Publishing. 2005 Artists pages in China Live: Reflections on contemporary performance art, Chinese Arts Centre / Live Art Development Agency. 2005 ‘Connotations Performance Images, 1994–1998’, in Live: Art and Performance, Tate Publishing. Selected Presentations/Conference Contributions 2006 ‘Performance and video’ presentation at the 14th International Performance Conference, Artists Association / Blue Space Dalat and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. 2005 ‘Performance to camera and liveness.’, at Video Art; from the margins to the mainstream, Tate Britain.

Selected Commissions 2009 Out of Memory, Live Art Development Agency, London. 2006–07 A Secret Sculpture, Rochford Reservoir, Rochford, Essex. 2006 MKVH (Milton Keynes Vertical Horizontal), Milton Keynes Gallery, Milton Keynes. Selected Awards 2004 Arts Council of England Helen Chadwick Fellowship, Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, Oxford and British School at Rome. 2004 One to One Live Art Bursary.

Hayley Newman, MKVH (Milton Keynes Vertical Horizontal), public artwork, 2006


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Pavelka Michael Reader

Biography   Michael Pavelka is a Reader at Wimbledon. His theatre design work includes two productions with Lindsey Anderson: The Fishing Trip and Holiday, (Old Vic); with Edward Hall/Propeller Company: Henry V, Winter’s Tale (in the UK , Europe, USA and Far East), and Rose Rage (West End, Chicago and New York – Best Costume Design nomination Jeff Awards, Chicago). Library Theatre Manchester designs include The Life of Galileo (Best Design MEN Awards), plus numerous Shakespeare and Brecht productions.

Pavelka co-produced the Young People’s Shakespeare Festival (Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia) and designed for the first African language Mother Courage and Her Children (NT Uganda, Kennedy Center, Washington DC and Grahamstown Festival, South Africa). Recent work includes Revelations and Off the Wall with Liam Steel (Stan Won’t Dance) at QEH with UK tour and Twelfth Night (Seattle Rep), Taming of the Shrew at the Old Vic, RSC and touring internationally. This year, he is working on Merchant of Venice and A Midsummer Night’s Dream (touring internationally). His West End productions include: Constant Wife, How the Other Half Loves, Other People’s Money, Leonardo, Blues in the Night (also Dublin, New York, Tokyo), Macbeth starring Sean Bean, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, A Few Good Men and Absurd Person Singular. Work for the RSC includes: The Odyssey, Two Gentlemen of Verona, Henry V and Julius Caesar and for National Theatre, Edmond starring Kenneth Branagh. R e search S tat e m e n t   My current practicebased research continues to extend over a decade of production work with the ensemble company Propeller of which I am a founder member. Each

project now spans a period of eighteen months and has recently involved double bills of plays, produced in England but toured across the UK , continental Europe, North America and the Far East. These radical but accessible productions of Shakespeare’s most challenging and layered works are explored in the context of all-male casting. The scenography supports performance that is characterised by its intensely physical approach, speed and clarity. Cross-gender casting presents opportunities to investigate the language of clothing and movement that are approached in different ways from project to project depending on the metaphorical positions of the characters. The ensemble company framework presents dynamic solutions to Shakespeare’s narratives that are told by a chorus with a specific social identity, unified as a force with costume, music and movement. The chorus are usually being seen to ‘devise’ the stories in view of the audience and underscore them with live soundscapes created with unusual objects as well as musical instruments – their continuous presence provide the focus for scenographic ideas and images. The company is committed wider accessibility and the productions attract diverse audiences. Its output has been extended to include the publication of ‘pocket’ versions of the texts for educational outreach. Recognition of this work is reflected by extended support from the Arts Council of England and the Department of Education. A second strand of recent work with collaborator Liam Steel involves the exploration of themes through devised visual storytelling with


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Michael Pavelka, Henry V, Royal Shakespeare Company, Stratford and Barbican

performers who bridge dance, acting and other disciplines such as circus and ‘parcours’. The scenography integrates ambitious engineering with multimedia imagery and attempts to give performers the means to use the entire volume of theatrical space, often suspended. The two strands of research connect when productions with Liam Steel have involved the interpretation of classic stories, such as Dickens, with ensemble companies of performers to find inventive contemporary means of telling familiar epic tales. Sleight of hand is at the root of this work and the design solutions are dependent upon close collaborative partnerships with the creative team.

S e lected Outputs and Achievements

Selected Performances 2009 The Good Soul of Szechuan, Library Theatre Company, Manchester. 2008–09 The Merchant of Venice and A Midsummer Night’s Dream, world tour. 2008 A Midsummer Night’s Dream (reduced version), UK touring. 2008–09 Great Expectations, Library Theatre Company, Manchester. 2008 Absurd Person Singular, Wyndhams Theatre, London West End. 2006 The Taming of the Shrew Propeller / RSC co-production. 2005 Oliver Twist, directed by Roger Haines (LTC) and Liam Steele (DV8) Library Theatre, Manchester. 2005 The Winter’s Tale, directed by Edward Hall Propeller Theatre Company at the Watermill. 2005 A Few Good Men, directed by David Esbjornson, starring Rob Lowe at West End’s Theatre Royal, Haymarket.


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2003 Edmond, directed by Edward Hall, starring Kenneth Branagh at Royal National Theatre (Olivier stage). 2003 Rose Rage (New Production), directed by Edward Hall Chicago Shakespeare Theatre The Duke Theatre on 42nd Street, New York. 2002 The Constant Wife, directed by Edward Hall, West End Apollo, Lyric Theatres. 2002 Rose Rage (Henry VI trilogy in two parts), directed by Edward Hall Propeller Theatre Company. 2002 UK Tour, West End Theatre Royal Haymarket Italy, Turkey, Poland. 2002 Macbeth, directed by Edward Hall Ambassadors Theatre Group, West End Albery Theatre. 2002 A Midsummer Night’s Dream, directed by Edward Hall Propeller Theatre Company, UK and international tour including: Barbados, Germany, Italy, BAM New York. Selected Exhibitions 2004 Three public sculptures for Cow Parade, including the opening exhibit at Manchester Airport . 2002 ‘Our Henry’, two Designs for 2D>3D exhibits of design process for Henry V and VI, category: The Line in Space, Sheffield.

Michael Pavelka, Julius Caesar, Royal Shakespeare Company, Stratford and Barbican

Selected Publications Production photograph and a diary entry in Thomson, P. Mother Courage and Her Children, Cambridge Publications. Selected Awards 2004 Nominated Best Costume Design, Jeff Awards, Chicago, USA. 2003 Winner Best Touring Production, Barclays TMA Award for A Midsummer Night’s Dream. 2002 Winner Best Touring Production, Barclays TMA Award for Rose Rage.


Quinn Malcolm

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Reader

account of the Bentham’s followers in the Political Economy Club and the Board of Trade who sat on the Select Committee on Arts and Manufactures in 1835/36, and more generally on an analysis of the politico-aesthetic legacy of utilitarian philo­ sophy, which began with a symposium on J.S. Mill which I led at Tate Britain in 2006, entitled ‘On Liberty and Art’. I have since delivered papers and lectures on this subject at Cambridge University, Bath Spa University, Jan Van Eyck Academy Maastricht, University College London and Yokohama National University, Japan. In an article for Journal of Visual Arts Practice (7:3) in 2008, I claimed that our current understanding of art and design knowledge and research, depends on the development of a unified art and design language within a political economic model of culture in the UK between 1832 and 1852. The effect this has had on the subsequent evolution of art and design knowledge, research and the identity of the creative subject, is dealt with in my chapter in the pan-European publication Handbook of Arts-Based Research. This chapter is part of a continuing engagement with a Freudo-Lacanian framework for arts-based research, an issue that I have also explored in an AHRC -funded collaborative doctoral training programme with Brunel Univer­ sity, and as a member of an AHRC network programme developed by the Institute of Advanced Study at Birkbeck. The final conference of the AHRC doctoral training programme at Rese a r c h S tat e m e nt   My current research is Chelsea College of Art in 2007, included speakers engaged with the role of UK government, drawn from the fields of clinical psychoanalysis, museums and the early publicly-funded art the humanities and art and design. As part school, in the development of a unified language for art and design activity through an engagement of the AHRC network programme at Birkbeck, I have produced symposia, an exhibition and with public culture and industrial capital, publications with Dr Sharon Kivland from following the Reform Bill of 1832. This work is Sheffield Hallam University, based around a specifically founded on an investigation of the reading of Jacques Lacan’s Seminar XVII . I also psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan’s account of the philosopher Jeremy Bentham, an historical lead the ‘Agendas’ research initiative at Biog r a p h y   Dr Malcolm Quinn is Reader in Critical Practice at Wimbledon. His research deals with aesthetics, politics and public culture, using psychoanalytic frameworks to analyse the constitution of speech and the structures of language in art and design. His research in the field of politics and aesthetics began with his book The Swastika: Constructing the Symbol (Routledge 1994), which appeared in the ‘Material Cultures’ series produced by the Department of Anthropology at University College London. This research has since led to published articles, appearances on radio and television, and as an invited speaker discussing political symbolism, totalitarian culture and branding, most recently at a symposium on post-totalitarian space at the Romanian Cultural Institute in 2008. Quinn’s more recent research has employed a Lacanian psychoanalytic framework for the analysis of politics, aesthetics and mass culture. This work has developed since the publication (with Professor Dany Nobus) of a study of the metho­ dologies of applied psychoanalysis, entitled Knowing Nothing, Staying Stupid: Elements for a Psychoanalytic Epistemology (Routledge 2005). Quinn’s latest work uses Lacanian psychoanalytic models of the social bond, to study the evolution of art and design language in the UK following the Reform Bill of 1832.


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Wimbledon College of Art, which is primarily concerned with the study of art and design speech and language, and with the cultural and political aspects of art and design activity. S elected O u t p u t s a n d Ach i e v e m e n t s

Published Books 2005 Co-authored with Dr Danny Noubus, Knowing Nothing, Staying Stupid: Elements for a Psychoanalytic Epistemology. Routledge: London. Selected Essays and Articles 2009 ‘Education Practice at Tate 1970 – Present’, online essay for Tate Encounters. 2009 ‘Critique conscious and unconscious: listening to the barbarous language of art and design’, in Journal of Visual Arts Practice, 7.3. 2007 ‘Practice-led Research and the Engagement with Truth’, in Reflections on Creativity: Exploring the Role of Theory in Creative Practices. Duncan of Jordanstone College, Dundee University. 2007 Catalogue essay for Ost Property at Danielle Arnaud Gallery. 2006 ‘The Whole World+The Work: questioning context through practice-led research.’ Working Papers in Art and Design, vol.4 (online peer-reviewed journal), Hertfordshire University. 2004 With Dr Naren Barfield, ‘Research as a mode of Construction: Engaging with the artefact in art and design research.’ Working Papers in Art and Design, vol.3 (online peer-reviewed journal), Hertfordshire University. 2003 ‘Teamwork and the Knowledge Base: Doctoral Study and Design Research’ in Proceedings of the Third Doctoral Education in Design Conference, Japanese Academy of Sciences, 2003.

Selected Exhibitions 2006 Psychoanalysis and the Arts and Humanities, IGRS Birkbeck University of London (with Sharon Kivland), curated exhibition. 2004 text+work (with Kieran Crowder), The Arts Institute at Bournemouth, included the joint exhibition of paintings by Kieran Crowder and a text by Malcolm Quinn, with a presentation by both exhibitors, a published text and associated website. 2002 Walk The Plank, Gulbenkian Galleries, Royal College of Art, work by tutors in the Design Products course at the Royal College of Art. Selected Presentations and Conference Papers 2009 ‘The Chamber of Horrors: Art Education and Mass Culture’, Cambridge University Faculty of Education. 2008 ‘On Liberty and Art’, Jan Van Eyck Academie Maastricht. 2008 Keynote address: ‘Occupying the Totalitarian Imagination’, at Evicting the Ghost, Romanian Cultural Institute. 2008 Keynote address: ‘Creative Cohesion and Social Impact 1835–2008’, at Creative Scholars Conference, Tate Britain. 2008 Plenary address at The Art of Giving: the artist in public and private funding, Tate Britain, London. 2008 ‘Art Schools and the Pedagogy of Capital’, at Doctoring Practice Conference, Bath Spa University. 2008 ‘Art History and the Art School: Capitalism, Pedagogy and Superstition’, at Art History and the Art School, Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art. Key Committee and Panel Memberships 2008 Peer reviewer, ESRC . 2008 Member, AHRC panel for research leave. 2004 Appointed member of AHRC Peer-Review College.


Quinn Malcolm

Malcolm Quinn and Dany Nobus, Knowing Nothing Staying Stupid, Routledge, 2005

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Tulloch Carol Reader

Biography   Carol Tulloch is Reader in Dress and the African Diaspora at Chelsea and Camberwell. She is a member of the Transnational Art, Identity and Nation research centre (TrAIN), and is affiliated to the Research Department at the Vistoria & Albert Museum (V&A). She was principal investigator of the Dress and the African Diaspora Network (2006–07), an international endeavour to develop critical thinking on the subject.

Tulloch has written and curated exhibitions on dress and black identities, style narratives, cross cultural and transnational relations and cultural heritage. Additionally, her research reviews historical ‘truths’ to present alternative perspec­ tives on the black body, dress and place. These issues were considered in publications such as: Out of Many, One People’?: The Relativity of Dress, Race and Ethnicity to Jamaica, 1880–1907 (1998), My Man, Let Me Pull Your Coat to Something: Malcolm X (2001), and Strawberries and Cream: Dress, Migration and the Quintessence of Englishness (2002), Black Style (editor, 2004), Interconnecting Routes: Networks, Dress and Critical-Creative Narra­ tives (2007), Resounding Power of the Afro Comb (2008). Her exhibitions include Nails, Weaves and Naturals: Hairstyles and Nail Art of the African Diaspora, A Day of Record (2001), Tools of the Trade: Memories of Black British Hairdressing, (2001), Black British Style (2004), A Riot of Our Own (2008). Forthcoming work includes Being at Home: Familial Dress Relations and the West Indian Front Room (2009), Dress and the African Diaspora (editor, 2010), and the exhibition The New Domesticity (2010).

R e s e a r c h Stat emen t   My current research continues with the telling of selves through the dressed black body, which has progressed through the inclusion of narrative studies. This line of inquiry has shifted to understand how individuals negotiate this within diverse contexts – locally, nationally or internationally. Therefore the work has begun to include other groups with similar experience, and/or cultural collaboration, with people of the African Diaspora in order to develop a dialogue in the telling and place of individuals and groups. This has partly developed out of the AHRC funded ‘Dress and the African Diaspora Network’ which I co-ordinated from 2006–07. Material and visual culture remain central to this investigation, but a wider range of media beyond my usual focus of garments, accessories and photography are now being used. This exploration is being conducted through writing and curating.

S e lec t e d Outputs and Ac hievements

Selected Solo Exhibitions Principle Investigator for the ‘Dress and the African Diaspora Network’ which was part of the AHRC initiative Diasporas, Migrations and Identity: Research Networks and Workshops Scheme (completed December 2007). Selected Publications 2009 ‘Resounding Power of the Afro Comb’ in Cheang, S. and Biddle-Perry, G. (eds) Hair: Styling, Culture and Fashion, Oxford, New York: Berg. 2008 A Riot of Our Own, editor, London: Chelsea Space. 2007 ‘Interconnecting Routes: Networks, Dress and CriticalCreative Narratives’, in Elke aus dem Moore (ed.) Les Histoires Communes: Kunst Und Mode. Kleidung als Ort der Selbsterfindung, Stuttgart: Künstlerhaus. 2006 ‘Altered States: Susan Stockwell in Crafts’, in The Magazine of Contemporary Craft, #198. 2005 ‘Picture This, The Black Curator’, in Littler, J. and Naidoo, R. (eds), The Politics of Heritage, the Legacies of Race, London, New York: Routledge. 2004 Black Style, editor, London: Victoria & Albert Publications.


Tulloch Carol

Selected Curatorial Projects 2008 A Riot of Our Own, Exhibition, Chelsea Space, London, 2004–06 Co-curator Black British Style, Victoria & Albert Museum, London (touring: Manchester Art Gallery; Cartwright Hall Art Gallery, Bradford; New Walk Museum and Art Gallery, Leicester; Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery 2002 Picture This: Representations of Black People in Product Promotion, Black Cultural Archives Gallery. Selected Lectures/Talks 2009 ‘We Too Should Walk in the Newness of Life: Style Narratives of the African Diaspora’, for the ‘Ethnic Costumes and Non-Material Cultural Heritage Preservation’ panel at 16th International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, Kunming, China. 2009 ‘Style-Fashion-Dress; From “Black” to “Post-black”’, at Fashioning Diasporas conference, Victoria & Albert Museum, London. 2009 ‘“A Riot of Our Own”: Style, “Blackness” and New Directions’, at Subculture and Style conference, Fashion Institute of Technology, New York. 2007 ‘What Next? A Researcher’s Thinking Around Future Projects’, University of Brighton, School of Historical and Cultural Studies Evening lecture series. 2006 ‘Fashionable Marks on Black Identities,’ at South African Fashion Week Seminar Series, Sandton Convention Centre, Johannesburg. Selected Conference Papers 2009 ‘Rock Against Racism 1979–1981’ at MetaNational: Re/Postitionierung – Critical Whiteness/Perspectives of Color, Neue Gesellschaft fur Bildende Kunst, Berlin. 2008 ‘What’s the Connection? Dress as Auto/Biography in the Jamaican Memories and the Shelton Family Archives’, at Keeping up Appearances: Dress & Auto/ Biography, Auto/Biography Study Group Christmas conference. 2008 ‘Connecting the Dots: Networks on Dress and the African Diaspora’, for the conference panel ‘Dress and the African Diaspora Network, A Transnational Research Collective’ at the Networks of Design, Design History Annual Conference, Falmouth. 2007 ‘Take a Researcher Like Me: Dress, Black Identities and the Autobiographical/I’, at Belonging in Britain, New Narratives/Old Stories: Race, Heritage and Cultural Identity symposium, University College Falmouth. 2007 ‘Me and Thee: Reflections of a Black British Researcher of Dress, the Aesthetic Self and the African Diaspora’, at the Annual Auto/Biography Conference, Trinity College, Dublin.

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Tulloch Carol

Dress and the African Diaspora: Tensions and Flows, international symposium. Victoria & Albert Museum, London, 27–29 September 2007. Part of the AHRC funded Dress and the African Diaspora Network.


Tulloch Carol

Design of ‘Comb’ (USD217996), submitted by Samuel H. Bundles and Henry M. Childrey to the United States Patent Office 4 April 1969. A patent was granted 7 July 1970.

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Tulloch Carol

Clare Chona, fashion designer based in Zambia, ‘freehand’ drawing a design as part of the Fashion and Textiles Workshop of The Interaction Networking Event on Cultural Heritage, Livingston, Zambia, 2005.


Tulloch Carol

Cushion Cover hand and machine sewn by Mrs Gloria Bennett, Doncaster, South Yorkshire, 1960s. The cushion cover was commissioned by Alfred Tulloch as a present for his mother’s front room in Brixton, London. The item is now seen as significant material evidence of the kind of ‘West Indian aesthetic’ that defined the West

Indian front room of Caribbean homes in the 1960s and onwards. The cushion was featured in the exhibition The West Indian Front Room: Memories and Impressions of Black British Homes, held at the Geffrye Museum, 2005–06, curated by Michael McMillan. The cushion also features in the essay ‘Dress it Right’ by Carol Tulloch in the forthcoming publication The Front

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Room: Migrant Aesthetics in the Home (edited by Michael McMillan). The domestic craft that was applied to this cushion by Mrs Bennett, a Jamaican migrant to Britain in 1961, has also been an inspiration for the forthcoming exhibition on issues around ‘New Domesticity’, at The Women’s Library, London, co-curated by Carol Tulloch and Gail Cameron.


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Tulloch Carol

Limited edition ‘Afro Pick T-shirt’, 2004, designed by David Hisa. The t-shirt was commissioned by the Studio Museum in Harlem to underwrite the identity of the museum. The Black Fist Afro Pick and the word ‘Beautiful’ were chosen because of ‘their iconic status in the community – Black is Beautiful, Black Power, black

hair are Harlem’, Ali Evans, PR Manager and editor at the Studio Museum in Harlem. The garment has partly inspired two research projects: Carol Tulloch’s current research on issues of terminology, notably when and how to use the terms ‘African diaspora fashion’ and ‘Black style’, particularly within the context of what ‘Black’, ‘Blackness’ and Post-black currently

mean. What is the cultural meaning of this t-shirt? Is this an example of diaspora fashion or the component of a style narrative? Carol will consider such issues in the forthcoming ‘Dress and the African Diaspora’, a special issue of Fashion Theory: The Journal of Dress, Body and Culture, for which she is editor.


Tulloch Carol

A Riot Of Our Own, exhibition, Chelsea Space, London, 2008. This exhibition was an archival narrative on the Rock Against Racism (RAR) movement, 1976–81. It is told through the personal archive of Ruth Gregory and Syd Shelton, who were RAR (London) committee members. Their intuitive act of keeping, rather than collecting, this material is ‘a form of self-historicisation’. A Riot of Our Own was inspired by the concept of ‘self-archiving’ – an exploration of one’s own history through a re-

acquaintance with, and re-assemblage of, the objects held in a personal archive. This was a collaborative curatorial project between Syd, Ruth and curator Carol Tulloch. As ‘selfarchivists’ Ruth and Syd wanted to convey an idiosyncratic interpretation of what RAR was. Carol provided objectivity and curatorial perspectives in order for the pair to explore this. Therefore, the exhibition sets the personal recollections, ‘function and storage memory in relation to one another’ to present the individuals and groups who were united against racism

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through the amalgamation of reggae and punk music, technology and dress styles. Most recently Carol Tulloch presented a joint paper with Syd Shelton on RAR and A Riot Of Our Own, exhibition at Re/Positionierung: Critical Whiteness/ Perspectives on Color lecture series organised by Metanationale at Neue Gesellschaft für Bildende Kunst, Berlin 2009, and in their forthcoming publication.


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Francis Mary Anne Fellow

Biography   Dr Mary Anne Francis is a Fellow at Chelsea and an artist, writer, teacher and researcher. After a BA in English at University College London, she completed the BA in Fine Art and Critical Studies at Central Saint Martins College of Art and an MA in Culture Commu­ nication and Society at Goldsmiths, where she also undertook her PhD in Fine Art. Her PhD explored the idea of a radically diverse art-practice in excess of post-structuralist conceptions of diversity and difference.

As a writer she has published widely – in the early 1990s reviewing the emerging YBA scene for magazines such as Art Monthly and Untitled and more recently, publishing around research interests such as open source culture, collabo­ ration, and the question of how an artist might approach the task of writing. Work as an artist has purposely pursued multifarious forms: for instance, interactive art (the ‘Part Art’ range), collaboration (with the Critical Practice research group), public art (e.g. Platform for Art at Piccadilly Circus), and curatorial forms: Mary Anne Francis: Group Show at Beaconsfield. As a teacher she has worked in various artschools. She is currently Senior Lecturer on the Critical Fine Art Practice BA at the University of Brighton. In my role as Research Fellow in Writing and Art at Chelsea College of Art and Design, I am currently addressing the question: ‘what is an artist’s writing?’ Work here explores the premise that an artist productively approaches the act of writing differently from say, an art-historian or art-theorist. I am particularly interested in writing as aesthetic practice, and as fiction, and the implications of this for writing as R e search S tat e m e n t  

cognition. Publications in this terrain include both instances of such a practice e.g. ‘In the Café Flaubert’ – a fictional, philosophical dialogue – and reflections on the area: e.g. ‘Creative Knowledge: on the value of “Situational Fiction” in an artist’s writing’ (which maybe recursive). Other initiatives have focused on the spoken word in the spaces of art education – for example, The ‘Art Lectures’ at the University of Brighton, in which guest speakers variously addressed ways in which their ‘lectures’ may or may not be art, and my presentation to Writing Encounters – ‘Art and the Value of Fictional writing’ – delivered by a lecturer equivocally acting the part. This interest in the space between, and including, pairs of terms in culture also characterises my other main research interests. Ongoing work in the theory and practice of ‘post-autonomy’ addresses art that seeks to mesh with social life and everyday cultural forms and yet has a residual dependence on art’s autonomy. (See Dirty Work: Art Beyond Autonomy and my Part Art brand which plies the gap between high art and functional commodity.) ‘Post-autonomy’ also describes collaboration as prefers social to individual authorship; publication here includes the paper for Sensuous Knowledge 5 reflecting on my work with the Critical Practice research group. Notions of the ‘space between’ also inform my work on ‘critique’ which recently entailed commissioning and guest-editing a collection of essays on the topic for the Journal of Visual Art Practice. My own contribution contended that the difference between writing and art-practice is structurally critical – an argument subsequently developed via Foucault for the symposium ArtWORK , CritiqueWORK .


Francis Mary Anne

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However, in as much as the notion of spaces inbetween broadly thematises much of my activity, it is also set in the context of a concern with multifariousness as an interrogation of the politics of bounded ‘interests’. This continues work advanced by my PhD, The artist as a multifarious agent, which argued that only a thoroughly heterogeneous practice could adequately acknowledge the radical contingency of subjectivity. Sele c t e d O u t p u t s a n d Ac h i e v e m e n t s

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2004 Stall, commissioned by the Financial Services Authority, London. 2002 Unsorted, e1 gallery, London. 2002 Covers – a poster series of photographic work, Platform for Art, Piccadilly Circus Station. 2000 Mary Anne Francis: Group Show, Beaconsfield, London.

Mary Anne Francis, abstract ‘In the Café Flaubert’ – article published in Journal of Writing in Creative Practice, vol.1.2, 29.7 × 21 cm, 2008

Selected Group Exhibitions 2008 Art of Research: Research Narratives Symposium Exhibition, Chelsea College of Art & Design, London. 2008 Farmers’ Market with Handel Street Projects, London. 2008 For Those Killed in Ambush, Hold and Freight, London. 2006 Would Silence the Apology, 35a Gallery, Brighton. 2005 ‘The Blooming Commons’ at Tate Britain as part of Open Congress. 2004 Bloomsbury Blooms, St George’s Chapel of Rest, Bloomsbury, London. 2003 The Book Show, The Nunnery, London and The Wordsworth Trust, Lake District. Other Selected Art Projects 2009 ‘Art and the Value of Fictional Writing’, lecturedemonstration for The Art Lectures, Sallis Benny Theatre, University of Brighton. 2007 Market-stall as artwork, as part of The Really Super Market, Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art. 2002 The Faust Supplement, Variety Press. And many collaborative activities with the Research Cluster, Critical Practice, including, ‘Beyond The Free Market’, ‘Between’ at South London Gallery, and Future Archive. (www.criticalpracticechelsea.org/modules/wiwimod)

Mary Anne Francis, slide from keynote address ‘Art as Research: A Glossary of Terms’ to the Artistic Research conference at Iceland Academy of the Arts, Reykjavik Screen shot from website, 2008


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Francis Mary Anne

Selected Articles 2009 ‘A Theory of Critique. in Practice: Practice as Critique’, in Journal of Visual Arts Practice, 7.3. 2009 Guest editor for Journal of Visual Arts Practice, 7.3, themed edition on ‘critique’, contributors: Mary Anne Francis, Yve Lomax, Suhail Malik, Malcolm Quinn, John Roberts, Michael Schwab, Marina Vishmidt. 2008 ‘In the Café Flaubert’, in Journal of Writing in Creative Practice, vol.1.2. 2007 ‘Dirty Work: Art Beyond “Autonomy”’, in Journal of Visual Art Practice, vol.6.1. 2006 Edited ‘Open Congress’ section in Media Mutandis: surveying art, technologies and politics, NODE.London. Also contributed introduction to section, and article, ‘Open Source Fine Art: infinities of meaning for an age of finite means’. Selected Conference Papers 2008 Art of Research: Research Narratives symposium at Chelsea College of Art and Design, co-organiser and co-Chair. 2008 ‘Art as Research: a Glossary of terms’ to Artistic Research conference, keynote lecture, Iceland Academy of the Arts 2008 ‘From Problem to Problematic: Collaborative Art Practice as Research: Discussion of Aesthetic Quality in Working Process’, for Sensuous Knowledge 5 – Questioning Qualities conference, Bergen Academy of the Arts, Norway. 2008 ‘Art and the Value of Fictional Writing’ a lecturedemonstration for the Writing Encounters symposium, York St John University. 2008 ‘Myself and I: Not Her’, for Kelly Large’s Me, Myself and I, at Walsall New Art Gallery. 2007 ‘Systems: Art and Collaboration’, for Systems Art at the Whitechapel Art Gallery, London. 2007 ‘Collaborative Art Practice and Research in the Art School’, for Future Reflections, Chelsea College of Art and Design, London 2005 ‘Open Source Fine Art’, a presentation on the artwork ‘The Blooming Commons’. The presentation was part of Open Congress at Tate Britain. 2005 ‘What work does the work of art do?’, a demonstration at What work does the work of art do? 2.

Selected awards 2008 With Hayley Newman, CLIP-CETL award, University of the Arts London, for researching Widening Participation at PhD level study. 2005 Project lead with Saul Albert and Lewis Sykes in receipt of Arts Council England funding for book publication Media Mutandis: Surveying Art, Technologies and Politics. 2002 Arts and Humanities Research Board: Small Grant in the Creative and Performing Arts. Editorial Positions and Examinerships 2009 Appointed External Examiner MA Fine Art, Glasgow School of Art. 2009 External Assessor for PhD confirmation, Norwich University College of the Arts. 2004 Appointed to the E.ditorial Board of the Journal of Visual Arts Practice.


O’Riley Timothy

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Fellow

Biog r a p h y   Tim O’Riley is a Fellow at Chelsea. He studied painting at Leicester Polytechnic and went on to complete his MA in Fine Art at Chelsea College of Art and Design. He subsequently gained a PhD at the college in 1998, looking at optical, perspectival and filmic space in relation to new technologies. O’Riley has taught at Chelsea since the mid-1990s and was awarded an AHRC fellowship in 2004. He has exhibited across Europe and the USA at venues including PS1, New York; Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon; Centre d’Art Contemporain, Geneva; Science Museum, London; Birmingham City Museum and Art Gallery; Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool. Recent publications include Acts of seeing (Kaniari, A., Wallace, M. (eds), London: Zidane Press, 2009), Accidental Journey (London: Ponsonby Press, 2009); Thinking Through Art: Reflections on art as research (Macleod, K., Holdridge, L. (eds), London: Routledge, 2005). Rese a r c h S tat e m e nt   Rooted in my interest in the overlapping spaces between art, science and literature, I have developed an eclectic working practice that explores relationships between technology and subjectivity, fact and fiction and between the still and the moving image. My work centres around computer technology – specifically modelling and animation – but is informed by an underlying interest in painting, photography and writing. Over the past few years, I have been visiting and documenting various scientific establishments in Europe and the USA , combining a reasoned approach to science and its history with one in which serendipity and speculation play an equally significant part.

Recent projects have been spurred on by a chance encounter with a memento from the Apollo 11 lunar mission, a small Irish flag which had

travelled aboard the historic spacecraft and which resides at an observatory near Dublin. This prompted research into various fictional journeys to the moon stretching back almost 2000 years, the more recent history of the space race and the lives and opinions of astronaut Michael Collins and Sir William Rowan Hamilton, Astronomer Royal of Ireland from 1827–65, who lived for much of his life in the building where the flag eventually ended up. In the light of this seren­ dipitous encounter, I have recently completed a 118-minute animation of a real-time orbit of the moon together with an artist’s book bringing together some of the material I have found relating to the observatory, lunar exploration and fictional, imaginary journeys. (www.timoriley.net) S e lected Outputs and Achievements

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2002 Three Places at Once, Galerie Olivier Houg, Lyon, France. 2001–02 Flipside, Houldsworth, London. Selected Group Exhibitions 2009 Pontos de Contato, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul Instituto de Artes, Porto Alegre, Brazil. 2005 Paramours, Art 45, Biennale de Lyon, Lyon. 2004 Do Something, Floating IP, Manchester. 2003 Now Showing, Houldsworth, London. 2003 Signatures of the Invisible, PS1 Contemporary Arts Centre, New York, USA. 2003 Precise Modern Order, Rubicon Gallery, Dublin. 2002 Contents, Briggs Robinson Gallery, New York, USA. 2002 Head On: Art with the Brain in Mind, Science Museum, London. Selected Screenings 2007 Ami, Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory, University of Cambridge. Selected Publications 2009 Accidental Journey, London: Ponsonby Press. 2009 Acts of seeing: Artists, scientists and the history of the visual (a volume dedicated to Martin Kemp), Kaniari, A., Wallace, M. (eds), London: Zidane Press.


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O’Riley Timothy

2009 Reflections and Connections, Nimkulrat, N., O’Riley, T. (eds), Helsinki: University of Art and Design Helsinki. 2006 ‘An Inaudible Dialogue’, in Working Papers in Art and Design, #4. 2005 Thinking Through Art: Reflections on art as research, Macleod, K., Holdridge, L. (eds), London: Routledge (chapter: ‘Representing Illusions’). 2005 ‘Pioneers in Art and Science: Art, Poetry and Particle Physics’, McMullen, K., Berger, J., London: Arts Council England. 2002 ‘Head On: Art with the Brain in Mind’ (additional text by curators Marina Wallace, Ken Arnold and Caterina Albano), London: Science Museum. Selected Conference Papers 2008 ‘The Other World’ at EVA, British Computer Society, London. 2005 ‘Parallel Spaces’ at Connected Space, McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge.

Tim O’Riley, Clementine, HD1080 animation, 118 min, 2009

Tim O’Riley, The Irish flag which travelled onboard Apollo 11 (photographed at Dunsink Observatory), inkjet print, 37.5 × 50 cm, 2005


Salter Rebecca

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Fellow

Biog r a p h y   Rebecca Salter is a Fellow at Camberwell. She was born and educated in the UK and after studying for a BA in Three Dimensional Design at Bristol Polytechnic, spent two years as a research student at Kyoto City University of Arts, Japan. She lived in Japan for a further four years and was taught Japanese woodblock by Professor Kurosaki Akira. Salter continues to research and teach the technique. She has published two books on the subject: Japanese Woodblock Printing (2001) and Japanese Popular Prints (2006).

In 2008 Salter completed an archive of filmed interviews with craftsmen involved in Japanese woodblock – carvers, printers, brush makers, tool makers, etc. The films are to be edited and made available for future research.

In her own practice Salter is working towards a show at the Yale Center for British Art in 2011 and one person shows in London and New York. R e search Stat emen t   My painting, both in the way it is produced and the way it is perceived, is influenced by a meditative tradition which is widely considered to have its origins in oriental culture. Investigation of the qualities of the drawn line is central to my work, especially in relation to the creation of an ambiguous pictorial space.

I am currently a member of the Forgotten Japonisme research group attached to the Transnational Art Identity and Nation (TrAIN) research centre. My particular interest is the American anthropologist Frederick Starr and his links with Japan and the senshafuda (votive slips) tradition.

Rebecca Salter, Untitled MM24, mixed media on paper, 99 × 108 cm, 2008

Rebecca Salter, Untitled RR21, mixed media on linen, 110 × 96 cm, 2009


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Salter Rebecca

S elected O u t p u t s a n d Ach i e v e m e n t s

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2007 Howard Scott Gallery New York, USA. 2006 Bliss of Solitude, Beardsmore Gallery, London, UK. 2004 Howard Scott Gallery New York, USA. 2002 Hirschl Contemporary Art, London, UK. Selected Group Exhibitions 2008 Drawing Gallery, Shropshire. 2007 Fils de..., Plouec de Trieux, France. 2006 Drawing Inspiration, Abbot Hall Gallery, Cumbria. 2005 Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, USA. 2003 Untitled, work on paper, Hirschl Contemporary Art, London. 2002 Working the Grid, Lafayette College, Easton Pennsylvania, USA.

Selected Publications 2006 Japanese Popular Prints – From Votive Slips to Playing Cards, A&C Black Ltd / University of Hawaii Press. Selected Residencies and Commissions 2008–09 Artwork commission, Main entrance, St George’s Hospital, Tooting London. 2003 Artist in residence, Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, USA.


Salter Rebecca

Rebecca Salter, St George’s Hospital, Tooting, main entrance artwork, recycled glass, bamboo panel, LED lighting, 25 m, 2008–09

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Sandino Linda Fellow

Biography   Linda Sandino is the Camberwell College of Arts / Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A) Senior Research Fellow in Oral History working on curators’ life histories at the V&A Museum. Previously she completed over 50 extensive life history recordings for the British Library National Life Stories at the British Library National Sound Archive interviewing artists, architects, craftspeople, curators and designers including David Queensberry, Peter Blake, Peter Collingwood, Terence Conran, Rodney Fitch, Catherine Lampert as well as the founders of the design group Pentagram. In 2005 she was a selected participant at the Advanced Summer Institute of the Regional Oral History Office at the University of California at Berkeley. At Camberwell, she has set up the Voices in the Visual Arts oral history project (VIVA, www.vivavoices.org) and is currently also the Design History Society’s Oral History Project Officer.

She has supervised two PhDs to completion and is an experienced External Examiner of BA and MA Level courses, as well as PhD. R e search S tat e m e n t   I am currently working on an oral history of curatorial practices at the Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A) over the last thirty years, a period in which the Museum has undergone significant structural changes. Using life history work as the methodological approach, the research seeks to document how curators perceive the meaning and function of their roles, the place of scholarship within museums, the creation of expertise which curatorial work fosters within the specific context of the V&A collections covering the applied arts of Europe and Asia.

Life history, as a branch of oral history, provides the opportunity for collecting data but the methods of narrative research enable one to map the meaning-content of narratives as stories of expertise which lead to the broader question of what institutions means and how it is constructed in the dialogic context of oral history recordings. My oral history work has always been based on audio recordings leading to exploration of how specific forms of inscription (audio, visual, textual) as technologies construct their narratives and how individuals collude with media forms; as the sociologist Anthony Giddens remarked in Modernity and the Self (1991), ‘… the media do not mirror realities but in some part form them’. Finally, however, life history interviewing is a form of auto/biographical research that elicits stories of the self and how that self is made in stories. So rather than focussing only on questions of when, how, where, life histories ask about the ‘who’ of their narratives. Furthermore, oral history is an ethical practice that engages with the problem of confronting otherness and sameness. This part of my research draws on the work of the philosopher Paul Riceour whose major areas of concern map my own: narrative, identity, the relationship between history and fiction, and the ethics of encounter. S e lec t e d Outputs and Ac hievements

Selected Publications 2010 [forthcoming] ‘Artists-in-progress: Narrative Identity of the Self as Another’, in Hyvärinen, M.K. (ed.) Beyond Narrative Coherence, Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 2009 [forthcoming] ‘News from the Past: Oral History at the V&A’, V&A Online Journal. 2009 ‘Museum Lives and Museum Stories: Oral History in Museums’ (paper), with Anna Kiernan, Kingston University, MGHG Museums and Biographies Conference, The National Gallery, London.


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Linda Sandino, [VIVA] Voices in the Visual Arts, Oral History projects, 2009

2009 ‘Taking Time’, in Making a Slow Revolution. 2007 ‘Crafts for Crafts Sake’ (essay), in Aynsley, J., Forde, K. (eds), Design and the modern magazine, University of Manchester Press. 2006 Journal of Design History, special issue: ‘Oral Histories and Design’, editor and author. 2006 Interviews, Fashion Lives, The British Library, London (exhibited life stories of John Church, Angus Cundy, Leslie Russell, Percy Savage, and Lily Silberberg). 2005 Catalogue essay, ‘Freddie Robins’, in Revealed: Nottingham’s Contemporary Textiles, an exhibiton of the museum’s collection. 2004 Co-editor and author, Journal of Design History, vol.17, #3: ‘Dangerous Liaisons: Relationships between Design, Craft and Art’ and ‘Here Today, Gone Tomorrow: Transient Materiality in Contemporary Cultural Artefacts’. 2002 ‘Studio Jewellery: Mapping the Absent Body’, in The Persistence of Craft, Greenhalgh, P. (ed.), London/New Brunswick: A&C Black/Rutgers University Press. Selected Conference Contributions 2009 ‘Listen to Yourself! Technology, Voice and the Self’ (paper), Oral History Society Conference, Hearing Voice in Oral History, University of Strathclyde, Scotland. 2009 ‘Curatocracies: an Oral History of Curatorial Practice at the Victoria & Albert Museum’ (paper), Oral History Association conference, Moving Beyond the Interview, Louisville, Kentucky, USA. 2009 ‘Research Cultural work and Creative Biographies workshop’ (paper), ESRC Centre for Research on SocioCultural Change, Open University.

2008 ‘Visual and/or Oral Narratives’ – paper presented at the CNR/LSE Gender Institute. 2008 ‘Audience Memories and Oral Histories’ (paper), presented at Rethinking Archives Workshop, Arnolfini Gallery, Bristol / University of West of England / AHRC. 2008 Co-convenor, In the Fold: Arts and Narrative, Centre for Narrative Research, University of East London/ International Centre for Fine Art Research, University of the Arts London. 2008 ‘Talking Pictures: Sound and Image in Oral History’ at Oral History – A Dialogue With Our Times, International Oral History Association conference, University of Guadalajara, Mexico. 2005 ‘From Objects to Subjects’ (paper), Show &Tell: Relationships between Text, Narrative and Image conference, University of Hertfordshire.


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Stair Julian Fellow

Biography   Julian Stair is a Fellow at Camberwell and a potter and writer. He has exhibited inter­ nationally over the last 28 years and has work in over twenty public collec­tions including the Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A), British Council, American Museum of Art & Design, Hong Kong Museum of Art and the Boymans Museum, Netherlands. In 2004 he was awarded the Euro­ pean Achievement Award by the World Crafts Council and received a Queen Elizabeth Scholar­ ship to research the making of monumental ceramics at Wienerberger’s brick factory in Sedgley. Last year the Art Fund pur­chased Monu­ mental Jar V for Middlesbrough Insti­tute of Modern Art. He was as Deputy Chair of the Crafts Council after eight years as a trustee and a period as Interim Chair in 2005–06.

Practical My practice based research exploring two major themes. The first is the relationship of ceramics and architecture through the making of pots and site specific ceramic plinths or ‘grounds’. The second area examines the containment of the human body in death through the making of funerary ware from cinerary jars for cremated remains to sarcophagi for burial.

In 2002 he completed a PhD at the Royal College of Art researching the critical origins of English studio pottery. He is a regular contributor to craft journals and has convened several conferences. He is a member of the research centre Trans­ national Art, Identity and Nation (TrAIN ) and also a core member of the major new ARHC funded project ‘Forgotten Japonisme’. He has recently written an essay on Omega pottery for the exhibition Beyond Bloomsbury: Designs of the Omega Workshops 1913–19 at the Courtauld Institute of Art, 2009.

Selected Group Exhibitions 2009 Keramik aus Großbritannien, Bayerischer Kunstgewerbe- Verein, Munich, Germany. 2009 Cup, Devon Guild of Craftsmen, Devon, UK. 2009 TEFAF Maastricht, Belgium, NED. 2009 Work exhibited at International Expositions of Sculpture Objects & Functional Art (SOFA), Park Avenue Armory, New York, USA. 2009 Collect, Saatchi Gallery, London, UK. 2009 Work exhibited at Eunique: World Crafts CouncilEurope Award for Contemporary Crafts from 1992 until Today, WCC, Karlsruhe, Germany. 2008 Joanna Bird, Browse & Darby, Cork Street, London. 2008 Inspirations, Conran (London, New York, Paris, Tokyo). 2008 Cup, Contemporary Applied Art, London, UK. 2008 Monumental Jar V exhibited at Material Culture: Recently Gifted Works, Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art, Middlesbrough, UK. 2008 Collecting a Kaleidoscope, Designed and Made Gallery, Newcastle, UK. 2008–09 Monumental Pots, Victoria & Albert Museum. 2008 DesignArt London, Berkeley Square, London. 2007–12 After Life, Manchester Museum Egyptian Galleries, Manchester. 2005 Modern Pots – Ceramics from the Lisa Sainsbury Collection, Dulwich Picture Gallery, London 2005 Functional Form Now, Galerie Besson, London. 2005 Celebrating 30 Years, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, UK.

R e search S tat e m e n t 

Historical I am currently researching Japonisme in English studio ceramics 1910–40 as part of the ‘Forgotten Japonisme’ project. This has broadened out to include research on critical writing on ceramics in Japan during the Taisho period as part of a study to compare theoretical developments in both countries.

S e lec t e d Outputs and Ac hievements

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2006 Out of History I, Galerie Heller, Heidelberg, Germany. 2005 The Artist’s House, Installation, New Art Centre, Salisbury, UK. 2005 Terra Keramik, Delft, Netherlands. 2004 Collect, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, UK. 2002 Egg, London, UK. 2001 Contemporary Applied Arts, London, UK.


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Stair Julian

2005 Meister der Moderne, Munich, Germany. 2004 Master & Pupil, Clay, Los Angeles, USA. 2004 Everything But: Contemporary English Kitchenware, British Council touring show (Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Indonesia, Bandung, Jakarta). 2004 Making It Yours, Crafts Council, London. 2003 Highlights Englischer Keramik, Hetjens-Museum, Dusseldorf, Germany. 2003 2nd World Ceramic Biennale, Seoul, Korea 2003 Beauty through Use, Yufuku Gallery, Tokyo & Art Salon Kogen, Nagoya, Japan. 2003 Slipped by Design, Browse and Darby, London. Books 2000 The Body Politic: The Role of the Body and Contemporary Craft, editor, London: Crafts Council.

2005 ‘Context & Consequence: Shoji Hamada and Early English Studio Pottery’ (conference paper), Revisioning Reality: International Japonisme, New York University, USA. 2005 ‘When East Shapes West’ (conference report), Japanese Ceramics: Cultural Roots and Contemporary Expressions, Harvard, Boston, in Crafts, #192, January/ Feburary. 2004 ‘Japanese Modernisation & Mingei Theory’, by Yukiko Kikuchi, book review, in Crafts, #191, November/ December. 2003 ‘Rational Primitives’, feature article on early English studio ceramics and Modernism, in Crafts, #180, January/February. Selected Memberships of Professional Bodies 2008–09 Deputy Chair, Crafts Council. 2008 Editorial Board Member, Interpreting Ceramics Research Collaboration (ICRC). 2000– Trustee, Crafts Council.

Selected Curatorial Projects 2009 UK entry for the Crafts Council at the European Triennial of Ceramic and Glass, Site des Anciens Abattiors, Mons, Belgium. Selected Publications and Papers 2009 ‘Collecting Objects’, in Collect: The International Art Fair for Contemporary Objects, London: Crafts Council. 2009 ‘Omega’, in American Craft, September. 2009 ‘The Employment of Matter: Pottery of the Omega Workshop’, in Gerstein, A. (ad.) Beyond Bloomsbury: Designs of the Omega Workshop 1913–1919, London: The Courtauld Gallery & Fontanka. 2005 ‘Ruth Duckworth Retrospective’, in Art in America, August/September. 2005 ‘Extended Inhumation: Contemporary Funerary Ware’ (conference paper) at Death, Dying and Disposal of the Body 7, University of Bath.

Selected Work in Collections 2009 One work (Teapot on a Floating Ground), purchased by Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art (Middlesbrough, UK). 2009 One group (Teapot and Six Cups of an Asymmetrical Ground), purchased by Victoria & Albert Museum. 2008 One Fund purchase of Monumental Jar V, purchased by Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art.

Julian Stair, Monumental Jar V, purchased by the Art Fund for Middlesborough Institute of Modern Art, reduced Etruria Marl, 174 × 95 cm, 2008 (photo by G. Ribeiro, g2)


154

Velios Athanasios Fellow

Biography   Dr Velios is a Fellow at Camberwell. He studied art conservation at the Technological Educational Institute of Athens. In 2002 he completed his PhD at the Royal College of Art on the automatic reconstruction of fragmented objects using 3D computer models. He has been active in the field of Computer Applications to Conservation for many years developing compu­ ter software for conservation-related applications. Currently responsible for the digitisation of bookbindings and the condition survey at the library of the St. Catherine Monastery, he is also developing systems for the tracking and sorting books for storage in the same library. Velios has jointly received an AHRC grant for the develop­ ment of a glossary of bookbinding terms using XML and is also the principle investigator for the AHRC funded project Reanimating John Latham through Archive as Event: the online archive of the artist John Latham based on the artist’s event structure theory. R e search S tat e m e n t   My work combines two fields of study: conservation and computing. I am particularly interested in conservation docu­ mentation and how conservation records can be created semantically using current standards. I employ XML technologies for the digitisation of bookbinding descriptions, implemented through the development of a multilingual XML glossary in the form of an XML schema. I am interested in web technologies and am looking into producing an AJAX based Xform to create XML bookbinding records by combining other XML standards such as SVG and XSLT .

I am also interested in colour management for conservation photography and digitisation.

A recent development in my work is within the field of digital creative archiving, and, more specifically, John Latham’s work and online archive. S e lec t e d Outputs and Ac hievements

Awards Principal Investigator of AHRC funded project Reanimating John Latham through Archive as Event. Co-Investigator of AHRC funded project An English/Greek terminology for the structures and materials of Byzantine and Greek bookbinding. Conference papers 2009 ‘The repair and re-use of Byzantine wooden bookboards in the manuscript collection of the monastery of St Catherine, Sinai’ (with A. Honey) at Holding it all together conference on ancient and modern joining, repair and consolidation, British Museum, London. 2009 ‘Archive as Event: Mitya’ (with A. Hudek), at ARLIS 2009 study day: Archiving the Artist, Tate, London. 2008 ‘“Applying Artists” Methodologies to Archiving: a Case Study of John Latham’s Archive’, IS&T Archiving 2008, Bern. 2008 ‘Collecting Digital Data on Paper’(with N. Pickwoad), in International Conference of Museology – Technology for Cultural Heritage, vol.1, Mitilini, Greece. 2007 ‘Digital Reconstruction of Fragmented Archaeological Objects’ (with J. Harrison), Studies in Conservation, vol.52, 2007. 2006 ‘The Digitization of the Slide Collection from the St Catherine Library Conservation Project’ (with N. Pickwoad), IS&T Archiving 2006, Ottawa, May. 2005 ‘Current use and future development of the database of the St Catherine’s Library Conservation Project’ (with N. Pickwoad), The Paper Conservator, #29, 2005. 2004 ‘Digital reconstruction of fragmented artefacts: improved methods or capturing data’, The Conservator, UKIC, 2004.


Velios Athanasios

Recording bookbinding techniques: Printed book, 1628, from the Saint Catherine’s Library, Sinai, Egypt.

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156

Walsh Maria Fellow

Biography   Dr Maria Walsh is a Fellow at Chelsea. After graduating from the Crawford College of Art & Design in Fine Art (Painting), Dr Maria Walsh undertook postgraduate study in the History and Theory of Art at Chelsea College of Art and Design, graduating in 1990. She taught as an associate lecturer on the BA Fine Art and the MA Art Theory at Chelsea from 1992–2001. During this time, Walsh completed an MA in Psychoanalytic Studies at Brunel University graduating with a Distinction. In 2000 she under­ took PhD studies at Falmouth College of Arts, University of Plymouth, graduating in 2003. Her thesis Identity-in-motion: The Narrative Duration of the Dis/continuous Film Moment focused on two films, Tacita Dean’s Disappearance at Sea and Chantal Akerman’s News From Home, to perform a dialogue on spectatorship using philosophy, psychoanalysis, and performative writing. Currently, Dr Walsh is a Theory Co-ordinator on the BA Fine Art course at Chelsea, and a Research Fellow of the Subjectivity & Feminisms research group, which she co-convenes with colleague Dr Mo Throp. R e search S tat e m e n t   My current research is focused on theories of subjectivity in relation to moving image practices, i.e. artist’s film and video installation and experimental cinema. I am particularly interested in film moments where nothing much happens and in how these moments can be considered in terms of narrativity, affect and embodiment. Particular theoretical interests include: Gilles Deleuze’s writing on cinema and feminist re-workings of phenomenology, e.g. Elizabeth Grosz. I have published a number of peer-reviewed essays on these topics in journals such as Screen, Angelaki, Rhizomes, Refractory, and Senses of Cinema.

I am interested in the interrelationship between critical theory and filmic narrativity. To this end, I am exploring methods and modes of writing – what might be called ‘performative writing’ or what I call ‘montage texts’. Some of this has been published in Senses of Cinema, /seconds, as well as being incorporated into catalogue essays on artists and filmmakers. My methodology is encapsulated in my text ‘The entranced spectator: A case of dispossession or Three Films: Lynne Ramsay’s Morvern Callar, Salla Tykka’s Lasso, and Maya Deren’s Ritual in Transfigured Time’, Cinematic Unfolding: The Furling and Unfurling of Images (Elavia, F. (ed.), Pleasure Dome: Toronto, 2008). I also collaborate with Dr Mo Throp with whom I co-convene the Subjectivity & Feminisms research group at Chelsea. We have co-curated a series of visual art exhibitions on current mutations of the feminine in visual art practice, which explored how these mutations have transmogrified into postmodern concepts of ‘animal’ and ‘hybrid’ subjectivity. The exhibitions Transmogrifications and Machinic Alliances were at Danielle Arnaud Contemporary Art in 2004 and 2008 respectively. In November 2008 we organised a conference at Tate Britain entitled Close Encounters of the Animal Kind, which explored extensions of these ideas and included speakers such as Rosi Braidotti, Claire Colebrook and Jaki Irvine. One of our main research group activities is the performance dinner events, which we curate based on classic texts in feminist theory. To date we have performed Simone de Beauvoir’s ‘The Second Sex’ and Valerie Solanas’s ‘S.C.U.M. Manifesto’.


Walsh Maria

Sele c t e d O u t p u t s a n d Ac h i e v e m e n t s

Selected Exhibitions and Projects 2008 Close Encounters of the Animal Kind, symposium at Tate Britain, London, organiser and Chair. 2008 Machinic Alliances, co-curator and catalogue essay, Danielle Arnaud Gallery, London. 2005–06 Conversing – Subjectivity and Feminisms exhibition, broadsheet and symposium, Chelsea College of Art and Design. 2004 Transmogrifications, co-curator, Danielle Arnaud Gallery, London. Selected Publications 2009 ‘Real Screens in Atom Egoyan’s Speaking Parts’, in Clarke, D. and Crawford, V. (eds) Moving Pictures/ Stopping Places: Hotels and Motels in Film, Lexington: Rowman. 2008 ‘The entranced spectator: A case of dispossession or Three Films: Lynne Ramsay’s Morvern Callar, Salla Tykkä’s Lasso, and Maya Deren’s Ritual in Transfigured Time’, in Extremes and Excesses in Film and Video, Pleasure Dome: Toronto. 2008 ‘Zizek, Deleuze, and the Feminine Cinematic Sublime’, in Rhizomes, #16. 2008 ‘The Registration of the Cinematic Instant in Film Installation’, in Spectator: Journal of Film and Television Criticism, vol.28,#2, University of Southern California. 2008 ‘The Double Side of Delay: Sutapa Biswas’, film installation Birdsong and Gilles Deleuze’s actual/virtual axis’, in Refractory, vol.14. 2007 ‘The Light Fantastic – Angela Bulloch interviewed by Maria Walsh’ and ‘Lost in Translation – Tacita Dean interviewed by Maria Walsh’, in Talking Art Monthly: Interviews with artists since 1976, London: Ridinghouse and Art Monthly. 2006 ‘Against Fetishism: The Moving Quiescence of Life 24 Frames a Second’, in Film- Philosophy Journal: Continental Film Philosophy Today, vol.10, #2. 2005 ‘Good Girls go to Heaven, Bad Girls go to London. But there is No Place like Home’, in Miles, S. (ed.) No Place, Film and Video Umbrella, London. 2004 ‘Intervals of Inner Flight: Chantal Akerman’s News From Home’, in Screen, vol.45, issue 3. 2004 ‘The Immersive Spectator: A Phenomenological Hybrid’, in Angelaki: Journal of the Theoretical Humanities, vol.9, issue 3. 2004 ‘Narrative Duration: Tacita Dean’s Disappearance at Sea’, in Reading Images and Seeing Words, Rodopoi: Amsterdam and New York.

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Selected Conference Papers 2009 ‘The Second Sex Dinner: A Re-Enactment’, Creative Practice/Creative Research conference, York St John University, York. 2009 ‘The Flaneusie of Cinematic Writing’, The Wild Eye: Experimental Film Studies, De Montfort University, Leicester. 2008 ‘The Time of the Cut’, Film as Philosophy, Philosophy as Film, University of the West of England, Bristol. 2007 ‘The Entranced Spectator’, Screen/Space: The Projected Image in Contemporary Art, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh. 2007 ‘Auto-affection as spectatorship’, Theorizing Affect, University of Durham, Durham. 2006 ‘Ontology and Meaning in New Media’, Art and Metaphysics in the Twentieth Century and Beyond, International University Bremen. 2005 ‘The Double Sided Interval: Salla Tykka’s Lasso’, International Association for Philosophy & Literature 29th annual conference, Helsinki.


158

Whitelegg Isobel Fellow

I have researched the presence and critical reception of the work of Latin American artists in the UK , focusing on experimental spaces and ephemeral practices in the 1960s and 1970s. More recently my focus has been on moments at She completed her BA at Winchester School of Art which the ideals of transnational movement and knowledge break down – concentrating in before specialising in modern and contemporary particular on the persistence of the Bienal de Latin American Art at the Department of Art São Paulo under international boycott (1969–79) History & Theory, University of Essex. While and the place of Latin America within the completing her PhD there (2001–05) she was a curatorial advisor to the University’s collection of political imaginary of Europe and the USA . Latin American art. As a post-doctoral Research Fellow at Essex she focused on the presence and My research takes the form of critical and con­ critical reception of artists from Latin America in textual writing, and exhibitions curated in 1960s and 1970s Britain. collaboration with contemporary artists, as well as those including historical artworks and Her published writing has focused on the retrieval archival material. I am a member of Conceptualis­ of exhibition histories, including research on mos Del Sur, an international research network the gallery Signals London (‘Signals Echoes that involves artists and writers from across Latin Traces’, in Brett, G. and Figueiredo, L. Oiticica in America engaged in retrieving artistic practice London; London: Tate Publishers, 2007) and the that took place under conditions of political Bienal de São Paulo (‘The Bienal de São Paulo repression. Unseen/Undone, 1969/81’, in Afterall #22; Antwerp–London–Los Angeles: Autumn 2009). Aspects of my research are also being developed as part of Meeting Margins: Transnational Art in She has curated exhibitions in collaboration Europe & Latin America 1950–1978, a collaborative with artists from Brazil; she is currently AHRC funded project that has the aim of co-convening a new international research forum challenging the role traditionally ascribed to on Transnational Latin American Art for the New York as a dominant force in the post-war University of Texas at Austin, and is a member of years and interrogating an emergent paradigm of the international research network Conceptua­ Latin American art viewed in terms of contact, lismos del Sur. collaboration and reception. This project includes Transnational Latin America – a new forum for emerging research in this area, (University of R e search S tat e m e n t   My research and writing Texas at Austin, November 2009) and will result addresses Latin American art as a field in an edited volume of essays (2011). constructed by sites of external reception and paradoxically dominated by English-language knowledge and attempts to negotiate the difference and distance between localised sites of action and dominant sites of reception. Biography   Dr Isobel Whitelegg is a Fellow at Chelsea and a core member of the research centre for Transnational Art, Identity and Nation (TrAIN ) at Chelsea and Camberwell.


159

Whitelegg Isobel

Sele c t e d O u t p u t s a nd Achi e v e m e nt s

Curatorial Projects 2009 This Same World Over (Cinthia Marcelle), Foyerspace, Camberwell College of Arts, London. 2008–09 Indirections (Nicolás Robbio), Pharos Centre for Contemporary Art, Nicosia, Cyprus. Publications 2009 ‘Signals 1964–66’, in Metropolis de papel, Revistas y redes internacionales en la modernidad artística latinoamericana, Buenos Aires: Biblos Press. 2009 ‘The Bienal de São Paulo Unseen/Undone, 1969/81’, in Afterall, #22 (Antwerp–London–Los Angeles: Autumn 2009). 2007 ‘Signals Echoes Traces’, in Brett, G., Figueiredo, L. (eds), Oiticica in London, London: Tate Publishers. 2007 ‘Mira Schendel, Towards A History of Dialogue’, in Asbury, M., Ferreira, G. (eds) Transnational Correspondence (Rio de Janeiro: Arte & Ensaios, 2007). 2007 ‘Mira Schendel, Ontological Landscape’ Dardo 6 (October–November).

Presentations/Conference Contributions 2009 ‘Reading the Archives of An Unseen Bienal, Sao Paulo 1973’ at The New Archive, Royal College of Art (Curating Contemporary Art Department) London. 2009 ‘The archived avant-garde, Latin American Art & The UK’ at LASA 2009, Rio de Janeiro. 2008 ‘A Bienal Não Vista da Fora’ at 28th Sao Paulo Biennal. 2008 ‘Biennales contra Biennales,’ at Association of Art Historians (AAH) Conference, Tate Britain. 2008 Transnational Latin America (panel convenor) at Latin American Art and the UK, History, Historiography, Specificity, AHRC conference at the University of Essex. Places on committees and selection panels 2008–09 Member of selection panel, TrAIN/Gasworks residency competition. 2008–09 Curatorial Advisory Committee, Brazilian Embassy, London.

Artist: Nicolas Robbio, curator: Isobel Whitelegg, Indirections (installation view), Pharos Centre for Contemporary Art, Nicosia, 2008


160

Whitelegg Isobel

Artist: Cinthia Marcelle, curator: Isobel Whitelegg, This Same World Over (installation view), foyerspace, Camberwell College of Arts, 2009

Artist: Cinthia Marcelle, curator: Isobel Whitelegg, This Same World Over (installation view), foyerspace, Camberwell College of Arts, 2009


Wilder Kenneth

161

Fellow, Course Director

Biog r a p h y   Dr Kenneth Wilder is a Fellow and Course Director for MA Spatial and Interior Design at Chelsea. Having previously practiced and taught architecture, Ken Wilder now practices primarily as an installation artist. His work engages issues of perspectival represen­ tation and spectatorship and combines sculptural objects with video projection. Wilder’s MA was from the Royal College of Art, and he has recently successfully completed a PhD entitled Projective Space: Structuring a Beholder’s Imaginative response. He is currently writing a book on the role of imagination in pictorial seeing. Rese a r c h S tat e m e nt   My research is fine art based, but directly addresses architectural and spatial issues. I make gallery installations which often combine sculptural object and video projection. Utilising perspectival geometry, these site-responsive works engage the threshold between two and three dimensions.

I have recently completed a PhD at Chelsea, entitled Projective Space: Structuring a Beholder’s Imaginative response. This thesis explored the reciprocal relationship between an artwork and the space of its reception. Referencing analytical philosophical arguments on representational seeing, and the reception aesthetics of Wolfgang Kemp, the thesis put forward a distinctive position that contended that while the visual imagination does not define depiction, it plays a pivotal role in supplementing perception in works where the spectator attends to and/or imagines away the threshold separating the real and fictive realms. I investigated two categories of works where such imagining facilitates a dis­ tinctive access to the picture’s content: (i) paint­ ings containing what Richard Wollheim refers to as an ‘internal spectator’; and (ii) paintings

integrated into their architectural settings, where the internal onlooker is fused with the external spectator. I highlighted differences afforded internal and external spectators: with the former, the viewer identifies with a spectator who already occupies an unrepresented extension of the ‘virtual’ space; with the latter, the beholder enters that part of the fictive world depicted as being in front of the picture surface, the work thus drawing the ‘real’ space of the spectator into its domain. I am currently writing a book that develops part of my written thesis, and distinguishes the question of ‘what’ a painting represents from ‘where’ the content of the painting is implied, relative to the viewer. I am also involved in a group of moving image artists working towards an exhibition and symposium on the subject of ‘screen as image’. This develops a previous collaboration with Adam Kossoff and Karen Mirza/Brad Butler. S e lect ed Ou t pu t s an d Ach ievemen t s

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2006 Passage, M2 Gallery, Peckham. 2004 Projective Space, Galerie Sebastianskapelle, Ulm, Germany. 2003 Conduit, M2 Gallery, Peckham. 2002 ‘I was once as you are...’, Kingsgate Gallery, West Hampstead, London. Selected Group Exhibitions 2009 Plenum #3 exhibited at A Place Called Limbo, Crypt Gallery, St Pancras Church, London. 2008 Mantle exhibited at Art of Research: Research Narratives, Chelsea College of Art and Design. 2007 Black and White, Gallery 12, Hampstead, London. 2006 Angles of Projection, Triangle Gallery, Chelsea College of Art and Design. 2006 Biblio-, Triangle Gallery, Chelsea College of Art and Design. 2005 Performance Furniture, Triangle Space, Chelsea College of Art and Design. London.


162

Wilder Kenneth

2004 Milky Voids (joint exhibition with Peter Stickland), LEG, Chelsea College of Art and Design, Manresa Road. 2002 Plenum, Austrian Pavilion, Venice Architectural Biennale. 2002 Suspended exhibited at Reflections, gf2 Gallery, Soho, London. Selected Curatorial Projects 2006 Biblio-, Triangle Gallery, Chelsea College of Art and Design. 2006 Angles of Projection, Triangle Gallery, Chelsea College of Art and Design. Selected Publications 2008 ‘The case for an external spectator’, in British Journal of Aesthetics. 2007 ‘Negotiating painting’s two perspectives: a role for the imagination’, in Image [&] Narrative, issue 18. 2006 Guest editor and author of the article ‘A spatiality of situation’, in Art In-sight, #31.

Kenneth Wilder, Monochrome Passage, (photo by K. Wilder)

Selected Conference Presentations 2009 ‘Levels of Unreality’ at Expanded Cinema Seminar: Expanded Cartography, Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, London. 2008 ‘Framing an Imaginative Engagement’, at British Society of Aesthetics Annual Conference, St Edmund Hall, Oxford. 2007 ‘Levels of Reality’, at Real Things: matter, materiality, representation, University of York. 2006 ‘Degrees of reality and the experiential’, at Text/Object Conference, Chelsea College of Art and Design. 2006 ‘A spatiality of situation’, at Angles of Projection symposium, Chelsea College of Art and Design. 2006 ‘Towards a situated video practice’, at Topos: Between architecture and film, Slade/Bartlett, Woburn Studios.


163

Wilder Kenneth

Kenneth Wilder, Milky Voids (photo by P. Harrison)

Kenneth Wilder, Intersection, (photo by K. Wilder)


164

Beech Amanda Course Director

Biography   Amanda Beech is Course Director for MA Critical Writing and Curatorial Practice at Chelsea. She makes artworks, writes and collaborates on curatorial projects. Her research looks to the possibilities of non-founda­tionalist, new realist critique in the context of democracy, examining both the problems of ontologicial identification when understood as necessary for power, and alternatively; the tenability of a politics of aesthetics that secures realism from idealism in a politics of contingency. These political and philosophical issues are taken to research of art’s material and forceful claims both in the architecture of exhibition making, and in discrete works. She is a member of the steering committee for The Political Currency of Art research group and a Co-Director of the Curat­ing Video research group; both are intercollegiate collaborations.

‘Freedom from power; The Problem of Talking Them Down’, in the book As If Something Once Mentioned Now Plain to See, Colony Gallery, Birmingham, 2007 and contributing editor of the book Episode: Pleasure and Persuasion in Lens Based Media, Artwords Press, with the essay ‘We Never Close’. I was also co-organiser of the accompany­ ing conference that launched the book at Tate Britain in autumn 2008.

Solo projects in 2008–09 include a new video commission Statecraft from Commissions East with the exhibition of the work in Harlow, Essex, and an AHRC research award to make a new work in Los Angeles in association with the Getty archives and Villa Aurora. I was awarded the SWAC residency at Spike Island in 2009 to com­ plete the work and have an upcoming solo exhibit of the work in 2010. The work explores the aesthetics of a discordant dialectical modernity R e search S tat e m e n t   My art work explores the and the pragmatic realism of liberal conserva­ tivism in post war LA . Identifying the two sets of relationship between democracy and violence in neo-liberalism by scrutinising the forceful politics to share the same logic of nature, the rhetoric within narratives of freedom, which play work examines the ideality of psychological and out in philosophy, politics, literature and popular geographic affiliations that are produced in culture. The work constructs narratives that take these subject positions. The research continues in particular biographies, sites, social mythologies to investigate these issues in art making, live and mixing them with the bounds of philo­ discussion and writing. sophical inquiry. Operating as a space of seductive power, will and force, the work looks to a world S e lec t e d Outputs and Ac hievements that emphasises decisiveness as its guiding Solo Exhibitions principle and that deals with our share in it. 2009 Image-Force, Urbanomic Studio, Falmouth. Recent work includes group show: Let us Pray For 2008 Statecraft The Temple of Utopias, temporary gallery, Those Now Residing in the Designated Area, DNA Harlow, Essex. 2006 Falk MOT Gallery London part of An Exhibition in Gallery, Berlin, trio exhibition with Roman Three Parts curated by Chris Hammond (publication). Vasseur and Diann Bauer 2008, Commonwealth, 2003 The Patriot, The Economist Plaza, London. MGK 127, Toronto, 2009, and The Institute of Curatorial Projects Pyschoplasmics, Battersea Pump House Gallery, 2009 Part of ongoing pedagogical research: Co-editor of London, 2008 with catalogue essay ‘Matters of Project Biennale, book published as a collaboration Freedom’. Other recent published writing includes between MA CWCP Chelsea and MA Curating students


Beech Amanda

from Essex and Sheffield Hallam University. Launched at the Venice Biennale 2009 and Press Conference event at SIA Gallery, Sheffield. 2008 One Way Street, KX Gallery Hamburg, Germany and Sheppard Gallery Reno, USA. Co-curated with Jaspar Joseph-Lester and Matthew Poole as Curating Video. 2006 Little Private Governments, University Gallery, University of Essex, co-curated with Matthew Poole (catalogue available). 2005–06 Episode, co-curated project with J.J. Lester and M. Poole as Curating Video. Temporarycontemporary Gallery, London, Leeds Met Gallery, Leeds and South Florida Arts Centre, Miami, USA. 2004 Death of Romance, Carnaby Street, London. Group Exhibitions 2009 Greetings comrades, the image has now changed its status, Brunswick Arts Centre, Australia, curated by Bridget Crone. 2009 Commonwealth, MGK127, Toronto, Canada. 2009 Let us Pray For Those Now Residing in the Designated Area, DNA, Berlin, Germany. 2008 The Mortar of Distribution, with Roman Vassuer, Artprojx, London. 2008 The Institute of Pyscholplasmics, Pump House, London. 2008 In A Manner of Speaking, Transmission, Glasgow. 2007 Foreign Body(ies), White Box gallery, New York, USA. 2007 Art Video Exchange, Bergen Kunsthall, Bergen, Norway. 2007 Local Operations, Serpentine Gallery, London, project space. 2007 Ubiquitous Media, Tokyo University, Japan. 2007 The Dream of Putrefaction, Metropole Gallery, Folkestone, Kent and Fieldgate Gallery, London. 2006 Little Private Governments, University Gallery, University of Essex. 2006 S1 Salon, S1 Gallery, Sheffield. 2005 Episode, Temporarycontemporary Gallery, London, Leeds Met Gallery, Leeds and South Florida Arts Centre, Miami, USA. 2004 Pilot: 1, Limehouse Town Hall, London. 2004 Zoo Art Fair, with Jeffrey Charles Gallery, London. 2004 Willkommen, The Metropole, Folkestone, Kent. 2004 Plaza Suite: Laden Für Nichts, Union Projects, London. Publications 2008 ‘Matters of Freedom’, in The Institute of Pyschoplasmics, Pump House Gallery, Kollectiv, P. and G. 2008 ‘We Never Close – Techno-Culture and the Force of Law’, in Episode: Pleasure and Persuasion in Lens Based Media, Artwords press, London, Beech, A., Joseph-Lester, J. Poole, M.

165

2007 ‘Don’t fight it: the embodiment of critique’, Journal of Visual Art Practice 6: 1. 2007 ‘Freedom from power; The Problem of Talking Them Down’, As If Something Once Mentioned Now Plain to See, book published by Colony Gallery, Birmingham. 2006 ‘Culture and the Real World, The Folly of Critique’, in Transmissions, Speaking and Listening, Sheffield Hallam University, essay and discussion. 2005 ‘On Violent Ground, Heidegger, Jünger and Malick’ article, Inventory, vol.5, #2 and 3, Cornerhouse. 2004 ‘Out For Justice’, published in exhibition catalogue, Strategies Against Marketecture, Temporary Contemporary Gallery, London. Selected Presentations, Panels and Conference Papers 2008 Respondent to Andrea Philips and Valerie Fraser, panel discussion ‘Is community the fantasy of architecture?” as part of a series of discussions for Art and the New Town, Harlow Essex. 2008 ‘Critique of Irony’ (paper), for the panel discussion for The Institute of Pyschoplasmics, Pump House Gallery, London. 2008 ‘Episode: the Pleasure and Persuasion of Lens Based Media’, panel convener and panel session, Tate Britain, London. 2008 Co-organiser Curating Video, paper ‘Art and Security’, Chelsea College of Art, London, . 2008 ‘On Arts Writing’, panel discussion with J.J. Charlesworth and Mark Wilsher, Chelsea College of Art, London, 2007 ‘Consequences of Capital’, panel discussion representing PoCA, in association with PILOT Artists and Curators Forum, Chelsea College of Art, London. 2007 Political Currency of Art, panel at Venice Biennale, Italy, in association with PILOT Artists and Curators Forum and Bevilaqua La Masa. 2007 ‘Resistance and Invention’, panel discussion as part of PoCA, Serpentine Gallery, London. 2007 Lapdogs of the Bourgeoisie symposium, Chair, Gasworks Gallery, London, representing The Political Currency of Art research group. 2007 Episode symposium, Respondant to Suhail Malik’s paper as part of Curating Video Leeds Met Gallery, Leeds. 2007 ‘The Dream Of Putrefaction’, panel discussion, Metropole Gallery, Folkestone, Kent. 2006 On Liberty and Art, co-organiser and Chair, paper ‘Liberty: Metaphors of Contingency.’, Tate Britain, London. 2006 ‘Don’t Fight It! The Embodiment of Critique’, at the The Institution of Critique panel, AAH Conference, Leeds.


166

Beech Amanda

2006 Little Private Governments symposium, The University of Essex, Colchester. 2005 ‘Out For Justice Consent and Disagreement in Fish and Seagal.’ (paper), at Dialogues Discourses Difference, AAH conference, University of Bristol.

2006 AHRC Small Award, Episode 2006 Hefce Promising Researcher Award. 2005 Stipend for residency, Rogaland Kunstsenter, Norway. 2005 Arts Council individual award towards residency in Norway.

Awards 2009 ‘Normative Divisions New Territorialisms in Contemporary Art’, AHRC Small Award. 2008 Statecraft, A New Video Commission for Harlow, Arts Council England. 2007 AHRC Small Award, Curating Video. 2007 Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation Grant. 2006 British Council, Travel Award.

Research, Pedagogy and Peer Esteem External Examiner MA Curatorial Practice, Falmouth. Member of the Advisory Board for the journal Collapse. Co-Director of Curating Video research group (www.curatingvideo.com) Steering Committee – The Political Currency of Art research group (www.gold.ac.uk/visual-arts/poca)

Amanda Beech, Statecraft, single screen video work, 15 min, 2008


Bircham Lorna

167

Course Director

Biog r a p h y   Lorna Bircham is Course Director for MA Textile Design at Chelsea. She has been a member of the teaching team at Chelsea since graduating from the Royal College of Art in 1978. Her work as a free lance weave designer and consultant has played an important part in her contribution to student specialist knowledge. She currently works on both the BA and MA textile design programmes. She is a founder member of the Textile Environment Design (TED ) research group, established in 1996, at Chelsea. An early contribution to the project was a collection of fabrics woven with Tencel and paper yarns for an exhibition The Story of Tencel at the Science Museum, London 1999. In 1999 and 2001, she undertook two related woven product develop­ment projects in Assam, India working with rural weavers using the local silks eri and muga. Lorna has built up many international connections through academic assignments in Europe, India and Thailand. These have resulted in reciprocal educational and research opportunities for both undergraduate and postgraduate students. Her research project ‘Mind the Gap’ looked at developing a new approach to the aesthetic and function of the universal hospital gown. Areas of importance included design and dignity, material choices, methods of production, maintenance and disposability.

As a member of the Textile Environment Design (TED) research  group, I was involved with the exhibition Ever and Again in the Triangle Space, Chelsea College of Art and Design in 2007. Following on from that exhibition I have continued to produce, exhibit and sell upcycled and remade castoff furniture enhanced by vintage textiles. I am currently un­dertaking a sustainable craft and technology Rese a r c h S tat e m e nt  

pro­ject involv­ing small producers in India – this is expected to run from June 2008 to February 2009. S e lected Outputs and Achievements

Selected Research Outputs 2007 Works featured in Ever and Again exhibition, Triangle Gallery, Chelsea College of Art and Design, London. 2004 ‘21st Century Textiles – The Past Re-invented’ (conference paper), delivered at Innovation – The New Paradigm for the Textile and Fashion Industry – 2nd International Conference of the North India Section of the Textile Institute, New Delhi, India. 2002 Dyeing workshop – introducing an exhaust dye method to weavers in Assam, India. External Examination and Teaching 2009 External examiner, University of the Creative Arts Farnham. 2009 External examiner, Pearl Academy Fashion, New Delhi, India. 2006 External Examiner for BA Textile Design, University College for the Creative Arts, Farnham. 2006 Postgraduate Teaching Post, National Institute of Fashion Technology (NIFT), New Dehli, India. 2004 External examiner, Pearl Academy of Fashion, New Delhi, India.


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Bircham Lorna

Lorna Bircham, Re-cycled fabrics – Ever and Again Exhibition, digital photograph, 2007

Lorna Bircham, Digital Craft project-Assam, digital, photograph, 2002–09


Chalkley Brian

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Course Director

Biog r a p h y   Brian Chalkley is Course Director for MA Fine Art at Chelsea. He studied at Chelsea College of Art (1969–73) before taking his Masters Degree at the Slade School of Fine Art (1973–75). He has taught at Chelsea since 1991, having previously taught at Norwich School of Art and Newcastle Polytechnic, and has undertaken residencies with the British Steel Corporation and the British School at Rome. Rese a r c h S tat e m e nt   ‘Canal admires the performances, videos and paintings of Brian Dawn Chalkley for their perverse multiplicity. His work accommodates a number of different identities: a cross-dressing monologist spouting an outsiders manifesto; the painter of claustro­ phobic interior scenes who pays homage to the sparse narratives of Pinter and Carver; a softlyspoken storyteller relating attempts to find sex in the wrong places; and the filmmaker who shoots himself prone on the ground, as if already dead. Canal understands why an artist like Brian Dawn prefers the margins to the spotlight, but wants nonetheless to see her standing, look­ ing stunning, in its cold white beam.’ — Gareth Jones in Pilot 3

S e lect ed Ou t pu t s an d Ach ievemen t s

Selected Exhibitions and performances 2009 Curator, The Apartment, Royal London House. 2009 One Day Project, performance at Spike Island, Bristol. 2009 Two night residency / Performance, Frankfurt. 2009 La Bird Club, Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club, London. 2008–09 Red Velvet Curtain Club, Whitechapel Gallery, London. 2007 Subjectivity and Feminism DVD screening, Chelsea College of Art and Design, London. 2006–07 After Turner: Cottages and a Barn with a Mountain Beyond exhibited at Drawing from Turner, Clore Galleries, Tate Britain, London. 2005 Conversing: Subjectivity and Feminisms, Triangle. 2002 Story Teller, Kinnijoe Space, Hamburg. 2002 Non-Plan, Domo Baal Contemporary Art, London. 2002 Cab Gallery Retrospective 99/02, Essor Gallery project space, London. 2001 What I Told The Truth, Cell Project Space, London. 2001 City Racing 1988–98, Institute of Contemporary Arts, The Mall, London. 2001 Club Club Club, Beaconsfield Gallery, London. 2001 Looking With/Out, East Wing Collection, No. 05; Biennial Installation of Contemporary Art, Courtold Institute, London. 2001 Vague but True, Angel Row Gallery, Nottingham. 2001 Showcase Part 1, Chelsea College of Art and Design, Millbank, London. 2000 Vague but True, Asbæk Gallery, Copenhagen. 2000–01 Death Race 2000, Threadwaxing Space, New York. 2000 Vague but True, Arnolfini Gallery, Bristol. 1999 Brian Dawn Chalkley, Platform Gallery, London. Selected Publications 2007 ‘Learning in groups: the student experience in Postgraduate Diplomas of Fine Art’, with Verhagen, M., in Art Design and Communication in Higher Education, 6.2. 2000 Dawn in Wonderland, platform.


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Chalkley Brian

Brian Dawn Chalkley, Hotel Room 1, oil on board, 2006 (photo by B. Borthwick)


Fitzpatrick Edwina

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Acting Course Director

Biog r a p h y   Edwina Fitzpatrick is Acting Course Director for MA Fine Art at Wimbledon. Her artwork explores the living environment and often involves using actual plant life. A central aspect of the practice is the creation of micro­ climates or sympathetic environments in order to sustain unstable entities such as uprooted plants or ice. It asks questions about the symbiotic rela­tionship between human beings and plant life, and who or what is being nurtured. Projects often examine what happens where ‘grey’ and ‘green’ spaces intersect, or when human interactions affect the nature/culture/ecology of a place.

The art projects are created through research and discourse. They celebrate narratives and conversations, and are often deeply informed by the history of a place. They are inclusive through the involvement of local individuals. Edwina’s practice is interdisciplinary and celebrates collaborations with experts across a range of disciplines. To date these have included horticulturalists, biodiversity experts, engineers, architects, perfumers, and composers. The artworks are presented both in public contexts (as permanent or temporary installa­ tions) and in galleries. (www.edwinafitzpatrick.co.uk) Rese a r c h S tat e m e nt   The projects are strongly informed by research. This often raises questions about the nature of a place, and the ways that both indoor and outdoor environ­ ments might be transformed in innovative, and sustainable ways. Recent projects have included:

The art of living An 18 month project in Castlemilk Glasgow. I worked closely with local residents and biodiversity experts across Scotland to create a unique Blood-Chlorophyll labyrinth, which acts as a spiral pathway into the newly created woodland walks. It was developed in acknow­ ledgement that there is always a tension when crossing the threshold of a woodland or forest; that of being seduced or frightened. It is ambiguous whether this seduction or fear is inspired by nature or another human being. The project also involved creating a temporary wildflower allotment to grow and reintroduce native wild flowers to the area. The art of living focused on the changing nature and diversity of plant life to develop and enhance our sense of nurture for a place. (The art of living publication) An Orchid Collection An Orchid Collection consists of a series of installations and sculptures which explore nature, nurture and obsession. Together, they unfold the intricacies and unpredictability of breeding patterns, and raise questions about race, otherness, and integration. They look at bio­ diversity – making connections between human activity and plants’ sustainability. Whilst ‘exotic’ plants are now commonly available across Europe, orchids are still able to inspire strong passions. I became so fascinated by orchid collectors and their obsessions, that I painstakingly replicated over 200 phalaenopsis (moth) orchids as an act of homage. These 3D, life sized paper flowers are pinned to the gallery wall as though they are 19th century butterfly specimens. Whilst looking identical to


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Fitzpatrick Edwina

living orchids, these replicas flatten and ‘neuter’ the plants reproductive (bi-sexual) organs. No pollinating insect would approach them, although they have a strong allure for humans because they are beautiful, ‘exotic’ and mimic female sexual parts. Poignantly, most phalaenopsis orchids are infertile due to constant hybridisation by international breeding programmes. King’s Wood Artist in residence for Stour Valley Arts – Arboreal Laboratory Arboreal Laboratory consists of three intertwined gallery installations, which resulted from a two year residency at King’s Wood in Kent. The work consciously relocates a rural experience to an urban setting, and refers to displacement and longing. The artworks were developed from a series of eight experiments conducted in the woods, which explored sound, scents, looking and time. I collaborated with perfumers to create scents of the woodland at specific moments of the year; and with composer, Matthew King to develop mobile phone ring tones of birdsong. (Arboreal Laboratory publication)

S e lec t e d Outputs and Ac hievements

Commissioned Projects Presented Outside the Gallery 2008 Manchester Metropolitan University. Commissioned artwork for St Helens Teaching Hospital. 2007–08 Oxford Churchill Hospital. Commissioned work for patient waiting area. 2005–07 Reputations. Glasgow. Art of Living permanent sited artwork. 2002–04 Stour Valley Arts project. Artist in residence at Kings Wood, Kent. 2002–03 Peabody Trust. Artist in residence at Coopers Road Estate, London. Selected Solo Exhibitions and Commissioned Installations 2008 An Orchid Collection, Gallery 33, Berlin, Germany. 2007 Arboreal Laboratory, Ovada Oxford (as part of OXDOX). 2006 Arboreal Laboratory, as part of Process and Product exhibition, Ashford Library. 2004 Arboreal Laboratory, Herbert Read Gallery, Canterbury and touring. Publications 2008 Art of Living publication, (monograph with commissioned short story by Lesley Forbes). 2007 Art of Living brochure. 2005 King’s Wood: a Context, Stour Valley Arts. 2004 Arboreal Laboratory, SVA monograph of Kings Wood Residency.


Fitzpatrick Edwina

Edwina fitzPatrick, The art of living – blood chlorophyll labyrinth, permanent sited commission in Castlemilk, Glasgow, 18 m × 18 m, 2007

Edwina fitzPatrick, An Orchid Collection – Flights of fancy, life-size 3D paper replications of fictional orchids, dimensions variable, 2008

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Ghazi Babak Course Director

Biography   Babak Ghazi is Course Director for the Postgraduate Diploma Fine Art course at Chelsea. R e search S tat e m e n t   I am interested in art as a way to experience life. My work involves the claiming and repetition of found materials and processes. My production includes object-based presentations, 2D and time-based media, and more recently web-based projects. As well as exhibiting as an artist I write for periodicals and publications. I also organise exhibition-events and irregularly publish a handmade magazine called Not-Yet. S elected O u t p u t s a n d Ach i e v e m e n t s

Solo Exhibitions 2008 Caribic Residency, Frankfurt, Germany. 2008 ‘Model’ presented at Nought To Sixty, ICA, London. Selected Group Exhibitions 2009 Still Life, Caribic, Frankfurt, Germany. 2009 The Apartment, Royal London House. 2009 The End is the Beginning is the End, Central Gallery, Reading, 2008 Sur Le Dandysme Aujourd’hui, Centro Huarte de Arte Contemporáneo, Pamplona, Spain. 2008 Allias, 29 rue de stassart 1050, Brussels, Belguim. 2008 Sound of Music, Collection of Frac Nord – Pas De Calais, France.

2008 Karen Cunningham, Luca Frei & Babak Ghazi, Glasgow Project Room, Glasgow International. 2008 Ready Made, Yvon Lambert Gallery, Paris. 2008 Babak Ghazi & Donelle Woolford, Liste 08, Basel. 2007 New Lexicon, The Apartment, Athens. 2007 Frozen Waves, YAMA, Istanbul. 2007 Because the night, Galeria Luisa Strina, Sao Paulo, Brazil. 2007 The Affirmation, Chelsea Space, Millbank, London. 2007 ANACHRONISM, Argos, Brussels. Selected Publications 2009 The Book of the Film, contributed new work, Jennifer Bailey: London. 2008 ‘Inventory 22.02.08’, in CROSS SECTION, Glasgow International Festival of Contemporary Visual Art 2008, Glasgow. 2007 ‘Du Cote de Chez Button’, in Frozen Tears III: Gay Prophesy of the Demonically Social, ARTicle Press: Birmingham. 2007 ‘Katharine Hamnett 1985 artist project’, in Katharine Hamnett 1985 artist project, #42. Places on committees and selection panels 2008–09 Co-Chair, Cubitt, artist-run studio and gallery in London. 2007 Member of Selection Panel, Publish and Be Damned self-publishing fair. 2006-09 Cubitt Curatorial Bursary Selection Panel.

Babak Ghazi, Data, September/October 1975, Arte Milano (withdrawn periodical) Magazine 21 × 30 cm, 2007


Ghazi Babak

Babak Ghazi, Model, 24 digital prints on canvas, dimensions variable, 2008

Babak Ghazi, Katharine Hamnett 1983, billboard posters, 304.8 × 203.2 cm, 2008

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Johanknecht Susan Pathway Leader

Biography   Susan Johanknecht is Pathway Leader of the Book Arts pathway, MA Visual Arts at Camberwell. Her work focuses on the develop­ ment and production of artists’ books under the imprint of Gefn Press. The press has published thirty books to date and had a retrospective exhibition at the University of Vermont, Burlington in 2007. Johanknecht works with the artists’ book as a site for collaborative practice and has co-curated several projects including: Here are my Instructions, 2004 co-edited with Redell Olsen in response to the writing instructions / reading walls series of installations at the Poetry Society, London; Volumes (of vulnerability) 2000 and Cunning Chapters, launched at the British Library, November 2007 – January 2008, both cocurated with Katharine Meynell.

Lily Goat Gruff, Modern (Laundry) Production and Subsequent Drainage on Folding Rocks. Discussing this work in Literary Value / Cultural Power: Verbal Arts in the Twenty-first Century (Manchester University Press) Lynette Hunter described these pieces as ‘synergetic texts’. Redell Olsen writes in her article ‘Postmodern Poetry in Britain’ (The Cambridge Companion to Twentieth-Century English Poetry, Corcoran, N. (ed.)): ‘The work of Milne, Riley, Fisher and Johanknecht reaches out of the autonomous niche afforded to poetry by closely guarded disciplinary and nationally constituted boundaries.’ An interdisciplinary interrogation of the book informs my teaching on the MA Visual Arts, Book Arts pathway.

Alongside individual publications, I have explored the artists’ book as a site for collaborative practice. Recent Gefn Press publications consider hypertext In 1997–2000, I co-curated the artists’ book millennium project Volumes (of vulnerability) with in relation to the printed page, Subsequent Drainage on Folding Rocks 2004, and the material Dr Katharine Meynell of Middlesex University, which included the work of twenty artists poetics of letterpress printing Subtext Localities, and toured internationally, and in 2006–08 2007. Her writing has appeared in HOW(2) internet journal of Contemporary and Innovative Cunning Chapters, which re-examined the category of artists’ books in light of recent cultural and Writing by Women and PORES avant-gardist technological shifts, producing a series of chapters journal of poetic research. where issues of aesthetics and ‘well-madeness’ were exposed and analysed. Here are my Instruc­ R e search S tat e m e n t   My research focuses on the development and production of artists’ books tions in 2004, was co-curated with Dr Redell Olsen of Royal Holloway, University of London, under the imprint of Gefn Press. Concepts of the hybrid, expanded book are central to my ongoing considering physicality and poetics through site-specific wall inscriptions leading to a colla­ research; questioning and negotiating the role of the book in contemporary fine art/poetic practice borative book. through the production of artists’ books and collaborative projects. Under the imprint of Gefn My investigation into materiality, physicality and poetics was published in a special feature on Press my projects from the last decade have explored relationships between digital sequences, ‘writing process and the artists’ book’ for HOW(2) , photo- animations written onto CD-ROM or DVD an internet journal of contemporary and inno­ vative writing by women. and the physical book. These include: of science & desire, WHO WILL BE IT?, The Transgenic Tale of


Johanknecht Susan

Forthcoming projects include: an artists’ book ‘interim corrode’, contributing to the book Mutual Dependencies to be published by Middlesex University and Art Words in autumn 2009, and the project Series & Sequence; The Fine Art Folio & Artist Book as sites of inquiry an AHRC application being developed with Professor Paul Coldwell. Sele c t e d O u t p u t s a n d Ac h i e v e m e n t s

Selected Exhibitions 2009 Land*scape*ist, Wall Gallery, London. 2009 Selections from the Athenaeum’s Erika and Fred Torri Artists’ Book Collection, Gefn Press, Athenaeum, La Jolla, California. 2007 Cunning Chapters, British Library, London. 2005 Arcadia Id Est: Artists’ Books, Nature and the Landscape, TRACE Gallery; touring internationally. 2005 30 Years of Innovation: A Survey of Exhibition History at the Center for Book Arts, 1974–2004, Center for Book Arts, New York. 2004 Beyond the Digital Surface, Ewha Gallery, Seoul, Korea. 2003 (re)readings: Artists Books Now, Gallery Lux, San Francisco. 2003 Inside Cover, The Center for the Book, San Francisco. 2002 After Dolly, FUSE art/science exhibition, ICA, London. Selected Curatorial Projects 2007 Cunning Chapters, co-curator, in collaboration with Dr Katharine Meynell of Middlesex University, British Library, London, UK. 2003 writing instructions / reading walls, visual poetics project, co-curator, Poetry Society Cafe, London, leading to the publication here are my instructions edited with Dr Redell Olsen, Royal Holloway, University of London. 2000 Volumes (of vulnerability), artists’ book millennium project, co-curator and exhibitor, touring nationally and internationally. Selected Poetry 2005 ‘Armour’ (online). Pores – avant-gardist journal of poetic research, issue 4. 2004 ‘Plates 1–4, Figures 1–3, Advice to Miss Buswell and Miss Ripley on Drawing Fossils, List of Illustrations’, in How2 Journal of contemporary writing (online), spring 2004. 2002 ‘Modern (Laundry) Production’, in How2 Journal of contemporary writing, autumn 2002.

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Selected Artists’ Books – authored 2004 Subsequent Drainage on Folding Racks. London: Gefn Press. Selected Books – edited 2004 Here are my Instructions, co-edited with Olsen, R., London: Gefn Press. Selected Articles 2004 ‘Stockholm’, in Harrison, L. (ed.) Fantastic Cities, Canterbury: Kent Institute of Art & Design. 2003 ‘The Symbolic Book: A Travelogue’, in Morley, S. (ed.) The Book Show, London: Utopia Press with the Nunnery and The Wordsworth Trust. 2003 ‘Bildersprechen’ (six artist’s pages), 6. Jahrbuch der Hochschule für Bildende Künste, Braunschweig, Cologne: Salon Verlag. 2003 ‘Some Reformations’, in Bodman, S. (ed.) Artist’s Book Yearbook 2003–2005, Bristol: Impact Press. Selected Honours 2009 Winner of Yale University Purchase Prize for cocurated collaborative work Cunning Chapters. 2009 Appointed Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.


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Johanknecht Susan

Susan Johanknecht, Cunning Chapters, collaborative book project, various media, 30 × 28 cm, 2007

Susan Johanknecht, Cunning Chapters, collaborative book project, various media, 30 × 28 cm, 2007


O’Connell Douglas

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Course Director

Biog r a p h y   Douglas O’Connell is Course Director for MA Visual Language of Performance at Wimbledon. He has worked in production design incorporating digital technology into design and performance. His recent credits include: Monsters (Arcola), This isn’t Romance (Soho Theatre), 50th Anniversary Gala of Harold Pinter’s The Birthday Party (Lyric Hammersmith), Fight Face (Lyric, Hammersmith), Saturday Night Sunday Morning (Harrogate Theatre), Sarajevo Story (Lyric, Hammersmith), Back at You (Lightwork/BAC), Here’s What I Did with My Body One Day (Pleasant Theatre London & National Tour), You Kill Me (ReActor Conference in Digital Media), Twelfth Night (Fervant Theatre), Utter (Verbatim Practices in Contemporary Theatre symposium), InVertigo (Vision Festival, Brighton), Triptych (Bath International Festival), Festival of Lights Exhibition (Royal National Theatre), Art in You (Greenwich Council).

Within theatre production he has worked in Off Broadway and regional theatre throughout New York and Chicago including the Apple Corp NY, John Drew Theatre, East Hampton and Steppenwolf Theatre, Chicago. As part of Gallery 37 he has worked in collaboration with the Emergency Exit Arts, the National Youth Theatre Deptford, Birmingham Royal Ballet, Collective Art Noise, and the Greenwich/Dockland Festival. In 2008 he was the recipient of a fellowship in Promising new Research at Wimbledon College of Art and is currently conducting research in the uses of web interface and social networking as a contemporary performance model for telematic performance. Rese a r c h S tat e m e nt   I aim to develop insights in which to explore concepts of contemporary

spectatorship through the integration of digital technologies for live performance. My work seeks to manifest a transactional performance environ­ ment, composed of images and sound, derived through content distributed digital devises, which enables a fluid integration of performance action with new communicative technologies. S e lected Outputs and Achievements

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2009 Monsters, video design for performance, written by Niklas Rådström. 2009 This Isn’t Romance, projection design for performance, Soho Theatre, London. 2008–09 The Overlook, online performance research, www.theoverlook.co.uk. 2008 Pinter 50th Anniversary Gala, video design, commissioned by David Farr to honour 50th anniversary of Harold Pinter’s The Birthday Party. 2008 FightFace, video design, subtitle design and animation for hearing impaired, written by Sophie Wooley and directed by Gemma Farlie. 2008 Sarajevo Story, video projection design for performance. Lightwork Image Performance, directed by Andy Lavender, devised by the company. 2007 Back at You, media design, Battersea Arts Centre. 2007 Once Dead, video design, Theatre and Performance Research Association presentation. 2005–06 Here’s What I Did With My Body One Day, visual designer, touring nationally, Lightworks, directed by Andy Lavender. 2006 Twefth Night, media design, Fervant Theatre Company, directed by Mike Benardi 2006 Passionate Alliance: Cardboard Citizens, designer, Emergency Exit Arts, directed by Stuart Mullin. 2005 InVertigo, Visions Festival, Brighton. 2005 InVertigo, conceived and directed, WoodenHead works, Broadway Theatre, Lewisham. 2005 Utterance, visual designer, Lightworks, directed by David Annen. 2004 Triptych, conceived and directed, Bath International Puppetry festival. 2004 Festival of Light, lighting and visual designer, projected media exhibition, The National Theatre, Media Designer v Thames Festival, Emergency Exit Arts. 2002 Livin’ it Large and Loud, visual designer, Art of Regeneration, Albany Theatre Deptford, Media Designer Thames Festival, Emergency Exit Arts.


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O’Connell Douglas

Douglas O’Connell, Fight Face (production photo), Lyric Hammersmith London, Project Imagery Design: Animated Sur-titles for the Hearing Impaired, 2008


O’Connell Douglas

Douglas O’Connell, The Overlook: Durational Internet Performance, projected text, scenography and performance, 2009

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182

Sandy Mark Course Director

Biography   Following a degree in Art History Mark Sandy studied paper conservation at Camberwell College of Arts where he has taught since 1992. He has been PG Dip and MA Course Director for Conservation at Camberwell since 2000 and is Assistant Director of MATAR (Materials and the Arts research centre). Mark Sandy is a member of the Institute of Conservation (ICON ), the International Institute of Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (IIC ), the Inter­national Council of Museums – Conservation Committee (ICOM-CC ) and the Conservation Teachers Forum. R e search S tat e m e n t   My current research interests include the science of paper conservation, degradation of plant fibres in ethnographic cultural artefacts and physical properties of cellulose relevant to conservation.

Laboratory techniques used include optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, finite span tensile testing and zero span tensile testing. S e lec t e d Outputs and Ac hievements

Selected Publications and Papers 2009 ‘Review of the ICOM-CC 2008 Triennial Conference, New Delhi’, in ICOM Ethnographic Newsletter, #30. 2009 ‘Changes in the Tensile Properties of Paper in Response to Fluctuating Relative Humidity – Relevance to Paper Conservation’, with Andrew Manning and Fabrice Bollet, in International Circular of Graphic Education and Research. 2008 ‘A Tensile Testing Method for Monocotyledon Leaves With Parallel Venation’, with Louise Bacon, at Bridgland, J. (ed.) Preprints of the ICOM-CC 15th Triennial Conference, New Delhi, 22–26 September, vol.1. 2003 ‘A Haptech Training Simulation for Paper Conservation: Preliminary Results’, with Dr Angela Geary, for Eurohaptec 2003.

Mark Sandy, photomicrograph of Raphia leaf surface taken at 400× magnification by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)


Sandy Mark

Photomicrograph of Raphia leaf fibres taken at 400 × magnification using polarised light microscopy (PLM)

Mark Sandy, photomicrograph of Raphia leaf surface taken at 400× magnification by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

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184

Stiff Andrew Pathway Leader

Biography   After eight years working with the co-operative arts group D-Fuse, focusing on web, video and DVD technology to produce installations and live events, Andrew Stiff was appointed to run the MA Visual Arts (Digital Arts) and MA Visual Arts (Digital Arts Online) pathways at Camberwell. He now works as an independent digital artist, using his experience of working within the architectural environment to explore the multiplicities of perception in our built environment. He has shown video installa­ tions in Rome, Seoul and the London Architecture Biennale. R e search S tat e m e n t   My work is concerned with developing a visual language of the intricacies implicit in our built environment. The surface of the city is the visible manifestation of our endeavour to formalise, expand and innovate within the spaces that we create. The surface also defines the relationship between the inhabitants and the city. This relationship is in continuous evolution, as technology manipulates the everyday patterns that have defined the city throughout the ages. The experience of the city is a temporal one, and I use moving image to reflect this experience.

Andrew Stiff, Flag, digital print on paper, 27 × 21 cm, 2009

S e lec t e d Outputs and Ac hievements

Selected Exhibitions 2009 Pasar Malam, Early Bird, exhibited at International Mini Print Exhibition, Various venues. 2009 Pasar Malam, exhibited at Atlas Show, Crypt Gallery. 2008 Rain 1, 3 min video, exhibited at Transcentric, Lethaby Gallery, Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, London. 2007 Digital and Physical Surfaces, symposium and video installation, University of the Arts London, Chelsea College of Art and Design. 2006 Twelve Views, video installation, University of Northampton, University of the Arts London, Camberwell College of Arts. 2006 Temporal Facades, video installation, London Architecture Biennale, London. 2005 Corners, exhibition in Art Space M-Post, Seoul, Korea. 2004 The City Quartered, film shown in the exhibition Digital Surfaces held in Seoul, Korea. 2003 Sonicity festival, Rome, in conjunction with D-Fuse. Selected Publications and Conference Presentations 2009 ‘The Faraday Grid’, at Digital Noise, Greenwich University. 2008 ‘Ten Key Digital Issues’, in Philosophy in Art, Zidane Press. 2007 ‘Second Life and Online Learning Experience’, conference paper, University of the Arts London. 2006 ‘The Tactile Learning Environment’, conference paper, Chelsea School of Art, London. 2005 ‘Digital Narratives’, lecture given to the Bartlett School of Architecture, London. 2005 ‘The City and the moving image’, talk given to the Architectural Association, London. 2005 ‘Developing a Community of Practice’, conference paper, London.


Stiff Andrew

Andrew Stiff, Eis Krim, digital print on paper, 27 × 21 cm, 2009

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Taylor Finlay Pathway Leader

Biography   Finlay Taylor is Pathway Leader for MA Visual Arts (Printmaking) at Camberwell. He attended Exeter College of Art, Croydon College of Art & Design and Wimbledon College (previously School of Art). His work inspects aspects of the landscape and natural history often investigating specific sites and species. In 2003 he was awarded the Boise Travel Scholarship to journey to the Monarch butterfly winter roosting sites in the Mexico. In 1999 he established the Pupa Press to produce book works and multiples and work with invited artists. Taylor has organised and partici­pated in various exhibitions including: Symptoms (2000), Cover Up, London, solo exhibition, Spin (2001), Victoria & Albert Museum, London; Entomology Vandal (2001), Cover Up, London, group exhibition; reinterpreting the house (2002), Abbot Hall, Kendall, group exhibition; Great Piece of Turf (2003), Danielle Arnaud Contemporary Art, London; Exhumed (2003), Museum of Garden History, London; Nowhere Else But Here (2004), Danielle Arnaud Contemporary Art, London; Undertow (2004), Generator projects, Dundee; USUK (2005), Lab Gallery, New York; Arcadia id est (2005), international touring show; The World is Turning (2006), domoBaal Gallery, London; Dream Alps (2006), Fiort di Bard, Bard, Italy; Isobar (2007), Fieldgate Gallery, London, group show and Cunning Chapters (2007), British Library, London, group show. B**K (2008) London Print Studios, London, group show; Northern Print Biennale (2009), Newcastle, group show. R e search S tat e m e n t   Depending on who is asking, I shift the angle of the reply but my work is often described as investigating landscape and the complex issues and notions involved with investigating it at this point in history.

Informed by specific species or locations I work across media from photography and moving image to print media, sculptural objects and books. I have been working for some years on ‘snail drawings’, using these garden molluscs to eat into paper in either an abstract manner or spelling out short texts. For example ‘Song Thrush’ which is major snail predator and appears as a warning or exclamation. Other works have pictured the Thames-side habitat of the Hairy-backed snail. Similarly grazed upon the inkjet photo docu­ ments become covered in snail trails and the dye based ink runs with texts like ‘holy land’ and ‘occupied territory’ reading across the image space. Recently I have worked on a snail eaten dictionary which spent six months in the garden, Darwin’s text On the Origin of Species and Steve Jone’s update of that thinking Almost Like a Whale, as well as more delicate decomposed book objects. Several works have involved the use of silk moth specimens (Bombyx mori). New Moon presents a swarm of moths around a light bulb casting large shadows onto the wall surfaces. Another work specimen rotates a single silk moth endlessly from the ceiling. These works are informed by the insects’ history. Bombyx mori has become extinct in the wild. This has happened at some point since its domestication in China over the last 3000 years. During this period the captive moths have lost the ability to fly, the colour has diminished to a ghostly off white and the larvae can no longer climb steep surfaces and are kept in flat trays. Recent photographic works depict butterflies on people’s tongues this phenomena of insects


Taylor Finlay

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Finlay Taylor, Globe, potatoe cut on paper, 65 × 65 cm, 2008

feeding from saliva or resting is changed with other insights. Its a meeting of taste sensors, butterflies ‘tongues are on the bottom of their feet or claspers and so the encounter is one of an invisible sense lost entirely in a c-type print but full of emotive responses. Sele c t e d O u t p u t s a n d Ac h i e v e m e n t s

Selected Group Exhibitions 2009 Mini Print, London Print Studios and touring. 2009 Atlas (separated by intervals), St Pancras Crypt, London. 2009 Wild is the Wind, Wall, London. 2009 1st Northern print Biennale, Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle. 2009 Territory, Otter Gallery, Chichester. 2008 Big Draw, University College London, London.

2008 B**K, London Print Studios, London. 2007 Isobar, Fieldgate Gallery, Londo. 2006 Dream Alps, Fiort di Bard, Bard, Italy. 2006 The World is Turning, domoBaal Gallery, London. 2005 For Millions of Years Great Things Have Grown Here, Yard Gallery, Nottingham. 2005 Arcadia id est, international touring book art show. 2005 USUK, Lab Gallery, New York, USA. 2004 Undertow, Generator projects, Dundee. 2004 Nowhere Else But Here, Danielle Arnaud Contemporary Art, London. 2003 Exhumed, Museum of Garden History, London. 2003 Great Piece of Turf, Danielle Arnaud Contemporary Art, London. 2002 reinterpreting the house, Abbot Hall, Kendall, group exhibition. 2001 Entomology Vandal, Cover Up, London. 2001 Spin, Victoria & Albert Museum, London. 2000 Symptoms, Cover Up, London, solo exhibition.


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Waller Tracey Course Director

Biography  

Tracey Waller is Course Director for MA Graphic Design Communication at Chelsea. She studied Graphic Design at Central Saint Martins and the Royal College of Art. She worked for leading Broadcast Design Companies before setting up her own bespoke design practice, specialising in graphics for Broadcast Design, TV Commercials and Film. Clients include: BBC , Nickelodeon, MTV , VH 1, Granada TV , ITV and Channel Five. Waller is known for her unique visual style of low- fi, hand drawn, painted graphics, working with clients on a commission and collaborative bases. R e search S tat e m e n t   My research explores the value of self-reflection within the creative practice. Learning from how we do things gives us the potential to realise our own creative voice and vision. Drawing from my own practice as a designer, personal experiences and influences, I use my own models as examples to help students establish their own unique design voice.

S e lec t e d Out come examples

Title: Words fail me Format: 30 sec animation Year: 2008 Drawn from the experience of being Dyslexic, and using creativity as a cathartic process the outcome of this project gives a personal and poetical voice to the definition of dyslexia. Starting with my phonetic spelling of the word and using dictionary definitions as the bases of the animation, the words and images play off each other building a new narrative of interplay and meaning. Title: My Feet Format: Photographs A collection of on going self-portraits, started in 1993 What started out as bit of self-mocking fun, photographs of my feet on holiday has grown over the years to form a collection. The collection when re-presented all together start to form a narrative, a journal, that documents my journeys over the years viewed from a different perspective. The beauty of this project is the spontaneity that it started out with, as the collection has grown and become more conscious, the fascination has been with the collecting and documenting. Given that narratives are part of my professional practice, stepping out side of the commercial time constraints, budgets and deadlines to work with a narrative that takes time, even years, allows me the space to re-frame myself and enjoy the creative process for what it is.


Waller Tracey

Tracey Waller, Words Fail Me, animation , 30 sec, 2008

Tracey Waller, My Feet, photographs, 1993 –

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Current Research Degree Supervisors

The following is an alphabetical list of current academic staff who are qualified or engaged in research degree supervision in C-C-W . This list is updated on an annual basis in relation to the matching of supervisory expertise to enrolled research students and to include recently qualified supervisors. Addison Gill, Fine art and expanded documentary practices. Asbury Michael, Art history and theory and modernism and contemporary art in Brazil. Baddeley Oriana, Art history and theory, transnational art, mexican art, cultural identity, latin american art and cultural hybridity. Bamford Anne, Art education, emerging literacies, visual communication. Basham Anna, Japanese architecture, victorian to modernist. Baseman Jordan, Fine art: practice, theory, history of video, film painting, sculpture, digital arts, drawing and sound. Baxter Hilary, Costume and theatre design. Beech Amanda, Contemporary art practice, liberalism, democracy, non representationalism, contingency, violence and critique. Fine art: all media, curating, writing, inter and multi-disciplinary practice. Beech David, Contemporary art practices and debates, the public sphere and politically engaged practices. Bircham Lorna, Textile design, new materials and environmental impact. Biswas Sutapa, Studio practice. Fine art: film, video, drawing, painting, historical and cultural studies. Blacklock George, Fine art, painting and abstract pictorial space. Boyce Sonia, Fine art practice and drawing. Burrows David, Costume and theatre design. Cartledge Frank, Design communication, representations of domestic spaces and mediums as technological interventions. Chalkley Brian, Fine art, transgender identity, performance, drawing painting, book publication, video, performance and story telling. Chesher Andrew, Fine art, documentary practice, avant-garde music, structures and practices. Coldwell Paul, Printmaking, sculpture, digital art, installation, memory and the work of Morandi. Collins Jane, Performance, identity, theatre design, scenography. Courtenay Philip, Collaborative transnational exchange processes, non representational theory and actor network theory.

Courtney Cathy, Archives, theatre, book art and oral history. Cross David, Fine art, context specific sculptural installation and photography. Cummings Neil, Critical practice, contemporary creative practice, art and social process, critical practice and digital technology. Cussans John, Fine art, new media, psychological models and the evolution of media technologies. Dennis Jeffrey, Fine art, painting, drawing, meaning and process in contemporary painting. Dobai Sarah, Photography, film, video, narrative, portraiture and billboards. Donszelmann Bernice, Fine art theory and practice, architectural space and wall installation. Drew Linda, Pedagogic research, phenomenographic and social constructivist approaches to research. Earley Rebecca, Eco-design, fashion, textiles, new textile technologies and contemporary craft practice. Elwes Catherine, Artists’ film and video, feminist art, wartime SAS. Fairnington Mark, Fine art painting. Farthing Stephen, Drawing, pedagogy and cross disciplinarity. Faure Walker James, Painting, digital arts, drawing and criticism. Fitzpatrick Edwina, Fine art, interdisciplinary practice and concepts of nature and nuture. Fortnum Rebecca, Painting, documentation, visual intelligence and feminism. Francis Mary Anne, Authorship and agency, the radically diverse artist and social art practices. Furlong William, Fine art practice and theory, artists’ use of sound, sound sculpture and the spoken word. Ghazi Babak, The creative individual, fine art production, object-based presentations, 2D and time-based media, meaning, intention and control. Graves Eve, Museology and conservation, meaning a material culture, intangible heritage and Intercultural communication. Gunning Lucy, Fine art, the ‘in between’, currently in relation to architecture and the social Implications of formlessness, in relation to place and behaviour. Ingham Mark, Fine art, installation, photography, sculpture and moving image.


Current research Degree Supervisors

Johanknecht Susan, Artists’ books, book art, contemporary poetics, small press publishing, The artists’ book as a site for poetic and collaborative practice. Kikuchi Yuko, Art, design and craft history in Britain, Japan and Taiwan. Modernity and national identity in non-western visual cultures. Maloney Peter, Parallel spaces, virtual reality and simulation, media arts, models and visual thought/idea visualisation. Newman Avis, Fine art practice with an emphasis on drawing. Newman Hayley, Performance and ‘liveness’, relationship between performance and its documentation. O’Brien Tamiko, Fine art, sculpture, site-based art practice and collaborative art practice. O’Leary James, Site specific practice, performance, documentation. O’Riley Tim, Animation, film, photographic works, relationships between art, science, literature and narrative. Osborne Richard, Philosophy, cultural studies and art theory. Pickwoad Nicholas, Book and library conservation, devising new techniques and methods to document material. Politowicz Kay, Development of textiles within interiors, textile design and production with an environmental agenda and addressing design problems. Quinn Malcolm, Critical practice. Roberts Aeli, Material science, conservation and law. Salter Rebecca, Contemporary printmaking, Japanese printmaking, cultural history of print, Edo period Japanese popular culture. Sandino Linda, History and theory of the applied arts, the role of narrated life stories and identity formation of practitioners in creative industries. Sandy Mark, Haptic technologies within conservation training, properties of cellulose and paper in relation to deterioration and conservation. Scrivener Stephen, Collaborative design, computermediated design, user-centred participatory design, practice-based research. Simonson Caryn, Textiles, photography, video, sculpture and Installation in a contemporary textiles context. Smith Dan, Fine art theory, notions of archive, memory and the utopian impulse within cultural forms. Stair Julian, Ceramic practice, ceramic history and theory, craft history and theory. Stiff Andrew, Digital arts, the city - urban landscape, cities temporal context and rhythm. Tchalenko John, Drawing, cognition, artistic creativity and research methodology. .

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Thomas Jennet, Experimental and narrative film and video. Throp Mo, Fine art, curating, practitioner, researcher, teacher identity, subjectivity, feminism, psychoanalysis. Tulloch Carol, dress and textiles associated with the african diaspora, material and visual culture, writing and curating. Velios Athanasios, Computer applications to conservation, digitisation, digital preservation, the concept of ethics in digital conservation and preservation. Walsh Maria, Artist’s film and video, installation, film narrative and theory, spectatorship, phenomenology, performative writing, subjectivity and feminisms.. Wainwright Chris, Photography, fine art, light forms, video, curating, climate change and cultural responses to the environment. Watanabe Toshio, Transnational art, art, architecture and design of victorian and Edwardian Britain and Japan 1850–1950, japonisme and orientalism. Whitelegg Isobel, Modern and contemporary latin american art. Wilder Ken, Projective space, installation art, video sculpture, spatial practice, philosophy of art.


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Selected Papers and interviews


Who? Me?: Confessions of a casual transnationalist

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michael Asbury

It seems reasonable to assume that an association with the UAL research centre for Transnational Art, Identity and Nation (TrAIN) combined with curatorial and art historical work, that focuses to a large extent on modern and contemporary art in Brazil, would provide fertile grounds for the exploration of questions and/or problems relating to notions of identity. Yet, if one is to take this assumption as truth, the manner in which ‘identity’ has featured in my work has been far from straight forward. Thinking about it as I write, I realise that the issue is rarely discussed in the first person (the mode of writing self-consciously adopted here). The issue becomes detached in this way as an observation of others or of particular historical instances whilst perhaps perversely fuelling the presumption that ‘I’ (the self) remain exempt from the subject, from those who are labelled with their attributed or self-proclaimed identities. A label can act positively as a means of asserting one’s autonomy, one’s independence from the hegemony or one’s sense of pride. Yet labels also have a sticky side which can contain, which can restrict or exclude. Despite any possible detachment from the subject, there is the implicit assumption that one writes from a particular place of belonging. It is this restriction that partly explains my reluctance to completely embrace the issue of identity. The fact is that my own sense of belonging is accompanied by an equally present sense of nonbelonging. This is actually not only specific to myself – to my own ambivalent relation to my sense of self – but is fundamental to the notion of identity itself, since to invoke identity is also to summon difference. Having overcome this initial reluctance to identify my work with this issue, I realise that this short statement could offer an opportunity to investigate certain shifts that have, inevitably, appeared in my research and writing over the years. Already in the late 1990s, my principle concern focused on the negation of an emerging paradigm that purported a particular genealogy for Brazilian contemporary art. This seemed to be an implicit way in which to suggest that such production was effectively distinct from that in Europe and North America, that it had its own predecessors. This fact became explicit while, during the curation of an exhibition entitled ‘Other Modernities’,1 one of the participating artists, Cildo Meireles, answered a question as follows: Of course it is important to state from where one emerges as an artist, and in my case artists such as Hélio Oiticica and Lygia Clark belonged to that context. But if we are to speak of influences, then we must speak of Marcel Duchamp.2


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Meireles was in fact skilfully articulating a necessary manoeuvre of identification with both the art world and a particular – then perceived far more in terms a local – cultural tradition. I too saw my own research through a type of productive negation, in a sense not so distinct from what both Meireles and Oiticica pronounced in the catalogue for the exhibition ‘Information’ (MoMA, New York 1970) where – individually but in accord – they stated their desire not to represent Brazil but only their own art.3 Similarly, the very concept of ‘Other Modernities’ (a title the exhibition inherited from a conference) seemed problematic to me as it suggested the advent of an original and/or homogeneous modernity. This is precisely the problem I have with the use of the term hybridity to describe composite cultural structures, preferring instead the juxtaposition model offered by the concept of syncretism.4 Keeping Meireles’ reference in mind, Duchamp’s door (11 rue Larrey) which could remain both open and at one and the same time closed, offers a close analogy to how I saw my role as a writer/curator dealing with issues that involved notions of identity. Duchamp also played with the term ‘literature’ decomposing it into ‘Lits-et-ratures’, thus suggesting, as Sarat Maharaj put it, that one writes ‘rubbing out the rubbish’.5 In this sense I saw myself purporting the uniqueness of the subject (the axiom ‘original contribution to knowledge’ which labels PhD research comes to mind here), while attempting to erase another form of claimed uniqueness (a genealogy that suggested a disconnection from the canon). This double manoeuvre, this writing by erasure, gained further emphasis during my work as associate curator for the Rio de Janeiro section of ‘Cen­ tury City: Art and the Modern Metropolis’ 6 where displays of neoconcrete and abstract geometric art, architecture and urban planning, photography and music, presented the astonishing modernity of Brazil in mid-20th century: a display that caused much surprise to a public expecting, to a large extent, tropical stereotypes. The difficulty of the manoeuvre consisted in the necessity to both affirm the astonishing similarities between the Brazilian and the European avant-gardes, sometimes even the precursory nature of the former, while negating their sameness (or as Homi Bhabha put it, ‘the same but not quite’ 7 ) by focusing on the specificities of the local cultural, social and political contexts. Canonical discourses had after all emphasised derivation, arguing that non-European modern art was nothing more than a late copy of the original. This problematic issue of precedent became an essay in which certain ‘coincidences’ between neoconcretism and minimalism, were discussed by referring respectively to Ferreira Gullar’s ‘Theory of the Non-Object’ of 1959 and Donald Judd’s ‘Specific Objects’ of


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1965.8 Neoconcretism arose out of disagreements within the concrete art groups in Brazil during the 1950s. Gullar had played a prominent role in questioning the rationalism of art concret offering a poignant critique of the a priori nature of Swiss artist and designer Max Bill’s rhetoric towards artistic production. If rationalism seemed coherent with the rapid modernisation of Brazil during the 1940s and 50s, with the drive to radically alter the nation’s view of itself from an agrarian to a modern industrial society, the neoconcretist rebellion argued that despite all the achievements of the developmentalist plan it was still possible to consider even abstract geometri­ cal art as capable of containing as well as being the product of expression and intuition. My following task was thus to further investigate the circumstances in which the concrete and neoconcrete movements had been implemented in Brazil, and the reasons which led to the local assumption that they stand as precursors for Brazilian contemporary art. Having worked on a critique of external historical interpretations, my focus then turned towards national narratives. As curatorial advisor for an exhibition on Brazilian sculpture, I suggested as a chronological point of departure the first edition of the Sao Paulo Biennial in 1951. My essay that accompanied that catalogue analysed both sculpture prizes at that Biennial in order to question the prevalent national view that constructivist-oriented movements spread unquestioned across Brazil as a consequence of Max Bill being awarded the international prize in 1951.9 The research undertaken for that commission suggested a far more complex scenario. A vicious polemic had ran in the press about the appropriate ‘national character’ required for art in Brazil as opposed to the imported nature of abstraction which the Biennial seemed to support. This fact nevertheless cannot be corroborated, as Mario Pedrosa argued,10 given the ‘imported’ nature of the ideologies that fed the polemic in the first place, but more specifically, the advent of the ‘national’ prize for sculpture having been awarded to Victor Brecheret for a work that drew on Brazilian ‘indianist’ themes. Brecheret had been one of the leading figures of the modernismo movement which during the 1920s overturned the Beaux-Arts tradition in favour of a modernist aesthetic adapted to local subjects and themes. Of course, the aesthetics remained European as the need to address cultural dependency had yet to gain a sense of urgency. This would arrive in 1928 with poet Oswald de Andrade’s characteristic irreverence profoundly affecting subsequent cultural production in Brazil. Oswald’s Anthropo­ phagite Manifesto suggested the cannibalisation of European culture as the


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only truly ‘Brazilian’ act. The contradiction – a national culture via the appropriation of the European canon – was played upon, in the spirit of Dada, by invoking the ‘original Brazilians’, the Tupi-Guarani tribes. Shakespeare’s famous line in Hamlet thus becomes: ‘Tupi or not Tupi, that is the question’.11 Similarly the Manifesto states its location and date as: ‘Piratininga [Tupi-Guarani name for the region of Sao Paulo] the year 374 after the swallowing of the Bishop Sardinha [one of the early Portuguese victims of cannibalism on the Brazilian coast in 1554]’.12 My first field work in Brazil focused on the 24th Sao Paulo Biennial in 1998, curated by Paulo Herkenhoff, with Anthropophagy as its theme. One of the most critically acclaimed Biennials, it took Oswald’s own rhetoric even further by considering art, whether contemporary or historical, from Brazil or beyond, as being driven by the process of appropriation. It would be fair to suggest that my own methodological approach to writing – particularly the articulation of historical narratives on modernist move­ ments in Brazil and Europe – possesses certain affinities with Herkenhoff’s strategy at that occasion. Researching modernismo led me to question the sources of some of the paintings produced during the 1920s.13 For instance, if in Europe the period known by the Rappel à l’Ordre – when many of the artists associated with modernismo arrived in Paris – had been an ideologically motivated call to realign French culture with its perceived rightful classical inheritance, then how derivative could Anthropophagy actually be? In other words, how can we consider the contemporaneous French invocations of Arcadia, that referred to mythical Greece, as less derivative than the Brazilian invocation of an equally mythical pre-Colombian ‘Arcadian’ vision?14 Moreover, if the aesthetics of modernismo led to the adoption of a largely figurative national style that became engrained in the ‘national consciousness’ until the 1950s, then what could be said about the equally recurrent British figurative tradition if compared to the institutionalisation of abstraction as the prevalent modernist mode in post-war continental Europe?15 If my prior research had questioned the claim that the adoption of art concret had been widespread in Brazil during the 1950s, showing it to be on the contrary, quite a localised if vocal event, then what of the dissemination of concrete art in Britain?16 What differences (other than the obvious socio-political ones), or indeed similarities, could the reception of Max Bill’s premises have had in each context?17 It seems therefore quite natural that the questions described above have led me into an ever more complex comparative and transnational method of approaching the problem of identity. The research process has thus become


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centred on the movement of artists, and the migration of ideas rather than on subjects defined or constrained by geopolitical borders. This became explicit in the collaborative project that I led between TrAIN and the Federal University in Rio de Janeiro, which culminated in a 416-pages-publication entitled Transnational Correspondence and a two-day conference at Tate Modern.18 Other than commissioned essays, the publication included reference texts and a dossier of letters between artists ranging from Édouard Manet (writing from Rio de Janeiro) to exchanges amongst contemporary artists. The theme also closely relates to the current three-year AHRC funded project, entitled ‘Meeting Margins: Transnational Art in Europe & Latin America 1950–1978’, with which I am engaged in with my TrAIN colleague Dr Isobel Whitelegg together with Professor Valerie Fraser and Dr Maria Inigo Clavo from the University of Essex. I would not like to end without mentioning the area of work that has given me the most pleasure, which is working directly with individual artists such as: Brigida Baltar, Ricardo Basbaum, Angela Detanico and Rafael Lain, Ducha, Cao Guimarães, Jarbas Lopes, José Patricio, Anna Maria Maiolino, Cinthia Marcele, Antonio Manuel, Cildo Meireles, Rosangela Rennó and many others.19 Here the emphasis has been on the study of their individual trajectories, their development of concepts through practice, whether or not their work bears any relation to issues of cultural identity. I should also admit that most of the art historical research I describe above had its origin within my PhD on the work and writings of Hélio Oiticica.20 It is precisely the fact that he has become such a paradigmatic figure that has driven me towards emphasising the context (to quote Meireles again) from which Oiticica himself emerged.21 My approach to research is thus to expand the international understanding of art from Brazil beyond strategic essentialist paradigms whose principle function is facile (commercial) dissemination. Here, lies the crux of the activity of writing by erasure.

Michael Asbury is Pathway Leader for MA Visual Arts (Transnational Arts) at Camberwell College of Arts and Associate Director of the research centre TrAIN .

1 Other Modernities: Foreign Investment, Milton Machado, Cildo Meireles and Yinka Shonibare, exhibition curated by Michael Asbury and Oriana Baddeley, in conjunction to section 6 of the 30th International Congress of Art Historians (CIHA), London Institute Gallery, London, 2000. 2 Meireles in conversation with the author, Rio de Janeiro, 2000.


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3 McShine, K. (ed.) Information, exhibition catalogue, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1970. 4 Canclini, N. Culturas Híbridas: Estrategias para Entrar y Salir de la Modernidad, Mexico: Editorial Grijalbo, 1989. 5 Maharaj, S., ‘“A Liquid, Elemental Scattering”: Marcel Duchamp and Richard Hamilton’, in Richard Hamilton, exhibition catalogue, Tate Gallery, London, 1992. p.40. 6 Century City: Art and the Modern Metropolis: Bombay/Mumbay, Lagos, London, Moscow, New York, Paris, Rio de Janeiro, Tokyo, Vienna, curated by Yvona Blaswick et al, (inaugural temporary exhibition), Tate Modern, London, 2001. 7 Bhabha, H. K. ‘Of Mimicry and Man: The Ambivalence of Colonial Discourse’, in October 28, spring, 1984, p.127. Admittedly, the context of Bhabha’s argument is distinct from mine. 8 Asbury, M. ‘Neoconcretism and Minimalism: On Ferreira Gullar’s Theory of the NonObject’, in Mercer, K. (ed.) Cosmopolitan Modernisms, inIVA and MIT Press: London, Massachusetts, 2005, pp.168–189. 9 Asbury, M. ‘The Bienal de São Paulo: Between Nationalism and Internationalism’, in Curtis, P., Feeke, S. (eds) Espaço Aberto/ Espaço Fechado: Sites for Sculpture in Modern Brazil, exhibition catalogue, The Henry Moore Institute: Leeds, 2006, pp.72–83. 10 Pedrosa, M. ‘A Bienal de São Paulo e os Comunistas’, in Tribuna da Imprensa, 1951. Quoted in: Asbury, Ibid. p.75. 11 Schwarz, R. ‘Brazilian Culture: Nationalism by Elimination’, in Gledson, J. (ed.) Roberto Schwarz: Misplaced Ideas, Verso, London, 1992, p.9. 12 Andrade, O. de, ‘Manifesto Antropofagico’, in Revista de Antropofagia, #1, Sao Paulo, 1928. Reprinted/translated, in Ades, D. (ed.), Art in Latin America: The Modern Era 1820–1980, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1989, pp.312–3. 13 Asbury, M. ‘Tracing Hybrid Strategies in Brazilian Modern Art’, in Harris, J. (ed.) Critical Perspectives on Contemporary Painting, Critical Forum Series #6, Tate Gallery Liverpool and University of Liverpool Press, 2003, pp.139–170. 14 See also: Asbury, M. ‘Parisienses no Brasil, Brasileiros em Paris: relatos de viagem e modernismos nacionais’, Concinnitas Journal, #12, Instituto de Artes, Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), 2008, pp.37–47. 15 Herbert Read did in fact consider modernism as a universal language with national accents when addressing the British contribution to the 1951 Sao Paulo Biennial. See: Machado, G. (ed.) I Bienal do Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo, exhibition catalogue, Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo, 1951, (2nd edition). 16 See: Alloway, L. Nine Abstract Artists: Their Work and Theory, Alec Tiranti Ltd, London, 1954. 17 This question has been explored in a number of articles. See: Asbury, M. ‘Shadows / Sombras’, in Asbury, M. Bueno, G., Ferreira, G., and Machado, M., Arte & Ensaios, #14, special issue: ‘Transnational Correspondence’, PPGAV-UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, 2007, pp.52–67. Asbury, M. ‘From Constructivism to Pop: Avant-Garde Practices in Brazil, Britain and North America between the 1950s and 1960s’, in Anderson, J. (ed.) Crossing Cultures: Conflict, Migration and Convergence, The Proceedings of the 32nd International Congress of Art Historians (CIHA), University of Melbourne, Australia, The Miegunyah Press, 2009, pp.743–46. 18 Arte & Ensaios, #14, op. cit. 19 Forthcoming editorial projects with Pharos Publishers include books on: Cao Guimarães, José Patricio, and Rosangela Rennó. Published work on individual artists includes: Asbury, M. and Keheyan, G. (eds) Anna Maria Maiolino, exhibition catalogue, Pharos Publishers, Nicosia, 2009.


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Asbury, M. ‘Memória e outros esquecimentos’, in Cao Guimarães, exhibition catalogue, Galeria Nara Roesler, Sao Paulo, 2009, pp.1–6. Asbury, M. ‘Painting by Numbers / Pinturas Numerosas’, in José Patricio, exhibition catalogue, Galeria Nara Roesler, Sao Paulo, 2008, pp.1–10. Asbury, M. ‘Some Articulations of Modesty and Ambition’, Paper Trail, exhibition catalogue, Allsop Contemporary, London, 2008, pp.11–14. Asbury, M. ‘Antonio Manuel’, ArtNexus, #68, vol.7, March–May, Miami, 2008, pp.70–75. Asbury, M. ‘Detanico & Lain After Utopia: Art in the Age of Information Technology’, in Asbury, M., Keheyan, G. (eds) Detanico & Lain: After Utopia, exhibition catalogue, Pharos Publishers, Nicosia, 2007, pp.62–88. Asbury, M. ‘Ricardo Basbaum: “Would you like to participate in an artistic experience?”’, in Documenta 12, Kassel, exhibition catalogue, Taschen GmbH, Köln, 2007, pp.220–221. Asbury, M. ‘Antonio Manuel: Occupations/Discoveries’, in Asbury, M., Keheyan, G. (eds) Antonio Manuel, exhibition catalogue, Pharos Publishers, Nicosia, 2006, pp.20–51. Asbury, M. ‘Anna Maria Maiolino: Order and Subjectivity’, in Dardo Magazine, #3, October, Santiago de Compostela, Rio de Janeiro, 2006, pp.152–173. Asbury, M. ‘Marvellous Perversions’, in Unbound: Installations by Seven Artists from Rio de Janeiro, exhibition catalogue, Parasol-Unit, London, 2004, pp.24–40. 20 Asbury, M. Hélio Oiticica: Politics and Ambivalence in 20th Century Brazilian Art, PhD thesis in the History and Theory of Art, Camberwell College of Arts, The London Institute, 2003. 21 This view is expressed in: Asbury, M. ‘O Hélio não tinha Ginga / Hélio Couldn’t Dance’, in Braga, P. (ed.) Fios Soltos do Experimental: A Arte de Hélio Oiticica, Editora Perspectiva, Sao Paulo, 2008, pp.27–65. Asbury, M. ‘This Other Eden: Hélio Oiticica and Subterranean London 1969’, in Brett, G. and Figueiredo, L. (eds.) Oiticica in London, Tate Publishers, London, 2007, pp.35–39. Asbury, M. (Annotated Translation of) Pedrosa, M. ‘Environmental Art, Postmodern Art, Hélio Oiticica’, Correio da Manhã, 26 June1966, in Open Systems: Art in the World c. 1970, exhibition catalogue, curated by Donna de Salvo, Tate Modern, Tate Publishers, London, 2005, pp.182–83.


In conversation

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Interview with Jordan Baseman by Roger Wilson

R W: Jordan, I have looked at your work, and I’m absolutely fascinated. What I would like to start off by asking is how did you start and how did film/ video come to be your chosen medium?

In 1998 I stopped making sculpture: I literally woke up one day and knew that I was never going to make sculpture again. Generally, I wasn’t very happy with what I was doing and how I was doing it and what was happening to what I was doing – so I just stopped. And then I didn’t know what to do. I had made films in undergraduate school in America but that was in the pre-digital era so equipment was really expensive. Once I left school I didn’t make any moving image work, I just made sculptures and installations. So when I stopped doing that in 1998 I didn’t know what I was going to do. Around that time I was starting a new job, I used to work at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art in Oxford, so around that time, actually on my first day of work, the School took delivery of a whole new suite of computers, and I thought it was a good opportunity for me to learn how to use them. So I taught myself. It took me over a year to figure out how to use a computer. In that time I knew that I wanted to make films, but I didn’t know what kind of films I wanted to make or what they would be like or anything like that. So those two things dovetailed – learning how to use computers and figuring out what kind of film I wanted to make: I wanted to make films that had a beginning, middle and an end and that were narrative and that told stories.

JB:

R W:

So in a way that sense of narrative was the core of what you wanted to do? Well my sculptures were always kind of a narrative in a way and in some kind of conceptual way there is very little difference in the objects that I was making, objects and installations that I was making and the films. They were always real narrative. So it wasn’t that much of a conceptual leap for me to begin making narrative films, but when I started doing semidocumentary narrative films it didn’t feel like, and this is probably my ignorance rather than the truth, it didn’t really feel like there were that many people in an art context that were making work like that. There were a lot more people making films, like Douglas Gordon, or Bill Viola where there were more formal concerns and more installation based work as opposed to more cinematic-style narrative driven work.

JB:

R W: Your work is also, in a sense, very observational, in that you have a prolonged look at a single story or a single storyteller.


In conversation

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Yeah, they are often culled from hours and hours and hours of observation, but also interviews and spending time with people and just recording anything I can possibly record and then distilling that infor­ mation into some kind of narrative. So I don’t really ever know what I am looking for until I find it and I don’t really know what I am doing until after it has been recorded. I have a general sense but I don’t really know what the outcome will be until I have stopped recording. I try not to intervene too much in the recording process beyond obviously being there with a camera and asking the participants a few questions and developing a relationship with somebody, but my intervention is primarily, aside from setting up a shot and stuff like that, my intervention is primarily in the editing suite – where I construct narratives from those interviews. I dis­ regard the chronology of events and just literally go through the material that I have collected and select what is interesting to me and piece together something from that.

JB:

R W: The way that you arrive at your subjects, either the story or the storyteller can’t be entirely accidental.

No, participants often respond to advertisements that I place in magazines and newspapers, sometimes I approach people, sometimes I get introduced to people, it really just depends. Every situation is different. When I stopped making sculpture I also decided that I wasn’t going to rely on commercial galleries to determine my fate. So, I started to apply for a lot of residencies and commissions and I was going to try to take a little bit more control over how the work was going to be presented and how the work was going to be manifested and generated. So often those residencies were situations where I had to go and meet people or I had to work, not towards a certain theme, but in a certain location, so yeah, they are not accidental at all.

JB:

Also, there seems also to be a sense of gentle tragedy in those portraits, I watched 1 + 1 = 1 with that kind of spectral image and what seemed until the second voice comes into play, really quite a personalized, localised commentary. Then The One About the Camel which is kind of funny in one sense but also sad in another, Their Little Heads, which I think is centered on personal tragedy. I then watched Don’t Stop ‘til You Get Enough – which, perhaps, gained an extra charge ten days after the Michael Jackson death but seemed to be a mixture of the absurd and the tragic, so is there a kind of linkage to do with moments of minor tragedy and revelation in all of those. R W:


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In conversation

Yeah, I mean I guess the work can be melancholic, although I don’t think it is only that. I’m trying to make works that are entertaining, that are funny, and sad and moving and beautiful, I mean the visual thing is really important for me too but I am also enamored by the human voice and human experience and the re-telling of those experiences – that really interests me a lot. So I am trying to marry up all of those things but in order for the work to have some kind of narrative, or impetus, or dramatic invention or something, there has to be something that engages the audience, there has to be a story that they can become touched by and sometimes that is by humor or sometimes that is through tragedy, and often it is through both at the same time. The One About the Camel is a good example of that – you kind of laugh at first and then you don’t laugh at all and then you laugh again at the end. Even 1 + 1 = 1 is a little bit, you know there are moments of humor in there but it is not an easy story but it is kind of funny, but it’s, I don’t know if it is tragic, but it is moving and I think his revelations about his personal experience are what the work is about. I think generally all the work is somehow about, this sounds really hokey, but about belief systems and how we orchestrate our lives and what is important to us and trying to look at the huge variety, the spectrum of human experience.

JB:

R W: You mentioned earlier the sound of the voice and I became very well aware of that. The textures of the human voice with a variety of accents and dialects, are subtly played through the individual pieces. Given your North American background the discovery of British voice patterns must have generated new dimensions to the work.

Yeah, I have just done a piece of work in Edinburgh and I didn’t under­ stand a word the guy was saying – it was really difficult because he was telling me this incredible story about how he lost his legs in a fire and I had to keep asking him to repeat himself. It was really horrible because I just didn’t understand what he was saying and he knew that I was having trouble with his accent. But what did redeem me was that other Scottish people I know didn’t understand him either so I didn’t feel so bad. The cadence of, not just particular to British voices, voices in general, they say a lot, sometimes they betray a lot, sometimes they give away things without us even knowing they are giving them away and meaning is a really complex thing and often very layered so you can say one thing with your words and another thing with the voice that is saying the words. That is what really interests me and then I am manipulating the information on

JB:


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top of that, I mean, with the voice-over work, like 1 + 1 = 1 it is really easy to manipulate it because you are not seeing the person speaking so I can start with interview number nine and then jump to interview number one and then jump back to interview number seven and it all sounds exactly the same. And that really interests me – the construction of a narrative from the real interview and trying to make that flow and trying to make it sound like it is someone naturally speaking, and just speaking as though it were almost scripted. There is a lot of stuff going on in there. R W: Yes, I was reminded watching the work of a visit I recently made to Glasgow, where I sat in the back of a taxi and the taxi driver told me a story between the station and my destination, and not one word of which I under­ stood and I watched the back of his head and nodded and smiled in the rear view mirror through the whole journey and it seemed like almost one of your pieces.

JB:

Yes, yes it could easily be.

R W: Tell me a little bit about the way that you work as an artist and the way that you work as an academic, as a teacher – are there linkages there?

I want to kind of instinctively say no there aren’t any links but of course there are in that, and this is where it sounds really hokey, so I apologise, but I really believe in making things and that whole process, that transfor­ mative process, and the development of ideas and personal experience, so that is paramount within my own work. In teaching I just believe very strongly about people’s personal development and their sense of personal achievement and I think my role is to encourage that in a critical context, but to encourage that generally. And my role is to assist people in develop­ ment of the formulation of their ideas towards their goal, whatever their goal maybe. So there isn’t really any connection except a series of tenets and beliefs that I hold close to my heart. I believe in people’s right to make whatever they want to make. Context is everything and knowing what you are doing and articulating your ideas are really totally important as they are in any other field of endeavor or enquiry so I don’t know if there is much of a link but a little bit. I try to keep myself out of those situations if truth be told, I mean my feelings and my thoughts really aren’t that important, the difference I guess is that in the editing suite I can then express myself whereas in a teaching situtation it’s not really my place to be expressing myself in terms of my beliefs or my opinions because it’s not my work. I am

JB:


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there to encourage people’s ideas and their making and their understanding of what it is their making through a critical engage­ment with the work. But having said that, and I think that you are being quite modest about that, I suspect that the kind of methodology you’ve allowed us to get some access to in this conversation is probably more important to students than you suspect. R W:

Yeah, probably, it’s hard for me to say. I think I just try to be as honest and as fair and as open and as critical as I can be. I think in teaching it’s imperative that you try and do all that stuff, it’s just that it’s impossible to get a balance, but I think it is striving to get a balance that is the most important part and I think that it is hard making art these days – I think that it is real hard and I think it is getting harder all the time. I think that it is important that people try to do what they want to do but to do it with a seriousness, a commitment and with perseverance.

JB:

R W:

Tell me just for a moment why you think it is getting harder? Well, we are just so saturated with stuff in our culture. We have easy access to an enormous amount of information. I love art and contemporary culture, it’s just that there is so much to see, so much to listen to, and there is so much to read. I’m not just talking about art, that’s just culture. So I think, how do you contribute as an artist? It is difficult. There is just so much. Everywhere you look there is a constant series of complex ideas: and as artists how do we contribute to our culture in a meaningful manner? I think that it is a challenge. I think that it’s a real good challenge: but not an easy challenge at all. I just mean to be an artist now, you have to be ready to accept that challenge, because it is a big, big challenge. But maybe it has always been this way for artists …

JB:

Jordan Baseman is a Reader at Wimbledon College of Art. Professor Roger Wilson is the former Head of Chelsea College of Art and Design.


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Interview with Jane Collins by Roger Wilson

R W: I remember your work very well. I remember it from the conference in Wimbledon when you described the piece from the African Choir really vividly. Tell me again how that started, how did you get involved in that project?

I have a long association of working on the continent of Africa which goes back through most of my professional life. The African Choir was a South African project but its genesis was much earlier as a result of some work I did in Uganda in the 1990’s. I was at the Sheffield Crucible Theatre and then the Royal Court Theatre with Stephen Daldry and Stephen had been sent out to Uganda by the British Council where I had worked at the end of the Ugandan Civil War. Stephen asked me if I would go back, if I would go in his stead to finish this project that he was doing. The project was looking at play writing in Uganda and trying to encourage play writing in Uganda as part of a British Council initiative with the Royal Court. Now, Uganda has its own very rich tradition of Opera and other forms of dramatic expression which do not necessarily fall into the category of the well made play or what the Royal Court might have considered a well made play at that time. Also, my experience of working in Africa over a long period had been much more concerned with making new work with companies and groups rather than developing individual artists and writers. So I suggested that we took a broader approach or rather that we started with a less prescribed notion of what the outcomes would be.

JC:

R W:

You say ‘we’. Who went to Uganda initially? Just myself and Doug Wilson, a stage-manager. The National Theatre of Uganda had requested some skills based workshops. Technical and stagemanagement skills and part of this initial visit was to set these up. We went out with a fairly open brief but we did take some texts , including a number of African plays and this was partly to give Doug some potential material to base his workshop around, looking at the requirements of staging lighting and sound using the texts as a starting point. We were working with a group of about 25 people all of whom were performers and all of whom were potential stage managers. The thing is, in Uganda there isn’t the same distinction between roles that we have in western theatre, the idea of the specialist is less recognised, everybody does everything to a certain extent. Anyway, during our first couple of days in Kampala we sat down in the Green Room at the National Theatre and went through all of these various plays, including some Ugandan plays, and the idea was we were going to

JC:


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make a piece of work as an ensemble maybe using one of the plays as a starting point maybe not. But amongst the group there was a unanimous response that the play that they wanted to work on was Brecht’s Mother Courage and her Children. This is a play which is set during the Thirty Years war in Europe and deals with the relationship between business and war; the way war is sustained by capital. It is also about survival, and the moral compromises that a person is prepared to make to survive during a war. As we looked at sections of the text the group kept shaking their heads and saying ‘this man Brecht knows our country’. R W:

And this was in response to their experiences of the Ugandan civil war? Yes quite recent experiences. In fact the war was still going on in the North and is still going on. So I agreed to try and facilitate our continued collaboration to develop the project because the company all felt that this was an important thing to do at this particular moment in Ugandan history. They saw it as a way of making sense of their own experiences and also a means of ending the isolation they had felt during and after the war. There was a sense, expressed by the company, that Ugandans were somehow intrinsically ‘bad’ people because of the terrible things that they had lived through and this was put in a context by this play and that made them feel less isolated. In the end it took five years to bring the project to fruition in Uganda. The text was translated into Luganda, which is the language of the Baganda who live in and around Kampala although there were sprinklings of other local languages as well. This made it the first official translation of a Brecht play into the African vernacular. Mother Courage or Maama Nalukalala, was played by Rose Mbowa who was also Professor of Drama at Makerere University, an eminent, actress, writer and scholar. Maama Nalukalala, follows the fighting in order to sell supplies to the troops. She sustains the war by her business activities and does this in order to feed and protect her children from the effects of war. Paradoxically of course she loses all of her children in the process. She was a very recognisable figure in Uganda.

JC:

R W:

So the work was performed in Kampala? Yes, at the National Theatre and then it toured to America and eventually South Africa. It went to the Kennedy Centre in Washington as part of the African Odyssey Festival, except we weren’t in the actual Kennedy centre, which is very plush. The company performed in a tent in

JC:


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‘The African Choir in Victorian Dress 1891’, from The calling of Katie Makanya, Margaret McCord, David Philip, Cape Town, 1995

the car park as did all the other African companies. The tent was directly under the flight path to Dulles Airport so you couldn’t hear what the actors were saying which seemed to imply that an assumption had been made that work from Africa would be visual rather than verbal. And then the company were due to do some schools workshops and they had prepared a very challenging schools programme based on the themes of the play and their experiences of the war but the organisers asked them to do workshops on drumming and dancing instead. They also asked them to bring all the musical instruments along so the children could play them. This was at the height of the genocide in Rwanda and of course American lack of involvement was very much in the public consciousness and here was a play that was looking at all of these issues and people literally just wanted to talk about dancing and drumming. This was a real shock to me, a terrible moment, but the Uganda response was typically pragmatic. They were very polite, ran drumming workshops and taught the children African dance. And then one evening coincidentally, this time in the Kennedy Centre, a group of Ugandan orphans were performing, singing and dancing for charity. They were all beautifully dressed in a kind of uniform, a long line of bright colours, with the tallest in the middle going down to the smallest at the edges. The audiences flocked to see them and threw loads of money into the collection buckets. It was all wonderfully celebratory and everyone felt good about it all, especially the audience who clearly felt very good about themselves.


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So, I started researching issues around the construction of identity, the notion of how the ‘other’ is read on stage, how we in the west read Africa and the ‘African’ on stage both historically and in contemporary perfor­ mance. This became a major piece of research for me, in retrospect I see it as an attempt to make sense of touring Mother Courage with the Ugandan company and indeed my long association with work in Africa. I discovered Veit Erlmann’s work, specifically his book Music, Modernity and the Global Imagination which looks at African Performance in a global context and it was through this that I discovered the story of The African Choir. This was the story of a choir from South Africa who toured Europe at the end of the 19th century and I immediately saw parallels with the Ugandan tour at the end of the twentieth. The choir was composed of a well educated, articulate Christian elite, apparently on a fundraising mission, who during the course of their tour, dressed in ‘native’ costume, in order to attract larger audiences. This was a completely constructed identity. Most of what they wore was bought in a London market but this was what British audiences wanted to see. I received funding from the AHRC to go to South Africa to look at the way contemporary artists there see their work as being shaped by the global market. This is basically the west so people start to make work they think will satisfy western audiences. I wanted to research the human cost of this and I also wanted to explore the potential of performance to investigate the production and reception of work dealing with these issues. So in conjunction with the Market Theatre Laboratory in Johannesburg and

Professor Rose Mbowa as Mother Courage, Kampala, Uganda, M. Pavelka


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with further funding from the AHRC we made a piece of work which explored this narrative and these themes. That is a really fascinating journey from one end to the other of that process, but it is sounded to me as if you started off with a developed professional approach to Theatre which is a kind of ensemble playing, you as a facilitator, to use your term, working with the material that was out there, then at some point you decided that this required a new kind of scholarship or enquiry, which is more in our terms academic enquiry which needed research into the process, which would then inform that process. Can you chart that back into the institution – what does that do to you as an academic as well as a creative person? How has that modified what you do? R W:

I think for me it became very clear that it was no longer enough just produce work. There was always an element of critical engagement obviously but in a responsive mode as a Director you are always jumping about between different agendas. This is also to do with the way in which the industry is structured. That gets quite frustrating. On reflection I think there were two things going on which converged. One, the experience I’ve described above, which was a kind of politicisation and another more personal shift. I don’t know if this happens to all artists, the moment when you look at your work and you think ‘OK I can do this and I just keep on doing this, the same old thing. The same old bag of tricks.’ I needed to step back from this. Interestingly this also coincided with my moving from having taught mainly in the studio at Wimbledon (College of Art) to becoming Contextual Studies Co-ordinator and I saw the oppor­tunity for undertaking more sustained research, both practical and theoretical. Significantly, I also had people like Rose Mbowa in Uganda as a kind of inspirational role model. This level of critical engagement with the subject and with the processes of production is something I really encourage in students.

JC:

R W: That would suggest to me the old definitions, or the old divide between the studio and the library, as it were, are not helpful to you.

They are not helpful anymore. I don’t think they were ever helpful. I have been co-editing Theatre Performance Design: A Reader in Scenography over the last eighteen months and this research has taken me back to re-looking at people like Appia, Meyerhold, Kantor and Brecht. These were all practitioners who theorised their own work and critically engaged with

JC:


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the contemporary. They saw no divide between those two spheres of activity. Brecht, ever the pragmatist, suggested you need a pocketful of theories. R W: Yes, and I can see that the western culture of possessive individualism, as challenged by Brecht first and then Kantor in that kind of radical ensemble approach is an interesting one educationally, it has a resonance with the way we behave within the academy, within the institution as well, I think.

Yes I think we have created false divides driven by individualism and sustained by notions of the boundaries of the specialism. In my experience collaboration and interdisciplinarity do not dilute the work produced, they sustain and strengthen it. Everyone’s process gets opened up to interrogation and challenge. You can’t make any assumptions or rest on any certainties.

JC:

R W: I want to go back to something you said earlier, the observation that you made about the ways in which the current contemporary South Africa work is fulfilling an expectation which is probably slightly manufactured by what they see as a global cultural exchange or cultural economy. That kind of theme is too big for an individual to carry isn’t it? If you were setting out to address that level of cultural manipulation the first thing you would do is not to disappear somewhere on your own and do it, you’d engage with other people, so maybe the scale of the theme, the scale of the ambition, for an artist or scholar to take that on requires you to collaborate, requires you to be part of a wider working practice.

JC:

I hadn’t thought of it like that, that’s interesting.

R W: From Theatre that is probably what you do anyway you see, us lone artists don’t do that so easily.

Perhaps, although Warhol managed to address the cultural economy, certainly cultural production in a singular way although there was a dialogue of sorts going on with the medium and the materials and the people he chose I suppose. Nobody works in vacuum. In theatre very often themes on this scale are dealt with through the experience of individuals. However, theatre is a collaborative art form so the degree of control you might wish to exercise as a lone artist doesn’t really feature. Even those who

JC:


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are considered an auteur in theatre, people like Lepage or Robert Wilson, have their teams of collaborators. It’s a real curricular challenge, in academic terms, if you and I would sit down and try to fashion a curriculum based on your experience and my experiences in a sense encountering those issues, it’s a new way of writing it, it’s a new way of imagining the curriculum. R W:

Yes, and a very timely one. For me, one of the exciting things about the Graduate School what, the graduate school represents, is that for the current generation of students, what we might have perceived as discrete disciplines, they see as fluid and interrelated. This is not about threatening the individual vision or undermining the specialism but rather recognising the potential that exists around the edges of the specialism, the discursive space that opens up beyond and between those boundaries. It is in those spaces that the most interesting new work is emerging. The challenge to you and I of course would to create the kind of curriculum that retains our core subject values but that is flexible enough to respond to these changes as and when they occur. A ‘rapid response’ curriculum.

JC:

Jane Collins is a Reader and Contextual Studies Co-ordinator at Wimbledon College of Art. Professor Roger Wilson is the former Head of Chelsea College of Art and Design.


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Museum Futures: Live, Recorded, Distributed Neil Cummings and Marysia Lewandowska Centenary Interview 2058

[Interior: The common room, Moderna Museet v3.0. A beautiful lounge, comfortable seating, local lighting, graduated windows with breathtaking views of the sea. The Executive of Moderna v3.0, Ayan Lindquist, is waiting to be interviewed in real-time from Guangzhou, in the Asian Multitude network. She is browsing screens as a face fades-up on the wall window.] ms chan: Nihao, hej, hello! Hello is that Ayan Lindquist? ayan lindquist: Nihao, hello. Yes Ms Chan, this is Ayan. We are in sync.

ms chan­: Ok, live. Maybe we could start with some personal history. What were you doing before you became executive at Moderna Museet 3.0? ayan lindquist: Well, I joined Moderna 2.0 in 2049, almost ten years ago. First as adviser to the development working group. Then as part of the governance team. I participated in the forking of Moderna 3.0 in 2'51. And was elected fixed-term executive in 2'52, … uhmm, … until today. I’ve got another four years in the post. ms chan: And before that?

ms chan: Thank you so much for finding time… You must be very busy with the centenary launch ayan lindquist: It’s a pleasure. We really admire your work on mid 20th century image ecologies. Especially your research on archival practice ms chan: Well I’m flattered. For many Asian non-market institutions, your pioneering work with long-term equity contracts has been inspirational too! ayan lindquist: Oh, there was a whole team of us involved… So, lets begin. ms chan: Ok. Just to refresh, for the centenary I’d like to archive your live-thread recall of Moderna. ayan lindquist: Yep, that’s fine, I’ve enabled about 20 min.

ayan lindquist: Immediately before joining Moderna I collaborated in the exhibition programme at the MACBA cluster in Mumbai for six years. Although, more in resource provision. That’s where we worked on a version of the equity bond issue you mentioned. ms chan: And before that? ayan lindquist: In programming again at Tate in Doha for four years, particularly developing exhibitionary platforms. And even before that, I participated in research on cultural governance, for the Nordic Congress of the European Multitude for six years. I suspect exhibition agency and governance are my real strengths. ms chan: Maybe we should dive into the deepend. Could you briefly say something of why Moderna 3.0 devolved, and why was it necessary?


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Neil Cummings and Marysia Lewandowska, Ayan and Ms Chan, still from Museum Futures; distributed Moderna Museet Stockholm, Sweden, HD video 32 min, 2008–09

ayan lindquist: As you can imagine there was a lot of consultation beforehand. It’s not something we did without due diligence. For almost forty years Moderna v2.0 has explored and developed the exhibitionary form. We pioneered the production of many collabora­ tive exhibitions, resources and assemblages. We helped build robust public – what you prefer to term non-market cultural networks. And scaled those networks to produce our i-commons, part of the vast, glocal, Public Domain. We have continually nurtured and developed emergent art practice. Moderna can proudly, and quite rightly say that we participated in shaping the early 21st century movement of art. From an exhibitionary practice based around art-artefacts, spectacle and con­ sumption – to that of embedded co-production.

Following the logic of practice, we became an immanent institution. ms chan­: Could you say a … ayan lindquist: Uhmm … Although having said all of that … We’ve not really answered your question, have we? Given that Moderna 2.0 continues its exhibi­ tionary research, some of us believe that exhibition as a technology, and immanence as an institutional logic needed to be subject to radical revision. So this is what we intend to explore with Moderna 3.0, we want to execute some of the research. To enact. To be more agent than immanent.

ms chan­: Do you mean that … ms chan­: Ok. I wondered if you could you say a … ayan lindquist: Of course there are many complex factors involved … But we were agent in the shift from a heritage cultural mind-set of ‘broadcast’, to that of emergent, peer-to-peer meshworks.

ayan lindquist: Sorry to over-write, but in a way the forking follows something of the tradition of Moderna Museet. Moderna 2.0 mutated through 1.0 because the


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tension between trying to collect, conserve, and exhibit the history of 20th century art, and at the same time trying to be a responsible 21st century art institution proved too difficult to reconcile. Moderna 1.0 continues its mandate. Its buildings and collection has global heritage status. In turn, this early hybridization enabled Moderna 2.0 to be more mobile and experimental. In its organizational form, in its devolved administration, and its exhibition-making practice … ms chan­: Could you just expand on the ‘more complex factors’ you mentioned earlier … ayan lindquist: That’s a big question … Let me re-run a general thread from composite … […] … uhmm [ayan taps the terminal/tablet] Well, a good place to start might be the bifurca­ tion of the market for ‘contemporary art’ from emergent art practices themselves. Although the public domain has a long genealogy. Waaaay … back into ancient European land rights, ‘commons’ projects and commonwealth’s. It was the advent of digitalisation, and particu­ larly very early composite language projects in the 1980s which – and this appears astonishing to us now, were proprietary – that kick-started what were called ‘open’, ‘free’ or non-market resource initiatives. Of course, these languages, assemblages and the resources they were building needed legal protection. Licenses to keep them out of property and competitive marketization. The General Public License, the legendary GPL legal code was written in 1989.

ms chan­: It’s not so old! ayan lindquist: So then, text and images – either still or moving; artefacts, systems and processes; music and sound – either as source or assembled; all embedded plant, animal and bodily knowledge; public research, and all possible ecologies of these resources began to be aggregated by the viral licenses into our Public Domain. Enumerate on fingers? Landmarks include the releasing of the sequenced human genome in 2001. The foundation of the ‘multitude’ social enterprise coalition in 2'09. Intellectual Property reform in the teen’s. The UN -Multitude initiated micro-taxation of global financial transactions in 2'13 – which redirected so many financial resources to Public Domain cultural initiatives. Well I could go on, and on, and on. But anyway, most participants will be overfamiliar with this thread. ms chan­: Remind me, when did Moderna affiliate? ayan lindquist: In-Archive records suggest Öppna dagar or Härifrån till allmänningen, with Mejan … I’m sorry. We did some collaborative ‘open’ knowledge projects with Mejan in Stockholm in late 2'09. And when Moderna 2.0 launched in 2'12 we declared all new knowledge General Public License version 6, compliant. ms chan­: Wasn’t that initiated by Chus Martinez, one of your predecessors? She seems to have shaped early Moderna 2.0, which in turn, became an inspiration globally.


Museum Futures: Live, Recorded, Distributed

ayan lindquist: It’s nice you say so. Since 2'12 we collaborated with the fledgling Nordic Congress, in what was to become the European Multitude, to form the backbone of the Public Domain cultural meshwork. It eventually convened in late 2'22. So we were at source. ms chan­: Ok. Uh ha, thanks. ayan lindquist: Now, simultaneous with the exponential growth of the Public Domain, was the market for what we still call ‘contemporary art’. Many historians locate one of the sources for this ‘contemporary art’ market, as the auction in New York in 1973 of the art-artefact collection of Robert and Ethel Scull. An extraordinary collection of paintings by popmale-artists like Andy Warhol, Claes Oldenburg, Ed Ruscha, and … er … I recall … Jasper Johns. ms chan­: Ok. From composite I’m streaming the John Schott analogue film of the sale, from New York MoMa’s Public Domain archive.

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billion old US dollars. Soon, global Trade Fairs mushroomed. Commercial galleries flourished and a sliver of ‘branded’ artists lived like mid 20th century media oligarchs. By 2'06 complex financial trading technologies were using art-artefacts as an asset class. And most public Modern Art Museums were priced out of the ‘contemporary art’ market. In retrospect, we wasted an enormous amount of time and effort convening financial resources to purchase, and publicly ‘own’ vastly overpriced goods. And we wasted time wooing wealthy speculators, for sporadic gifts and donations too! ms chan­: That connects! It was the same locally. The conflictual ethical demands in early Modern Art Museums were systemic. And obviously unsustainable. Reversing the resource flow, and using Transaction Tax to nourish Public Domain cultural meshworks seems, … well, inevitable.

ayan lindquist: Ahhh, sometimes, rethreading is such a wonderful luxury! Anyway, auction houses began to buy commercial galleries. And this dissolved the tradition of the primary – managed, and secondary – free art market. ms chan­: I have the catalogue. As a consequence, by 2'12 the ‘contemporary art’ It’s present, … I’m browsing. market was a ‘true’ competitive market, with ayan lindquist: That auction set record prices for prices for assets falling as well as rising. Various ‘contemporary art’ bond, derivate and many artists. futures markets were quickly convened. It also connected art-artefacts with financial And typically, art-asset portfolios were managed speculation in a way previously unimagined. through specialist brokerages linked to banking By 1981 one of the ‘big two’ auction houses, subsidiaries. Sotheby’s, was active in 23 countries and had a ‘contemporary art’ market throughput of 4.9 ayan lindquist: It’s a great film, and many of the art-artefacts have subsequently devolved to Moderna.


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Which in turn, has enabled us to develop our local cluster and node network. Generally, competitive markets thrive on artificial difference and managed risk. They are just too limited a technology to nurture, or challenge, or distribute a truly creative art ayan lindquist: Probably. Market corrections and practice. And just take all these private art-asset collections, built by speculator-collectors, and their repercussions. Overall the market expanded, matured in 2'27 and supported through private foundations. Apart from the hyper-resourced, they all has remained sufficiently resourced ever since … ultimately fail. Then they’re either broken-up and More or less. re-circulated through the ‘contemporary art’ By 2014 formerly commercial galleries, the market. Or, more usually, devolve to the primary market, had became a competing multitude and enter public Museum collections. meshwork of global auction franchises. Here at Moderna, we have benefited enormously By 2'25 they needed to open branded academies from a spate of default donations. Consequently, to ensure new assets were produced. we’ve a comprehensive collection of ‘contemporary’ art-artefacts through reversion. ms chan­: I can see the Frieze Art Academy in Beijing. ms chan­: Ok. Then this was the basis for the Was that was one of the earliest? amazing Moderna Contemporary Art exhibition in Shanghai in 2'24. ayan lindquist: The market for ‘contemporary It was reconstructed as a study module while art’ became, to all intents and purposes, a I was at the Open University in 2'50. competitive commodity market, just like any I can still recall it. What a collection! What an other. amazing exhibition! Of course, useful for generating profit and loss Ok, so maybe here we could locate an ethic through speculation. approaching something like a critical mass. And useful for generating Public Domain As Moderna Museet’s collection. exhibitions and financial resources, but completely divorced activities expanded – and of course other from emergent art practice. Museums too – the ethic of public generosity is ms chan­: Ok. This might be a bit of a dumb query. distributed, nurtured and also encouraged. Everyone benefits. But does Moderna feel that in the self-replication of the ‘contemporary art’ market, that something I can see that when the Ericsson group pledged its collection for instance, it triggered a whole valuable has been lost from public Museums? avalanche of other important private gifts and donations. ayan lindquist: To be perfectly honest, no. Like the Azko – la Caixa collection, or the No, we only experience benefits. You see, through the UN Multitude distribution of Generali Foundation gift. Or, like when the Guggenheim franchises Transaction Tax, we’re much better resourced. ms chan­: Ok. I also see some local downturns linked to financial debt bubbles bursting. Spectacularly in 2'09, again in 2'24 and again in 2'28. Market corrections?


Museum Futures: Live, Recorded, Distributed

collapsed as the debt-bubble burst in 2'18, and the Deutsche Bank executive reverted their collection. ayan lindquist: [laughter] We think that’s a slightly different case, and certainly of a different magnitude! Although it’s a common trajectory for many public/private museum hybrids. ms chan­: Ok, it’s certainly true of museums locally. The former Ullens Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing, … and MOCA in Shanghai for instance. ayan lindquist: That connects, the increased resources, and the gifts, donations and reversions enabled us to seed our local cluster devolution. From 2'15 we invested in partnerships with the Institutet Människa I Nätverk in Stockholm; with agencies in Tallin and also Helsinki. With the early reversion of the Second Life hive, and with Pushkinskaya in St Petersburg. We created, what was rather fondly termed, the Baltic cluster. ms chan­: Ok, from composite I see there had been an earlier experiment with a devolved Moderna. During the enforced closure in 2'02–2'03, exhibitions were co-hosted with local institutions. There was even a Konstmobilen! ayan lindquist: Ja, and it was always considered something of a success. Distributing and re-imagining the collection through the cluster – incidentally we cut our carbon debt to almost 12 – radically scaled our activities. So, while developing locally, we also began to produce a wider Moderna Museet network.

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The first Moderna node opened in Doha in the United Arab Emirates. We participated in the local ecologies restructuring of resources; from carbon to knowledge. That was in 2'18. In 2'20, Mumbai emerged with the Ex Habare three-year research project. In cooperation with several self-organised Research Institutions – I recall Nowhere from Moscow, the Critical Practice consortium in London, and Sarai from Delhi. And as you already mentioned Shanghai launched in 2'24 with the landmark Contemporary Art exhibition, then the Guangzhou node went live in 2'29 with La Part Maudite: Bataille and the Accursed Share. A really timely exhibition! It explored the distribution of trust and ‘wellbeing’ in a general economy. The ethics of waste and expenditure; and the love, and terror, implicit in uninhibited generosity. Isn’t that node’s location near your present Guangdong Museum hub? On Ersha Island, by the Haiyin Bridge? ms chan­: We’re almost neighbours! As for the La Part Maudite: much of that source work is still live, and still very present. ayan lindquist: We saw you did some restoration to the image server codecs recently, thank you for that. ms chan­: Ok. A pleasure. ayan lindquist: Our most recent node emerged in San Paulo in the Americas in 2'33. Through the agency of the Alan Turing Centenary project Almost Real: Composite Consciousness.


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ms chan­: Ok, if I may, I’d just like to loop back with you, to the 20s and 30s. It’s when many academic historians think we entered a new exhibitionary ‘golden age’ with Moderna. You co-produced a suite of landmark projects, many of which are still present. ayan lindquist: We’re not too comfortable with the idea of a ‘golden age’. Maybe our work became embedded again. Anyway, if there was a ‘golden age’ we’d like to think it started earlier, maybe in 2'18. We set about exploring a key term from early machine logic – ‘feedback’. And we made a re-address to the source, the legendary Cybernetic Serendipity exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art in London; on the exhibition’s 50th anniversary. ms chan­: From composite – I see Tate has many Public Domain archive resources – it’s recorded as the first exhibitionary exchange between visual art and digital assemblies. ayan lindquist: For us at Moderna, that exhibition set in motion two decades of recurrent projects exploring Art, Technology and Knowledge. Its most recent manifestation, linked to the Turing research, has resulted in Moderna 3.0’s cooperation on a draft amendment to Article 39 of the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights. We are seeking to extend certain rights to organic/ synthetic, intelligent composites.

ms chan­: Now I understand, sovereign composites! I can see Moderna’s centenary proposal for a Museum of Their Wishes. It’s absolutely amazing! I know it’s a very common thread, but definitely still worth rerunning. The one about the foundation of the Moderna Museet’s collection with the Museum of Our Wishes exhibition in 1962. And how this was revisited in 2006 with the Museum of our Wishes II – to address the lack of women artists within the collection. ayan lindquist: We see our legacy as a resource, not a burden. It’s something we have been working with for a while, recursive programmes. It’s at root. Actually, Wish II was finally fulfilled in 2'22, when some Dora Maar photographs reverted. But, with the emergence of self-conscious composite intelligence, addressing ‘their’ wishes seemed appropriate, even necessary. And it’s true, if the draft amendment is ratified, it will be an amazing achievement. ms chan­: Ok. Even if you don’t like the term, maybe a new ‘golden age’ is beginning?

ms chan­: You’re co-producing sovereign composites!

ayan lindquist: For that, we’ll all just have to wait and see. But earlier, you were right to suggest that in 2'20, with Ex Habare The Practice of Exhibition, we consolidated the idea of emergent art. And, distributed new institutional practices.

ayan lindquist: Yes, yes that’s what I was hinting at earlier; about Moderna being more agent, and executing as well as exhibiting.

ms chan­: In the Asian network it’s common knowledge that Ex Habare reaffirmed the role of the Museum in civil society.


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ayan lindquist: Well to start, we un-compressed the Latinate root of exhibition, ex habare, to reveal the intention of ‘holding-out’ or ‘showing’ evidence in a legal court. It’s obvious, that implicit in exhibition is the desire to show, display and share with others. By grafting this ancient drive, to desires for creative co-production, we enabled exhibitions to remain core to Moderna’s aspirations. It’s also true that to source, participate, co-produce and share, to generate non-rivalous resources, are vital to the constitution of a Public Domain. And indeed, a civil society. There’s a neat homology. Ex Habare distributed these values, and it’s also true, they replicated at an astonishing speed.

creative exchanges between artist and media in the studio / manufactory. Exchanges which were distributed through competitive trade and collecting institutions. At best, ‘broadcast’ extended a small measure of creative agency to the encounter between audiences – often referred to as passive ‘viewers’ – and artworks.

ms chan­: It’s so good to be reminded! Even I tend to take the power of exhibition as a technology for granted. Do you think that this is because artists and others moved into collaborative relationships with Moderna?

ayan lindquist: You might be right Ms Chan. It was really when artists began to imagine art as a practice, and explore creativity as a social process …

ms chan­: Ok, I have material from composite. So even when this model was disrupted; like in 1968, the Modellen; A Model for a Qualitative Society exhibition at Moderna for example. It looks like we fell back into, uhmm … Perhaps the wider creative ecology was just not receptive enough.

ms chan­: Sometime around the late 1990s perhaps?

ayan lindquist: Var ska vi börja? Artists and others realised … that the 19th century ideological construction of the artist, had reached its absolute limit. As configured, art as a ‘creative’ process had ceased to innovate, inspire or have any critical purchase. Quite simply it was irrelevant! ms chan­: Everywhere, except in the ‘Contemporary Art’ market! ayan lindquist: [laughter] That heritage ‘broadcast’ communication model of culture that we mentioned earlier, privileges

ayan lindquist: … Yes, yes, then we could detect something of a change. Artists began to engage creatively with institutions, and vice versa. With all aspects of institutional practice; of course through co-producing exhibitions, but also through archival projects – which you’ve done so much to research Ms Chan – through organisa­ tional engagement, administration, and so on … ms chan­: Ok, I’m browsing material from compo­ site on Institutional Critique. Michael Asher and Hans Haacke, they seem to be mostly artists from the America’s in the 1970s–1980s


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ayan lindquist: Not sure if those are the appropriate resources? Artists associated with Institutional Critique, I recall Michael Asher and Hans Haacke, but also Julie Ault and Group Material, or Andrea Fraser. They had a much more antagonistic and oppositional relationship with exhibitionary institutions. They resented being represented by an exhibi­ tionary institution. Especially those linked to a 19th century ideology. ms chan­: Ok, now I’m browsing material on Sputniks, … EIPCP , Bruno Latour, Maria Lind, Arteleku, Van Abbe Museum’s Plug-Ins, Superlex, Franc Lacarde, Raqs and Sarai, Moderna’s projects, Bart de Baer … ayan lindquist: Yes, this constellation feels more relevant, as artists rethought their practices, they recognised themselves as a nexus of complex social process. And that creativity was inherent in every conceivable transaction producing that nexus. At whatever the intensity, and regardless of the

scale of the assembly. The huge challenge for all of us, was to attend to the lines of force, the transactions, and not be dazzled by the subjects, objects or institutions they produced. We recall that it was under these conditions that artists’ practices merged with Moderna. Merged into relations of mutual co-production. And so in exchange, Moderna began to think of itself as a creative institution. Subject to constant critical and creative exploration. ms chan­: Ok, so these were the forces generating Moderna 2.0 in 2'12. ayan lindquist: You’re right, we simply stopped thinking of ourselves as a 19th century museum – which had to constantly expand, commission signature buildings, evolve huge administrative hierarchies – exhibition, education, support, management and so on. And more on instituting – in the ancient sense of the word – of founding and supporting. On instituting creative practice.

Neil Cummings and Marysia Lewandowska, Ms Chan, still from Museum Futures; distributed Moderna Museet Stockholm, Sweden, HD video 32 min, 2008–09


Museum Futures: Live, Recorded, Distributed

So, we started to play, risk, cooperate, research and rapidly prototype. Not only exhibitions and research projects, but ourselves. Some values were lost – which is always painful, and yet others were produced. And those most relevant maintained, nurtured and cherished. We learnt to invest, longterm, without regard for an interested return. And that’s how we devolved locally, and networked globally. We’ve had some failures; either exhibitions couldn’t convene the necessary resources, or we made mistakes. But as an immanent institution, most experiences were productive. Ahm … Not sure if that jump-cut thread answered your query …, ms chan­: Sort of … ayan lindquist: The short answer could be that artists have transformed Moderna, and we in turn transformed them. ms chan­: Ok, but that last sound-bit is rather banal. Although, the thread’s not uninteresting. ayan lindquist: Ironically, our playful devolution of Moderna 2.0 reanimated the historical collection displayed in version 1.0. We freed art-artefacts from their function, of ‘recounting’ the history of 20th century Art; however alternative, discontinuous, or full of omissions we imagine that thread to be. And once free, they engaged with real-time discursive transactions. They became live again, contested nodes in competing transactions of unsettled bodies of knowledge.

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ms chan­: Um …, I’m not sure I’m following this … As time is running out, and there’s so much to cover. I just wonder if you could mention … Could you recall, even briefly, some beacon exhibitions. Like Transactional Aesthetics, or the Ecology of Fear. ayan lindquist: Rädslans ekologi, or the The Ecology of Fear was timely, given the viral pandemic throughout DNA storage – so many systems were compromised; and the various ‘wars’ that were being waged, against difference, and public attention … for material resources, energy, … And I guess the same with Transactional Aesthetics. It was the right moment to be participating in the production of local social enterprise and wellbeing initiatives … ms chan­: Could you just mention the legendary Alternative Research in Architecture, Resources, Art and Technology exhibited at Moderna in 1976. Which you revisited on its 50th anniversary, in 2'26. From composite I can see archive materials. They’re present. ayan lindquist: There’s not much to add. Obviously the first version of ARARAT explored appropriate local technologies for buildings and urban systems – using sustainable resources. In 1976, this was the beginning of our under­ standing of a global ecology, and of the finite nature of mineral resources; especially carbon. Given our population reached 8 billion in 2'26 it was vital to revisit the exhibition. To somehow, take stock … The first shock was that so little of the initial exhibition was recoverable – we invested in


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reconstruction and archival research – it’s all Public Domain composite now. And the second, was the realisation that so little of the source exhibition had had any real effect. We suspect a serious flaw in the exhibitionary form. ms chan­: The lack of resources from those early exhibitions is always disheartening. It’s hard to imagine a time before, even rudimentary Public Domain meshworks, embedded devices, … and semantic interfaces. ayan lindquist: Well, one of the great outcomes of the Moderna Golden Jubilee celebrations in 2'08, is that they revisited and reflected on the preceding fifty years. We recently found shadow-traces for a Moderna History book. And for reasons that are not entirely clear, it remained unpublished during the Jubilee celebra­ tions – so, we intend to issue a centenary heritage publication, we’ll be sure to send you a copy. ms chan­: I see we have overrun, I’m so sorry. I just wonder before we disconnect, what is Moderna re-sourcing in the near future? ayan lindquist: Well, for us, there are some beautiful assemblies emerging. Real-time consensus is moving from a local to regional scale. Triangle in the African Multitude is distributing amazing regenerative medical technologies. Renewable energy has moved through the 74% threshold. Um … live, almost retro, music performance is popular again Nano-technology has come of age, and 1:1 molecular replication will soon be enabled, linked

to scanning technology hardwired to the manu­ factories in the Asian network. Outside of heritage, singularity will be over­ written by difference. Now that’s exciting! ms chan­: Exciting indeed! Thank you so much Ayan. Its been a privilege, really. Enjoy the centenary celebrations, we’ll all be there with you in spirit. Zai Jian, goodbye ayan lindquist: Thank you Ms Chan. Goodbye, zai jian, hejdå

Neil Cummings is a Professor at Chelsea College of Art and Design.


Drawn Identities: Pepsi, Shakers and Tattoos

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Stephen Farthing

first a brief note on drawing I no longer recognise much of a divide between writing and drawing, for me, the two travel hand in hand towards very similar goals. Leonardo’s drawing books contain as many words as images, probably more, when words failed him, images took over and when an image didn’t do the job his pen moved on to shape words in support. Both writing and drawing involve the translation of multidimensional events and concepts into readable two-dimensional matter. In the case of drawing, directions and instructions are turned into lines, volume into contours, sounds into shapes, shadows into tone, colors into words and words into marks. Marks that can be drawn using sets of established conventions, built from on-the -spot improvisations, or constructed from a combination of the two. In the case of writing and as it happens Morse code the entire world is translated into lines and dots. identities However complex our identities seem, most of us have just one passport, and as a result one identity. Some have two, but any more than that we know from the movies usually means trouble. We are born with: racial, ethnic and national identities, family names, dates of birth, finger prints, footprints, retinas that can be scanned and DNA that can be swabbed. Some of these identifying features we can wrestle with, with pencil and paper in the life room, the rest are either too subtle , too complex or too difficult to pin down in that way. We travel through life with: a birth certificate, a given name, and what were known on the old UK passport as distinguishing features. After those primaries we have: height, weight and a hair color , a postal address , various ID , photographs, a signature, pin numbers and bar codes that as time progresses we update. All of these are designed, in one way or another to establish and act as proof of our identities. At no point in our lives are we more aware of the importance of being able to establish proof of our identity than when we cross a regulated boarder. This easily measurable side of our identity, the side that post 9/11, government agencies call biometrics, is what we now use to authenticate identity. At a governmental level the art of recognition is now software driven, it is the scan-able , match-able, digitally stored images and data not the memory of a time serving policeman that today will detect a forgery and catch a thief. Artists I suspect are less interested in facial recognition


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software national security and fraud than they are in the intangible, the difficult to measure and the constructed. Identities need not after all be for life, they can as any brand advisor, crook or member of the clandestine service tell you manipulated, reconstructed and fabricated. At this point it may be worth reflecting on what we remember of the stories of some artists lives: Duchamp, Dali and Warhol, all make interesting reading, each I suspect was fully in control of their “Brand” identity. pepsi, shakers and tattoos Writing and drawing doesn’t have to be all tied up in schools, pens, pencils and paper, you can write and draw just about anywhere, with, just about anything. You can work with a needle in flesh, a diamond on glass even an aircraft in the sky. What’s good about taking writing and drawing on this kind of excursion is that the medium becomes an active carrier, it no longer sits in the background as a probability, it gets involved in actively construct­ ing meaning. If for example we take the phrase Drink Pepsi-Cola and tattoo it onto someone’s forehead, then engraved it onto a mirror and finally write it into a perfect blue sky, each time as you re-read the phrase written into its new location and medium its meaning is conditioned by that context. Sky writing is created by vaporizing fluid in a plane’s exhaust system to form a white trail. Flying at about ten thousand feet the pilot uses the plane as a drawing instrument to complete an image that is usually five to ten miles across. During the 1930s Pepsi-Cola became the first corporation to write its name ‘onto’ the skies of America. It is said that the campaign was so effective that incredulous people would sometimes phone the company to tell them that God had written the name of their product in the sky. This is how the branding of Pepsi-Cola started and its identity, as a fresh all American product was established. A red plane in a blue sky leaving a white vapour trail that gave the impression of having arrived, just like the clouds in the sky, by virtue of the hand of God. Two hundred years before the Pepsi campaign got under way the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing, established a community in Manchester, England. By 1774 the ‘Shakers’, as they became known, had relocated under the guidance of their spiritual leader Anne Lee to rural New York. The Shakers were responsible for inventing: the spring clothes peg, rotary harrow, circular saw and wheel driven washing machine, they are best remembered today however, for their rational furniture design, loathing of art and celibacy. The former being the reason they are best remembered, the latter being all most certainly the cause of their demise.


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Their views, not just on painting and drawing but all two dimensional imagery were unambiguously broadcast in an 1845 ordinance. ‘No maps, charts and no pictures or paintings, shall ever be hung up in your dwelling-rooms, shops or offices. And no pictures or paintings set in frames, with glass before them, shall ever be among you.’ In spite of the ordinance, a small group of shakers made over a twentyyear period just short of 200 drawings. Variously referred to in Shaker literature as: ‘sheets’, ‘lines’, ‘rewards’, ‘presents’, ‘gifts’ and ‘tokens’ any connection with drawing or art was studiously circumnavigated. These images were completed by just 16 members of the sect between 1839 and 1859, on ordinary stationery in pen and ink, that was sometimes coloured-in. Known not as artists or scribes but as ‘Instruments’ the sixteen makers of these drawings, thirteen women and just three men were positioned within Shaker society as ‘conduits’. They were not expected to be thinking, imaginative people with personalities and identities that conditioned what they drew the expectation was that they were disinter­ ested translators of messages from the spirit world. Sometimes translating their own ecstatic visions into two-dimensional images, more often the visions of others. Their drawings developed their appearance from the vernacular visual traditions of: needle point, quilting, family trees, Sunday school texts and home made maps. They were however neither made to decorate houses nor hang on walls, more likely they were intended to be kept as records and used as teaching aids in conjunction with the spoken word to retell stories and underscore the communities spiritual beliefs. Both named and designed to circumnavigate the ordinance that forbade their making, each ‘Gift’ set out to become a factual account of an experi­ ence or event. Each however was a failure, not because it told the story badly, but because as a free translation it failed to conceal the individuality, resourcefulness and identity of the maker. Authorship, I suspect , is most visible when the draftsman or draftswoman is forced to improvise, while strictly adhering to a set of conventions authorship is masked. So it’s not simply that we know the names of the ‘Instruments’ who made these ‘Gifts’; it is that there was no given or shared drawing convention they could either work within or hid behind. This resulted in the ‘Instruments’ uninten­ tionally showing their hand and revealing something of their personality and identity beyond their name. Drawing is good at that. When Paul Cezanne said ‘The man must remain obscure. The pleasure must be found in the work’, he was I suspect, trying to explain a belief many artists have, which is that their identity as artists is less involved with their physical appearance than the appearance of their work.


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But what Cezanne hadn’t foreseen was the degree to which a modern audience would have just as much interest in the identity of artists as the appearance of their art , a situation Warhol saw coming and elegantly summed up, ‘Don’t pay any attention to what they write about you. Just measure it in inches’. When the Mexican artist Frida Kahlo painted Self-Portrait as a Tehuana (Diego on My Mind), she went beyond just making a likeness and gave the audience an opportunity to reflect on the possibility that her identity was more than the product of her genetic make up, nurture and chosen career path, it was also her choice of primary partner. Married to the older and at the time infinitely more successful Diego Rivera, Kahlo clearly understood the degree to which her own identity and status as an artist was for better or worse linked to and conditioned by her artist husband’s. Her Self-Portrait as a Tehuana brings together two faces and two identities. The first and primary image is a likeness of herself dressed in regional Mexican costume, the second, an either ghostly or tattooed image of her husbands face, on her forehead. The sub title of the painting ‘Diego on my mind’ suggests Kahlo intended his ‘presence’ to be understood as a memory and not as it may first appear a tattoo. Her very simple solution to the very complex problem of going beyond appearances and the visible to establish absence or invisibility as a part of identity, is to my mind impressive. Ta¯moko (Maori tattoos) are carved like furrows into the flesh with uhi (bone chisels) they are mid way between drawings and carvings. In preEuropean Maori culture all high-ranking persons received moko, as a part of their rights of passage and as a permanent indicator of social status and rank. Men generally received moko on their faces, buttocks and thighs, women on their lips and chins. Within Maori culture moko are the wearers ID and passport, beyond the confines of Maori culture they were most probably ‘read’ as incomprehensible disfigurations or a some kind of ‘war paint’. The degree to which the complexity of the line drawings over rode or masked readings of facial expression and physiognomy will I suspect always remain something of a puzzle , but what they certainly serve to illustrate is the degree to which identity can be constructed and exist in layers. First the face, then the drawn on narrative, the ‘back story’. In Maori culture male facial tattoos are made according to a strict sense of order. Although at first sight they appear symmetrical one side of the face is subtly different from the other, each side telling a different story. The left describes the wearers patriarchal ancestry, the right spells out the matriarchal half. Together they tell a story of descent. If on the fathers


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side there was no significant bloodline of either power, status or achieve­ ment the left side of the face would be left as a blank. Prior to European first contact there was no history of drawing let alone pen and paper, the Maori wove and carved and as near as they got to produc­ ing anything that could be called drawing were the Ta¯moko. Probably the earliest surviving examples of pen and ink drawings made on paper by the Maori, are the drawings they made of their own faces, not of their physical features but the linear patterns chiselled into the surface of their face, the moko. Within the story of drawing these made from memory images, executed at the bottom of land deeds as proof of an individuals identity, are not simply signatures, they are also powerful reminders of the bond that exists between writing and drawing. Ta¯moko however, the actual tattoos, are more complex than signatures. As drawings they are important because they have a living background, a background that’s far from neutral. Working in partnership with the wearer’s physical appearance they produce a representation of identity that ties inheritance to appearance and past to present. What connects each of the five examples I have chosen to illustrate this exploration of drawn identity is that apart from Kahlo they are not tied to high art and are instead drawn from everyday life. Both the act of drawing and the business of conducting research into drawing can take an inquisitive person on an extraordinary journey. For me the journey included being taken by a Maori to a history museum in Auckland, writing about Shaker Drawings, whilst touching a drawing made in New Lebanon ,New York, in the 1850s and finally, holding a pencil over a blank sheet of paper in my studio at Chelsea College of Art, trying to make sense of my identity as an artist and Research Professor ,whilst remembering conversations, things seen and things read.

Professor Stephen Farthing is the University of the Arts London Rootstein Hopkins Chair of Drawing and Director of the Centre for Drawing research centre.


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Art and Knowledge Workshops in the Age of Networks David Garcia

The success of minimalism was sensed by Greenberg as a threat to high standards in art … from the mid sixties on he had to live with the fact that that there is an art around that calls itself minimal, that sometimes calls itself sculpture but never painting, and that relies on the perceptual experience of the ‘real’ or the ‘literal’, an experience, that is unmediated by the conventions of a specific medium and hence not submitted to the strict constraints of modernist history. —Kant after Duchamp, Thierry Duve, An October book, published by MIT, 1996 The statement above, written more than a decade ago, is still a fair summary of the backdrop against which not only fine art but also contemporary design still operates. A realm in which loyalty to ‘the conventions of a speci­ fic medium’, has given way to a concept of the artist and designer at large, someone capable of ranging across all possible media. At Chelsea College of Art and Design this post-formalist approach has been emphasised across both the fine art and the design disciplines as our workshops have been centralised and interconnected, increasing opportuni­ ties for generating hybrid combinations of media. making as thinking In fine art, at Chelsea, the traditional pathways such as painting, sculpture have given way to courses that are simply called ‘Fine Art’. In place of the differentiated media based pathways, the BA fine art course is structured through ‘seminar and studio groups’ made up of students who are identified and clustered according to affinities (or contrasts) based on issues rather than loyalty to any particular material practice. The issues emerge and are identified through a process of dialogue around the actual studio practice of individual students. Supporting this process a special kind of teaching has developed intensifying the relationship between theory and practice. The themes and subjects of these potential affinities (or generative oppositions) emerge through critical dialogue and debate. It was thus inevitable that theory (with specialist theory lecturers) would become a key tool for teasing out and framing the variety of possible interpretations and meanings from the embodied materiality of studio practice. This could be misinterpreted as quite a loose approach to a curriculum, on the contrary it is rigorous, combining criticality with an intensely deliberative culture in which the artefacts that emerge are experienced simultaneously as objects and as arguments. The foundational position of all courses at Chelsea is that making is thinking.


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old and new media The hand is the window to the mind. —Immanuel Kant Though the traditional loyalties to particular forms of material practice may have been shaken and questioned the act of making remains central. In fact one could argue that problematising its position, has intensified its importance. However this is not a straightforward binary dialogue between practice and theory; we also have to consider the unpredictable and increasingly complex domain of technology. In the context of the college, the technological occupies two distinct locations; college technical workshops and privately owned mobile devices. It is hard to overestimate the importance of the relatively new world of mobile media devices, the lap-tops, mobile phones with video cameras, mp3 players etc. Collectively they are what I would call the new intimate media and they are playing a central role in giving shape to what Manuel Castells dubbed in 1996 the networked society. I will come to the impact of network cultures and intimate media later. But for the moment I will focus on the domain of technical workshops, the places where students go when their material ambitions can no longer be satisfied in a straightforward studio context. The expansion and centrality of the workshops at Chelsea has given rise to an interesting triangulation between theory, studio practice and the workshops, particularly with regard to the distinct relationships that students have with the technical experts in the workshops. In our workshops new technologies and skills in all forms of electronic media and creative computing are juxtaposed with the more traditional and tangible media such as metal work, wood and ceramics. This collision of modalities has increased the potentiality for hybridity and infinite varieties of experimentation. It is a regime that (when it is able to perform optimally) is continuously testing the limits of what was previously thought to be materially possible. As a result our workshops and their technologies are being challenged as never before. But the centralisation also holds dangers, they must be seen as part of a wider educational ecology, an interconnected process of open-ended critical exploration. It was described by the Course Director of MA Fine Art, Brian Chalkley as the impulse ‘to create an environment that allows students to make, think, discuss and develop art that is yet to be defined as art’.


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digital networks social and otherwise Less tangible than the changing position of workshops and technical expertise, but no less momentous is the impact of the internet when connected to the every day technologies of an ever expanding range of mobile devices. In a recent exchange with Chelsea’s theory tutor for the Graphic Design and Communication course, Frank Cartledge, described how a great deal of the content of the theory for this course deals directly with the implications of technological change. In a rough estimate he estimated that around ‘50% of the final dissertation subjects are dealing directly with the impact changes in technology have on the organisation of culture both as a discernible arena of political and economic practices as well as the popula­ rity of social networking sites, on how notions of identity and community are being re-written through the changing media surfaces through which the students themselves communicate.’ 1 We see it every day as students from the design courses sit with wireless lap-tops, huddled together arguing and comparing their assignments (or briefs) in the college refractory, creating de-facto internet cafes. Meanwhile in the fine art studios, amidst the pigment, the rags, the half drunk mugs of coffee and piles of crumpled paper lie the lap tops, cell phones with embedded cameras, once glistening now shabby and scuffed with constant use. There is nothing alienated or technocratic about these 21st century dream machines. These tools are as intimate and expressive as 19th century diaries and sketchbooks. Though deeply personal they are not private. Today’s new media platforms are wide open to dialogue, to commentary and networking. This is a generation of students who are ‘growing up in public’. They embody the aspirations and the anxieties of the age of transparency and ephemeral celebrity. After more than a decade of promising something big, the Internet has, at last, finally delivered. The once separate modalities of human com­ munication, text, speech, image and moving image have been collapsed into a multi-modal media space. This has been a claim made for the net almost since its inception. As far back as 1996 the usually sober social and political scientist Manuel Castells, described what he believed to be happening at the time in momentous terms. ‘We are witnessing’, he declared ‘the forma­ tion of a hypertext and a meta-language which for the first time in history, integrate into the same system the written, oral and audio-visual modalities of human communication The human spirit reunites its dimensions in a


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new interaction between the two sides of the brain, machines and social contexts. For all the science fiction ideology and commercial hype surrounding the so-called information superhighway we can hardly underestimate its significance.’ 2 Its impact can be seen in matters as far ranging as, changing concepts of human freedom and identity, notions of the public and the public domain, the nature collaboration, friendship and intimacy. Nothing remains untouched. difference and networks The revolution in consumer electronics made cheap media tools available for mass market DIY media production. This, combined with popular internet platforms such as YouTube and MySpace, have expanded and democratised the possibilities for expressive self-articulation from the few to the many. Artists and designers are still struggling to respond to the challenges created by these new political economies, what have been called the ‘economies of contribution’. But although there is greater emphasis on networks of collaboration the failure of 20th century utopias based on mass collectivisation have reinforced the claims of the singular self-created individual. This concept of expressive autonomy is not isolated or sovereign as it must be negotiated with others making the same claim. The social scientist Ulrich Beck put it well when he wrote ‘the choosing shaping deciding human being who aspires to be the author of his or her own life, the creator of an individual identity has become the central character of our time’. 3 But alongside these narratives of identity and subjectivity, the networks have also given new body and shape to alternative conceptions of autonomy. As opposed to the freedom to be yourself, the networks suggest a freedom from the self, certainly traditional concepts of the self-conceived as a unitary whole. Late 20th century conceptions of subjectivity come under increasing pressure from popular movements that effectively de-centre the sovereignty of the individual subject, in favor of a constellation or a network. The character of nodes in a network are not so much determined by intrinsic, absolute qualities, as they are by relational qualities, their position in the network. The new freedoms of networks are based on shifting the centre of gravity away from the ‘within’ to the ‘in-between’. Rather than asking what something is made out of, we have to ask what does it interface to’.4


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designing for a networked culture Even the boundaries between human and non-human are questioned as chips with Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID ) are increasingly tagged onto everyday objects, giving rise to an Internet of things. Moreover the most advanced products of contemporary design rarely exist in isolation but rather are part of a system, or network, of both tangible and intangible elements that together that taken together have transformed, and multiplied, the ways in which we work and the objects we make. The classic example here is the iPod, which is connected to the iTunes software and then to the iStore where you can download the products.5 The iPhone with its expanding plethora of new applications has taken this principal to the next level. But these products also mark the fault lines where a graduate school might work more critically and ask; what is it that industry does not want? And give it to them anyway. A graduate school in a radical academy would be involved in processes of critical making, and be a platform for developing works that of artistic, social and technological critique. ‘The Commercial networks like Apple, through conflations of social, technical, and legal regimes, can sometimes result in decreasing, rather than increasing access to knowledge and cultural capital. It is easy for Steve Jobs, to ask for the removal of restrictions on content distribution when you control the network itself.’ 6 New approaches to the practice of art and design not only reference open source models of development such as Linux and Wikipedia but may also contribute to the current expansion of the traditional British ‘Public Service broadcast’ currently being pioneered by museums such as Tate, with their growing emphasis on Tate Media with its accessible content. q-art london An example of the unpredictable ways in which the networks might impact on pedagogy can be found in Q-Art London (www.q-artlondon.com) an entirely student organised peer review network. The project is the initiative of Sarah Rowles, a second year fine art student at Goldsmith’s, who estab­ lished it in November 2008 and since then with a small but growing team she has run monthly meetings at Goldsmiths, Central Saint Martins, APT Gallery, University of the Arts London Hub, Slade School of Art and Chelsea. Q-Art currently includes upwards of about 1600 students from the main London art colleges, working together in regular seminars and gallery visits,


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to learn from and teach one another. It is already building a formidable network. This entirely student run and student initiated project cut has been able to cut across all institutional boundaries and hierarchies. It challenges large-scale institutions like the University of the Arts London to find ways to learn from and nurture this new self organised, grass root, networked pedagogy. Similar networks might have been possible in the past but the internet has made it possible to scale these experiments up till they are operating on the scale of an art school. This is the kind of thing we mean when we ask what it might mean to create, an institute ‘imminent to the logic of networks’. and so … At an art technology conference I attended, a Professor of a liberal arts department pleaded for the speakers at a conference ‘to look behind the technology’… . ‘To look for the person behind the machine.’ She received a round of applause from an audience relieved to have a reassuringly humanist perspective. How strange I thought to make this separation between us and our tools, our technologies and our media. She spoke as though they were simply an add-on. My argument with her and my technological advocacy resides in repudiating this position as a false dichotomy. We are and always have been toolmakers. Its part of who or what we are. We make our tools, then they make us.

Professor David Garcia is Dean of Chelsea College of Art and Design. 1 Castells, M. (1996) The Rise of the Network Society- The Information Age: Economy, Society, and Culture, vol.1, Oxford: Blackwell. 2 E-mail exchange with Frank Cartledge, Theory tutor for Graphic Design and Communications at Chelsea College of Art and Design. 3 Beck, U. (2002) ‘A Life of One’s Own in a Runaway World’, in Individualisation. Sage. 4 Stallder, (2002) ‘Space of Flows: Characteristics and Strategies’ presented at the Doors of Perception conference Amsterdam, 14–16 November 2002. 5 Geke van Dijk essay (2007), in (Un)Common Ground, Creative Encounters Across Sectors and Disciplines, Brickwood, C., Ferren, D., Garcia, D., and Putnam, T. (eds), Amsterdam: Bis Publishers. 6 Ratto, M. and Van Kannenburg, R., essay (2007), in (Un)Common Ground, Creative Encounters Across Sectors and Disciplines, Brickwood, C., Ferren, D., Garcia, D., and Putnam, T. (eds), Amsterdam: Bis Publishers.


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Lines of Enquiry Chris Wainwright

This text is based on a reflection on the symposium Who Is Responsible? which I organised and chaired for the tenth ELIA conference in Goteborg 2008. The symposium proposed a number of questions, discourses, and challenges for art education intended to stimulate future agenda setting with reference to cross disciplinary thematic ‘Lines of Enquiry’. It also contains an edited interview with David Buckland, Director of Cape Farewell and one of the main contributors to the symposium. Cape Farewell is currently an ‘artist in residence’ at the Southbank Centre, London and one of the key cultural partners of the C-C-W Graduate School. The notion of emphasising ‘Lines of Enquiry’ may not constitute a new or radical approach to curriculum structuring or a means of engagement with social, political and broader contexts for practice, as there are many examples relating to feminist and post feminist agendas, race, political and social activism to name but a few. There is arguably, at this moment in time, a real sense of urgency for example, in relation to addressing, or at least working with a sense of awareness of the dramatic effects of climate change. If the assertion that climate change is caused by the way we live our lives, then surely there is a legitimate case to engage artists in the process of addressing the issue on the basis that one of the primary historical and contemporary preoccupations of artists is to show us how they see the world; right now that world is changing at an alarming rate! The symposium provided a context for focusing on the debates surrounding the potential future directions, agendas, and roles for artists and the modern art school. It also raised the issue of what constitutes a legitimate curriculum and reference points for artists who evidence a commitment to addressing thematic issues such as climate change, through involving other disciplines, agencies and partnerships and to what effect this has on ‘individual practice’. The diverse constituency of participants in the symposium debated the relationship between subject disciplines and a wider set of parameters of social and cultural conditions that affect, and in turn are affected by, cultural practice. It created an opportunity to present a case for arts education to establish a thematic orientated structure predicated on ‘Lines of Enquiry’ as a relevant axis for creative education and questioned the more established subject specific practices, that currently characterise the majority of our institutional approaches to curriculum construction and the learning experience in art schools. It is arguable that informed and critical cultural practice draws its momentum from a reflection on, and an awareness of, current pertinent social, cultural and political aspects of life more than from the arts


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disciplines and practices. Contemporary artists are primarily occupied with addressing and commentating on how they see and reflect the often complex, contradictory, stimulating and problematic world that they live in. This is not to suggest that there is a lesser value in engaging with the traditions, history and the heritage of the arts, much of which is highly relevant to contemporary practice and provides both evidence and inspiration in relation to artists who have focused on social and political issues in the past. A key aspect of these debates is essentially one of emphasis and concerns a clarification of the context for the artist and for how the artistic practice is located and intended to function. A legitimate reservation with regard to the creation or identification of a community of critical practice in an art school, through the collective engagement with thematic ‘Lines of Enquiry’, might be the danger of creating a prescriptive instrumentalism in artistic practice and a compro­ mise to the learning experience that threatens individual expression. Clearly there is room here to engage in a process of discourse that challenges and potentially destabilises both sides of this argument and seeks to actively problematise the simplistic notion of thematic ‘Lines of Enquiry’ at the same time as robustly challenging the assertion of individually centred practice. I believe the forum for such debates should be located within the modern art school and be driven by a wide range of informed, confident practitioners and researchers. Arguably there are key questions arising from this process of dialogue and interchange, ‘Who Is Responsible?’ What is the role of the artist, the art institution and what are the subsequent challenges for artists and designers to reflect and engage with broader issues of our time such as, climate change, social integration, intolerance, migration and the effects of our endangered economies. How do artists and our art institutions function purposefully in relation to these and other external factors and who are the key partners and how do they develop a complex network of relationships to make this work? Is it not also time to rethink and re-draw the map of the relationships both within the art institution and outside it and place a greater emphasis on learning and cultural practice as a reflexive process that is both inclusive and proactive in addressing the notions of context, quality, the relationship between theory and practice, and what we mean by knowledge generation and research with reference to the specific characteristics of the arts and how this interfaces with other non arts disciplines such as the sciences? The specific debates surrounding the importance of research, the function of discourse, recognition of process as a form of practice and the


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role and purpose of the artefact, are well articulated and continually critically interrogated within the academic institution. There is a danger, however, for these debates to become hermetic, or to lack a sense of urgency in the opening up of dialogue outside the formal institutional education sectors and fail to reflect and engage with the world we live in. It is therefore vital to create conditions that support sustainable approaches to a negotiated and inclusive cross disciplinary cultural produc­ tion, that demonstrates how artists can contribute to the creation of a socially engaged community of artists/educators. In turn, this stimulates a contribution to the discussions and models for creating an expanded role for the art school in the 21st century. There are inevitable problems for institutions embracing a model that raises questions for artists when initiating projects based on a responsible socially engaged practice. These relate in part to questioning the nature of collaboration, partnerships and networks, and the need for artistic inter­ vention to raise awareness and contribute to, or effect change. There are fundamental issues concerning the definition and role of the art school itself when challenged by a model that proposes legitimate questions around areas such as authorship, creative intervention, and participation in a more fluid and contingent relationship where the art school is only one of a number of engaged agencies. There is also a need to recognise the partici­ patory nature of this approach to cultural production that acknowledges and reflects the conditions of those placed in the assumed position of its receivers, or audiences. Such conditions could stimulate, challenge and question the possible role for the artists of today if models of inclusive cross disciplinary cultural practice are adopted, developed and interrogated in our art schools, and by a wider public. The art schools’ relationship with its external communities and the development of sustainable partnerships is central to its purpose that now goes beyond the traditional function as a detached onlooker, a commentator and reflector of the world seen and interpreted through the eyes of a privileged creative class. There needs to be a considered and strategic approach to positioning the art school in being identified, as a generator of progressive and inclusive educational opportunities and as a centre for innovative cultural production that creates social as well as intellectual capital. This of course raises further questions about how the art school is both populated and supported. How we develop pedagogic models that embrace the need to contribute to and influence society in order to amplify both individual and collective voices on important and increasingly pressing


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social and political issues affecting our lives. How we can achieve this whilst retaining our independence, promoting experimentation and originality is arguably one of our greatest challenges for the future. interview The following text is an extract of conversation between myself and David Buckland, artist and Director of Cape Farewell, an artist led organisation that creates a cross disciplinary dialogue between artists, scientists, musicians and key individuals from the wider creative sector and promotes as its core assertion, the importance of foregrounding a cultural response to climate change as one of the most significant issues of our time. The interview was conducted in April 2009 as one of a number of activities and reference points leading up to the launch of the Graduate School. In September 2008, David Buckland led the seventh Cape Farewell expedition to the High Arctic, taking a team of 40 artists and scientists to Disko Bay off the west coast of Greenland to see the Jakobshavn Glacier, which is losing 20 million tons of ice every day. In addition David Buckland and myself the artists included Lori Anderson, Sophie Calle, musicians Jarvis Cocker, Ryuichi Sakamoto and KT Tunstall, architect Sunand Prasad, poet Lemn Sissay, filmmaker Peter Gilbert, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke while previous voyages have included novelist Ian McEwan, artists Antony Gormley and Rachael Whiteread among many others. D B : Cape Farewell came about from artistic enquiry. I’d come across mathematicians who were model building in the late 1990s. They’d constructed what is now a very famous climate model the HadCM3, that had the structure and integrity for looking into the future climate of the planet. They had a really big problem - they knew that climate change was a reality, but the language they were using was the language of graphs and scientific data. The public wasn’t engaging, so Cape Farewell was set up to construct a different language of talking about climate change. The idea was to gather the best creative brains we could find, embed them with the scientists, go up the Arctic, put them in this extraordinary frontline situation with climate change and give them an open invitation to work with this as an idea. Sixty or 70 artists have been through the programme, and they’ve all come up with amazing ways of thinking about climate change. The artists are challenging the way we live, our values and lifestyles. There have been seven expeditions so far; five with major artists and


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scientists and two with sixteen year-old youths. We made a strategic deci­ sion last year to work with university students rather than youths, because you can embed students with the artists, and it’s not a separation. They can feed off each other. C W: I’m interested in the strategic decision that Cape Farewell took to work with young, emerging artists rather than youths. It suggests to me that within that choice there’s also a challenge; that part of the motivation for working with students is not just to offer them the opportunity to engage with Cape Farewell, but to pose the question, ‘we think this is important that you engage with climate change, what do you think?’ From where I’m sitting, I see it as a challenge for students as much as an opportunity. I don’t know if that’s the intention or not. D B : It’s the same challenge for the artists. We work with the best artists we can find and ask them to address climate change. With the exception of one or two, they’re not environmental artists. There’s been a big debate on whether that is a legitimate ask since the inception of Cape Farewell. You’re asking if that is a legitimate ask of the student to say, ‘you can be the best painter, film-maker, fashion designer, but I want you to address climate change’. C W: As somebody who’s responsible for running an art school, I’d say it is a legitimate question, because it challenges the notion of curriculum and of self-expression. It challenges the notion of the art school being the place where people can develop their individual and collective creative ideas. There are some contentious arguments about the values of creative educa­ tion that have actually moved away from some of the core responsibilities that artists have to address – social, cultural and economic issues – as well as those issues about individual creativity. If you go back to a very basic premise that all artists do is tell you how they see the world, then I’ve got no problem with that. My only question for that premise is how big is that world? Is that the world you live in from day to day going from your flat to your studio, to the supermarket and home again, and your experiences about that? Or is your sense of how you see the world influenced by issues such as climate change? So it’s about the breadth, the reference and not so much about challenging the premise of what an artist should be. It’s actually more to do with saying, ‘if you are somebody who has a creative ability to see the world in a very particular way and tell people about it, and tell them about it confidently and in


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Greenhouse Gas, installation by Sunand Prasad with Chris Wainwright,Disko Bay, West Greenland, Cape Farewell expedition to Disko Bay, September 2008 (photo by C. Wainwright)

a way that’s engaging through exhibitions, music, performance, then that world that you’re seeing ought to have some relevance to other people’. D B : There’s also a greater notion of being right at the edge of knowing some­ thing, that edge where you’re just trying to make sense of something that you can only just about touch, and it’s probably an emotion. That is also a totally valid enquiry for me. The artist’s job is to grab those things that are way out on the edge and somehow be able to articulate them. But the thing about the climate change is that the whole structure of society in which we live has evolved into something that is not sustainable. Six billion people cannot carry on living like this. But the solutions are right on the edge of something out there and it needs artists to try and articulate that curiosity. C W: Remember when you said to me, just before the trip, ‘it’s okay to come along and fail’. By saying it, you’re creating the pressure not to fail. You’ve upped the ante.


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DB:

I know. C W: There were times on that voyage where people were completely at a loss as to how to deal with what they were experiencing, not because of a lack of confidence in their ability as artists or musicians, but because of the sheer enormity of the question. You can ask the question about climate change sitting here in the city, because there’s lots of other things that you’re asking questions about in the same time, the same day. When you’re in the Arctic, the only question is climate change. The more you thought about it the more you became completely incapable of understanding why we’ve got to the position that we’re in. And I saw that as a sense of failure. Not personal failure, but just failure to be able to assimilate the enormity of the problem.

D B : This planet has certain major natural forces that are in balance. They are forces beyond imagination; the whole of the northern ice cap in the North Pole or the whole mass of ice on Greenland. They’re so big that you can witness them, but if someone tells you they’re not going to exist in five

Greenhouse Gas, installation by Sunand Prasad and Chris Wainwright and students from Chelsea College of Art Design, The Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground, Millbank, April 2009 (photo by C. Wainwright)


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years’ time, you can’t even imagine the consequences. It is extraordinary that human activity can change one of those forces. Six billion of us doing the same thing is causing it. C W: And you feel that pressure when you’re there with a small group of people right at the cutting edge of where that’s happening. You’re carrying the burden of six billion people’s activities on your back. D B : Ian McEwan said when he was up there he realised one day that, except for probably a hundred people, everybody was south of him. It touches on artists dealing with being right on the edge of something and trying to drag it back. Every artist that’s come back has told a personal story, that’s how they dealt with it. They’ve managed to make a human scale out of this enormous question and that is the most exciting thing that’s come out of the whole process of the Cape Farewell project. Most of the work that the artists have done has not been in the Arctic, it’s what they’ve done since they’ve come back. C W: One of the most interesting institutional and educationally challenging things to deal with is how you marry up the concerns of art and science in such a way that is both analysing a situation, but putting something out in a way that people will engage with.

When we first started, neither the scientific community nor the artistic community knew the outcomes. They trusted that through a process of doing, we would actually achieve what we couldn’t think. The scientists at first thought the artists would illustrate their problem and then they soon realised that that’s not what artists do. They somehow took hold of this amazing piece of scientific thinking and then transposed it into something completely different and came up with another way of visioning what the scientists were doing, but connecting it to human activity, the human story. DB:

C W: The musician Ryuichi Sakamoto is an emblematic example of how an art and science collaboration can work in a way that is completely unexpected. D B : The geologists were towing a blaster behind the boat that would put sound down through two or three kilometres of sea to the rock at the sea bed. The idea was that as the actual land mass of Greenland is underwater, as the ice melts in the middle of Greenland, the land will rise and cause fusions


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in the seabed. So the geologists were trying to see if there were any major changes in the rock structure. As they were doing this they came up with these incredibly beautiful drawings of data that showed the seabed. Ryuichi asked them about the information and what form it was in. They said, ‘it’s digital information. We just take it into the computer and we digitalise it’. He said, ‘I can turn it into music. I’ll make a symphony that’s half a million years old’. And that’s what he’s done – he’s written a piece of music that is influenced by that whole process of taking the data and transforming it into a different way of thinking about time itself. Fabulous. C W: What that does is take the scientist’s data and puts it into a public domain in a way that science could never achieve through its own mechanism of scientific journals, scientific conference, or government reports. Ryuichi would reach a few thousand people a night with that information. D B : Easily, and the story reaches thousands more, it’s just brilliant. That’s endlessly happened.

What always amazed me was not just the potential for collaboration, but that in very short spaces of time people got it. People collaborated more quickly than they might have done if you’d had this slow evolving relationship over a number of years. C W:

D B : It’s an interesting experiment to run in the University, because you have painters, sculptors, etc, and you get them all addressing this one collective issue for a year. You’re throwing people together and setting up a paradigm of a potential collaboration. C W: For me that reinforced a core belief that if you create a strong thematic, it forms a glue between different disciplines. I was completely knocked out by how musicians, artists, poets, geologists and beatboxers came together in a way that was only possible because of the collective focus on climate change. For me, it strengthened the belief that within the creative educational context, we can set up big agendas for creative people to address, whether they’re designers, filmmakers or ceramicists. You can bring these people together meaningfully, get everyone focusing on a much more important issue than what they do as an individual, and exciting things will come from that.


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D B : What you’ve just said there is quite a challenge to a lot of people. It’s a bit like me saying, ‘you can be allowed to fail’.

I’m always conscious that whatever I do, the students will benefit from it. The opportunity came up for us to get involved with Cape Farewell’s evening at the Late at Tate in February. We used the same students to respond to and reconstruct a piece of work that Sunand Prasad and I did on the voyage, this series of four balloons in a cube that represented one cubic ton of carbon dioxide, which is a tenth of what each of us produces each year. We made this very temporary piece of sculpture on the beach, and we thought we’d use the programme to reconstruct it. What a great experience for the students – they got Sunand, who’s the Pre­ sident of the Royal Institute of British Architects, and me as tutors, they got materials, they got exposure and they got 4000 people coming to the Parade Ground to see the work. We asked them to respond to the idea of a ton of carbon. Industrial design and fine art students worked on it for a week and produced an interpretation of our work. Now they want to do something more with it and redevelop the project. So we seeded that with a group of people, but one of the really important things is putting a bit of pressure on them to do something, to produce something for an event. ‘You’ve got a week to do it. It doesn’t matter if you fail.’ C W:

DB:

No pressure! It creates an anxiety in them that indicates they’ve got something really important to do. It’s fantastic seeing people rise to that challenge. We can create real opportunities that aren’t just about making work about climate change, they’re about the students making things happen. We can say to them ‘this is a project about now, which is about a problem about now and the time to deal with it is now. So don’t put it off. Don’t over-theorise the process’. And, to use one of your terms, David, it’s about making. It’s bringing about awareness through actually doing something. That’s not to say there isn’t a sound theoretical or intellectual basis for it, but it’s about direct action to a fairly direct problem. C W:


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D B : But you’re always aware of not making that a wasteful process. You make it as efficient as possible. So there’s a fine tuning to it, but it’s not blind just making. That’s the artistic process …

upcoming projects Cape Farewell is planning three nights of concerts in January 2010 with musicians from the expeditions and others, including work from the Uni­ versity of the Arts London students at Chelsea College of Art and Design and London College of Fashion, two colleges that are working to increase awareness of climate change and sustainability. Cape Farewell in collaboration with the University of the Arts London is also creating a touring exhibition based on work by the 2008 Cape Farewell artists, called Unfold. The show curated by David Buckland and Chris Wainwright, will travel to Seoul, Vienna, Chicago and other venues worldwide and conclude with a UK tour and finishes in London in 2011.

Professor Chris Wainwright is Head of Colleges Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon. David Buckland is an artist and Director of Cape Farewell.


Research Environment


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research Centres

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Centre for Drawing

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Ligatus

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SCIRIA

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TrAIN

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Graduate School Partnerships


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Research at Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon Professor Oriana Baddeley, Director of Research

Through the combined work of the many talented and dedicated researchers and support teams within C-C-W we are able to offer an exciting and rigorous experience for our graduate students and staff alike. One of the most important functions of the Graduate School is to facilitate greater communication, focus and debate of key issues across the communities within the three colleges. Our research activities are well established, diverse, specialist and are grounded in the broad portfolio of art and design subjects represented by our taught course programmes. They frequently offer new and challenging ways of thinking about how specific disciplines can share common concerns and questions. Issues surrounding the practice, theoretical and historical contexts of Fine Art, Design, Conservation, Theatre and Performance are developed and interrogated through a focused research approach of contemporary relevance that leads to tangible outcomes and impact. Our team of research administration staff supports the development of external research partnerships and projects and provides assistance with the development of conferences, symposia, publications and public events. Many of our individual researchers and groups are recipients of external funding for their research. Our research centres units and networks, hosted by C-C-W provide a rich programme of events to inform and enhance the broader course and college based activities. This echoes our commitment to ensuring that our individual and group research activity has a direct impact within the colleges as well as externally. We are particularly interested in research proposals that address either individually, collectively or in tandem, the current Graduate School themes of Climate Change Identity and Technologies. This is not to say that we are expecting all of our research to specifically address these issues directly as we recognise that many of our individual researchers and centres have very specific and specialist areas of enquiry. The identification of a number of key thematic lines of enquiry is primarily intended to identify a context over and above individual research interests where there may be some common ground and a space for cross disciplinary dialogue. The themes also reflect a growing collective awareness amongst our research communities for identifying some of the more pressing and urgent social, political, economic and cultural agendas of our time that can be addressed through innovative and creative responses.


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The current research focus and project developments in C-C-W relate to the identity of our centres, units and networks as well as that of individual researchers. These include: > The interface of new technologies and creative practice. > The creative, historical and theoretical exploration of nation and identity in transnational arts. > The investigation and redefinition of the limits of performance, costume design and scenographic practice. > The generative languages of drawing and the material procedures of drawing as a tool for the realisation of ideas. > Textiles research and designer-centred solutions that have a reduced impact on the environment. > The study of artist’s voice, the designer’s voice and the practitioner’s voice, both in the specific sense of oral testimony, and in the broader context of cultural, ethical and political representation. > The history of bookbinding and the conservation of Byzantine books and manuscripts. > Critical fine art practice and the exploring of new models for creative practice. > Questions and issues of identity and subjectivity as they are mediated between artist/writer, artwork and viewer. > Narrative structures and meanings in the visual arts.

In addition to hosting the research centres listed here in the Directory, C-C-W supports and hosts a number of research units, groups and networks that form a vital part of the research environment. These include:

critical practice Critical Practice is a cluster of artists, researchers, academics and others. Through our aims we intend to support critical practice within art, the field of culture and organisation. Critical Practice recognise dramatic transformations in creative practice. Transformations instigated by, and a reflection of wider social, political,


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technological and financial changes. One of the most obvious affects is that as artists, curators, designers or theorists, our practices, or their inter­ pretation, or how they are theorised, historicised or organised, are no longer separate concerns, or indeed the prerogative of different disciplines. Currently, we are concerned by the threat of the instrumentalisation of the artistic field through the internalisation of corporate values, methods and models. This can be seen everywhere, in funding agencies, at art schools and academies, in museums and galleries, and even in the studios of artists! Therefore, we seek to avoid the passive reproduction of art, and uncritical cultural production. Our research, projects, exhibitions, publications and funding, our very constitution and administration become legitimate subjects of critical enquiry. All art is organised, so we are trying to be sensitive to issues of organisation. Governance emerges whenever there is a deliberate organisation of interactions between people. We are striving to be an ‘open’ organisation, and to make all decisions, processes and production, accessible and public. We will post agendas, minutes, budget and decision-making processes online for public scrutiny; as advised by open-organization.org. We are always in the process of defining our aims and objectives. (www.criticalpracticechelsea.org)

agendas, agendas, agendas The Agendas, Agendas, Agendas initiative at Wimbledon College of Art, is engaged with three linked strands of research: > The study of artist’s voice, the designer’s voice and the practitioner’s voice, both in the specific sense of oral testimony, and in the broader context of cultural, ethical and political representation. > Critical Practice, which engages with the aesthetic constitution of the social bond. > The initiation of debate with constituencies, audiences and fields of research beyond the art and design area. The Agendas Programme, which is led by Dr Malcolm Quinn, Reader in Critical Practice and Bill Furlong, visiting Professor of Fine Art, has a tripartite structure, embracing internal Agendas symposia in connection


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with the gallery at Wimbledon, events in partnership with Tate Gallery and other major venues in the UK, and regular ‘Venice Agendas’ symposia at the Venice Biennale since 1999. (http://venice.wimbledon.ac.uk)

subjectivity & feminisms The Subjectivity & Feminisms research group consists of artists and writers whose practices explore questions and issues of identity as they are mediated between artist/writer, artwork and viewer. Research Questions Subjectivity is related to identity and the personal, but it is not reducible to these formations. While identity is formed out of a whole range of intersecting determinations (social, political, linguistic, psychological, ideological), the emphasis on subjectivity implies that these determinations are fluid as well as being culturally specific. The emphasis on subjectivity implies that signifying practices such as art open the individual up to change. In recent practices and debates, subjectivity has been characterised as both fluid and processual. This group questions whether and how subjectivity is a transitive process or whether and how it is attached to identity (race, gender, sexuality, disability etc.). The individual members of the Subjectivity & Feminisms group question in their practices how these concepts are mediated, how they push the boundaries of language and how they might challenge orthodox ways of understanding. This research question acknowledges the legacy of feminist thinking in re-evaluating aesthetics in relation to the encounter with what lies outside the frame of representation.

fine art and digital environments (fade) This joint research project between Camberwell College of Arts and Chelsea College of Art and Design has developed out of a previous project, The Integration of Computers within Fine Art Practice. FADE seeks to investigate through practice based research, the impact of digital technologies on fine art practice including its relationship to established


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studio practice. In particular, issues around questions of Surface, Layering and Memory will be central to the project’s concerns. (www.faderesearch.com, www.faderesearch.com/digitalsurface)

textiles environment design (ted) The Textile Environment Design (TED ) project at Chelsea College of Art and Design was established in 1996 and is a unique collective of practicing designers / educators. The main aim of the Project is to look at the role that the designer can play in creating textiles that have a reduced impact on the environment and to provide a toolbox of designer-centred solutions. Designers have a crucial role to play in improving the environmental profile of textile production, and research shows that if designers make informed and appropriate design decisions at the outset, then the environmental performance of any product can be improved by up to 80%. In 2003 the TED Resource was established to create a central focal point for all TED research activity, past and present. This is a resource that draws together a collection of fabric and clothing samples, press cuttings, academic papers, research projects and case studies, creating a valuable and original facility for textile designers at every stage of their career. This resource is much needed to take theory into practice. It is used by staff, Associate Lecturers, students, alumni, and designers from our professional contacts. It is a living collection that benefits researchers and designers, and is a resource that they can also contribute to. TED has also developed a series of possible strategic solutions to assist

designers in their decisions. Some are materials and process based including; low toxicity/organics, new technologies, design for recycling and biomimicry and some consider more conceptual approaches such as; lifecycle thinking, fair-trade and ethical production, short life/long life textiles, design for low laundering and systems and services design. (www.tedresearch.net)


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the engine room The Engine Room is a centre for the development and promotion of projects to bring Enterprise, Research and Community together around arts-based activities to build sustainable systems of knowledge transfer about the impact of the arts within society. The Engine Room undertakes research, impact measurement, evaluation, community projects, consultancies, education services, professional development, events, performances and exhibitions. The emphasis in the Engine Room is on facilita­tion, mobilisation, support, encouragement and recognition of successful and sustainable prac­tices in the arts and cultural sector. The Engine Room is committed to sustainable growth in the creative and cultural sectors by gathering human and other resources to disseminate and exemplify models of best practice in ethical impact research using arts-based measures in combination with qualitative and quantitative methods. The Engine Room projects involve partnerships, research, knowledge transfer, community, enterprise, businesses, capacity building, professional development, dissemination, outreach and advocacy. (www.engineroomcogs.org)

voices in visual arts [viva] Voices in the Visual Arts [VIVA ] is an oral history project set up by Camberwell College of Arts, to record the life histories of alumni working in the creative industries as a resource for teaching, learning, and research. These audio documents provide an opportunity to hear individuals reflect on the meaning and effects of a life and/or education in creative practice. The interviews focus on three core experiential histories: family back­ ground, education, and professional practice, recorded over several sessions with completed recordings averaging in length from 6–10 hours in total.


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The complete recordings are available to researchers by appointment with VIVA ’s Senior Research Fellow, Linda Sandino (l.sandino@camberwell.arts.ac.uk)

the book as artefact The St Catherine’s Library Conservation Project is a joint endeavour with the St Catherine Foundation carrying out research into the conser­ vation of early manuscripts and binding structures. Research is pursued in the context of a consultancy role in the development of a long-term conservation strategy for the world-famous Sinai Monastery’s unique collection of manuscripts and books. Supervisors: Professor Nicholas Pickwoad, Dr Athanasios Velios

The University of the Arts London website (www.research.arts.ac.uk) also provides information and contact with fellow researchers within the University and has more information on its university wide research centres, units and networks as well as those which are hosted by Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon. In many cases research activities form part of a wider network across the University’s research centres and units and many involve external partnerships. Researchers within the Graduate School participate particularly in the International Centre for Fine Art Research (ICFAR ); Centre for Materials and the Arts (MATAR ); the research unit for Information Environments (IE); and the Textiles Futures Research Group (TFRG ).


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research Centres

Kreider and O’Leary, The Drawing Field workshop documentation, April 2009


Centre for Drawing

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Director and Rootstein Hopkins Chair of Drawing: Professor Stephen farthing

Launched in February 2008, the Centre for Drawing (CfD) supports research into drawing across University of the Arts London (UAL ). Working with artists, designers, researchers and external partners we develop seminars, con­ ferences, research projects and publications that maximise our contribution to knowledge in our field. In addition the Centre provides specialist supervision for a cluster of research students. College Co-ordinators Each college of the University has a CfD coordinator who provides research support and initiates and programmes events. These include: The Forum for Drawing at London College of Fashion; The Drawing Group at London College of Communication and the annual Procedures & Enquiries Symposium at Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon. International Collaborations The Centre’s research focus is on understanding, defining and expanding the uses of drawing. This year we will be receiving Kit Wise, Artist and Head of Fine Art at Monash University and Peter Robinson, University of Auckland as Visiting Fellows. Over the past two years a series of conferences designed to explore drawing and subject matter: Drawn Encounters, Complex Identities (2008) and Archive/Counter-Archive (2009) were organised in partnership with Monash University, Melbourne. Collaborations have also taken place with The University of Auckland, New Zealand and The National Art School Sydney. PhD Programme Professor Avis Newman coordinates weekly PhD seminars in the project space at Wimbledon College of Art, which has resulted in the development of a strong PhD community. Over

the past year, two distinct areas within research culture have emerged: Drawing in Relation to Semiotics; Drawing and Memory and Diaspora. As a site that is part studio, part exhibition space, the CFD Project Space aims to encourage a discourse and exchange between postgraduate students, fine art researchers and artists from both within the University and beyond. From time to time PhD students will lead projects, a recent example is ‘The Drawing Field’, a series of master classes coordinated by PhD student Maryclare Foa, aimed specifically at the postgraduate and research student community which interrogates a diverse range of individual approaches to drawing. 2009–10 Projects Our primary focus is the development of research projects and study programmes relating to the sketch and drawing book. Capturing the Concept, an exhibition originated by the CfD, will tour to the Royal Academy of Arts and Edinburgh College of Arts. In September 2009 we will publish The Sketchbooks of Nicholas Grimshaw 1980–2009 in collaboration with RA Publishing. This publica­ tion is the first in a series that tracks idea develop­ ment in artist and designers’ drawing books. Current international projects include: Significant Sites, a conference that takes subject matter as its theme, is jointly organised with Monash University and University of the Arts Sydney and will take place in London during the summer of 2010, Drawing Out a conference that explores the bigger picture of drawing within the university curriculum, organised with RMIT to be held in Melbourne, spring 2010, and Drawing the World an exhibition of drawings by UAL academic staff held at the University of Seoul, autumn 2009. (www.thecentrefordrawing.org)


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Ligatus Director: Professor Nicholas Pickwoad

The Ligatus research unit offers a unique environ­ ment within the University of the Arts London, where the study of the history of bookbinding and book conservation is combined with research into modern digital data analysis and collection management tools. Current projects include:

also be the repository of an additional, unrivalled collection of materials relating to the history of bookbinding donated by key scholars who have worked internationally in major public and pri­ vate collections. Wherever possible, these images will be made available on the Ligatus website.

Saint Catherine’s Monastery Library Project, Mount Sinai, Egypt The monastery of St Catherine in the Sinai, Egypt, is the oldest active Christian monastery in the world. The monastery’s library holds a unique collection of Byzantine manuscripts. Ligatus has undertaken the task of assessing the condition of the manuscripts, is designing a new con­ servation workshop and is advising on further conservation work.

John Latham Archive The visionary British artist John Latham died on 1 January 2006. His influence on the visual arts is remarkable and yet consistently underrepresented in the literature. His philosophical ideas on Events and Event Structures and ‘Flat Time Theory’, a unifying overview of the world, are fascinating, complex and worthy of serious study. By focusing on such an original, highly theoretical artist, the John Latham Archive project argues for the need for creative solutions to the methodological and technical challenges posed by artists’ archives. These solutions will be tested against, and adapted to, other private and institutional archives.

This project is largely funded by the Saint Catherine Foundation with additional support from the Headley Trust. Bookbinding Glossary A project to create a detailed bookbinding glossary which can be edited on-line by experts located in different countries. The glossary will also serve as the basis for an on-line descriptive process to record bookbindings. It will first appear in English and Greek.

This project is funded by the AHRC and the Henry Moore Foundation.

Exhibition Archives The history of exhibitions, particularly of contemporary art exhibitions from the late 1960s, is an emerging field of investigation at the This project is funded by the Arts & Humanities convergence of art history, curatorial and social Research Council (AHRC ). studies. As a centre dedicated to the study of archives and conservation, Ligatus is well positioned to develop theoretical and practical Digital archive of bookbinding frameworks for the analysis of exhibitions. 30 000 slides of the bound manuscripts in the Saint Catherine’s Monastery Library, taken as part Projects related to this axis of research include an online resource for the exchange of of the survey, have already been digitised with information about exhibitions and a series of funding from the Headley Trust and are now joined by a large collection of digital images of the workshops devoted to specific exhibition archives. bindings on the early printed books. Ligatus will


LIGATUS

Ligatus Summer Schools The purpose of the Ligatus Summer School is to uncover the possibilities latent in the detailed study of bookbinding and it focuses mainly on books which have been bound between the 15th and the early 19th century. Over the past four years courses have taken place in Volos, Patmos and Thessaloniki. The courses also offer visits to important local libraries, both secular and monastic. A knowledge of the structure of bindings can help conservators, librarians, book historians and scholars who work with old books to understand the age, provenance and significance of bindings for historical research and cataloguing, as well as to make appropriate decisions regarding conservation treatments, housing and access. Descriptions of bindings are also important for digitisation projects, as they dramatically enrich the potential of image and text metadata. This is particularly important for collections of manuscripts and early printed books.

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Ligatus areas of PhD research > The interface of new technologies and creative practice. > Historic bookbinding in Europe, the Middle East and the Americas. > Digital applications to bookbinding and conservation. > Creative archiving. > Online archiving. Ligatus cooperates with institutions such as: > School of Advanced Study, University of London. > Centre for the Study of the Book, Bodleian Library in Oxford University. > Museum of Byzantine Culture in Thessaloniki, Greece. > Institute of Byzantine Research, Athens, Greece. > Istituto centrale per il restauro e la conservazione del patrimonio archivistico e librario, Rome, Italy. > Wellcome Trust Library, London. (www.ligatus.org.uk)

Bookbinding detail


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SCIRIA Acting Director: Professor Paul Coldwell

The SCIRIA (Sensory Computer Interface Research & Innovation for the Arts) research unit and the research project FADE (Fine Art Digital Environment) will be working together under the leadership of Professor Paul Coldwell during a transition stage until the end of 2009. SCIRIA (Sensory Computer Interface Research and Innovation for the Arts) focuses on arts and science collaborative research. Currently, within SCIRIA Dr John Tchalenko leads the Leverhulme funded project Drawing and Cognition: How is something that is perceived by the eye trans­ formed into movement of the hand resulting in a wonderful drawing? The 2-year Leverhulme project investigates this question with eye tracker tests (Dr Tchalenko at Camberwell College of Arts) and fMRI neuroimaging tests (Professor Miall at the Brain & Behaviour Centre, University of Birmingham). The methodology for this dual approach has recently been developed by Tchalenko and Miall in a series of articles in leading cognitive journals. Two complementary peer-reviewed outputs are planned in the form of contributions to learned cognitive science journals, and a 52-minute popular film targeting all school institution where drawing is taught. James Faure Walker, a painter with an international reputation, leads research which considers the potential use of the computer within painting. Using paint programs in painting, especially abstract painting, it is now less about ‘virtual’ art forms, and more about adaptation. Watercolour, with its peculiar history, is one interest, another in development is a book that connects 1920’s drawing books and current software. Papers include,‘Drawing Lessons for Ants’ (ISEA 2009 paper, Belfast), ‘Origins of Artscribe’

(criticism in the 1970’s, Artists’ Writings, Courtauld Institute and Computer Space (invited lecture on Painting and the Computer) Sofia, Bulgaria. SCIRIA runs the lecture series OpenMind and AppliedMind workshops, which are open to all and include external speakers and PhD students. FADE brings together staff and research students

in practice based research using the computer in relationship to established technologies. Professor Paul Coldwell and Dr Barbara Rauch have just completed a two-year AHRC funded project ‘The Personalised Surface within Fine Art Digital Printmaking’ and Coldwell will be presenting a paper on this research at the Impact Printmaking Conference at UWE , Bristol in September. Also through FADE , ‘Points of Contact’, (a collaborative exchange exhibition with the Instituto De Artes in Porto Alegre ,Brazil), will be re-staged, in the Chelsea Triangle Space between the 28 September and 3 October 2009, featuring work by Jonathan Kearney (AL in Digital Arts), Dr Tim O’Reilly (Research Fellow at Chelsea), Maria Lucia Cattani (Brazil) and Paul Coldwell, with an accompanying symposium.


SCIRIA

Professor Humphrey Ocean painting subject using eye-tracker

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TrAIN Director: Professor Toshio Watanabe

The University of the Arts London research centre for Transnational Art, Identity and Nation (TrAIN ) is a forum for historical, theoretical and practice based research in architecture, art, communication, craft and design. In an increasingly complex period of globalisa­ tion, established certainties about the nature of culture, tradition and authenticity are being constantly questioned. The movement of peoples and artefacts is breaking down and producing new identities outside and beyond those of the nation state. It is no longer easy to define the nature of the local and the international, and many cultural interactions now operate on the level of the transnational. Focusing on how the movement of both people and artefacts breaks down borders and produces new identities beyond those of the nation state; the Centre aims to contribute to both creativity and cultural understanding. Central to the Centre’s activities is a consideration of the impact of identity and nation on the production and consumption of artworks and artefacts in this new global context. Transnational relationships are explored through crossings that traverse different media including fine art, design, craft, curation, performance and popular art forms. The centre grew out of an established Chelsea/ Camberwell research group active since 1993 and involves internationally recognised scholars and practitioners at three colleges of the University of the Arts London: Camberwell College of Arts, Chelsea College of Arts and Design and Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design. It also includes a community of post-graduate students pursuing historical,

theoretical and practice-based research degrees at both MA and PhD level. Core members of the Centre are Professor Toshio Watanabe (Director), Professor Oriana Baddely (Deputy Director), Professor Deborah Cherry (Associate Director), Dr Michael Asbury, Sutapa Biswas, Dr Yuko Kikuchi, Rebecca Salter, Dr Julian Stair, Carol Tulloch and Dr Isobel Whitelegg. Members contribute to TrAIN’s activities by completing group and individual research projects and through the supervision of relevant postgraduate study. Issues and debates arising from research activities are disseminated by TrAIN conferences, exhibitions and publications. Throughout the academic year, TrAIN organises Open Lectures at Chelsea College of Art and Design and Conversations at Central Saint Martins which are open to the public and at which artists, theorists and curators present their work and ideas. Current TrAIN projects include Forgotten Japonisme, the Taste for Japanese Art in Britain and the USA, 1920s–1950s’ (AHRC funded); Meeting Margins, Transnational Art in Latin America and Europe, 1950–1978 (in collaboration with the University of Essex, AHRC funded). Previous TrAIN projects include British Empire and Design; Ruskin in Japan, 1890–1940, Nature for Art, Art for Life; Other Modernities; Refracted Colonial Modernities: Identities in Taiwanese Art and Design; and Modernity and National Identity in Art: India, Japan and Mexico, 1860s–1940s.


TrAIN

Antonio Manuel, Ocupações / Descobrimentos (Occupations / Discoveries – installation view), Museum of Contemporary Art Niterói, 1998 (photo by V. de Mello)

TrAIN workshop with Anna Maria Maiolino, May 2008

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Graduate School Partnerships


Graduate School Partnerships

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One of the most significant and distinctive aspects of the C-C-W Graduate School is the range and quality of its external partnerships and networks with the cultural industries, organisations and institutions in London, the UK and Internationally. Many of these relationships have been built up over the years by the individual colleges and have resulted in a number of research projects, staff and student exchanges and funding opportunities. At present, we are developing specific links and partnerships on a more strategic level with a smaller number of institutions and networks that reflect the ethos of the Graduate School and our chosen thematic lines of enquiry. Currently we have strong links with the following key institu足 tions and organisations with whom we are looking to forge longer-term partnerships with to support the work of C-C-W and the Graduate School in particular: > The Barbican Centre, London, UK. > Cape Farewell, London, UK. > Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing, China. > Columbia College, Chicago, USA . > Design Research Society, UK. > European League of Institutes of the Arts, The Netherlands. > EWAH , Womans University, Seoul, South Korea. > Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Australia. > The Saint Catherine Foundation, UK. > Singapore Economic Development Board, Singapore. > Southbank Centre, London, UK. > South London Gallery, UK. > Tate Britain, London, UK. > Tokyo Wondersite, Japan > Tsinghwa University, Beijing, China. > United Nations University, Tokyo, Japan. > Victoria and Albert Museum, London, UK. This list is by no means definitive as it does not include the large number of important partnerships that exist in relation to more time specific individual research projects and research degree programmes of study.


Appendix


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HOW TO APPLY and ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

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Contact Details


HOW TO APPLY and ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

One of the most important things to do is find out as much information about the course or research programme as you can. Please read the prospectus, check the UAL website (www.arts.ac.uk) and where possible visit us on an open day to get a full understanding of what the courses are about, and the selection criteria for each course. This will give you the best possible chance when applying for your chosen course. ENTRY RE Q UIREMENTS

Postgraduate Diploma > An Honours degree or equivalent academic/ professional qualifications. > Applicants who do not have English as a first language must show proof of IELTS 6.0, or equivalent, in English upon enrolment. > The College takes into consideration prior learning, alternative qualifications and experience. Masters Degrees > An Honours degree or equivalent academic/ professional qualifications. > Applicants who do not have English as a first language must show proof of IELTS 6.5, or equivalent, in English upon enrolment, with the exception of MA Critical Writing and Curatorial Practice which requires an IELTS level of 7.0. > The College takes into consideration prior learning, alternative qualifications and experience. Research (MPhil and PhD) The minimum entry requirement is an upper second class honours degree from a British university, or from a recognised higher education institution. A Master’s degree in an appropriate

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subject is considered to be particularly valuable in preparing candidates for a research degree. Applicants who do not have English as a first language must show proof of IELTS 7.0 or equivalent in English within the application form. In some instances, applicants without this requirement may be considered if they can demonstrate appropriate alternative qualifica­ tions, professional experience or previous research. APPLI CATION FORMS

Applicants for taught postgraduate courses can download the application form by clicking the ‘Apply’ tab on the relevant course information page. You can also pick up application forms at our open days or contact: Graduate School Administrator Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon C-C-W Graduate School 16 John Islip Street London SW1 P  4 JU T  +44 (0)20 7514 9600 E  ccwgraduateschool@arts.ac.uk Applicants for Research Degrees can download the application form from the University or College websites, or you can request one from: Laura Lanceley Research Degrees Administrator Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon C-C-W Graduate School 16 John Islip Street London SW1 P  4 JU T  +44 (0)20 7514 7836 E  l.lanceley@arts.ac.uk


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Contact details

Professor Chris Wainwright Head of Colleges Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon C-C-W Executive 16 John Islip Street London SW1 P  4 JU

Professor Stephen Scrivener Director of Doctoral Programmes Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon C-C-W Executive 16 John Islip Street London SW1 P  4 JU

T  +44 (0)20 7514 7895 E  c.wainwright@arts.ac.uk

T  +44 (0)20 7514 2089 E  s.scrivener@arts.ac.uk

Professor Linda Drew Dean of Graduate School Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon C-C-W Executive 16 John Islip Street London SW1 P  4 JU

Graduate School Administrator Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon C-C-W Graduate School 16 John Islip Street London SW1 P  4 JU

T  +44 (0)20 7514 7753 E  l.drew@arts.ac.uk

T  +44 (0)20 7514 9600 E  ccwgraduateschool@arts.ac.uk

Professor Oriana Baddeley Director of Research Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon C-C-W Executive 16 John Islip Street London SW1 P  4 JU

Laura Lanceley Research Degrees Administrator Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon C-C-W Graduate School 16 John Islip Street London SW1 P  4 JU

T  +44 (0)20 7514 6307 E  o.baddeley@arts.ac.uk

T  +44 (0)20 7514 7836 E  l.lanceley@arts.ac.uk


C-C-W Graduate School launch Directory 2009 Editor: Chris Wainwright Assistant editor: Kate Sedwell Editorial team: Oriana Baddeley, Linda Drew, Kate Sedwell Thanks to Hannah Fitzgerald, Patricia Forbes, Claire Foss, Cliff Hammett, Laura Lanceley, Anne Lydiat, Susie Morrow, David Revagliatte, Kerry Sullivan, Sian Stirling, Matthew Whyte and Roger Wilson Design: Paulus M. Dreibholz Printing: Cassochrome, Belgium Published by: C-C-W Graduate School 16 John Islip Street London SW1P 4JU +44 (0)20 7514 7895 This title was published as part of the Bright series of publications produced by C-C-W. ISBN 978-0-9558628-1-6 Š 2009, Graduate School, C-C-W and contributors


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GRADUATE SCHOOL | LAUNCH DIRECTORY 2009

GRADUATE SCHOOL LAUNCH DIRECTORY 2009

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CAMBERWELL CHELSEA WIMBLEDON

Bright 1: Graduate School Launch Directory 2009  

This launch publication marks the creation of the Graduate School here at Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon colleges.