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UNOBUSINESS NOT BUSINESS SCHOOL AS USUAL

2017-18

DANNY VENTURA:

AIMING HIGH PAYING IT FORWARD

Tim and Traci Harrison Scholarship Celebrates Milestone Anniversary

FULBRIGHT SUMMER PROGRAM Business Student Travels to London for Rare Learning Experience

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IN THIS ISSUE

FE AT UR E S 16 AIMING HIGH

Danny Ventura’s story about being a first generation student working inside First National Bank.

30 PAYING IT FORWARD

R E SE A RCH 20 WINNING NATIONALLY Students place third in national counter-extremism competition.

22 FACULTY RESEARCH Four CBA faculty delve into their current research.

Celebrating the milestone anniversary of the Tim and Traci Harrison Scholarship.

42 SPRING TRAVEL ABROAD Students travel to China and India to apply what they learned in the classroom.

44 EMBA COVERS THREE CONTINENTS

International capstone students travel through Europe, South America, and Asia.

40 FULBRIGHT SUMMER PROGRAM

NE W S

T R AV EL

46 EXPERIENCING GERMANY

CBA student earns spot in prestigious selective scholarship program and travels to London.

Photos from the CBA Scholars Academy trip abroad.

5 RANKED AMONG THE BEST CBA’s MBA and Executive MBA are included among the top programs nationally and globally.

A L UMNI

6 THE END OF AN ERA CBA’s long-time MBA director retires, another alumna takes the helm.

27 DISNEY COLLEGE PROGRAM

Young CBA alumna experiences being a Disney employee.

8 COMMUNITY OF ACHIEVERS Celebrating faculty and staff earning awards and honors, retiring, and those just hired.

10 DEPARTMENT NEWS

Updates about the accomplishments CBA’s departments have achieved in the past year.

28 DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI

S T UDEN T S 26 MAVERICK BUSINESS PLAN COMPETITION Students earn first place with non-profit business idea.

36 CBA SCHOLARS ACADEMY

The program completed its third year of programming and went abroad.

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UNO BUSINESS

Honoring esteemed alumni who have become leaders in their careers.

34 COMMENCEMENT

Alumni and students earn honors and pave their path for the future.

DONOR S 38 PARTNERING ABROAD CBA receives a grant and a partnership that is helping build education opportunities for Afghanistan and China.

47 SCHOLARSHIPS

Thanking CBA’s generous donors.


LOUIS G. POL

DEAN, UNO COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The success of a business school, or any other educational organization, is measured by the impact that the students, faculty, staff, and alumni have on the communities in which they are located, including the state, region, and beyond. As you read the stories within the latest issue of our magazine, please think of our college in terms of its impact beyond the classrooms and laboratories of Mammel Hall. I believe that you will find that the College of Business Administration (CBA) at the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) has a great impact through the successes of its students and alumni, the importance of the research conducted, and the ways in which we work to make our society better. At the same time, our college brings opportunities to our students, many of whom are the first in their families to attend a college or university. We represent the possibility of significant life change as the completion of a degree opens up a wide range of options that have both immediate and long term effects on our students, as well as their families and friends. As you read the stories about our students, I hope that you have the same level of excitement I feel when I think about how their lives change after they secure their first jobs, and as their careers advance over time. Our top priority is simple: bring significant value to our students, partner organizations, and community. Our faculty and staff are dedicated to that end. Please tell us your stories of success and how your favorite professors and staff members influenced your life. Also, tell us how you think we can improve our programs or processes.

Louis G. Pol Dean, UNO College of Business Administration

CONTRIBUTERS Chelsea Bailey Tim Fitzgerald Angelica Genovesi Rebecca Gratz Ryan Henriksen Sam Petto Charley Steed

COMMENTS OR STORY IDEAS

unocbainfo@unomaha.edu

SUBSCRIBE TO EMAIL NEWSLETTER

cba.unomaha.edu/connect

CONNECT WITH THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION /UNOCBA @UNOCBA @UNOCBA

[ CB A .UNOM A H A .EDU ] Printed on FSCÂŽ certified Rolland Enviro paper manufactured with 100 percent post-consumer fiber using biogas energy. It is certified as environmentally preferable by EcoLogo and processed chlorine free. Ink used is vegetable based with zero VOCs. The University of Nebraska does not discriminate based on race, color, ethnicity, national origin, sex, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, disability, age, genetic information, veteran status, marital status, and/or political affiliation in its programs, activities, or employment. 0022MAGCBA1018 2 017-2 018

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UNO BUSINESS


MBA AND EMBA PROGRAMS

RANKED AMONG THE BEST UNO’s part-time MBA and Executive MBA are included among the top programs in the latest national and global rankings.

“BEST BUSINESS SCHOOLS” LIST UNO’s part-time MBA ranked No. 97 in the country placing it above similar programs at Oregon State University, Clemson University, and Iowa State University. U.S. News & World Report, 2019

2018 GLOBAL MBA RANKINGS UNO’s MBA program is ranked among the best in the world and placed as a tier one program. UNO is the only university in the state to receive this recognition. CEO Magazine, 2018

2018 GLOBAL EXECUTIVE MBA RANKINGS UNO’s Executive MBA program, included for the first time, is listed as a tier one program and ranked No. 55 worldwide.

LEARN MORE ABOUT UNO’S MBA AND EXECUTIVE MBA PROGRAMS

TRADITIONAL MBA Part-time and full-time formats offered

Programs are classified as tier one or tier two by CEO Magazine based on fact-based criteria such as quality of faculty, international diversity, class size, work experience, and accreditation. CEO is a U.K. based magazine.

CEO Magazine, 2018

OUR MBA AND EXECUTIVE MBA PROGRAMS ARE TOP-NOTCH, ATTRACTING TALENTED STUDENTS AND HIGH-QUALITY FACULTY, AND I’M PLEASED TO SEE BOTH PROGRAMS RECEIVING NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL ATTENTION.

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Concentration options in areas such as business analytics and healthcare management

EXECUTIVE MBA 17-month cohort program for experienced working professionals

INTERNATIONAL ACCREDITATION The College of Business Administration, including its MBA and Executive MBA, is AACSB-accredited in business and accounting. AACSB business and accounting accreditation is a standard earned by fewer than 200 universities worldwide.

LOUIS POL, PH.D. DEAN, CBA

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THE END OF AN ERA

THE EXCITING THING IS ALL OF THE GROWTH WITH THE UNMC DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS AND HAVING THOSE RELATIONSHIPS ACROSS CAMPUS.

I REALLY WANT TO HELP UNO ADJUST, BE PROACTIVE, AND REMAIN COMPETITIVE IN THE MARKETPLACE.

LEX KACZMAREK

KRISTI LYNCH

MBA DIRECTOR, 1989-2018

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UNO BUSINESS

MBA DIRECTOR, JULY 2018-PRESENT


UNO’S LONG -T IME MBA DIREC TOR RE T IRE S, A ND A NOT HER A LUMN A TA K E S T HE HELM WRIT TEN BY SAR AH HEIMERMAN

After 28 years in UNO’s MBA program, Lex Kaczmarek retired this summer. Part of the Maverick family for most of her adult life, Kaczmarek first attended UNO as an undergraduate, earning a bachelor’s in interior design. After graduation, she worked at a local interior design firm and eventually became general manager. With many years of work experience on her résumé, Kaczmarek decided to earn an MBA—part time. However, every time she tried to enroll in more than one class, she had to travel for work. Determined to earn a graduate degree, she eventually left her job and enrolled as a full-time student. “I thought ‘I’ll turn lemons into lemonade,’” Kaczmarek says. She finished the program in December 1989 and started working as the sole MBA advisor the following June. She was responsible for processing applications, advising students, and assisting with enrollment. Through the years the MBA program grew and changed, and Kaczmarek was promoted to director, leading dayto-day operations, scheduling rooms for classes, and supporting the international exchange programs and partnerships, all while growing the program and maintaining UNO’s reputation of producing excellent graduates. “No two days are the same around here,” she says, “I really never got bored.” With support from Dean Pol, Kaczmarek collaborated with UNMC to develop dual degree programs, combining business and medical degrees to create unique learning opportunities for students. “The exciting thing is all of the growth with the UNMC dual degree programs and having those relationships across campus,” she says. Kaczmarek says she will miss the people most, including all the students, faculty, and staff she worked with throughout the years. Thankfully, she’s leaving the program in good hands. A UNO MBA alumna, Kristi Lynch was named the new director in July. After earning a bachelor’s in journalism and working in digital marketing and e-commerce, she earned an MBA from UNO in 2004.

As an undergraduate journalism student, she wasn’t required to take business classes and wanted a better grasp of business. “I heard that UNO had a really good college of business, and I was familiar with their reputation,” Lynch says. After Lynch earned her MBA, she worked as a marketing consultant and taught business courses as an adjunct professor. Lynch also started her own stroller fitness company. The class combined cardio and strength training while parents pushed their kids in a stroller. After a few years of running her own business, she decided to go back to teaching full time. Recently, Lynch was looking for a career change but wanted to stay in education. “As a graduate of the program, I have a lot of respect for the program and for the university,” she says. “I am very excited to join an AACSB-accredited program.” With her background in marketing, business, and higher education, Lynch has an understanding of the competitive nature of the education landscape and trends in customized programs and online options. “I really want to help UNO adjust, be proactive, and remain competitive in the marketplace,” she says. Lynch plans to continue growing the MBA program and looks forward to the opportunity to create partnerships with corporations and organizations. “I’m really hoping to get out in the community and create more awareness for the program,” she says. While Lynch is thinking ahead, Kaczmarek is also thinking of her future. She’s looking forward to a slower pace, spending time with family and friends, and being available to travel. Thinking back on her 28 years of service, Kaczmarek says she is proud of how the program has grown during her tenure but is most proud of the number of MBA graduates who continue to make a positive impact in the community. She recalls one conversation with a graduate who thanked her for the support and for changing his life. Kaczmarek responded, “‘I did not change your life; I opened the door, and you went through.’”

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A COMMUNITY OF ACHIEVERS At the UNO College of Business Administration, we practice excellence. Congratulations to our faculty and staff for another academic year marked by many honors and awards.

CBA FACULTY AWARDS AND HONORS DALE EESLEY, PH.D. CBA Alumni Association Teaching Award DAVID VOLKMAN, PH.D. Executive MBA Professor of the Year BEN SMITH, PH.D. MBA Professor of the Year JENNIFER RILEY, PH.D. Graduate Accounting Professor of the Year UNO Excellence in Teaching JILLIAN POYZER Dean’s Citation for Outstanding Teaching

HARLAND EARNS CHANCELLOR’S MEDAL

RAY LEBLANC Dean’s Citation for Outstanding Teaching

The Chancellor's Medal recognizes a faculty or staff member’s extraordinary service to UNO.

BREVAN JORGENSON Dean’s Citation for Overall Performance

Lynn Harland, Ph.D., is a professor of management and the associate dean of the UNO College of Business Administration. She received her B.A. in industrial/organizational psychology from Purdue University and her Ph.D. in organizational behavior with a minor in human resources from the University of Iowa’s College of Business. Harland joined UNO as an assistant professor of management in 1989 and has taught undergraduate, MBA, and Executive MBA courses in management and leadership, as well as executive education seminars in the banking, utility, transportation, health care and insurance industries.

COLLEEN LOGES Dean’s Citation for NBDC STEVE SCHULZ, PH.D. Dean’s Citation for Outstanding Service ROOPA VENKATESH, PH.D. Dean’s Citation for Outstanding Service GINA LIGON, PH.D. Dean’s Citation for Outstanding Research

DALE EESLEY, PH.D. 8

UNO BUSINESS

DAVID VOLKMAN, PH.D.

Harland has published research articles in areas including leadership, employee resilience, workplace fun, expatriate selection, procedural justice, peer performance appraisals, influence tactics, and personality testing. She currently serves as the director of outreach for UNO’s Center for Collaboration Science. Her consulting activities include employee selection validation studies in police and fire departments, and in the utility, health care, and manufacturing industries. Harland received the UNO Excellence in Teaching Award in 2003. In 1999 and 2002, she received the College of Business Administration Dean’s Citation Award for Teaching, and in 1997 and 2004 she received the MBA Outstanding Professor of the Year award. Harland served as president and program chair of the Midwest Academy of Management and currently serves on the editorial board of two academic journals. Since 2009, she has served on the statewide Spirit of Nebraska Girl Scout Board of Directors, where she currently serves as board secretary.


CBA WELCOMES NEW FACULTY Meet the UNO College of Business Administration’s new faculty, hired in 2017-18.

MEGAN HARRIS DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING

JUNG EUN PARK DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING

Megan Harris is an accounting instructor and certified public accountant. She is a member of the Nebraska Society of CPAs and the American Institute of CPAs. Before entering academia, she worked in public accounting at KPMG and private accounting in a variety of industries, including financial services, nonprofits and health care. Harris enjoys running and spending time with her family.

Jung Eun Park, JP for short, is an assistant professor of accounting. She earned a Ph.D. from Louisiana State University, a master’s from Florida State University and a bachelor’s from Catholic University of Korea. She worked for PolyMirae Co. Ltd. for several years before going to graduate school. Her research interests include financial reporting quality, securities regulation, initial public offerings, auditing, and audit specialization. Her teaching interests include financial accounting, cost accounting, and auditing. From Seoul, South Korea, JP enjoys cooking Korean food.

HOLLAND NAMED DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR EMERITUS The Department of Marketing and Entrepreneurship honored Dr. Jonna Holland, associate professor of marketing, with the Distinguished Professor Emeritus Award for 2018. Holland retired this spring after more than 20 years of service at UNO. Department colleagues presented her award on April 26 during her last day of teaching at the UNO College of Business Administration. Holland started her career in marketing and technical sales support at New England Telephone and Northern Telecom. She returned to academia and earned her Ph.D. in marketing in 1996 and, soon after, joined the marketing faculty at UNO. An award-winning professor and active community member, Holland served as chair of the UNO sustainability committee and as the coordinator of the Boys and Girls Clubs Stock Market Championship. She is also a community partner with BeadforLife, a fair trade organization dedicated to eradicating poverty.

ADDITIONAL CBA RETIREES LEX KACZMAREK, MBA DIRECTOR Lex retired after 28 years of service at the UNO College of Business Administration. Learn more on page 6.

RICHARD FILE, PH.D., ACCOUNTING Before entering academia, Dr. File worked in public accounting in Texas, serving education, oil and gas, real estate, agriculture, banking, and manufacturing clients. He taught financial accounting and retired this summer after 30 years of service at the UNO College of Business Administration.

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UNO ECONOMICS Undergraduate and graduate students studying economics at UNO will benefit from the following program updates, which allow a faster path toward earning an advanced degree and additional opportunities for international students to gain work experience.

STEM DESIGNATION In recognition of the quantitative nature of UNO’s economics graduate programs, the degree programs have received STEM designation effective Fall 2018. Under current rules, international students with science, technology, engineering, and math degrees are eligible for an additional 24 months of optional practical training (OPT) beyond the standard 12 months of OPT. UNO’s Master of Science and Master of Arts in Economics programs provide a solid background in economic theory, econometric and quantitative methods, and other applied skills. Economists’ unique blend of understanding human behavior and strong empirical skills allows them to solve many societal or organizational problems.

ACCELERATED 4+1 DEGREE The new 4+1 economics program provides the opportunity for eligible undergraduate UNO students to earn a Master of Science in Economics degree in one additional year of study beyond completion of their bachelor’s degree. Eligible students can obtain a joint Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (with an economics concentration), Bachelor of Science in Economics, or Bachelor of Arts in Economics, and a Master of Science in Economics within a five-year period.

Learn more

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UNO ACCOUNTING EARNS

IMA ENDORSEMENT UNO is the first university in the state to earn an endorsement from the Institute of Management Accountants (IMA). The endorsement covers the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Accounting concentration and Master of Accounting degree programs, touting the quality of the UNO College of Business Administration’s management accounting curriculum. Fewer than 50 universities across the country to date have earned IMA’s higher education endorsement. To qualify, business programs must meet the quality educational standards required for students to earn a Certified Management Accountant (CMA) designation. Standards include evidence of learning outcomes as well as faculty support, employer relations, and program accreditation.

EXCELLENCE IN ACCOUNTING EDUCATION UNO Department of Accounting offers many opportunities for students to engage in the community and prepare for their careers. Programs include the Accounting Careers Program, Accounting Speakers Series, and Accounting Careers Expo. UNO’s Beta Alpha Psi accounting student honors organization has earned international recognition as a Superior Chapter for the past eight consecutive years. The department maintains a specialized accounting accreditation through AACSB International. Fewer than 200 universities worldwide hold this prestigious, rigorous accreditation.

“Students in UNO’s undergraduate and graduate accounting programs understand the career benefits associated with professional certifications such as CMA and CPA,” said Department Chairperson Susan Eldridge, Ph.D., CPA. “Our curricula and student learning experiences, along with directed faculty advising, support students pursuing certification options.”

Dr. Susan Eldridge, professor and department chair, was honored at the IMA Platte Valley Chapter on May 11 as a woman leader in Nebraska. A visionary leader in education for over 20 years, Eldridge has created opportunities for others to pursue high-quality education and professional development. She’s garnered recognition for her service to the college and community as well as her contributions to the finance and accounting industries.

OUR CURRICULA AND STUDENT LEARNING EXPERIENCES, ALONG WITH DIRECTED FACULTY ADVISING, SUPPORT STUDENTS PURSUING CERTIFICATION OPTIONS. 2 0 1 7 - 2 0 1 8 11


UNO REAL ESTATE

RECEIVES CRE AWARD

UNO’s Center for Real Estate and Asset Management was honored during the annual Commercial Real Estate (CRE) Summit in April. This event attracts nearly 1,000 participants from the local real estate community. The center received the CRE Summit Chairman’s Recognition Award for its long-time support of the Omaha real estate community and dedicated efforts to educate future generations of commercial real estate professionals. During the same event, real estate student Tiffany Hunter received the inaugural CRE Summit student scholarship, valued at $5,000. A senior studying real estate and land use economics, Hunter is a member of UNO’s Honors Program, is president of Rho Epsilon real estate student organization, and is an intern at Union Pacific Railroad.

UNO LAUNCHES NEBRASKA’S

FIRST STUDENT VENTURE FUND This spring, the UNO College of Business Administration launched the Maverick Venture Fund, the first student-run venture fund in Nebraska. Supported by UNO's Center for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Franchising (CIEF), the fund makes actual investments in local companies. Beginning in January 2018, the first class of fund analysts — including eight undergraduates and six graduate students — were mentored by local venture capitalists and investment professionals. Part-time faculty member Tom Chapman, owner of Chapman and Co. and a practicing lawyer, took the class through the book Venture Deals and helped students gain insight and experience in the world of venture capital and angel investing. This fall, fund analysts were promoted to fund associates and, equipped with $20,000, began to scout, analyze, and manage early-stage investments in student, alumni, and community startups. The class is positioned for steady and high-quality deal flow this semester, giving them rare and valuable hands-on experience in venture capital. Next spring, the veteran students will coach and mentor the incoming students for the next cohort, bringing it full circle.

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Students interested in applying contact: CIEF Associate Director Levi Cermak lcermak7@unomaha.edu For more information about seeking funding for your business or idea, visit

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C B A C R E AT E S A UNIQUE

CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE

Born at the UNO College of Business Administration in 2015, the Capstone Cup is unique to UNO’s metropolitan university identity and is focused on engaging the community and preparing students for success.

THANKS TO OUR 2017-18 AND 2018-19 SPONSORS

Student teams compete in three rounds of a tournament-style competition. Every UNO business student enrolled in an on-campus section of the undergraduate capstone course (Corporate & Business Strategy) participates in this competition, impacting over 300 students each year. The competition combines integrated learning with community and alumni engagement. Student teams have 10 days to analyze a complex business situation, develop a creative and practical solution, and build a presentation for a panel of faculty, alumni, and business leaders. Competition Benefits: • A real-time professional development experience for students • Enhanced engagement with alumni and local business community • A prime opportunity for employers to identify and recruit up-and-coming talent

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For sponsorship information and inquiries, visit

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CAPSTONE CUP BY THE NUMBERS SINCE 2015

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Competitions

STUDENTS WIN

COLLEGE MARKETING COMPETITION

1,023

Participants

40% Female

30%

International

7%

Active Military, Veterans, or Military Dependent Students

90

Judges

29

Area Employers

Last winter, UNO business students enjoyed back-to-back wins during a college marketing competition against peers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Creighton University. In partnership with Heartland Chevy Dealers and Southport Marketing, the competition challenges students to develop a marketing plan for the Chevy brand. Working as a marketing agency with a $100,000 mock budget, teams are tasked with preparing a 30-second TV commercial, social media marketing, event marketing, and budget research. UNO’s winning student team presented to a panel of more than 10 managers from Chevy and Southport Marketing, impressing judges with their out-of-the-box thinking and a well-developed marketing plan for the Chevy Trax. “This competition was a great experience,” said Erin Dabbs, a senior business student and member of the winning team. “Creighton and UNL both brought strong teams and set the bar high. Being from three different universities, everyone’s presentation styles were unique, and I enjoyed learning from each group.”

WINNING THE COMPETITION BACKTO-BACK SHOWCASES THE ABILITY OF UNO MARKETING STUDENTS TO HANDLE REALWORLD MARKETING CHALLENGES. DR. YANHUI ZHAO ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MARKETING

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THE FIRST IN HIS FAMILY TO EARN A COLLEGE DEGREE, DANNY VENTURA IS SAVORING HIS NEW CAREER INSIDE AN ICONIC OMAHA SKYSCRAPER

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ON SUNDAYS LAST FALL, DANNY VENTURA ROSE EARLY AND RACED TO MAMMEL HALL. Prepared to study, the senior business student brought his breakfast­— a box of Eggo waffles and gallon of milk— and booked it to one of the building’s breakout rooms. “I’m all in, I have my hat on, and I’m not leaving until I finish what I have to finish,”says Ventura, reflecting on the busiest semester of his college career when he was enrolled in 24 credit hours (double a typical course load). Spending most of his life in Dodge and Fremont, Nebraska, Ventura knew he wanted to attend UNO. Omaha was a major draw, especially the downtown skyline, he says. “I’ve always liked cities and big buildings, maybe because I was born in L.A.” The summer before college, Ventura worked at Fremont Beef Co. as a packaging specialist, reporting every day at six a.m. That workplace, and its employees, made an impression. “I heard stories of adults working there for $10 an hour,” he says. “When I’m at the university and I get to study, there’s no room to complain.”

“The College of Business has been a place for me to meet everybody, a place to get to work, a place to find internships,” he says.

becoming the first person in his family to earn a college degree. And a few weeks later, he began commuting to his new office inside Omaha’s iconic tower.

Through the college’s connections, Ventura heard about First National Bank’s management trainee program, which is designed to develop the firm’s future leaders. And that’s when his Sunday study sessions last fall became serious business.

“I was so happy when day one came,” says Ventura, crediting his extensive internship experience for preparing him to hit the ground running.

A master time manager, Ventura was working overtime to graduate a semester early—all because he wanted an interview; a shot at becoming a management trainee.

Carrying that same hustle-hard mentality with him at UNO, Ventura often worked seven days a week juggling classes, study sessions, and work.

Thankfully, his sacrifices paid off. After an intensive and competitive interview process this spring, he found out he was one of only four candidates selected out of hundreds of applicants.

Before college, Ventura didn’t know what an internship was. A few years later, he had several sales and marketing roles on his résumé, including Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Do Space, and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Nebraska.

With his dream job secured, Ventura cruised through his final semester. In May, he earned a B.S. in Business Administration with concentrations in marketing and international business,

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In the coming months, he will be shadowing different business units within the bank, gaining hands-on experience in many roles and personalized career guidance. After one year, the goal is to find the right fit within the organization. “Working here is a dream come true,” he says. “It’s why we study. Why we eat those waffles on Sunday when nobody’s watching. It’s a blessing.” Ventura credits others— coworkers, his mother, UNO— for giving him the confidence to go after his dreams. “I will always be grateful to this university,” says Ventura, who plans to come back in a couple years to earn his

MBA. In fact, he didn’t attend commencement this spring. He’s saving that special moment for his master’s degree, he says. Right now, Ventura is focused on soaking in as much knowledge as he can while also inspiring others to follow in his footsteps. “I want to help those who are in my shoes,” he says. Those people include his sister, who’s studying education at UNO, and other first-generation students. The 23-year-old gives this advice to current students: Put your best foot forward and keep swinging. “The worst we’ll ever hear in our internship quest, our career quest, is that key phrase: thank you for your interest,” he says. Outside the office, Ventura is taking advantage of his free time and working toward a personal goal. “I’m learning how to cook the right way, slowly but surely,” he says. “Eggo waffles — we’re not doing that any more. That’s my new challenge right now.”


THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS HAS BEEN A PLACE FOR ME TO MEET EVERYBODY, A PLACE TO GET TO WORK, A PLACE TO FIND INTERNSHIPS. C O V2E0R1 7S- T2O 01 R 8Y 19


The three finalists included UNO student organization “Room at Our Table” and teams from the University of Maryland and Boise State. UNO’s students presented the results of an online and in-person campaign, which aimed to change the attitudes of people who were uncommitted in their feelings about refugee families in Nebraska.

THIS IS PARTICULARLY RELEVANT TO NEBRASKA BECAUSE WE RESETTLE MORE REFUGEES THAN ANY OTHER STATE PER CAPITA. WE SHARED THE STORIES OF A LOCAL FAMILY OF REFUGEES TO GIVE PEOPLE A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF WHERE THESE FAMILIES ARE COMING FROM AND WHAT THEY’VE BEEN THROUGH. ULTIMATELY, WE WANTED TO HELP PEOPLE FEEL MORE EMPATHY. VIRGINIA GALLNER, NEW UNO GRADUATE

STUDENTS FINISH THIRD IN NATIONAL COUNTEREXTREMISM COMPETITION WRITTEN BY SAM PETTO

This summer a Maverick student organization finished third in a national competition leveraging social media to counter extremism. The Anti-Defamation League (ADL): Innovate Against Hate campus challenge finals took place in Washington, D.C. in front of a jury panel of industry leaders, including representatives from Facebook, Univision, and Pew Charitable Trusts. The competition challenged students to design, pilot, and implement social or digital initiatives with the goal of countering hate and extremism. 20 U N O B U S I N E S S

The students tracked the effectiveness of their efforts for comparison to white supremacist groups’ social media posts targeting refugees. To learn just how effective the different groups’ messages were, the team leveraged cutting-edge marketing technology in the College of Business Administration’s Koraleski Commerce and Applied Behavioral Laboratory (CAB Lab), measuring physical responses to messages. The result: both sets of posts caused strong emotions—but the group’s digital work in combination with an in-person event created more positive perceptions about refugees. The campaign is an evolution of a project the team developed in 2017, earning a fourth place finish in a similar competition sponsored by Homeland Security and EdVenture Partners. Gina Ligon, associate professor of management, says the students’ use of marketing technology and theory is what helped them advance to the finals of the competition.

THIS IS AN EXAMPLE OF HOW TECHNOLOGY FROM A BUSINESS SCHOOL CAN MAKE AN IMPACT IN THE FIGHT AGAINST EXTREMISM, IN THIS CASE LOCAL WHITE SUPREMACISTS. IT SHOWS HOW COLLABORATIVE, INTERDISCIPLINARY WORK CAN OFFER UNCONVENTIONAL SOLUTIONS TO SERIOUS THREATS AND HOW STUDENTS CAN BE CREDIBLE MESSENGERS AGAINST EXTREMISM. GINA LIGON, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF MANAGEMENT Beyond social media, the team also organized an in-person group dialogue event with more than 60 attendees. The group’s community partners include Lutheran Family Services and ADL Great Plains. Campus partners include Sustained Dialogue at UNO, Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative at UNO, as well as faculty and graduate students within the College of Arts and Sciences; the College of Business Administration; the College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media (UNO Social Media Lab); the College of Information Science & Technology; and the College of Public Affairs and Community Service (School of Criminology and Criminal Justice). The effort originates from an Honors program colloquium course taught in Fall 2016.


ACCESS TO EXCEP TIONAL

FACILITIES

UNO’s Mammel Hall, home of the College of Business Administration, will get a 43,700 square foot addition. Construction on the privately-funded, $17 million addition is expected to begin September 2019 and be completed by April 2021. The program statement calls the project a top facilities development priority of UNO. The building addition will provide additional space for classrooms, faculty offices, research instructional laboratories, student individual and group study space, and a multipurpose room that can seat 180 people.

THIS INVESTMENT BY OUR COMMUNITY IS A VOTE OF CONFIDENCE IN THE LEADING ROLE UNO WILL CONTINUE TO PLAY IN DEVELOPING NEBRASKA’S SKILLED WORKFORCE. JEFFREY P. GOLD, M.D., CHANCELLOR, UNMC & UNO

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FACULTY RESEARCH GAINING STAKEHOLDER APPROVAL: A WINNING STRATEGY By Dr. Erin Bass

In a study published in the Academy of Management Journal, Erin Bass and co-authors from UNL and Oklahoma State University researched the use of scrutiny as an advantage and uncover what they term the “scrutiny-bundling phenomenon.” Using data from 2003-2010 of media coverage and investment activities of publicly-traded

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organizations, the team found a pattern of behavior in which managers hasten unpopular—but necessary—actions which they know may well attract scrutiny. Our takeaway message is not for practitioners to hasten their engagement in unfavorable behavior, but rather to be conscious of timing when these behaviors might occur. “This study provides an important piece of strategic food-for-thought for managers,” says Bass. “Most organizations face scrutiny at one time or another. Being strategic about using that time-frame of scrutiny can actually enhance financial performance in the long-run.”

In another research project, Bass and a colleague at the College of Charleston researched another option for dealing with stakeholder scrutiny: strategic actions to turn scrutiny into social approval. Inspired by the recent pipeline protests, the team interviewed employees of energy companies as well as members

of Native American communities to understand how organizations gain—and stakeholders grant— social approval. The authors uncovered a sequential process that follows four stages: 1) enacting responsibility to stakeholders by focusing on safety, 2) creating a relational space with stakeholders, 3) working together to build a shared philosophy, and 4) cocreating positive social impact. This process makes stakeholders more likely to approve of the organization and its project. This saves the organization time and money, but also increases its reputation in and connection to the local community. “Although this project is set in a particular context, I think it provides important lessons for all organizations,” Bass says. “Ignoring stakeholder demands is a thing of the past. We find that organizations that invest in developing authentic relationships with stakeholders are more likely to be able to execute their strategy, complete

projects on time and with little resistance, and even become preferred community partners.” The implications of this research have received international attention from both the corporate and academic worlds. In June, Bass was invited to speak on this topic to a group of energy executives from around the world at the Haskayne School of Business at the University of Calgary in Canada. In September, Bass presented the team’s research at the Strategic Management Society Conference in Paris, France. “I love researching practical things,” she says. “Things that executives can actually implement to create value. Our responsibility as business faculty is not to tell managers what to do, but rather to work alongside organizations and provide actionable insights, while at the same time learning from their experiences.”


IS REBRANDING WORTHWHILE? By Dr. Yanhui Zhao

later considered a failure, reportedly cost Gap $100 million. The cost of Pepsi’s rebranding campaign in 2008 was estimated at over $1 billion. Moreover, the public’s reaction to rebranding is extremely uncertain. For example, when Starbucks refreshed its brand identity by dropping “STARBUCKS COFFEE” from its long-existing logo in 2011, a backlash ensued on social media.

A recent study by Dr. Yanhui Zhao, assistant professor of marketing, reveals an increase in stock prices due to rebranding. Rebranding campaigns seem to be popping up at an accelerated pace. This year, we have observed multiple rebranding events in the marketplace. MONI, OM Asset Management, Link Motion, Encompass Heath, and Weight Watchers all launched rebranding campaigns in early 2018. Firms employ rebranding initiatives to rebuild brand associations, regain market recognition, update brand identity, and improve brand strategy. When a firm’s external or internal environment changes, it needs to revise its brand strategy and identity to enhance marketing communications with various stakeholders. However, rebranding campaigns carry significant costs and risks. For example, Gap’s logo change in 2010, which was

Given the benefits and risks, there is no hard evidence of whether or not it is worthwhile for a firm to invest in rebranding projects. In light of practical rebranding concerns and the lack of empirical evidence in the area, we conducted a study (Zhao, Yanhui, Roger J. Calantone, and Clay M. Voorhees, "Identity change vs. strategy change: the effects of rebranding announcements on stock returns." Forthcoming at the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science) to answer two questions of managerial importance: First, is it worthwhile to rebrand? Specifically, do the benefits of rebranding outweigh its costs and risks? Second, what factors should firms consider when rebranding? IS REBRANDING WORTHWHILE? In this study, we examined how rebranding campaigns influence investors’ valuation of firms. Our sample consisted of 215 rebranding announcements across a 20-year span (1996–2015). Our results suggest that, on average, rebranding events are

associated with positive stock returns. We observed an average increase of 2.46 percent in stock prices, which is equivalent to an average gain of $31 million in market value of the sample firms.

their rebranding announcement. Therefore, in the face of fierce competition, a firm should refrain from changing its name, and limit its rebranding efforts to aesthetic elements (e.g., logo).

Therefore, we conclude that investors appreciate and reward firms’ rebranding efforts, and that rebranding produces significantly positive changes in firm value. Generally speaking, it is worthwhile to rebrand.

Investors reward brand strategy revisions when a firm is facing increasing competition. When a firm is under fierce attacks from competitors, firm investors demand a signal of strategy changes and will reward the firm for signaling such changes. For example, when competitors were increasingly encroaching on its traditional computer business, Apple Computer Inc. announced in 2007 that it was changing its name to Apple Inc. to signal its brand transition, and the stock market reacted very positively (10.87 percent increase in stock price). Investors may also punish firms that do not modify their brand strategy when facing increasing competition. For example, part of the reason that investors negatively reacted to Starbucks’ rebranding campaign in 2011 (2.86 percent decrease in stock price) was that they did not see brand strategy changes in Starbucks’s rebranding efforts.

However, not every firm benefited from rebranding. We observed that 89 out of 215 rebranding events in our sample were followed by negative stock market reactions. As such, we are interested in further identifying and understanding what factors influence investors’ valuation of the worth of rebranding. THE FIT OF REBRANDING TO COMPETITIVE CONDITIONS We found that investors’ valuation of the worth of rebranding is significantly driven by the fit of rebranding to the current competitive conditions. Specifically, we offer the following observations: Investors reward corporate name changes in less competitive industries (3.82 percent increase in stock price) and brand logo changes in competitive industries (5.15 percent increase in stock price). A highly competitive environment carries more risk for complete corporate name changes than a less competitive environment. For example, because of the pressure of competition, Research in Motion changed its name to Blackberry in 2013, but a 7.5 percent decrease in stock price followed

Firms should be especially cautious when abandoning long-standing brand identities. We observed a significantly negative impact of brand identity age on the worth of rebranding. For example, when the long-term firm Phillip Morris announced its name change to Altria in 2001, there was a 6.9 percent decrease in its stock price.

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HOW FUN IS YOUR WORKPLACE? By Dr. Lynn Harland

several years later when Ford, Newstrom, and McLaughlin surveyed 572 HR professionals regarding their perceptions of the frequency of various fun activities at work and the outcomes associated with those activities. This initial study sparked other academics to begin examining the phenomenon of workplace fun in a more systematic fashion. Academic interest in workplace fun has continued to grow and has spread beyond its initial roots in the U.S. to researchers across the globe.

Dr. Lynn Harland, associate dean and professor of management, researches workplace fun as well as service-learning and team effectiveness. Can you think of a time in the last year that you had fun at work? This could have been a one-time experience or something that happens more regularly. Assuming you were able to think of an example, why do you think it was fun? (In other words, what made it fun for you?) While we don’t always immediately associate work with fun, our research and the research of others suggests that people do sometimes have fun at work and that having fun at work can be associated with positive organizational outcomes. While books like “Fish!: A Remarkable Way to Boost Morale and Improve Results” (co-written by Lundin, Paul, and Christensen in 1998) touted the benefits of workplace fun—there was no empirical research to back up those claims until

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So after 20 years of research on workplace fun, what do we know? We know that while people differ in what they think is fun, most people hold reasonably positive views toward the appropriateness, the importance, and the benefits of having fun at work. In terms of what people think is fun at work, people tend to feel less positive toward extreme or “wacky” fun (e.g., office Olympics) and more positive toward “normal” fun activities such as outings and parties. Not surprisingly, younger employees tend to rate workplace fun activities more positively overall, but attitudes regarding the appropriateness of having fun at work don’t seem to differ as a function of age. While women rate fun activities more positively and higher in importance, there is consistency across genders in their relative rankings of various fun activities. In the realm of personality differences, few would be shocked to learn that people with personalities higher in extroversion and agreeableness tend to have more positive attitudes toward fun.

Interestingly, there do appear to be organizational context differences in ratings of fun activities such that employees in business, nonprofit, and governmental organizations rate various workplace fun activities significantly differently. When we turn our attention to looking at the research on organizational outcomes associated with workplace fun, we find that outcomes such as satisfaction, commitment, employee retention, applicant attraction, service quality, and performance are positively associated with workplace fun. So is that the end of the story? Not quite! Over the last 10 years several researchers have started examining the potential negative outcomes (e.g., employee cynicism) associated with organizationally mandated (versus naturally occurring) fun. This more nuanced notion that workplace fun activities vary widely in their characteristics has led to the development of models of workplace fun that “unpack” workplace fun into specific dimensions that more accurately capture the differences underlying various workplace fun activities. For example, our recent research suggests that workplace fun activities can reliably be categorized as Organic (i.e., naturally occurring/spontaneous) versus Managed (i.e., company organized). Another reliable way to categorize fun activities stems from whether the fun is associated with a work task or is non-task in nature. Indeed, when our sample was asked to describe a fun

activity they experienced at work in the last year, the most frequently reported activities (53 percent) were non-task company-organized activities (e.g., company parties). Perhaps less surprisingly, only 15 percent of respondents described a workplace fun activity that would be classified as Organic and Task-related (e.g., working with children). In a recent study, we looked closely at respondents’ explanations of why they found specific experiences to be fun and those explanations have utility for managers. Over 62 percent of our respondents mentioned the following four reasons why an activity was fun: “talking, laughing, interacting” (30 percent), “informal, relaxed, no stress” (12 percent), “different than the normal work setting” (12 percent), and “food or drink” (8 percent). The finding that almost onethird of our respondents mentioned “talking, laughing, interacting” as the primary reason why an activity was fun is highly consistent with Gallup’s wellbeing research indicating that an employee’s amount of “social time” is associated with his or her level of well-being. For managers and HR professionals, research on workplace fun is a potential source of ideas for enhancing organizational effectiveness. For example, are there ways that your organization can design a task that makes it more intrinsically fun—for example—gamification? Is there a way that your organization can intentionally


design physical spaces that increase spontaneous “talking, laughing and interacting”? One organization found that relocating a pool table into an open and inviting break area led to higher levels of talking, laughing, and interacting among employees than when the pool table was located in a room with doors. One simple way to incorporate more fun into your organization is to establish a “fun” committee that gathers employee input on potential fun activities and then plans non-mandatory fun activities based upon that input. As Dale Carnegie noted decades ago, “People rarely succeed unless they have fun in what they are doing.”

AN UNBIASED MEASURE OF STUDENT LEARNING By Dr. Ben Smith and Dr. Jamie Wagner

Dr. Ben Smith, assistant professor of economics, researches the areas of economic education, industrial organization, and behavioral economics.

Dr. Jamie Wagner, assistant professor of economics, directs UNO’s Center for Economic Education and researches economic education, economics pedagogy, and financial literacy. Student learning or knowledge is measured for all sorts of reasons: some to determine the effectiveness of specific education programs (e.g., financial literacy) on life outcomes and some to determine if specific innovations in pedagogy (e.g., grade ‘nudges’), at the classroom or school level, have resulted in increased learning. Perhaps most importantly, all accredited institutions (including UNO) must measure learning as a part of the continuous improvement process. The earliest, and most popular, measures of learning are scores on assignments or exams (stock of knowledge). These are actually measures of knowledge instead of knowledge accumulation (learning). These measures effectively assume that all samples of students have the same incoming subject-level knowledge; an obviously incorrect assumption.

Some investigators difference post- and pre-test scores to account for the student’s incoming knowledge (flow of knowledge); this measurement controls for incoming knowledge, but it mixes multiple types of learning and is biased given that students will guess when they don’t know the answer to the question.

and adjust for the expected amount of guessing. This is a more accurate and detail-oriented way to study learning with known statistical properties; when used by instructors, this topicarea level understanding can lead to better feedback to the instructor and, as a result, better teaching.

Given the importance of measuring student learning, it is somewhat surprising that the typical measures of learning are biased and have unknown (or undesirable) statistical properties. The only redeeming characteristic of the stock and flow of knowledge is that they are easy to calculate. But given they are biased measures, they can lead to incorrect research results and incorrect conclusions by university units on how best to improve student learning.

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE RESEARCH

A collection of researchers at the University of Nebraska are attempting to correct this undesirable situation. Three recent papers in The Journal of Economic Education provide the investigator with improved measures of learning. These measures disaggregate types of learning (Walstad & Wagner, 2016) and are unbiased in the presence of student guessing (Smith & Wagner, 2018). Further, these measures have known statistical properties (Smith & Wagner, 2018) and can be easily implemented by researchers, assessment committees, and educators (Smith, 2018). These papers are built on the previous convention of differencing the post- and pre-test scores, but examine student-level data to categorize types of learning

Despite the relatively short life of this research program, these improved measures have already been adopted for assessment at multiple universities and in multiple disciplines. Further, researchers both in the United States and abroad have adopted the measures to achieve more accurate estimates of the phenomenon of interest. With this work, assessment units, researchers, and educators no longer have to depend on biased measures of learning. This will lead to better research, better assessment and better decisions. REFERENCES: Ben O. Smith (2018). Multiplatform software tool to disaggregate and adjust value-added learning scores. The Journal of Economic Education, 49(2), 220-221. Ben O. Smith & Jamie Wagner (2018). Adjusting for guessing and applying a statistical test to the disaggregation of value-added learning scores. The Journal of Economic Education, 49(4), Forthcoming (Fall 2018 Issue). William B. Walstad & Jamie Wagner (2016). The disaggregation of value-added test scores to assess learning outcomes in economics courses. The Journal of Economic Education, 47(2), 121-131.

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MAVERICK BUSINESS PLAN COMPETITION

Fresh out of business school, a passionate team is chasing their dreams through a new nonprofit, CollegePrep.org, founded on the mission of educational equity. Raul Aguilera, 21, describes his personal college search process as painful. He battled massive information barriers and wasn’t sure where to turn for guidance, he says. His status as a Deferred Action of Childhood Arrivals (DACA) student added an extra layer of difficulty for the South Sioux City, NE, native. He persevered and ended up at the University of Nebraska at Omaha as a high-achiever and member of the University Honors Program. Aguilera graduated in May, earning a B.S. in Business Administration with an accounting concentration. “UNO has been a fantastic place to explore and meet various kinds of people,” he says. “The Maverick community has been very supportive of a lot of my quests, including winning the Maverick Business Plan Competition.”

WE’RE VERY PASSIONATE ABOUT THE IMPACT THAT THIS CAN HAVE. WE WILL DO WHATEVER IT TAKES TO POSITIVELY IMPACT THE LIVES OF STUDENTS. (RAUL AGUILERA) 2018 RESULTS UNO's Center for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Franchising hosted the 2018 Maverick Business Plan Competition in April. Finalists pitched their business plans to a panel of experts for a chance to win up to $3,000 in prize money. Congratulations to the top three:

$3,000 COLLEGEPREP Raul Aguilera, Nathan Novack, Amrit Kandel

$2,000 PRAIRIE LEGAL, LLC Prairie Legal provides comprehensive virtual attorney services to rural Nebraska.

Gabriella Hezel

$1,000 BITWELL MEDIA BitWell Media specializes in the development of brokering apps that bridge gaps between isolated markets.

Emily Buettner, Vondre Caldwell

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In April, Aguilera and business partners Nathan Novak and Amrit Kandel were part of a group of finalists invited to pitch their budding businesses to a panel of alumni, entrepreneurs, and community members at Mammel Hall. Their winning business, CollegePrep, is a nonprofit fueled by the fundamental belief that every high school student should have access to top-notch college preparatory resources, Aguilera says. “These resources are like oxygen—everyone needs them.” CollegePrep seeks to remove information barriers for highpotential students so they can go to the college of their choice, he says. Serving as chief operating officer, Aguilera and his team plan to use the $3,000 in prize money to beta test their products, which include personalized test prep resources and a tutor marketplace. In a cluttered market, the power of CollegePrep lies in its nonprofit business model as well as personalization and scalability through the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning technology. In addition to the company’s five co-founders, CollegePrep has a sizable team of volunteer software engineers to help bring this dream to life. The nonprofit has also secured partnerships with two rural educational cooperatives that will beta test the products. Long term, the team is working to build a comprehensive web-based platform that serves students around the world and accelerates the pace of educational equity.

Learn more

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IT WAS AWESOME BUT DIFFICULT. WE TREAT EVERY GUEST AS IF IT’S THEIR FIRST TIME AT DISNEY. WE’RE MAKING THAT MAGIC 24/7.

YOUNG ALUMNA EARNS HER EARS IN

DISNEY COLLEGE PROGRAM Brieland Fripp, 23, earned her business administration degree from UNO last December. Shortly after walking across the stage at Baxter Arena, she left for magical Walt Disney World Resort in Florida — act one in a dream that’s been years in the making. “I’ve been obsessed with Disney since I was born,” says Fripp, who grew up in Bellevue with a Disney-themed nursery. “It’s in my blood.”

Disney store, World of Disney. Fripp says she used her business and sales skills daily.

At three years old, she made her first visit to Disney World, donning princess dresses and leaving with a dream to one day live in Cinderella’s castle.

“It was awesome but difficult,” says Fripp, describing her long hours “on stage,” which is Disney speak for working on the floor in front of guests. “We treat all guests as if it’s their first time at Disney. We’re making that magic 24/7.”

Fripp had her sights set on the Disney College Program (DCP) for years, and she believes her strong résumé and passion for all things Disney helped her stand out and lock in her spot during the competitive application process. Her past experience includes a mission trip to South Africa and months spent working as a social media intern at Core Bank—an excellent complement to her marketing concentration for UNO’s Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (BSBA) degree. As a newly crowned cast member (Disney employee), Fripp checked in to her new digs in mid-January. Although she wasn’t living at the castle, she lived close by in an apartment reserved for DCP participants. The program spans five months, including one week of intensive training. “Earning her ears,” she worked in retail at the world’s largest

Interacting with guests from around the world, Fripp says one of her biggest takeaways was learning how to talk to anyone and navigating language barriers. “I learned how much I enjoy working with people and building relationships.” During her play time, Fripp spent the days park hopping. The fireworks show at Magic Kingdom was among her favorite experiences, she says. Her 23rd birthday was also magical. “I spent my birthday at the happiest place on earth. That’s been a lifelong dream.” Full of memories, knowledge, and new friendships, Fripp moved back home in May. Now, she’s ready for act two: starting a full-time career in marketing. Someday, she dreams of working in a marketing or sales role within the Disney empire. And as Fripp knows firsthand, dreams really do come true.

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DISTINGUISHED ALMUNI GROW TO

105

The UNO College of Business Administration honored four esteemed alumni in May during the 31st annual Distinguished Alumni Achievement Awards luncheon. The following honorees join an exclusive list that now totals 105 distinguished UNO business alumni from a network of more than 20,000.

Amala Duggirala came to the U.S. to work on a master’s degree in computer science but then decided an MBA would be a better fit for her career aspirations. It was a good decision. When she started working, she wasn’t asked about technology but rather business, such as how to convert strategy into action. Duggirala now works at the confluence of information technology and business. She’s a change agent, challenging longestablished norms in an industry that’s often conservative and slow to adapt.

Mohamad Doghman began college in Lebanon but civil war forced him to flee. Arriving in the U.S. at 21 years old, he learned English in record time thanks to UNO’s intensive English language program and earned a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from UNL, an M.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Missouri, and finally an Executive MBA from UNO. Thanks to strong family support, Doghman has seen many lives in his family changed from higher education, including one of his daughters who graduated from the UNO College of Business Administration in 2011.

Greg McMillan is an entrepreneur who began his career at Cargill as a financial analyst. With high aspirations, he and a couple of co-workers went on to form an investment firm, Varde (Swedish for value). Two years in, they had $30 million in assets under management, and today the firm has grown to $14 billion in assets under management with 270 employees worldwide. Retired from Varde, McMillan now owns another investment firm, Blackburn, with his son. He and his wife, Lori, are also philanthropists and look for ways to support students.

Dr. Vincent Miscia has led a fascinating life with two different and successful careers. An accomplished cardiologist, he saved many lives while living in New Jersey, Alabama, Maryland, and Florida before the University of Nebraska Medical Center recruited him to join their faculty. After retiring from UNMC in 1999, Dr. Miscia and his wife moved to Connecticut. He worked in New York City as an investment consultant and later founded a hedge fund, Pacemaker Fund, managing it from 2003-2012. Dr. Miscia, also a retired U.S. Army colonel, and his wife are now back in Omaha. They started an investment club, Margin of Safety, in 2015.

AMALA DUGGIRALA, MBA 2005 EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT & ENTERPRISE CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER, REGIONS BANK

MOHAMAD DOGHMAN, EXECUTIVE MBA 2007 VICE PRESIDENT, ENERGY DELIVERY & CHIEF COMPLIANCE OFFICER, OPPD

GREG MCMILLAN, BSBA 1983 CEO & CO-CHIEF INVESTMENT OFFICER, BLACKBURN INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT

VINCENT MISCIA, EXECUTIVE MBA 1992 DOCTOR; FOUNDER, PACEMAKER FUND; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, UNMC

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‘40 UNDER 40’ LIST

SALUTES MANY MAVERICKS

RALPH DOVALI Hancock & Dana, P.C.

The Midlands Business Journal’s 2017 “40 Under 40” list saluted many with ties to UNO, including five from CBA. The list honors 40 young, dynamic business leaders in the Omaha metropolitan area.

(alumnus, Executive MBA)

(alumnus, MBA)

JEROD EVANICH A Place at Home

ASHLEY KUHN White Lotus Group (alumna, BSBA)

PATRICK FALKE Project Harmony (alumnus, BSBA & MBA)

JAMIE WAGNER The University of Nebraska at Omaha

(faculty, Economics Dept.)

DAN O’NEILL INDUCTED INTO

OMAHA BUSINESS HALL OF FAME Retired president of First National Bank, Dan O’Neill earned a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from UNO in 1977. He was named a Distinguished CBA Alumnus in 2004. And in April 2018, O’Neill was one of five outstanding leaders to join the Greater Omaha Chamber’s Omaha Business Hall of Fame. 2 0 1 7 - 2 0 1 8 29


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2018 MARKS A MILESTONE ANNIVERSARY OF UNO ALUMNI TIM AND TRACI HARRISON SCHOLARSHIP

UNO alumni Tim and Traci Harrison were once a couple of college kids with big dreams and high work ethic, juggling jobs and classes. Now they’re high-powered partners (and parents of pre-teens) making it a priority to pay it forward.

PAY IN G I T

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“OMAHA IS A SPECIAL PLACE BECAUSE THERE ARE SO MANY FAMILIES THAT WANT TO GIVE. I THINK EVERYBODY WANTS TO DO GOOD THINGS FOR OTHERS, THEY JUST MAY NOT KNOW THE BEST PATH.” Tim turned his college sales internship at Northwestern Mutual into a thriving enterprise. An accounting major, Tim soared to the top nationally as an intern, hired his 16-year-old brother as his first employee, and has since built Harrison Financial Services to a firm of 15. Together they manage $700 million in assets and $1 billion of life insurance in force. For nearly 25 years, Tim and his team have served clients—decisionmakers, business owners, families and foundations in Omaha—and earned dozens of post-graduate credentials in the process. “One of the core values in our company is continuous learning,” Tim says. In addition to his bachelor’s degree from the UNO College of Business Administration, the Omaha native holds a master’s in financial services and numerous professional designations, including his CIMA® at the Wharton School and CPWA® from the Booth School of Business in Chicago. Traci earned a degree in international business from UNO in 2000, three years after Tim graduated. From Springfield, Nebraska, she worked in business for many years, most recently at West Corporation, before stepping away to spend more time with their son and daughter and help Tim at the office. Outside the family business, the Harrisons have also invested in the educations of nine UNO business students over the last 10 years…and counting. This year marks a milestone anniversary of the Tim and Traci Harrison Scholarship, which covers all tuition costs and is awarded annually to a junior or senior studying investment science, finance, and/or accounting. Recipients are selected based on financial need and academic achievement, and preference is given to students who work at least 20 hours a week. “It’s not easy to have a full-time job and a full-time workload in school,” says Tim, speaking from experience. “It’s nice to know there’s somebody there to offer a hand.” Tim and Traci both worked through college and know firsthand the struggles and sleep deprivation that come from a brimming schedule. But the combination of classes and work experience is key, Tim says. Since their days at UNO, the Harrisons have stayed involved on campus and in the community, serving on many nonprofit boards and even inspiring their two children, ages 10 and 12, to volunteer with them—from ringing bells for the Salvation Army to attending UNO’s service days. “We’re trying to teach them that it’s important to give back,” says Traci, who’s served on the UNO Alumni Association’s board of directors and was a member of the association’s inaugural Young Alumni Academy cohort. Both with humble upbringings, Tim and Traci say they learned by watching their own parents provide for their families and give back to the community. Among Tim’s greatest accomplishments, he says, is hiring his dad, who never had the opportunity to finish college, to work as the firm’s office manager. Aside from all the accomplishments, including the firm’s national ranking on the 2018 Financial Times 400 Top Financial Advisers list, the Harrisons hope to serve as an example for others. The Tim and Traci Harrison Scholarship is one such example. Tim says he encourages other business owners to consider giving back to their college experience by establishing a scholarship. “Omaha is a special place because there are so many families that want to give,” he says. “I think everybody wants to do good things for others, they just may not know the best path.”

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2017-18 HARRISON SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT Theresa Holly graduated in May with 150 credit hours, poised to take the CPA exam and start full time at Hancock & Dana, where she also worked as an intern. During her time at UNO, she worked over 40 hours a week and was involved in several organizations, including Beta Alpha Psi accounting fraternity, Delta Sigma Pi business fraternity, and Chi Omega sorority.

CHARITABLE GIVING Everybody should find something they’re passionate about and devote time and/or treasure to that passion. On our team, we encourage all our people to find something they really care about in the community and go make an impact.

WEALTH MANAGEMENT Pay yourself first. A good goal is saving or investing 20 percent of your gross income. But at the end of the day, make sure you’re also spending life living. We travel and take our kids on trips to create memorable experiences. Our life is not all work related. It’s about a combination of having things you’re passionate about and having fun while you’re at it.

BUILDING A BUSINESS What’s most important is find something you love to do. And the key is building a great team of people around you who know more than you do in their area of expertise.

From the moment she toured Mammel Hall, she knew the UNO College of Business Administration was going to be her home away from home. In addition to many classes and study sessions, Holly worked in the college’s operations department for nearly two years as the lead customer service consultant. “I honestly should pay rent because I’m here so much,” she says. Holly says she was excited to learn she received the Harrison’s scholarship, which allowed her to pay only $50 during her final semester. “It’s wonderful to get recognized and have my accomplishments pay off.”

THERESA HOLLY; OMAHA, NE; GROSS CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL

2013-14 HARRISON SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT Thanks to the Harrison’s generosity, Zach Griffith says he has already made it a priority to give back to UNO, both financially and through service as a mentor for the CBA Scholars Academy. Griffith worked as an intern at Union Pacific and then started full time after graduation in the financial reporting group, working at the railroad for nearly four years and holding four different jobs. In spring 2018, the young alumnus embarked on a new chapter of his life and career as a community economic development volunteer in the Peace Corps. Reflecting on his scholarship, Griffith says that instead of worrying about paying for college he was able to focus on learning, taking risks, and exploring worlds and perspectives he had no idea existed —including a life-changing opportunity to travel to India in 2013. “I have been blessed beyond measure and will make it a point throughout my life to give back, whether that is financially or through service, as I will be doing for the next 27 months in Namibia.”

ZACH GRIFFITH; OMAHA, NE; CREIGHTON PREPARATORY SCHOOL 2 0 1 7 - 2 0 1 8 33


UNO BUSINESS ALUMNI

HONORED AT COMMENCEMENT Two alumni from the UNO College of Business Administration received some of the university’s highest honors during May commencement.

ANDERSON FAMILY ORDER OF THE TOWER The Order of the Tower is awarded to individuals whose exemplary service and/or financial support have advanced the mission of UNO.

IVAN GILREATH CITATION FOR ALUMNI ACHIEVEMENT The UNO Alumni Association’s highest honor, the Citation for Alumni Achievement, encompasses career achievement, community service, involvement in business and professional associations, and fidelity to the university.

Ivan Gilreath earned an MBA from UNO in 1989 and was named a College of Business Administration Distinguished Alumnus in 2002. He is a lifelong Omahan who attended Kellom Elementary, Horace Mann Junior High School, Omaha Central, and Omaha Bryan High School. Growing up, he was active in the North Omaha Boys Club. Gilreath has served as president and CEO of the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Midlands (BGCM) since February 2011.

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Talton “Tal” Anderson began attending the University of Omaha in 1957 on a partial athletic scholarship and working part time pumping gas at a Texaco station owned by Johnny Baxter. A gifted salesperson, he left college after two years to grow his career. His hard work and dedication earned Mr. Baxter’s trust. He bought shares in the business over the years, becoming sole owner by 1984 – the same year he completed his education, earning a bachelor’s in business from the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Tal was named a College of Business Administration Distinguished Alumnus in 1992. Mary Joy LeClair grew up in Omaha, graduated from Creighton University, and went on to work for United Airlines. She and Tal married in 1965 and together they raised three children, Lisa and Mickey Anderson, and Angie Anderson Quinn. Tal passed away in 2009, handing the business over to Mickey and Angie. Mickey and Angie have been steadfast supporters of the University of Nebraska at Omaha and the Omaha Mavericks, having served on numerous university boards and generously supporting the One Fund for Athletics. In 2015, they honored their family’s long-standing connection with UNO and dedication to the Omaha community by gracing UNO’s Baxter Arena with the company’s name.


MAVERICKS

READY TO LAUNCH These Mavericks graduated in May ready to write their next chapter after college.

I HAVE NEVER QUESTIONED HOW DEDICATED THE FACULTY AND STAFF AT UNO ARE TO MY SUCCESS AND WELL-BEING.

CBA HAS PROVIDED ME WITH MANY OPPORTUNITIES TO NETWORK AND REACH OUT TO PROFESSIONALS.

Ningeena Rahmanzai completed two bachelor’s degrees in three years from UNO. In addition to her BSBA, she earned a B.S. in Political Science. This fall, she’s off to New York City to attend the CUNY School of Law, studying immigration and human rights law.

Justin Oehm is the first in his family to graduate from college and is moving on to graduate school and staying at UNO. He starts his MBA this fall and plans to take the CPA exam in spring 2019.

One of her favorite memories from CBA is meeting with her advisor, Kristy, each semester. “She is always so genuinely excited to meet with me and hear about everything that has happened since the last time we met. I have never questioned how dedicated the faculty and staff at UNO are to my success and well-being.”

NIGEENA RAHMANZAI; GRETNA, NE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION: ECONOMICS

Justin says the UNO College of Business Administration has prepared him for the future in many ways. “CBA has provided me with many opportunities to network and reach out to professionals, which has led to several internships. I am very grateful for my experiences and look forward to starting back up in the fall.”

JUSTIN OEHM; LINCOLN, NE

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATIONS: ACCOUNTING, FINANCE, BANKING & FINANCIAL MARKETS, INVESTMENT SCIENCE & PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT 2 0 1 7 - 2 0 1 8 35


CBA SCHOLARS ACADEMY CHALLENGES STUDENTS IN THE CLASSROOM AND ABROAD The CBA Scholars Academy completed its third year of programming in 2017-2018, with 56 students spanning three cohorts. The program invests in the present and future of high-achieving business students, equipping them to make a positive impact in their communities by providing challenging coursework in the classroom, connections to businesses and thoughtleaders in the field, and unique opportunities for growth in self-awareness. Within a close-knit community of ambitious and high-achieving students, Scholars challenge themselves while pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. Throughout the four years in the program, Scholars are mentored by professionals in the Omaha community, enroll in special business courses taught by award-winning faculty, and gain realworld experience through community engagement and international travel.

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SCHOLARS ACADEMY STATISTICS 2017-18

56

Scholars

3.77

SCHOLARS SPEND

TWO WEEKS IN GERMANY Written By Brianna Eisert

This May, the 2015 CBA Scholars Academy cohort traveled to Germany for two weeks to experience the business culture, try new food, learn about the history of the country, and network with new people in the business world.

Average GPA

37

High Schools

29

5

Cities

States

NUMBER OF STUDENTS FROM EACH STATE

47 Nebraska 4 Iowa 3 Kansas 1 Minnesota 1 South Dakota

NUMBER OF STUDENTS FROM EACH ETHNICITY

10 Hispanic 44 Caucasian 2 Multiple Ethnicities

54

Organizations Scholars were Members of BREAKDOWN OF ORGANIZATIONS BY TYPE

12 CBA 38 Non-CBA 4 Greek Life

Our group was a diverse mix of experienced travelers, backpackers, road trippers, and even new adventurers. Even when we did get lost, we had Dr. Phani Tej Adidam, professor of marketing and entrepreneurship, and Bethany Hughes, director of the Scholars Academy, to lead the trip and help us with all of our questions. Our two weeks were spent traveling to six cities, visiting more than 10 German companies, exploring a number of historical sights, and eating our fair share of traditional German food. Each city we visited led to new companies tailored to different Scholars’ majors and interests. It was a fantastic way to learn how our degrees can be used in an international setting. Dr. Adidam, Bethany, and our tour guide Volker Langeheine’s hard work and planning made the trip a unique experience. We didn’t just visit the companies but had the chance to really connect and talk with the people behind the company names. In Braunschweig, we shared food and drinks with the owner of a local art gallery. In Wolfsburg, we received a tour of the Volkswagen factory getting to see cars created from scratch. And in Dusseldorf, we met entrepreneurs at a startup company working to create a new business. These interactions helped us to better understand the similarities and differences between how business is conducted in Germany versus other countries — not to mention getting the chance to network with businesspeople from all over the world. We also observed social, economic, and historical differences when we explored each city, each one offering new insight into the country’s culture. For some Scholars, that meant getting to see a live (and very heated)

soccer game during our stay in Braunschweig. Others took the time to appreciate the tastier side of Germany, making sure to stock up on Haribo gummy bears in Bonn, chocolate in Cologne, and schnitzel in Berlin. Of course, no trip is met without challenges. With 20 travelers in a group, there’s bound to be some exciting (and unplanned) adventures along the way. We can now all laugh thinking about the many times we became lost, how we constantly had to remember to stay clear of the bike paths, and even learning the practical lesson of how German security operates. Moments like these pushed us outside of our comfort zone and made us challenge ourselves to learn and adapt. We learned how to read public transportation signs, practiced simple German phrases, and adapted to the social norms of the country. For many, this trip has sparked an excitement of travel and exploring the world. We’ve proven to ourselves that we can travel, adapt, try new things, and be comfortable in a completely different environment. And while we may have gone to Germany only with our passports and suitcases, we came back with so much more. We returned to Omaha not only with the many souvenirs we managed to stash in our bags, but also business and cultural knowledge that I know will benefit all of us in our careers and lives. For whichever city, state, or even country we find ourselves in, the Scholars Academy has given us the tools and resources to face challenges and expand our knowledge. Now it’s time for us to start exploring. See photos on page 46. Brianna is a senior in the Scholars Academy pursuing a BSBA with concentrations in marketing, management, and international business. 2 0 1 7 - 2 0 1 8 37


IMPROVING BUSINESS EDUCATION IN AFGHANISTAN A grant from the U.S. Department of State worth nearly $1 million is helping UNO develop an internationally competitive business school in Afghanistan.

THIS GRANT IS AN EXCITING OPPORTUNITY FOR OUR COLLEGE AND COLLABORATORS ACROSS UNO. OUR EXPERIENCE WITH SIMILAR WORK IN ROMANIA AND MOLDOVA IS HELPING GUIDE US THROUGH THE STEPS REQUIRED FOR SUCCESS. THE RELATIONSHIPS WE ARE DEVELOPING THROUGHOUT THIS PROJECT WILL PRODUCE LIFELONG PARTNERSHIPS AND FRIENDSHIPS THAT WILL ADVANCE BOTH INSTITUTIONS IN THE SHORT TERM AND WELL INTO THE FUTURE. LOUIS POL, PH.D., DEAN, CBA 38 U N O B U S I N E S S

The grant partners faculty and staff from UNO’s College of Business Administration and Center for Afghanistan Studies with peers at the American University of Afghanistan (AUAF) to enhance AUAF’s business school, shape strategic plans for the future, and improve the country’s economy. Work on the project, which is funded through the end of 2019, began in November with an initial site visit in Kabul. “Nothing is more important to Afghanistan than rebuilding the economy after decades of conflict and our work with AUAF business school will be a great help in this regard,” says Patrick McNamara, UNO director of International Studies and principal investigator for the grant. UNO faculty and staff will advise AUAF on best practices to improve classroom technology and teaching materials, as well as pedagogical techniques that engage students in the learning process. Faculty from both universities will also work together to present at international conferences and publish their research in highly regarded academic journals. Training is scheduled to take place virtually and through three faceto-face meetings. UNO faculty, staff, and consultants traveled to Dubai in Spring 2018 and will meet in Delhi for follow-up this fall. UNO hosted AUAF faculty on campus for three weeks in April, allowing them to review UNO’s business curriculum, customize it and integrate it into their own teaching and learning materials. It also provided an opportunity

to highlight connections with the Omaha and Nebraska communities through service learning projects and internship opportunities for students. “We are eager to work toward building bridges and an everlasting legacy in Afghanistan,” said Phani Tej Adidam, Ph.D., director of UNO’s Center for International Business Initiatives and chair of the Department of Marketing and Entrepreneurship. “Although the grant focuses on strengthening AUAF’s business programs, we also intend to learn a lot from our friends and colleagues who work there.” This project is just the latest in a decades-long history UNO has enjoyed with Afghanistan and Afghan universities, building out academic capacities through partnerships with Kabul University, Balkh University, and Kabul Polytechnic University. The Center for Afghanistan Studies, founded in 1972, is the world’s only permanent research center devoted entirely to the study of Afghanistan’s geography, culture, and people. UNO CBA has a long record of partnerships with business schools across the globe, with faculty helping update curricula, working on international research projects, and organizing a number of internationally focused conferences. “This grant is an exciting opportunity for our college and collaborators across UNO,” said Louis Pol, Ph.D., dean of CBA. “Our experience with similar work in Romania and Moldova is helping guide us through the steps required for success. The relationships we are developing throughout this project will produce lifelong partnerships and friendships that will advance both institutions in the short term and well into the future.”


CBA PARTNERS WITH GUANGZHOU COLLEGE OF COMMERCE

UNO’s College of Business Administration is expecting 100 students from Guangzhou, China, to arrive on campus in Fall 2019. These students are the first cohort in a new dual degree program between CBA and Guangzhou College of Commerce (GCC). In March, UNO faculty and staff—including Dr. Susan Eldridge, accounting professor, and Annesha Mitra, academic advisor—spent a week in Guangzhou meeting many of the dual-degree students and working with GCC leaders on program details. Eldridge, Mitra, and Dr. Tej Adidam, director of CBA’s Center for International Business Initiatives, are currently engaged in additional planning and preparation for these students’ arrival as part of a collaborative committee including UNO representatives from admissions, international programs and ILUNO, housing, the Department of English, and other student support services. Most of the GCC students are planning to complete concentrations in finance or economics. Upon successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration requirements at UNO, GCC students will also earn a Bachelor of Management from GCC. CBA expects new cohorts of between 50 and 100 students each fall.

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fulbright summer program

BUSINE SS S T UDEN T E ARNS PL AC E AT

WRITTEN BY CHARLEY STEED

While many people travel internationally for business or for pleasure, sophomore Brian Lacy, a finance, banking and real estate major at UNO, had the opportunity to travel to London this summer for a rare learning experience.

In May, Brian Lacy, a Bellevue native, learned that he was the recipient of a Fulbright Summer Institute award, which is one of the most prestigious and selective summer scholarship programs in the world. In 2018, only 60 students were selected to participate from across the United States and Lacy was one of five selected by the US-UK Fulbright Commission to spend three weeks at the University of Westminster focusing on global leadership. Throughout the three weeks, Lacy, who is also a member of UNO’s University Honors Program, student government, and Delta Sigma Pi, would spend time in the classroom not only with his fellow Fulbright participants from the United States, but students from across the world who were also studying at the University of Westminster. “In the morning we would study in the classroom and in the evening we would go out to a different museum every day and look at the real life examples of what we were learning about that day,” Lacy says. “Every Friday, the five Fulbright recipients would meet separately for a global citizens class that focused on figuring out your own global identity and how to work in a global environment.” Through these courses and one-on-one meetings with his professor, Lacy was able to take a new, globally-focused mindset back to Omaha as he begins his sophomore year in the College of Business.

40 U N O B U S I N E S S

“We really talked about developing real estate abroad and specifically developing real estate in the United Kingdom. Right now London is experiencing this giant development boom and it’s a very controversial thing because of foreign investors, foreign companies developing in London, and London companies developing in foreign countries.” Lacy was also able to make use of his leisure time to explore areas of London that spoke to his love of architecture and design. “I really enjoyed being able to tour Buckingham Palace. I also went to Greenwich and it was a really cool place to see a lot of architecture. It was also a lot more calm than the rest of London. After that I was able to explore the London Docklands, which is a really significant place in terms of architecture and city planning—I was interested to see how it was laid out and operating.” Now that he’s back, Lacy plans to be an advocate for the Fulbright program and study abroad programs in general. He says the experience, from beginning to end, has taught him that any student who may be thinking about the opportunity to travel abroad should pursue it if they can, because it is an experience you can’t get any other way. “You’ll never know what could happen if you don’t try and if you put the effort into it. I say go for it and don’t hold yourself back with self-doubt.”


“YOU’LL NEVER KNOW WHAT COULD HAPPEN IF YOU DON’T TRY AND IF YOU PUT THE EFFORT INTO IT. I SAY GO FOR IT AND DON’T HOLD YOURSELF BACK WITH SELF-DOUBT.”

2 0 1 7 - 2 0 1 8 41


SPRING TRIPS OFFER ALTERNATIVE TO SEMESTER LONG STUDY ABROAD

42 U N O B U S I N E S S

The UNO College of Business Administration offers short trips during spring break each year, providing an appealing alternative to traditional study abroad opportunities that require a larger commitment. Students first meet in the classroom for several weeks and then apply what they learn in country. This year, the college offered two course opportunities to study business across the globe.


BUSINESS IN CHINA

BUSINESS AND SOCIAL ACTION IN INDIA

During this course, students explored the importance of China as a production base and market for multinational firms. Students learned the facets of political, legal, cultural, and institutional environments in China and how they affect business, helping gauge the bottlenecks and opportunities. Students visited two of China’s most iconic cities: Beijing and Shanghai. In addition to experiencing Chinese business culture firsthand, students also explored Chinese history and culture at sites like the Great Wall.

Students learned about India’s business environment, cultural identity, and the role of nonprofits in society. UNO’s partner university, Institute of Management Technology (IMT) Ghaziabad, hosted students and paired them with “cultural buddies,” sharing their views of modern Indian life. In addition to visiting businesses and non-governmental organizations, the class made stops at the Taj Mahal and Akshardam Temple. Students also enjoyed Bollywood dancing, cricket, and classical Indian music.

2 0 1 7 - 2 0 1 8 43


EXECUTIVE MBA CLASS OF 2018 COVERS THREE CONTINENTS Each year, UNO’s Executive MBA program tackles an international capstone project, which includes several days of travel. This summer, teams trekked through Europe, South America, and Asia. Although the students are there on business, they also get to take in the sights and taste the cuisine.

BRAZIL

CHINA

Team Brazil first stayed in the capital city, Brasilia, where they enjoyed visiting the Lago do Paranoa and the TV Tower, one of the tallest structures in the country. Next, they moved to São Paulo, the largest city in the Americas. Most of their client meetings took place in Paulista Avenue, a business district (think Wall Street mixed with Park Avenue), as well as Ibirapuera Park (similar to New York City’s Central Park) and Island of Guaruja. They ended the trip in Rio de Janeiro, with stops in Copacabana, Sugarloaf Mountain, Tijuca Forest, and the Lapa District. The fare included meat and more meat with a side of meat, broccoli rice, pizza, pasta, and sushi galore, they said.

Team China started in the south and worked their way along the coast to the north. They hit many major cities, including Shenzhen (near Hong Kong), Shanghai and Beijing. When they weren’t in meetings or traveling by air or train, they visited a few major tourist hotspots: Great Wall, Forbidden City, Tiananmen Square and the Shanghai World Financial Center. The team enjoyed China’s varied cuisine, trying many regional styles such as Dim Sum and Hot Pot. They feasted on chicken feet, cow stomach, seafood, pork, and exotic fruits unavailable in the U.S.

MEMBERS: Anneline Hatutale, Todd Liermann, Colleen Naughton, Jim Slisik FACULTY ADVISOR: Dr. Erin Bass & Dr. Erin Pleggenkuhle-Miles PURPOSE: Market Research

CHILE Team Chile spent their time in Santiago, the capital city, meeting with the founder of a SaaS solution for private practice dental and health clinics. They also visited the dentistry college at the Universidad de los Andes as well as the U.S. Embassy. The team says they learned great insight into some of the nuances of the Chilean education system. Later, the team split up for their own adventures. Justin went skiing at El Colorado in the Andes while the rest of the group went to the top of Cerro Cristobal, the second highest point within Santiago offering dramatic views of the city. MEMBERS: Stacie Hamel, Ifeanyi Mosindi, Justin Rediger, Mark Seelbach FACULTY ADVISOR: Dr. Erin Bass & Dr. Erin Pleggenkuhle-Miles PURPOSE: Market Research

44 U N O B U S I N E S S

MEMBERS: Dan Gard, Patrick Gomez, Tanvir Hussain, Chris Johnson, Shea Lundeby FACULTY ADVISOR: Dr. Xiaoming Yang & Dr. Yanhui Zhao PURPOSE: Market Research

EUROPE Team Europe traveled to Berlin and Amsterdam, choosing to take the train between cities so they could see the countryside. They met with many doctors and officials to investigate the state of health care in the two countries. In Germany, they made time to visit the Berlin Wall, Brandenburg Gate, and Museum Island. In Amsterdam, they enjoyed a canal tour and visited the Anne Frank House. The team savored some delicious cuisine, including octopus and an extreme amount of waffles with Nutella. They also ate at the world’s greatest pancakery. MEMBERS: Ali Khan, Sreenivasulu Kode, Brooke Lurvey, Doug Page, Malinda Sapp, Michael Summers FACULTY ADVISOR: Dr. Phani Tej Adidam PURPOSE: Market Research


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CBA SCHOLARS ACADEMY

TRAVELS TO GERMANY

This May, the 2015 CBA Scholars Academy cohort traveled to Germany for two weeks to experience the business culture, try new food, learn about the history of the country, and network with new people in the business world. Full story on page 37.

46 U N O B U S I N E S S


2017-18 CBA SCHOLARSHIPS THANK YOU TO C B A’S M A N Y GENEROUS DONORS

311

Total Scholarships

178

Student Recipients

$770,474 Total Awarded

TO MAKE A GIFT, CONTACT SUE KUTSCHK AU, CBA DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT sue.kutschkau@nufoundation.org | 402.502.4109

·· Barbara Osborne Miller Memorial Graduate Scholarship ·· Barbara Osborne Miller Memorial Undergraduate Scholarship ·· Ben & Martha Simmons Scholarship ·· Beverly Grace (Ward) Spencer Memorial Accounting Scholarship ·· Building Owners and Managers Association Scholarship ·· Bun Song Lee Economics Scholarship ·· C Glenn Lewis Scholarship ·· C Marsh Bull Honors Scholarship in Marketing ·· Carl Avrid Nelson College of Business Administration ·· CBA Student & Faculty Excellence Scholarship ·· Charles & Gloria Billingsley Scholarship ·· Charles T & Denise A Olson Merit Scholarship ·· Charles T & Denise A Olson Need-Based Scholarship ·· CM’s A Cut Above Scholarship ·· David Raymond Talent Scholarship ·· Dean & Maria Jacobsen Business Scholarship ·· Dean John Lucas Memorial Marketing Scholarship ·· Delaine R. & Dorothy M Donohue Excellence Scholarship ·· Dr James J Conway Memorial Scholarship ·· Dr Roger P & Jeannine K Sindt UNO CBA Scholarship ·· Duffy Family UNO CBA Scholars Academy Fund ·· Ed Belgrade Scholarship ·· Emma Weibel Scholarship ·· Entrepreneurial Living Learning Community (UNO CIEF) ·· Ernest H and Joyce Kenyon Scholarship in Public Accounting ·· Esther Gehr Jepsen Young Entrepreneur Scholarship ·· Frank L Mansell Scholarship Program ·· Frankel Zacharia, LLC Scholarship/Fellowship ·· Gary Penisten Talent Endowment Scholarship Fund ·· Genius of Buffett Scholarship ·· H Steve Anderson MBA Fellowship ·· Herb Sklenar Scholarship ·· High School Business Plan Scholarship ·· Hollis and Helen Baright Foundation Real Estate Scholarship ·· Horace Wu & Kate King Wu Accounting Scholarship ·· Horace Wu & Kate King Wu International Scholarship ·· Jack Haley Scholarshp Fund Presented by DEI Communities ·· Jaksich Family MACC Fellowship ·· James A Sedlacek Memorial Scholarship ·· James C. Horejs Economics Scholarship ·· John A & Phyllis S Jeter Scholarship Award ·· John and Mary Schleiger Graduate Scholarship ·· John and Mary Schleiger Undergraduate Scholarship ·· Jon Guinn Scholarship/Fellowship Presented by Lutz & Company PC

·· Karla J Stowe Memorial Scholarship ·· Karla J. Stowe MAcc Fellowship ·· Keith V Kiernan Scholarship ·· Laura Gogan Memorial Scholarship ·· Lucille M Gannon Scholarship ·· Lynn A Stephenson Memorial Scholarship ·· M C “Mike” Biggerstaff Memorial Scholarship ·· Major Thomas A Spencer Business Scholarship ·· Mark & Frances Grieb Accounting Scholarship ·· Maverick Investment Camp Scholarship ·· Natan & Hannah Schwalb CBA Scholarship ·· Nebraska Bankers Scholarship ·· Nebraska Society of CPA’s Scholarship ·· Noack Family Trust ·· Omaha Area Board of Realtors Scholarship ·· Ora C & Fred B Vomacka Memorial Scholarship ·· Paul & Barbara Kistler Scholarship ·· R Craig Hoenshell Leadership Scholarship ·· R Craig Hoenshell Talent Scholarship ·· Richard & Jeanne Morrison, Nuts & Bolts, Inc. SS ·· Richard E Prince III Memorial Scholarship ·· Robbins Family Finance/Investment Science Scholarship ·· Robert C Stedman UNO College of Business Scholarship ·· Robert E. Bernier Nebraska Business Development Center Graduate Assistant Fellowship ·· Robert Kreitner & Margaret Sova Book Scholarship ·· Robert Kreitner & Margaret Sova Tuition Scholarship ·· Ron & Shirley Burns Leadership Scholarship ·· Ronald J Bauers Memorial Scholarship ·· Rose Marie Baumgarten Accounting Scholarship ·· RSM Accounting Scholarship/Fellowship ·· Sam & Dorie Leftwich Scholarship ·· Scott Copple Memorial Scholarship/Fellowship ·· Securities America, Inc. Scholarship Fund for Academic Excellence ·· Sloan Medical Young Entrepreneur Scholarship ·· Stanley J & David M Widman Memorial Scholarship ·· Stephen M Cary Scholarship ·· Tal Anderson College of Business Administration/Athletic Scholarship ·· The Woodmen of the World Leadership Scholarship ·· Tim & Traci Harrison Scholarship ·· Timothy J Jensen Accounting Scholarship ·· Trever Lee Memorial Scholarship . ·· UNO Commercial Real Estate Brokerage Scholarship Fund ·· Van Carl Deeb Entrepreneur Scholarship Fund ·· Virginia Pettengill Scholars Academy Scholarship ·· Wayne M. Higley Delta Sigma Pi Award ·· William Brown Memorial Scholarship ·· Willy Theisen Entrepreneur Scholarship Fund

2 0 1 7 - 2 0 1 8 47


NON-PROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID OMAHA, NE PERMIT NO. 301

College of Business Administration Mammel Hall 6708 Pine Street Omaha, NE 68182-0048 402.554.2303 cba.unomaha.edu

ACCESS TO EXCEP TIONAL

CONNECTIONS Over 90 percent of recent grads live, work, and play in Omaha. At UNO’s College of Business Administration, careers begin well before commencement. That’s why we call Omaha our campus and classroom—a creative partnership that prepares our graduates to add value at their companies and engage in their communities.

[ CB A .UNOM A H A .EDU ] 48 U N O B U S I N E S S

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UNO Business - Not Business as Usual 2017-2018  

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