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CATALOGUE OF BEST PRACTICES FOR AN

EFFECTIVE REPRODUCIBLE MODEL OF INNOVATION SYSTEM

September2012


The ERMIS project has been made possible by the INTERREG IVC and Co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund The contents reflect the author’s views and the INTERREG IVC Managing Authority is not liable for any use that maybe made of the

information.

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TABLE OF CONTENT FOREWORD ....................................................................................... Erreur ! Signet non défini. PART 1: ERMIS DESCRIPTION.......................................................................................... 2 ERMIS PARTNERS .................................................................................................................... 2 ERMIS PROJECT....................................................................................................................... 2 PART 2 : ERMIS METHODOLOGY & SWOT ANALYSIS .................................................. 2 METHODOLOGICAL BACKGROUND .............................................................................................. 2 PARTNERS PROFILE & SWOT ANALYSIS ........................................................................................ 2 1. FRANCE : Sophia-Antipolis and the French Riviera ............................................................... 2 2. ITALY : Emilia Romagna and Forli-Cesena ........................................................................... 2 3. NETHERLAND : Brainport Eindhoven ................................................................................... 2 4. PORTUGAL: Coimbra and Centre Region .............................................................................. 2 5. HUNGARY : Miskolc Municipality .......................................................................................... 2 6. SPAIN : Castilla y León ........................................................................................................... 2 7. GREECE: North Aegean Region.............................................................................................. 2 8. DENMARK: Capital Region ..................................................................................................... 2 9. ROMANIA: Nord –Est Region ................................................................................................ 2 PART 3 : ERMIS BEST PRACTICES .................................................................................. 2 BEST PRACTICES CLASSIFICATION ............................................................................................ 2 French Best Practices .................................................................................................................... 2 Best Practice 1: Valor’Innov – Collective programme for the valorization of innovation in the SMEs ................................................................................................................................... 2 Best Practice 2: ECOBIZ Collaborative Platform ....................................................................... 2 Best Practice 3: Club Action Brevet (CAB) - the Industrial Property Club ................................ 2 Best Practice 4: Young Shoots Challenge .................................................................................. 2 Best Practice 5: CIMPACA Microelectronics Integrated Centre ............................................... 2 Italian Best Practices .................................................................................................................. 74 Best Practice 6: Cesena Sustainable Energy Action Plan - planning and administrative tools to promote environmental innovation in SMEs .............................................................. 2 Best Practice 7: Innovation Observatory of the Regional Union of the Chamber of Commerce of Emilia-Romagna and Innovation Report of the Forlì-Cesena Chamber of Commerce ................................................................................................................................. 2 Best Practice 8: Global Grant SPINNER 2013 ............................................................................ 2 Best Practice 9: Romagna Creative District .............................................................................. 2 Best Practice 10: Mechatronic Club .......................................................................................... 2 Dutch Best Practices .................................................................................................................. 80 Best Practice 11: Creative Conversion Factory ......................................................................... 2 Best Practice 12: Holst Center and Development Lab .............................................................. 2 Best Practice 13: United Brains ................................................................................................. 2 Portuguese Best Practices .......................................................................................................... 84 Best Practice 14: Penela's territory policy of enhancing and promoting / Tourism Development............................................................................................................................. 2 Best Practice 15: IPN Model...................................................................................................... 2 3


Hungarian Best Practices ............................................................................................................ 87 Best Practice 16: Robert Bosch Department at the University of Miskolc ............................... 2 Best Practice 17: Local FDI support system and one-stop shop services for companies ......... 2 Spanish Best Practices ................................................................................................................ 90 Best Practice 18: Specific Unit of Identification and Monitoring of European and International consortia ............................................................................................................. 2 Best Practice 19: R&D and Innovation Managers Training ....................................................... 2 Greek Best Practices .................................................................................................................. 93 Best Practice 20: Aegean Technopolis ...................................................................................... 2 Best Practice 21: BIOBUS - Biodiversity resources for innovative Business development ...... 2 Danish Best Practices .................................................................................................................. 96 Best Practice 22: Accelerace ..................................................................................................... 2 Best Practice 23: Connect Denmark ......................................................................................... 2 Romanian Best Practices ............................................................................................................ 99 Best Practice 24: Science and Technology Park "TEHNOPOLIS� ............................................... 2 Best Practice 25: Innovation Entrepreneurial Research Programs and Training ..................... 2 GLOSSARY .......................................................................................................................... 2

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FOREWORD The ERMIS project stands for "Effective Reproducible Model of Innovation System" and has been made possible by the INTERREG IVC and co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund. ERMIS together with its 15 European partners from 9 member states aims to jointly develop an effective governance model for local innovation systems, in order to foster increased competitiveness and sustainable growth within SME's. The innovation capacity of SME's is vital to achieve economic growth in the EU. They are the economic backbone of Europe and are at the core of the ERMIS project. The project has initiated a mutual exchange among practitioners active in the field of innovation and facilitates discussions in workshops and seminars that will continue, throughout the duration of the project. This network is designed to be open and actively reaches out to include additional regional stakeholders from different countries to share practices on related efforts in already existing initiatives. One step of the ERMIS method is to identify and transfer partners’ good practices. This document aims to make an overview on ERMIS including a description of the project, the method and a presentation of the 25 Best practices generated and managed by the consortium partners. The selection of best practices was based on the SWOT analyses of the participating 9 regions by giving answers to the identified weaknesses and presenting adaptable solutions to effectively use the opportunities. The SWOT methodology the consortium elaborated and applied is a unique combination of qualitative and quantitative indicators and detailed in the methodological background chapter. The best practices will serve as a core part of ERMIS in order to ensure an intensive transfer of experiences site visits will be organized in the second part of the project between the consortium members.

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PART 1: ERMIS DESCRIPTION

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ERMIS PARTNERS

FRANCE

French Riviera Chamber of Commerce and Industry Lead Partner RĂŠmy-Antoine CONTI ERMIS Project Director Sophia Antipolis Communauty Agglomeration Jean-Marie Audoli Partner 2 Project Manager

ITALY

NETHERLANDS

PORTUGAL

HUNGARY

Cesena Municipality Elena Giovanini Partner 3 Project Manager CISE: Centro per l'Innovazione e lo Sviluppo Economico Giulia Bubbolini Partner 4 Project Manager Eindhoven Municipality Anthony Van de Ven Partner 5 Project Manager Penela Municipality Luis Filipe da Silva Lourenco Matias Partner 6 Project Manager IPN Incubator Ana Seguro Partner 7 Project Manager Miskolc Municipality Kristof Pleban Partner 8 Project Manager Miskolc Holding Gergely Soos Partner 9 Project Manager Region of North Aegean Dimitrios Protoulis & Stratos Vougioukas Partner 11 Project Director & Manager

GREECE Samos Chamber of Commerce Panagiotis Lampropoulos Partner 12 Project Manager

DENMARK

ROMANIA

SPAIN

Horsholm Municipality Betina Bojesen Partner 13 Project Manager Erhvervnet - Copenhagen Regional Agency Bent Bennemann Bischoff Partner 14 Project Manager Iasi Municipality Bianca Cernescu Partner 15 Project Manager ADE - Agencia de Innovation y Financiacion de Empresarial Yolanda Arias Partner 16 Project Manager

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ERMIS PROJECT ERMIS stands for "Effective Reproducible Model of Innovation System" and has been made possible by the INTERREG IVC and co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund. The ERMIS project together with its 15 European partners from 9 member states aims to jointly develop an effective governance model for local innovation systems, in order to foster increased competitiveness and sustainable growth within SME's. The innovation capacity of SME's is vital to achieve economic growth in the EU. They are the economic backbone of Europe and are at the core of the ERMIS project.

PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION The project runs from January 2010 to December 2012 and started with a comprehensive study of the composition and strengths of innovation systems that leverage performance for SME's in the 9 participating countries. This meta review of academic and economic literature has enabled designing a methodology for context-specific SWOT analysis of the partners Local Innovation Systems (LIS). Thanks to this SWOT analysis and benchmark of partner performance, partners identified relevant Best practices on territories sharing the same context. This process is central to ERMIS as the primary objective of the project is to bridge the gap between the so far partially inefficient approach of „one size fits all” and the recent perspective of a place-based innovation approach fostered by the European Union. The transfer and the testing of these Best Practices between partners should lead to the elaboration of guidelines for a context-specific, reproducible methodology of analysis of LIS effectiveness, supported by a first set of context-specific Best Practices for fostering innovation in SMEs. Local stakeholders are involved in the assessment throughout the process that is anticipated to last beyond the project period.

PROJECT OBJECTIVES In order to achieve the objectives of the project, ERMIS:     

exchanges effective local innovation system tools and methods, designs and exchanges a governance framework and methodology to manage local innovation systems, designs a set of governance and management guidelines, involves public stakeholders outside the project, Involves policy makers to validate policy recommendations for implementation in the local and regional policies and Structural Funds.

PROJECT RESULTS In accordance with the Lisbon Strategy objectives, results of the ERMIS project will enhance long-term economic performance and improve the ability of European SME's to generate innovation and growth. Knowledge generated from the project will be disseminated efficiently, and will be actively fed into relevant sustainability initiatives, enabling regional stakeholders to formulate policy strategies with regards to innovation issues.

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PART 2 : ERMIS METHODOLOGY & PARTNERS SWOT ANALYSIS

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METHODOLOGICAL BACKGROUND

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PROJECT APPROACH

The ERMIS (Effective Reproducible Model of Innovation System) project aims to open the “black box” of the regional innovation system through a solid analysis of place-based innovation assets, to establish: a) the state of the economic environment and the business context of regional and local innovation, stressing the peculiarity of each locality or region (confirming the paradigm that “one size does not fit all” in innovation strategies ); b) what are the reproducible assets of local or regional innovation policy (assuming that the place-blased approach to innovation can be strengthened by interregional exchange of best practices as a form of knowledge diffuSion). ERMIS is a joint response from a regional perspective to the UE challenge to develop a regional policy for smart growth through Europe 2020. The ERMIS contribution is centred around: • Taking a place based approach to innovation (recognizing the importance of local capacities and local knowledge bases); • A recognition of regional/local interdependencies and externalities based on degrees of diversification and maturity of the economic base ; • A recognition of the dominant role of high growth SMEs.

ERMIS Model Synthesis

The ERMIS model intends to be reproducible to all European applicable whatever the regional context. As mentioned above, effectiveness relies on the ability of the model to describe the specificity of each region and to relate and compare regions that share similar contexts. Then, we assume that best practice transfers will be more effective by relying on the precise analysis of the gaps between the transferor region (where the considered practice has been developed, implemented and tested) and the host region (where the best practice will potentially be transferred). The ERMIS model suggests a step-by-step analysis to provide a synthetic understanding of the situation of the partner region and a highlight of potential developments with regard its structure and history on the one hand and its performance. The SWOT analysis is an appropriate tool to present synthetic results.

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SWOT Analysis Presentation The aim of the SWOT analysis is to evidence strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of partner regions in order to define and support the development of local and regional policies stimulating the innovative performance of SMEs as a source of sustainable growth. Innovative performance is defined as innovation output relative to resources invested in innovation process. The SWOT analysis approach -generally attributed to the “design school model” (Mintzberg 1994, 3639) was originally designed to prepare the strategic corporate planning. It aims to relate internal dimensions (strengths and weaknesses) to external dimensions (opportunities and threats) in order to clarify the current situation and initiate possible remedial actions in case of potentially unfavorable conditions. In recent years, the SWOT analysis has been applied increasingly in a regional development context to evaluate the relevance of a specific project/policy. However, given the number of stakeholders in a region, the risk is to have ambiguous objectives and then reduce the relevance of the analysis. As a consequence, it is important that partner regions concentrate on a specific (set of) objective(s) in order to make clear which dimensions should be taken into account in the assessment process. The SWOT instrument will help analysts evaluate their region on the basis of the relevance and of the effectiveness of policy actions in enhancing the innovative capacities of local SMEs. It follows that the study will have first to evaluate strength, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of SMEs in their business context, and then to estimate the relevance and the impact of innovation policy actions aiming to boost SMEs innovation performance. Drawing on a RIS framework (as described by Cooke 2001) the study will first carry out a cluster analysis in order to establish the economic environment and the business context of local firms. It will then focus on the super-structural level (interactive learning, network functioning, co-operative culture) of the region and, subsequently, on the infrastructural level (regional policies and the governance structures) in order to test their impact on cluster dynamics favoring SMEs innovation capacities. For a step-by Step explanation of the process, see the complementary document “A step-bystep guidelines to the ERMIS SWOT analysis”.

SWOT Analysis:

 Strengths rely on resources, conditions, or capacities firms can effectively exploit and leverage to innovate and thereby enjoy a competitive advantage  Weaknesses are limitations, defects or lack of necessary resources, conditions, or capacities to take up innovation and achieve a competitive advantage  Opportunities are favorable situations or conditions in the firms’ environment that could be exploited to increase the firms’ innovating capacity and achieve a competitive advantage  Threats are unfavorable situations in the firms’ environment that could damage the firms’ competitive advantage if required resources or capacities to face and overcome 12these situations are not accessible


PARTNERS PROFILE & SWOT ANALYSIS

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1. FRANCE : Sophia-Antipolis and the French Riviera Sophia Antipolis: Sophia Vision 2020 + Livre Blanc de SA: a strategic plan with a strong focus on the knowledge economy, sustainable development and innovation. French Riviera Eco Valley: 1st national-scope territorial planning program dedicated to sustainable development Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur: a regional innovation strategy: a competitive cluster-centered strategy Foster and leverage coherence and cooperation between public and private stakeholders The French Riviera Industry Roadmap : a new industrial model A diagnostic of industrial activities in the French Riviera Guidelines to enhance the attractiveness of industrial activities and maintain employment in the area 4 major structurally coherent strategic clusters emerge: - Perfumes, fine chemistry, life sciences - Micro-electronics and ICT - Tourism - Support services

Region Profil Indicator

Value

Population

1082464 (**)

Density

251,8 inh/km2

Average annual population growth

0,8% (19992007)

Employment

480000 jobs

GDP ***

29618 (in mill €)

GDP per capita

27723 (in €, ***)

Employment rate

71,1% (**)

Productivity (GDP/worker)

72786 (***)

Average annual growth of GDP

4,7% (19972007)

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The economic development of the French Riviera has been supported by strategic groups of firms and activities embedded in various determinants: -historical factors (historical tendency towards intra development, “Nice County”) -geographical factors (naturally gifted area, still isolated, with little “usable” land) -cultural factors (an attractive area, with a service-oriented economy) -socio-economic factors (quality of life as a competitive advantage) -industrial factors (few industry-intensive roots based on specific know-how or natural resources) 4 major structurally coherent strategic clusters emerge: Perfumes, fine chemistry, life sciences Micro-electronics and ICT Tourism Support services 4 strategic groups representing a large scope of expertise: 21% of employment 18% of businesses middle tech and high tech activities manufacturing and service industries international and local markets

Diversity of activities –French Riviera: a highly specialized area Name Industry 1

Perfumes, fine chemistry, healthcare

Industry 2

Employment in your region

Share

Share²

6366

0,070

0,005

Microelectronics, ICT

18735

0,205

0,042

industry 3

Tourism

42034

0,459

0,211

Industry 4

Support services

24430

0,267

0,071

Total HHI

91565 0,329

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Maturity of industries rate year 2 rate year 3 rate year 4 rate year 5 Average Perfumes, fine chemistry -0,063 0,030 -0,026 -0,073 -0,033 Micro-electronics, ICT 0,070 0,103 -0,105 -0,150 -0,020 Tourism 0,018 0,044 0,027 0,057 0,036 Support 0,011 0,018 0,056 0,033 0,030 Industry services 5

Regional Turbulence

-0,002

Industry types and the role of SMEs Types of industries are characterized by their level of concentration and level of dynamism (entry rate of new firms) French Riviera : a Region with a medium maturity characterized by a balance between dynamic (Tourism, Support services) and relatively mature (perfumes, micro-elect.) clusters

nb of employees in the country

comparison with national level Perfumes, fine chemistry

nb of nb of employees nb of employees weight of the weight of the employees in in the country in the region industry five industry the region five years ago five years ago years ago

Evolution

74900

6366

0,08

72200

6698

0,09

-0,09

139900

18735

0,13

156600

18101

0,12

0,14

Tourism

1682800

42034

0,02

1540100

36441

0,02

0,05

Support services

6712400

24430

0,00

6333000

21747

0,00

0,06

Micro-electronics, ICT

Relative positioning and sector relatedness

Transition Analysis Local Level

Evolution 15,00%

Support Services

10,00% 5,00% 0,00% -0,02 -5,00% 0 -10,00% -15,00%

Tourism

Micro-electronics & softwares 0,02

0,04

Perfumes & Fine chemistry

0,06

0,08

0,1

0,12

Relative weight

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Reference regions selected Regions with the same population, and/or same density, and proprietarily with same key clusters and considered as good innovation performers (Regional Innovation Scoreboard 2009

Population (000)

Density

French Riviera

1082

252

Isère

1180

158

Bas-Rhin

1084

228

Oberbayern

4000

248

Main similar clusters Fine chemistry, Microelectronics, Tourism, Support services Fine chemistry, Microelectronics, Tourism, Support services Fine chemistry, Microelectronics, Tourism, Support services Fine chemistry, Microelectronics, Tourism, Support services

Economic performance: comparison of key elements of territorial competitiveness at national and regional levels Indicators Evolution of population migration rate GDP (2005) in € million GDP per capita (2005) Employment rate (2007) Unemployment rate (2007) GDP per worker (productivity) 2005 Growth of GDP (average over 8 years – 20002007 Synthesis

French Riviera +0,8%

France +0,7%

+0,9

BasRhin 67 +0,7

+0,8%

+0,3%

+0,3

+0,2

30669

28829

166600

29618

Isère 38

Munich Oberbayern

rating

27723

27397

26355

26815

38100

3

71.1%

69,1%

72.2%

73.1%

74,5%

3

7,7%

8%

6,7%

7,2%

4,3%

4

72786

68928

66829

64872

71717

1

2,61%

2,10

2,31%

1,49%

2,95%

1

Rate the relative results of your region on 1-5 scale (1 very good)

2,4

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Justification of the identified and selected Best Practices on the basis of the SWOT Strengths identified in the SWOT

Best Practices contributing to the strengths

Weaknesses identified in the SWOT

Best Practices to be studied and adapted

* Strong entrepreneurship climate in the region * Strong concentration of Intermediairies dedicated to SMEs support

VALOR'INNOV: collective program for the valorization of innovation in SMEs

* Lack of strategic management practices in SMEs * Lack of Medium-High Technology innovations * Small size firms do not share practices

* Medium size firms are involved in many networks * Good transversal cooperation of manufacturing SMEs on technological innovation

Ecobiz Collaborative Platform: the network of networks

* Small size firms (<10 pax) do not participate in networks * SMEs do not participate in collaborative projects * Low level of cooperation with local R&D centers

* Sharing of experiences and tools to support the dissemination of strategic management practices * Optimization of SMEs operational processes to be able to conduct value innovation projects * Strengthening cross fertilization with other sectors * Promotion of open innovation practices * Development of awareness of local expertise and knowledge mobility * Stimulate disruptive technology transfers from academic research * Increase awareness of the interest of patenting (protection of disruptive innovation, valorization of firm assets)

* Structured network of Club Action Brevet: valorization units for the Industrial Property academic centers Club * High R&D intensity of local SMEs

* Strong entrepreneurship climate in the region * Strong and dense academic community in ICT

Young shoots Challenge

* Strong local ICT expertise (academic and business) * Strong ICT infrastructure and ecosystem gathering large and small firms

CIM PACA ICT Technological Platform

* Low level of capital in local SMEs * Low level of technology transfers to SMEs from academic research * Low level of patenting of SMEs * Low degree of novelty of innovations * Low survival rate of start-ups * Low market orientation of start-ups * Low level of practice on collaborative projects

* Low level of collaborative projects between large and small firms * Low level of seed funding to support technological development of start-ups * Low level of knowledge mobility from one cluster to another

* Intense coaching on the maturation and the validation of the proof of concept of the project * Development of awareness of the importance of market-based innovation * development of knowledge mobility between engineering, management and legal sciences * Foster access of SMEs to state of the art technological and human capabilities * Provide access of SMEs to ICT intensive new markets by cross fertilization between market and technology specialists

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Innovation system SWOT

Weaknesses

Strengths • • • • • • • • •

mature world-class industries (Perfumes & flavors, Tourism) dynamic transversal industries (ICT, support services) high productivity supported by knowledge intensive activities non-relocatable industries (Tourism, support services, energy, construction) high level of public expenditures for R&D local employment market (attractiveness of the region) high density of population with university degree high specialization in human and business sciences high intensity of R&D of local manufacturing firms (receptivity to technology transfers)

• • • •

• • • • • • •

Opportunities •

• • • •

Dynamic industries (ICT) with potential growth levers on ancillary industries (Tourism, Support services, Healthcare, Energy) Legal and fiscal incentives to support innovation in SMEs Presence of world class competitive clusters (SCS, Capenergies) Dense network of innovation management structures A sense of urgency from local stakeholders for a coordinated innovation value chain

Low level of technological innovation Local relative decrease of dynamic sectors (Micro-elec, ICT) Lack of cooperation between strategic clusters Industries of suppliers highly dependent on turbulences of upstream supplied sectors Lack of strategic management practices among SMEs Low level of internationalization of SMEs Low level of cooperation of SMEs with local R&D centers Lack of private investments in R&D Lack of capital in SMEs Lack of seed funds Limited access to refinancing

Threats • •

• •

• Growing competition on leading industries: Business Tourism, ICT • A local tendency to shift from high tech, R&D oriented dynamic industries (micro-electronics, IT) to support services industries Lack of local coordination of innovation policies Dispersion of regional public funds to support administrative structures of numerous clusters Lack of coordination between local strategic directions from public stakeholders: no “territorial flagship”

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2. Emilia Romagna and Forli-Cesena - ITALY

The regional system of innovation of Emilia Romagna (NUTS 2 region) is based on one of the most advanced pieces of legislation in Italy, recognizing economic systems of specialisation and fostering innovation and technology diffusion by means of an articulated system of academic and private laboratories of research recently encompassed in 9 Technopoles. However well laid out in principle, the regional system of innovation is now (2011) in its crucial phase of delivering a real system of integration between the SME’s regional base and the sources of research and knowledge. In this perspective the system has so far provided a perfect ground for technology transfer envolving medium to large firms. The capacity to foster innovation on the part of small enterprises, that nonetheless represent the backbone of the regional system with 95% of the total of firms, acting on the demand-side of innovation, remains the key challenge for the future.

Region Profile Indicator

Value

Population

4,405,486 (4,432,418 31/12/2010 ISTAT)

Density

196.3/km2

Average annual population growth

Var.% 2009/2010 +0,83%

Employment

1,608,259 addetti alle sedi di impresa al 31/12/2010 (Registro Imprese – Stiockview)

GDP

€ 128.8 billion (€ 133,035 million Dato 2009 ISTAT – Valori a prezzi correnti [Tav.6 Conti Economici Regionali 1995-2009]).

GDP per capita

30,265.70 €/abitante (dato 2009)

Unemployment rate

5,7% Media 2010 - Rilevazione Continua delle Forze di Lavoro Istat

Productivity (GDP/worker)

83,685.07 €/addetto alle sedi di impresa (dato 2009)

Average annual growth of GDP

Var % 2009/2008 -3,66%

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Although selected clusters account for just one third of regional employment, they represent areas of the regional economy where there is a higher intensity of innovation (in fact the remaining two thirds of employment are in agriculture, construction, distributive trades). Emilia Romagna has a high innovation intensity and patent output in mechanics/mechatronics. Food

6%

Fashion

4%

Mechanics

12%

Tourism

7%

Support services

11%

% on total NUTS 3 employment (2007)

40%

In the locality of ForlĂŹ-Cesena (NUTS3) selected clusters account for a larger share of local employment (40%) and this implies that actions envisaged vis a vis innovation of these clusters may have a great potential in enhancing territorial capabilities.

Diversity of activities - Emilia Romagna: share 2009

share2

0,114182646

0,013037677

0,08696042

0,007562115

0,456843137

0,208705652

0,210639369

0,044368944

0,131374427

0,01725924

FOOD N. of employees Region FASHION N. of employees Region MECHANICS/MECHATRONICS N. of employees Region TOURISM N. of employees Region SUPPORT SERVICES N. of employees Region HHI

0,290933628

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Maturity of industries

Turbulence (net entry rate per year) rate year 2006

rate year 2007 rate year 2008

rate year 2009 Average

food

-0,009905301

-0,016710934 -0,016194332

-0,003725025

fashion

-0,022834275

-0,037996335 -0,053681771

mechanics

-0,005828541

-0,019198238 -0,018634287

-0,053430974 -0,03358867 -0,01644853 -0,038581596

tourism

-0,027400436

-0,048871815 -0,039163171

supp. services

-0,002245839

-0,01332954

-0,003957568

-0,00930712

-0,038084247 -0,03070393 -0,00645183 -0,012726221

Regional Turbulence

-0,02652184

Relative positioning and sector relatedness Emilia Romagna

0,1 0,08 0,06

evolution 2007 - 2009

TOURISM

SUPPORT SERVICES

0,04 0,02 FOOD 0 -0,02 MECHANICS/MEC HATRONICS

-0,04 -0,06

FASHION

-0,08 0

0,1

0,2

0,3

0,4

0,5

share 2009

Forli Cesena

0,15 support services

evolution 2005-2007

0,1

tourism mechanics

0,05

0

fashion

-0,05 food

22

-0,1 0

0,05

0,1

0,15

0,2

share 2007

0,25

0,3

0,35


SWOT analysis for Emilia Romagna Strengths

Weaknesses

• a rather balanced region with mature industries built on • a major part of employment dependent on nonsolid bases (Mechanics, Food, Fashion) as world-class manufacturing industries (where innovation intensity is exporters with international leading firms lower) • a high intensity of innovation output (patents) • a low R&D intensity due to low R&D private especially in mechanics and production of machinery investment (owing to prevalence of small businesses) • high productivity • lagging behind in high tech employment vis a vis • High capacity of leading mechanical firms to serve as leading regions in EU global suppliers of world OEMs • no strong world-class high-tech industrial basis (limited source of technological innovation) • divergence in knowledge bases between world class leaders and local suppliers

Opportunities •

exploit leaders’ knowledge bases to strengthen small firms’ competitiveness through production networks role of growing industries (Tourism, Support services) percentage of workers with a a post graduate degree in science and technology incentives for “green conversion” for manufacturing and construction sectors

• • •

Threats • stagnating global demand for core products (machinery, automotive, fashion) • risk of being locked in a medium specialization and medium tech position

Innovation System Swot Strengths •

Mature firms highly specialized and world class exporters

Opportunities • • •

Technopoles launched by regional policy Presence of University as a knowledge hub in engineering, avionics, ICT, social sciences Creativity and talent of local entrepreneurs

Weaknesses • • •

High share of micro enterprises Low levels of tech transfer Low levels of graduate workers

Threats •

- Territory locked in a mature and low tech position

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Justification of the identified and selected Best Practices on the basis of the SWOT Strengths identified Best Practices Weaknesses identified in Best Practices to contributing to the the SWOT be studied and in the SWOT strengths adapted A rather balanced region with mature industries which imply the need to think of innovation not just in terms of products but also in terms of energy efficiency

Cesena Sustainable Energy Action Plan planning & administrative tools to promote environmental innovation in SMEs

In terms of weaknesses the SEAP tackle the crucial issue of diversification in terms of possible reconfiguration of productive processes along energy efficient lines and creation of new firms out of retrofitting activities on existing buildings, photovoltaic installation and recycle processing

Emilia-Romagna lags behind in high tech employment vis a vis leading regions in EU; divergence in knowledge bases between world class leaders and local suppliers.

Global Grant Spinner 2013 The new programme for human resources qualification in the research technological innovation sectors in EmiliaRomagna.

BPs that will be studied and proposed for possible adaptation and adoption focus on supporting SMEs in triggering and managing their innovation processes, in order to give wings to creativity, overcome low levels of tech transfer, enhance the knowledge base at company level, help finding financial support.

The maturity of the economic texture allows for innovation that is incremental. Since one of the key specializations of Emilia Romagna is machinery and mechanical engineering, the specific evolution of the historic district of Reggio Emilia has been selected to account for the evolution of mature sectors towards a medium-tech specialization. The Mechatronic club of Reggio Emilia is a good example of this evolution

The mechatronic club of Reggio Emilia (a special programme to increase the innovative capacity of leading mechatronic firms in the district)

The mechatronic club aims at increasing the innovative capacity of leading forms, guaranteeing at the same time that the capacities of other firms in the supply chain remain in tune with the engineering evolution of the sector.

 LP BP1 VALOR'INNOV: collective program for the valorisation of innovation in SMEs  P5 BP8 Creative Conversion Factory

 P7 BP11 IPN Model  P10 BP15 Specific Unit of Identification and Monitoring of European and International consortia

 P10 BP16 R&D and Innovation Managers Training Programme  P11 BP17 Aegean

Technopolis

This special programme aims also at increasing the share of tech transfer between University and firms.

24


3. Brainport Eindhoven - NETHERLAND

Brainport 2020; Top economy, smart society - A comprehensive, strategic vision for Brainport as the cornerstone of the Dutch economy - Set up by triple helix partners - Sectoral approach that provides answers to the societal challenges of tomorrow - A complete programme with >70 actions that improve the entire ecosystem (people, technology, business, basics) - Brainport 2020 promises to rise the annual contribution to the gross national product in 2020 by €40 billion to €136 billion

Region Profile Indicator

Value

Population

735.000 inhabitants

Density

504 inh/km2

Average annual population growth

2.782 per year (0,38% of 2010inh)

Employment

371.000 jobs

GDP

€27 billion

GDP per capita

€36.600

Unemployment rate

3,6 % of the workforce

Productivity (GDP/worker)

€70.200

Average annual growth of GDP

€1,034 billion per year (3,9% of 2008-GDP)

Brainport Eindhoven’s 5 major sectors High tech systems & Materials – Automotive - Life tec – Design - Food 5 strategic groups representing a large scope of expertise  16% of employment in Brainport Eindhoven  10% of businesses in Brainport Eindhoven  16% of all jobs in Brainport Eindhoven are in high tech  Jobs in high tech service increase; in medium and high tech industry decrease

25


Diversity of activities - Brainport Eindhoven: a highly specialized area Industry

Employment in the region

Share

Share²

Automotive

7.074

0,109

0,012

Design

6.189

0,095

0,009

Food

7.892

0,122

0,015

High tech systems & Materials

40.132

0,618

0,382

Life tec

3.606

0,056

0,003

Total

64.893

HHI

0,421

Brainport Eindhoven is a region with a low overall maturity characterized by a mix of immature sectors (high tech systems & materials, automotive and design), medium mature sectors (food) and high mature sectors (life tec)

Maturity of industries rate year 1 rate year 2 (2005) (2006)

rate year 3 (2007)

rate year 4 (2008)

rate year 5 (2009)

Average

Automotive

-1

2

7

-35

42

3

Design

146

87

117

103

276

145,8

Food

4

0

-8

-4

-6

-2,8

High tech systems

456

244

334

199

422

331

Lifetech

5

-10

1

-1

6

0,2

Regional Turbulance

218,6

nb of nb of employees employees in in the country the region

nb of employees in nb of weight of weight of the country employees in the industry the industry t-5 the region t-5 t-5 Evolution

Automotive 47259

7074

0,15

53898

6930

0,13

0,14

Design

100003

6189

0,06

88939

5931

0,07

-0,08

Food 147453 High tech systems & Materials 487311

7892

0,05

152167

7800

0,05

0,04

40132

0,08

437482

36616

0,08

-0,02

Lifetech

3606

0,12

30903

3532

0,11

0,04

30405

26


Relative positioning and sector relatedness

Reference regions selected (and NUTS 2 region; Eurostat) -Stuttgart -Oberbayern - Helsinki

(DE) (DE) (FI)

DE11 DE21 FI18

27


SWOT analysis of the region Region economic competitiveness

S

W

O

T

-GDP per hour worked in the Eindhoven region is high (CBS, 2010)

-Many potential value propositions -Good tech-transfer -Proper infrastructure for starters

-Labour force; growing need for talented employees (knowledge workers) -Productivity of high tech companies lags behind other sectors -Large growth of high tech industry when world market improves «toolmaker of the manufacturing industry» -Complexity increases and wins over cost; trend towards value sourcing instead of outsourcing -World market improves -Global battle for talent

-Limited capacity to create value “valorisation”; extent of entrepreneurship lags behind technology -Specialized profile (technicians)

Access to finance

S W

O

T

Entrepreneurship performance

Innovative outcomes -High density of patents (high tech); within specialization is diversity; many possibilities for convergence (as for example the cooperation between KIC InnoEnergy and the HTC Lab both in the region) -High investments in private R&D -Suitable regional roadmap (strategy) -Low public R&D

-Cooperation with other regions -Convergence of technology; many possibilities (when it comes to entrepreneurship) for crossovers between different fields of technology due to social developments (health and aging, energy and mobility)

-Absence of European market; too high barriers of entry

Human capital

-Lack of government support

Technology transfer

- Efficient support capacity leading -High quality of education -Many starters to finance -Many possibilities for job -Extensive knowledge infrastructure ; with TNO, development ; people have autonomy campuses, shared facilities (MiPlaza/Automotive to make career choices facility Centre) - Lack of funds after «proof of -Amount of graduates is low, on all -Transfer to medium and small enterprises, and concept» education-levels (vocational educ.) cooperation between knowledge institutes and -Climate for foreign workers is not enterprises (large/small/science/application) very friendly in European context (e.g.: partner’s job) -Preparation of revolving -Worldwide many people are -Possibilities for and positive pressure to innovation fund by government technically educated cooperate (proprietary innovation) -Technical knowledge is universal and can be employed throughout the world as opposed to legal/building knowledge -Too few exits; time to cash is -Internationally the quality of human -Increasing costs and decreasing time to earn long, long development paths and capital lags behind money; risk increases the required specialized -Aging of the population -Monetary government support seems to stop knowledge (AWT, 2010) -Battle for talent all over the world 28


Quality of infrastructure

Legal and regulatory framework

S

-Good data infrastructure -3 international airports within 1,5 hour -Good connections in road infrastructure

-Stable legal and regulatory environment ; no corruption, low tax pressure, wide WBSO (support of technical activities)

W

-Capacity of road infrastructure

O

-Government policy aimed at investments in infrastructure

T

-Increasing congestion due to economic growth and benefits of agglomeration -No connection to HSL network (high speed train)

-Inflexible labour market -High administrative pressure for companies -Both European and worldwide regulation force innovation (for example in the automotive industry where regulation has made new cars much more «green» energy efficient) -Level playing field when the Netherlands goes alone in regulation

Innovation SWOT System Strengths • High participation in lifelong learning • Strong international knowledge base • Unique open innovation system • Worldwide competitive supply chains • Triple helix cooperation

Weaknesses • • •

Opportunities • • • •

Internationalization leads to new businesses and economic development Growing need for durability Increasing importance of open innovation and development of technology (complexity increases) Convergence of technology (crossovers)

Lack of technical talent Low public R&D expenditure Lack of market focus

Threats • • • •

Growth of new economies and new markets outside Europe Climate pressure Rare resources Aging population

29


Justification of the identified and selected Best Practices on the basis of the SWOT Strengths identified in the SWOT

-Many potential value propositions -Good tech-transfer -Proper infrastructure for starters -High density of patents - Strong international knowledge base - Unique open innovation system

BPs contributing to the strengths Creative Conversion Factory

Weaknesses identified in the SWOT

- Transfer to medium and small enterprises, and cooperation between knowledge institutes and enterprises (valorisation and the explicit focus on SMEs) (technology transfer)

Holst Centre and - Specialized technical profile (entrepreneurship Development performance) Lab - Transfer to medium and small enterprises, and cooperation between knowledge institutes and enterprises (valorisation and the explicit focus on SMEs) (technology transfer) -Limited capacity to create value “valorisation”; extent of entrepreneurship lags behind technology (entrepreneurship performance) - Lack of funds after «proof of concept» (access to finance)

- Lack of market focus by businesses - Transfer to medium and small enterprises, and cooperation between knowledge institutes and enterprises (technology transfer)

BPs to be studied and adapted VALOR'INNOV

ECOBIZ Collaborative Platform

Club Action Brevet (CAB) the Industrial Property Club Specific Unit of Identification and Monitoring of European and International consortia Aegean Technopolis

30


4. PORTUGAL: Coimbra and Centre Region

Operational Programme of Centre Region - Reinforcing the Competitiveness and Innovation - Development of Cities and Urban Systems - Environment protection and valorisation Development Strategic Projects from Coimbra, Aveiro and Beira Interior Universities - a strategic plan with a strong focus on the knowledge economy, sustainable development and innovation, leaded by the major 3 Universities in the Centre Region

Region Profile Indicator

Value

Population

2.383.448

Density

84,4 inh/km2

Average annual population growth

0,0% (2005-2009)

Employment

93,1%

GDP

30.519 (in million â&#x201A;Ź)

GDP per capita

GDP per capita: 15.300 (in â&#x201A;Ź)

Unemployment rate

:10,9%

Productivity (GDP/worker)

33.255

Average annual growth of GDP

3,5% (2005-2009)

This measure estimates the dependence of the region on its industrial specialization Cluster profiles: Today 7 major structurally coherent strategic clusters emerge: -

Wood, Paper and Forest Home Equipment and Materials Health Services and Products Moulds and Plastics Agro-Industries

31


Diversity of activities â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Centre Region of Portugal This measure estimates the dependence of the region on its industrial specialization Cluster profiles: Today 7 major structurally coherent strategic clusters emerge: -

Wood, Paper and Forest

-

Home Equipment and Materials

-

Health Services and Products

-

Moulds and Plastics

-

Agro-Industries

-

Energy Production

-

ICT

Industry 1 Industry 2 Industry 3 Total HHI -

Employment in your Region Name Wood, Paper & Forest 15.450 Home Equipment and Materials 57.672 Agro Industries 26.729 189.861

Share 2 Share 0,081 0,007 0,304 0,092 0,141 0,020 0,119

3 sectors representing -

58% of total manufacturing firms

-

53% of Industry total employment

-

54% of Industry Turnover

Centro Region: Low-Medium specialization

32


Maturity of industries

A Region with a medium maturity characterized by a balance between dynamic (Health & ICT) and relatively mature (Home, Wood and Agro-Industries.) clusters Using transition matrix at national versus regional level

nb of employees in nb of weight of the nb of nb of the country employees in employees in weight of the employees in industry t-5 the country the region industry the region t-5 t-5 Evolution Wood, Paper & Forest Home Equipment and Materials Agro Industries

52.243

15.450

0,30

62.400

14.600

0,23

0,06

217.940 111.408

57.672 26.729

0,26 0,24

215.731 107.400

53.418 32.400

0,25 0,30

0,02 -0,06

33


Relative positioning and sector relatedness

Reference regions selected

Region

Population (000)

Density Area (km2) (h/km2)

GDP per capita

motor vehicles, agro- food, electrical appliances, machinery, chemicals, wood and paper, healthcare, information technologies, biotechnology, forestry, agriculture, fishing, and tourism,

Centro

2 377

28 462

83

Galicia

2 790

29 575

94

tourism, sustainable forestry and organic and traditional agriculture, shipbuilding, textiles, granite, motor vehicles

161

mining, marble, agriculture, wine, textiles, chemicals/pharmaceuticals, metalworking, glass and ceramics, clothing, printing,publishing, motor vehicles, timber processing and wood furniture, paper

Tuscany

Languedoc -Roussillon

3 734

2 548

22 990

27 376

93

15 300

Main Clusters

26 540

agro-industries, textil and clothing, pharmaceuticals, motor vehicles, shipbuilding, aeronautics, rolling stcck, wood and paper, chemical, metalomecanic, electrical appliances 34


Innovation System SWOT Strengths • •

• • •

Polynucleated organization of urban systems based on a balanced network of cities with an average size; • Regional production structure diversified with traditional areas of expertise evenly distributed throughout the territory; • Scientific and technological system with a high quality offer: higher education institutions, private laboratories, research centers university, and technological centers technology transfer; Areas of regional excellence in the fields of health and life sciences, biotechnology and ICT; Growth of the National System of S & T and a progressive integration into international scientific networks; R & D centers of international quality in promising areas - robotics and automation, health sciences, biotechnology and energy.

Weaknesses •

• • • • • •

Opportunities •

• •

Promoting the competitiveness of cities through its redevelopment and structuring and strengthening of urban networks; Installation of telecommunications network, increasing penetration of Internet broadband and the widespread use of ICT; Clustering of economic activities, broadening and densified by incorporation of innovation and technology, value chain of traditional sectors with profile to export; Legal and fiscal incentives to support innovation in SMEs; Dense network of innovation management structures.

Serious structural weaknesses in terms of production structure: entrepreneurial tissue consisting of small institutions (70% are micro enterprises), low strength in technology and innovation, and lack of export capacity (only 12% of companies are exporting); Infrastructure-industrial location poor in terms of planning, environment, technology services and logistics; Reduced capacity to incorporate the results of business processes technological innovation; • Lack of strategic management practices among SMEs; Low level of internationalization of SMEs; Low level of cooperation of SMEs with local R&D centers; Lack of private investments in R&D; Limited access to refinancing.

Threats •

• •

• Development model based on labor-intensive activities with low unit costs of manpower, undermining the long term economic competitiveness of the region; Weak presence of foreign capital and foreign investment in the region; Difficulties of cooperation between public and private sectors: organizational failures, corporate culture and academic culture individualistic and closed.

35


Justification of the identified and selected Best Practices on the basis of the SWOT Strengths identified in the SWOT

Best Practices contributing to the strengths

Weaknesses identified in the SWOT

Best Practices to be studied and adapted

Polynucleated organization of urban systems based on a balanced network of cities with an average size;

Penela's territory policy of enhancing and promoting / Tourism Development

Serious structural weaknesses in terms of production structure: entrepreneurial tissue consisting of small institutions (70% are micro enterprises), low strength in technology and innovation, and lack of export capacity (only 12% of companies are exporting);

Industry and High Value Services Attraction policies

Regional production structure diversified with traditional areas of expertise evenly distributed throughout the territory;

Scientific and technological system with a high quality offer: higher education institutions, private laboratories, research centres university, and technological centres, technology transfer;

Enterprise/University cooperation

IPN Model

Areas of regional excellence in the fields of health and life sciences, biotechnology and ICT; Growth of the National System of S & T and a progressive integration into international scientific networks; R & D centres of international quality in promising areas - robotics and automation, health sciences, biotechnology and energy.

36


5. HUNGARY : Miskolc Municipality Integrated Urban Development Strategy (2008) : improving socio-economic competitiveness Urban Development Strategy (2005) : urban of renewable economic attractivity North Hungarian Regional Innovation Strategy (2007-2013) Main objective: raising economic competitiveness of entrepreneurships in the region due to R&D facilities, transfer of knowledge and technology, exploiting synergies in clusters, entrepreneurial corporations. Vision: competitive economy, improving infrastructure, raising standard of living Miskolc Municipality: 5 major sectors: - Construction - Manufacturing - ICT - Mechatronics - Trade, transportation

Regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s profile Indicator

Value

Population

169,226 (2010)

Density

715.06 (2010)

Average annual population growth

-4.5% (Source: KSH, 2009)

Employment

82,419 (Source: NFSZ, 2010)

GDP

137,667 million HUF (Source: KSH, 2009)

GDP per capita

813,510 HUF (Source: KSH, 2009)

Unemployment rate

13 % (Source: NFSZ, 2010)

Productivity (GDP/worker)

1 670 331 HUF (Source: KSH, 2009, NFSZ, 2010)

Average annual growth of GDP

-3.8% (Source: KSH, 2009)

37


Diversity of activities â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Specialisation level of Miskolc is high NOTE: In the following points we havechanged the analised industries because the statistical data required to take modifications is opposite to the development strategies.

Diversification/specialisation

Name

Employment in your region

Share

Share²

Industry 1

Mechatronics

3996

0,532586965

0,283648876

Industry 2

ICT

633

0,084366253

0,007117665

industry 3

Construction

1719

0,229108357

0,052490639

Industry 4

Economic services 1155

0,153938425

0,023697039

Total

7503

HHI

0,366954218

Maturity of industries Net entry rate of new firms Turbulence rate year 1

rate year 2

rate year 3

rate year 4

Average

Manufacturing

0,011616651

-0,011167513

-0,03027027

0,008918618

-0,004180503

Construction

0,056179775

0,034917556

0,060784314

0,037411527

0,037858634

Trade

0,033185084

0,022377622

-0,006184067

0,023186238

0,014512975

Transportation

0,01980198

0,021825397

0,003868472

0,017751479

0,012649466

Regional Turbulence

0,005531347

Transition matrix of Miskolc versus regional level nb of nb of employees employees nb of nb of in the region in Miskolc employees employees weight of five years five years in the region in Miskolc the industry ago ago

weight of the industry five years ago Evolution

Manufacturing 67067

8735

0,13

69356

9751

0,14

-0,08

Construction

11327

1494

0,13

11902

2555

0,21

-0,63

Trade

22235

4361

0,20

22637

4523

0,20

-0,02

Transportation 11005

5331

0,48

10424

6214

0,60

-0,23 38


Relative positioning and sector relatedness Transition Analysis 0,10

Evolution

0,00 -0,100,00

Trade 0,10

-0,20 -0,30

0,20

0,30

0,40

Manufacturing

0,50

0,60

Transportation

-0,40 -0,50 -0,60

Construction

-0,70 -0,80 Relative weight

Reference regions selected (and NUTS 5 region; Eurostat) Debrecen (HU), Kosice (SK) • • • • •

Similar size of population Cities are near to each other Heavy industrial heritage (Kosice, Miskolc) Growing cities (Debrecen, Kosice) Competing cities (development poles: Miskolc-Debrecen, European Cultural Capital: KosiceMiskolc)

Justification of the identified and selected Best Practices on the basis of the SWOT Strengths identified in the SWOT

Best Practices contributing to the strengths

Strong human capabilities BOSCH Department (intensive role of the University of Miskolc University of Miskolc, strong educational system). There is a new industrial Local Economic park in Miskolc with large System band net.

at

Best Practices to be studied and adapted

the Cesena Sustainable Energy Action Plan planning and administrative tools to promote environmental innovation in SMEs

Development Penela's territory policy of enhancing and promoting / Tourism Development

Creative Conversion Factory Aegean Technopolis

39


Economic competitiveness Entrepreneurship performance of the region

S

W

O

T

Prosperous geographical location. High density of population, strong population potential in the region.

Strong human capabilities (intensive role of the University of Miskolc, strong educational system). Local values â&#x20AC;&#x201C; notable cultural potential. Active international relationship of the city. Decreasing number of Lack of competitive enterprises in inhabitants, adverse the region. migration potential. Weak Adverse R&D intensity of local GDP potential in the country. enterprises. High unemployment rate and Low level of innovation potential. relatively low level of active population. Unsatisfied level of wages, lower productivity rate. Improve the attractiveness Increasing growth of academic of the city in order to research-industry collaborations. observe Strengthening the role of dynamic the population. industries, ICT sector. Increasing Creating attractive economic growth of public-private partnership, environment for the knowledge intensive activities. entrepreneur. Ensuring the framework for supporting small and middle size enterprises. Highlighting the networking potentials in many sectors. Establishing competitive clusters. Continuously decreasing Lack of local coordination of number of inhabitants. innovation policies. Few possibilities, lack of Dispersion of regional public funds. funds for creating more attractive environmental terms.

Innovative outcomes Important role of the University of Miskolc, as knowledge centre. High number of researchers, publications in scientific journals. Low level of innovation potential. Relatively low rate of high tech companies, slow evolution phases. Low rate in number of high tech patent applications per inhabitant, lack of incubators.

Fostering transversal and vertical innovation. Better innovation opportunities of firms.

Lack of coordination between the sectors. Lack of funds for improving innovative terms of environment.

40


Access to finance

S

W

O

T

Human capital

More and more RnD interests of multinational enterprises (e.g. Bosch).

University of Miskolc has several There are several entities for internationally known professors in different supporting of innovation and RnD fields of industry. activities. Several internationally known industrial RnDs are already done. There are several departments named and financed by multi. Only a few enterprises Majority of those involved in RnD are There are no business incubators, no presence in RnD activity. involved in the education. spin-offs from the University No business angels. Only cca 40% of the students are studying (because of the legislation). Very low venture capital RnD intensive studies. There are no knowledge intensive investments. There is not enough capacity in Miskolc for business services. the talented students. Available EU funds for RnD International co operations are good with There are several ongoing activities. other Universities. international projects focusing for The multinational Because of the heritage of the Uni, the keen RnD activities. enterprises generate and of cooperation between the ex- students are finance RnD projects. high. There are on-going EU funded developments for RnD activities. The effect of the crisis is Because of the less RnD activity the The entities for technology transfer still high. migration of talents from Miskolc is even and for innovation support became There are less and less higher. not active because the EU funding SMEs who have the opportunities has finished. possibility to start any RnD activities.

Quality of infrastructure

S

W

O

T

Technology transfer

The majority of the inhabitants and the SMEs have large band access. The cost of living in Miskolc is low, the quality of transport is good. There is a new industrial park in Miskolc with large band net. There is no airport (but in Debrecen and in Kosice there is).

Legal and regulatory framework It is quite simple to start a new business.

The regulations for a SMEs is problematic (cca 30 authorities are able to inspecting one SME). High taxation, the continuous analysis of the tax office is frustrating. There is no patent office, and no lawyers for patents. A new taxation regulation is already made by the government.

Thanks to the EU funds the road infrastructure will be renovated and developed. There is a new infrastructure of geoenergy, which generate RnD activities and less living costs. Available EU funding to develop more intensively the infrastructure. The development of Miskolc has already behind of - There is no change in the governmental mentality and Hungary, and because of the crisis, might be worse. everything became more bureaucratic

41


6. SPAIN : Castilla y León Strategic goals for the next years - Attracting, recruiting and keeping specialised personnel - Incentives to the research capability of universities, and self-development of this kind of research - Participation in national and international networks, technology platforms, and R&D and Innovation programmes - Fostering of existing financial tools and development of new tools adapted to the needs of SME - Support to the identification of knowledge-based business ideas - Establishment of innovative business clusters 5 main sectors in Castilla y León - Agro-food - Automotive - ICT - Energy - Chemistry

Region’s profile Indicator

Value

Population

2,60 millions (2010)

Density

27 inhabitants per km².

Average annual population growth

0,97%

Employment

998.000 (2010)

GDP

57.279.525 (2010)

GDP per capita

22.030 (2010)

Unemployment rate

15.78% (2010)

Productivity (GDP/worker)

57.394 (2010)

Average annual growth of GDP

+1,0% (2010)

5 main sectors in Castilla y León - Agro-food - Automotive - ICT - Energy - Chemistry 42


Diversity of activities - Castilla y Le贸n is a medium-high specialized area Name

Employment in your region

Industry 1

agro-food

38000

0,436781609 0,190778174

Industry 2 industry 3

automotive ICTs

30000 8000

0,344827586 0,118906064 0,091954023 0,008455542

6000 5000 87000

0,068965517 0,004756243 0,057471264 0,003302946

Industry 4 energy Industry 5 chemistry Total HHI Medium-high specialization level

Share

Share虏

0,326198969

Maturity of industries rate year 2 (2006) Industry 1 Industry 2 industry 3 Industry 5

rate year 3 (2007)

-0,009179927 0,007728639 0,077097506 0,018018018

-0,003069368 0,010830325 0,026490066 0,008928571

rate year 4 (2008)

rate year 5 (2009)

-0,014953271 -0,019371229 -0,227580813 0,0668937 -0,848979592 0,111245466 -0,018181818 -0,044303797

Average -0,00931476 -0,02842563 -0,12682931 -0,00710781

Regional transition matrix

Industry 1 Industry 2 industry 3 Industry 4 Industry 5

nb of employees in the region 38000 30000 8000 6000 5000

weight of the nb of employees in industry in the the region five region years ago 0,079166667 35200 0,0625 40000 0,016666667 7000 0,0125 5300 0,010416667 4700

weight of the industry in the region five years ago 0,07 0,09 0,01 0,01 0,01

Evolution 0,05 -0,36 0,11 0,10 0,04

Relative positioning and sector relatedness

Transition Analysis 20,00%

Energy

Agro-food

ICTs

10,00% 0,00% Chemistry -0,02 0,02 -10,00% 0

0,04

0,06

0,08

0,1

-20,00% -30,00% -40,00%

Automotive

-50,00%

43


Reference regions selected The agro-food sector represents the 18% of the employment in Castilla-La Mancha and the 30% GDP of the region. It is its main industry. Other relevant industry in Castilla y León is ICTs. They have similar specialization and mature level.

Indicators (INE, Instituto Nacional de Estadística) Evolution (2010)

of

population

Castilla y León

Castilla la Mancha

Andalucía

2,559,515 inhabitants -0,16%

2,098,373 inhabitants 0,82%

8,370,975 inhabitants. 0,82%

Migration rate (2009)

-2,997 internal inmigrants. 1,089 Spanish foreign inmigrants. 14,455 foreign inmigrants.

6,691 internal inmigrants. 577 Spanish foreign inmigrants. 18,325 foreign inmigrants.

2,150 internal inmigrants. 2,991 Spanish foreign inmigrants. 60,814 foreign inmigrants.

GDP per capita

22,475.00 €

17,573.00 €

17,498.00 €

Unemployment rate (2010)

15.78%.

21.33%.

28.35%.

Growth of GDP and employment

-3,0% (GDP Growth) 15.78% (unemployment rate)

-2,9% (GDP Growth) 21.33% (unemployment rate)

-4,0% (GDP Growth) 28.35% (unemployment rate)

Access to finance indicators R&D intensity

Castilla y León

Castilla la Mancha

Andalucía

1.12 (2009)

Public R&D investment at regional levels GERD

1,26 2007.

0,72 2007.

1,03 2007.

Private R&D investment at national and regional levels BERD as % of GERD

62% 2007.

56.2% 2007.

33.6% 2007.

Access to human capital and human capital mobility indicators

Castilla y León

Castilla la Mancha

Andalucía

Personnel working in R&D as % of total employee

4.7% 2008.

1.5% 2008.

10.8% 2008.

27,873.01 € 2009.

27,302.28 € 2009.

28,398.00 € 2009.

Net labour costs

44


Quality of infrastructure indicators

Castilla y León

Castilla la Mancha

Andalucía

with

50.3%. 2011.

53.6%. 2011.

54.5%. 2011.

Rate of household with large band access

47.1%. 2011.

51.9%. 2011.

52.9%. 2011.

Rate of SMEs with large band

97.3%.

97.2%.

97.4%.

access

2011.

2011.

2011.

541,713. 2009.

15,127. 2009.

18,748,561. 2009.

Rate of household internet access

Airport: number of foreign passengers per year

Strengths  Institutional experience in R&D and Innovation policies  Increasing R&D expenditure (both public and private):  Strong university system in key areas for social and productive sectors  qualified human resources in R&D+I activities  Improvement and availability of industrial, scientific and technological infrastructures.  Strenghthening among regional Innovation System agents  Evolution of the economic structure: - Development of innovative/emerging sectors - More innovative products in consolidated sectors.  Increase of Innovative companies: 1800  Increase of Innovative companies participation in R&D National, European and International cooperation programmes

Weaknesses  Lack of big industrial groups – mostly SMEs  Need of transition to emerging sectors of added value  Difficulties in technology transfer: University – private sector. Scientific activity is not enough oriented to businesses’ needs.  Need of private funding for R&D+I private activities.  Need of more human resources specialized in R&D+I in the private sector.  Still low internationalization of the R&D sector.  Low level of patents, specially in SMEs.

Opportunities  Leadership of the region in future trending sectors: renewable energy, agrofood biotechnology, new mechanisms of production, etc.  Globalization of the economy allows the region to promote their products or projects.  Increase of resources allocated to European R&D programmes.  Increasing demand of cultural and Spanish language.  Development of national and European technology platforms and innovative business clusters.

Threats  Reduction of structural funds.  Increasing competition for public R&D funds at European and Spanish level (as a consequence of economic globalization).  The current economic situation has derived in a lack of credit facilities, which limits the development of innovative companies.

45


Justification of the identified and selected Best Practices on the basis of the SWOT Strengths identified in the SWOT

Best Practices contributing to the strengths

Weaknesses identified in the SWOT

Best Practices to be studied and adapted

Institutional experience in R&D and Innovation policies

Specific Unit of Identification and Monitoring of European and International consortia – helps SMEs in the region to get in touch with European consortia in which they could take part.

Lack of big industrial groups – mostly SMEs

SPINNER 2013 – Interventions for the qualification of human resources in the field of Research and technological innovation. It is the programme established by Emilia-Romagna Region to support young individuals in the field of research and technological innovation and for the creation of a community capable of placing the individual at the core of its innovation processes for future community and knowledge economy development.

Strong university system in key areas for social and productive sectors  qualified human resources in R&D+I activities

R&D and Innovation Managers Training Programme – it is an initiative started up by the Regional Government of Castilla y León through ADEuropa Foundation, with the objective of incorporating in enterprises and SMEs in the region, human resources specialized in R&D and Innovation management, that will facilitate SMEs participation in Innovation projects.

Need of transition to emerging sectors of added value

“Club action Brevet” (Chamber of Commerce French Riviera) – Club of regional companies with the objective of discussing themes related to innovative issues with Industrial Property experts.

Difficulties in technology transfer: University – private sector. Scientific activity is not enough oriented to businesses’ needs.

Valor’Innov: coaching-traing collective program designed by the French Riviera Chamber of Commerce dedicated to innovative projects in SMEs: 1. validation of the potential novelty and marketability of the innovation. 2. Aligns the organizational configuration of SMEs with strategic choices addressed by the project, and 3. initiates the implementation of the prohect to put SMEs “on track”.

Improvement and availability of industrial, scientific and technological infrastructures.

46


Strengths identified in the SWOT

Best Practices contributing to the strengths

Weaknesses identified in the SWOT

Strenghthening among regional Innovation System agents

Need of private funding for R&D+I private activities.

Evolution of the economic structure: Development of innovative/emerging sectors. More innovative products in consolidated sectors.

Need of more human resources specialized in R&D+I in the private sector.

Increase of Innovative companies: 1800

Still low internationalization of the R&D sector.

Increase of Innovative companies participation in R&D National, European and International cooperation programmes

Low level of patents, specially in SMEs.

Best Practices to be studied and adapted

47


7. GREECE: North Aegean Region Strategic Plan for the Development of Research, Technology and Innovation 2007-2013 Strategic Plan for the Development of Research, Technology and Innovation 2007-2013 continues the tradition of focusing on infrastructure development for the North Aegean region. The key priorities are: -

improvement of transportation links (ports, airports, roads) protection on the environment, which is the key economic resource for the region. Investments in waste management, water supply management and sewage infrastructure will receive priority funding - focus on the ‘green’ economy, with particular emphasis on tourism and agriculture (organic products, commercialization of unique local products, etc.) - Investments in technology will be mostly allocated to infrastructure projects, such as the development of broadband networks and Wi-Fi infrastructure for businesses The implementation of these region-specific plans will be guided by the recently updated EU Regional Innovation Scoreboard, in order to better allocate funds and ensure that measurable returns are actually achieved.

Region’s profile Indicator

Value

Population

200.517

Density

54 inh/km2

Average annual population growth

-0.3%

Employment

58.6%

GDP

€ 3.0 bn

GDP per capita

€ 14,545.00 (2007)

Unemployment rate

11.9%

Productivity (GDP/worker)

€ 37,857.00 (2009)

Average annual growth of GDP

- 1.6%

North Aegean’s 3 major sectors -

Agriculture, Forestry & Fishing Wholesale & Retail Trade Hotels & Restaurants

48


Diversity of activities Diversification/specialisation

Name

Share

Share²

Industry 1

Wholesale & Retail Trade

0.154

0.023716

Industry 2

Agriculture, Forestry & Fishing

0.125

0.015625

industry 3

Hotels & Restaurants

0.100

0.01

Total HHI

0.049

Reference regions selected (and NUTS 2 region; Eurostat) Main criteria: - geographical similarities to our region (e.g. regions that include islands, or regions that are only comprised of islands) - area size - population size - population density (per sq. km). The unique profile of the region inhibited a close match that could satisfy all or most of the above criteria. The following table indicates the short-list of candidate reference regions. Country

Region

Area (km2)

Population

Greece Belgium UK

North Aegean Luxembourg Cornwall and Isles of Scilly

3,836 4,443 3,563

200,517 261,178 534,300

Indicators Evolution of population (10 years) Migration rate GDP per capita (2007) Employment rate (2009) GDP per worker (2009) Growth of GDP (2006-2007)

North Aegean Region -2.1 % N/A € 14,545 58.6% € 37,857 -1.6%

Population density (per km2) 52.27 59.00 150.00

Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Region 8.9% N/A € 21,595 69.5% € 43,468 5.8%

49


Justification of the identified and selected Best Practices on the basis of the SWOT Strengths identified in the SWOT

* Strong evaluation process.

Best Practices contributing to the strengths

Weaknesses identified in the SWOT

Aegean Technopolis

* Not very well known

* Innovation-focused organizational structure: Board of Directors, Experts Committee, Evaluation Committee, Support services (business planning, public relations, accounting)

Access to finance

S

Public R&D investment but limited to infrastructure projects Presence of all Greek banks, with full array of financial products

W

No venture capital firms No business angels Very low private R&D investments Very low venture capital investments

O

Access to EU funds Access to Greek government funds Large community of emigrated Aegean inhabitants who may be willing to invest in their motherland Large number of Greek shipowners who were born and raised in the Aegean islands and may be willing to invest in improving the economic profile of the region Economic crisis, that makes the fight for financing even more difficult There is an on-going restructuring of the regional public sector in Greece that may delay processing and awarding of public funds

T

Best Practices to be studied and adapted

* VALOR'INNOV: collective program for the valorization of * Operating in a very difficult innovation in SMEs economic environment * ECOBIZ * Not many links with local centres of innovation (e.g. * IPN Incubator Model University of the Aegean)

Human capital

Technology transfer

University of the Aegean - about 600 Aegean Technopolis is the technology researchers in various fields (from park of the region (however, its scale is business administration to industrial still very limited) design) In 2009, 5,000 workers were involved in science & technology (education, occupation). Majority of those involved in science & No business incubators, either private or technology are involved in the education public part The majority of students come from outside the region and they return to their home regions after graduation Very limited number of foreign postgraduate students No executive education Limited life-long education New funding from the Greek government New funding from the Greek specifically targeting life-long education in government to boost innovation the region through development of a regional business incubator

The economic crisis may lead to There is an on-going restructuring of the decreasing number of people (and regional public sector in Greece that especially skilled workers) that stay or may delay the development and want to move into this rather isolated implementation of relevant policies and region. initiatives

50


Economic competitiveness of the region

S

W

O

T

Entrepreneurship performance

Innovative outcomes

Good quality and variety of local agricultural products. Several of them are labelled as PDO (Protected Designation of Origin) Rich culture Pristine environment Low productivity across many of the industries in the region Basic infrastructure facilities require further improvements (ports, roads, etc.) New energy sources (or expansion of existing ones) are needed Ageing population

SMEs that commercially exploit local The University of the Aegean plays an agricultural products. For example, mastic increasingly important role in the production in Chios is a global monopoly promotion of innovation of the region (however, it lacks significant links to the businesses of the region)

Protection and strategically planned exploitation of natural and cultural resources Improvements in transportation links with the rest of Greece/Europe in order to contain the “psychology of isolation” that may deprive businesses active in the region from reaching their true potential Turning its “frontier region” position into a position of “port of entry” to Europe The country is hard-hit by the economic crisis. Current efforts are focused more on containing public deficit rather than achieving growth (although this is changing)

Strengthening the links between the University of the Aegean and the business firms of the region, especially in terms of supporting life-long education of local workforce Greek government (and EU) funding for linking SMEs to the University and other R&D institutions New funding from the Greek government to boost innovation through development of a regional business incubator

Low degree of cooperation among the industry sectors active in the industry Small firms, mostly focusing on the region’s markets (which are small too) Average educational level of the region’s workforce Highly educated personnel is usually transient in the region and/or is not offered enough opportunities that will enable such workers to reside permanently in the region Gender inequalities in terms of access to the labour markets of the region Expand the region’s tourism industry Increase cooperation among the region’s firms in order to lower their respective costs of operation, as well as develop joint products and services Be more outward-facing when thinking about new markets for the region’s products and services EU funding opportunities Better links with the University of the Aegean, the region’s fairly recently established academic and research institution

Low adoption of new information technologies No recent patents or patent applications No high tech companies (as defined by NACE 24.4, 30, 32, 33, 35.3) Almost no medium tech companies (as defined by NACE 24, 29, 31, 34, 35.2, 35.4, 35.5)

Local businesspeople and entrepreneurs find Local workforce finds it difficult to adapt it difficult to differentiate their products and to technological innovations in their services from those offered by the respective fields competition (within and outside Greece) Local workforce finds it difficult to adapt to technological innovations in their fields

51


Quality of infrastructure

S

W

O

T

Broadband connections, both for households and SMEs, is on the up, due to subsidized connectivity plans Airports in several of the islands in the region (Chios, Mytilini, Samos, Ikaria, Limnos) Ports in all islands Cost of living Basic infrastructure facilities require further improvements (ports, roads, etc.) New energy sources (or expansion of existing ones) are needed Improvements in transportation links with the rest of Greece/Europe in order to contain the â&#x20AC;&#x153;psychology of isolationâ&#x20AC;? that may deprive businesses active in the region from reaching their true potential

Legal and regulatory framework Lower tax regime than mainland Greece

As for the rest of the country, significant bureaucracy in starting or closing a business No patent application office

New legal framework proposed by the Greek government in order to enable fast-start of new business ventures New legislation for SME development in Greece, with significant tax subsidies New structure of regional public administration that is operating since 1/1/2011, leaving space for new ideas and propositions The country is hard-hit by the economic crisis. Current efforts The region stays entangled in existing bureaucracy are focused more on containing public deficit, with corresponding cuts on infrastructure development initiatives

52


8. DENMARK: Capital Region Regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s profile Indicator

Value

Population

1,687,454 inhabitants

Density

504 inh/km2

Average annual population growth

2.782 per year (0,38% of 2010-inh)

GDP per capita

373,500 DKK

Productivity (GDP/worker)

456,000 DKK

Average annual growth of GDP

2.3%

Capital Region of Denmarkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 5 major sectors -

Food Life sciences Tourism and events ICT Cleantech

The Capital Region of Copenhagen is characterized by a diversified and service based economy. In fact the manufacturing industry has decreased from an important source of income to a situation where Copenhagen now has the lowest employment share in manufacturing (13%) and the largest employment share in the services sector (86%) among European cities. Also the region boosts high import and export shares and the economy is diversified into several sectors. Copenhagen, as would be expected, features the highest degree of regional specialisation in Denmark. However, it should be noted that Denmark as a whole has a low degree of regional economic specialisation when compared to other OECD countries. In 2003, the score for economic specialisation in Denmark was 0.21 countries against 0.31 for the total of OECD countries.

53


Cluster

Share of regional employment in the Capital Region of Denmark

Food ITC Life sciences Cleantech Tourism and events

12.3 %1 4.5 %2 2.5 – 3.4 %3 2.1 %*4 5.1 %5

Export Intensity – share of export in the cluster (National figure) 36 % 20 % 43 % N/A** 13 %

Maturity of industries The Capital Region of Denmark can generally be said to be a dynamic region bordering on mature with regards to its business structure. According to the OECD, the region s economic base is characterised by a low rate of specialisation in technology-intensive industries with the exception of life sciences. Strong export sector in the region include transport and logistics, business services, agricultural products, processed food, life sciences, production technology. Weak export sector where there is a relatively high employment in the region include tourism and ICT6. The fact that the Capital Region in Denmark is somewhere between a dynamic region and mature region is also evident from the fact that the ability within innovation has started to lack behind in certain sectors. Whereas the industry is outstanding when it comes to process and user driven innovation there is an immediate need to strengthen the ability to achieve product innovation as well as there is a need to strengthen research capabilities and the commercialisation of research7.The region is fully aware of this problem and the regions business development strategy for 2011-2013 is in many ways an answer to the specific problem of generating technology driven product innovation.

1

The size of the food cluster in Copenhagen is contentious pending on definition. If one only includes processed food the as is done in “Metropolens Globale Udfordringer – region Hovedstaden i den globale konkurrence” the share is only about 2-3%. However, the Øresund Food Network uses a more broad definition that includes ingredients producers, as well as the restaurant and catering business in the region. In this analysis it has been chosen to follow the definition as provided by the cluster initiative in the region. 2 Metropolens Globale Udfordringer – region Hovedstaden i den globale konkurrence 3 There is a small descripiancy between the size of the cluster as estimated by the Medicon Valley Alliance and the size of the cluster as indicated in the Metropolens Globale Udfordringer – Region Hovedstaden i den globale konkurrence. 4 Monitor Copenhagen Cleantech Cluster, 2010 5 Danmarks Internationale by – Wonderful Copenhagens Strategi for udviklingen af Hovedstaden turisme og oplevelsesøkonomi 6 Territorial Review Copenhagen, OECD 2009 7 Hovedstaden – Nordeuropas grønne, innovative vækstmotor’ - Erhvervsudviklingsstrategi for hovedstadsregionen

54


9. ROMANIA: Nord –Est Region

Improving research capacity in developing innovative institutions in the Nord –Est (North-East) Region to increase regional economic competitiveness Developing the capacity to be innovative enterprises, including through improving business support infrastructure Developing an innovative entrepreneurial culture in the Nord –Est (North-East) Region Improving human resources Indicator

Value

Population

3,734,546

Density

103

Average annual population growth

-1,31 (20072008)

Employment

2,285,422

GDP

10.882 million euro

GDP per capita

2.519

Unemployment rate

4.5%

Productivity (GDP/worker)

6,600

Average annual growth of GDP

5.6%

Nord –Est Region’s 2 major sectors -

Textile Industry

-

Wood Industry

55


Diversity of activities - Nord –Est Region: 5723+16.1 47+5.279 = 27149

No. employees Industry 1 – Textile

S1 = 27149/43919 S1= 0.61 S1² = 0.37

No. employees

15.544+1.226 = 16770

Industry 2 – Wood

S2 = 16770/43919 S2 = 0.38 S2² = 0.14

Total No. employees (Industry 1+Industry 2)

HHI   s i2

43919 (0.61)²+(0.38)²= 0.37+0.14= 0.51

0.3<0.51 < 1

Maturity of industries No. of net creation of companies, Nord –Est (North-East) Region, Romania Year 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

2006

No. new 11.227 enterprises

11.886

17.553

18.620

23.210

18.218

Entry rate

31.6

42.9

40.9

47.0

34.7

30.1

9.4% is the rate entry for the industry wide in the Nord-Est Region, - a low entry rate, and also nearly 20% failed companies (one year of existence), so it shows a high degree of maturity. Net creation of companies in industry (Nord –Est (North-East) Region, Romania) Year 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Industry

11.7

12.3

9.4

15.2

10.5

2006 9.4

Source: The socio-economic analyze of the Nord –Est (North-East) Region, 2007-2013, 2. CADRUL SOCIOECONOMIC, www.adrnordest.ro/.../1_2__CADRUL_SOCIO-ECONOMIC.pdf

56


Relative positioning and sector relatedness EVOLUTION

T. Clus TEXTILE W ter Cluster 1 . WOOD Cluster 2

RELATIVE WEIGHT

Reference regions selected (and NUTS 2 region; Eurostat) -

South-Est Region, Romania (RO22) Prov. West-Vlaanderen (BE25) Ita-Suomi (FI13)

Regional gross domestic product (PPS per inhabitant), (2006) 5800

NUTS 2

Population density

Regional gross domestic product (million Euro)

Regional gross domestic product (PPS per inhabitant in % of the EU27 average)

Nord â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Est (NorthEast) Region (RO 21)

10882 (2006)

24,7

7700

South -East Region (RO) Textile Prov. WestVlaanderen (BE25) Textile

103.3 /km2 (2006) 103 /km2 (2008) 91.1/km2

10897

32,5

365.2 /km2 (2006) 366.6 /km2 (2008) 9.5 /km2 (2006) 9 /km2 (2008)

32556

111

15617

85

26300

20200

Ita-Suomi (FI13) Wood and wood products

57


Economic Entrepreneurship competitivenes performance s of the region

S-

The Nord –Est(North-East) Region is the largest of the eight development regions of Romania, its potential can be used for infrastructure development, rural areas, tourism and human resources, access to the region by air is provided by international airports (Bacau, Iasi, Suceava); The existence of Textile Cluster Astrico The emergence of Wood Cluster

-

-

The most employment growth in the SME sector, 7 business incubators -

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Innovative outcomes

In terms of volume of innovation expenditure by enterprises, Nord –Est (NorthEast) Region recorded a 8,45% share, ranking the 3rd among developing regions; Nationally, in 2006-2008, a third of Romanian companies are among the companies with innovative technology or non-technological innovation and twothirds were non-innovative enterprises, registering a progress compared to previous years8. A rate of 19,7% of enterprises have been technological innovators (products and processes by introducing new or significantly improved); a percentage of 13.6% of the enterprises are non-technological innovators (implementing new methods in business practices of businesses, workplace organization in external relations and new marketing methods); Among the technological innovators, one of eight companies has innovated a product, one of three companies has innovated a process and about one in two companies developed and implemented as both products and processes. Nontechnological innovators have implemented and developed more than marketing organizational innovations; There is a relatively small percentage of companies in which it was indicated the absence of innovative approaches, lower than in previous years (19,38% in 2006 compared to 21,18% in 2008); It may be noted the small percentage of firms (0,5%) who have not completed or abandoned innovation; The analysis reveals that Romania is relatively efficient in transforming innovation inputs into Application outputs. Romania performed relatively well in Applications of Innovations, where it was above the EU average in terms of Sales of new-to-firm products. There is a growing concern of SMEs for innovation activities (in 2009 compared with 2008); There is a growing number of SMEs are equipped computer9 (83,26% in 2006 compared to 82,25% in 2008), Internet access (81,44% in 2006 compared to 72,93% in 2008) and use e-mail for communication (72,52% in 2006 compared to 61,07% in 2008); A percentage of 36,58% of SMEs have the Intranet (from 21,50% in 2008), a rate of 16,20% (against 11,54% in 2008) have their own website and in the to 11,01% of the units are completed on-line transactions (compared to 6,77% in 2008); The percentage of turnover from the sale of innovative products is similar to that obtained by SMEs in the European Union; At regional level, in 2006-2008, the highest share of innovative enterprises was owned by macro-region 2 (45.9%), including regions of the Nord –Est (NorthEast) Region and South-East Region { Macro-Region 3 including Bucharest-Ilfov Region and South-Muntenia Region - 34.2%; Macro-Region 1 including NorthWest and Central Region - 29% and Macroregion 4 - South West and West Oltenia – 22,6%); In terms of volume of innovation expenditure by enterprises, the Nord–Est (North-East) Region recorded a 8,45% share, ranking the 3rd among developing regions; In the Nord–Est (North-East) Region have been developed following business

8

cf. Institutul Naţional de Statistică, comunicat de presă nr. 153 / 2010, http://www.insse.ro/cms/files/statistici/comunicate/com_trim/Inov_ind/inov_ind_serv_10r.pdf 9 Romanian National Council of Small and Medium Private http://www.cnipmmr.ro/presa/conferinte/30.07.2009/Inovarea_si_informatizarea_in_IMM_30.07.2009.pdf

Enterprises,

58


infrastructure projects PHARE CES 2000: Park infrastructure development business for SMEs and private entrepreneurs in Bacau (HIT Hemeius Industrial Park), University of Innovation Center and park business infrastructure development for SMEs and private investors - TEHNOPOLIS Science); Phare 2001 (business incubator for SMEs in Botosani; Center Economic Bucovina Suceava); Phare 2002 (Business Center Tutova-Barlad, Vaslui) , Phare 2004-2006 (Business Resource Center - Vaslui, Iasi Moldova Exhibition Centre). -

Economic Entrepreneurship competitiveness performance of the region

W-

-

-

-

-

Nord â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Est(North-East) Region is one of the poorest region in Europe10, 6.600 GDP per capita, 26.6%as % of EU-27 average ; The share of economic growth is inferior than national level. Regional gross domestic product per capita in 2006,is the lowest among all regions, representing 64.48% of the gross domesticproduct per capita nationwide ; Low percentage of SMEs per capita ; Low rate entry companies ; Negative occupied population growth rate ; Low

Low share of SMEs in the manufacturing and services -( except for trade and public catering); Lack of implementation of the knowledge of marketing, management, quality assurance to entrepreneurs and managers in the region; Lack of specific knowledge in business development and creation of new jobs12 Concentration of major investments, especially in some cities (Onesti, Roman, Barlad, Dorohoi Pascani, Vatra Dornei); Low level of industrialization of wood; Insufficient promotion of the -

Innovative outcomes

The main source of competitiveness is the low cost and no degree of innovation of products and technologies; Percentage of innovative enterprises in all enterprises was only 33,3%. Only a proportion of 2,4% of firms are product innovators (formerly innovative new products 24,7%); 6,6% have implemented the new processes (14,3%); (10,3%) of enterprises have implemented both types of innovations, both products and processes13; The largest share of the costs of innovation holds the purchase of machinery, equipment and software (8684.9 million). R & D expenses are small (867.6 million lei for internal R & D activities and the amount of 582.9 million lei for foreign R & D activities. Smallest share of expenditure on acquisition of other external knowledge (licenses, patents, knowhow, etc.); Romania is below the level of countries in Central and South-Eastern Europe on R & D intensity14 (in 2007 - 0.53% of GDP); Romania performed less well in Knowledge creation and Intellectual Property15; SMEs in Romania are below the level of those of the Member States as percentage of investment dedicated to innovation and utilization of information technology16, less than 0,5% (0,49%); New technologies come largely from imports or direct foreign investments and not from the local effort; It was recorded a low use of sources of information for innovative products from universities and other institutions of higher education (3%) and government research institutions 17(2%); Compared with large firms, small and medium-sized firms are less innovative, six in ten large companies are innovative and only three in ten small and medium enterprises. Analysis by sector innovation highlights the fact that industry is more innovative than services (even the services sector is greater than industry sector); Romanian companies do not cooperate sufficiently. Only 2,7% of enterprises have cooperated to achieve innovative activities, the main cooperation partners were suppliers of equipment, materials, components or software. The rate of cooperation for innovation at national and European level, but also with other countries is low: at the national level is 12,9%, at European level is 7,6%; cooperation with the United States of America is 1,4%; China and India is 0,8% and other countries is 0,6%. Small compared with large enterprises cooperate weaker;

10 Economically weakest NUTS-2 regions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_the_European_Union#Economically_weakest_NUTS-2_regions

59


infrastructure 11, 55% of road infrastructure in the region isbelow the minimum acceptable standards 2004 -

region's investment potential;

-

-

-

-

-

Only 13,8% of all innovative firms have cooperative arrangements for innovation; Lack of cooperation between universities and innovative companies. Low cooperation with universities and government institutions or public research institutes (only 5,1% of the enterprises, of which 3,5% are small, 5,3% are medium-sized enterprises, 14,7% are large enterprises, 4,9 % in industry and 5,4% in services sector); Share of SMEs applying methods of protecting intellectual property rights is less than that of large enterprises; Lack of effectiveness of science parks - poor cooperation with the providers of knowledge. Institutional sources consulted are less (only a percentage of 3,7% of the companies prefer universities as sources of information and only a percentage of 4,3% of companies are turning to sources of information provided by government or public research institutions18 (information sources to support the innovation process have been obtained by in house staff or group of companies (44,6%) and suppliers of equipment, materials, components and software19 (33,0%); Only a low percentage of firms (2,7%) has a partnership for innovation with universities / institutions of higher education and only 2.6% of them have partnerships with government and research institutes; Of the total innovation expenditure only 14,1% were spent for research and development; In 2006, in Nord –Est (North-East) Region the expenditure of public funds (62,26%) has a much higher than those of companies (31,06%); the situation is different from 2000-2004 when the region Nord –Est (North-East) private spending were over 50%; The Nord-Est Region has a relatively low level regarding the patent applications to the EPO per million inhabitants – 0,27 in 2004 (the highest level is owned by Bucuresti – Ilfov – 4,96).

-

12 Regiunea de dezvoltare nord-est. Planul de dezvoltare regionala Volumul 2 - Strategia de dezvoltare regionala - www.adrnordest.ro/.../Strategia%20de%20Dezvoltare%20Regionala%20NordEst4.pdf 13 http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/statistics_explained/index.php?title=File:Proportion_of_innovative_enterprises_which_introduc ed_products_new_to_the_market_or_owndeveloped_process_innovations,_2006_(%25_of_enterprises_within_size_class_or_total).PNG&filetimestamp=20100531132423 14

http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/cache/ITY_OFFPUB/KS-32-10-225/EN/KS-32-10-225-EN.PDF

15

http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/cache/ITY_OFFPUB/KS-EM-09-001/EN/KS-EM-09-001-EN.PDF http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/portal/pls/portal/!PORTAL.wwpob_page.show?_docname=36126.PNG 17 http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/cache/.../KS-SF-07-116-EN.PDF 16

18

19

http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/cache/.../KS-SF-07-116-EN.PDF cf. Sergiu-Valentin PARVAN, Statistics in focus SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 81/2007, European Communities, 2007

60


Economic competitiveness of the region

O

-

-

-

Entrepreneurship performance

Development of a Continuous-OrientedInnovative Strategies for Economic Recovery Resources in the Nord–Est (North-East) Region of Romania (DISCOVER NE ROMANIA); Romania's Government promoted the creation of the necessary basic infrastructure to improve the business environment in Romania and theprogram "Industrial Parks" (Ceahlău Mechanical Industrial Park, Neamt County, Botosani Industrial Park, established by the Association Electromining SC, SC ELECTROCONTACT, SC Mechanics), which aimed at stimulating regional economic investment to improve infrastructure, namely the organizationof industrial, scientific and technological facilities to create economic development activtităţii. The opportunity of the European funds

Innovative outcomes

Development of -a Continuous-Oriented Innovative Strategies for Economic Recovery Resources in the Nord– Est (North-East) Region of Romania (DISCOVER NE ROMANIA); Romania has introduced a new scheme known as 'Start', which developed entrepreneurial skills among young people and helps them access finance. It had a total budget of €21.2 million in 2009. Support for entrepreneurship in schools and universities is conducted through the Minister of Education, Research and Youth.

Implementation of the National Plan for Research, Development and Innovation 2007 2013 with a role in developing science and technology to increase economic competitiveness, improving social quality and increase recovery potential of knowledge and broaden the horizon of action20; Different invention salons (Research Fair, Inventika, etc..) which award and motivates innovation activity. Several diagnosis of national innovation which indicate the preoccupation in promoting and supporting of innovation activities.

-

-

T

Economic competitiveness of the region

Entrepreneurship performance

Geographical and historical conditionshave led to a serious to remain behind of the Nord –Est (North-East) Region, in socio-economic terms; -

The lower entrepreneurship spirit of that region, Lack of functionality of legislation to encourage SMEs The fragility of the market economy, industrial structure, due to the use of obsolete technology, low productivity and economic efficiency21;

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Innovative outcomes

The economic crisis led to lower spending on research and development and innovation and/or exit from the market of many SMEs; Implementing new technologies – 27% managers are most affected by such difficulties 22 Lack of cooperation between higher education institutions and potential investors23;

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20

http://www.mct.ro/img/files_up/1188313421PN2%20ro.pdf

21 idem 22 23

ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/flash/fl196_en.pdf 61


Access to finance

S

-

W-

Human capital

Authorities 45% of Romanian employees have played a bigger completed a degree at an institution of role in public higher education (at national level). funding of innovative enterprises than the central government;

Managers report that innovation in their enterprise was constrained byexpensive or limited financing opportunities (24%) -

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Technology transfer

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In the Nord–Est (North-East) Region operates 7 business incubators and 33 counseling centers ; There are 2 industrial parks ; There is a tendency for companies to invest in machinery, equipment and software. In the Nord –Est (North-East) Region it is 88,02 % of these costs, being higher national average (which is 62,18%) ; A positive aspect is the bigger share of the private sector in financing R & D expenditure, compared with the 10 new EU member states ;

A relatively low level regarding the Ineffective and inefficient functioning of industrial percentage of human resources in parks, with deficiencies at the structural level; science and technology (HRSTO), 13,4% in 2007 (the highest level is owned by Bucuresti – Ilfov – 34,78%) ; The Nord- East Region is part of Macroregiunea doi RO2, witch is between the 20 lowest regions (in 1,000) regarding the employment in high-tech manufacturing and in knowledge- intensive services: 32.8 (2006). A relatively low level of the researchers as a percentage of persons employed24 (0,19% in 2006); the highest level is owned by BucurestiIlfov (1,46%); The number of employees in research activities has decreased; Increasing average age of highly qualified staff work for R&D, so that those aged over 40 years represents the currently approximately 60% of total researchers.

24 http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/portal/page/portal/publications/regional_yearbook

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Access to finance

O-

-

-

-

-

EU funds play an importantrole in ensuring access to finance for SMEs in Romania. The government has introduced a National Credit Guarantee Fund for small firms and this has been used to cover the risk associated with currency fluctuations, as well as to ensure co-financing of projects funded through European Structural Funds. The European Investment Bank (EIB) has also supported Romania through the Jeremie initiative, which has seen €100 million transferred as financial capital to aRomanian fund. Support for entrepreneurship in schools and universities is conducted through the Minister of Education, Research and Youth. The government has also decided to develop new legislation which it hopes will reduce red tape for SMEs. New laws now provide companies with protection against bankruptcy, and ensure that companies will not be refused credit by banks due to insolvency25 .

Human capital

Technology transfer

There is an increased orientation of policies and funding instruments towards the consolidation of human resources and infrastructures for R&D and innovation, strengthening links between university, industry and R&D institutions and the participation of the private sector in R&D activities, as well as the international visibility of Romanian researchers; Number of people who graduated from higher education institutions: 1.37 million people (7% of the total number), nationwide -

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The existence of the public clusters, created through public policies can be approached as opportunities for innovation; Romania's Government promoted the creation of the necessary basic infrastructure to improve the business environment in Romania and the program "Industrial Parks" (Ceahlău Mechanical Industrial Park, Neamt County, Botosani Industrial Park, established by the Association Electromining SC, SC Electrocontact, SC Mechanics), which aimed at stimulating regional economic investment to improve infrastructure, namely the organization of industrial, scientific and technological facilities to create economic development; The existence of several research and development programs: Research Program of Excellence (CEEX), National Plan for Research, Development and Innovation (PNCDI I), core research and development programs, research grants program, the Sectoral Plan MEdCT CD - NASR, INFRATECH program, the IMPACT program ; There are numerous research units: CD units, institutions of higher education, agricultural stations and businesses ; During 2001-2006 in the Nord –Est (North-East) Region were set up 12 Centres of Excellence in the following universities: University Al.I. Cuza University, Technical University Gh Asachi Iasi University of Medicine and Pharmacy Gr.T Popa Iasi ; During 2001-2006, were acreddited 79 research centers in the Nord –Est (North-East) Region, located at the University Al.I. Cuza University, Technical University Gh Asachi Iasi University of Medicine and Pharmacy Gr.T Popa Iasi, Bacau University and the University "Stefan cel Mare" Suceava ; National Council of Private Small and Medium Enterprises in Romania (CNIPMMR) supports tax incentives for research and development. Study subjects of entrepreneurship in universities ; The existence of academic centers with expertise in high-potential research – development.

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25 (http://www.euractiv.com/en/enterprise-jobs/eu-promote-sme-exports-news-496146)

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Access to finance

T-

24% of managers were most likely to report thatinnovation in their enterprise was constrained by expensive or limited financing opportunities 26 To attract FDI is negatively affected by poor accessibility to and from the rest of Europe, the rural character of the region, insufficient qualityof transport infrastructure and the perception of corruption and a difficult business environment.

-

Human capital The lack of appropriate labour is most striking for 48% of SMEs in Romania - At least half of SMEs have encountered difficulties of lack of skilled labour, Romania (53%) - Labour force too expensive - 72% of SMEs have encountered such difficulty27

Technology transfer The weak collaboration between universities and companies ;

26 ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/flash/fl196_en.pdf

27

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Quality of infrastructure

S

3 airports in the region (Bacau, Iasi, Suceava)

W

Low quality of infrastructure roads between the East-West areas of region; Low percentage of upgraded roads ; Low density railway lines per 1,000 sq km; The uneven distribution of electrified railways; The low number of localities where there is natural gas distribution systems and thermal energy; Underdeveloped telephone network in rural Poor development of infrastructure for recreational activities; Inadequate and outdated (moral and physical) in the food distribution systems, sewage and water treatment and waste management. Implementation of the National Plan for Research, Development and Innovation 2007 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2013 ; The existence of the feasibility study and the Ministry of Defense and visas Transport for converting airport in Bacau and Iasi international airport able to satisfy the requirements of the entire area The economic crises reduces the amount of public funds allocated to improve the quality of the infrastructure

O

T

Legal and regulatory framework improving legislation on obtaining a building permit; on bankruptcy and insolvency regime; trading across borders, to prevent abuses in closing a business and promoted the establishment of specialized courts in insolvency (the recovery rate is 33 cents to a dollar, compared to 69 cents per dollar of developed countries (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Romania is ranked as one of the last places in the number of taxes to be paid by a company (113 taxes28) worsing legislation on creating a business, closure a business, getting credits, protecting investors, enforcing contracts

numerous and frequent legislative changes affecting the business sector

28 http://www.doingbusiness.org/data/exploreeconomies/romania/

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PART 3: ERMIS BEST PRACTICES

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BEST PRACTICES CLASSIFICATION In order to provide help for the choices of the site visits the best practices have been grouped into 6 categories based on practical aspects:

CLASSIFICATION BY TYPE

S1. Tackling barriers and developing SMEs skills

BEST PRACTICES TITLE VALOR'INNOV: collective program for the valorization of innovation in SMEs Creative Conversion Factory Global Grant SPINNER 2013 United Brains ACCELERACE Specific Unit of Identification and Monitoring of European and International consortia

S2. Internationalization and mobilization of SMEs

R&D and Innovation Managers Training Programme BIOBUS: Biodiversity resources for innovative Business development Young Shoots Challenge Innovation Entrepreneurial Research Programs and Training ECOBIZ Collaborative Platform Club Action Brevet (CAB) - the Industrial Property Club Romagna Creative District

S3. Promoting networking and channeling information to SMEs

Mechatronic Club Connect Denmark

S4. SMEs participation in decision making and programming

Cesena Sustainable Energy Action Plan - planning and administrative tools to promote environmental innovation in SMEs Innovation Observatory of the Regional Union of the CoC of EmiliaRomagna and Innovation Report of the ForlĂŹ-Cesena CoC Holst Centre

S5. RDI infrastructure and cooperation serving SMEs

S6. complex LED and support for the external investments

IPN Model Robert Bosch Department of Mechatronics Aegean Technopolis CIMPACA Microelectronics Integrated Centre Science and Technology Park "TEHNOPOLIS Iasi, Romania Penela's territory policy of enhancing and promoting / Tourism Development Local FDI support system and one-stop shop services for companies

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French Best Practices Sophia-Antipolis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; French Riviera

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Best Practice 1: Valorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Innov â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Collective programme for the valorization of innovation in the SMEs VALOR'INNOV is a collective program dedicated to the detection, structuration and implementation of innovative "sleeping" projects in SMEs. It addresses the problem of low level of innovation of SMEs due to their their lack of critical mass and the difficulty for SME managers to devote the time necessary to: - Analyze of the true feasibility and innovative potential of the project. - Reconfigure the organization to foster the implementation of the project. - Lead change within the firm to implement the project. In a 360 degree approach covering all external (market forces, influencing factors, key success factors) and internal dimensions (degree of novelty of innovation, strategy, organizational configuration, strengths and weaknesses) of the company. - The level of risk of the project is analyzed. - To gaps to valorize the project are identified. - Operational processes impacted by the project are optimized. - An approach to change management and launch of the project is implemented. The programme is a mix of individual diagnostics and coaching with training (strategic management, change management) and cross-fertalization seminars. It gathers groups of 10 firms. Programme duration: 18 months. VALOR'INNOV is dedicated to: - Detect innovative projects (technological or non-technological innovations) in small firms that might not be implemented properly or in due time. - Validate the potential novelty and marketability of the innovation. - Align the organizational configuration of SMEs with strategic choices addressed by the project. - Initiate the implementation of the project to put SMEs "on track". Contact information ENEE Jean-Michael Chambre de Commerce et d'Industrie Nice CĂ´te d'Azur / maison des Entreprises 06902 Sophia Antipolis / France 33 (0)4 93 95 32 75 Jean-Michel.ENEE@cote-azur.cci.fr

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Best Practice 2: ECOBIZ Collaborative Platform

Ecobiz was designed to meet the following expectations from firms and economic development stakeholders: - networking, more synergies, cooperation and business exchange - facilitate access and circulation of information - federate initiatives dedicated to firm growth Objectives: - Stimulate economic development through cluster cross-fertilization - Valorize networking throughout the whole value chain - Strengthen networks visibility and cooperation Positioning: ECOBIZ - the network of networks - federate and structure communities - host existing professional networks - combination of virtual and physical networking (local events, forums, business platforms, speed business meetings) - cross-functional business intelligence - 40 ECOBIZ networks in France hosted by chambers of Commerce and economic development stakholders Functioning: - free and secured access - community leaders - creation of news & documents for content and practice sharing (expert inputs) - overall visibility of all events taking place on the territory with sceening and searching by multiple themes - member directory (by community, business, industry, expertise, territory, ...) - forums: direct discussions (free or confidential) between members - business platform: to promote products and services, look for partnerships, ... - a meta-search engine

Contact information Eric BARRAT Chambre de Commerce et Industrie Nice C么te Azur / 20 bd Carabacel / 06000 NICE / France Phone: 0033(0)4 93 13 75 46 e-mail: eric.barrat@cote-azur.cci.fr URL: www.cote-azur-ecobiz.fr

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Best Practice 3: Club Action Brevet (CAB) - the Industrial Property Club CAB was created in 2008. It has been designed in cooperation with the French Agency for Industrial Property in order to foster the culture and practices of the protection of innovations in French firms and specifically in SMEs. CAB is unique in France. The format and the content of CAB services have been exante designed with relevant stakeholders such as SMEs, large firms, R&D centers, IP lawyers, IP specialists. All major clusters of the territory were consulted (perfumes and flavours, ICT, microelectronics, life sciences, energy, ...). CAB objectives are: - inform innovative firms about the specific practices of IP dependent on industry and firm-specific contexts - stimulate IP policies and strategies within SMEs - sustain innovation protection strategies within SMEs - facilitate communities of practices between innovative firms, innovation management organizations and IP specialists CAB methodology: - Conferences: round tables with IP specialists and practitioners on transversal IP issues (8:30 to 11:30) - Debate meetings: debate moderated by an innovation specialist, involving innovation experts and CEOs. The format is designed to create communities of practice. The debate is followed by an "happy hour" cocktail to stimulate face to face discussions and cross-cooperation (17:00 to 19:30) - Patent intelligence (automatic IP intelligence on demand of club members) - IP individual coaching of SMEs to implement IP strategy - Patenting feasibility studies CAB community is hosted by ECOBIZ collaborative web platform which also provides business intelligence information and agenda of events of CAB Contact information WEBER Pauline, LILAS Michel Chambre de Commerce et d'Industrie Nice C么te d'Azur / maison des Entreprises 06902 Sophia Antipolis / France Phone: 0033(0)4 93 95 45 51 e-mail: pauline.weber@cote-azur.cci.fr; michel.lilas@cote-azur.cci.fr URL: http://www.cote-azur-ecobiz.fr/ccinca/cabaccueil.nsf/EXMHP?ReadForm

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Best Practice 4: Young Shoots Challenge Telecom Valley is an association that boosts the use of the Internet and mobility in the field of health, green-technology, tourism ... It has 140 members (SMEs, large groups, training and research organizations, institutional partners and intermediaries) and 225 volunteers. Working in project mode and commissions, Telecom Valley stimulates technological innovation in the euro-mediterranean and accelerates the adoption of IT usage and practice. the "Young shoots" challenge is a project led by Telecom Valley. Running for 9 years, competition for projects to create innovative company is open to students from all disciplines and backgrounds in the French Riviera. Thus, students meet in team training sessions and work together on the business plan of their project. Each team is coached and receives advice from experts in their fields which gives them the opportunity to develop their project in the best conditions. A semifinal is scheduled in March and the teams selected for the final receive a budget to help them realize their project. During 6 months, students are supervised by the steering committee. In the final, in October, teams present their project and the winners receive the Isabelle Attali prize representing an amount of 3000 euro for setting-up their business. Beyond this financial help, it is the discovery of the experience of entrepreneurship, the importance of networking and contact with experienced professionals who value the challenge. Objectives: -

Help and train young graduates to strengthen their entrepreneurship spirit

-

Gather students in multi disciplinary teams. Foster network development practices

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Participate in economic development of the French Riviera

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Coordinate actions of dissemination in the field of new ICT

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Sustain the development of innovative initiatives in Sophia Antipolis science park.

Contact information JosĂŠphine HERVE 2229 route des CrĂŞtes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 06560 SOPHIA ANTIPOLIS Phone: 0033 4 83 28 80 51 e-mail: j,herve@telecom-valley.fr URL: www.telecom-valley.fr/cjp

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Best Practice 5: CIMPACA Microelectronics Integrated Centre The PACA Microelectronics Integrated Centre is emerging as a structuring and grouping element for the Region's microelectronics sector. Start-ups, SMEs, large groups, laboratories and universities worked together to build a service center: this platform is a "compute farm" software access system, a unique innovation-assistance and operational tool for the region's start-ups. It is a place where scientists industrialists and researchers can use top-performance equipments, to enable them progress in thier fields and firms to shorten the time and the means needed to develop novel products and services. CIMPACA aims at investing further to ensure the equipment remains state of the art, acquire tools to continue its role in Microelectronics and aims at developing its interactions with other sectors as nuclear, space and optical-photonic sectors. Only tool to offer access to products of rival groups in secure conditions. By sharing human ressources and equipment and bringing together SMEs and laboratories, CIM PACA enables the sector to achieve economies of scale and improve its know-how and reinforces the innovative capacity of the sector. CIM PACA facilitates start-ups' R&D process until institutional investors provide seed and venture capital. Whithin 4 years (2005-2008) CIMPACA has mobilized nearly 65 million euros, of which 55% stemming from public funding and 45% from the private sector. Annuel fees to became a member of the ARCSIS CIM PACA • 4000 Euros HT for SME and Industries (between 10 to 250 employees and more) • 3333 Euros HT for the academics • 1000 Euros HT for SMEs (Less than 10 employees) • 500 Euros HT pour Start-Ups (incubated) Apart from pooled projects, the firms are invoiced according to their usage time. Softwares available : ANSOFT, CADENCE, COFLUENT DESIGN, CST, MATHWORKS, MENTOR GRAPHICS, SYNOPSYS Contact information Pierre BRICAUD and Catherine DEVY 505 route des Lucioles Sophia Antipolis Phone : 00 33 4 97 23 97 02 et +33 (0)4 92 38 85 27 e-mail : pierre.bricaud@synopsys.com URL: www.arcsis.org

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Italian Best Practices Emilia Romagna and Forli-Cesena

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Best Practice 6: Cesena Sustainable Energy Action Plan - planning and administrative tools to promote environmental innovation in SMEs Since becoming a signatory to the Covenant of Mayors in November 2009 the city council has made a commitment to achieve a larger reduction in COâ&#x201A;&#x201A; emissions than the EU target of 20%. To achieve this and meet obligations under the Covenant, the city has recently developed a Sustainable Energy Action Plan (SEAP) which provides pragmatic tools to foster environmental innovation in local SMEs. A relevant part of interventions planned in Cesena SEAP are targeted to industrial sector because of its significant impact in term of COâ&#x201A;&#x201A; emissions and energy consumption at local level. The interventions in favor of environmental innovation of SMEs are: - Reviewing administrative procedures for giving companies permission to construct and operate plants for the production of electricity, heating and cooling or transport fuels from renewable energy sources. - Reinforcing the city council energy desk which provides information on administrative procedures to construct and operate energy plants and on financial incentives for use of renewable and energy efficiency. The help-desk will be directly managed by the in-house company for energy services of Cesena municipality. This company is totally owned by the city council and employs experts on energy issues; - Promoting the renovation of electric machineries in SMEs to increase energy efficiency and reduce energy consumption of industrial sector at local level. - Creating new district heating and cooling networks within the city boundaries to provide both local SMEs and privates with thermal energy from co-generation plans and biomasses. The municipality will identify suitable areas at urban level and plan interventions together with the multi-utility company HERA. This urban planning will consider the location of rural areas and agro-industrial companies which can easily provide biomasses without significant impacts in transports. Also areas for biomasses processing will be identified. The municipality will involve Cesenaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agro-industrial companies in planning the interventions. Contact information Gianni Gregorio - Executive director of Department for environmental services Piazza del popolo, 10 4751 Cesena Phone: 0039 0547356400 e-mail: gregorio_g@comune.cesena.fc.it URL: www.comune.cesena.fc.it/ambiente

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Best Practice 7: Innovation Observatory of the Regional Union of the Chamber of Commerce of Emilia-Romagna and Innovation Report of the Forlì-Cesena Chamber of Commerce Type of Best Practice: SMEs participation in decision making and programming

The Innovation Observatory is a web-based tool to collect and analyze data on innovation performances and needs by local enterprises. It enables to map innovation in Emilia Romagna, to make comparisons between its provinces, to identify improvement areas and priorities for action and it is aimed at providing the chambers of commerce and the other local stakeholders of the innovation system with sound information for policy making, action planning and monitoring. The Innovation Observatory was launched in 2006 by CISE (Innovation and Economic Development Centre, which is the innovation agency of the Forlì-Cesena Chamber of Commerce) and was then upgraded to a regional tool adopted by the Network of the Innovation Desks of the Chambers of Commerce of Emilia Romagna, coordinated by the Regional Union of the Chambers of Commerce EmiliaRomagna). The Innovation Observatory is fed by annual surveys based on an on-line questionnaire (computer aided telephone interviews ensure that a relevant sample of enterprises is included). Innovation Patterns, Innovation Tools, Innovation Needs are the investigation areas included in the Innovation Observatory. Questions include information on industry sector, activities, products and services, revenues, number of employees, localization of suppliers and clients to segment the answers to questions on type of innovation, innovation investments, impact of competiveness, enabling factors, obstacles, revenues from innovation, innovation goals, patenting, cooperation with universities and research centers, sustainable development issues, support from public authorities. In the province of Forlì-Cesena, the data included in the Innovation Observatory are merged with EIS indicators and the data included in SIMET (a data warehouse and data mining system to monitor the local economy, developed by CISE on behalf of the Chamber of Forlì-Cesena) to calculate 29 indicators on enabling factors (human resources, finance and support), enterprise level activities (investments, entrepreneurship, cooperation, intermediate results), outputs (results, economic impact). The indicators, along with additional qualitative and quantitative analysis are included in the annual Innovation Report of the Forlì-Cesena Province (third edition to be issued in 2011). Neither the Innovation Observatory nor the Innovation Report of the Forlì-Cesena Province has a direct impact on the business environment in terms of increased innovation capacity in local enterprises. They both are governance tools to be adopted by public authorities, business associations, universities, innovation centers, etc. to design policies and actions to pave the way and support enterprises in building their innovation capacity, develop innovative products and services, innovate their production processes , cooperate with universities and R&D centers, etc.

Contact information CISE - Agency of the Forlì-Cesena Chamber of Commerce Corso della Repubblica, 5 - 47121 Forlì -Italy Phone: +39054338213 e-mail: innovazione@ciseonweb.it URL: www.ciseonweb.it/innovazione

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Best Practice 8: Global Grant SPINNER 2013

The Global Grant Spinner 2013 "Interventions for the qualification of human resources in the field of research and technological innovation" is the programme established by Emilia-Romagna Region to support young individuals in the field of research and technological innovation and for the creation of a community capable of placing the individual at the core of its innovation processes for future community and knowledge economy development. The access to Spinner 2013 is possible for employed, unemployed, individuals in search of first occupation, on redundancy payment or on mobility residing or living in Emilia-Romagna. In particular, the access is offered to graduating and graduated students, PhD students, individuals with post graduate degrees and high school students with multi-year working experience in technical and/or management fields and covering managerial positions both individually or in groups. Spinner 2013 offers an integrated system of grants, services and opportunities for individuals consisting in: • Financial support • Technical Assistance and Tutorship • Empowerment of Human Capital • Seminars and Conferences • Specialist Advisory services The Spinner 2013 offer for financial support, services and opportunities is provided through assistance services carried out by the Spinner Point desks located within universities and research centers in EmiliaRomagna. The offer pertains to the following activity areas: • Innovative and/or high knowledge content business ideas • Industrial Research, experimental development, technology transfer • Organizational, Managerial and Financial Innovation • Vouchers for participating to the inter-university Masters • International Mobility Pilot Action • Women, Technology and Innovation Pilot Action • Professional conversion through Innovation Projects carried out in firms The access to Spinner 2013 is structured according to a two-step evaluation process: • During the submission of applications, when the accompanying and support services provided by the Spinner Points induces self-evaluation and selection of qualified project ideas, dismissing inapplicable ideas before submission. • During the evaluation of proposals, this registers an approval mean rate of 58%. Contact information SPINNER CONSORTIUM Villa Gandolfi Pallavicini - Via Martelli 22-24 - 40138 – Bologna, Italy Fax: +39 051 532 691 Phone: +39 051 601 4300 e-mail: info@spinner.it URL www.spinner.it

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Best Practice 9: Romagna Creative District

The Romagna Creative District is currently a registered trademark, and by February 2011, it will be registered as a public-private Association (with social and cultural objectives). It currently has over 950 members subscribed to its portal www.romagnacreativedistrict.com comprising companies and professionals in creative fields including Architecture, Crafts, Design, Computer Software, Publishing, Film and Video, Photography, Media, Fashion, Music, Amusement Parks, Museum Management and Cultural Heritage, Advertising and Communication, Entertainment, Television and Radio. The majority of its members are micro and small enterprises and self-employed individuals residing in Romagna. This dynamic network of interdisciplinary companies and individuals is growing on a daily basis, with the aim of sparking creativity and boosting the economy of the region. Romagna Creative District aims to launch a debate (by considering interdisciplinary approaches towards the question of creativity) on whether recognizing the inherent creativity within a region may, in turn, have significant benefits on the local economy of that region and increase opportunities for the export of its talent and best practices to the world. RCD is primarily a social network which connects businesses within the creative tertiary sector; RCD is designed to be a creative think tank available to businesses, institutions and to the region itself; it is a network for facilitating the emergence and success of young talent; an informational tool for building creative capacity by increasing the demand for creative content offered by products and services, and therefore challenging businesses that are engaged in producing such products and services to improve their creative potential and capacity. To strengthen the relationship within the territory, RCD has consolidated a number of partnerships with local and national institutions, such as Commune, Region, Universities, and other public entities working for the development of its local economy as well as promoting education, training and employment for young people in the region. In addition to this, RCD is currently securing relations with European organizations with whom it shares common ideas, goals and activities, in order to widen its reach and scope for development. In this phase of development, RCD aims to drive increased entrepreneurial development, by creating new business ventures; attract external firms, by promoting the internal resources that attract external companies; attract external talent, by taking advantage of resources that come from external companies; improve quality of the production of knowledge, by fostering continuous research, education and training; improve local networking skills, by its capacity to link networks of complementary nature; and improve external networking skills, by fostering international relations, and inter-regional relations. Contact information Romagna Creative District c/o Matitegiovanotte Piazzale della Vittoria 1, 47121 ForlĂŹ, Italy Phone: +39054333866 e-mail: barbara.longiardi@matitegiovanotte.it URL: http://www.romagnacreativedistrict.com

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Best Practice 10: Mechatronic Club

The question of how an industrial district evolves over time prompts two related questions. The first concerns the extent to which the pace of evolution is linked to technological change and product upgrading; the second asks about the consequences of evolution for the inter-firm linkages of traditional districts and their mechanisms of reproduction. The case of Reggio Emilia in northeast Italy presents features associated with the classical Italian district, in that it is a localized ‘social network’ specialized in customized goods. However, the district also has a longstanding tradition of openness and export-oriented production which has dictated a lesser role for traditional inter-firm linkages inside the district. It is, to a certain extent, an ‘open district’ with loose geographic constraints, a high rate of innovation and high intensity of technological integration within core firms. A mechatronic product is defined as a mechanical element controlled by an electronic application that is integrated into it. ‘Control’ is the ability of the machine/component to change performance according to changes in external conditions. It is the high level of integration between the different technologies (mechanics, electronics and information solutions) that distinguishes a mechatronic device from one that is purely mechanically, electronically or information-based. The design and production of mechatronic devices is therefore based on the integration of two knowledge bases (KBs). The first is the traditional mechanical KB that has been the foundation for production in the Region Emilia district for decades. In the case of mechatronic devices, this must now be combined with appropriate knowledge of electronics and information technology, but as much of the additional knowledge originates outside the district, firms engaged in mechatronics need to devise new strategies for acquiring and using a second KB. In the process, however, they are creating a ‘two-track’ trajectory among firms in the district as the additional knowledge tends to be held tightly by firms that have made a transition to production of mechatronic devices. As a result, the degree of homogeneity in the district is being diminished. Objectives: The maturity of the economic texture of the region allows for innovation that is incremental. Since one of the key specializations of Emilia Romagna is machinery and mechanical engineering, the specific evolution of the historic district of Reggio Emilia has been selected to account for the transformation of mature sectors. The Mechatronic club of Reggio Emilia is a good example of this evolution The mechatronic club of Reggio Emilia is a special programme to increase the innovative capacity of leading mechatronic firms in the district. The mechatronic club aims at increasing the innovative capacity of leading firms, guaranteeing at the same time that the capacities of other firms in the supply chain remain in tune with the engineering evolution of the sector. Contact information Mechatronic Club, Industrial Association of Reggio Emilia Via Toschi 9, Reggio Emilia Phone: +39 0522 409711 e-mail: Davide.Bezzecchi@assindustria.re.it URL: http://www.meccatronica.org

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Dutch Best Practices Brainport Eindhoven

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Best Practice 11: Creative Conversion Factory

Due to a strong Design & Technology position the Eindhoven region generates many good ideas on a regular basis. However, a lot of those ideas don’t make it to the market due to reasons like: • Lack of expertise [technical, marketing, legal,] • No direct fit with the business interest of the idea owner • No fit with the product/service portfolio and/or market scale of the idea owner Many potentially valuable ideas are therefore ‘locked away’ in cabinets and drawers being idle. CCF provides Projects will be executed in a maximum of three subsequent phases which in total don’t last for more than three years. Between and during the phases projects are reviewed by the assigned Review Board. The three phases have a different character with respect to rights, obligations, finance and the legal. At the end of a projects lifetime within the CCF [after the second or third phase] the final deliverables of the project are transferred to an external interested party. This party has, most likely, already been defined in a much earlier stage, preferable during the first phase or at the Mach-making event at the end of the first phase. This external party can, depending on the kind of project, market segment, complexity, required suppliers, required market parties for installation and/or service and the like], be: • A new company that is built for this project • A [new] department of an existing company • An alliance of existing companies or another form. Whatever form is preferred, part of the deliverables is also a contract that formulates what parts of the potential revenues of the results of the project are returned to the CCF. The CCF will distribute these returned revenues to the project participants on the basis of the final assignment of ownership of the project. At present two ideas are exploited, 20 ideas are in portfolio. Objectives: The aim of the CCF is to support the process of generating sustainable business propositions for products and/or services from potentially valuable ideas. The function of the CCF is to guide and support this process to transfer potential successful ideas into sustainable business propositions. Basically the following disciplines are aligned in a very early stage of business development: • Design • Business intelligence • financing • Legal • Marketing communication Contact information Jasmijn Rompa, Brainport Development PO BOX 2182, 5600 CD Eindhoven The Netherlands Phone 31407512424 e-mail j.rompa@brainportdevelopment.nl

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Best Practice 12: Holst Center and Development Lab

Holst Centre is a joint cross border initiative set up by two founding organizations: TNO (Netherlands) and imec (Belgium), with financial support from the Ministry of Economic Affairs of the Netherlands. The Centre was launched December 2005 as an Open Innovation Centre for Wireless Autonomous Sensor Technologies and Flexible electronics. Its mission as stated on the Holst Centre website is as follows: “To be a world-leading open-innovation R&D Centre, creating generic technologies and enhancing the innovative power in the fields of Wireless Autonomous Transducer Solutions and Systems-in-Foil by combining the strengths of our local and international industrial partners with in-house expertise.” Holst Centre is an open innovation Centre enabling interaction between industry and academia. A key feature is the multi-partner program approach, which is based upon imec’s Industrial Affiliation Programs, where several industrial partners join a certain research program. The contents of the research program are developed by Holst Centre (in dialogue with industrial and academic players) and each industrial partner signs a bilateral contract with Holst Centre to get access to the research results developed in a program. An advantage for the companies participating is the leverage effect that occurs because companies are “pooling” their R&D resources for a certain topic. This effect is enforced by the government contribution to Holst Centre research. Another feature is the IPR model which is based upon co-ownership of the results to which the partner has contributed and non-exclusive rights to use the results generated by the technology program for which is paid. By collaborating with both industry and academia, Holst Centre provides market insight and focus to universities and educational institutes and keeps its partner companies informed of the breakthroughs that are expected along its roadmaps. Typically, results obtained within Holst Centre aim for products that appear on the market within three to ten years. develop a common goal, without the risk of direct competition on the market place at a later stage. Contact information Jasmijn Rompa Brainport Development N.V. - Emmasingel 11, 5611 AZ Eindhoven Phone: 0031 40 7512445 e-mail: j.rompa@brainportdevelopment.nl URL: www.holstcentre.com www.devlab.nl Links to reports and other related information: http://www.holstcentre.com/en/~/media/Files/HolstCentre_ExecutiveReport2009_final.ashx

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Best Practice 13: United Brains

United Brains is an initiative that started around the year 2000 that connects local SMEs with knowledge institutes in the Brain port Eindhoven region. SMEs can address United Brains for expertise on for example product renewal, the production process or â&#x20AC;&#x201C;service. Then, United Brains has access to a broad network of knowledge institutes as the Eindhoven University of Technology, Fontys Hogescholen, TNO, ROC Eindhoven and ROC ter AA that find a solution for these practical problems. This Best Practice is based on the idea that Small and Medium Enterprises and knowledge institutes are not their natural partners. Research shows that only 2% of the SMEs have a durable relationship with a knowledge institute. Underlying reasons are in the fact that knowledge institutes are focused primarily on education and research. Their starting point is not delivering business, but principles. And, they are always restricted by college schedules programmers. On the other hand, SMEs are looking for solutions to problems that occur at random and need to be solved in a short time frame. These reasons make the relationship between SMEs and knowledge institutes a difficult one. United Brains tries to bridge this gap. United Brains is collaboration between the Eindhoven University of Technology, Fontys, ROC, TNO and also Philips, DSM and Syntens. It is both a virtual and physical office window where SMEs can address their company questions by e-mail. Often, these are related to innovation since SMEs are more and more involved in product and process- renewal and improvement. United Brains interprets the question and, most often, contacts the SME concerned to ensure a correct interpretation of the question. Then, United Brains finds the proper knowledge institute to answer the question, ranging from research universities to intermediate vocational education and company research facilities. These different parties come together on a weekly basis to discuss the new questions that have arrived and to keep up with the running projects. At this meeting, questions are assigned to knowledge institutes. The knowledge institutes search for a certain expert that finds an answer to the question, who can be a students or a researcher. United Brains guides the process from the posing of the question until the final answer. This can take up to a year. Contact information Jasmijn Rompa Brainport Development N.V. - Emmasingel 11, 5611 AZ Eindhoven Phone: 0031 40 7512445 e-mail: j.rompa@brainportdevelopment.nl URL: ttp://unitedbrains.nl/

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Portuguese Best Practices Coimbra and Central Region

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Best Practice 14: Penela's territory policy of enhancing and promoting / Tourism Development

Penela Municipality is a small territory with 135 km2, where the area forest occupies most of the territory, located in the Central Region of Portugal (NUT II) within the subregion Pinhal Interior Norte (NUTS III). Regarding to the urban region, Penela is near from the city of Coimbra, establishing strong regional and natural ties with a wide range of services and activities. At the subregional level, Penela belongs to "Terras de Sicó - Local Development Association (integrated with the Municipality of Pombal, Soure, Alvaiázere, Ansião and Condeixa-a-Nova) where resists a greater tradition of cooperation. "A County with the following demographic characteristics: about 6,500 people, 40% of assets, with low education level of its population, low levels of entrepreneurial ability and aging above the national average should cause one of two feelings: either give up and let the time run or take advantage of the best we have and start a walk where only will be worth use words like DARE, RISK ACT and nonconformity and daring attitudes, against the spirit of accommodation or criticism." (Font: Penela Municipality Mayor’s swearing speech ceremony). Awake to this reality, Penela has obviously chosen the second path. Aware of national and European policy guidelines that confirm the economic, social and territorial cohesion as the main standard of development, the Municipality of Penela recognized the importance of defining a local strategy sustained, focused on innovation, competitiveness and entrepreneurship, able to create competitive advantages from the differentiating factors of the territory and establish strategic partnerships that could exploit real opportunities. With this in mind, we created the Director Program for Innovation, Competitiveness and Entrepreneurship (DP-ICE). This program concluded that the Municipality of Penela should be distinguished by environmental excellence, quality education, development of socio-cultural peculiarities and a clear commitment to innovation based in the consolidation of an environmentally sustainable and multifunctional economic model. Based on these conclusions, it was possible to define a vision for the Municipality shared by all: "Local resources to service innovation, innovation in the service of local resources." The ICE (Innovation, Competitiveness and Entrepreneurship) strategy proposed for Penela assumed local singularities as the main differentiating factor able to provide the necessary foundation for sustainable development Contact information Luís Matias Município de Penela, Praça do Município, 3230-253 Penela Phone: +351 239 560 120 e-mail: luis.matias@cm-penela.pt URL: www.cm-penela.pt

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Best Practice 15: IPN Model Instituto Pedro Nunes is the technology transfer organization from Coimbra University. Its mission is to leverage a strong university / enterprise relationship for the promotion of innovation, quality and entrepreneurship in private and public sector organizations, by acting in three complementary areas: - Research and technological development, consultancy and specialized services; - Business and ideas incubation; - Highly specialized training and promotion of science and technology IPN has its own technological infrastructures â&#x20AC;&#x201C; six R&TD laboratories and a Business Incubator that promotes the creation of tech based firms by giving support to innovative and technology-based ideas generated by its own laboratories, institutions of higher education, and other entrepreneurs. As a transversal support, the Innovation Department: provides services on intellectual property, support to RTD projects, and marketing and technology commercialization. It also belongs to several national and international networks, including TII, EARTO, Incubator Forum and Proton (Gate2Growth). IPN has specialized laboratories in Automation and Systems, Information Technologies, Materials, Electro analysis and Corrosion:, Pharmaceutical Studies and Geotechnique, besides accessing a network of researchers in the scientific and technological system, particularly from the University of Coimbra, mainly through the Faculty of Sciences and Technology. It also has a Training Department that organizes high level technological specialized training and training addressed to young entrepreneurs engaged in the creation of start-up companies. IPN- Incubator has recently won the 1st place in the world award for "Best Science based incubatorâ&#x20AC;?. The award was given during the 9th Annual Incubator Conference and Awards on "Best Practices in Science Based Incubators" on November 18 and 19, 2010 in Liverpool, UK. Rankings for the award are based on a combination of 25 quantitative performance indicators and the opinion of an international expert jury. More than 50 science-based incubators from 23 countries around the world entered the competition in 2010. Over the last six years, more than 250 incubators from Europe, Northern America, the Middle East, Australia and Asia have competed for the award. Instituto Pedro Nunes is the technology transfer organization from Coimbra University. Its mission is to leverage a strong university / enterprise relationship for the promotion of innovation, quality and entrepreneurship in private and public sector organizations, by acting in three complementary areas: - Research and technological development, consultancy and specialized services; - Business and ideas incubation; - Highly specialized training and promotion of science and technology Contact information Ana Seguro IPN Incubator, Rua Pedro Nunes, 3030-199 Coimbra, Portugal Phone: 00351 239 700 300 e-mail: aseguro@ipn-incubadora.pt URL: www.ipn-incubadora.pt

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Hungarian Best Practices Miskolc Municipality

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Best Practice 16: Robert Bosch Department at the University of Miskolc

The Robert Bosch Department of Mechatronics has a short history; it was founded in July 1, 2005. Top Managements of the Bosch Group and the University of Miskolc initiated the foundation of the Department to support practical oriented education and researches in the engineering sciences devoting special emphases on the wide range applications of the mechatronics. The expenses were covered by Robert Bosch Automotive Electronics Ltd. in Hatvan, Robert Bosch Power Tool Ltd. in Miskolc, Robert Bosch Energy and Body Systems Ltd. in Miskolc, Bosch Rexroth Pneumatic Ltd. in Eger, Deutscher Stiftungsverband Bosch Rexroth Ltd. in Budapest, Robert Bosch Ltd. in Budapest. The first Head of the Department was Associate Professor Endre Jakab (CSc), and he was succeeded by Associate Professor Tamás Szabó (Ph.D). Education The practical oriented education is based on a modern laboratory system: Lab for Pneumatics and Hydraulics, Lab for Sensor Techniques, Lab for PLCs and Modular Mechatronics System and Lab for Robotics and Electrical Driving Systems (See the pictures below). The courses of the mechatronical engineering are accredited both for undergraduate program (BSc) and graduate program (MSc). The first graduation in BSc level is expected in 2010, so the first MSc course will be started in 2011. In addition to the standard education activities the Department takes part in the organization of Pneumobil and Electromobil Competitions together with the Bosch Companies. In order to establish and develop programmes in mechatronic engineering, on July 1, 2005 the Robert Bosch Department of Mechatronics was established at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics of the University of Miskolc with support by the executive management of Bosch and the Bosch factories in the region. The Department operated as an enterprise for three years. The objective of the cooperation between the factories and the University is: to apply and expand the technical and scientific knowledge in the research, teaching and wide-ranging application of mechatronics, to provide practice-oriented academic programmes and to meet the demand of the factories for engineers. The University of Miskolc was pleased to accommodate the first department to be financed by companies since World War II and took over its operation on July 1, 2008. The University also granted substantial funds for the project. The example, although not in the same structure, has been followed by several higher education institutions. Contact information Name: Prof. Dr. Gyula PATKÓ Address: University of Miskolc, Miskolc Phone: 00-36-46-565-111 e-mail: patko@uni-miskolc.hu URL: www.uni-miskolc.hu

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Best Practice 17: Local FDI support system and one-stop shop services for companies

The management of Miskolc is committed to increasing the number of productive and productiveservicing enterprises which operate profitably on the long term as well as to creating new jobs. In 2007 an Office for Local Economic Development was set up in Miskolc City and a FDI support system has been prepared with several pillars. One pillar is the one-stop-shop service. -

Supported administration Direct help from Miskolc Holding Zrt. during the lot planning, land registration and other licensing procedures. Direct assistance by Miskolc Town of County Rank during the authorization process One-stop administrative shopping offered by Miskolc Holding during the official proceedings with the authorities. Assistance in the reconciliation with public utility service providers.

The second pillar is the investment incentives offered on the basis of a local level regulation. The services belonging to the programme to develop business and stimulate investment may be basic services, advanced services and premium services (hereafter, jointly: services), which constitute service-packages (hereafter: service-package). The individual service-packages build on each other, such that those taking advantage of the advanced services are entitled to take advantage of the basic services too; and those taking advantage of the premium services are entitled to take advantage of both the advanced services and the basic services. The third pillar is the availability of a special fund for the companies creating a high number of workplaces that can be allocated by the Municipality of Miskolc on the basis of a selection procedure. Objectives: Miskolc tries to create a friendly environment for the enterprises wishing to settle down in Miskolc with the tools at its disposal and the one-stop administrative shopping system. The Local Government of Miskolc Town of County Rank gives priority to the companies which want to move into the Mechatronics Industrial Park and takes into consideration the needs of the investors when issuing the building permits, preparing the arrangement plans or on the occasion of lot purchases furthermore offers quick and precise administration for the companies moving in. The operation of the one-stop-shop service is the responsibility of the Miskolc Holding Plc. Direct support from the Municipality in the form of office space, infrastructure, hosting services, project management, can be allocated to the selected companies. In each case the maximum amount of the support (in the form of cash subsidy or other in kind support) cannot succeed 500,000 EUR/company which is a basic EU level regulation in the case of the temporarily support. Contact information Ms. Nóra DURÁNYIK Miskolc Holding Zrt., 3530 Hunyadi str. 5., Miskolc, Hungary Phone: 00-36-46-516-450 e-mail: duranyik.nora@miskolcholding.hu URL: www.miskolcholding.hu

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Spanish Best Practices Castilla-y-LĂŠon

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Best Practice 18: Specific Unit of Identification and Monitoring of European and International consortia In order to increase the participation of regional SMEs in R&D and innovation Programmes, ADEuropa Foundation has created the Specific Unit of Identification and Monitoring of European and International consortia, a work team specialized in European and International Programmes related to R&D and innovation, especially the 7th Framework Programme (FP7) and the Competitiveness and Innovation Framework Programme (CIP). This Unit develops their own methodology specifically adapted to Castilla y Leon needs and according to the regional R&D and innovation strategy. One of the main specific characteristics of this methodology is related to a close and personal contact with both the proposer and the regional SME. By means of different information sources (our own contacts in Europe, WebPages such as Cordis, partners in European and international networks, partner searches, direct contacts made during attendance to info days and other events, etc.), many partner searches are collected and studied. This work is partially supported by our Delegation in Brussels. Although the work is mainly focused on FP7 and CIP, other European Programmes related to innovation, such as INTERREG, AAL, LIFE, Health Programme, Life Long Learning, EUROSTARS, COST, PLANT-KBBE, etc. are also taken into consideration when the project might be of interest for our regional entities. All the proposals are carefully studied and selected by the Specific Unit of Identification and Monitoring of European and International consortia, taking into account the relevance for regional SMEs as well as the most suitable call, the adequate consortium, deadline, etc. Next, the proposers of the future projects are contacted and asked for the possibility of providing them with a suitable partner from our region. This Unit has developed a complete database about regional SMEs and other entities (Universities, Technology Centers, Public Administration, etc.) with detailed information about their interests and needs in R&D and innovation issues. This database has been elaborated thanks to an exhaustive and dedicated effort mainly based on visits, meetings, interviews, etc. with all the relevant entities of Castilla y Leon. The database is connected to a matching tool which allows finding the best partner in our region. Furthermore, the monitoring process is registered by means of an additional application. In this sense, every step taken with a particular proposal (reception of proposal, expression of interest in the proposal, entity accepted in the consortium, etc.) is registered and the current state of every proposal can be easily known. Contact information Isabel Gobernado Mitre C/ Jacinto Benavente, nยบ 2. 3rd Floor. 47195 Arroyo de la Encomienda, Valladolid Phone:4983214792 e-mail:sabel.gobernado@adeuropa.org URL: w.adeuropa.org Links to reports and other related information http://www.adeuropa.org/EN/IDi/fomentoParticipacion/

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Best Practice 19: R&D and Innovation Managers Training

The R&D and Innovation Managers Training Programme is an initiative started up by the Regional Government of Castilla y Le贸n through ADEuropa Foundation, with the objective of incorporating in enterprises and SMEs in the region, human resources specialized in R&D and Innovation management that will facilitate SMEs participation in Innovation projects. The first part of the programme is a theorical-practical training 2 months long, in which 30 persons holding technical or scientific university degrees take part. This training period is provided by a professional expert team coming from different institutions related with R&D and Innovation, so the students get a direct knowledge about the different organisms that participate in this matter. During this period, the students also attend to visits to the different agents of the regional innovation system: technological centers, university institutes, and relevant enterprises in R&D and Innovation. Once this first training period is finished, the grant Innovation Managers start a practical training 6 month-period, working within SMEs in the region, where they will have direct contact with the most practical issues concerning R&D and Innovation managing, as well as they will foster and facilitate SMEs participation in Innovation projects. When the second period finishes, the enterprise awarded with the Innovation manager has the possibility of hiring him/her. In negative case, the Innovation manager joins a monitoring programme that provide him/her the possibility of participating in work interviews with other entities/enterprises in the region. Objectives: The main objective of this Programme is to reduce the barriers that regional SMEs have to participate in Innovation programmes. Improvement in the business environment for SMEs and large enterprises: The SMEs receive for 6 months a worker specialized in R&D and Innovation managing who will help them to participate in Innovation Programmes. Contact information Jorge Izquierdo Zubiate C/ Jacinto Benavente, n潞 2. 3rd Floor. 47195 Arroyo de la Encomienda, Valladolid Phone: 983214792 e-mail: e.izquierdo@adeuropa.org URL: w.adeuropa.org Links to reports and other related information http://www.adeuropa.org/EN/programa_gestidi/

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Greek Best Practices North Aegean

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Best Practice 20: Aegean Technopolis

Aegean Technopolis SA is the Technology Park of the Aegean Region in Greece, a company funded and supervised by the Greek Secretariat of Research and Development. The main premises of the park are located on the island of Chios at the heart of the Aegean Region. Aegean Technopolis provides a unique and vibrant location for established and emerging technology based companies. Aegean Technopolis premises located on the island of Chios, in the traditional settlement of Xalkios. The premises are consisted of: • The main building of the Aegean Technopolis Administration Offices; • The building of resident companies; and • The Conference Centre The Technology Park of Aegean Technopolis offers onsite Managers and support Team providing companies with services and support related to: • Strategy and development • Product Design and Development • Marketing and Promotion • Sales Management • Technology and Innovation Management • Accounting, Financial and Control management There exist four different ways that a technology-focused company can gain approval to be resident within the technology park: 1. Residence as a Funded Company: The candidate Company submits a business plan and an application for funding to be reviewed. In case of acceptance the company will be resident within the Technology Park 2. Residence: The candidate Company submits its statute and a synopsis of its future objectives in the field of technological innovations. Upon acceptance, the company will be resident within the Technology Park 3. Residence as a subsidiary: In this case the candidate Company should go through the same process as it is described in (2) but upon acceptance there is no need for physical presence of the Company. 4. Virtual Residence: The process is the same as it is described in (2). However, upon acceptance, the company is only referenced on the Aegean Technopolis portal. Contact information Dr. Michael Glykas AEGEAN TECHNOPOLIS S.A. CHALKIOS, 82 100 CHIOS Phone: 0-2271022049 e-mail: info@aegeantechnopolis.com URL http://www.aegeantechnopolis.com

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Best Practice 21: BIOBUS - Biodiversity resources for innovative Business development

BioBus, where an initiative of the Region of North Aegean aiming to investigate the extend of innovation that can be applied in our region. The financial tools provided by the E.C. under this programmes such as NAIAS and BIOBUS, proved to be extremely valuable for our region in order to research its capacity in applying new ideas and innovation in the attempts of the local authorities and agencies that bear the burden of regional development. In a European environment that is characterized by fast changes and developments influenced by the global changes and in an environment that is getting more and more antagonistic, our region has to be extra cautious and follow the developments as close as possible. This programme started mainly due to the experience of the close cooperation of the partners of a former project named NAIAS. The experience accumulated in the past four years was very helpful, in making three variables work together: -

The Public sector (Governmental Authorities) The University of the Aegean (Regional academic potential) The Entrepreneurial world (Chambers of Commerce and Private Sector)

The main idea of investigating the use of Biodiversity in the business environment proved to be more complicated and challenging than expected. All of the partners have to deal with an extremely delicate issue: the sources and uses of Biodiversity. Biodiversity on one hand, which implies directly that resources our environment is providing us are not unlimited and that any attempt to exploit them should be carefully designed always bearing in mind the aim for sustainability, and on the other hand the need of economic development, financial growth, diversification and competition. The two variables are at the same time antagonistic to each other and complementing each other. Our “experimentation” is aiming to find the point where we can maximize benefits and minimize losses in order to achieve knowledge that can be viable and transferable in our socioeconomic reality. In the Region of North Aegean it is difficult due to geographic conditions – we are a border of the E.C., away from the centres of developments – to generate innovation. Nevertheless we believe we have reached a noticeable level of innovation; the next step, the challenge, is to make it obvious and make it work towards the benefit of the citizens of the Region and we are confident we will reach this goal. “Biodiversity businesses” represent a new and dynamic partnership. This alliance between business and conservation interests offers enormous potential benefits for humankind. Like traditional businesses, biodiversity enterprises seek to earn a profit. At the same time, they make a deliberate effort to conserve biological diversity through the sustainable use of environmental products.

Contact information Panagiotis Lambropoulos P. Kountoyrioti 71 Mytiline Lesvos e-mail : palabr@istoselides

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Danish Best Practices Horsholm Municipality

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Best Practice 22: Accelerace

The Accelerace program has been initiated by the largest Danish incubator "Symbion"- located in the capital region. The programme is primarily funded by: The Danish Growth Fund (government), The Danish Capital Region (partially European regional development grants) and one of the other regions. The programme has been designed in order to overcome one of the typical weaknesses: to bring companies from ideas to market i.e. assisting in bridging the gap until proof of business, The Accelerace programme comprises 3 main areas: Accelerace Growth Accelerace Invest Accelerace Spin-off The programme selects their candidates/beneficiaries through a semi-annual application process. A dozen of the most promising ideas/companies are then selected. Accelerace Growth is a 5 month intensive program where professional business consultants work intensively with the company and its specific business-plan. This includes workshops with international experts within the candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; field of expertise. The candidates are furthermore matched with their own professional business consultant â&#x20AC;&#x201C; working inside the company for app. 2 days a week through the entire period. Accelerace Spin-off is basically the same concept as Accelerace Growth however it is focused on spinoffs from existing companies and thereby realizing a potential in an idea, product or patent that is otherwise dormant or not within the core-strategy for the originating company. Accelerace Invest is set up as a separate programme, but it works in close collaboration with the other two activities. Accelerace Invest can furnish the candidate companies with soft loans up to 400,000 â&#x201A;Ź for a duration of 7 years with 2 years grace at an interest rate of 10%. Furthermore Accelerace Invest works in close collaboration with the Danish Growth Fund and local seed-investors. The combination of supplying candidates with professional business development skills as well as capital is expected to be a winning combination Objectives: Over a 5 year period from 2009 more than 150 projects or companies shall have been through the programme within a 5 year timeframe

Contact information Bent Benemann Bischoff Phone: +4540271450 e-mail: bb@erhverv.net URL: www.erhverv.net Links to reports and other related information

www.accelerace.dk

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Best Practice 23: Connect Denmark

Type of Best Practice: promoting networking and channeling information to SMEs Connect Denmark is a private membership-based non-profit organization established in year 2000. Today Connect Denmark has in excess of 300 companies and close to 900 business executives as members. The members comprise the best performing companies and the highly estimated executives. Connect Denmark provides free coaching to entrepreneurs from the idea stage and through the later growth stages. Furthermore Connect Denmark provides matching between entrepreneurs and professional board members. The activities are primarily conducted through “springboards” where entrepreneurs – selected by the organization – receives sparring from a panel of typically 6-12 business executives selected among the members on basis of their respective qualifications in relation to the challenges faced by the entrepreneur. The concept originates from San Diego in the US and has been adopted by a number of countries – however in Europe only in the northern countries. Objectives: Connect Denmark and its member’s make innovation and technology to the primary Danish growth factors. For the purpose of creating and developing successful growth companies, Connect Denmark facilitates contacts between entrepreneurs and financial, industrial and business developing resources. Resources: The organization comprises some 10 employees. The annual budget amounts to 1.5 mill. € The major part being paid by the members as membership-fees and sponsorships. A smaller part is contributed from government funds as "proof-of-concept" funds Improvement in the business environment for SMEs and large enterprises Connect Denmark has conducted in excess of 800 springboards for Danish entrepreneurs since its inauguration. The companies have in average 5 employees and job-creation following a springboard amounts to a growth in employees of 24% (capital region 43%). Development in turnover shows a 27% growth (capital region 39%) and development in export of 18%. 43% of springboard companies have attracted new capital amounting 0.5 mill. € in average per entrepreneur – the major part being venture capital. 39% attracts professional board-members among Connect Denmark’s members Survival rate for companies going through a Connect Denmark springboard is 93.8% Contact information Bent Benemann Bischoff Krakasvej 17 Phone: +4545271450 e-mail: bb@erhverv.net URL: www.erhverv.net Links to reports and other related information www.connectdenmark.dk

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Romanian Best Practices Iasi North-East of Romania

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Best Practice 24: Science and Technology Park "TEHNOPOLIS”

Science and Technology Park "TEHNOPOLIS Iasi was founded in order to use the results of research, applying advanced technologies in economy and increase participation in higher education institutions in the socio-economic development through science and technology. Science and Technology Park "TEHNOPOLIS Iasi was founded in order to use the results of research, applying advanced technologies in economy and increase participation in higher education institutions in the socio-economic development through science and technology. The current stage of development of the Park offers to use two buildings, "Duplex «with a total built area of 1.200 square meters and "NUCLEUS «with a total built area of over 9.000 sqm. The NUCLEUS amenities include the following areas: office areas and production areas (for rent) the laboratories exhibition areas and coffee breaks restaurant area the "Business Incubator", the "Conference Center", the "Audio-Video Studio". Objectives: • Technology transfer research results to economic agents in manufacturing or packages of products and services with competitive value and capitalization domestic or foreign • Establishment of specialists with advanced training in research and higher education • training young people to research • attract private funding in education and research activities • Market capitalization of scientific research results • Creation of new jobs in advanced technologies • stimulating innovation and scientific-technical potential of academic staff, university researchers and students • Orientation of universities and research facilities for economic and social environment • Integration of students and graduates of higher education institutions in the socioeconomic • stimulate initiative accredited higher education institutions and research and development units to attract new funding sources • stimulating active participation of companies to private sector development and exploitation of research and innovation, by making high-tech products • attracting foreign companies to invest in technology transfer activities • developing the potential of scientific, technological and regional economic Contact information B-dul. Poitiers Nr.10 (inside Fortus) Cladirea Nucleus, etj.1 Iasi 700671, Romania Phone: +4 0332 102.208 +4 0232 222.249 e-mail office@tehnopol-is.ro URL http://www.tehnopol-is.ro/index.html

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Best Practice 25: Innovation Entrepreneurial Research Programs and Training

There are several academic research programs and training for stimulation the innovative entrepreneurial culture. These are: " Capacity for innovation and growth impact post-doctoral research programs”, 80 researchers "Training and managerial assistance to small, entrepreneurial and future entrepreneurs, managers and employees in SMEs in the North East, North West, Central and Southeast” ”Knowledge based Entrepreneurship Academy” MEDIAEC platform (Alexandru Ioan Cuza University) - is designed to develop the highest level of educational services and research through interdisciplinary interaction, multifunctional and permanent. Objectives: These projects are implemented and carried through the universities, with European funding in order to stimulate the innovative spirit, entrepreneurial culture and developing SMEs. Within these programs are carried out research on entrepreneurial innovation and its impact on SME development. It offers training, consulting and specialized programs for people who want to open a small business. Resources: " Capacity for innovation and growth impact post-doctoral research programs”, 80 researchers The total project is 377487,804 Euro Improvement in the business environment for SMEs and large enterprises: These projects will lead to a better understanding of the development needs of SMEs at local and national. They will promote entrepreneurship and strengthen the entrepreneurial culture. Will train specialists in SMEs and contribute to a better foundation for developing strategies for SMEs to local and national level, with beneficial effects on economic and social development.

Contact information Universitatea Alexandru Ioan Cuza, Iași Bulevardul Carol I, Nr.11, 700506 Iasi, Romania Phone: +40 (232) 201000 e-mail: contact@uaic.ro URL: http://www.postdoc-uaic.ro/index.php?page=home

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GLOSSARY

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R.I.S.: Regional Innovation System â&#x20AC;&#x201C; local ecosystem dedicated to organize and manage innovation initiatives and stakeholders (also called L.I.S with L for Local).

SMEs: Small and Medium Enterprises â&#x20AC;&#x201C; up to 250 staff.

Innovation*: the adoption of an internally generated or purchased device, system, policy, program, process, product, or service that is new to the adopting organization, in view of developing a competitive advantage.

Product innovation**: the introduction of a good or service that is new or significantly improved with respect to its characteristics or intended uses. This includes significant improvements in technical specifications, components and materials, incorporated software, user friendliness or other functional characteristics.

Process innovation**: the implementation of a new or significantly improved production or delivery method. This includes significant changes in techniques, equipment and/or software used to create, produce and provide the new product.

Marketing innovation**: the implementation of a new marketing method involving significant changes in product design or packaging, product placement, product promotion or pricing.

Organizational innovation**: the implementation of a new organizational method in the firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business practices, workplace organization or external relations.

RDI: Research and Development and Innovation

LED: Local Economic Development

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Profile for CCI Nice Côte d'Azur

ERMIS overview best practices  

projet ermis

ERMIS overview best practices  

projet ermis