Page 1

The Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine Educating naturopathic doctors for almost 40 years

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2016 – 2017


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE If you are the type of individual who views the healing of others as a calling, you exhibit a quality that we value in our students. You do not simply want to enter a profession; you are answering a calling that will lead to greater fulfillment in your life.

Naturopathic medicine is founded on the principle of healing through the co-operative power of nature. Naturopathic doctors (NDs) focus on promoting health, not on alleviating symptoms. To address the fundamental causes of disease, to heal the whole person through individualized treatment, to teach the principles of healthy living and preventative medicine—these are among the principles that underpin the profession. CCNM is a very special place. Our small student body and self-contained campus allows for an intensity of interaction that fosters life-long friendships. The faculty have impressive credentials and experience and are strongly committed to teaching others the path to promoting health. The staff is dedicated to ensuring that the educational environment is of high quality and that student experiences are positive. We all work together to ensure that CCNM graduates individuals who are well prepared for their roles as naturopathic doctors. 

If you choose to become a practicing ND, you will be entering a rewarding profession that has a long tradition and is growing. Reflecting the ethics and values of the profession, NDs have developed a set of principles that enshrine the safe use of natural methods and substances to support and stimulate the body's self-healing processes. Are you being called? Do you have the drive and ability that will allow you to excel in an intensive program of study? If so, I look forward to welcoming you into the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine.

Bob Bernhardt, B.Sc., LLM, M.Ed., PhD President/CEO

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  1


TABLE OF CONTENTS ABOUT CCNM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 The College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Doctor of Naturopathy Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Our Clinics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

INFORMATION FOR U.S. AND INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Living, Studying and Working in Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Admission Requirements for International Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Evaluation of International Transcripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Proficiency in English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

YEAR-AT-A-GLANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 HOW TO APPLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Academic Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Required Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Recommended Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Personal Statement/Essay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Confidential References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Resumé . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Personal Interview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Admission Decision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Deferred Enrolment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Experienced Student Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Enrolment Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 TB Testing Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Hepatitis B Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 CPR Certification Requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Criminal Background Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Essential Skills and Abilities Required for the Study of Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Accommodating Students with Disabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Application for Academic Accommodation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Registering with Accessibility Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Student Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Confidentiality of Student Academic Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Student Grades and Transcripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Transfer/Advanced Standing Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Limitations on Amount of Credits Awarded for Transfers and Advanced Standing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Appeals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 2016 – 2017 Advanced Standing Application Deadlines . . . . . . . . . 21 Withdrawal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Refund Calculation for Withdrawal from the Program . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Deferral, Discontinuation or Cancellation of the Program . . . . . . . 22 Withdrawal from a Course(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Refund Calculation for Withdrawal from a Course(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Readmission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Requirements for Graduation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Peer Tutor Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Counselling Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Residence/Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 FEES AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . 24

IMG BRIDGE DELIVERY FOR FOREIGN-TRAINED MEDICAL DOCTORS . . . . . . 17 Who are IMGs? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Do I qualify for Bridge Delivery of the ND Program? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 What is the MCCEE? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Naturopathic Students’ Association (NSA) Health and Dental Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 The Naturopathic Medical Students Association (NMSA) . . . . . . . 26

TUITION FEES AND FINANCIAL POLICIES . . . . . 27 Method of Fee Payment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Statement of Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Outstanding Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Planning your Financial Commitments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  2


TABLE OF CONTENTS cont’d

FINANCIAL AID (CANADIAN STUDENTS) . . . . . 28

ACADEMIC POLICIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Financial Assistance – Doctor of Naturopathy Degree Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Provincial Student Loans and Bursary Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Important Information on Student Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Satisfactory Scholastic Progress Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Ontario Student Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Maintaining Interest-free Status for Federal and Provincial Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Loan Responsibilities Regarding Repayment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Financial Assistance Offices (Provinces and Territories) . . . . . . . . 30 Additional Financial Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Academic Promotion and Standing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Attendance Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Examination Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Examination Dates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Grading Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Incomplete Grades Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Official Grade Notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Rescheduled and Supplemental Examinations Policy . . . . . . . . . 39 Examination Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Clinic Entry Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Remediation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Vacation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

FINANCIAL AID (U.S. STUDENTS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Application Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Direct Stafford Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Direct Grad PLUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Entrance and Exit Counselling for Direct Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Entrance Counselling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Exit Counselling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Sallie Mae Signature Student Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Emergency Student Loan Program (ESLP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

HONOUR CODE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Standards of Student Conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

DISPUTE RESOLUTION POLICY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 First Nations Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Entrance Bursaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Bursaries for Returning Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Convocation Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Governors’ Award of Excellence – Sponsored by CCNM . . . . . . . 34 Humanitarian Award – Sponsored by CCNM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Leadership Award – Sponsored by CCNM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 NSA Community Spirit Award – Sponsored by the NSA . . . . . . . 34 NSA Naturopathic Honour Award – Sponsored by the NSA . . 34

ACADEMIC OFFENCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Academic Misconduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

NON-ACADEMIC OFFENCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Offences against Persons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Offences against Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Parties to Offences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Sanctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

DISCIPLINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Disciplinary Procedures for Academic Offences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Disciplinary Procedures for Non-academic Offences . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Employment Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Default Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

APPEALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

PROGRAM STRUCTURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Appeal of a Course Grade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Procedure for Hearings of the Appeals Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Program Duration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Academic Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  3


TABLE OF CONTENTS cont’d

ACADEMIC FREEDOM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

General Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Guest Speakers and Other Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Year 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Year 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Year 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Year 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Coverage and Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Scholarly Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Works for Hire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 All Other Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Consulting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

Clinical Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

DOCTOR OF NATUROPATHY DEGREE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 DOCTOR OF NATUROPATHY DEGREE . . . . . . . . . . 52 Biomedical Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Clinical Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Art and Practice of Naturopathic Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Naturopathic Therapeutics – an Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Asian Medicine/Acupuncture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Botanical Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Clinical Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Homeopathic Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Physical Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Health Psychology and Lifestyle Counselling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Clinical Education Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

COURSE LISTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 How to Read Course Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

PRECEPTOR PROGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Preceptor Program Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Global Health Preceptorship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

CLINICAL EDUCATION AND CLINIC OPERATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Clinical Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Accommodations for Clinic Shifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Externship Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 RSNC Absence Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Infractions and Sanctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Business Cards and Advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Dress Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Etiquette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Clinic Completion Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Clinical Experience After Graduation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Residency Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

POLICIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Drug-free Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Fragrance-free Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Smoke-free Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 AODA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Bill 168 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Equal Opportunity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Harassment and Discrimination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Institutional Closure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Formal Complaint Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  4


TABLE OF CONTENTS cont’d

REGULATION AND LICENSURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

CCNM VISION AND MISSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 British Columbia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Manitoba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Quebec – Unregulated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 New Brunswick – Unregulated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Newfoundland and Labrador – Unregulated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Nova Scotia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Northwest Territories – Unregulated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Nunavut – Unregulated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Prince Edward Island – Unregulated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Yukon – Unregulated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 United States of America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Licensing Examinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 NPLEX (Naturopathic Physicians Licensing Examination) . . . . . . 84 North American Board of Naturopathic Examiners (NABNE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84

Vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

ACADEMIC STRUCTURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  5


For almost 40 years, the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine (CCNM) has been Canada's premier institute for education and research in naturopathic medicine. CCNM offers a rigorous four-year, full-time naturopathic program, culminating in the only Doctor of Naturopathy degree in Canada. CCNM is also home to the Robert Schad Naturopathic Clinic, a dynamic naturopathic teaching clinic where senior clinicians and ND supervisors conduct more than 25,000 patient visits per year. The College is accredited by the Council on Naturopathic Medical Education (CNME), the accrediting agency for naturopathic colleges and programs in Canada and the United States.

THE COLLEGE • F ounded as the Ontario College of Naturopathic Medicine in 1978. • Registered charity dedicated to education and research in naturopathic medicine. Receives no direct government funding. • Student enrolment: approximately 550. • Annual operating budget of $17 million, with an estimated economic impact on the community of more than $40 million.

HISTORY The Institute of Naturopathic Education and Research (INER) was incorporated under the Corporations Act (Ontario) in 1984. INER is registered as a charitable organization under the federal Income Tax Act. INER operates under the registered business name the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine (CCNM). CCNM receives no direct government funding. A pioneer in Canadian naturopathic education, the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine first opened its doors in 1978 (as the Ontario College of Naturopathic Medicine in Kitchener). By 1983 the College was offering Canada’s first

ABOUT CCNM

ABOUT CCNM four-year, full-time professional program in naturopathic medicine. In 1984 CCNM relocated to Toronto, where it has continued to grow, educating students from across Canada and around the world. CCNM’s 4.3-acre campus includes an on-site 198-bed residence, modern classrooms, a wellequipped learning resources centre, a 248-seat lecture theatre, a healthy-foods cafeteria serviced by Hearty Catering and a bookstore/dispensary. The campus is also home to the Robert Schad Naturopathic Clinic, Canada’s largest naturopathic teaching clinic. Through excellence in health education, clinical services and research that integrate mind, body and spirit, the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine program graduates primary care doctors accomplished in the art and practice of naturopathic medicine. CCNM is accredited by the Council on Naturopathic Medical Education (CNME). Accordingly, CCNM’s program standards are held in high regard: they ensure that the education and training students receive equips them to practice the full scope of naturopathic medicine in the province of Ontario and other regulated and licensed jurisdictions across North America. The Doctor of Naturopathy degree program is broadly composed of three main areas of study: biomedical sciences, clinical sciences, and the art and practice of naturopathic medicine. CCNM’s Board of Governors consists of naturopathic doctors and laypersons from a variety of disciplines who are elected by INER members. The Board’s mandate is to govern the organization, that is, the Corporation (INER) operating as the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine (CCNM), with a strategic perspective through effective policy governance and assurance of executive performance that allows the vision and ends of the organization to be achieved with excellence.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  6


ABOUT CCNM

ABOUT CCNM cont’d

DOCTOR OF NATUROPATHY DEGREE

OUR CLINICS

• P ost-graduate program requiring a three- or four-year bachelor's degree with standard pre-medical course prerequisites for admission. • CCNM is the only naturopathic program in Canada approved to grant degrees. • Involves more than 4,200 hours of classroom and clinical training. • In 2013, CCNM became the only college to offer a two-year bridge delivery for foreign-trained medical doctors (international medical graduates – IMGs) • CCNM was the first accredited North American naturopathic college to earn a seven year reaccreditation period.

• T  he Robert Schad Naturopathic Clinic (RSNC) hosts over 25,000 patient visits per year. • The CCNM Brampton Naturopathic Teaching Clinic is the first naturopathic teaching clinic in a hospital setting (Brampton Civic Hospital) in Canada. • The Ottawa Integrative Cancer Centre (OICC) is the first integrated cancer care and research centre of its kind in Eastern Canada. • Integrated into local health-care delivery in five community health satellite clinics: Sherbourne Health Centre, Anishnawbe Health Toronto, LAMP Community Health Centre, Parkdale Community Health Centre, Queen West Community Health Centre.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  7


YEAR-AT-A-GLANCE

YEAR-AT-A-GLANCE

FALL TERM 2016 Sept. 2

Year 1 Jan, 4 & IMG summer final grades released to Moodle

Sept. 5

Labour Day, CCNM closed (clinic & library closed Sept. 3 & 5)

Sept. 6

Fall term classes begin (September intake Year 1, IMG and Years 2, 3 & 4); Clinic Fall term begins.

Sept. 6 & 7

Town Hall meeting

Oct. 10

Thanksgiving, CCNM closed (clinic & library closed Oct. 8 & 10)

Oct. 17-21

Midterm exam week

Nov. 4

Fall Midterm grades posted to Moodle

Nov. 7-11

Last week to receive any prorated tuition refund for dropped term 1 courses*

Nov. 7-11

Last week to drop term 1 courses without academic penalty

Dec. 9

Fall term classes end

Dec. 12-23

Exam period (fall term)

Dec. 23

Clinic Fall term ends

Dec. 24 – Jan. 2

Holiday break (September Year 1, IMG, Years 2, 3 & 4)

Dec. 24 – Jan. 2

CCNM and clinic closed

New student orientation (September intake)

Sept. 8 & 9 Unity Summit Sept. start students Sept. 9

Sept. 26

Deadline to submit health records if applicable (TB test/risk assessment form, Hep B vaccination/waiver and/or CPR certification)

Sept. 12

Welcome Back BBQ

Sept. 12

Last day to make tuition payment arrangement without late fee

Sept. 13

Advanced Standing application deadline (September intake Year 1 and Years 2, 3 & 4 – fall 2016 term and 2016 – 2017 full year courses)

Sept. 16

Last day to add fall term and full year courses

Sept. 16

Last day to drop fall term courses without financial penalty

Sept. 20

StudentCare.net NSA Health Plan opt-out deadline (www.ihaveaplan.ca)

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  8


YEAR-AT-A-GLANCE

YEAR-AT-A-GLANCE cont’d

WINTER TERM 2017 Jan. 3

CCNM and clinic open

Mar. 6-10

Last week to drop winter term courses without academic penalty (January intake)

Jan. 3

Winter term classes and clinic begin

Jan. 3 & 4

New student orientation (January intake)

Mar. 6-10

Last week to receive any prorated tuition refund for dropped winter term courses (January intake)

Jan. 5 & 6

Unity Summit Jan. start students

Jan. 6

Deadline to submit health records if applicable (TB test/risk assessment form, Hep B vaccination/waiver and/or CPR certification – January intake)

Mar. 10

Winter midterm grade release to Moodle (January intake)

Mar. 13-17

Last day to make winter term tuition payment arrangement without late fee

Last week to drop winter term courses without academic penalty (September intake Year 1, IMG and Years 2, 3)

Mar. 13-17

Advanced Standing application deadline winter term courses

Last week to receive any prorated tuition refund for dropped winter term courses

Mar. 14-17

OSCE III Primary Care exam (Year 3)

Jan. 13

Fall 2016 final grades released

Mar. 17

Jan. 16

Last day to add winter term courses

Winter midterm grade release to Moodle (September intake Year 1, IMG and Years 2, 3, 4)

Jan. 16

Last day to drop winter term courses without financial penalty

Apr. 7

NSA Closing ceremonies

Jan. 18

StudentCare.net NSA Health Plan opt-out deadline (January intake) (www.ihaveaplan.ca)

Apr. 7

Winter term classes end (January intake)

Apr. 10

Grad Lunch (Class of 2017)

Apr. 10-21

Exam period (January intake)

Apr. 13

Winter term classes end (September intake Year 1, IMG and Years 2, 3)

Apr. 14

Good Friday, CCNM closed (clinic & library closed April 14 & 15)

Apr. 17-28

Exam period (September intake Year 1, IMG and Years 2, 3)

Apr. 24-28

Reading week (January intake)

Apr. 29

Clinic Winter term ends

Apr. 30 – May 6

Clinic closed

Jan. 9 Jan. 10

Jan. 30 – Feb. 3

Last week to receive any prorated tuition refund for dropped full year courses**

Jan. 30 – Feb. 3

Last week to drop full year courses without academic penalty

Feb. 20

Family Day, CCNM closed (clinic & library closed Feb. 18 & 20)

Feb. 20-24

Reading week (September intake Year 1, 2, 3 & IMG)

Feb. 21-24

Midterm exam week (January intake)

Feb. 27 – Mar. 3

Midterm exam week (September intake Year 1, 2, 3, 4 & IMG)

Mar. 6

Town Hall meeting

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  9


YEAR-AT-A-GLANCE

YEAR-AT-A-GLANCE cont’d

SPRING TERM 2017 May 1

Spring term classes begin (January & IMG intake)

May 1-2

New Student Orientation (IMG intake)

May 4

Welcome new IMG class/ Year End Wine and Cheese Event

May 5

Advanced Standing application deadline IMG

May 5

Jun. 12-16

Midterm exam week (IMG)

Jun. 19-23

Midterm exam week (Year 4)

Jul. 1

Canada Day, CCNM & clinic closed June 30 & July 1

Jul. 3-7

Last week to drop spring term courses without academic penalty (IMG)

Winter Final grades posted to Moodle (January intake)

Jul. 3-7

Last week to receive any prorated tuition refund for dropped spring term courses

May 8

Last day to make spring term tuition payment arrangement without late fee (January Intake & IMG)

Jul. 4

Midterm grades posted to Moodle (January & IMG)

July 11

Midterm grades posted to Moodle (Year 4)

May 8

Advanced Standing application deadline IMG & January intake term 2 courses

Aug. 4

Spring term classes end (January & IMG intake)

May 8 & 9

Clinic orientation (IMG and Year 4)

Aug. 7

May 9

StudentCare.net NSA Health Plan opt-out deadline (IMG intake) (www.ihaveaplan.ca)

Civic Holiday, CCNM closed (clinic & library closed August 5 & 7)

Aug. 8-18

Final Exam period (January & IMG intake)

May 10

Clinic reopens for Spring term

Aug. 11

Spring term classes end (Year 4)

May 12

Winter final grades posted to Moodle (September intake year 1, 2, 3 & IMG)

Aug. 14-25

Final Exam period (Year 4)

Week of May 16 (TBA)

OSCE for IMGs – mandatory attendance

Aug. 21-25

Reading Week (IMG)

Sept. 1

Clinic Spring term ends

May 22

Victoria Day, CCNM closed (clinic & library closed May 20 & 22)

Sept. 1

Final exam grade release to Moodle (IMG Intake)

May 23

Last day to make spring term tuition payment arrangement without late fee (Year 4)

May 25

Convocation (clinic closed)

* Prorated tuition refund based on 16 week duration. Courses and refund may vary. ** Prorated tuition refund based on 32 week duration. Courses and refund may vary.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  10


HOW TO APPLY

HOW TO APPLY CCNM accepts applications for admission for the four-year degree through the Naturopathic Doctor Centralized Application Service (NDCAS): www.ndcas.org. Complete instructions regarding the completion of the online admissions application are available at https://portal.ndcas.org/ndcasHelpPages/ instructions-faqs/. The application form for the two-year bridge delivery for international medical graduates is available on the CCNM website or by contacting Student Services. Please direct all inquiries to: Student Services Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine 1255 Sheppard Ave. East Toronto, Ontario, Canada M2K 1E2 Tel: 416-498-1255/1-866-241-2266 ext. 245 Fax: 416-498-3197 E-mail: info@ccnm.edu

About NDCAS 1. Be sure to read CCNM’s academic requirements prior to starting your online admissions application. 2. The NDCAS application may be completed all at once or over multiple sittings. 3. The application fee is payable online and is $115 for the first school or program designation and $40 for each additional school or program designation. 4. Once the admissions application has been received and verified by NDCAS, it will be forwarded to CCNM for further review and response.

Session Start

Priority Application Date

Final Application Deadline (for late applications and if space permits)

January 2017

August 12, 2016

November 30, 2016

May 2017 (IMG Bridge Delivery)

December 2, 2016

April 15, 2017

September 2017

January 2, 2017

July 31, 2017

Possessing the minimum admission requirements published herein does not guarantee an offer of admission. In addition to these requirements, the College will admit only those candidates who, in the judgment of the College, are of good character, are capable of completing the Doctor of Naturopathy Degree program in its entirety, and show promise of becoming worthy members of the naturopathic profession.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  11


The Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine (CCNM) is committed to excellence in naturopathic education and to the success of our graduates. All candidates for admission are evaluated based on their academic history and personal interview, as well as their motivation for becoming a naturopathic doctor, leadership skills, problem solving and critical-thinking skills, and specific personal qualities and characteristics.

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS To be considered for admission to the Doctor of Naturopathy degree program, applicants must have completed a three- or four-year bachelor’s degree in any discipline at an accredited institution. For September admission, courses must be

completed by August 31 of the year of application. For January admission, courses must be completed by December 31. Applicants are encouraged to apply early. Admission requirements may be subject to change at any time without notice. Applicants must have a minimum grade point average of 2.7 on a four-point scale. Historically, the average cumulative GPA of accepted students has been 3.3 on a four-point scale, encompassing a range of 2.7 to 4.0.

REQUIRED COURSES The table below outlines the required courses that applicants must take in order to submit a complete application.

Required Courses

Credit Hours

Units

Requirements

General Biology

6

1.0

May be fulfilled either by a one-year biology course or by two semesters of courses such as anatomy, botany, cell biology, endocrinology, genetics, immunology, microbiology, molecular biology, or zoology. Example: CCNM SBI100 Biology*

Physiology

6

1.0

May be fulfilled either by a one-year physiology course or a one-year anatomy and physiology course. Example: McMaster University – HTH SCI 2F03-Human Physiology and Anatomy I and HTH SCI 2FF3-Human Physiology and Anatomy II or CCNM SPH100 Physiology*

Chemistry

6

1.0

May be filled either by a one-year chemistry course or two semesters of any chemistry. General, organic and/or biochemistry courses would be accepted towards this requirement. Example: CCNM SGC100 General Chemistry*

Psychology

3

0.5

May be fulfilled either by one semester of introductory psychology, health psychology, developmental psychology, or other similar courses. Example: University of Toronto – PSY100Y-Introductory Psychology

Humanities elective

6

1.0

Acceptable courses include, but are not limited to: psychology, sociology, economics, organizational behaviour/management, English, history, women's studies, etc. This elective must include an essay-writing component. Foreign language courses are not accepted towards the humanities prerequisite. Example: Lakehead University – Nursing 2500Concepts of Health

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  12

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS


RECOMMENDED COURSES In addition to the required courses outlined above, we recommend that applicants complete courses in some or all of the following areas to prepare for the ND program curriculum: • • • • •

anatomy biochemistry organic chemistry environmental science genetics

• • • • •

microbiology physics sociology statistics English composition

Credit will not be given for the completion of prerequisites unless a grade of C� (60%) or better is earned.

PERSONAL STATEMENT/ESSAY Applicants are required to complete a personal statement/essay. Essay questions are included in the application. Please follow the specific instructions provided when answering the essay questions.

CONFIDENTIAL REFERENCES Three letters of reference must be submitted online through NDCAS. The following references are required: • One academic reference • One reference from a regulated health-care professional • One additional reference from either of the above categories or a past employer/volunteer • Referees must have known you for a minimum of one year, although it is strongly recommended that you choose someone who has known you for 2 years or more When selecting your referee, you should choose someone who can comment on your capacity in the following areas: • • • • • • • •

Ability to handle stressful situations Business management skills Commitment to upholding high ethical standards Demonstration of tolerance, compassion and empathy Initiative Maturity Problem solving skills Self-discipline

RESUMÉ Applicants must submit a current curriculum vitae/resumé including the following information:

• • • • •

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS cont’d

Education Work experience Volunteer experience Awards Skills and abilities

PERSONAL INTERVIEW It is an essential part of the admissions process. The purpose of this interview is to assess an applicant’s ability to successfully complete the program and become an effective naturopathic doctor. Applicants will be chosen for interviews based on their academic performance. Interviews are conducted at CCNM in Toronto for applicants who are able to travel to the campus. In extenuating circumstances, interviews may be conducted via Skype for applicants unable to travel to the campus. The personal interview lasts approximately 45 minutes. The interview team consists of one faculty member and one fourthyear student intern. There are three components to the interview: • • •

Several vignettes/scenarios with applicable questions (for which no prior medical knowledge is required) Additional questions related to motivation and familiarity with naturopathic medicine An opportunity for open dialogue

ADMISSION DECISION The decision to admit an applicant is based primarily on the applicant’s undergraduate grade point average and admissions interview. Additional criteria will include: • • • •

applicant’s academic history essay references resumé

If an applicant is offered admission, a deposit of $2,000 is required to confirm acceptance of the offer. The deposit will be applied to the student’s first-year tuition fee. Please note that if an applicant withdraws their acceptance of the admission offer within 48 hours of accepting it, or if the program is discontinued before the first day, they will receive a full refund of the $2,000 deposit. If an applicant withdraws their acceptance of the admission offer after 48 hours but before the start of the program, or if they do not attend the first ten

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  13


consecutive days of scheduled classes, they will receive a refund of the deposit and an administrative charge of $500 will be assessed. Withdrawals received after the start of the program will receive a refund calculated according to the program withdrawal policy.

DEFERRED ENROLMENT Letters of acceptance are only valid for the intake session for which the applicant was admitted. Applicants who do not enrol in the intake for which they applied, may submit a reapplication through NDCAS for a future intake. Additional designation fees apply on submission of the new application. The admissions application will be reassessed for the new intake and if approved, a new letter of acceptance will be sent.

EXPERIENCED STUDENT POLICY As outlined in the above section on admissions requirements, completion of a bachelor’s degree is expected. A limited number of exceptions are made for experienced students. Experienced students wishing to apply to CCNM must have completed a minimum of three years of university study (90 credit hours, 15 full courses) towards a baccalaureate degree. Competitive applications must have an average cumulative grade point average of at least 3.3 on a four-point scale (equivalent to B+). A lower grade point average (minimum 2.7) may be acceptable, depending on the applicant’s academic history, interview, essay, references and career-related experience. Applicants applying as experienced students must possess all of the minimum prerequisites as outlined in the above section on admission requirements. In addition, anyone applying as an experienced student must be able to demonstrate a minimum of four years of work and life experience outside of university. Please note that possessing the published minimum admission requirements does not guarantee an offer of admission. Please contact Student Services for more information.

ENROLMENT REQUIREMENTS Students accepted for admission to CCNM must satisfy the following enrolment requirements in order to be registered in the program: TB TESTING POLICY All new students must submit a two-step Mantoux (PPD) skin test prior to the start of classes. For fall enrolment, tests must be taken between June 1 and September 1. For winter enrolment (January intake) tests must be taken between October 1 and January 1. All returning students must submit a TB Risk Assessment form annually, prior to the start of classes each year. All TB test results must be submitted to Student Services. The CCNM TB Test form and Risk Assessment forms are available from Student Services or can be downloaded from Moodle. All students who test positive for tuberculosis must submit the results of one baseline chest x-ray to rule out active disease. If any student is found to be high-risk, s/he may be required to submit the results of an additional TB test or chest x-ray to rule out active disease. Failure to submit TB test results and/or Risk Assessment form may result in deregistration from all clinic-related activities including classes. Questions regarding the student TB testing policy should be directed to Student Services. HEPATITIS B POLICY Students who have been vaccinated for Hepatitis B must submit proof of vaccination or immunity to student services by one of these two methods: 1. A  letter from your MD stating that you received the vaccination within the last 15 years or; 2. Laboratory testing demonstrating immunity to Hepatitis B. Students who do not wish to be vaccinated for Hepatitis B must submit a Hepatitis B waiver form to Student Services prior to the start of classes. This form is available from Student Services or Moodle. This is a one-time only requirement. Once a student has submitted appropriate documentation to Student Services, it will be kept on file for the duration of their enrolment at CCNM. Failure to submit proof of Hepatitis B vaccination or waiver form may result in deregistration from all clinic-related activities including classes. Questions regarding the Hepatitis B Policy should be directed to Student Services. CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  14

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS cont’d


CPR CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENT All students are required to obtain CPR certification at the Health Care Provider (HCP) Level. Copies of CPR certification must be submitted to Student Services prior to the start of classes. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that their CPR certification is kept up-to-date at all times for the duration of their enrolment at CCNM. CPR recertification must be completed at least every two years or less depending on the expiry date of the initial certification. Failure to submit CPR certification may result in deregistration from all clinic-related activities including classes. Some CPR courses are offered at CCNM through the Continuing Education Department. CPR certification is also accepted from St. John’s Ambulance, Red Cross and the Heart and Stroke Foundation, among others. Questions regarding the CPR certification requirement should be directed to Student Services. CRIMINAL BACKGROUND CHECK All students should expect to submit a criminal background check prior to beginning their clinical internship at CCNM.

ESSENTIAL SKILLS AND ABILITIES REQUIRED FOR THE STUDY OF MEDICINE CCNM is responsible to society to provide a program of study enabling graduates to possess the knowledge, skills, professional behaviour and attitudes necessary to enter the regulated practice of naturopathic medicine. Graduates must be able to diagnose and manage health problems and provide compassionate primary care to their patients. For this reason, students in the ND program must possess the cognitive, communication, sensory, motor and social skills necessary to interview, examine and counsel patients, and competently complete certain technical procedures in a reasonable time while ensuring patient safety. Prospective applicants should note that cognitive, physical examination, management and communication skills, as well as professional behaviour, are all evaluated in timed simulations of patient encounters. All applicants are expected to assess their ability to meet the standards set out in this policy. This policy does not preclude individuals with disabilities from attending the College. Applicants who anticipate requiring disability-related accommodation are responsible for notifying CCNM in a timely manner; however, applicants should be aware that

the awarding of the program credential is dependent on candidates demonstrating skill in a number of areas, some of which require physical dexterity. A candidate for the ND degree must demonstrate the following abilities: Observation skills The candidate must be able to demonstrate skills in observation. In particular, a student must be able to accurately observe a patient at a distance and close at hand. Observation necessitates the functional use of the sense of vision and somatic sensation, enhanced by tactile, olfactory, and auditory information. Communication skills A student must be able to speak to, hear and observe patients and coherently summarize a patient’s condition and management plan, verbally and in writing. A student must be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients, families, employees and other health-care practitioners. Motor skills A student must demonstrate sufficient motor function to safely perform a physical examination on a patient in a timely fashion, including palpation, auscultation, percussion and other diagnostic techniques. A student must be able to use common diagnostic aids or instruments either directly or in an adaptive form, and be able to perform basic laboratory tests. A student must be able to execute fine and gross motor movements that are required to provide general medical care to patients. Intellectual-conceptual, integrative and quantitative abilities A candidate must demonstrate critical thinking, sound judgment, analysis, reasoning, and synthesis, essential to the problemsolving skills demanded of physicians. In addition, the candidate should be able to comprehend three-dimensional relationships and to understand the spatial relationships of structures. Behavioural and social attributes A student must consistently demonstrate the emotional maturity and stability required for full utilization of his or her intellectual abilities. The application of good judgment and the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients are essential attributes. The development of mature, sensitive and effective relationships with patients, families, employees and other health-care practitioners is also required. The student must be able to tolerate the physical, emotional and mental demands of the program and function CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  15

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS cont’d


effectively under stress. Adaptability to changing environments and the ability to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the care of patients are both necessary. Compassion, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal skills, intellectual curiosity and self-motivation are all personal qualities that naturopathic doctors and naturopathic medical students must demonstrate.

ACCOMMODATING STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES In accordance with the spirit and principles of the Ontario Human Rights Code (OHRC) and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, CCNM will use all reasonable efforts to accommodate students with disabilities in a manner designed to provide them with education equity in order to meet the standards of the program. At the request of a student, reasonable accommodations will be provided with respect to the documented disability, permanent or temporary, that affects the student’s ability to function in an academic setting. CCNM will endeavour to offer the most appropriate accommodation in a manner that does not compromise program standards, respects the dignity of the student, meets individual needs, best promotes inclusion and maximizes confidentiality.

APPLICATION FOR ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATION

REGISTERING WITH ACCESSIBILITY SERVICES Students requiring accommodations will need to provide documentation about their disability from a recognized health-care professional (see “Medical Certificate” accessed through Moodle). This documentation will be kept in confidence by Accessibility Services, and used solely to assess requests for accommodations. This information is maintained separately from the student’s academic file. The documentation verifying the disability (or disabilities) is then reviewed with the student, and eligible accommodations are discussed. Counselling and Accessibility Services then determines the eligible accommodations, and provides the student with a letter outlining the approved accommodations for that academic year. A copy of this letter is provided to the Office of Academic Affairs, who assists in facilitating the stated accommodations. There may be instances where students may need to provide a copy of the letter to his/her instructor(s). Students are required to re-register with Accessibility Services prior to the start of the next academic year while they are enrolled in the naturopathic medical program. Note for students with disabilities: Accommodations provided by CCNM may or may not be acceptable to a given licensing board or examining body independent of the College. Students with disabilities are strongly advised to consult the naturopathic licensing board in the province or state in which they intend to be licensed.

To facilitate appropriate accommodation, students are encouraged to register with Counselling and Accessibility Services as early as possible to avoid a delay in service. First-year students should register as soon as they are accepted to the College. In addition, further information may be required than is provided in the original documentation. The provision of accommodations begins after the registration process.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  16

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS cont’d


CCNM offers bridge delivery of its naturopathic medical program, developed specifically for foreign-trained medical doctors as an opportunity to further their health care careers in Canada. Required courses are organized into a compressed period of 24 months. The six-term curriculum incorporates all of the competencies of the four-year naturopathic medical program, acknowledges previous medical experience and education, while providing additional supports to address the unique needs inherent to foreign-trained medical doctors. Graduates receive the Doctor of Naturopathy Degree. Many foreign trained medical doctors feel that the nature of a naturopathic doctor’s practice is much closer to their experience as a medical doctor. Modalities associated with naturopathic medicine are used world-wide: clinical nutrition; lifestyle management; traditional Asian medicine and acupuncture; botanical (herbal) medicine; physical medicine, and homeopathy are used the world over and are delivered at CCNM.

WHO ARE IMGS? An international medical graduate (IMG) is an individual who has graduated from a medical school outside of Canada. They may have several years of independent practice experience in his/her country; have just recently completed medical school; have completed a residency training program; have gone directly into practice with no requirement for a residency; be from a country with a medical education system similar to Canada's; or be from a country whose medical education system is very different from Canada's.

DO I QUALIFY FOR BRIDGE DELIVERY OF THE ND PROGRAM? 1. Applicants must have graduated from a medical school recognized by the Medical Council of Canada 2. Applicants must have attained a passing grade on the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE) or, attained a passing grade for United States Medical Licensing Examination Step I (USMLEI). Applicants must have graduated from a medical school recognized by the Medical Council of Canada 3. G  raduates from non-English language medical programs must submit proof of English proficiency and satisfy the minimal grade required by CCNM in Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English language Testing System (IELTS). CCNM’s minimum requirements are: IELTS: minimum overall band score of 6.5 or higher (on a 9 point scale) TOEFL IBT: minimum 86 out of 120 (CCNM TOEFL DI Code: 0245)

WHAT IS THE MCCEE? The Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE) is a four-hour, computer-based examination offered in both English and French at more than 500 centres in 80 countries worldwide. The MCCEE is a general assessment of the candidate’s basic medical knowledge in the principal disciplines of medicine. International medical graduates must take the MCCEE as a prerequisite for eligibility to the MCC Qualifying Examinations.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  17

IMG BRIDGE DELIVERY FOR FOREIGN-TRAINED MEDICAL DOCTORS

IMG BRIDGE DELIVERY FOR FOREIGN-TRAINED MEDICAL DOCTORS


CCNM welcomes applications from U.S. and international students to the degree program. Every year, students choose the College because of its reputation as a leader in naturopathic education and research. An applicant is considered an international student if he or she is not a Canadian citizen or does not have permanent resident or landed immigrant status. For those applicants from the United States who wish to return home to practice after graduation, CCNM graduates meet the eligibility requirements for all regulated jurisdictions in the U.S. Applicants who intend to practice outside North America are advised to contact the local naturopathic medicine licensing body to inquire about requirements for licensing in that jurisdiction. International applicants must ensure that their academic credentials meet Canadian equivalency. If you are an International Medical Graduate, you may qualify for bridge delivery of the ND program. For more information visit the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Applicants who intend to practice outside Canada are advised to contact the local naturopathic medicine licensing body to inquire about requirements for licensing in that jurisdiction.

LIVING, STUDYING AND WORKING IN CANADA CCNM is recognized by the Government of Canada as a designated learning institution (DLI) for study permit purposes. Our DLI number is O19305338292. International applicants must comply with Citizenship and Immigration Canada admissibility requirements and must obtain a study permit. Study permit applicants should expect to complete a medical exam and/or a security check prior to entering Canada. International students are encouraged to apply for admission to CCNM as soon as possible so that they can allow ample processing time for their study permit application.

As CCNM’s naturopathic program is degree-granting, through Ministerial consent in the province of Ontario, international students may be eligible to work both on and off campus without a work permit while enrolled at CCNM. Additionally, CCNM graduates may be able to extend their stay in Canada after graduation, under the Post-Graduation Work Permit Program (PGWPP). Spouses or common-law partners of students who carry a valid study permit may be eligible to apply for a work permit in Canada. For more information about studying in Canada, visit the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada. International students can also choose from CCNM’s affordable, on-site residence or nearby, off-campus housing options. In addition to the Naturopathic Students' Association (NSA) extended health and dental plan, CCNM provides basic health insurance protection for international students at no cost to them. Additional protection can be purchased at the student’s expense for spouses and/or dependants. CCNM is the only naturopathic school in Canada approved to administer financial aid, such as unsubsidized Direct Loans to U.S. students. When completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) please use the following identification number for CCNM: 03273300/G3273300.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS In addition to CCNM’s admission requirements, international applicants must ensure that their academic credentials meet Canadian equivalency. If you are an International Medical Graduate, you may qualify for our 24-month bridge delivery of the naturopathic program. Contact Admissions and Student Services for details at 416-498-1255 x 245.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  18

INFORMATION FOR U.S. AND INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

INFORMATION FOR U.S. AND INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS


EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL TRANSCRIPTS Students applying for the four-year naturopathic program who have completed their university study at an institution outside North America must have their transcripts evaluated and translated (if necessary) on a course-by-course basis. (This is not required for bridge delivery applicants.) World Education Services www.wes.org Toronto: canada@wes.org 416-972-0070 or 1-866-343-0070 New York City: info@wes.org 212-966-6311

PROFICIENCY IN ENGLISH As CCNM curriculum is delivered in English, all applicants are expected to demonstrate sufficient facility in the English language to fully participate in the learning process. If an applicant’s post-secondary studies were completed outside of North America in a language other than English, proof of English proficiency must be submitted to CCNM. CCNM’s minimum requirements are indicated below. IELTS: minimum overall band score of 6.5 or higher (on a 9 point scale) TOEFL IBT: minimum 86 out of 120 (CCNM TOEFL DI Code: 0245)

The International Credential Assessment Service of Canada (ICAS) www.icascanada.ca info@incascanada.ca 519-763-7282 or 1-800-321-6021

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  19

INFORMATION FOR U.S. AND INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

INFORMATION FOR U.S. AND INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS cont’d


The office of the Registrar supports students in a numbers of ways, including help with registration, graduation and important dates regarding the school year.

STUDENT RECORDS The Registrar maintains permanent academic records of every student enrolled at CCNM. A student’s file contains their application, information related to the business of the College, grade reports and comments, and records of official action taken by CCNM concerning the student. Records may be made available to members of the faculty and administration with a demonstrated need. Except as may be required by law, no part of a student’s record will be released to any person outside CCNM without written consent of the student.

CONFIDENTIALITY OF STUDENT ACADEMIC RECORDS 1. A student’s academic record is defined as the information concerning the student that is held by the registrar at CCNM. 2. Academic records are the property of CCNM. 3. Release of information: a. Except as may be required by law, a student’s academic record will not be released to any third party without the written authorization of the student. b. Students may request that an official copy of their transcript be issued to a third party by completing the transcript request form. c. Students may obtain an unofficial copy of their transcript by completing the transcript request form. d. Student academic records may be released to authorized CCNM staff or faculty for the execution of job responsibilities as approved by the Registrar or designate. e. Any authorized review of a student’s file must be supervised by the registrar or designate. f.

Biographic and financial aid information will be forwarded to the designate of the Ontario Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development (formerly the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities) for the purposes of conducting the required Key Performance Indicator (KPI) surveys for graduation and employment rates.

STUDENT GRADES AND TRANSCRIPTS Students can access official grades through Sonisweb (http://records.ccnm.edu) by logging in with their Moodle user ID and password. The transcript is an official record of all academic and clinic credits earned toward the CCNM's Doctor of Naturopathy degree. It lists the course title, course code, number of credit hours and the numerical or letter grade for all courses taken. Unofficial transcripts are provided to students free of charge. Official transcripts are available at $10 each. Official transcripts will only be released directly to educational institutions and licensing boards whom the student has authorized to receive the transcript. Students and potential employers may have access to official transcripts in special circumstances. Transcript request forms can be downloaded from the student forms and resources section of Moodle.

REGISTRATION Students will register for all courses through Sonisweb (http://records.ccnm.edu) by logging in with their Moodle user ID and password. Complete registration instructions are available in the forms and resources section of Moodle. Online registration is open for a limited period. Failure to register during this period will result in a late registration fee of $100. Students who fail to register by the deadline to add courses will not be considered enrolled in that class and coursework will not be credited.

TRANSFER/ADVANCED STANDING CREDITS CCNM considers applications for transfer and advanced standing credits from applicants who have completed comparable courses at a CNME-accredited or candidate-for-accreditation institutions, or at approved accredited post-secondary institutions. Transfer students must provide an official transcript and a letter of recommendation from a senior administrator at the transferring institution. The letter should indicate that the transferee was in good standing and has not been subject to any disciplinary actions. Non-transfer students may apply for advanced standing in certain CCNM courses. Applicants must apply for advanced standing on a course-by-course basis. Detailed course outlines for each course must be submitted. Applications can be downloaded from the student forms and resources section of Moodle. New students can request advanced standing application form(s) from student services (info@ccnm.edu).

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  20

THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR

THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR


Before acceptance becomes official, the registrar must approve the transfer credits based on the following criteria.

2016 – 2017 ADVANCED STANDING APPLICATION DEADLINES

• • •

Applications for advanced standing will not be accepted under any circumstances after the following deadlines.

Courses must be equivalent or better in the number of credit hours. A passing grade of 65 per cent must have been achieved. Each course must be substantively equivalent (minimum 70 per cent) in content/learning outcomes to the CCNM course it replaces.

LIMITATIONS ON AMOUNT OF CREDITS AWARDED FOR TRANSFERS AND ADVANCED STANDING No more than 50 per cent of CCNM's Doctor of Naturopathy degree can be completed via transfer or advanced standing credits.

ADMINISTRATION All courses approved for transfer and advanced standing credits will show as EQV (equivalent) on the CCNM transcript and will not be calculated into a student’s GPA. Successful advanced standing or transfer applicants will not be charged tuition for courses for which credit has been granted.

APPEALS Any applicant/student who is denied a requested transfer or advanced standing request does have the ability to appeal the decision of the Registrar. Upon receipt of the original notification, the requestor will be notified of the basis for the denial in writing. Should the decision be made to exercise the right to appeal, the applicant must provide a written request for review with a rationale for the request, along with any relevant documentation, within five business days of the notice being issued. All documentation will be forwarded to the Associate Dean, Curriculum, who will review the written materials and make an independent determination. The Dean will then conduct a final review and will advise the applicant of his or her final decision in writing within ten business days of receiving the appeal.

Term/Year

Application Deadline

2016 – 2017 Full-year courses (Year 3)

September 13, 2016

Fall 2016 term course

September 13, 2016

Winter 2017 term course

January 10, 2017

Spring 2017 (IMG intake)

May 8, 2017

Spring 2017 term course (January intake)

May 8, 2017

Important Note about Advanced Standing and Student Loans If you are granted advanced standing, your federal and provincial student loans office (i.e., OSAP, BCSAP, etc.) will need to be notified of the change in your course load. Student Services will notify you of the course load change so that you can make the necessary changes to your loan application. If the loan has already been processed for the term, a tuition refund will be issued directly to the lender or to the student if applicable. Please contact Student Services for further information.

WITHDRAWAL Students who withdraw from CCNM for any reason must give written notice to the Registrar. The letter must be dated and signed by the student. If no letter is received, the last date of attendance will be the effective date of withdrawal and will be the date used to close out the student’s account. Any tuition refunds or remaining financial obligations to the College will be assessed based on the last date of attendance. Failure to attend for 10 consecutive scheduled class days without notice will be deemed to constitute a withdrawal from the College.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  21

THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR

THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR cont’d


REFUND CALCULATION FOR WITHDRAWAL FROM THE PROGRAM Upon providing written notice of their decision to withdraw, the student’s refund will be assessed based on the time spent in the program. Once the program has started, if the student withdraws, the amount of tuition owing (earned tuition) will be prorated and calculated on a course-by-course basis using the following formula: (Number of Weeks Attended / Total Number of Course Weeks) x Course Tuition = Earned Tuition (Tuition Owing) Once the time spent in a course reaches two-thirds of the total course hours, no refund will be issued. An administrative charge of $500 is assessed on withdrawals. The $500 administrative charge will be credited to the student’s account should that student return to the ND program within one year.

DEFERRAL, DISCONTINUATION OR CANCELLATION OF THE PROGRAM In the event of deferral, cancellation or discontinuation of the program, the College will refund to applicants unearned tuition. At his/her option, an applicant may choose to defer his/her application to a subsequent program start in which case the funds will be credited towards that program start.

WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE(S) A student who chooses to withdraw from a specific course or courses must advise the Registrar in writing, who will adjust their registration to reflect the course load reduction. The date of the request for the reduction in course load will be used to calculate the amount of the refund (if any).

READMISSION Students who voluntarily withdraw from CCNM are permitted to resume study and should notify the Registrar of their intent to return. If their absence has exceeded one academic year, they are required to re-apply through NDCAS. At that time the Registrar will review all courses previously taken. In cases where there has been a substantial change to a course previously completed, the student will have to take the new version of that course. Students dismissed for academic reasons must reapply. As part of their re-application they will be required to demonstrate that they have upgraded their skills by means of successful performance in an academic setting or by satisfying the College that any previous barriers to successful academic performance have been addressed and eliminated.

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION Candidates for the Doctor of Naturopathy degree must fulfill the following requirements to graduate: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Achieve a passing grade in all required courses in the Doctor of Naturopathy degree program. Attain a Cumulative Grade Point Average of 2.70. Attend the required number of hours in clinical training, and fulfill all other requirements of the clinical program with a passing grade. Satisfy all financial obligations to CCNM.

Students who have not met all of the requirements for graduation listed above may still be allowed to participate in convocation; however, no degree will be given until all requirements are met. Students to whom this applies will have their situations reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

REFUND CALCULATION FOR WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE(S) Once a student has reduced their course load, the refund (if any) for a specific course will be calculated by the Registrar as follows: (Number of Weeks Attended / Total Number of Course Weeks) x Course Tuition = Earned Tuition (Tuition Owing) Once the time spent in the course reaches two-thirds of the total course hours, no refund will be forthcoming. If the course has not yet started, no tuition charges will be incurred.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  22

THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR

THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR cont’d


PEER TUTOR PROGRAM

RESIDENCE/HOUSING

For those students in need of additional academic support, the registrar helps to match high-achieving upper-year students with students experiencing academic difficulty for individual tutoring in a specific subject area. To become a peer tutor, receive tutoring assistance or for more information about this program, contact Student Services.

CCNM’s on-campus residence rooms offer co-ed accommodations on both a short-term and year round basis for CCNM and non-CCNM students. Conveniently located adjacent to the main campus building, residents are just steps away from the fitness facility, Learning Resources Centre, a healthy food cafeteria and the RSNC.

COUNSELLING SERVICES On-campus, short-term counselling is available free of charge. This confidential service is designed to assist students who are dealing with personal issues that are impacting their student and/or personal lives. CCNM students can contact the student counsellor at 416-498-1255 ext. 256 to make an appointment. When leaving a message, please include details about the best time to return the call and whether a message can be left at the number provided. Messages are usually returned within 24 hours and every effort will be made to accommodate students as quickly as possible.

Each floor has a number of shared lounges complete with satellite television and a balcony overlooking the courtyard. A kitchen equipped with major appliances adjoins each lounge. Laundry facilities are available on each floor. All residence rooms are single occupancy only. Rooms include a single bed, desk and chair, wardrobe closet, personal refrigerator and Internet access, which is cabled in the room and wireless in the lounges. For more information or to request a residence application package, call 416-498-1255 ext. 330 or email residence@ccnm.edu. Off-campus housing listings are available online at www.ccnm.edu. These postings are available to the public and can be posted free of charge.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  23

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES


TUITION FEES – Doctor of Naturopathy Degree Program Annual tuition fee 2016 – 2017

$22,290

MANDATORY FEES – Doctor of Naturopathy Degree Program (non-refundable*) CAND annual student membership fee

$25

Naturopathic Students’ Association (Year 1)

$200

Naturopathic Students’ Association (Years 2-4)

$85

NSA Health and Dental Plan (September start)

$525

NSA Health and Dental Plan (January start – pro-rated)

$350

NSA Health and Dental Plan (IMG start – pro-rated)

$175

Basic Health Plan (International Students, 12 Months Coverage)

$1,077

Basic Health Plan (International Students, 8 Months Coverage)

$798

Basic Health Plan (International Students, 4 Months Coverage)

$424

ADDITIONAL FEES – Doctor of Naturopathy Degree Program (non-refundable*) Late registration fee

$100

Late payment fee

$50

Off-site exam administration fee

$50

Supplemental exam fee (including OSCE)

$100

Rescheduled mandatory practical fee (including OSCE)

$50

Rescheduled mandatory practical fee (with a standardized patient)

$50

Rescheduled practical exam fee

$50

Rescheduled written exam fee

$50

Clinic Entry Readiness Examinations

$350 (maximum)

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  24

FEES AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION

FEES AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION


ADDITIONAL FEES – Doctor of Naturopathy Degree Program (non-refundable*) cont’d Official transcript fee

$10

Returned cheque

$30

Photocopy of tuition tax receipt (T2202A)

$5

Student ID card replacement fee

$15

Advanced standing (per course) application fee

$25

Student INER membership

$25

* Fees are non-refundable except in the event of deferral, cancelation or discontinuation of the program or in the event that the student does not attend the first 10 consecutive days of scheduled classes.

COST OF BOOKS AND EQUIPMENT – Doctor of Naturopathy Degree Program (estimated) Year 1: Books

$2,392

Year 1: Equipment

$452

Year 2: Books

$1,578

Year 2: Equipment

$771

Year 3: Books

$1,674

Year 3: Equipment

$0

Year 4: Books/Equipment

$0

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  25

FEES AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION

FEES AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION cont’d


NATUROPATHIC STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION (NSA) HEALTH AND DENTAL PLAN

THE NATUROPATHIC MEDICAL STUDENTS ASSOCIATION (NMSA)

All NSA members (students enrolled in the Doctor of Naturopathy degree program) are assessed a fee for the NSA health and dental plan. The plan provides CCNM students with health and dental coverage for 12 months, from September 6, 2016 to August 31, 2017. Students already covered through another plan may opt out of the NSA health and dental plan at www.ihaveaplan.ca no later than September 20, 2016. Proof of coverage is required to opt-out. Students can also enrol their spouse and/or dependents in the plan by going to www.ihaveaplan.ca. Students starting in January 2016 will be assessed a fee pro-rated for eight months of coverage (January 1 to August 31, 2016). The opt-out deadline for January intake students is January 18, 2017. IMG students starting in May 2017 will be assessed a fee pro-rated for four months of coverage (May 1 to August 31, 2017). The opt-out deadline for January intake students is May 9, 2017. Please note that plan fees are subject to change prior to the start of the coverage period. The NSA health and dental plan is only available to students enrolled in the ND program. For more information, contact www.studentcare.net/works at 1-866-369-8791 or visit www.ihaveaplan.ca.

The Naturopathic Medical Students Association (NMSA) is an international, student-governed, non-profit organization established to support naturopathic medical students at accredited schools in the U.S. and Canada. The NMSA provides access to unique leadership experiences, travel grants, educational resources, as well as professional development opportunities to promote success in future careers as health-care professionals. NMSA annual membership fee is optional and costs $60 per student.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  26

FEES AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION

FEES AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION cont’d


METHOD OF FEE PAYMENT Tuition and all other fees are payable by cash, cheque, money order, or online banking. Cheques do not need to be certified; however, any student who tenders a cheque that subsequently is not honoured by the banking institution (NSF) will be charged a $30 fee plus the appropriate interest charge. Credit card payments cannot be accepted. Students may request that funds be directly disbursed to CCNM from their government student loans program and other similar sources. In such cases, students will be allowed a two-week grace period from interest charges before the actual receipt of the funds by CCNM. For students who will be graduating, all outstanding fees must be paid on or before May 15 of the graduating year. Fees paid after May 15 must be in the form of cash, certified cheque money order, or online payment. Students seeking alternate payment arrangements must meet with the Finance Office before tuition is due to avoid late payment fees.

STATEMENT OF ACCOUNT Statement of account is available through Sonisweb. Students are responsible for communicating with the Finance Office regarding any questions or concerns.

OUTSTANDING BALANCE Students whose accounts are in arrears will not be permitted to enrol in the following term until a satisfactory solution is reached with the finance department. Students who complete their academic studies with an account in arrears will not be issued a transcript, degree or clearance to write the NPLEX exams. Interest of 1.5 per cent per month (18 per cent per annum) is charged on all outstanding balances until the account is cleared. CCNM works to maintain a balance between minimizing the costs of tuition and other services and ensuring a high quality of education and support services. CCNM is a not-for-profit educational institution and does not receive direct financial support from the federal or provincial government. The College’s charitable status allows it to receive donations that are used to offset the full cost of providing the ND program. In order to complete their registration, students must have paid all required fees by the end of the first full week of scheduled classes.

Tuition fees are due on a monthly basis, although students may choose to pay a term at a time. The due date for tuition payments is the end of the first full week of scheduled classes within the month. Students seeking alternate payment arrangements must meet with the Finance Office before tuition is due to avoid late payment fees. The tuition fee is reviewed each year and increased as required to adjust for program growth and inflation.

PLANNING YOUR FINANCIAL COMMITMENTS Students are encouraged to plan ahead to manage the financial commitments of the program. The following points are important to remember: • • •

Recognize and quantify the total expenses related to the program as well as your personal expenses during this period of time. Consider all avenues of financing, including personal and family resources, loans and bursaries. Be aware of the limitations and uncertainties of provincial and federal loans and bursaries. These loans and bursaries cover only a portion of your tuition. A sound financial plan should include a contingency plan in case the expected loans and bursaries are not received in time or are not for the anticipated amount. • Be diligent and prompt in following up on all matters related to your finances, such as submitting loan documents and communicating with the Student Services and/or Finance departments. • Review your statement of account available through Sonisweb. CCNM’s financial policies are based on an understanding and acceptance of the responsibilities of the student and the College. It is important to have a clear understanding of the following relationships: 1. C  CNM has no direct relationship with government agencies such as the National Student Loan Service Centre in matters of finance. Students are responsible for all financing arrangements, including government student loans. The relationship is between the government, the bank and the student, and does not involve CCNM. 2. Tuition fees and any enrolment matters are strictly between the student and CCNM. Students are solely responsible for the total amount of tuition and other costs of education.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  27

TUITION FEES AND FINANCIAL POLICIES

TUITION FEES AND FINANCIAL POLICIES


FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE – DOCTOR OF NATUROPATHY DEGREE PROGRAM CCNM is not responsible for loans arriving past the tuition due date. Delays relating to processing and advancing of loans are the student’s responsibility.

PROVINCIAL STUDENT LOANS AND BURSARY PROGRAMS Under the Canada Student Loans Program and the provincial governments of Canada, students may be eligible for student loans and/or bursaries. Canadian students enrolled in the Doctor of Naturopathy degree program may be eligible, if qualified, for assistance under components of one or more of the following: • Canada Student Loans Program (CSL) • Ontario Student Loans Program (OSL) • Student loan program in your province of residence The federal and provincial government may not cover the full cost of tuition. A student may only apply from the province of residence in which he or she has most recently lived for at least 12 consecutive months, excluding time spent as a full-time student at a post-secondary institution. Currently, the province of Quebec does not recognize the CCNM Doctor of Naturopathy degree as eligible for government loans. A loan application must be submitted for each academic year you attend. Student loan applications are administered by your provincial loan office and usually become available at the beginning of June. Online applications are available on the website of your provincial loan program and are typically the preferred method of applying. Paper applications have, in some cases, been eliminated. You may submit an application prior to receiving your acceptance letter from the College. It is recommended that you submit your application as early as possible (mid-June) to ensure your loan will be available upon College registration. Processing times may vary and could take eight to 10 weeks. You may obtain student loan information from your provincial loan office or by contacting Student Services.

Be sure to read your loan application, accompanying guide and all other documents carefully. You are responsible for your student loan and its repayment. Your provincial loan application guide details eligibility requirements, maximum loan amounts, repayment process, etc. Nunavut and the Northwest Territories operate their own student assistance plans. If you are a resident of Nunavut or Northwest Territories, contact the territorial student assistance office for further information.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION ON STUDENT LOANS CCNM complies fully with the performance requirements for the administration of the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) by Private Schools (non-PVS) as set out by the Ontario Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development (formerly the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities) to ensure the proper administration of public funds and the prevention of program abuse and fraud. The Ministry’s full requirements can be accessed through the website at http://osap.gov.on.ca.

SATISFACTORY SCHOLASTIC PROGRESS POLICY All students receiving OSAP or other provincial loans are required to adhere to applicable OSAP regulations and conditions, regarding satisfactory scholastic progress to the full extent of CCNM’s satisfactory academic progress requirements. Students will be disqualified from eligibility for OSAP or government loans and withdrawn from loan arrangements if they fail to meet the following requirements: • • •

failure to attend for 10 consecutive scheduled days without valid documentation maintain a course load of 60 per cent participate in 20 hours of instruction per week for four consecutive weeks

Withdrawal from OSAP eligibility is automatic and does not require written notification.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  28

FINANCIAL AID (CANADIAN STUDENTS)

FINANCIAL AID (CANADIAN STUDENTS)


In addition, students receiving OSAP must achieve satisfactory scholastic progress at the institution and a passing grade in each course while maintaining the above-stated conditions. Those not meeting the scholastic progress requirement will be subject

to the following consequences and remedies, as required by the Ontario Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development (formerly the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities):

Scholastic Situation

Consequence

Remedy

Failure to achieve satisfactory scholastic standards during one study period.

Student remains eligible for OSAP in next study period.

Must succeed in all following academic years to maintain continuous CSL/ CSG*/OSL eligibility.

Failure to achieve satisfactory scholastic standards during two study periods.

Student loses CSL/CSG/OSL eligibility for a minimum of 12 months.

Must maintain CSL/CSG/OSL in good standing with lending institution during the 12 month period.

Failure to achieve satisfactory scholastic standards during three study periods.

Student loses CSL/CSG/OSL eligibility for a minimum of 36 months.

Must maintain CSL/CSG/OSL in good standing with lending institution during the 36 month period.

* Canada Study Grant

ONTARIO STUDENT LOANS Once you have completed your online application, you will then print out the following forms: • Master Student Financial Assistance Agreement (MSFAA). You are required to take this form to a postal outlet for further processing. Be sure to bring appropriate ID (Social Insurance Card and government-issued photo ID) as well as any other documentation requested. • Declaration and Signature pages. These forms must to be completed and returned to Student Services either in person or by mail. If mailing the forms, please be sure to include “Attention Student Services” on the envelope. • Request for Study Period Information. Once you print this out, please be sure to indicate (a sticky note will suffice) if your course load is less than 100 per cent to ensure you are not put into an overpayment situation. This form must also be returned to Student Services either in person or by mail. If mailing the forms, please be sure to put “Attention Student Services” on the envelope. Student Services will process this form once received. Please keep in mind that all loans will require approximately one to two weeks before funds are transferred into your account. If you expect to receive a government student loan, please sign and return the promissory note included in this package.

MAINTAINING INTEREST-FREE STATUS FOR FEDERAL AND PROVINCIAL LOANS If you have a previous Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan, Canada Student Loan, and/or an Ontario Student Loan, it is important that these remain in interest-free status. To maintain interest-free status, the lender holding your previous loans (bank, financial institution and/or National Student Loan Service Centre) must be informed that you are still in school. This is done automatically once your completed Confirmation of Enrolment form is processed by your post-secondary institution and by the Ontario Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development (formerly the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities). The Ministry will electronically inform your previous lender that you are still in school. If your loan documents are not in by the first day of class or if your loan is on hold, you must complete the appropriate Continuation of Interest-Free Status form (Schedule 2) from your province. Students must be enrolled in at least 60 per cent of a full-time course load to qualify. Students with disabilities must be enrolled in at least 40 per cent of a full-time course load to qualify. Note: A student who does not qualify for a loan must complete the appropriate Schedule 2 form for his/her province.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  29

FINANCIAL AID (CANADIAN STUDENTS)

FINANCIAL AID (CANADIAN STUDENTS) cont’d


LOAN RESPONSIBILITIES REGARDING REPAYMENT Loan repayment begins six months after the completion of your studies, or when you have stopped being a full-time post-secondary student. The rates and conditions for repayment are set at the time of repayment.

It is the borrower’s responsibility to understand the loan terms and conditions. Specific information is available on provincial loan websites. For students who temporarily cannot repay their loans due to low income, interest relief and/or debt-reduction programs may be available to aid you in paying the interest on these loans. Applications are available from the financial aid office or your lender.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE OFFICES (PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES) Alberta Student Aid Alberta P.O. Box 28000, Station Main Edmonton, AB T5J 4R4 www.studentaid.alberta.ca 1-855-606-2096 Fax: 780-422-4516 British Columbia Student Aid BC, Ministry of Advanced Education P.O. Box 9173, Stn Prov. Govt. Victoria, BC V8W 9H7 www.studentaidbc.ca 250-387-6100 or 1-800-561-1818 Fax: 1-888-262-2112 Manitoba Manitoba Student Aid, Advanced Education and Literacy 401–1181 Portage Ave. Winnipeg, MB R3G 0T3 204-945-3744 or 1-866-626-4862 TTY: 204-945-4796 Fax: 204-948-3421 www.manitobastudentaid.ca New Brunswick Student Financial Services, Dept. of Postsecondary Education, Training and Labour P.O. Box 6000, 77 Westmoreland Street Fredericton, NB E3B 6Z3 www.studentaid.gnb.ca 506-453-2577 or 1-800-667-5626 Fax: 506-444-4333

Newfoundland Student Financial Services Division Department of Education P.O. Box 8700 St. John’s, NF A1B 4J6 709-729-5849 or 1-888-657-0800 Fax: 709-729-2298 www.aes.gov.nl.ca/studentaid Northwest Territories Government of NWT, Department of Education, Culture and Employment, Student Financial Assistance P.O. Box 1320 Yellowknife, NT X1A 2L9 www.nwtsfa.gov.nt.ca 1-867-873-7190 or 1-800-661-0793 Fax: 867-873-0336 or 1-800-661-0893 Nova Scotia Student Assistance Office Department of Education 2021 Brunswick Street, P.O. Box 2290, Halifax Central Halifax, NS B3J 3C8 http://studentloans.ednet.ns.ca 902-424-8420 or 1-800-565-8420 (within NS) Fax: 902-424-2058

Nunavut Financial Assistance for Nunavut Students Department of Education P.O. Box 390, Arviat, NU X0C 0E0 1-877-860-0680 Fax: 1-877-860-0167 www.edu.gov.nu.ca Ontario Ontario Student Assistance Program, Student Support Branch, Ontario Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development (formerly the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities) P.O. Box 4500 Thunder Bay, ON P7B 6G9 http://osap.gov.on.ca 1-877-672-7411 1-800-465-3958 (TDD/TTY) Fax: 807-343-7278 Prince Edward Island Student Financial Services, Dept. of Innovation and Advanced Learning P.O. Box 2000 90 University Avenue, Suite 212 Charlottetown, PE C1A 7N8 902-368-4640 Fax: 902-368-6144 www.studentloan.pe.ca

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  30

FINANCIAL AID (CANADIAN STUDENTS)

FINANCIAL AID (CANADIAN STUDENTS) cont’d


FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE OFFICES (PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES) cont’d Quebec Ministere de l’Education Superieur, de la Recherche, Science et Technologie, Aide Financiere aux Etudes 1035, rue De La Chevrotiere, Quebec, QC G1R 5A5 * Please note that the province of Quebec does not recognize CCNM students as eligible for government loans. 418-646-4505 (outside Quebec) 1-877-643-3750 www.afe.gouv.qc.ca

Saskatchewan Student Financial Assistance Branch Saskatchewan Education, Employment and Immigration 200–3303 Hillsdale Street Regina, SK S4S 6P4 www.saskatchewan.ca/residents/ education-and-learning/student-loans 306-787-5620 or 1-800-597-8278 Fax: 306-787-1608

Yukon Territory Students Financial Assistance Advanced Education Branch Department of Education, Government of Yukon P.O. Box 2703 Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2C6 www.education.gov.yk.ca 867-667-5131 1-800-661-0408 ext. 5131 Fax: 867-667-8555

ADDITIONAL FINANCIAL INFORMATION The National Student Loan Service Centre 1-888-815-4514 TTY: 1-888-815-4556 Fax: 1-888-815-4657

Scotiabank Scotiabank offers the Scotia Professional Student Plan to naturopathic students. More information is available.

Bank Loans Loans and professional/student lines of credit are available to CCNM students at a number of financial institutions. Please contact your bank for more information. If the bank requires a confirmation of acceptance and/or enrolment, please contact Student Services.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  31

FINANCIAL AID (CANADIAN STUDENTS)

FINANCIAL AID (CANADIAN STUDENTS) cont’d


CCNM students may be eligible for U.S. based financial assistance such as Direct Stafford Loans and Direct Grad PLUS Loans. It is recommended that U.S. students begin the application process as soon as possible recognizing the dates reflected

in the table below. If this is your first time applying for Federal Student Aid (FSA) you will need to obtain an FSA ID as soon as possible. Only one application is required per academic year. Funding will be awarded in two or three installments for students starting in September. Students must re-apply each academic year.

U.S. FEDERAL STUDENT AID CHART Academic Year 2016 – 2017 Intake

FAFSA application available

FAFSA application deadline

May 2016

January 1, 2016

April 1, 2016

September 2016

January 1, 2016

July 15, 2016

January 2017

January 1, 2016

October 15, 2016

Intake

FAFSA application available

FAFSA application deadline

May 2017

October 1, 2016

April 1, 2017

September 2017

October 1, 2016

July 15, 2017

January 2018

October 1, 2016

October 15, 2017

Academic Year 2017 – 2018

APPLICATION PROCESS 1.

Complete a free application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Please choose Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine (032733 00/G3273300) as one of your school choices to have your SAR available to the school online. Please be reminded that CCNM is considered a foreign school and you must choose “foreign country” under “state.”

2. Sign your Master Promissory Note 3. C  omplete Entrance Counselling (ONLY if this is your first time using federal student loans while a student at CCNM, if you are a returning student and have already completed this in past year(s), please skip). 4.

If you wish to apply for a Federal Grad PLUS loan, you can complete the additional MPN. Please note: PELL Grants are not available for students studying at CCNM (foreign schools are not eligible).

5. The Student Services Department will complete the online confirmation and will notify you when your loan has been processed and approved. 6. All Direct Loan money will come directly to CCNM. • Photocopies of your/your spouse’s Income Tax Returns (IRS Forms 1040, 1040A, or 1040EZ) may be required later. The information will be used to verify the income figures entered on your FAFSA. You will be informed if any of these are required. • Spousal income tax returns are required if the applicant is married, or in a common-law relationship according to the students original state of residence. • Complete and submit the Program Information Sheet to CCNM, as well as the Cost of Attending form. • Married students must submit a detailed budget for you and your family for the study period.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  32

FINANCIAL AID (U.S. STUDENTS)

FINANCIAL AID (U.S. STUDENTS)


DIRECT STAFFORD LOANS

SALLIE MAE SIGNATURE STUDENT LOANS

Students on U.S. Loans are only eligible for Unsubsidized Stafford loans. An Unsubsidized Stafford loan is a federally insured student loan that is not needs-based. The maximum annual loan amount is $20,500 U.S. Interest accrues on this loan while you are attending school.

Signature loans are available for students who are either U.S. citizens/residents or have a co-borrower who is a U.S. citizen/ resident. Students may qualify for up to $25,000 U.S. per school term. Please contact a student services officer for additional information.

DIRECT GRAD PLUS

EMERGENCY STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM (ESLP)

To be eligible for the Grad PLUS loan, you cannot have an adverse credit history. Students can borrow up to the cost of attendance, minus other estimated financial assistance in the FFEL program (e.g., Stafford loan). Unless the student submits an In-School Deferment form or the lender activates an automatic deferment, the student will be required to begin making payments 60 days after the loan is disbursed in full. The standard repayment term is 10 years; however, it may be extended up to 25 years depending on the amount borrowed.

ENTRANCE AND EXIT COUNSELLING FOR DIRECT LOANS Students with Federal Student Loans (Direct Loan) must complete these online counselling tools as a requirement of using Direct Loans.

ENTRANCE COUNSELLING Students who are using a Direct Loan for the first time (those have not previously used Federal Student Loans at CCNM) must complete entrance counselling before loans will be certified by CCNM. Students only need to complete this counselling once during their studies at CCNM. Please see instructions above to find entrance counselling online.

EXIT COUNSELLING Students who are graduating or withdrawing and who have received U.S. Federal Student Loans while at the CCNM must complete exit counselling. CCNM student services will email a link to all graduating/withdrawing students at the end of the academic year.

The CCNM Emergency Student Loan Program is an interest-free loan available to full-time and part-time (minimum 60 per cent course load) students who are experiencing delays or shortfalls in funding and are having difficulties meeting essential living expenses. Living expenses normally include items such as rent, utilities and food. Terms and Conditions: • •

The ESLP cannot be used to pay debts to the College (i.e., tuition fees, parking fees, library fines, residence rent, etc.) Eligible applicants may borrow up to $500 for living expenses or up to $1,000 for special circumstances. Loans will not exceed $1,000 per eligible student per year

To be eligible, the student must: • c omplete the ESLP application form in full (obtain from Student Services) • demonstrate financial need • have completed a minimum of one term in the ND program • be in satisfactory academic standing • have no outstanding debts to CCNM • have exhausted all available sources of funding Repayment of the principal loan amount (zero per cent interest) must be paid back to CCNM no later than two years following graduation.

Please contact Student Services at info@ccnm.edu for more information.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  33

FINANCIAL AID (U.S. STUDENTS)

FINANCIAL AID (U.S. STUDENTS) cont’d


CCNM offers a number of scholarships, bursaries and awards through the generosity of donors. For more information on the various bursaries and awards available, visit CCNM’s web site or contact Student Services at 416-498-1255 ext. 245 or by e-mail at info@ccnm.edu.

GOVERNORS’ AWARD OF EXCELLENCE – SPONSORED BY CCNM

FIRST NATIONS AWARD

HUMANITARIAN AWARD – SPONSORED BY CCNM

CCNM and Baagwating Community Association jointly sponsor a bursary for students who are Canadian status Indian, Inuit or member of a recognized First Nations band, including Métis. $10,000 per year for four consecutive years if one student is awarded the scholarship or $5,000 per year for four consecutive years if two students are awarded the scholarship. Students must remain enrolled in courses at CCNM and maintain satisfactory academic progress.

ENTRANCE BURSARIES A number of $1,000 entrance bursaries are available to new students. Candidates must be registered as a new student with a minimum 60 per cent course load in year one of the Doctor of Naturopathy degree program; must demonstrate financial need by qualifying for government financial aid and must submit one paragraph outlining why they feel they are a good candidate for an entrance bursary and how this bursary will assist them. The funds will be applied directly towards the student account. The number of awards available is dependent on the amount of money collected from donors.

BURSARIES FOR RETURNING STUDENTS A number of $1,000 bursaries are available to returning students (Years 2-4 and returning IMG students). Eligible applicants must be registered as full-time students (minimum 60 per cent course load) in year two, three or four of the four-year program or the second year of the IMG bridge delivery demonstrate financial need by qualifying for government student loans and have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. The number of awards available is dependent on the amount of money collected from donors.

$1,000 awarded to the graduating student who has demonstrated outstanding academic performance in the Doctor of Naturopathy degree program.

$1,000 awarded to the graduating student who has best exemplified dedication to the betterment and service of humanity, as demonstrated through words and deeds that reflect the principles of naturopathic medicine and that produce meaningful change in the lives of others.

LEADERSHIP AWARD – SPONSORED BY CCNM $1,000 awarded to the graduating student who has best exemplified outstanding leadership within the CCNM community.

NSA COMMUNITY SPIRIT AWARD – SPONSORED BY THE NSA $1,000 awarded to the student who has demonstrated exceptional commitment and a consistent desire to promote student life during their time at CCNM, and through their involvement has greatly contributed to raising school spirit by making a positive imprint on the CCNM community.

NSA NATUROPATHIC HONOUR AWARD – SPONSORED BY THE NSA $1,000 awarded to the student who has revealed outstanding leadership, contribution and dedication to the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine throughout their four years. More specifically, it is in recognition of a student who served as a role model to other students, inspired students to take action, and most actively and positively impacted CCNM as an agent of change.

CONVOCATION AWARDS Members of the graduating class who have excelled in the Doctor of Naturopathy degree program and who have exhibited exceptional school spirit and a passion for the profession may be nominated for several convocation awards.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  34

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS


In accordance with the Ontario Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development's (formerly the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities) Performance Guidelines, CCNM publishes performance indicators for students on employment rates, graduation rates and student loan default rates.

EMPLOYMENT RATES CCNM graduates participate in the NPLEX (Naturopathic Physicians Licensing Examinations) in August of their graduation

year and are not eligible for licensure until September. Please note that the employment rate is calculated in November, which is only two months after students gain licensure. Note: The Ontario Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development (formerly the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities) did not conduct surveys to determine employment rates or graduation rates for the 2006 – 2014 graduating classes. The graduation rates shown for 2007 – 2014 are based on our own calculations.

Graduate Class

Graduation Rate

Graduate Class

Employment Rate

2014

86%

2005

81%

2012

84%

2004

72%

2011

89%

2003

76%

2010

84%

2002

87%

2009

87%

2001

81%

2008

91%

2000

83%

2007

86%

1999

85%

DEFAULT RATES The default rate reflects the repayment status of CCNM students who were issued Ontario student loans in the academic years prior to graduation. Graduate Class

Number of Loans Issued

Loans in default

Default Rate

2014

69 (2011-12)

1

1.4%

2013

84 (2010-11)

0

0%

2012

92 (2009-10)

1

1.1%

2011

60 (2008-09)

0

0%

2010

46 (2007-08)

2

4.3%

2009

49 (2006-07)

0

0%

2008

70 (2005-06)

0

0%

2007

52 (2004-05)

0

0% CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  35

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS


CCNM’s academic program and policies are designed to help create a College environment that is learner-centred and focused on helping our students succeed in their academic and professional careers. It is CCNM’s goal to see our students succeed. If you are experiencing difficulties of an academic or personal nature, it is highly recommended that you contact Student Services or the Office of Academic Affairs as soon as possible so that assistance and support can be provided.

PROGRAM DURATION Students normally complete the curriculum over a four-year period. Students who do not intend to, or cannot complete the curriculum in four years should consult with the Registrar at their earliest opportunity. A full-time student is expected to complete the curriculum in no more than six years. However, recognizing that some students complete the program through part-time study, students may complete the curriculum in up to seven and one half years with the approval of the dean.

ACADEMIC SESSIONS The curriculum is comprised of four academic years. The 2016 – 2017 academic year is divided as follows: SESSION 1

SESSION 2

SESSION 3

Year 1

Sept. 6 – Dec. 23, 2016

Jan. 3 – Apr. 29, 2017

Year 2

Sept. 6 – Dec. 23, 2016

Jan. 3 – Apr. 29, 2017

Year 3

Sept. 6 – Dec. 23, 2016

Jan. 3 – Apr. 29, 2017

Year 4 (2015-16)

May 11 – Sept. 2, 2016

Sept. 6 – Dec. 23, 2016

Year 1

Jan. 3 – Apr. 29, 2017

May 1 – Aug. 18, 2017

IMG Start

May 2 – Aug. 19, 2016

Sept. 6 – Dec. 23, 2016

Jan. 3 – Apr. 29, 2017

IMG2 Start

May 11 – Sept. 2, 2015

Sept. 6 – Dec. 23, 2016

Jan. 3 – Apr. 29, 2017

September Start

Jan. 3 – Apr. 29, 2017

January Start –

* Students completing Year 3 in 2017 will start their Year 4 schedule in May 2017.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  36

PROGRAM STRUCTURE

PROGRAM STRUCTURE


ACADEMIC PROMOTION AND STANDING Grade point average 1. E ach course is assigned a unit value based on the nature of the instruction and the number of contact hours for the course. A weighted grade point average for each academic year will be calculated using the credit hours of each course as the weight. Transcripts of academic record will include a grade point average for each academic year and a cumulative grade point average. 2. G  rades for courses that are measured on an “achieved competency” basis and with final grades of “W,” “INC,” or “EQV” will not be used in the calculation of grade point averages. 3. W  hen a course is taken for a second time, both grades are recorded on the student’s transcript. However, only the higher of the two grades is used in CGPA calculations. 4. F inal grades for a course will normally be derived from a series of examinations, quizzes, tests or assignments. Final grades will be reported to the Registrar as a percentage grade. This percentage grade will be converted to an alpha grade and a grade point based on the following scale: Per cent grade

Alpha grade

Grade point

90 to 100

A+

4.0

85 to 89

A

3.9

80 to 84

A�

3.7

77 to 79

B+

3.3

73 to 76

B

3.0

70 to 72

B�

2.7

67 to 69

C+

2.3

65 to 66

C

2.0

<65

F

0

ACADEMIC POLICIES

ACADEMIC POLICIES

 Explanation of symbols Achieved Competency

AC

Pass

P

Fail

F

Incomplete

INC

Withdrawal

W

Advanced Standing

EQV

5. E ach student’s grade point average (GPA) is calculated on a term-by-term basis, to determine their academic standing in the program. The cumulative GPA (CGPA) they attain will result in them being placed in one of the following three categories: a. Good Standing A CGPA of 2.7 or above maintains good academic standing and is the College’s graduation requirement. b. Academic Probation I. If at the end of a term a student’s CGPA is less than a 2.7, or for two consecutive terms his/her term GPA (TGPA) is less than 2.7, that student will be placed on academic probation. Academic probation reflects a warning that the student’s current performance is below that required to continue in the program. The student must improve his/her academic achievement to avoid dismissal from the College. II. If at the end of the probationary term the CGPA is raised to 2.7 or above, a student is returned to good academic standing; if at the end of the probationary term the CGPA is still below 2.7, but the TGPA is 2.7 or above, the student remains on probation for an additional term. III. Students on academic probation are encouraged to discuss with the appropriate course instructor and associate dean the problems leading to poor academic performance. Student Services personnel may suggest additional options, such as peer tutoring. IV. In situations where academic probation applies, probation status is indicated on the student’s transcript. CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  37


c. Academic Dismissal I. The College will normally dismiss a student if his/her academic progress is unsatisfactory based on any of the following criteria: • T  he CGPA is below 2.3 after the first term of enrolment. • After a probationary term both the TGPA and CGPA are below 2.7. • A student fails a course twice. II. A student may submit a written appeal of his/her academic dismissal to Academic Affairs. A student who is successful in his/her appeal receives a written contract outlining the conditions for reinstatement. III. A dismissal for academic standing is recorded on a student’s transcript.

MONITORING It is the role of the monitoring committee to identify, as early as possible, students who are facing significant academic challenges. This committee meets twice a term and is responsible for reviewing students’ academic performance with the aim to provide the support they need to improve their academic standing. Students who are not being successful in the program will initially be offered additional support, but if they continue to exhibit low performance they will be dismissed from the program.

ATTENDANCE POLICY CCNM believes that student attendance leads to optimum academic achievement. With respect to practicals and clinic shifts, attendance is imperative. Students are expected to attend all classes, and are responsible for learning the content from any classes that they miss. Each course outline describes the attendance requirements for the course. For courses with a practical component, such as laboratories, practicums, small group sessions and clinical components, attendance is essential and the course outline will stipulate the number of permitted class absences. Students who exceed this number will fail the course. Teaching Assistants, in consultation with the course instructor, have the authority to determine whether a student’s lateness should be considered an absence.

If a student fails to attend all classes for 10 consecutive scheduled days without valid documentation they will be deemed to have withdrawn. The last date of attendance will be used as their date of withdrawal.

PROCEDURE If a student misses a practical session, they are required to complete a missed practical form and submit it to the course instructor. The instructor will determine whether the missed learning outcomes can be achieved by means of an alternate educational method (for example self-study or watching a video) and will inform the student by so indicating on the form. Should the instructor determine that the missed practical must be made up, they will indicate this on the form and the student will submit it to Student Services along with payment of any applicable fee.

EXAMINATION PROCEDURES 1. S tudents should arrive at the College and ready to check in 30 minutes before the start of an examination. 2. Admittance to examination rooms occurs 15 minutes prior to examination start time. Prompt arrival ensures that students have time to check-in, be seated and hear instructions before the testing period begins. 3. All examinations will start on time unless advance notice is provided by the Office of Academic Affairs (OAA). Students who arrive 30 minutes after the start time will not be permitted to write the exam. 4. All students must remain seated for the first 30 minutes of the examination or until all attendance has been taken and each student has had an opportunity to sign in, whichever is longer. Students cannot leave a testing session during the last 10 minutes to avoid disrupting those who are still writing. 5. Once you have checked in and are seated you are not allowed to leave the examination room without the permission of the proctor. Therefore, please use the restroom before you check in for an examination. If you need to use the restroom during an examination session, please raise your hand and a proctor will direct you further. Washroom breaks will be taken one student at a time and a proctor of the same gender must accompany the student. Please note that students are not given extra time to make up for time lost due to restroom breaks taken during the exam period.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  38

ACADEMIC POLICIES

ACADEMIC POLICIES cont’d


6. T  he examination booklet and the computer answer sheets must be kept in front of the examinee at all times. No examination answer booklet, or other material issued for the examination, may be removed from the examination room by any student. 7. If a student believes that an exam question is poorly written, has double right answers or is vague, the student may write his/her comments on the back of the Scantron sheet for multiple choice questions, and/or the first answer sheet for written questions. 8. The following items are permitted at testing stations: student card, pen, pencil, (HB), eraser and water in a closed non-breakable container. If you need to eat, take medications, etc., or to have access to medical supplies during the testing period, you must leave these items with a proctor at the time you check in for an examination. The items must be clearly labeled with your first and last name before you leave them with a proctor. 9. The following Items are prohibited from all testing stations and are to be placed neatly in the designated areas of the examination room prior to seating: a. Electronic devices, including cell phones, pagers, PDAs, laptop computers, calculators, digital watches, recording or filming devices, digital or analog music players, etc. b. Backpacks, handbags, briefcases, wallets c. Books, notes, study materials, scratch paper d. Coats, jackets, gloves, hats, caps, hoods, scarves (with the exception of religious head coverings) e. Sunglasses, visors, eyeglass cases 10. Irregular behaviour or cheating exhibited by a student will be reported by the exam proctor to the OAA and will result in an academic misconduct investigation. For more information please refer to the section on Student Conduct. Irregular behaviour or cheating includes: a. Copying or allowing answers to be copied while taking the examination b. Talking to other examinees once the testing period has begun c. Accessing written or electronic information while taking the examination d. Reproducing exam content (e.g., taking notes about or digital pictures of exam items) e. Failing to adhere to a proctor’s instructions or requests f. Failing to close the exam booklet and cease marking the answer sheet when time is called

g. Taking any exam materials from the testing room at any time during or after the testing period h. Behaviour which in the opinion of the proctor provides an unfair advantage to a student

EXAMINATION DATES All examination dates are posted on Moodle. It is the responsibility of the student to confirm the dates of specific examinations as the examination date approaches.

GRADING POLICIES INCOMPLETE GRADES POLICY 1. Students who have not completed all required components of a course will be assigned a grade of INC. 2. If all required course components have not been completed, and a passing grade has not been achieved, the INC will convert to an F at the one year anniversary of the start of the course. Note: this policy does not apply to CLE 404, 412 and 450, which must be completed as outlined in the clinic course requirements. OFFICIAL GRADE NOTIFICATION 1. Official grades are posted in SonisWeb. 2. It is the responsibility of the student to stay informed of his/her official grades. RESCHEDULED AND SUPPLEMENTAL EXAMINATIONS POLICY Note: There are no opportunities to complete a course beyond the one year anniversary of the start-date of the course. 1. T  he examination schedules are provided before the beginning of classes. All students are expected to write examinations at the scheduled times. Where students miss a scheduled examination they will be eligible to have a rescheduled examination through the Testing Centre. Rescheduled practical examinations will be scheduled by the College and students must attend the practical examination at that scheduled time. There will be an administrative fee for the rescheduled examinations, and that fee along with the process for registering in the rescheduled examinations is described within the CCNM Moodle Learning Management System.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  39

ACADEMIC POLICIES

ACADEMIC POLICIES cont’d


2. R  escheduled exams will test similar competencies to the original examination, but may utilize different testing methods (e.g., multiple choice, short answer, essay and/or oral questions). 3. Rescheduled examinations must be taken by the one year anniversary of the start of the course. Students are advised to complete all course requirements at least eight (8) weeks prior to the anniversary of the start date of the course, so that if they are not successful, they will have time to write a supplemental, if eligible. Note: Due to the nature of the OSCE II and III examinations they will each only be scheduled once per academic year. Each examination will include the originally scheduled day(s) and one additional make-up day scheduled within four weeks of the originally scheduled examination. 4. S tudents receiving a failing grade of not less than 50 per cent and who have completed the majority of coursework will be eligible to write a supplemental examination. 5. The relevant fee and the process for enrolling in the supplemental examinations is described within the CCNM Moodle Learning Management System. 6. The right to sit a supplemental examination expires one year after the first date of classes for the course to which the supplemental would apply. 7. Supplemental examinations are comprehensive for the course and may include multiple choice, short answer, essay and/or oral questions. A student who receives a grade of 65 per cent will be deemed to have passed the supplemental exam. Supplemental examination grades greater than or equal to 65 per cent are indicated on transcripts of academic record as 65 per cent. 8. Failure of a supplemental examination will result in the student failing the course. 9. Offsite proctoring of supplemental exams may be arranged at accredited educational institutions. EXAMINATION REVIEW Once grades are released in Moodle, students can choose one of the following two options that apply to exam review. Option 1: Expedited Exam Review for students writing a supplemental exam. Students will have the opportunity to sign up for a group examination review with individual course instructors.

The intended goal of this process is to allow for students to identify areas where they achieved competency and areas where they did not as well as being able to ask individual questions and ensure understanding of key course concepts in a group environment. Please note that there is an administrative charge of $10 that will be charged in situations where a student signs up and does not show up for the expedited review session. To take part in an expedited review the student must go to examreview@ccnm.edu to sign up. Deadlines to sign up for this review will be posted on Moodle once grades are released. Option 2: Three Step Exam Review Step 1: Student will have 30-60 minutes of class time where professors will go over particularly challenging items and items of low reliability. The goal of this process is to ensure educational efficacy of key course competencies. This opportunity is available to all students in the class. Please note that this step only applies to mid-term exam reviews. Step 2: By request CCNM students will have an opportunity to review their performance in an invigilated environment. Students are asked to sign up at Student Services in order to review their exams by the deadline (refer to dates on the Year at a Glance). For multiple choice examinations, students will have access to an itemized scantron report (contains exam key) and a master examination; for written examination students will have access to a copy of their examination to identify areas where they achieved competency and areas where they did not. Step 2 review is scheduled outside of class time (common time and early evening), and is available free of charge. Please note that there is an administrative fee of $10 per exam that will be charged to the student in situations where the student signs up and does not show up for an examination review session. Step 3: After completing step 2 students will have the opportunity to sign up for group examination review with individual course instructors. The intended goal of this process is to allow for students to ask individual questions and ensure understanding of key course concepts in a group environment. Students can request a Step 3 review via the OAA. Please note that there is an administrative fee of $10 that will be charged in situations where a student signs up and does not show up for a step 3 examination review session. If you have questions, please send an email to examreview@ccnm.edu, which will be responded by the Office of Academic Affairs. CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  40

ACADEMIC POLICIES

ACADEMIC POLICIES cont’d


PREREQUISITES Prerequisite requirements are designed to ensure that students have the requisite knowledge to participate effectively in the course requiring the prerequisite. We recognize that students who actively participate in a course, but who have not earned a credit, may still have acquired most of the prerequisite concepts. As such, students who have participated in a prerequisite course, and have not yet earned a credit in that course, and who are eligible for further testing and/or remediation, may be permitted to enrol in the subsequent course. This will not be permitted where there is a safety concern. Students are still required to earn credit in prerequisite courses when they have passed the course requiring the prerequisite, as the content in the subsequent course does not include all of the competencies of the prerequisite course(s). Students who choose to attempt a course for which they have not earned credit in the prerequisite, do so at their own risk, and the lack of the prerequisite is not a ground for appealing a failing grade. Students are advised to consult with program faculty prior to enrolling in the course for which they have not successfully completed the prerequisites regarding the challenges they may face in attempting the subsequent course. CLINIC ENTRY REQUIREMENTS In the final year of the program students enrol in CLE404 and work as primary interns under the supervision of licensed naturopathic doctors and are responsible for managing the care of patients in the Robert Schad Naturopathic Clinic (RSNC) and its satellite teaching clinics. Students are required to demonstrate the competencies outlined in the Primary Intern Manual and to complete all relevant requirements. Students are required to have passed all courses in years 1, 2 and 3 of the program prior to entry into clinic. The Rescheduled and Supplemental Examinations Policy (i.e., one year completion date of all course requirements) does not apply to students enrolling in CLE404. Rescheduled examinations must be completed within the period between the end of the Winter Term exam period and clinic orientation days. Students who have only failed one third-year prerequisite course, and are eligible to write a supplemental exam, may register in CLE404. However, should the student subsequently fail the supplemental exam for that pre-requisite course, the student will be removed from their clinical shifts.

REMEDIATION 1. The purpose of remediation is to permit a student who fails selected academic courses to avoid program delay. Remediation is a personalized program of intensive study and focused review of the course material, accompanied by appraisal, to raise a student’s comprehension of the subject to an acceptable standard. An instructor or teaching assistant will lead the remediation and a course of self-study will be assigned. The focus of the remediation will be on those learning outcomes where improvement is most required. The appraisal will be a comprehensive evaluation of the student’s knowledge of the entire course material and may include multiple choice, short answer, and essay or oral questions. 2. R  emediation is a privilege, not a right. The Associate Dean Academic Delivery will determine if a student is eligible for remediation and what form the remediation will take. Prior to officially enrolling in a course of remediation a student will be advised on the form that their remediation will follow. A student must have obtained a final mark of at least 60 percent on the supplemental examination to be eligible for remediation. Students who are taking a course for the second time will not be eligible for remediation. The College will not always be able to offer remediation in a course. There are no supplemental privileges in remediation courses. 3. S tudents will be required to pay the cost of the remediation course. The cost will be determined on a course-specific basis. VACATION Students taking courses in Years I, II and III must restrict their vacations to the periods set out in the CCNM Calendar as official breaks. Year IV students must submit an Intern Vacation Request Form to the Office of Clinical Education at least one month before their intended vacation. Approval will be contingent upon CCNM’s ability to provide adequate ongoing clinical services.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  41

ACADEMIC POLICIES

ACADEMIC POLICIES cont’d


CCNM’s Honour Code applies to all College constituents, including students, faculty and staff members. As part of the College’s commitment to academic excellence, the highest standards of ethical behaviour are expected from

Autonomy

Recognizing the dignity and intrinsic worth of individuals and their right to make personal choices

Beneficence

Making the best interests of patients, society and the environment of paramount consideration

Compassion

Being sensitive to individual and societal needs for comfort and health

Competence

Striving to achieve and consistently demonstrate the highest levels of knowledge, judgment and ability

Integrity

Incorporating core values as the basis for ethical practice and as the foundation for honourable conduct

HONOUR CODE

HONOUR CODE everyone associated with this institution. The foundation for proper conduct is established by the fundamental Principles of Naturopathic Medicine and the following core values:

Justice

Treating all individuals in a fair and equitable manner

Professionalism

Being committed to the service of humanity

Tolerance

Respecting the rights of individuals to hold and express disparate opinions and beliefs and recognizing that these differences may arise from personal, ethnic, religious or cultural values

Veracity

Valuing truthfulness as the basis for trust in personal and professional relationships

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  42


STANDARDS OF STUDENT CONDUCT Upon enrolment at CCNM, students are expected to clearly understand their rights and obligations with respect to the institution, fellow students, faculty and staff, the naturopathic profession, other professions and the public. A student must respect and uphold the core values of the organization and understand that behaviour that is consistent with these values will benefit all who participate in the community. The standards of student conduct define the boundaries within which a rewarding and mutually supportive learning environment can be maintained. A student must be prepared to abide by certain rules and regulations. In this regard, CCNM retains the right to ensure that the students will conduct themselves in a professional manner. Any breach of conduct involving morality, ethics or legality, on or off campus, may be subject to disciplinary action. CCNM retains the right to initiate disciplinary action in a case where a student conducts him/herself in a manner unbecoming of a member of the educational institution. Students are obliged to adhere to and uphold the highest ethical standards. The Naturopathic Doctor’s Oath is one expression of these standards. The College and the profession are seen in the eye of the general public through the actions and behaviour of their individual members. Thus,

in all dealings in and outside of CCNM where students evoke the College’s name or reputation, students are expected to conduct themselves according to these standards. Students will therefore conduct themselves in a professional manner, both in behaviour and appearance. Students will give proper attention to dress and hygiene while on College property or while representing the College off campus. While in clinic, the dress code as stipulated in the clinic policies and procedures will be followed. Students are expected to maintain a respectful and attentive presence in the classroom. Disruptive behaviour such as talking, cell phone use, distractive computer use or noisy children will not be tolerated, as this affects the learning environment for other students. Faculty are expected to ensure adherence to this standard. Relationships between faculty and students should remain professional at all times. Students must refrain from forming inappropriate relationships with faculty and staff where a conflict of interest in their professional relationship can be reasonably determined. Additional guidelines for professional conduct are stipulated in the Primary Intern Manual 2016 – 2017.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  43

STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT

STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT


In an effort to resolve disputes equitably and expeditiously, CCNM has adopted a dispute resolution policy to enshrine the principles of natural justice into all College policies that involve disputes between College stakeholders. Individuals are entitled to know and understand the charges or complaints made against them, and in any matter involving a possible sanction, the individual should be provided with this information in writing.

Individuals also have the right to be heard in response to charges or complaints made against them before disciplinary action is taken. The onus is on the College to demonstrate it has acted as expeditiously as reasonably possible in the circumstances. This policy applies to all students, staff, faculty and administration of CCNM. CCNM students, staff and faculty are required to abide by the College policies applicable to them. View full policy.

ACADEMIC OFFENCES Academic offences relate to the honesty and fairness of the teaching and learning relationship, especially with respect to evaluation. Thus, the essence of an academic offence by a student is the seeking of a credit by fraud or misrepresentation, rather than on the basis of merit.

ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT

It is the responsibility of the student to be aware of and to abide by all College academic and clinic policies and procedures.

Academic misconduct comprises but is not necessarily limited to the following:

To protect the integrity of the degrees granted by this institution, CCNM has the power to recall and cancel any degree granted to a graduate who, while a student, committed an academic offence that, if detected before the granting of the degree, would have resulted in the degree not being granted.

1. using unauthorized means to complete academic work 2. plagiarism by submitting academic work that uses the ideas or words of another without proper attribution 3. submitting for credit any work for which credit has been obtained or is being sought in another academic course at CCNM or elsewhere, without authorization from the faculty member to whom it is submitted 4. any dishonest act committed to complete academic work

Every CCNM student has an obligation to participate in the enforcement of these regulations. Any student who fails to report the existence of a violation by another student may be found guilty of participating in the said violation.

Academic misconduct at CCNM will be treated very seriously. The first incident of academic misconduct may result in failure in the class involved; a second incident may result in dismissal from the program.

Any student who is in violation of the regulations may be subject to disciplinary action and penalty.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2017â&#x20AC;&#x201A; 44

DISPUTE RESOLUTION POLICY AND ACADEMIC OFFENCES

DISPUTE RESOLUTION POLICY


1. A  ny breach of conduct involving morality, ethics or legality, on or off campus, may be subject to disciplinary action. 2. Students are expected to conduct their behaviour both in and outside of the classroom in a manner that is consistent with the CCNM Honour Code. Specifically, students will not: a. demonstrate a lack of respect, courtesy or professionalism in any of their dealings with other students, faculty, patients or other member of society; b. damage, destroy or steal College property, or c. fail to return borrowed College property on time and in good condition.

OFFENCES AGAINST PERSONS Students will not: 1. M  ake comments or otherwise behave in a way that offends the Ontario Human Rights Code or the principles of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms; 2. Engage in acts or threats of bodily harm, property damage or sexual assault, or 3. Knowingly create a condition that unnecessarily endangers the health or safety of other persons.

OFFENCES AGAINST PROPERTY 1. 2.

Students will not knowingly take, destroy or damage any physical property that is not her/his own. Students will not enter into offices, rooms or other places to which they are not entitled.

PARTIES TO OFFENCES 1. A CCNM student is a party to an offence who: a. actually commits it; b. aids or assists another individual to commit an offence, or c. counsels another individual to commit or be party to an offence. Every party to an offence is liable to the sanctions applicable to that offence.

SANCTIONS Sanctions will vary from case to case in accordance with the nature of the misconduct. A wide range of sanctions may be applied including warnings, loss of privileges, suspension, course failure and expulsion.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2017â&#x20AC;&#x201A; 45

NON-ACADEMIC OFFENCES

NON-ACADEMIC OFFENCES


DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES FOR ACADEMIC OFFENCES 1. W  here an instructor has reasonable grounds to believe that an academic offence has been committed by a student, the instructor shall so inform the associate dean of the details of the suspected academic offence. 2. T  he associate dean, in conjunction with the dean, will investigate the matter in a fair and expeditious manner. The student will be advised in writing of the charge made against him or her and will be given the right to be heard before any sanction is applied. If the student admits guilt or if after completing the investigation the dean believes that an academic offence has been committed, the dean will impose disciplinary sanction consistent with College policy and advise the student in writing. 3. S erious academic sanctions will become part of the student’s permanent academic transcript.

DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES FOR NON-ACADEMIC OFFENCES 1. S tudents who are suspected of committing acts of nonacademic misconduct are subject to disciplinary action by the College. Violation of CCNM’s Residence Policy will usually be investigated and, if appropriate, subject to sanction by the Chief Financial Officer. However, misconduct by a CCNM student in the CCNM residence that raises concerns as to that student’s suitability to become a naturopathic doctor may be subject to additional sanction. 2. N  on-academic offences committed in locales other that the CCNM residence will be investigated by the College legal counsel.

DISCIPLINE

DISCIPLINE 3. T  he student will be advised in writing of the charge made against him or her and will be given the opportunity to be heard before any sanction is applied. If the College legal counsel determines that the student is guilty of a non-academic offence, the dean, in consultation with the College legal counsel, will impose a sanction and advise the student in writing. If the student is dissatisfied with the finding of guilt or with the sanction, the student may request that the matter be referred to the Appeals Committee. The Appeals Committee will review the case and determine whether or not the sanction is deemed appropriate. The College may withhold the granting of a degree, either as part of the disciplinary sanction or pending the resolution of the investigation. A student may be permitted to use CCNM facilities while a decision is pending, unless the dean determines that it would be a threat to the safety or security of others or a disruption of the learning environment if the student were permitted to remain on campus. In such instances, the student’s access to CCNM facilities may be restricted. The dean may cause a notation to be recorded on the student’s academic record and transcript, until the final disposition of the matter, to indicate that a student’s standing in a course or academic status is under review. A student upon whom a sanction has been imposed shall not be allowed to withdraw from a course so as to avoid the sanction imposed. Serious academic sanctions will become part of the student’s permanent transcript. Clinic offences will be dealt with pursuant to the process set out in the Primary Intern Manual.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  46


The Appeals Committee is constituted to hear academic and disciplinary appeals. The Committee is comprised of one faculty member appointed by the chair of faculty council, one CCNM student (not in the same year as the appellant) appointed by the president of the NSU and a chair who is appointed by the president. Only individuals who have been trained in the policies and procedures associated with the Appeals Committee are eligible to serve on the committee.

APPEAL OF A COURSE GRADE Any student who wishes to appeal an academic issue (e.g. they believe a final course grade has been arrived at incorrectly) must first consult with the associate dean of academic delivery. • If the matter cannot be resolved to the student’s satisfaction with the associate dean, the student must consult with the dean. • In the event that the matter is not resolved to the student’s satisfaction, the student may appeal to the Appeals Committee. • The student must notify the registrar in writing of his/her intention to do so within 10 working days after receiving written (or electronic) notification of the final course grade, clearly setting out the grounds for the appeal. • The appeal must clearly set out the specific facts and assertions on which the appeal is based. Claiming that the decision will cause the student to suffer career disruption, emotional upset or program delay is not a valid ground of appeal. • Upon receipt of the notice of appeal from the student, the registrar will review it to determine whether the grounds for appeal comply with the requirements stipulated in these procedures. If the registrar finds that the grounds for appeal do not comply, the registrar shall advise the student within two working days and permit the student to either revise or withdraw the notice of appeal. If the appeal is in order, the registrar will advise the student of the date, time and place of the hearing within five working days. The hearing will be scheduled as expeditiously as possible.

PROCEDURE FOR HEARINGS OF THE APPEALS COMMITTEE • A  t the hearing, the student is entitled to be represented by legal counsel at his or her own expense. In the event the student elects to have legal counsel they must inform the College at least five days in advance of the hearing; CCNM may or may not choose to be represented by legal counsel.

APPEALS

APPEALS At least three working days prior to the hearing, each party must identify who will represent them, the witnesses they will call, and the material they will provide in evidence. Note: Failure to provide notice of issues before hand will normally cause those issues to be excluded from the hearing. • C  opies of the student’s notice of appeal, as well as the supporting documentation from each party will be made available to each party at Student Services at least three days prior to the hearing. • At the beginning of the hearing, the chair will advise the parties that the committee members have read the appeal and the supporting documentation and summarize the rules of the hearing. The student or the student’s representative will then be permitted to present evidence, examine witnesses and introduce arguments in support of the appeal. The College’s representative may cross-examine any of the student’s witnesses. The College representative will then be permitted to present evidence, examine witnesses and introduce arguments in opposition to appeal. The student or the student’s representative is entitled to cross-examine any witness called by the College. The members of the Appeals Committee may question all parties or witnesses. The student or student’s representative and the College’s representative may make closing statements. • Admission of any person to the hearing shall be at the discretion of the chair of the Appeals Committee. • All procedural questions are subject to the final decision of the chair of the Appeals Committee. • At the conclusion of the hearing, the Committee will proceed to consider the matter and determine its decision on the appeal, during which time all persons other than the members of the committee are excluded and shall withdraw. • The decision will be determined by a majority vote. A formal written decision with reasons will be drafted. The Committee may only determine whether or not the grade or sanction is appropriate. • Following the decision of the committee, the registrar will immediately notify the student of the decision. • The decision of the committee is final. • Proceedings of the committee are confidential and no individual who is not a committee member, committee secretary, a party to the proceedings or witness may be in attendance during the hearing, unless specifically permitted by the chair. CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  47


GENERAL PRINCIPLES

STUDENTS

CCNM acknowledges that the enrichment of the intellectual experience is dependent upon the existence of a free and open academic community. Conflict of ideas cannot occur unless there is the guaranteed opportunity for a variety of viewpoints to be expressed. Tolerance for the opinions of others is an inescapable condition of the meaningful pursuit of truth. CCNM recognizes its responsibility to provide opportunity for expression of diverse points of view as a means of guaranteeing academic freedom. As set out in the Policy Statement of the Canadian Association of University Teachers, “academic freedom carries with it the duty to use that freedom in a manner consistent with the scholarly obligation to base research and teaching on an honest search for knowledge.”

Students are entitled to be taught within an environment in which the exploration of ideas is encouraged, and to have access to all information pertinent to their subjects of study. They have the right to intellectual disagreement with their instructors and associates and to question them without fear of recrimination or punishment. They are also entitled to seek publication of their views, to seek membership in voluntary groups, to seek or hold public office and to take lawful action in accordance with their views. Students also have the obligation, when appropriate, to make it clear that their actions, their statements and their memberships do not necessarily represent the views of the institution.

FACULTY Faculty members are entitled to freedom in research and in the publication of results, subject to the review of the College’s ethics review board and the adequate performance of their other academic duties. They are also entitled to freedom in lecturing or conducting demonstrations in their subject or field of competence. They are entitled, as any other member of the community in which they live, to establish membership in voluntary groups, to seek or hold public office, to express their opinions as individuals on public questions and to take lawful action in accordance with their views. It is expected that faculty members will be cognizant of their responsibilities to their profession and to this institution. They must attempt to be accurate, to exercise sound judgment and respect the rights of others to express opinions. They have an obligation, when appropriate, to make clear that their actions, statements and memberships do not necessarily represent the views of the institution.

GUEST SPEAKERS AND OTHER PROGRAMS A guest speaker or program may be presented under the sponsorship of any duly recognized student, faculty or administrative organization or any individual instructor. It is not necessary that the point of view presented be acceptable to CCNM, members of the staff or student body individually, or to individual members of the wider community. Speakers must be accorded the courtesy of an uninterrupted presentation. Speakers must attempt to be accurate, to exercise sound judgment and respect the rights of others to express opinions. They must also accept as a condition of their appearance the right of their audience to challenge or question statements made in their address. The invitation or scheduling of such a program must represent the desire of the institutional sponsor and not the will of external individuals or organizations. The sponsor must take full responsibility and must make clear, when appropriate, that the points of view expressed in an address or program do not necessarily represent the position of the institution. No presentation may violate the laws of Ontario or Canada.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  48

ACADEMIC FREEDOM

ACADEMIC FREEDOM


Research leading to new knowledge for the benefit of humanity and the dissemination of knowledge through teaching and service are fundamental objectives of CCNM. The College plays a leading role in the research of natural health products in Canada and in the development of naturopathic medical education. To achieve these objectives, CCNM encourages the creation of scholarly works and the development of useful materials and processes. Such knowledge and technology has the potential to have commercial value and should be treated as a financial asset of CCNM to be used appropriately to generate a financial return. Creative and scholarly works and inventions that have commercial potential may be protected as “intellectual property,” a term that includes patents, copyrights, trademarks and other rights. In order to establish the respective rights of CCNM, its faculty, staff and students, the following policy has been created.

OBJECTIVES • t o generate new knowledge by encouraging research, scholarship and a spirit of intellectual inquiry and discovery • to provide an administrative system to determine the commercial potential of intellectual property and assist in bringing these into public use • to provide for the equitable division of rights to intellectual property among the College, the originator and, where applicable, the sponsor • to provide incentives to originators in the form of personal development, professional recognition and financial compensation • to safeguard intellectual property so that it may receive adequate legal protection against unauthorized use

COVERAGE AND DEFINITION This policy applies to all intellectual property conceived, first reduced to practice, written or otherwise produced by faculty, staff or students of CCNM using College funds, facilities or other resources. For the purpose of this policy, intellectual property is defined as the tangible or intangible results of research, development or any other intellectual activity including, but not limited to, the following: • • •

inventions and discoveries or other new developments capable of being patented written materials, sound recordings, videotapes, films, computer programs, computer assisted instruction materials and any other material capable of being copyrighted tangible research property such as biological materials, computer software, databases and analytical procedures, even if these may not be capable of being patented or copyrighted

GENERAL This policy applies to all CCNM employees and students. All rights to intellectual properties as defined in this policy shall be owned and controlled by CCNM, subject to the exceptions set out in this policy. When a College faculty member, staff member or student develops or originates an item of intellectual property which, under the terms of this policy is to be owned and controlled by the College, such individual may have an interest in and share in any income derived from the commercialization of such property depending on the circumstances surrounding the item’s development.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  49

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY


SCHOLARLY ACTIVITY

ALL OTHER WORK

Traditional products of scholarly activity, which have customarily been considered to be the unrestricted property of the author or originator, are exempt from this policy, unless they are created as “works for hire.” These traditional products include student projects/assignments, journal articles, reviews and textbooks.

The originator and CCNM shall share intellectual property ownership if developed by CCNM faculty, staff or students through an effort that makes significant use of College resources. In general, CCNM shall not construe the provision of office space, library resources or the use of office computers as significant use of College resources. Significant use of College resources shall include, but not be limited to, use of research funding, use of CCNM-paid time within the employment period, use of support staff, use of telecommunication services and the use of facilities other than the library or the individual’s office.

WORKS FOR HIRE Intellectual property produced by CCNM faculty, staff or students who are employed for the purpose of producing works for instructional or administrative use are deemed to be “works for hire” and are therefore the College’s property. These works include course materials such as syllabi and manuals as well as instructional items such as videotapes, telecourses, drawings, slides, models, computer programs, etc. Any revenue sharing arrangements may be made as part of an individual’s employment contract. Nothing in this paragraph shall limit the rights of CCNM faculty and staff members to works produced or developed outside the scope of their employment and not involving the significant use of College facilities or other resources. Rights to intellectual property resulting from sponsored projects shall be owned and controlled by CCNM subject to the terms of the sponsored project agreement. Collaboration between CCNM faculty, staff or students and individuals not employed by, or associated with, the College may result in the development of intellectual property owned jointly by CCNM and other individuals or their employers. Accordingly, it is essential that individuals involved in or contemplating collaborative activities that may result in the development of intellectual property advise the College of such activity.

Net income is defined as gross receipts received by CCNM from license activity minus the out-of-pocket costs incurred by CCNM in protecting and licensing the intellectual property. Unless otherwise provided for and agreed to in writing by CCNM and the originator, net income derived from the commercialization of intellectual policy covered by this policy shall be shared as follows: 40 per cent to the originator, 60 per cent to CCNM.

CONSULTING Any faculty or staff member engaged in consulting work is responsible for ensuring that any contractual arrangements they make are not in conflict with this policy and that CCNM’s rights and the individual’s obligations to this College are in no way abrogated or limited by the terms of such agreements.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  50

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY cont’d


Through excellence in health education, clinical services and research that integrate mind, body and spirit, CCNM’s Doctor of Naturopathy degree program develops primary-care doctors accomplished in the art and practice of naturopathic medicine. Graduates of the program will be able to: 1. I ntegrate naturopathic philosophy and principles with medical knowledge in the care of patients. 2. Educate patients and the public in health promotion and disease prevention. 3. Manage the underlying spiritual, social, mental and physical causes of disease. 4. Practice in a manner that exemplifies professionalism, strong ethics and a commitment to the principles of naturopathic medicine. 5. Communicate effectively with patients. 6. Appraise and apply research in treating patients. 7. Integrate biomedical with clinical science knowledge in the assessment, diagnosis and management of patients. 8. Utilize naturopathic therapeutics in the individualized care of patients including but not limited to: • Asian Medicine • Botanical Medicine • Clinical Nutrition • Counselling and Health Psychology • Homeopathic Medicine • Lifestyle Modification • Nature Cure • Pharmaceuticals • Physical Medicine

9. I dentify the need for urgent and emergent health care and direct appropriate resolution. 10. Establish and manage a naturopathic practice. 11. Manage chronic disease. 12. Demonstrate leadership in health advocacy and environmental stewardship. 13. Collaborate effectively and work in partnership with other health-care practitioners. 14. Demonstrate commitment to the advancement of the naturopathic profession. CCNM’s four-year accredited professional program in naturopathic medicine provides more than 3,000 hours of classroom training and 1,200 hours of clinical experience.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  51

DOCTOR OF NATUROPATHY DEGREE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

DOCTOR OF NATUROPATHY DEGREE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES


Naturopathic medicine is a primary health-care profession that focuses on the promotion of health, assessment of the physical and mental condition of an individual, and the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of diseases, disorders and dysfunctions. It does this through the integrated use of therapies and substances that promote the individual’s inherent self-healing mechanisms. The principles underlying the practice of naturopathic medicine include: • • • • • •

Utilization of therapies that minimize the risk of harm and are the least invasive, in order to restore health. (First, do no harm.) Recognition and support of the inherent self-healing ability of the individual. (The healing power of nature.) Identification and treatment of the underlying cause of disease. (Treat the cause.) The primary role of the naturopathic doctor is to educate and support patients in taking responsibility for their health. (Doctor as teacher.) Treatment of the whole person through individualized care. Prevention of disease through encouraging a healthy lifestyle and controlling risk factors.

The ND program is broadly composed of three main areas of study: the biomedical sciences, the clinical sciences and the art and practice of naturopathic medicine.

BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES The biomedical sciences segment of the curriculum provides an in-depth study of the human body through lectures and labs. Students take courses in anatomy (including gross anatomy, prosection, neuroanatomy, embryology and histology), physiology, biochemistry, immunology, clinical pathology, environmental and public health (including infectious diseases), pharmacology and pharmacognosy.

CLINICAL SCIENCES The clinical sciences segment of the curriculum thoroughly prepares students to educate patients and the public in health promotion and disease prevention. It also prepares them to identify and diagnose a range of primary care conditions and to effectively help patients manage their conditions utilizing an array of therapeutics. Laboratory and clinical demonstrations are employed to foster the development of practical skills. Diagnostics courses include physical and clinical diagnosis, integrated clinical pathology and differential diagnosis, and diagnostic imaging. Focused health care issues are covered in courses such as maternal and newborn care to pediatrics. Primary care management is covered in the study of botanical medicine, homeopathy, emergency medicine, nutrition, physical medicine (including naturopathic, osseous and soft tissue manipulative therapy, physiotherapy, sports medicine, therapeutic exercise and hydrotherapy), psychological counselling, nature cure, acupuncture and Asian medicine and minor surgery.

ART AND PRACTICE OF NATUROPATHIC MEDICINE A defining element of naturopathic medicine is the integration of naturopathic philosophy and principles with medical knowledge in the care of patients. In the program, students are exposed to the practical application of this knowledge and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of both the art and practice of naturopathic medicine. In addition, students will develop the skills to practice in a manner that exemplifies professionalism, strong ethics and a commitment to the principles of naturopathic medicine.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  52

DOCTOR OF NATUROPATHY DEGREE

DOCTOR OF NATUROPATHY DEGREE


NATUROPATHIC THERAPEUTICS – AN OVERVIEW There are six major modalities that help to define naturopathic practice. Each is a distinct area of practice and includes diagnostic principles and practices as well as therapeutic skills and techniques. The integration of these modalities to effectively meet the individual health needs of each patient is one of the major outcomes of CCNM’s ND program. Below is an overview of the major modalities covered in the program.

ASIAN MEDICINE/ACUPUNCTURE Students learn about the philosophy and principles of Asian medicine: Yin and Yang theory, the meridians and channels system, the five-element theory and the symptoms and signs involving the 12 master meridians. Applying these principles in the context of patient assessment and treatment is emphasized, with acupuncture and therapeutic botanicals being the main approaches.

BOTANICAL MEDICINE The pharmacognosy, clinical indications, interactions and toxicology of plants and crude plant extracts are examined. Traditional and historical uses of botanical medicines are analyzed as a foundation for modern usage and current research. Field trips for identification of local botanicals are part of the program, along with an exploration of herbs in light of their ecological significance and contribution to the history and evolution of medicine.

CLINICAL NUTRITION The clinical nutrition stream provides students with current knowledge and research in clinical nutrition, and its application in the prevention and treatment of disease processes. Macro and micro nutrients and their interacting biochemical roles in human metabolism are investigated; the concept of biochemical individuality is highlighted. Etiological considerations and clinical manifestations of nutritional imbalances and food sensitivities are appraised. Diagnostic evaluation of nutritional status is presented while prescriptive therapeutic strategies such as fasting, detoxification, specific diets, supplementation, orthomolecular therapy, use of food extracts, glandular concentrates and digestive aids are critically reviewed.

HOMEOPATHIC MEDICINE The history, principles and philosophy of homeopathy are discussed in depth. Practical application of homeopathic principles in patient assessment and management is emphasized for acute and constitutional cases. Skills are developed in case analysis, repertorization, materia medica search, remedy differentiation and selection and prescribing the appropriate posology.

PHYSICAL MEDICINE Students are taught a variety of assessment techniques ranging from orthopedic tests to naturopathic manipulation. Students learn to manipulate the osseous and soft tissues in order to correct structural and/or postural imbalance or pathology, including active and passive manipulation of spinal, costovertebral, costosternal and limb articulations. The prescription of restorative and/or preventive exercise for patients requiring these measures is also taught. The therapeutic application and effects of physical modalities such as hydrotherapy, physiotherapeutic machines and naturopathic manipulation are discussed and practiced. Internal and topical therapeutic uses of water are examined, including immersion baths, douching, thermal body wraps, fomentations, and constitutional hydrotherapy.

HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY AND LIFESTYLE COUNSELLING Courses in health psychology review current psychological theories and help students acquire practical counselling skills. These courses discuss the importance of the mind-body connection and teach approaches to enhance this connection in patient care. Lifestyle counselling is taught throughout the program.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  53

DOCTOR OF NATUROPATHY DEGREE

DOCTOR OF NATUROPATHY DEGREE cont’d


CLINICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM The ND program’s extensive classroom training prepares students for their roles as primary interns, co-managing patient care with licensed naturopathic doctors in the CCNM teaching clinics. Students are introduced to clinical practice through staged courses between years one and three of the program, culminating in an intensive fourth year of clinical internship. During their fourth year, students are mentored in the art and practice of naturopathic care, employing a patient-centred approach to preventative and therapeutic health care. IMGs become clinical interns in their second year. Primary interns are taught and assessed by clinical faculty in areas of naturopathic medical competency such as clinical knowledge and diagnosis, communication skills, naturopathic therapeutics, research skills, systems-based practice and professionalism. The Robert Schad Naturopathic Clinic is CCNM’s main teaching clinic, hosting approximately 25,000 patient visits per year and furnished with 37 patient treatment rooms and 8 media-equipped conference rooms. The clinic allows its interns and practitioners to provide a range of services, including acupuncture, physical therapeutics, IV therapy and sauna/hydrotherapy. In addition, clinical interns work in the on-site laboratory and collection centre and in the botanical compounding room, formulating medicinal tinctures and dried herbal prescriptions.

CCNM boasts the first naturopathic teaching clinic in a hospital setting in Canada at the Brampton Civic Hospital. The Brampton Naturopathic Teaching Clinic provides 72 intern positions yearly. It is a fast paced, primary-care operations that operates four days a week and hosts over 7,000 patient visits annually. Clinical interns are also expected to complete at least one four-month placement in an external community healthcare clinic site, where they gain in-depth knowledge of the practice of community-based medicine. The external sites are located in five community health centres (Sherbourne Health Centre, Anishnawbe Health Toronto, LAMP Community Health Centre, Parkdale Community Health Centre and Queen West Community Health Centre). The clinical education program has established five focused care clinics in the RSNC: Adjunctive Cancer Care, Sports Medicine, Pediatrics and Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Fibromyalgia and reproductive health/fertility. These areas of focus were created to address the specific need for an introduction to focused training of clinical interns and specialized care of individuals in these demographic groups and/or affected populations. Successful clinical intern applicants are led by naturopathic doctors who have extensive experience in their respective areas of interest.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  54

DOCTOR OF NATUROPATHY DEGREE

DOCTOR OF NATUROPATHY DEGREE cont’d


COURSE LISTING

COURSE LISTING

FIRST YEAR Course Code

Course Name

Credit Hours

ASM102

Asian Medicine I

2.0

ASM103

Asian Medicine Point Location I

1.0

BAS103

Biochemistry

3.0

BAS108

Embryology

1.5

BAS115

Immunology

2.5

BAS118

Clinical Physiology I

2.0

BAS119

Clinical Physiology II

2.0

BAS120

Anatomy I

6.5

BAS121

Anatomy II

6.5

BOT101

Botanical Medicine I

2.5

CLE100

Clinic I

1.0

CPH101

Public Health

2.0

HOM100

Homeopathic Medicine I

2.0

NMS101

Ethics and Jurisprudence I

1.0

NPH101

Naturopathic History, Philosophy, Principles

2.0

NPH102

The Art and Practice of Naturopathic Medicine

2.0

NUT102

Clinical Nutrition I

3.0

PHM104

Massage/Hydrotherapy

2.5

PSY103

Health Psychology I

2.5

RES100

Principles in Research

2.0 TOTAL YEAR ONE: 49.5

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  55


COURSE LISTING

COURSE LISTING cont’d

SECOND YEAR Course Code

Course Name

Credit Hours

ASM202

Asian Medicine II

2.0

ASM203

Asian Medicine Point Location II

1.0

ASM204

Asian Medicine Point Location III

1.0

BAS208

Pharmacology

5.0

BAS215

Microbiology I

2.0

BAS216

Microbiology II

2.0

BOT202

Botanical Medicine II

4.0

CLE201

Clinic II

1.5

CLS213

Clinical Medicine I

9.5

CLS214

Clinical Medicine II

9.5

CLS223

Physical and Clinical Diagnosis Practicum I

1.0

CLS224

Physical and Clinical Diagnosis Practicum II

1.0

FNM201

Foundations of Naturopathic Medicine

2.0

HOM204

Homeopathic Medicine II Part I

3.0

HOM205

Homeopathic Medicine II Part II

3.0

NUT202

Clinical Nutrition II

4.5

PHM201

Naturopathic Manipulation I

2.0

PSY203

Health Psychology II

1.5 TOTAL YEAR TWO: 55.5

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  56


COURSE LISTING

COURSE LISTING cont’d

THIRD YEAR Course Code

Course Name

Credit Hours

ASM302*

Asian Medicine III

3.0

ASM303*

Asian Medicine III Clinical Applications

2.0

BOT302

Botanical Medicine III

6.0

CLE310

Clinic III

4.5

CLE303*

Primary Care

3.0

CLS301

Maternal and Newborn Care

2.0

CLS302

Pediatrics

2.0

CLS304*

Emergency Medicine

1.5

CLS308*

Men’s Health/Women’s Health I

3.0

HOM300

Homeopathic Medicine III

5.0

NMS310

Practice Management I

2.0

NPH305

Integrated Therapeutics I

3.0

NPH315

Integrated Therapeutics II

3.0

NPS315*

In-Office Procedures I

2.5

NUT302

Clinical Nutrition III

5.0

PHM301*

Naturopathic Manipulation II

3.0

PHM324

Physical Medicine

4.5

PSY303

Health Psychology III

2.5

RAD302

Radiology and Advanced Imaging

2.0 TOTAL YEAR THREE: 59.5

* Courses designated with an asterisk (*) must have been taken no more than six months prior to commencing CLE404. If more than six months has elapsed from the time a student completed these courses to the commencement of CLE404, the student will be required to pass the Clinic Entrance Readiness Examination to demonstrate his or her competency prior to entry into clinic. Additionally, if a fourth-year student withdraws for over six months, s/he will be required to pass the Clinic Entrance Readiness Exam before re-entering the Primary Internship program.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  57


COURSE LISTING

COURSE LISTING cont’d

FOURTH YEAR Course Code

Course Name

Credit Hours

CLE404

Clinic IV

17.5

CLE412

Clinic V

17.5

CLE450

Clinic VI

17.5

CLS408

Men’s / Women’s Health II

2.5

NMS401

Ethics and Jurisprudence II

1.0

NMS410

Practice Management II

1.0

NPS402

In-Office Procedures II

1.0 TOTAL YEAR FOUR: 58.0

Note: One credit hour is defined as the credit for one lecture hour per week for one term. A full-year course will earn two credit hours for each hour of lecture per week. Lab and practicum hours are credited at a one-half rate (e.g., two hours per week for a term is required to earn one credit hour) and clinic time is credited at a two-thirds rate.

One credit hour = 14 lecture hours One credit hour = 2 8 lab, tutorial, practicum or independent study hours One credit hour = 21 clinic hours

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  58


COURSE LISTING

COURSE LISTING cont’d

HOW TO READ COURSE CODES The following legend will assist you in understanding the course codes. The first three letters indicate the subject (BAS = Basic Sciences). The first number indicates the academic year. Subject Areas ASM

Asian Medicine

NMS

Naturopathic Practice Management Skills

BAS

Basic Sciences

NPH

Naturopathic History and Philosophy

BOT

Botanical Medicine

NPS

Naturopathic Practice Clinical Skills

CLE

Clinical Education

NUT

Nutrition

CLS

Clinical Science

PHM

Physical Medicine

CPH

Community and Public Health

PSY

Psychology

FNM

Foundations of Naturopathic Medicine

RAD

Radiology

HOM

Homeopathic Medicine

RES

Research

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  59


YEAR 1 ASM102: Asian Medicine I Students focus on the fundamentals of Traditional Chinese Medicine including basic history, philosophy, and development. They are introduced to fundamental theories such as Yin/Yang, five elements and Zang-Fu. Therapeutic and diagnostic theories such as 8 principles, 6 Pathogenic Factors, Qi, Blood, Body Fluids and 7 emotions are introduced. Acupuncture channels, pulse and tongue diagnosis as well as other therapies employed in Traditional Chinese Medicine, are discussed. ASM103: Asian Medicine Point Location I The first in a series, this course covers the location, action, surrounding anatomy, and needling methods for acupuncture points. Points and meridians from the 12 regular channels and 8 extra meridians as well as extra points will be covered. (Prerequisite: ASM102, BAS120) BAS103: Biochemistry Students learn the nomenclature and control of biochemical pathways at the cell, tissue, and organ level in an integrated approach. They gain an understanding of carbohydrate, fat, protein metabolism and enzyme functions as applied to the human being in health and disease. Cellular biochemistry as related to nutrition is introduced. BAS108: Embryology Basic principles and mechanisms of human development from conception to shortly after birth are discussed. The normal development of each of the body’s systems is reviewed, and examples of how abnormal development may occur are given. (Corequisite: BAS121)

BAS115: Immunology This course presents the field of immunology with a focus on the host’s interaction with an environment containing various potential harmful microbes. It also examines the molecular mechanisms used by the immune system to recognize foreign invaders and describes the process of immune system activation that results from this recognition. The means by which the stimulated immune system eliminates foreign molecules, cells and organisms is discussed. Clinical aspects of immunology, such as allergy, autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, vaccination and immunity to tumors, are presented as variants of this basic protective function in which the nature of the antigen is the major variable. BAS118: Clinical Physiology I Students explore and incorporate detailed knowledge of the functional organization and operational mechanisms used by cells, tissues, organs and organ systems to patient presentations. Using lectures, practicals, clinical demonstrations and case analyses, students integrate their understanding of the physiological functions of the major systems of the human body in health and disease, to assess patient presentations. Specific physical examination techniques are introduced to explain physiology in action and their utility in clinical assessment. BAS119: Clinical Physiology II Clinical Physiology II continues and builds on the concepts taught in Clinical Physiology I. Students integrate their understanding of the physiological functions of the major systems of the human body in health and disease through clinical application. Using lectures, practicals, clinical demonstrations and case analyses, students integrate their understanding of physiology to assess patient presentations. Specific physical examination techniques are introduced to explain physiology in action and their utility in clinical assessment. (Prerequisite: BAS118)

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  60

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


YEAR 1 cont’d BAS120: Anatomy I With an emphasis on regional, functional and clinically oriented anatomy, this course is a survey of gross regional anatomy of the entire locomotor system. Instruction methods include lectures, case studies, study of human bones and physical examination. BAS120 emphasizes that the function of muscles, bones, joints, together with peripheral nervous system and surrounding connective tissues as a complex, integrated and interdependent part of the human body. Together with the anatomical fundamentals of the locomotor system, students learn skills of observation of movement, posture and tissue tone. BAS121: Anatomy II In BAS121 the focus of study is shifted to anatomy of body cavities and organ systems, including study of the head and central nervous system. Instructional methods continue to include lectures and case studies and are supplemented by the study of dissected human cadavers. Students apply anatomical concepts to the study of the human form as a living, moving entity and are expected to integrate it with principles of physiology. (Prerequisite: BAS120)

CPH101: Public Health This course examines the impact of the social determinants of health on the individual and communities. Students explore essential concepts of health promotion and disease prevention as a foundation for examining health beliefs and practices of individual patients. The role of naturopathic professional in health promotion and disease prevention is further explored. HOM100: Homeopathic Medicine I This introductory course in homeopathic medicine introduces the basic concepts of homeopathy, including: an introduction to the history, principles and philosophy of homeopathic medicine; repertory; principles of homeopathic treatment; first aid prescribing; acute prescribing; and basic case-taking. NMS101: Ethics and Jurisprudence I The medico-legal aspects of naturopathic practice in Ontario and other Canadian provinces are examined. The emphasis in first year is on identifying and discussing the ethical duties of naturopathic physicians to their patients, other medical practitioners and to society.

BOT101: Botanical Medicine I This course provides a foundation for the therapeutic use of botanical medicines in naturopathic practice. The traditional prescription of herbs is discussed within a context of body systems and common pathologies while the study of pharmacognosy provides a framework for understanding the pharmacological aspects of herbs. Students learn how to prepare herbal medicines in naturopathic practice based on an independent group assignment.

NPH101: Naturopathic History, Philosophy and Principles This course engages students in an exploration of the basic underlying principles of naturopathic medicine. These principles are understood through philosophical discussion of concepts such as holism, vitalism and health. The historical evolution of medicine and the naturopathic profession are examined. Students will know and understand the Naturopathic Doctor’s Oath, and identify what the values and principles in the oath mean to them.

CLE100: Clinic I This course introduces students to naturopathic practice at the Robert Schad Naturopathic Clinic, the teaching clinic of CCNM. Students shadow clinic faculty as they do their rounds at the RSNC, and also have the opportunity to observe a variety of treatments. Students are introduced to the standards of medical record keeping (including SOAP charting), privacy policy and concepts of clinical reasoning.

NPH102: Art and Practice of Naturopathic Medicine This course explores the many facets of naturopathic medicine, including its major modalities and the manner by which they are incorporated into a unified approach to healing. The major qualities and skills required for naturopathic medicine are addressed in the context of the program, as well as the ongoing experience necessary to cultivate those skills and qualities. The principles discussed in NPH101 are applied in a small group setting. (Prerequisite: NPH101)

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  61

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS cont’d


YEAR 1 cont’d NUT102: Clinical Nutrition I This course examines the relationship between nutrition, health and disease. The structure and function of macro and micro nutrients required for human health are examined, and the roles and requirements of vitamins and minerals are discussed. The clinical application of nutrients is introduced from a nutritional biochemistry perspective, and includes discussion of therapeutic dosages, adverse effects, and laboratory methods for assessing status. This course provides the foundation for Clinical Nutrition courses taught in second and third years. (Prerequisite: BAS103)

PSY103: Health Psychology I This course supports students’ understanding of human psychology and the manner that individual factors relate to health, wellness and disease. Year 1 provides a foundation in health psychology theory and research. Basic principles of counselling and intentional interviewing techniques are introduced. Students are challenged to address their own psychological habits, gain insight into their personal patterns of communication, and develop confidence in their clinical interviewing skills.

PHM104: Massage/Hydrotherapy This course introduces the student to the clinical examination and assessment of soft tissues through palpation, as well as how to administer both hydrotherapy and massage treatments. In supervised, hands-on classes, students learn the therapeutic value of touch and bodywork by giving and receiving massage. The importance and healing power of water is experienced through the exchange of naturopathic hydrotherapy treatments. With an emphasis on developing self-awareness, presence, respect and healing intent, these key therapeutic tools are instructed in preparation for clinical application. (Prerequisite: BAS120)

RES100: Principles in Research This course introduces the methodological principles of research. It emphasizes the critical assessment of medical literature and highlights published research and research methods relevant to naturopathic medicine. The curriculum supports students in acquiring an efficient, critical approach to making clinical decisions based on an objective assessment of medical literature.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  62

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS cont’d


YEAR 2 ASM202: Asian Medicine II This course focuses on the understanding of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) diagnosis. Students learn etiologies, pathogenesis, pattern identification, and pulse and tongue diagnosis. Other diagnostic theories such as 6 channels, 4 levels and 3 burners are presented. Case studies are implemented in order to facilitate learning. Discussion on the use of acupuncture points is limited as students are not required to take ASM 203 concurrently. (Prerequisites: ASM102) ASM203: Asian Medicine Point Location II This is the second in a series of courses that covers the location, action, surrounding anatomy, and needling methods for acupuncture points on the body. Points and meridians from the urinary bladder, kidney, conception vessel, and governing vessel will be covered. Students performing acupuncture are taught the clean needle technique as per the guidelines for the NCCAOM program. Additionally, students learn how to correctly and safely use acupuncture needles in a clinical setting. (Prerequisites: ASM103) ASM204: Asian Medicine Point Location III This is the final course in a series that covers the location, action, anatomy, and needling methods for acupuncture points on the body. Points and meridians from the stomach, spleen, liver, and gall bladder meridians as well as extra points will be covered. Students performing acupuncture are taught the clean needle technique as per the guidelines for the NCCAOM program. Additionally, students learn how to correctly and safely use acupuncture needles in a clinical setting. (Prerequisites: ASM103) BAS208: Pharmacology The study of pharmacological principles develops a strong foundation in understanding the factors that influence drug action. This course examines the indications, mechanisms of action, adverse effects and interactions of the most common pharmaceutical drugs. Case analysis and group research projects develop students’ understanding of pharmacological agents and their influences on the practice of naturopathic medicine. (Prerequisites: BAS103, BAS119, BOT101; Co-requisite: CLS213)

BAS215: Microbiology I This course focuses on the role of microorganisms in clinical disease. Students demonstrate the capacity to track the course of diseases arising from infection, understand transmission modes, and determine appropriate labs for diagnosis of micro-organisms. This course stresses the integration of scientific information with naturopathic approaches. (Prerequisites: BAS115, BAS119) BAS216: Microbiology II This course continues and builds on the curriculum of Microbiology I. The role of microorganisms in clinical diseases is discussed. Students demonstrate the capacity to track the course of diseases arising from infection, understand transmission modes, and determine appropriate labs for diagnosis of micro-organisms. This course stresses the integration of scientific information with naturopathic approaches. (Prerequisites: BAS215) BOT202: Botanical Medicine II This course organizes the study of herbs based on their specific clinical effects and affinities for different body systems, providing training in pharmacognosy and the clinical use of whole plants and extracts. Along with a traditional lecture format, clinical application of the course material is approached through casebased learning sessions. Topics include: therapeutic actions and indications of specific herbs; dosage and prescribing strategies; contraindications, interactions, and safety issues; therapeutic categories of herbs and principles of botanical practice. Empirical data on traditional uses for plants as medicines is integrated with modern scientific research on their pharmacological actions and clinical use. (Prerequisites: BAS119, BOT101) CLE201: Clinic II This course allows students to continue the development of their clinical skills through direct contact with patients. Under the mentorship of fourth-year interns and clinical faculty, students perform portions of the patient intake and physical exam on RSNC patients. Students spend time shadowing clinic faculty and their fourth-year mentor, and are assessed on clinical competencies such as patient rapport, intake skills, professionalism and medical record keeping. (Prerequisites: BAS119, BAS121, CLE100, NMS101; Co-requisites: CLS223)

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  63

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS cont’d


YEAR 2 cont’d CLS213: Clinical Medicine I The curriculum of Clinical Medicine I is integrated with CLS223 (Physical and Clinical Diagnosis Practicum I). Presented in modules, the Clinical Medicine series are designed to support the student in developing competence in each stage of the clinical encounter: history, physical examination, laboratory investigation, differential diagnosis, and concepts related to management. Each module uses case studies to discuss incidence, etiology, pathology, and progression of common primary care concerns relevant to clinical practice. Students explore and incorporate the functional organization and operational mechanisms used by cells, tissues, organs and systems. Clinical cases provide context for selecting and applying specific physical examinations and laboratory tests. The student interprets and critically evaluates information derived from history, physical exam, and laboratory investigations, and uses their developing clinical reasoning skills to arrive at relevant and appropriate working diagnoses, based on real-life signs and symptoms presented in clinical practice. Successful course completion of CLS213 enables students to understand basic patterns of human pathologies and their application to varying disease processes, recognize the presentation of life-threatening disorders, identify and interpret clinical manifestations of common diseases, and provide a rationale for underlying treatment. The course serves as a foundation for the clinical reasoning skills used in the practice of primary care. (Prerequisites: BAS121, BAS119; Corequisite: CLS223) CLS214: Clinical Medicine II Clinical Medicine II is a continuation of Clinical Medicine I, and is integrated with CLS224. It builds on the competencies acquired in CLS213, and is designed to continue student development in each stage of the clinical encounter: history, physical examination, laboratory investigation, differential diagnosis, and concepts related to management.

Case studies are used as the backdrop to discuss incidence, etiology, pathology, and progression of common primary care concerns relevant to clinical practice. They provide context for selecting and applying specific physical examinations and laboratory tests, and students interpret and critically evaluate information derived from history, physical exam, and laboratory investigations. Students use their clinical reasoning skills to arrive at relevant and appropriate working diagnoses, based on real-life signs and symptoms presented in clinical practice. Successful course completion of CLS214 enables students to understand basic patterns of human pathologies and their application to varying disease processes, recognize the presentation of life-threatening disorders, identify and interpret clinical manifestations of common diseases, and provide a rationale for underlying treatment. The course serves as a foundation for the clinical reasoning skills used in the practice of primary care. (Prerequisites: CLS213, CLS223; Corequisite: CLS224) CLS223: Physical and Clinical Diagnosis Practicum I The curriculum of CLS223 is integrated with Clinical Medicine I and the cases used in each of the modules are designed to support the student in developing the technical competence in taking a patient history and performing a physical examination efficiently and accurately. This course develops the skills necessary to conduct a thorough systems-based physical examination, interpret physical findings, elicit a complete medical history, and document the information appropriately. (Corequisite: CLS213) CLS224: Physical and Clinical Diagnosis Practicum II This course follows CLS223 and CLS213; the curriculum for Physical and Clinical Diagnosis Practicum II is integrated with Clinical Medicine II. The cases used in each of the modules are designed to support the student in developing the technical competence in taking a patient history and performing a physical examination efficiently and accurately. This course develops the skills necessary to conduct a thorough systems-based physical examination, interpret physical findings, elicit a complete medical history, and document the information appropriately. (Prerequisite: CLS223; Corequisite: CLS214)

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  64

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS cont’d


YEAR 2 cont’d FNM201: Foundations of Naturopathic Medicine Students are engaged in examining, debating and assessing the principles, philosophical and practical underpinnings that define naturopathic medicine. Active learning is facilitated through group writing and debate, as well as through panel discussions with practicing naturopathic doctors. (Prerequisites: NPH102) HOM204: Homeopathic Medicine II Part I Students continue their study of homeopathic medicine, and discuss the underpinning principles and philosophy, using The Organon of the Medical Art as a template. The materia medica of homeopathic remedies is taught according to their classification in the animal, plant or mineral kingdoms, as well as the families and/or groups within the kingdoms. Case studies are used to orient the student to the practical application of homeopathy, and students develop skills in homeopathic case taking, repertorizing, case analysis, and single-remedy prescribing taught in accordance with The Organon of the Medical Art. (Prerequisite: HOM100) HOM205: Homeopathic Medicine II Part II In HOM205 students continue their study of homeopathic medicine. Interactive lectures are used to teach materia medica of homeopathic remedies, and case studies are used to orient the student to the practical application of homeopathy. Students further develop their skills in homeopathic case taking, repertorizing, case analysis, and single-remedy prescribing taught in accordance with The Organon of the Medical Art. (Prerequisite: HOM204)

NUT202: Clinical Nutrition II This course outlines objective evidence in the field of nutritional science as it relates to health promotion, disease prevention and disease treatment. The focus is on diet and lifestyle-based interventions. The goal is to provide students with evidencebased intervention plans that safely and effectively facilitate the primary care management of presenting metabolic diseases. (Prerequisite: NUT102, RES100) PHM201: Naturopathic Manipulation I This course introduces students to the assessment and examination of the vertebral column and the costo-sternal and costo-vertebral joints. It also covers the examination of extremities, and provides an introduction to motion palpation and the static assessment of the vertebral column and pelvis. Students learn to assess and diagnose various peripheral joint irregularities. (Prerequisite: BAS121) PSY203: Health Psychology II This course deepens students’ understanding of health psychology and encourages them to explore counselling as a naturopathic modality. Year 2 builds on the foundation established in Year 1 and teaches students to consider the relationships between thoughts, emotions, behaviours and health. The course also introduces concepts in behavioural medicine relevant to the clinical practice of naturopathic medicine and encourages students to utilize applied counselling skills. (Prerequisite: PSY103)

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  65

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS cont’d


YEAR 3 ASM302: Asian Medicine III Various allopathic diagnoses are considered from an Asian medicine perspective. Common pathologies are discussed in terms of their etiology, pathogenesis, TCM pattern identification, acupuncture treatment prescriptions, and adjunct treatment options. Students are taught the main TCM patent herbal formulas used in clinical practice. Adjunct therapies such as cupping, moxibustion, scalp acupuncture, auricular acupuncture and various needling techniques are taught and later performed in ASM303. (Prerequisites: ASM202, ASM203, ASM204, CLS214; Corequisite: ASM303) ASM303: Asian Medicine III Clinical Applications The focus of this course is the application of various treatment strategies and prescriptions covered in ASM302. Students practice advanced needling techniques such as free-hand, tonification and sedation maneuvers, and De Qi sensations. Adjunct therapies practiced include cupping, moxibustion, scalp acupuncture and auricular acupuncture. Additionally, students explore case studies in a problem-based format to gain a better understanding of TCM diagnosis, treatment and therapeutic effect. (Prerequisites: ASM202, ASM203, ASM204; Corequisite: ASM302) BOT302: Botanical Medicine III This course continues the examination of herbs based on their clinical effects on different body systems, focusing on indications, dosage, contraindications, interactions and associated pharmacological data. Empirical data on the traditional uses of plants as medicines is integrated with scientific research on their pharmacological and clinical actions. Formulation and prescribing principles are presented. (Prerequisites: BAS208, BOT202, CLS214) CLE310: Clinic III To prepare for their role as primary intern, third year students enter the clinic in a mentored environment. Together with fourth year students and supervised by a naturopathic doctor, these secondary interns co-manage patients at the Robert Schad Naturopathic Clinic where they are able to apply their skills in physical examination, medical history taking, case analysis and treatment planning and delivery. (Prerequisites: CLE201, CLS214, CLS224; Corequisite: CLE303)

CLE303: Primary Care Primary care standards govern the systematic process of symptom/sign recognition, cost-effective laboratory investigation, procedural diagnosis and case management. Students will learn to identify, analyze and manage clinical problems in order to provide effective and efficient patient care. Competencies achieved in this course provide the foundation for clinical rotations, independent medical practice, and postgraduate training. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is part of the evaluation of this course. (Prerequisites: CLS214, CLS224); Corequisite: CLE310, NPH305/315) CLS301: Maternal and Newborn Care Students are provided with the fundamental knowledge of prenatal, labour, birth, and postpartum physiological processes. An emphasis is placed on birth being a normal physiological process rather than a pathological one. The diagnosis and treatment of common complaints of pregnancy and postpartum periods are addressed including both allopathic and integrative approaches. Complications that can arise in the childbearing year are also discussed to give students a foundation in understanding when referral is necessary. (Prerequisites: CLS214, CLS224) CLS302: Pediatrics This course examines the growth, development and health promotion of pediatric patients. It also examines common and critical pediatric conditions with respect to case management. Students practice their skills in taking a medical history and performing a physical exam on children of varying ages. They learn how to manage the application of naturopathic principles and therapies to pediatric practice, and how to engage in effective parent education. Emphasis is placed on developing a creative and flexible approach to pediatric care and the importance of referral and contraindications to treatment. (Prerequisites: CLS214, CLS224)

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  66

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS cont’d


YEAR 3 cont’d CLS304: Emergency Medicine Students learn the key principles of basic life support and develop thought processes required to effectively handle emergency situations. Clinically relevant case scenarios and supervised practical sessions are presented. The RSNC emergency procedures are incorporated to prepare students to implement protocols during their internship. Successful graduates will possess the knowledge, skill and experience to develop emergency protocols for their clinical practice. (Prerequisites: CLS214, CLS224) CLS308: Men’s Health and Women’s Health This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the most commonly seen health concerns related to men’s and women’s health in clinical practice. Students are able to identify and apply gender-specific and age-based screening tests based on current research and regional guidelines. They develop skills in performing gender-specific physical examinations and interpreting relevant lab results. Therapeutic management of gender-specific health concerns is emphasized. (Prerequisites: CLS214, CLS224) HOM300: Homeopathic Medicine IV Clinical exposure to case taking, case analysis and case management are the focus of this course, which consolidates knowledge from HOM100, HOM202 and HOM203. Real cases are presented and managed by advanced practitioners who are experienced in the field of homeopathic medicine. This gives students the opportunity to witness various styles of homeopathic practice rooted in a classical homeopathic approach. Additionally, students prepare for their internship through independent study of acute and first aid materia medica. (Prerequisites: HOM205)

NMS310: Practice Management I The goals of this course are to provide students with a general knowledge of business concepts, practices and activities and to give them a framework for understanding the steps in the development of their future business as a naturopathic doctor. The course will guide the student towards understanding the business purpose, targeting patient segments, attracting and retaining patients, marketing, and understanding a variety of business models. Double entry accounting will also be introduced. Students will also develop their presentation skills and interact with experienced practitioners. NPH305: Integrated Therapeutics I This course is a companion to Standards in Primary Care (CLE303). Integrated Therapeutics I discusses and evaluates the best practices in therapeutic intervention for commonly seen conditions in primary care. Naturopathic principles and philosophy are aligned in patient management, and the naturopathic therapeutics including, but not limited to Asian medicine, botanical medicine, clinical nutrition, counseling, homeopathic medicine, lifestyle modification, nature cure, pharmaceuticals and physical medicine. These are discussed in the context of commonly seen conditions. (Corequisite: CLE303) NPH315: Integrated Therapeutics II Integrated Therapeutics II is a continuation of NPH305, and is a companion course to Standards in Primary Care (CLE303). The objective is to discuss and evaluate the best practices in therapeutic intervention for commonly seen conditions in primary health care. Naturopathic principles and philosophy are aligned in patient management, and the naturopathic therapeutics including, but not limited to Asian medicine, botanical medicine, clinical nutrition, counselling, homeopathic medicine, lifestyle modification, nature cure, pharmaceuticals and physical medicine. These are discussed in the context of commonly seen conditions, and independent clinical learning projects enhance student knowledge for patient case preparation and treatment. Primary, secondary and tertiary prevention strategies are also discussed. (Prerequisite: NPH305; Corequisite: CLE303)

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  67

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS cont’d


YEAR 3 cont’d NPS315: In-Office Procedures I Students learn the procedures needed to obtain a good quality specimen (i.e., blood, hair, skin, throat and urine) for testing, which include patient preparation, collection of the specimen, processing the specimen, and storing and/or transporting the specimen. Students develop an appreciation for the clinical utility of parenteral therapies by naturopathic doctors, and learn how to administer intramuscular injections. The course also covers the administration of naturopathic parenteral preparations of therapeutic benefit to patients. Topics include vitamins, minerals, and evidence supporting the use of outpatient intravenous therapy. (Prerequisite: CLS214; Corequisites: CLS304) NUT302: Clinical Nutrition III The application of biomedical and clinical sciences to nutrition offers students valuable perspectives on the treatment and prevention of disease, and health optimization. This course is taught in modules, including biochemical individuality, clinical nutritional examination and the toxicology of commonly used vitamins. (Prerequisites: CLS214, NUT202) PHM301: Naturopathic Manipulation II This course exposes students to the clinical assessment and treatment of subluxations/fixations in the cervical, thoracic, lum¬bar and sacro-iliac portions of the axial skeleton, as well as costo-sternal, costo-vertebral and peripheral articulations. Clinical assessment of the subluxation/fixation complexes primarily involves the use of motion palpation of these areas, augmented with instruction in static palpation and basic visual assessment techniques. Treatment of subluxation/fixation complexes will be accomplished by high velocity, low amplitude spinal and peripheral manipulative techniques. Indications, contraindications, and appropriate referral for spinal and peripheral joint manipulative therapy will also be discussed. (Prerequisite: PHM201)

PHM324: Physical Medicine Students learn a system of evaluating musculoskeletal disease and injury, and the principles of rehabilitation for each condition. Rehabilitation is directed by the stage of healing and body part injured. Students will be able to appropriately manage these orthopaedic pathologies using naturopathic modalities. The focus is on the application of manual techniques, hydrotherapy principles, patient education, exercise and utilization of therapeutic machines including ultrasound, TENS and interferential current. Hands-on sessions in small tutorial groups are conducted under the guidance of experienced practitioners in the field of physical medicine. (Prerequisites: CLS214, CLS224, PHM201) PSY303: Health Psychology III Health Psychology III focuses on selected clinical topics of significance including: stress management, health maintenance, adaptation to chronic illness, life span challenges, psychopathology, and crisis intervention. This course provides students with opportunities to integrate skills, model psychological adjustment, and gain the confidence necessary to maintain healthy relationships with patients when engaging in therapeutic conversation. (Prerequisite: PSY203) RAD302: Radiology and Advanced Imaging Diagnostic imaging modalities, image acquisition techniques, and their indications and benefits are presented with contraindications and risks for a variety of cases. Congenital anomalies and normal variants will be explored, as well as other more serious pathological conditions. Cases presented stress the importance of integrating imaging and lab results to formulate a diagnosis. (Prerequisite: CLS214) Note: Courses designated with an asterisk (*) in the course listing section must have been taken no more than six months prior to commencing CLE350. If more than six months have elapsed, the student is required to pass the Clinic Entrance Readiness Examination to demonstrate competency prior to starting CLE350. Additionally, if a student is away from clinic for greater than six months for any reason, the student will be required to pass the Clinic Entrance Readiness Examination before resuming as a primary intern.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  68

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS cont’d


YEAR 4 CLE404: Clinic IV CLE412: Clinic V Students further develop their skills as primary interns treating patients in the Robert Schad Naturopathic Clinic and its satellite teaching clinics, supervised by licensed naturopathic doctors. Students are required to demonstrate the competencies outlined in the Primary Intern Manual and to complete all relevant requirements. (Prerequisite: CLE404) CLS408: Men’s Health and Women’s Health II This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the most commonly seen health concerns related to men’s and women’s health in clinical practice. This course is intended as a continuation of CLS308. Students will further develop their ability to perform sex-specific physical examinations and interpret relevant lab results. They will also be exposed to a variety of primary care and alternative treatment options. They will be able to apply naturopathic treatment options based on levels of evidence that currently exist. By the end of this course, the student will be able to work up and manage a patient case, from a naturopathic perspective based on the topics covered. (Prerequisite: CLS308). NMS401: Ethics and Jurisprudence II The course concludes the study of the medico-legal aspects of naturopathic practice. Civil litigation is emphasized as it relates to medical malpractice. Students are taught how to provide written and oral testimony as expert witnesses. The business aspects of establishing a practice are also discussed, including topics such as commercial leases, employment arrangements and partnership law. (Prerequisite: NMS101; Co-requisite: NMS410)

NMS410: Practice Management II The goals of the course are to build on the skills learned in NMS310. This course will guide the student toward understanding the basic financial statements of a business, and the skills needed to start, organize, develop and market a successful practice. Students will interact with successful guest speakers from the profession, and the course will include hands on experience with a popular accounting software package. Students will complete the development of a formal business plan suitable for presentation to a financial institution. (Prerequisite: NMS310; Co-requisite: NMS401) NPS402: In-Office Procedures II A continuation of NPS315, In-Office Procedures II prepares the students to perform point-of-care procedures in a primary care setting including an introduction to minor surgery which is not within the scope of practice for naturopathic doctors in Ontario. This course prepares the student for more advanced training in those jurisdictions where such licensing applies. This introductory course covers minor surgical procedures such as suturing of wounds and treatment of commonly encountered conditions such as skin abscess, removal of a foreign body or performing a biopsy/removal of suspected skin lesions. The use and application of general/local and topical anesthetics and proper use of basic surgical instruments are reviewed as well as principles of asepsis, antisepsis and sterilization. (Prerequisite: NPS315) CLE450: Clinic VI Students further develop their skills as primary interns treating patients in the Robert Schad Naturopathic Clinic its satellite teaching clinics, supervised by licensed naturopathic doctors. Students are required to demonstrate the competencies outlined in the Primary Intern Manual and to complete all relevant requirements. (Prerequisite: CLE412). Note: If a student is away from clinic for greater than six months for any reason, the student will be required to pass the Clinic Entrance Readiness Examination before resuming as a primary intern.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  69

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS cont’d


Candidates for the Doctor of Naturopathy degree must fulfill the following requirements to graduate: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Attend all required courses in the prescribed curriculum and achieve a passing grade in each course. Attain a Cumulative Grade Point Average of 2.70. Attend the required number of hours in clinical training, and fulfill all other requirements of the clinical program with a passing grade. Satisfy all financial obligations to CCNM.

The final year of clinical education requires successful completion of course work, clinical requirements and rotations (e.g., laboratory, botanical dispensary, etc.).

CLINICAL REQUIREMENTS In order to graduate students need to achieve a certain number of clinical hours and patient contacts throughout the program. In order to better understand these requirements the following terms will be defined:

Secondary Contact is defined as a patient interaction with a student or clinical intern that is primarily limited to patient observation, but may include some clinical activity under the direction of the primary intern and/or supervising clinical faculty. Secondary contacts may be accumulated at CCNM teaching clinics, preceptorship and externship postings. Preceptorship is a period of practical experience where students primarily observe the delivery of patient care by a regulated health-care provider. Preceptorships may be engaged in all years of the program. For more information on our preceptorship requirements, please see the section on preceptorship below. Externship is a period of practical experience where students are responsible for the primary assessment and/or treatment of patients under the supervision of an approved Externship Host (licensed ND). Externships can only be performed during the terminal clinical internship period (fourth-year).

Primary Contact is defined as assessment and/or treatment of patients, performed by the student clinician primarily responsible for patient care while under the supervision of a licensed naturopathic doctor acting as clinical faculty. Primary contacts are accrued at CCNM teaching clinics and externship postings.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2017â&#x20AC;&#x201A; 70

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS


Students will achieve their clinical requirements through activities linked to specific clinical courses. The clinical requirements are listed below for the four- and five- year programs respectively:

FOUR-YEAR PROGRAM Academic Year

Clinical Education Course

Clinical Hours/ Patient Contacts In Teaching Clinics

Preceptorship Hours/ Patient Contacts

Year 1

CLE100

6 hrs./5 Secondary Contacts

Required at end of CLE201

Year 2

CLE201

30 hrs./10 Secondary Contacts

20 hrs/20 Secondary Contacts

Year 3

CLE310

66 hrs./20 Secondary Contacts

30 hrs/30 Secondary Contacts

Year 4

CLE 404/412/450

1,032 hrs./280 Primary Contacts; 45 Secondary Contacts

50 hrs/50 Secondary Contacts

FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM Academic Year

Clinical Education Course

Clinical Hours/ Patient Contacts In Teaching Clinics

Preceptorship Hours/ Patient Contacts

Year 1

CLE100

6 hrs./5 Secondary Contacts

Required at end of CLE201

No requirements

Required at end of CLE201

Year 2

Year 3

CLE201

30 hrs./10 Secondary Contacts

20 hrs/20 Secondary Contacts

Year 4

CLE310

66 hrs./20 Secondary Contacts

30 hrs/30 Secondary Contacts

Year 5

CLE 404/412/450

1,032 hrs./280 Primary Contacts; 45 Secondary Contacts

50 hrs/50 Secondary Contacts

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  71

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS cont’d


IMG PROGRAM Academic Year

Clinical Education Course

Clinical Hours/ Patient Contacts In Teaching Clinics

Preceptorship Hours/ Patient Contacts

Year 1

CLE307 – term 1

12 hrs./10 Secondary Contacts

Required at end of term 2

Year 2

CLE308 – term 2

24 hrs./5 Secondary Contacts

20 hrs./20 Secondary Contacts

Year 3

CLE309 – term 3

66 hrs./20 Secondary Contacts

30 hrs./30 Secondary Contacts

Year 4

CLE404/412/450

1,032 hrs./280 Primary Contacts; 45 Secondary Contacts

50 hrs./50 Secondary Contacts

Teaching clinic targets for hours and patient contacts are specific for the individual course with which they are associated. Any clinical hours or contacts collected in excess of the course targets will be added to the total number of secondary credits required during a student’s primary internship (CLE404/412/450) and cannot be used to meet the clinical course requirements of CLE201, and 310.

Preceptorships occur throughout a student’s enrolment in the naturopathic program, but must meet the prescribed targets and academic requirements outlined in the associated clinical course. Failure to meet the minimum targets for preceptorship requirements in their designated courses will result in failure of the associated course. Preceptorship hours and contacts accumulated beyond minimum targets will contribute to future course requirements for preceptorship. Details of the preceptorship program are found below.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  72

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS cont’d


Preceptoring is a component of the ND program that allows students to observe health-care practitioners in the community. The goal of the preceptor program is to give CCNM students a wide variety of experiences in different health-care settings in order to develop the clinical knowledge, attitudes and skills relevant to the role of a naturopathic doctor. Beginning in Year 1, all students participate in the preceptor program. These hours may be achieved by working with a registered naturopathic doctor or an approved health-care practitioner. The Office of Clinical Education must pre-approve all preceptoring requests with health-care practitioners not registered with the CCNM preceptorship program.

PRECEPTOR PROGRAM PROCEDURE 1. 2. 3.

Students are required to complete 100 hours of clinical preceptorship and observe 100 unique patient interactions before graduation. Preceptoring must be completed with a minimum of three different practitioners. A minimum of 50 per cent of the hours and patient contacts must be completed with one or more registered naturopathic doctor(s). The remaining hours and patient contacts may be done with any approved health-care practitioner. Preceptorship with naturopathic doctors and other health care practitioners may occur at any time during the program, as long as the specific course targets are met. 4. Students are expected to contact potential preceptors independently. CCNM provides a list of active preceptors (located on Moodle > Student Forms and Resources). However, since practitioners on the CCNM list are contacted frequently, students should also consider sourcing practitioners not found on the active preceptor list. 5. To qualify as a preceptor, a health care practitioner should be a member of a regulated profession or a profession in transition towards regulation. For health care practitioners working in unregulated jurisdictions or for non-traditional health care practitioners, suitability as a preceptor will be determined by the Office of Clinical Education (OCE) and/or the Associate Dean, Clinical Education. Naturopathic doctors should have at least one year of practice experience to qualify as a preceptor.

6. I f a health-care practitioner is not already listed on the CCNM preceptorship list, the student should forward the practitioner a Preceptor Registration Form and a Preceptorship Information Package prior to the start of preceptoring (Preceptor Program documents may be found on Moodle > Student Forms and Resources > Preceptorship): • Preceptorship Information Package • Preceptor Registration Form 7. The completed registration form should then be submitted to the Office of Clinical Education for approval at least five (5) days prior to the planned preceptoring dates. The Office of Clinical Education reserves the right to reject any preceptorship request not submitted accordingly and/or any preceptorship credits submitted without prior approval of the preceptor host. Students will only be contacted if a preceptor is not accepted. 8. On the dates of preceptorship, the student must bring the Student Preceptorship Record to the preceptor location for completion. 9. Submission of preceptorship records: First-, second- and third-year students must submit their preceptorship records by the close of the courses where due: Clinic II (CLE201) and Clinic III (CLE310). Preceptorship records may be submitted to the OCE at any time during the program for recording. Fourth-year students should attach all preceptorship records to their monthly clinic summary forms. Only the original, signed preceptorship record will be accepted. All documents are to be submitted to the Clinical Education drop box, located in the RSNC by the file room. Students are reminded to keep a copy of all paperwork for their personal records. 10. Further information about the program, as well as preceptorship documents and forms, are available online through Moodle > Student Forms and Resources, which can be accessed through the Current Students section of the CCNM website. 11. Students are representing not only themselves, but the College and the profession and, as such, are expected to demonstrate professional attitudes and behaviours at all times, when contacting potential preceptors and while at the preceptorship sites. Reports of unprofessional behaviour will be approached as a CCNM Code of Conduct issue and may result in penalties. 12. Preceptorship program policies and procedures may be subject to change. Students should note that they are also required to comply with any additional policies and procedures, as required by the preceptor. CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  73

PRECEPTOR PROGRAM

PRECEPTOR PROGRAM


GLOBAL HEALTH PRECEPTORSHIP In addition to the standard preceptor program, CCNM recognizes the importance of students being exposed to healthcare delivery in other countries, particularly those lacking the infrastructure that exists in Canada and other developed nations. Such exposure should provide students with a greater appreciation of the need to develop sustainable medical services in developing nations as well as an understanding of the inter-relationship between barriers to care and health outcomes. To encourage the development of clinical skills and greater appreciation of global health issues, students at CCNM can apply to do a global health preceptorship during the program.

Please note that global health preceptorships are processed through the Office of Academic Affairs and if approved, students will be allowed to miss up to one week of academic class time. This time does not include exam periods or the week preceding exam periods (midterms or finals). Any academic/ course-based learning objectives missed due to preceptorship will be the students’ responsibility to meet. Students participating in a global preceptorship will be required to abide by the laws governing the delivery of medical services in the relevant jurisdiction. Students are also prohibited from engaging in any medical services for which they have not been trained.

Students applying to do a global health preceptorship with a medical professional during an academic term need to demonstrate: 1. t hat the opportunity will strengthen their clinical judgment and physical exam skills 2. that the opportunity will develop enhanced skills in cultural competency and communication 3. that the preceptoring opportunity is only available during the academic term and not during 4. non-academic time (i.e., summer) 5. they are in good academic standing

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  74

PRECEPTOR PROGRAM

PRECEPTOR PROGRAM cont’d


INTRODUCTION This section provides an outline of the clinical curriculum, policies and procedures. Complete details of the final year curriculum can be found in the Primary Intern Manuals 2016 – 2017: Clinical Education and Clinical Operations, which are available on Moodle.

CLINICAL CURRICULUM At the core of the 2016 – 2017 clinical curriculum is the application of knowledge, skills and attitudes learned in the academic program to clinical practice. The curriculum is designed to provide a progression of clinical responsibility as students advance in the program, and the experience is founded on the integration of the philosophy and principles of naturopathic medicine with best evidence, as applied to clinical practice. All clinical education courses are designed around clearly outlined objectives and clinical competencies. Clinic I (CLE100/100J): In the first year of the ND program, students participate in clinical shifts by shadowing faculty supervisors while learning core concepts of professionalism, medical record keeping, privacy legislation and clinical reasoning. Clinic II (CLE201): In the second year of the ND program, students continue shadowing clinic faculty, but can now participate in elements of patient care. Under the mentorship of fourth-year interns and clinical faculty, students perform portions of the patient intake and physical exam and are assessed on clinical competencies. Clinic III (CLE310): To prepare for their role as primary intern, third-year students transition to practicing in the clinic through a mentoring relationship. Together with fourth-year interns, and supervised by a naturopathic doctor, these secondary interns co-manage patients at the RSNC where they are able to apply their skills in physical examination, medical history taking, case analysis and patient management.

In the final year of the program, students serve as primary interns for patient care under the supervision of registered naturopathic doctors. Students must fulfill the requirements and expectations outlined in the Primary Intern Manual 2016 – 2017 to successfully complete the ND program. Full-time, primary interns (those enrolled in CLE404, 412 and 450) are scheduled for four shifts per week in the RSNC and/or any of its off-site teaching clinics. Shift times may not overlap with other shifts or courses. The associate dean of clinical education reserves the right to make necessary changes to the student clinic shift schedule at any time.

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR CLINIC SHIFTS Students in the clinical portion of their education who have religious, child or parental care responsibilities or medical issues that restrict the times they may be on clinic shifts will be accommodated in terms of scheduling in accordance with the requirements of human rights legislation. Students must provide evidence in support of their request for accommodation. If the requirement for a student to be present for a clinic shift at a specified time violates the tenets of his or her faith regarding religious observance then he/she will be accommodated. The Ontario Human Rights Code defines family status in terms of a parent-child relationship and prohibits discrimination on the basis that an individual is a caregiver. The care could be a parent caring for a child and it can also be a child caring for a parent. The College will accommodate the needs of caregivers by providing them flexible working hours. Individuals with medical issues or disabilities that affect one’s ability to meet clinic shift schedule requirements should first register for accommodation with Accessibility Services. See “Accommodating Students with Disabilities” for details. Please note that there is no legal obligation for the College to accommodate a student who does not want to work a clinic shift because it conflicts with his/her work schedule, athletic training, or other educational courses or activities.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  75

CLINICAL EDUCATION AND CLINIC OPERATIONS

CLINICAL EDUCATION AND CLINIC OPERATIONS


EXTERNSHIP PROGRAM An externship refers to a primary intern conducting a portion of his/her final year of clinical education at a site external to RSNC. An externship site may be chosen by the intern and must allow him/her to treat patients and manage patient care in a manner similar to the duties and responsibilities of a primary intern. The intern must be under the supervision of the registered naturopathic doctor at all times. This program is an optional component of the clinic curriculum, by application only. All applications are subject to the approval of the Associate Dean of Clinical Education and/or Dean. Further information about the program, as well as externship documents and forms, are available online through Moodle > Student Forms and Resources.

RSNC ABSENCE POLICIES Primary interns are allowed 20 shifts of planned absence for vacation and/or professional development (PD) throughout CLE404, 412 and 450. For all students enrolled in CLE404, 412 or 450, an Absence Form must be submitted to the drop box in the RSNC Student Message Centre at least three weeks prior to the requested days off. Make-up shifts are available to students who have missed clinic due to documented illness, emergency or statutory holidays. Planned Absence Days (vacation, professional development, etc.) cannot conflict with any scheduled exams nor may these absences negatively impact clinic operations; clinical assignments and activities must be completed by their assigned due dates, regardless if this conflicts with a planned absence. Details of Planned Absence Days can be found in the Primary Intern Manual 2016 – 2017. Please note that clinic hours in excess of the minimum requirement cannot be “banked,” i.e., applied towards additional vacation days. Vacation or PD may not be taken: • Immediately prior to, or following a month-long externship • In the two weeks prior to the clinical year-end Maximum planned absence length allowed: • 2 weeks (8 clinic shifts): during CLE404 • 3 weeks (12 clinic shifts): over the course of CLE412 and CLE450 combined

A maximum of three consecutive weeks of planned absence is allowable. Planned absences from one specific shift may not exceed three shifts over the course of a term. If an intern is not present at, or does not complete a scheduled clinic shift due to illness or emergency, he/she is required to complete the Clinic Absence form and submit the form promptly upon his/her return. An on-call shift may also be requested on the absence form, which must be submitted for approval in the drop box in the RSNC Student Message Centre at least three weeks prior to the requested shift date (Please note that this includes the last three weeks of the final clinical term). Students who are absent from more than six clinic shifts due to illness/ emergency may be required to use planned absence days to make up missed shifts, rather than having on-call shifts. Students who are absent from clinic for greater that six shifts or for extended leave periods should contact the Associate Dean, Clinical Education to make specific arrangements. On-call shifts are not available to compensate for a withdrawal, suspension or having started the term late. Time taken off for an elective withdrawal will be made up after the end of the clinic year.

INFRACTIONS AND SANCTIONS An infraction is defined as a breach of professionalism, policy or procedure on the part of the intern. Examples of Infractions include but are not limited to: 1. U  nexcused absence – absence not scheduled through Clinic Operations and no illness/emergency; no doctor’s note when required. 2. Provision of treatment to a non-patient, or to anyone while outside the confines of a clinical shift at RSNC, its satellite clinics or externship placements. Communicating a diagnosis or treatment plan without the knowledge and explicit approval of the supervising naturopathic doctor. 3. Selling any products to RSNC patients. Specifically, interns may not use their BMS student discount to acquire and resell products to patients regardless of whether any profit is earned on the transaction. 4. Entering the patient record room. 5. Keeping patient charts overnight or taking them off-site.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  76

CLINICAL EDUCATION AND CLINIC OPERATIONS

CLINICAL EDUCATION AND CLINIC OPERATIONS cont’d


6. A  ttempting to sign out patient charts when you are not the treating intern. 7. Advising a patient to walk-in as an acute for a non-acute condition. 8. Transferring rooms without re-booking at reception. 9. Repeated clinic dress-code violations 10. Refusing to cover laboratory, dispensary, acute or new patients when requested to do so. 11. Late attendance to any scheduled duty intern shift. Repeated late clinic attendance. Sanctions will be considered on a case by case basis and determined by the Associate Dean of Clinical Education, the Associate Director of Clinic Services, and/or the Dean. A range of sanctions may be applied including warnings, loss of privileges, suspension, course failure and expulsion, depending on both severity of the infraction and number of prior sanctions.

BUSINESS CARDS AND ADVERTISING Clinic interns are encouraged to use business cards, with the following guidelines: 1. T  he card is produced under the guidance of CCNM's Marketing & Communications department. A standard, consistent format is used. The design may not be altered in any way. 2. Personal telephone numbers and addresses are not permitted on student business cards. 3. The card shall clearly indicate that the person is a clinic intern. 4. The card may list only those degrees previously earned; however, the degree MD may not be used (see Annual Report 1988, p. 32 of the Board of Directors of Drugless Therapy - Naturopathy). The prefix Dr. may not be used even if one has earned a PhD. You may not list that you are a student or trainee in another health-related profession. 5. When acting as a representative of CCNM, the title ND (Cand.), or any other modification of the Naturopathic Doctor title, may not be used in any communication or marketing material (including business cards, email signatures, presentations, etc.). 6. The card shall in no way identify areas of naturopathic therapy (lifestyle, manipulation, homeopathy, etc.) or scopes of practice.

DRESS CODE The dress code for RSNC is “business-casual,” as outlined below, and is required of all interns on shift (including those on duty intern shifts). An intern who does not conform to the clinic dress code will be asked to leave and return wearing the appropriate attire. General Dress Code Rules: • W  hite lab coat with name tag are to be worn at all times and in all areas of the clinic • Clean, neat, pressed clothing that reflects a professional appearance • Minimal jewelry and/or visible piercings • Nails must be neat, clean and short. Dark coloured nail polish is discouraged • Long hair must be tied back • No scents/fragrances of any kind. CCNM is ascent free environment as a number of our patients are sensitive to scents and perfumes • No offensive body odour Please refer to the Primary Intern Manual 2016 – 2017: Clinical Operations for specific examples of acceptable and not acceptable dress.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  77

CLINICAL EDUCATION AND CLINIC OPERATIONS

CLINICAL EDUCATION AND CLINIC OPERATIONS cont’d


ETIQUETTE All clinic faculty members are to be referred to in a manner corresponding to their professional designation. Students are expected to always interact with reception staff, clinical faculty and other members of the clinic community in a respectful and professional manner.

CLINIC COMPLETION REQUIREMENTS The final year of clinical education requires successful completion of course work, clinical requirements and rotations (e.g., laboratory, botanical dispensary, etc.). In addition, the following minimum requirements must be completed: RSNC, satellite clinics and externship program: 1,032 hours, 280 primary patient contacts, 80 secondary patient contacts (cumulative and including those amassed during years 1-3) Preceptor program: 100 hours, 100 patient contacts

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE AFTER GRADUATION RESIDENCY PROGRAM CCNM is committed to providing high quality postgraduate residence experiences for a limited number of qualified graduates from Council on Naturopathic Medical Education (CNME) accredited naturopathic medicine programs. The residencies will consist of increasingly independent clinical experiences, research opportunities, structured mentoring and advanced clinically focused curriculum components. The number of residencies provided each year will be dependent on the number of college-approved residency sites as well as the availability of qualified candidates.

For more information, see the Primary Intern Manual 2016 – 2017.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  78

CLINICAL EDUCATION AND CLINIC OPERATIONS

CLINICAL EDUCATION AND CLINIC OPERATIONS cont’d


Other College Policies with Potential Application to Students and Applicants DRUG-FREE POLICY CCNM will not tolerate, and will take action against, the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession or use of a controlled substance on College premises by any employee or student, or by any employee or student conducting College business. As a condition of College employment or enrolment, all employees and students agree to abide by the prohibition against controlled substances and to notify the College of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring in a location in which the College operates no later than five days after such a conviction. View full policy.

FRAGRANCE-FREE POLICY Due to health concerns arising from exposure to scented products, CCNM is committed to providing a fragrance-free environment to all employees, students, residents, patients and visitors. Fragrances are defined as any product that produces a scent strong enough to be perceptible by others, including but not limited to cologne, after shave lotion, perfume, perfumed hand lotion, fragranced hair products, scented oils and/or similar products. Any student who is found in violation of this policy on CCNM property will be issued a warning, and any further violation of this policy will result in progressive discipline up to and including suspension or expulsion from CCNM. Please be aware that we have a number of students who have serious chemical sensitivities and anaphylactic allergies that can be life threatening. The College tries its best to provide a safe environment for these students. We expect the student body to support us in these efforts. Please be aware of those around you and do not consume food items that you know are sensitive to other students. View full policy.

POLICIES

POLICIES SMOKE-FREE POLICY The smoking of any substance is prohibited anywhere in the building and on the grounds of the College. View full policy.

AODA The provincial government enacted the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) with the goal to create an accessible province by 2025. All members of the CCNM community are expected to provide consistently high customer service standards for all clients, students, patients and customers. All customer service provided by CCNM shall follow the ideals of dignity, independence, integration and equal opportunity. CCNM will meet or exceed all applicable legislation regarding the provision of customer service for people with disabilities. This policy applies to every person who deals with members of the public or other third parties on behalf of CCNM, whether the person does so as an employee, student, agent, volunteer or otherwise. An employee, student, agent, volunteer or otherwise is defined as anyone who has interaction with the public, CCNM students, patients at the Robert Schad Naturopathic Clinic (RSNC) or patients at the Ottawa Integrative Cancer Care Clinic (OICC). CCNM employees, students, agents and volunteers working at non-CCNM sites should be aware that the AODA policy at that site will apply. CCNM will provide training about the provision of accessible goods and services to its employees, students and others who interact with persons who wish to obtain goods and services provided by CCNM. View full policy.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2017â&#x20AC;&#x201A; 79


POLICIES

POLICIES cont’d

BILL 168

HARASSMENT AND DISCRIMINATION

Bill 168 is an Act to amend the Ontario Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) with respect to violence and harassment in the workplace. CCNM is committed to providing a safe work environment for all employees, students, and visitors. The College proclaims “zero-tolerance” for violence and therefore will not tolerate any acts of violence by or against any employee, contractor, student, patient, resident, or visitor.

All members of the CCNM community are expected to be sensitive to and respectful of other members of the community and those with whom they come into contact while representing CCNM. All forms of harassment and discrimination are prohibited.

“Workplace Violence” is any act in which a person is abused, threatened, intimidated or assaulted in the course of employment. Workplace violence includes threatening behaviour, verbal or written threats, verbal abuse and physical attacks. Each member of the CCNM community is responsible for creating an environment that is free from workplace violence. Employees are required to report any violence or any serious potential of a violent situation immediately to management, security, or the Human Resources department. The Human Resources department is responsible for providing training to all workers on the harassment and violence policies. View full policy.

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY The Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine works to ensure that the principles of the Ontario Human Rights Code are reflected in our dealings with all of our constituents. The Ontario Human Rights Code states: Every person has a right to equal treatment with respect to services, goods and facilities, without discrimination because of race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, creed, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, same-sex partnership status, family status, or handicap.

Discrimination refers to action or behaviour that results in the unfavourable, adverse or preferential treatment related to the following prohibited grounds: race, colour, ancestry, place of birth, national origin, citizenship, creed, religious or political affiliation or belief, sex, sexual orientation, physical attributes, family relationship, age, physical or mental illness or disability or place of residence. Harassment is a form of discrimination. It includes unwanted remarks, behaviour or communications in any form based on a prohibited ground of discrimination where the person responsible for the remarks, behaviour or communications knows, or ought reasonably to know these are unwelcome, unwanted, offensive, intimidating, hostile or inappropriate. Sexual harassment means engaging in a course of vexatious comment or conduct of a sexual nature including, but not limited to: sexual assault, verbal abuse or threats of a sexual nature, unwelcome and repeated sexual invitations, dates, flirtations or requests, unwelcome innuendo or taunting about a person’s body, physical appearance or sexual orientation. Conduct also constitutes harassment, whether or not it is based on the prohibited grounds as listed above, when it creates an intimidating, demeaning or hostile working or learning environment.

This applies to all matters of the College.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  80


If at any time you believe you are being subjected to harassment or discrimination, if you become aware of such conduct being directed at someone else, or if you believe another student or employee has received more favourable treatment because of discrimination, please promptly notify the director of human resources, the department dean, your supervisor or the president. Please note that in addition to reporting harassment and discrimination, CCNM students, employees and faculty have a legal obligation to report to the Children’s Aid Society when he or she believes on reasonable grounds that a child is or may be in need of protection. This policy is intended to assist CCNM in addressing any conduct that is offensive and inappropriate in a learning and working environment. All reported incidents will be investigated under the following guidelines: • A  ll complaints will be kept confidential to the fullest extent possible and will be disclosed to such individuals necessary to permit the proper investigation and response to the complaint. No one will be involved in the investigation or response except those with a need to know. • Anyone who is found to have violated the harassment and discrimination policy is subject to corrective action up to and including immediate expulsion or discharge. Corrective action will depend on the severity of the offence. Action will be taken to prevent an offence from being repeated. • Retaliation will not be permitted against anyone who makes a complaint or who cooperates in an investigation. View full policy.

POLICIES

POLICIES cont’d

INSTITUTIONAL CLOSURE To meet the standards required of the Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board (PEQAB), CCNM has created a policy on Institutional Closure. In the unlikely event that CCNM is required to close, to ensure that the needs of students and graduates are met, CCNM would: 1. Provide a “teach out” for existing cohorts; 2. Arrange with sister institutions across North America for the transfer of students who for personal reasons did not feel they could complete the program in the schedule associated with the “teach out”; and 3. Contract with a third party so that academic records would be maintained, and could be accessed by graduates, for a period of not less than 75 years. View full policy.

FORMAL COMPLAINT POLICY As required for the Council on Naturopathic Medical Education accreditation, CCNM maintains a formal process for receiving and responding to significant student complaints related to the Doctor of Naturopathy degree program. Students with a serious complaint about the Doctor of Naturopathy degree program should submit their concerns in writing to the President’s Office, noting that the submission represents a formal complaint. The president will review all complaints, ensure that all necessary parties are consulted and attempt to resolve any matters in dispute.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  81


CANADA

BRITISH COLUMBIA

Naturopathic practice is regulated under provincial law in five provinces: British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Ontario. Nova Scotia has legislation which provides Title Protection. Naturopathic doctors are required to complete an undergraduate degree with prerequisite medical studies at a recognized university, four years of full-time naturopathic education at a CNME-accredited naturopathic medical program, and pass rigorous regulatory board examinations that are standardized for North America.

Naturopathic doctors have been licensed in BC since 1936 under the Naturopathic Physicians Act. Changes to legislation in 2009 resulted in the granting of prescribing authority for NDs. The provincial regulatory authority is The College of Naturopathic Physicians of British Columbia (CNPBC).

For information on the practice of naturopathic medicine in Canada, contact the Canadian Association of Naturopathic Doctors.

CNPBC Tel: 604-688-8236 office@cnpbc.bc.ca www.cnpbc.bc.ca

416-496-8633 or 1-800-551-4381 info@cand.ca www.cand.ca

British Columbia Naturopathic Association Tel: 800-277-1128 bcna@bcna.ca www.bcna.ca

ONTARIO

ALBERTA

The profession of naturopathic medicine has been regulated since 1925 in Ontario. On July 1, 2015, the Naturopathy Act was proclaimed in force bringing the profession into the same legislative structure as other regulated health professions in Ontario and granting members of the profession the authority to prescribe certain drugs. The provincial regulatory authority is the College of Naturopaths of Ontario (CONO). CONO Telephone: (416) 583-6010 info@collegeofnaturopaths.on.ca www.collegeboardofnaturopathicmedicine.on.ca Ontario Association of Naturopathic Doctors (OAND) Tel: 416-233-2001 info@oand.org www.oand.org

As of August of 2012, the naturopathic profession in Alberta is regulated under Schedule 14 of the Health Professions Act of Alberta. Naturopathic doctors must meet the requirements for the restricted activities they perform in their practice and must maintain competence for them. Upon proclamation of the legislation, the Alberta Association of Naturopathic Practitioners became the College of Naturopathic Doctors of Alberta which oversees the regulation of the profession. College of Naturopathic Doctors of Alberta Tel: 403-226-2246 www.cnda.net

SASKATCHEWAN Naturopathic doctors have been regulated since 1954 under the Naturopathy Act (revised 1978). The legislation is currently under review. The Saskatchewan Association of Naturopathic Practitioners acts as both the professional association and the regulatory authority. Saskatchewan Association of Naturopathic Practitioners Tel: 306-955-2633 registrar@sanp.ca www.sanp.ca

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2017â&#x20AC;&#x201A; 82

REGULATION AND LICENSURE

REGULATION AND LICENSURE


MANITOBA

NORTHWEST TERRITORIES – UNREGULATED

Naturopathic doctors in Manitoba have been regulated under The Naturopathic Act since 1946. The profession will be transitioning under umbrella legislation for all health care professionals in the next few years and the Manitoba Naturopathic Association acts as both the professional association and the regulatory authority.

Northwest Territories Association of Naturopathic Doctors Dr.redvers@gaiand.com

NUNAVUT – UNREGULATED No professional association.

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND – UNREGULATED Manitoba Naturopathic Association (regulatory body/provincial association) Tel: 204-947-0381 info@mbnd.ca www.mbnd.ca

QUEBEC – UNREGULATED Quebec Associaton of Naturopathic Doctors 514-279-6629 www.qanm.org

NEW BRUNSWICK – UNREGULATED New Brunswick Association of Naturopathic Doctors Tel: 506-773-5053; fax: 506-773-5056 www.nband.ca

NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR – UNREGULATED Newfoundland and Labrador Association of Naturopathic Doctors Tel: 709-722-4232 natpatkat@yahoo.ca

Prince Edward Island Association of Naturopathic Doctors 902-894-3868 www.peiand.com

YUKON – UNREGULATED Yukon Naturopathic Association 867-456-4151

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA At present, NDs are licensed in 18 U.S. states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, Utah, Vermont, Washington and the territories of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Active legislation campaigns to license NDs are underway in Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Nevada, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island. The American Association of Naturopathic Physicians (AANP) Tel: 202-895-1392 www.naturopathic.org

NOVA SCOTIA Naturopathic doctors have title protection under The Naturopathic Doctors Act passed in 2008. The Act provides regulation of the profession, title protection and recognition of the profession ensuring patients can claim ND services as a medical tax deduction. Nova Scotia Association of Naturopathic Doctors Tel: 902-542-5560 www.nsand.ca

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  83

REGULATION AND LICENSURE

REGULATION AND LICENSURE cont’d


LICENSING EXAMINATIONS To obtain a naturopathic medical diploma or degree that qualifies the recipient to sit for a licensing examination in a province or state with a licensing board and standards of practice, students must have attended a CNME-approved naturopathic medical program following three years of standard pre-medical education. Some naturopathic medical programs require a baccalaureate from an approved university as a prerequisite for entry into the program.

NPLEX (NATUROPATHIC PHYSICIANS LICENSING EXAMINATION) NPLEX is the standard examination used by all licensing jurisdictions for naturopathic physicians in North America. It includes five basic science exams (anatomy, physiology, pathology, immunology, biochemistry and microbiology) that are taken after the first two years of naturopathic medical school. The clinical science examinations are taken following graduation (after the fourth year of school). They include: physical, clinical, and lab diagnosis, diagnostic imaging, botanical medicine, clinical nutrition, physical medicine, homeopathy, psychology, emergency medicine and pharmacology. Individual jurisdictions may require additional examinations in minor surgery and acupuncture before complete licensure.

NORTH AMERICAN BOARD OF NATUROPATHIC EXAMINERS (NABNE) NABNE is a non-profit organization established in 1999. Its purpose is: • T  o set policies regarding the qualifications of applicants to sit for NPLEX; • To set policies regarding the administration of the NPLEX; • To verify the qualifications of applicants to take the NPLEX; and • To administer those examinations at testing sites in the U.S. and Canada. For more information visit www.nabne.org.

Passing the NPLEX is only one aspect of the requirements to become licensed in any of the jurisdictions, and passing the exams does not guarantee that the examinee will be licensed.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  84

REGULATION AND LICENSURE

REGULATION AND LICENSURE cont’d


VISION CCNM will make naturopathic medicine an integral part of health care through pre-eminent education, research and clinical services.

MISSION The Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine will: • D  emonstrate excellence in education to our students, supporting them throughout their careers; • Provide a working environment that allows our faculty and staff to excel; • Expand our knowledge of naturopathic medicine through high quality research; • Excel in delivering naturopathic medicine to our patients; • Forge a strong relationship between allopathic and naturopathic medicine with a focus on affordable, accessible and effective health care; …and so make the practice of naturopathic medicine widely acknowledged as key to maintaining patient health.

To drive CCNM in its pursuit of excellence in naturopathic medicine, CCNM’s Board of Governors has developed a series of "Ends": 1. Excellence in Education Educate naturopathic doctors on the basis of clear and focused curriculum, delivered by the most competent faculty, and graduate high-quality naturopathic doctors. 2. High-Quality Clinical Services Provide high-quality naturopathic care in a clinical setting, resulting in positive educational experiences for students and positive outcomes for patients and clients. 3. Excellence in Research Conduct and disseminate research relevant to naturopathic medicine and help develop skills among faculty, students, and graduates that foster research activity and a culture of evidence-informed clinical practice. 4. Prominent National Profile Increase the awareness and respect of the College among the profession, other health practitioners, government and the public. 5. Change Agent Foster positive change in our health, our environment, and our health-care system through the promotion of the principles and practices of naturopathic medicine.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  85

CCNM VISION AND MISSION

CCNM VISION AND MISSION


ACADEMIC STRUCTURE

ACADEMIC STRUCTURE

Dean

Associate Dean, Curriculum, Residency and Continuing Education

Continuing Education Coordinator Residents

Associate Dean, Academic Delivery

Full and Part-Time Academic Faculty Academic Administration

Associate Dean, Clinical Education

Full and Part-Time Clinic Faculty Clinic Education Administration First Year Residents (3)

Associate Director, Clinic Services

Chief Naturopathic Medical Officer

Clinic Operations Integrated Health Centre

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  86


ADMINISTRATION Name

Title

Credentials

Battistuzzi, Paul

Chief Financial Officer

BA, CA, M.Ed., York University, University of Toronto

Bernhardt, Bob

President and Chief Executive Officer

B.Sc., B.Ed., M.Ed., LLM, PhD, University of Guelph, University of Toronto, Osgoode Hall Law School, University of Toronto

Beernink, Cynthia

Coordinator, Years 1 & 2

B.Sc., B.Ed., ND, Trent University, University of Windsor, CCNM

Carino, Jasmine

Associate Dean, Curriculum and Residency Program, Associate Professor

B.Sc., ND, Laurentian University, CCNM

Cooley, Kieran

Director, Research

B.Sc., ND, University of Saskatchewan, CCNM, University of Toronto

Daniels, Leah

Executive Director, Institutional Research & Government Affairs

LLB, Osgoode Hall Law School

De Groot, Nick

Dean

B.Sc., ND, University of Toronto, CCNM

El-Hashemy, Shehab

Associate Dean, Academic Delivery Associate Professor

MBChB, B.Sc., HBSc., ND, Cairo University (Egypt), Lakehead University, CCNM

Hall, Dave

Registrar

B.Sc., M.Sc., (Ed.), University of Toronto, Canisius College

Pownall, Keith

Legal Counsel, Associate Professor

BA, LLB, LLM, University of Toronto, University of Windsor, Osgoode Hall Law School

Philogène, Simone

Chief Enrolment, Marketing & Communications Officer

BA (Hons), MA, University of Ottawa, McGill University

Prousky, Jonathan

Chief Naturopathic Medical Officer, Professor

B.Sc., BPHE, ND, M.Sc.,MA, University of Toronto, Bastyr University, University of London, Yorkville University

Seely, Dugald

Executive Director, OICC Executive Director, Research

B.Sc., ND, M.Sc. Acadia University, CCNM, University of Toronto

Tahiliani, Sasha

Coordinator, Continuing Education

B.Sc., ND, McMaster University, CCNM

Young, Barbara

Executive Director, Human Resources

BA, York University

Zeifman, Mitchell

Associate Dean, Clinical Education

B.Sc., ND, University of Toronto, CCNM

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  87

ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY

ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY


FACULTY Name

Title

Credentials

Abdelaziz, Abdullah

Clinic Resident

MBChB, M.Sc., ND, Tanta University, (Egypt), CCNM

Bakir, Nadia

Clinic Supervisor, Associate Professor

B.Sc., ND, HOM, M.Sc., University of Toronto, OCNM, Canadian Homeopathy, University of Lancashire

Barlow, Kerry

Instructor

B.Sc., ND, University of Guelph, CCNM

Blyden-Taylor, Kimberlee

Clinic Supervisor, Associate Professor

BA, ND, Columbia University, CCNM

Bowler, Sarah

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of Birmingham, CNNM

Brooks, Kristina

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of Guelph, CCNM

Browman, Jessica

Instructor

BA, ND, M.P.H., University of Toronto, CCNM University of Waterloo

Brydges, Glenys

Instructor

BA, ND, Trent University, OCNM

Burns, Shelley

Clinic Supervisor

BA, ND, Wilfrid Laurier University, CCNM

Chew, Tracy

Instructor

B.Sc., PhD, McGill University, McMaster University

Chow, Gabriella

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, McGill University, CCNM

Coombs, Dylan

Clinic Resident

B.Sc., ND, University of Guelph, CCNM

Creech, Allison

Instructor

BA, M.Ed., ND, Duke University, University of Virginia, CCNM

Davis, Paul

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of Toronto, CCNM

Denis, David

Instructor

B.Sc., ND, University of Alberta, CCNM

Dunk, Ken

Clinic Supervisor, Instructor

DC, ND, FCAH, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, OCNM, Canadian Academy of Homeopathy

Facca, Melanie

Instructor

B.Sc., ND, University of Waterloo, CCNM

Fontes, Mark

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, McMaster University, CCNM

Fraser, Ian

Instructor

BA, M.Sc., PhD, University of Western Ontario, Dalhousie University

Franc, Valerie

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of Guelph, CCNM

Fritz, Axel

Instructor

DC, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  88

ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY

ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY cont’d


FACULTY cont’d Name

Title

Credentials

Gavin, Nadine

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, McMaster, CCNM

Gilbert, Cyndi

Clinic Supervisor, I

BA, ND, Trent University, CCNM

Gowan, Matt

Instructor

B.Sc., ND, University of Waterloo, CCNM

Gratton, Adam

Clinic Supervisor, Assistant Professor

B.Sc., M.Sc., ND, University of Toronto, University of Michigan, CCNM

Grossman, Jay

Instructor

B.Sc., M.Sc., DC ND, University of Guelph, CMCC, CCNM

Habib, Chris

Clinic Supervisor, Instructor

B.Sc., ND, University of Toronto, CCNM

Habiballa, Mohammed

Instructor

B.MLS, University of Khartoum

Hall, Alexander

Clinic Supervisor, Assistant Professor

B.Sc. (Eng.), P.Eng. MPH, ND, University of Guelph, University of Waterloo, CCNM

Henry, Nicole

Clinic Supervisor, Coordinator, IMG

B.Sc., ND, McMaster University, CCNM

Huff, Hal

Clinic Supervisor, Associate Professor

BA, ND, M.Sc., Lakehead University, CCNM, McMaster University

Hussein, Hind

Medical Laboratory Technologist Lead

B.Sc., M.Sc., Omdurman Ahlia University, University of Khartoum

Irons, Nastasia

Clinic Supervisor

BA, ND, Brock University, CCNM

Kapadia, Ashit

Instructor

B.Homeopathic Medicine & Surgery, ND, Shivaji University, CCNM

Kassam, Neemez

Instructor

M.Sc., ND, Bastyr University, CCNM

Khalili, Afsoun

Clinic Supervisor, Associate Professor

B.Sc., ND, Concordia University, CCNM

Kiani, Payam

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, McMaster University, CCNM

Lad, Ajay

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, Queen’s University, CCNM

Laic, Carol

Instructor

B.Sc., M. Ed., ND, University of Toronto, CCNM

Lander, Daniel

Clinic Supervisor, Associate Professor

B.Sc., ND, University of Guelph, CCNM

McConnell, Sean

Clinic Supervisor

BA, ND, Concordia University, CCNM

McCrindle, Louise

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of Alberta, CCNM CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  89

ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY

ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY cont’d


FACULTY cont’d Name

Title

Credentials

Meffe, Cristina

Clinic Supervisor

BPHE, ND, University of Toronto, CCNM

Meyer, Caroline

Clinic Supervisor

BA, ND, McMaster University, CCNM

Mitha, Rupi

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of Guelph, CCNM

Mohammed, Ehab

Research Resident

MBBcH., MA, ND, Cairo University (Egypt) CCNM

Moore, Amber

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, Wilfrid Laurier University, CCNM

Montgomery, Kaleb

Instructor

B.Sc., Doctor of Traditional Chinese Medicine, University of Toronto, International College of TCM Vancouver

Nasagar, Adrian

Clinic Supervisor

BA, ND, McMaster University, CCNM

Pachkovskaja, Nellie

Professor, Senior Coordinator

MD, CMS (PhD), University of Medicine (USSR)

Parikh-Shah, Sejal

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of Toronto, CCNM

Patel, Rita

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., M.Ed., ND, University of Toronto University of Calgary, CCNM

Pickrell, Chris

Instructor

B.Sc., ND, University of Calgary, CCNM

Popov, Larissa

Instructor

B.Sc., ND, University of Waterloo, CCNM

Prince, Kristi

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc. Kin., ND, McMaster University, CCNM

Psota, Erin

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of Waterloo, CCNM

Ragbir, Rajesh

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of West Indies, CCNM

Raina, Romi

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc. & BA, ND, McMaster University, CCNM

Rennie, Pat

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of Guelph, OCNM

Roberts, Chris

Instructor, Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., B.Ed., ND, University of Toronto, CCNM

Rouchotas, Philip

Instructor

B.Sc., M.Sc., ND, University of Guelph, CCNM

Saunders, Leigha

Instructor

B.Sc., ND, Trent University, CCNM

Saunders, Paul

Clinic Supervisor, Adjunct Professor

PhD, ND, DHANP, Duke University (USA), OCNM, National College of Naturopathic Medicine, Diplomate Homeopathic Academy of Naturopathic Physicians

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  90

ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY

ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY cont’d


FACULTY cont’d Name

Title

Credentials

Searle, Tim

Instructor

B.Sc., ND, Queen’s University, CCNM

Shainhouse, Jill

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of Western Ontario, CCNM

Shapoval, Maria

Instructor, Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of Toronto, CCNM

Singh, Onkar

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, McMaster University, CCNM

Smith, Lisa

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of Ontario, Institute of Technology & University of Western, CCNM

Solomonian, Leslie

Clinic Supervisor, Assistant Professor

B.Sc., ND, University of Guelph, CCNM

Suneja, Ashima

Instructor

B.Sc., ND, University of Toronto, CCNM

Teasdale, Tracey

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, McMaster University, CCNM

Tebruegge, Peter

Clinic Supervisor, Instructor

B.Sc., RMT, ND, University of Windsor, Ontario Business College, CCNM

Terzic, Ljubisa

Associate Professor

MD, University of Sarajevo

Tokiwa, Jonathan

Clinic Supervisor, Associate Professor

B.Sc., RN, ND, M.Ed., University of Toronto, Seneca College, University of Calgary, CCNM

Trowell, Stefanie

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of Saskatchewan, CCNM

Truscott–Brock, Erin

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of Toronto, CCNM

Tsui, Teresa

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, M.Sc., University of Toronto, CCNM

Tummon Simmons, Laura

Clinic Resident

B.Sc., ND, University of Toronto, CCNM

Uraz, Zeynep

Clinic Supervisor, Associate Professor

B.Sc., ND, Acadia University, CCNM

Viinberg, Rachelle

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of Victoria, CCNM

Villegas, Pilar

Clinic Supervisor

B.Sc., ND, University of Toronto, CCNM

Vu, Alan

Clinic Supervisor, Instructor

B.Sc., ND, University of Toronto, CCNM

Willms, Heidi

Clinic Supervisor

BA, ND, McGill University, CCNM

Wong, Ellen

Clinic Supervisor, Associate Professor

B.Sc., ND, University of Waterloo, CCNM

Note: This list was accurate at time of creation, but is subject to ongoing change.

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017  91

ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY

ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY cont’d


Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine 1255 Sheppard Avenue East Toronto, Ontario, Canada M2K 1E2 Tel: (416) 498-1255 Fax: (416) 498-1643

ccnm.edu

CCNM Academic Calendar 2016 2017  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you