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COV E R TO COV E R Four Product Design alumni — the entire design studio at a well-known brand — innovate protective sports gear for youth and pros. An Interior Design alumna reimagines commercial and hospitality design in Detroit. An Illustration alumna breaks down what it takes to maintain a thriving freelance career. Six Communication Design alumni show off their type personalities. And six alumni in Entertainment Arts, Illustration and Product Design careers share their advice for future artists and designers.

T H E S E A R E CC S A LU M N I . O N E DAY, YO U W I L L B E O N E O F T H E M .

COLLEGE FOR CREATIVE STUDIES offers 11 undergraduate majors and a Teacher Certification program, but as you’ll see, the possibilities are limitless.

Townhouse Detroit restaurant. Lead Designer, Elizabeth Swallow ‘07, Interior Design, McIntosh Poris Associates.


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KICKIN T W E N T Y M I N U T E S . T H AT ’S T H E AV E R AG E

Founded in Boston in 2006 by former Harvard

A M O U N T O F T I M E A N Y O N E P L AY E R W I L L

gear and apparel brand, Xenith, puts the safety,

S P E N D O N T H E FO OT BA L L F I E L D D U R I N G A T Y P I C A L P R O G A M E . A N D I T ’S O F T E N

quarterback Vin Ferrara, the football, helmet, performance and comfort of athletes first — from youth to pros — during every step of the design and engineering process. Those 20 minutes and every second of sweat and prep

H A L F T H AT. B U T I F YO U ’ R E I N T H E

leading up to them? Covered. Now, having based

B U S I N E S S O F D E S I G N I N G A N D I N N OVAT I N G

in Detroit, Xenith, which introduced its first

P R OT EC T I V E AT H L E T I C G E A R L I K E X E N I T H ,

a five-star-rated helmet featuring an industry-

YO U K N OW T H AT 2 0 M I N U T E S O F I N T E N S E

technology, part of a patented shock matrix that

FO OT BA L L R EQ U I R E S P E A K P R O J EC T I O N , W I T H O U T E XC E P T I O N .

its entire design and manufacturing operation helmet in 2009, has debuted Xenith Shadow — first novel polymer shell and adaptive fit moves independently of the shell. And every member of the design studio is Team CCS. Lead Product Designer CONNOR RIEGLE ‘17, Product Design, says that Xenith Shadow


NG OFF was his first big project at Xenith, along

Bailey Boyd contributed the helmet’s sleek

Studio is what started it all. The course was

with product designers BAILEY BOYD and

silhouette. “If you look at Xenith’s helmets in

led by McPhail, who points out that the studio

ANDREW LARK , both ‘17, Product Design,

the past, you know we’ve had a very simple

“really sparked what is now a full design team

and that the design process was so comfortable

silhouette,” he explained. “That was something

that is comprised almost entirely of people from

it felt as if “we had brought a little bit of CCS

that I really wanted to influence on the helmet:

that original studio, which you just don’t see

here. We’re basically a solid CCS design team.

design something that looks fast and would

very often in a design space.”

It really feels like a family both from a Xenith

really catch people’s eyes from a distance

Xenith completed its third sponsored studio

perspective and a CCS perspective, so we have

while it’s out on the field.”

with CCS in spring 2019, this time in conjunction

this shared history. We know each other’s paths,

More than friends and former college

with the Product Design and Advertising Design

and we’re on that journey together.”

classmates, Boyd, Lark and Riegle have forged

departments. According to CEO Ryan Sullivan, the

Director of Product Design, MATTHEW

something utterly unique within a brand known

company has grown significantly in parallel with

MCPHAIL — also a CCS alum ‘09, Product

for uniqueness.

what is clearly a winning partnership. “Each year

Design — gave them free reign on the Xenith

The Xenith Shadow helmet is currently on the

at Xenith, we try to continue evolving, continue

Shadow project to come up with something

field being used by thousands of athletes from

raising the bar, continue trying new things, and

game-changing. “It was fun to see a little bit

the NFL and college ball to youth and high school

to enhance and deepen the partnership with the

of competitive edge through sketching and

teams. And an undeniable element of the trio’s

College for Creative Studies,” he said. “Because,

research,” said Lark. “All of us just trying

success at Xenith is the bond they created at CCS.

at the end of the day, that’s the best environment

to work together to find that novel solution.”

The 2017 Xenith-sponsored CCS Design

for both organizations to thrive.”


PLAY-BY-PLAY “Genius is 1% inspiration and 99% CONCEPTING

perspiration.� Goes for anything worth

Develop concepts:

doing. Athletes know this, as do designers, engineers and everyone else who puts their all into the relentless pursuit of the next game-changing helmet.

1

PROBLEM-SOLVING

the look, the style.

What are the barriers

Create sketches. Develop

to player performance?

lo-fi prototypes. Evolve

What kinds of impacts

comfort, fit, shape, shell,

happen during

shock absorbers. Evolve

game time?

performance.

2

3

4

RESEARCH Thousands of athlete interactions. Talk to players, coaches, parents. What are the problems?

DEVELOPMENT

What are their needs?

Use computer-aided

What next?

design to run simulations. How will the helmet react to real-word forces? Create molds. Experiment with materials. Refine, refine, refine. 4


COLLEGEFORCRE ATIVE STUDIE S . EDU

PRODUCTION Paint, assemble, polish, package. 1,000+ helmets per day at peak production.

5

6

7

8 REVOLUTIONIZING Welcome to the revolution. Xenith Shadow boasts enhanced shock arrangement and

BRANDING

materials tuned

This is who we are, and

specifically to a wide

TESTING

this is what we do: design

range of hits, with an

Learning and improve-

and manufacture five-star

adaptive fit system that

ments phase. Test helmet

helmets exclusively.

to measure response to

conforms to the head for a disappearing fit.

various impacts. Test to NFL, NOCSAE and Xenith standards for elite performance.

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THE A RT O F POP OF RED Bold red drapes and rug reflect the Townhouse brand palette

“My earliest memory of interior design was growing up: my sister and I shared a room. We used to dream out loud about what we were going to do,” said ELIZABETH SWALLOW ’07, Interior Design, a Lead Designer at McIntosh Poris Associates. “They were just ideas, but we built on them. You never know if something you’re interested in is a hobby or a real career. This is one hobby that turned into a career.” After years in the field and five years at McIntosh Poris, which specializes in hospitality — think restaurants, hotels and pubs — multifamily residential and

GLOBE LIGHTING

commercial design, Elizabeth Swallow understands

Elegant, retro lighting

what it really takes to be an interior designer. While it’s

helps warm the space and evokes

more complex than the TV clichés of fluffing pillows and

a peaceful library setting

picking paint swatches, it’s still a lot of fun. Swallow has taken lead on multiple high-profile projects, including Townhouse Detroit, upscale steakhouse Prime + Proper, DuCharme Place apartments and Detroit Athletic Club. “The process is a little bit different with each client,” Swallow said. “First, we take into account the architecture. We go look at the building that we’re working with, or, if it’s a new build, we take a look at the neighborhood. So we always look for context first. Also, who are the end users? What is the budget? There’s a lot to consider.”

FLEXIBLE SEATING Seating can be used for a range

She explains that hospitality clients tend to have a more fleshed out idea of what they want, based on the food

of social events, including private

they’ll be serving and the clientele they’re after.

dinners and business gatherings,

A good portion of the work involved, however, is less

without sacrificing style

about the designs than how to execute them. “We have these great concepts. Now, how do we make it happen?”

Three INTERIOR DESIGN ALUMNI The design studio of McIntosh Poris Associates includes three CCS alumni: Karin Abel ‘17 Jennifer Buesos ‘13 Elizabeth Swallow ‘07

Swallow typically teams up with a lot of people, including architects, engineers, lighting designers and many more. But smaller projects can be satisfying, too, precisely because the teams are smaller — more collaborative, with budgets requiring more creative solutions. Either way, Swallow adds, “as long as you have a great team in place, it’s a great experience.” Private dining and event space in Townhouse Detroit, an upscale restaurant designed by Elizabeth Swallow and team. The wood paneling and warm lighting are meant to have a library feel.

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9


UEEN T YPE PERSONALITIES

The right typeface is essential to a design’s message and impact.

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But sometimes the type IS the message: think Ed Fella’s hand-

drawn classic, “OutWest,” or Jackson Cavanaugh’s brand type for Rosetta Stone . CCS alumni have designed typefaces recognized ®

all over, well, everywhere — from global brands to award-winning restaurants. You can even find them in museum collections like Cooper Hewitt and The Museum of Modern Art in New York. These ain’t your mama’s fonts.

2

odon & Sa 1 – “Monoline”

TODD SMITH

‘00, Communication Design Design Director — Bags and

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Equipment, Nike

2 – “Out West Half Full” EDWARD FELLA

‘85, Communication Design

il Em Design faculty at California

Institute of the Arts and recipient of the 2007 AIGA Medal

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3, 10 – “Resist”; 4 – “Rise”; 8 – “Marguerite”

ELIZABETH CAREY SMITH ‘02, Communication Design

Creative Director, Bank of New

York Mellon and Vice President of the Type Directors Club

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BAT 4

5 – “Mink,” custom letterform PAOLO CATALLA

‘12, Communication Design Senior Designer, Lafayette American

3

asquatch 6

6, 7 – Custom letterforms

STACEY DONALDSON

‘12, Communication Design

Senior Designer, One Design Company

mpire 10

Okay Type

Harriet v2

All Styles

Harriet Display Thin Harriet Display Light Harriet Display Regular Harriet Display Medium Harriet Display Bold Harriet Display Black

Harriet Display Thin Italic Harriet Display Light Italic Harriet Display Regular Italic Harriet Display Medium Italic Harriet Display Bold Italic Harriet Display Black Italic Harriet Text Thin Harriet Text Light Harriet Text Regular Harriet Text Medium Harriet Text Bold

Harriet Text Thin Italic Harriet Text Light Italic Harriet Text Regular Italic Harriet Text Medium Italic Harriet Text Bold Italic

9 – “Harriet v2 Text Bold”

JACKSON CAVANAUGH

9

‘05, Communication Design Owner/Designer, Okay Type

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The first time you experience the work

good things will happen as long as

of South Korean alumna UIJUNG KIM

you don’t quit.

‘13, Illustration, you’re struck by how

P OW !

vibrant and joyful it is. Her playful

Faculty at CCS who were

figures and bold color schemes are

particularly helpful?

inspired by Japanese characters,

Don Kilpatrick, Chair of Illustration,

including “Kogepan” — literally “Burnt

encouraged me to pursue illustration

Bread” — and they’re pretty addictive.

and taught me about fashion illustration

Here’s what she had to say about her

as well. Lora Parlove prepared me for

style, what it takes to maintain a

the real world. I still have her paper in

freelance illustration career, and why

front of my desk. She is great. Stephanie

she wouldn’t want to do anything else.

Henderson helped teach me basic oil painting. I learned about and fell in

How did you get started in illustration?

love with color. And Frank Zerilli ’12,

I tried many things before illustration.

Illustration, taught me Adobe Illustrator®,

But what I wanted most was to tell

showed me American culture and exposed

stories that were personal to me. I

me to many new things. He was my class-

recommend doing what you love, and

mate, and now he’s my husband!


Where can we find your illustrations? I pitched an idea for a book to Cicada, and they liked my idea. I just finished! It’s about subway systems around the world — I even designed the book’s layout. It has been the best experience in my career so far. I had work selected for American Illustration 38. I also got to do the cover of PLANADVISER, a sticker set, Box Girl, for Facebook, and I’ve had work in The New York Times. Advice on becoming an illustrator? Be patient, and do personal work when you don’t have a job. If your work is good, clients will connect with you. I always want my work to be better, and I am still learning every day. Also, save money and learn how to invest it. The more you can save, the more options you will have open to you. Opposite, left to right: Illustrations for PLANADVISER and PLANSPONSOR, SooJin Buzelli, Art Director. This page, top to bottom: The New York Times online, Melody Newcomb, Art Director. Hello and Floating Market, Vietnam. Box Girl illustration for Facebook, Liz Sparber, Art Director.

Influences? Inspiration? I am influenced by many cute Japanese characters. I had a notebook when I was little, and it had an illustration of this burnt bread man character, Kogepan. I love how simple it is. Also watching Dragonball and playing the game Animal Crossing. I want to make art like that someday! What’s it like to freelance? It’s a really challenging job. You can’t predict the next project. Just have patience. It makes me happy that I can make illustrations that make other people happy.


BERNADETTE LITTLE

VERONICA BAYAGICH

CORI STEELE

MICHAELA ALLEN

COIYA WILSON

‘15, Illustration

‘11, Illustration

‘09, Product Design/Crafts

‘13, Communication

‘19, Advertising Design/

Designer

Senior Graphic Designer

Senior Designer

Design/Fine Arts

Illustration

Color and Materials

Assistant Project Manager

JALAL ENAYAH

ZACH COONROD

EFRAIN CORONADO

‘14, Product Design

‘12, Transportation Design

‘17, Product Design

BRANDON BIDLEMAN

Footwear Designer

Senior Designer

Footwear Designer

‘15, Illustration

Designer

Graphic Designer

G

32

WAY

alumni work for Adidas

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A N I L LU ST R ATO R W A F I N E A RT I ST W

FO OT W E A R. AU T A N I M ATO R. W I T H

CC S, YO U R O P T I O N

alumni work for Disney

N DAVE HARDIN

K ASSANDRA HELLER

SCOTT MALLWITZ

JENNIFER

JOANNA NAZIMEK

‘04, Entertainment Arts

‘10, Illustration

‘86, Industrial Design

STRICKLAND

‘10, Advertising Design

Animator

Background Painter

Executive Creative Director

‘16, Entertainment Arts

Creative Director/

Storyboard Director

Graphic Designer

CHRIS HOUGHTON

VAUGHAN LING

JEFFREY ABRAHAM

‘10, Illustration

‘11, Transportation Design

‘91, Product Design

Animator/Producer

Vehicle Designer

Art Director

(freelance)


K YLER HANZIE

CALVIN WADDY

ANDREW BAZINSKI

JOHN HATCHER

MISHO MILOSEVSKI

‘08, Photography

‘10, Entertainment Arts

‘11, Transportation Design

‘01, Advertising Design

‘16, Communication Design

Product Designer

Digital Sculptor

Exterior Designer

Senior Graphics Designer

Advanced UX/UI Designer

CARRIE KENNERLY

JENNIFER ATANASOVSKI

DEV YN OSTRAND

TAURUS BURNS

NICHOLAS NGUYEN

‘01, Product Design

‘00, Fine Arts

‘97, Communication Design

‘02, Fine Arts

‘10, Entertainment Arts

Senior Color and Materials

Human-Centered

Ford Performance Program

Sculptor

Lead 3D Designer

Designer

Insights Manager

Studio Lead

O

145

I T H A T H I N G FO R

TO D E S I G N E R AS A D EG R E E F R O M

NS ARE ENDLESS.

YOUR

W H O M A K E S M OV I E S .

alumni work for Ford Motor Company

9

alumni work for Google

O PHILLIP SPEHAR

LINDA XINRUI JIANG

GUSTAVO GONZALEZ

CHUCK CARLSON

JESSICA CHOI

‘07, Illustration

‘11, Product Design

‘05, Entertainment Arts

‘05, Communication Design

‘16, Product Design/

Illustrator

Senior Industrial Designer

Motion Designer

Creative

Advertising Design

SCOTT LANGE

JOHN CASSIDY

MATT SEFLIC

CHUCK GIBSON

‘92, Communication Design

‘07, Communication Design

‘04, Product Design

‘04, Communication Design

Group Creative Director

Product Designer

Industrial Designer

UX Designer

Industrial Designer


COLLEGEFORCRE ATIVE STUDIE S . EDU

A DV I C E F R O M T H E

AND ANOTHER THING Eat your vegetables. Get some sleep. No, more than that. Be kind. Work at something you’re passionate about.

ZACH SMITH

Learn from the folks who came before

’10, Entertainment Arts (Animation)

but over time I realized that I fit

you — they know stuff.

Storyboard Artist on SpongeBob 3

better as a storyboard artist.

Paramount/Nickelodeon

What drew me to my current field:

What I do:

I’ve always been obsessed with

I draw storyboards for TV and fea-

cartoons and being funny (or at least

ture animation, and I create shows,

attempting to be funny). In college,

comics and development ideas in the

I made three films and enjoyed the

TV animation industry.

process a lot. Once I left school I just

How I got started:

continued creating and developing

I interned on The Mr. Men Show (Car-

my own ideas on the side, while work-

toon Network) between my third and

ing as a storyboard artist during the

fourth year at CCS. After graduation,

day. I really like pitching, creating and

I returned to the animation studio

developing my ideas with studios.

where I had interned (Renegade

I’ve had three pilots (none of which

K ATE BRUSK

Animation in Glendale, CA). I started

have been greenlit), but I find working

’12, Entertainment Arts (Animation)

as a Prop Designer and Animator,

in the story department informs my

Storyboard Artist, Nickelodeon

then shifted into character design,

development work and vice versa.

What I do: I take a script for an episode and draw it all out in storyboards to create the visual base for an episode. I choose shots, define acting and, basically, play Director. I also get to sneak in chickens and add jokes. How I got started: I’ve always loved to draw! And I knew I wanted to tell stories, because they can have such an important impact on people. Working in animation was sort of a natural conclusion. Advice to my past self: Stop trying to draw it perfect. It really doesn’t need to be.

Chase what inspires and impacts you. Draw yourself down rabbit holes and build a library of inspiration that will inform your work and help you stand out as someone with a voice.


BERNADETTE LITTLE ’15, Illustration (Minor: Product Design) Designer, Adidas What I do: I work on the global brand design team, which can be thought of as Adidas’ internal advertising team. How I got started: I hopped around through a few internships — two at Adidas — and one apprenticeship at Reebok.

I really enjoy storytelling and I really enjoy drawing, so I think storyboarding is a nice mash-up of the two because it challenges your storytelling sensibilities and your draftsmanship at the same time. It wasn’t easy, though! It took a lot of trial and error, patience and perseverance, which applies to most art jobs.

Diversify your skill set. Have something that you really love doing, but make sure you have a few different skills in your back pocket. If you’re an illustrator, learn to animate or code or even 3D model. And learn to network: it’ll be one of your most important assets.

JAY SHUSTER ’93, Industrial Design Production Designer, PIXAR Animation Studios What I do: I produce characters and environments for feature animation. What drew me to my current field: I stood in line to see Star Wars: A New Hope in 1977, and that was the moment I decided design in film was what I wanted to do. Advice to my past self: Take more time outside of work to get inspired.

KELLYE PERDUE

the Creek, Marvel’s Spider-Man and

and half later, in September 2017,

’16, Illustration

Ben 10 (reboot).

after consistently posting my work

Storyboard Artist,

How I got started:

online and a bunch of other things

Cartoon Network

One of my good friends and fellow CCS

that happened, I got contacted by

What I do:

alum, Jenn Strickland, recommended

the Infinity Train crew to join their

I typically work in a two-person team

me for my first storyboard freelance

production as a storyboard artist.

storyboarding (and sometimes writing)

gig, Ben 10, right after graduation, and

I accepted, moved to Los Angeles

episodes for children’s TV shows, in-

I’m really grateful because that was

from Detroit, and have been working

cluding Infinity Train, Craig of

my first animation job. About a year

at Cartoon Network ever since!


ALUMNI, FACULT Y OR STUDENT? There’s no real mystery: CCS alumni and faculty are highly trained artists and designers making an impact in a wide range of industries. But you don’t have to wait until you graduate. CCS students create innovative, award-winning work — and start laying the foundation for successful careers — while they’re still in school.


1 – Alumnus

Global Design and User Experience,

6 – Alumnus

Accessories Design, 2019

Kevin Calabrese ‘08, Product

Whirlpool Corporation, KitchenAid

Damarcus Holbrook ’02,

Adidas x Footlocker Design

Design, VP of Creative Services,

4 – Faculty

Entertainment Arts, Senior

Challenge winner

Czarnowski, exhibit marketing

Hojoon Kang, Assistant Professor,

Designer, Blizzard Entertainment,

9 – Faculty

2 – Alumna

Transportation Design, exterior

World of Warcraft – Battle for Azeroth

Don Kilpatrick, Illustration Chair,

Jessica Pierce ‘16, Photography,

car design

7 – Alumnus

Designer, 2002 Olympic Winter

Staff Photographer, Forever 21,

5 – Faculty + Alumnus

Don Crum ‘94, Industrial Design,

Games medal

product photography

Tim Flattery ‘87, Transportation

Animator, Pixar Animation Studios,

10 – Student

3 – Faculty + Alumnus

Design, Entertainment Arts Chair,

Coco

Veronika Scott ’11, Product Design,

Patrick Schiavone ’88, Industrial

DeLorean Time Machine, Back to

8 – Student

CEO of The Empowerment Plan,

Design, (retired) Vice President of

the Future

Kayla Donaldson ‘19, Fashion

EMPWR coat


Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID College for Creative Studies

Office of Admissions 201 East Kirby Detroit, MI 48202 collegeforcreativestudies.edu 313.664.7425 | 800.952.2787 admissions@collegeforcreativestudies.edu

WANT IN? If CCS looks like the place for you, visit our website or drop us a line on social media, and let’s talk about the next four years.

The College for Creative Studies is a nonprofit, private college authorized by the Michigan Education Department to grant bachelor’s and master’s degrees. CCS is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design and is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. Documents regarding accreditation are available

COVER ARTWORK Ramen Girl, Uijung Kim ‘13, Illustration

in the Executive Office upon formal request. The College for Creative Studies subscribes to the principle of equal opportunity in its employment, admissions, educational practices, scholarship and loan programs, and other schooladministered programs, and strives to provide an educational environment and workplace free from unlawful harassment or discrimination. Discrimination, including harassment, because of age, race, color, national or ethnic origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, veteran status, physical attributes, marital or familial status, disability or any other characteristic protected by law is strictly prohibited.

Profile for College for Creative Studies

Alumni Magazine - November 2019  

Alumni Magazine - November 2019