Method & Critique – Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Page 1



Method& Critique

1


WiFi Science Centre SSID: RTD 2019 Wpa2 key: tudelft2019

Frictions and Shifts in RTD

2


Welcome to Research Through Design 2019 It is a great pleasure to welcome you to RTD 2019, the fourth biennial Research through Design conference! This year we are very excited to be holding the conference at the Science Centre in Delft (for the main program) and Het Nieuwe Instituut in Rotterdam (for the Thursday Night program). These two venues are quite different in character and mission; we believe that jointly they offer a tangible representation of the theme of this year’s conference, and the frictions and shifts that we aim to expose and explore through a carefully crafted program. Hosting RTD 2019 in the Netherlands, we aim to continue to open up the conference to new audiences and conversations, and help it grow as an international forum for practice-based research that engages all disciplines of design. As in previous years, the RTD conference offers an alternative to the traditional conference presentation of papers in darkened auditoriums. With in-depth discussions within Rooms of Interest and the accompanying artifacts (or processes) curated in the Exhibition, the conference aims to support a more discursive and synergistic setting for exploring the conference theme through the sharing and critiquing of design artifacts. Artifacts are brought from the exhibition and presented to the participating delegates assembled in the Rooms of Interest. The combination of tangible artifact and narrative gives rise to a discussion that is intended to stimulate debate around the ideas and lines of enquiry embodied and manifested by creative output. RTD 2019 continues to build on the success of the previous conferences held at the

3


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh in 2017, the European Lab of Microsoft Research in Cambridge in 2015, and the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art in Newcastle in 2013. The conference this year revolves around the theme Method & Critique – Frictions and Shifts in RtD, through which we hope to continue to bring into view and discuss the contemporary material, technological, socio-political and economic shifts in design research and practice that call for new ways of making. The aim is to expose and debate the assumed frictions between traditional ways of doing and knowing and recent strands of experimental work, and to tease out the type of productive collisions and/or collaborations needed in RtD for capitalizing on emerging shifts in design research and practice, and moving forward. As always, the conference offers an eclectic program of peer-reviewed work accepted into both the exhibition and the archived proceedings. There were 261 submissions at the first stage, all reviewed through double-blind peer-review and we had a very difficult task in choosing 93 for the second round, and harder still to bring final submissions down to only 39. We have been greatly inspired by the quality of submissions as well as their variety (of outcomes and disciplines), and their contribution to the theme of the conference. Once again, the 2019 program brings together work that is at the forefront of design-led research in the context of creative and critical practices (e.g., fashion, craft, industrial manufacturing, product design, interaction design, speculative design), with an eye though, also to design-led research in more unconventional disciplinary and geographical contexts (e.g., anthropology, sociology, journalism, ground activism in refugee camps, inner cities and developing countries of the Global South). RTD 2019 also continues with an exciting program of invited Provocations – plenary talks to inspire and provoke further discussion and debate on the conference theme. In keeping with this #rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #conference #delft #rotterdam #welcome

4


year’s focus on Method & Critique – Frictions and Shifts in RTD, we have invited provocateurs for whom the distinction between theory and practice may well be futile. The opening provocation will be from Johan Redström from Umeå Institute of Design, who will engage us with a fairy tale (so he promised) about design after dichotomies. The closing provocation comes from Elvin Karana, from CARADT and Delft University of Technology, whose design work dissolves the boundaries between materials science and artistic experimentation. We have also organized two panel discussions, addressing the frictions expressed by the conference theme at different levels of scale: one on New Agencies and Alignments in RtD (theoretical/practical making), and one on the Policy and Governance of RtD (institutional policy/governance). As with all conferences, the creation of the RTD 2019 program has been a collaborative effort, and the conference would not be happening without the considerable time, energy and passion invested by a large team of people. First and foremost, we would like to thank all of the authors whose wonderful work makes RTD what it is. Thank you! We are also hugely grateful to the Program Committee members who have thoughtfully handled submissions, contributing specialist expertise in a wide range of fields. We are particularly grateful to Debbie Maxwell, Annika Hupfeld and Ingrid Mulder, who have worked closely with us on the review process; to Marco Rozendaal, Geke Ludden and Joyce Yee for a highly curated display and exhibition concept based on the work that was accepted; to Catelijne van Middelkoop, Lenneke Kuijer and Abigail Durrant for pushing the envelope of the conference documentation; to Strange Attractors for designing and producing a dynamic and provocative visual identity for the conference; to Tomasz Jaskiewicz and Ian Lambert for an impressive pre-conference workshops program; to Daan van Eijk and Christine de Lille for engaging our sponsors with the conference content; to Mariet Sauerwein and Abhigyan Singh and all the wonderful student volunteers for their support; and of course, to our many reviewers, who have committed considerable time and effort to provide helpful and timely feedback to the authors.

5


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

We are wholly indebted to Marijke Idema, who has worked tirelessly behind the scenes to keep things on track. We would also like to thank all the RTD Steering Committee members who have provided invaluable guidance to ensure continuity in moving the conference outside of the UK for the first time. Finally, we must thank those organizations that have been instrumental to making the conference happen: Delft University of Technology, Eindhoven University of Technology, University of Twente, University of York, Northumbria University, and Edinburgh Napier University. We must also thank our key sponsors: Design United and TU Delft Science Center for their contribution to the program; the TU Delft Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Het Nieuwe Instituut, and NWO for the Thursday evening program; and KLM and Philips for supporting the workshop programs and drinks. RTD 2019 General Chairs Elisa Giaccardi and Pieter Jan Stappers

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #conference #delft #rotterdam #welcome

6


8 Themes 10 Conference Schedule 17 Floor Maps Science Centre 20 Documenting RTD 22 Workshops 34 Day 1 97 Day 2 149 Day 3 171 Credits

7


Themes Frictions and and Shifts Shifts in in RTD RTD Frictions

The themes of RTD 2019 reflect and expand on the main issues found in the literature review of RtD, Chapter 43 of the Encyclopaedia of Interaction Design: Artefact, Process, Knowledge, and Dissemination. Artifacts: From Tools to Partners New agencies for objects and materials have emerged in RtD, urging us to interrogate the role of the artifact in a process of ‘making’ that is increasingly more distributed and dispersed. Computational materials, artificial intelligence and living organisms are opening up possibilities for less functional forms of imagination and expressivity, less hierarchical human-object relations, and alternative production systems. What does this mean for approaches such as craft and manufacturing that are based on long established and well-disciplined material agencies? What does it mean for critical and speculative approaches building upon (or rather against) traditions of technological functionality? Process I: From Iteration to Co-Creation As new agencies emerge and are at work , the cyclic nature of iteration in the RtD process appears superseded by always-available opportunities for insight and co-creation. In this more fluid process, different disciplines and approaches intersect and collide, expanding the meaning of the things that are produced. What does this mean for traditional modes of participation and inclusion in RtD practice? What people, what other agencies, what disciplines should be represented and take part? How does this challenge the dichotomies that still persist in how we value things and processes that are digitally enabled vs. handmade?

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #conference #themes

8


Knowledge: From Interactions to Future States In face of change, the type of knowledge gained by RtD trail-blazes at the cutting edge. Our understanding of the world becomes less neutral, seeking forms of material and critical resistance, exploring future spaces for alternative values, advocating for more intimate forms of care and newly embodied relations to the artificial world. What does this mean for the type of research outcomes that are generated by RtD? What is this new knowledge about? How can it be communicated, documented and reused? And are these the kind of post hoc questions we should be asking? Process II: From Products to Diagramming Artifacts increasingly perform actions and judgments next to us with different degrees of autonomy. This problematizes what we understand in RtD practice as the object of inquiry (what is to be researched) as well as the object of design (what is to be made). What does this mean for the role that critical and speculative design practices are to play in RtD? What areas of ethical concern are to be taken seriously, and what has critical design to offer? And as for how things are made, what does a more fluid and collaborative material landscape mean for how we generate and sustain value? Dissemination: From Documentation to Engagement Traditional methods in RtD usually document the intermediate stages of the design process or annotate final outcomes with the goal of supporting personal reflection, and increasingly some shared and incremental building of knowledge. But as our understanding of the world becomes less neutral, so does documentation –pursuing impact onto other disciplines beyond practice, engaging politically on the ground of global transitions, and seeking post-colonialist approaches to knowledge production. What does this mean for how RtD relates to other forms of making? What does this mean for RtD audiences and beneficiaries, and for where RtD belongs?

9


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Conference Schedule Tuesday, March 19th 09:00–17:00 Workshops •Making Pockets •Encountering Ethics •Listening to Materials •Intra-Action Design •E-textile* Playground •Narratives of Waste •Recombinant Flora •Thinking-through-Making •Sketching RTD •Legitimacy in and for doctoral RtD 13:00 Lunch 15:00–17:00 Conference Registration 18:00 Local Pubs

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #conferenceschedule #workshops

10


Wednesday, March 20th 08:30 Conference Registration

09:00 Welcome by General Chairs

with Prof. Ena Voรปte (Dean of Industrial Design Engineering, TU Delft), Michael van der Meer (Director Science Centre)

09:30 Opening Provocation Johan Redstrรถm 10:30 Break

11:15 Rooms of Interest Artifacts: From Tools to Partners 3 parallel sessions (3 speakers each) 13:00 Lunch 11


Wednesday, March 20th Frictions Frictions and and Shifts Shifts in in RTD RTD

14:00 Rooms of Interest Process I: From Iteration to Co-Creation 3 parallel sessions (3 speakers each) 15:45 Break

16:30 Panel I New Agencies and Alignments in RtD Chaired by Elisa Giaccardi with Iohanna Nicenboim James Pierce, Larissa Pschetz and Johan Redström

18:00–20:00 Opening exhibition #rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #conferenceschedule #day1

12


Thursday, March 21st 09:00 Rooms of Interest Knowledge: From Interactions to Future States 3 parallel sessions (3 speakers each) 10:30 Break

11:15 Making Space | Mapping RTD

Reflection in action on exhibition and workshop outcomes 13:00 Lunch

14:00 Rooms of Interest Process II: From Products to Diagramming 2 parallel sessions (3 speakers each) 13


Thursday, March 21st Frictions and and Shifts Shifts in in RTD RTD Frictions

15:45 Break 16:00 Bus transfer to Het Nieuwe Instituut, Rotterdam

17:00 Panel II Policy and Governance of RtD Chaired by Pieter Jan Stappers with Kees Dorst Paul Hekkert Janneke van Kersen Christine de Lille

19:00 Walk to Boompjes for dinner

19:30 Conference Dinner 22:00 Bus transfer to Delft

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #conferenceschedule #day2

14


Friday, March 22nd 09:00–10:00 Town Hall Meeting RTD Conference Series 09:00 Documentation | Sharing RTD

Reflection on action for conference dissemination 10:30 Break

11:15 Rooms of Interest Dissemination: From Documentation to Engagement 2 parallel sessions (3 speakers each) 15


Friday, March 22nd Frictions and and Shifts Shifts in in RTD RTD Frictions

13:00 Lunch

14:00 Closing Provocation Elvin Karana 15:00 Conference Wrap-Up 15:30 Exhibition Take Down

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #conferenceschedule #day3

16


Science Centre Delft Floor Maps

Level 0

Stairs to Level 1

Elevator

Route to Conference Main Entrance 17


Level 1

Stairs to the exit

Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Route to Conference

Elevator

Stairs to Level 2

Level 2 Elevator

Stairs to Level 1 #rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #sciencecentredelft #oormaps

18

Food & Drinks


Stairs to Level 2 Plenary & Event Space

Room 1

Room 2

Stairs to Level 1 Mineral Museum

Room 3

19


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Documenters: Illustrator Ludwig Volbeda graduated cum laude from the Acadmy of Art and Design St. Joost in Breda in 2011 and has since won several international awards including a prestigious ‘Gouden Penseel’ (Golden Brush) for the best illustrated children’s book in The Netherlands. Ludwig loves maps, deserts, machines, science, reading books and writing letters and his authentic drawing style portrays an unique eye for detail in an almost scientific depiction of complexity and imagination.

Day 1

Conferences are events where new ideas form, where relations emerge, and where those with diverse and differing perspectives meet each other. From its first edition, the RTD Conference series has critically explored innovative ways of documenting the conference experience. In previous conference editions, the RTD Documentation process has focused on capturing the unfolding experience and rich discussions around artifacts, through scribing (RTD 2015) and incorporating attendees’ expressions into the scribing process (RTD 2017). Scribes have offered an idiographic and alternative set of perspectives on the exhibition and Rooms of Interest discussions. Documenting the conference has also formed an exploration in itself, and has led to critical reflections on the challenges of disseminating knowledge outcomes from practice-led research. This year, we continue in this tradition by experimenting further through co-creative activities of making artefacts that represent the conference experience. We have invited a diverse team of documenters to capture their views on the conference in their own professional medium. Chef Naresh Ramdjas began blending food with design during his studies at Design Academy Eindhoven. Since 2013 he has managed every aspect of his own pop-up ‘Nareshtaurant’ where he combines innovative dishes with design insights. Naresh reached the finals of the Dutch version of Masterchef in 2013. He is currently running his catering and food development program and popup restaurants in Amsterdam, Utrecht and Eindhoven.

Day 2

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #documentingrtd

Ethnographer Eva Theunissen is a PhD candidate at the Visual and Digital Cultures research center (ViDi) at the University of Antwerp. Conducting online and offline ethnography, her research focuses on the roles of digital and image-based technologies in the everyday lives of sexual and gender minoritarian subjects. She explores how digital/visual practices may help social actors and communities cope with the intricacies of precariousness, marginalization and invisibility.

Day 3 20


Documenting RTD

Photo: Abigail Durrant, RTD 2017

The ‘scribing’ in the Rooms of Interest is transferred to volunteer conference attendees. The participatory documentation, will not only capture the conference for post-hoc communication, but catalyse discussion and reflection during it. Attendees will be asked to annotate the exhibits, and draw links and frictions between them, guided by provocations based on the conference theme of ‘Method & Critique’. On Day Two, the Making Space: Mapping RTD session consolidates these annotations through attendees creation of a series of maps. The Documentation session on Day Three follows up and expands on the Making Space session. After capturing and mapping the landscapes of RTD, the Documentation Chairs will invite 3D responses to questions of how to share the diverse forms of knowledge generated through design.

21


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Workshops Tuesday, March 19th 09:00–17:00

22

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #sciencecentredelft #tuesdaymarch19th #workshops


Practice-led Research

The RTD workshops instantiate a breadth of research through design practices, and demonstrate how these practices enable the generation and sharing of knowledge. Workshops provide conference delegates with the opportunity to come together as co-designers and co-researchers in mini-projects, and immerse themselves in the shared action of practice-based research methodologies. Participants in the RTD workshops have the opportunity to reflect on design research as it happens. As such, workshops emphasize the role of the narrative of process as a research artifact in its own right. The research findings and artifacts generated in the workshops will be featured in the conference exhibition, acting as enablers and catalysts for conference debates.

23


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Kristina Andersen (Eindhoven University of Technology) and Angella Mackey (Eindhoven University of Technology and Philips Lighting Research)

Making Pockets Many garments have pockets, some have none. Your daily agency is in some ways dictated by the presence or absence of a pocket in your clothing. In this one-day workshop, participants will add or modify pockets in their own clothing, as a means of exploring notions of secrecy, power and control. The day will constitute a design research exploration into the potential that pockets serve as places for safekeeping and secrecy. Participants will be guided through adding, displacing or modifying pockets in their own brought or worn clothing, fostering a reflection on the power and potential of the modification being made. As such, we hope that this process will cast a light on the materiality, practice and power of the pocket.

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #tuesdaymarch19th #workshops

24


Anuradha Reddy (Malmö University), Iohanna Nicenboim (Delft University of Technology), James Pierce (California College of the Arts and University of California Berkeley) and Elisa Giaccardi (Delft University of Technology and Umeå Institute of Design)

Encountering Ethics in data-enabled RtD Building upon critical and participatory design traditions in RtD practice, and informed by thing-centered design perspectives and methods, this workshop explores the approach of doing ‘ethics through design’ that involves an active interplay among humans and “smart” things in the shaping of responsible encounters. Contemporary ethical issues in design such as trust, privacy, security, sustainability, and care will be materially engaged with and discussed throughout the workshop. Human workshop participants will engage with “smart” things as co-participants and will have the opportunity to bring their own consumer or RtD artifact to the workshop. Collectively, we will speculate and experiment with ways to engage ethics with things and generate design scenarios that critically address our responsibility in such encounters. This workshop aims to produce a refined set of methods, guidelines, and frameworks for engaging ethics and responsibility in data-enabled RTD practices that can be applied within existing IoT and IxD design, as well as explore more radical alternatives to human-centered design methods.

25


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Jane Norris (Richmond University, The American University in London)

Listening to Materials – Making sonic fiction with materials to co-design equitably How do we listen to materials and other beings to co-design equitably? This workshop offers guided listening / sonic activities as catalysts to reanimate our mutual relationships with materials. Through a combination of material listening exercises and narrative mapping, participants will use audio recording on mobile phones as a research-through-design methodology to consider ‘con-structing’ object narratives. By engaging sonically with ‘materials-as-co-performers’ participants are encouraged to decolonise design relationships. This workshop introduces sonic fictional design as a more-than-human approach to making through listening to materials and considering their intimate performative relationship with us. Questions for discussion will be: In what ways can we listen to materials? How does a material’s changing sound inform our relationships to it? How can sonic fiction enable us to co-perform with materials in design? This workshop will seek to map out a nascent audio material vocabulary relevant to co-making in the Anthropocene.

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #tuesdaymarch19th #workshops

26


Michaela Büsse (Institute of Experimental Design and Media Cultures, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland)

Intra-action design – Unsettling design as relational practice of planetary inhabiting In this hands-on workshop we will reflect on and act with one of the most precious materials on earth: sand. From the microscopic level—sand being a compound of rocks eroding, and shells and plants degrading—to the global level— geological rifts caused by the reallocation of whole islands—sand is a truly planetary medium. After inspirational inputs, covering G. Deleuze, G. Simondon, T. Ingold and J. Bennett, the rest of the day is devoted to material encounters and collaborative research aimed at collecting visual and text-based propositions for a relational reading of design. The participants are asked to bring a sand sample from their place of residence. Starting from mesmerising microscopic landscapes, we will further uncover the omnipresence of sand. Sand-based objects will act as conversation pieces which challenge the role of the designer and design practices that move beyond human-centredness and the hylomorphic model.

27


Sara Nevay and Lucy Robertson (Richmond University, The American University in London) Frictions and Shifts in RTD

E-textile* Playground: Prototyping and dialogues for wellbeing This workshop invites participants to explore wellbeing - Â generating new knowledge, interpretations and definitions of wellbeing by using everyday craft and e-textile materials as well as electronic components. Participants will work together and engage in making to explore wellbeing using the the New Economics Foundation Five Ways to Wellbeing model: Connect; Be Active; Keep Learning; Give; Take Notice. Through descriptive mapping, prototyping and scenario based concept generation we aim to produce a series of low fidelity e-textile prototypes as dialogue around wellbeing. Join PhD researchers Sara Nevay and Lucy Robertson from Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Designs, University of Dundee to explore wellbeing through e-textile making.

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #tuesdaymarch19th #workshops

28


Katharina Vones and Ian Lambert (Edinburgh Napier University

Narratives of Waste: An exploration of material transformation through 3D printing This practice-led workshop is aimed at exploring how Ocean Plastic 3D printing filament can be used to devise objects to make use of its particular material qualities and communicate the journey of the material from the initial object to remanufactured filament. Ways to identify different types of plastic waste and their suitability for FDM 3D printing will be discussed, as well as the findings of our recent fieldwork activities on the Isle of Harris, to highlight the environmental impact of Ocean plastic. The workshop will focus on creating a discourse to explore the meaning designed object outcomes can attain through engaging in a process of co-design that is stimulated by informed critical debate. Participants will have a chance to produce final 3D printed outcomes with Ocean Plastic filament that reflect both the nature of the manufactured material as well as the conclusions reached by the group. Participants should bring a notebook and drawing utensils.

29


Margaret Urban (Carnegie Mellon School of Design)

Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Recombinant flora Field research and design practice combine in the Recombinant Flora workshop. The collaborative Designers and Forests will lead an exploration of the Botanical Gardens of TU Delft. Participants will observe the plants, generating formal stylizations that will be combined through guided experiments in Processing. Through randomization, the program will mimic the genetic recombination of the hybridization process and provide a unique method of collaboration for participants. The “species� that result from the workshop will be shared with the conference through static images and animations. This workshop uses a practical methodology to explore how designers can spur environmental research and posit possible ecological futures through their observations and unique skill sets. Recombinant Flora is an investigation of the relationship between humanity and ecology, and ideas of conservation, climate change, and botanical refugees.

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #tuesdaymarch19th #workshops

30


Bas Raijmakers and Danielle Arets (Design Academy Eindhoven)

Friction in thinking-through-making At RTD we will create space to explore and learn what friction means and could mean in our practices, and what fictions might exist between our practices. The method we will use for this is drawing (in the morning), and a “Socratic Dialogue” (in the afternoon). The drawing will respond to 17 Thining-ThroughMaking projects at Design Academy Eindhoven, as well as projects of the participants, and aim to visualize ‘friction’ in their processes. The Socratic Dialogue is an attempt to develop a mutual understanding of ‘friction’ through systematic questioning. Visual support and inspiration will be provided by a vj who responds to the dialogue on a large screen, and by bespoke materials on the table designed for this purpose. The outcomes will include drawings and notes on specially designed sheets, to be exhibited at the RTD conference. Afterwards, ‘Friction’ will be added to the Lexicon of Design Research.

31


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Jan Willem Hoftijzer (Delft University of Technology)

Sketching RtD ‘Sketching’ has proven to be a great, engaging and flexible activity and means to develop and communicate (Hoftijzer et al., 2018; Pei et al., 2011). Within the context of research, however, output, disseminations, papers or proposals are seldom submitted or published using sketches. The workshop aims to explore and demonstrate the potential of sketching for articulating and communicating knowledge generated through design. It will involve a set of sketching exercises and explorations. Subsequently, attendees will attend the first day of the RTD2019 conference with a task to create a sketch of one of the RtD processes or research narratives features in the rooms of interests and/or presentations. The resulting sketches will be displayed at the conference during the following days. Workshop participants not registered for the conference receive a pass to the 1st day of the RTD2019 conference to complete the exercise.

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #tuesdaymarch19th #workshops

32


Christine De Lille (The Hague University of Applied Sciences) and Rebecca Price (Delft University of Technology)

Legitimacy in and for doctoral RtD Legitimacy for Research through Design unlocks knowledge generated within the design process as valid input for scientific breakthrough. The research-through-designer can leave the laboratory setting and venture into complex environments with epistemological and methodological support. Yet RTD faces critique. Of great challenge to researchers using design as a source of data generation and collection, is critique faced from positivist realms of the scientific community. This critique begins informally, often elicited through offhand remarks such as, ‘that’s not rigorous research’, or ‘how generalizable is this?’ Later this critique can manifest in blocks to high-impact journal publications and ultimately career progression in academia. We cannot avoid this critique, but rather should let our research demonstrate value and impact. This PhD one-day workshop is designed and developed to assist PhD Candidates (TU Delft, TU/e and University Twente) who are pursuing RTD to increase research design and methodological integrity. We focus on transparency, ethics, triangulation and reporting with impact. Participants may be close to completion or only just starting their candidature.

33


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Day 1 Wednesday, March 20th 09:00 Welcome by General Chairs 09:30 Opening Provocation Johan Redström 10:30 Break 11:15 Rooms of Interest Artifacts: From Tools to Partners 13:00 Lunch 14:00 Rooms of Interest Process I: From Iteration to Co-Creation 15:45 Break 16:30 Panel I: New Agencies and Alignments in RtD 18:00–20:00 Opening Exhibition

34

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #openingprovocation #wednesdaymarch20th #day1


09:30 Opening Provocation: Johan Redström Design After Dichotomies Johan Redström is Professor in design at Umeå Institute of Design, Umeå University (Sweden). He has previously been Rector of Umeå Institute of Design, and before that Design Director of the Interactive Institute (Sweden). He received his PhD from Göteborg University in 2001, where he also became Docent in Interaction Design in 2008. Working with research through design based on combining experimental practice with design philosophy, he has done research in areas such as emerging technologies and traditional materials (e.g. on IT+Textiles), design and sustainability (e.g. on design, energy consumption and awareness) and more recently reconceptualizations of ‘things’ in light of new digital forms of making and using. His most recent books are “Making Design Theory” (MIT Press 2017) and “Changing Things; The future of objects in a digital world” together with Heather Wiltse (Bloomsbury 2019).

In his Provocation, Johan Redström will reflect, or perhaps better speculate, upon unfolding relations between practice and research in design. He will engage with the idea that research through design, as it evolves, might bring about dissolving its original conceptual framing of practice and theory as a dichotomy. Imagining such a scenario – whether fictive or real – one might ask: would that be a good thing?

35


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

11:15 Artifacts: From Tools to Partners Talk 1 (p.37) The materiality of digital jewellery from a jeweller’s perspective Talk 2 (p.38) Wearing Digital Shimmers: A fashion-centric approach to wearable technology Talk 3 (p.39) SNaSI: Social navigation through subtle interactions with an AI agent

Talk 1 (p.46) Flâneur’s Phonograph: A flâneur approach to urban exploration Talk 2 (p.47) 7½ and weekend alarm: Designing alarm clocks for the morality of sleep and rest

Room 1: Subtlety and Expressivity

Chaired by Nithikul Nimkulrat (OCAD University)

Room 2: Contested Narratives

Chaired by Zoe Sadokierski (University of Technology Sydney)

Talk 3 (p.52) A smartphone in the nursery

Talk 1 (p.54) Crafting sympoietic artifacts: Making sonic needlepoint with nonhuman partners Talk 2 (p.55) Mineral accretion factory: An underwater production process with a positive impact on the environment

Room 3: More-than-Human Partnerships

Chaired by Lenneke Kuijer (Eindhoven University of Technology)

Talk 3 (p.60) REP(AIR): An olfactory interface for bike maintenance and care #rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

36


The materiality of digital jewellery from a jeweller’s perspective Nantia Koulidou, Jayne Wallace, Tommy Dylan Northumbria University jayne.wallace@northumbria.ac.uk

(AM) Room 1 | Talk 1: Subtlety and Expressivity | Morning Session | Day 1

Keywords: digital jewellery; poetic interactions; sense of self; micro-transitions; craft; digital technology; contemporary jewellery

Taking a research-through-design with craft sensibilities approach we present design propositions in the digital age that value the complexity and uniqueness of being human. We introduce exemplars of digital jewellery objects that offer alternative ways of connecting a person with personal anchor points, significant others and places. The pieces were inspired by the lives of three participants and the researcher who all frequently travel back to their native countries, but who live permanently in the UK and experience feelings of transition and what we describe as “being in-between”. ‘Microcosmos’, ‘Togetherness: Connected Brooches’ and ‘Topoi’ expand our understanding of what digital jewellery can be by embodying interactions that highlight the sensorial and imaginative aspects of digital technology. Building on our previous work on poetic qualities of interaction with digital jewellery we offer a reflective view on how digital jewellery can challenge our expectations of digital connectivity, sensor functionality and location awareness and we discuss the material qualities of the pieby unfolding the narratives associated with their function and form. Most digital devices come with a set of expectations such as: What does it do? How long is battery life? How cutting edge is the technology? By contrast, this research offers a focus on atypical personal interactions in order to address a different range of questions and potentially open up our expectations of the digital. By reflecting on our designs we continue the discussions on how jewellery practices and digital technologies can suggest more poetic interactions for people. 37


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Wearing Digital Shimmers: A fashion-centric approach to wearable technology Angella Mackey1,2, Stephan Wensveen1, Ron Wakkary1,3, Annika Hupfeld1, Oscar Tomico1,4 1 Eindhoven

University of Technology a.m.mackey, s.a.g.wensveen, r.l.wakkary, o.tomico, a.hupfeld @tue.nl

Philips Lighting Research angella.mackey@lighting.com 2

3 Simon

Fraser University ron_wakkary@sfu.ca

4 ELISAVA

otomico@elisava.net

(AM) Room 1 | Talk 2: Subtlety and Expressivity | Morning Session | Day 1

This paper describes an approach to designing wearable technology that sees and uses the technology expressively in terms of fashion, and minimizes the notion of its technological function. We do this by presenting an account of the research-through-design project Phem, a fashion brand concept for garments constructed with surface-changing, animated fabrics by way of augmented reality. Phem consists of five outfits paired with varying ‘digital shimmers’ (discrete animated videos) presented through a short fashion film. The fashion film, which is a commonly used artefact of the fashion field, traditionally aims to synthesize a particular mood and style for its garments. In this case, the film also acts as a space for design inquiry where the temporal form of the digital shimmers can ‘play-out’ over time, on a particular body, and within a particular context. Furthermore, in ‘doing fashion’ and letting expressivity be the guiding concern, we discuss how this approach differs from a prevalent technology-driven approach, and our deliberate attempt to avoid a futuristic aesthetic that dominates the field of wearables.

Keywords: animated textiles; wearable technology; fashion design; augmented reality

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

38


SNaSI: Social navigation through subtle interactions with an AI agent Rebecca Kleinberger1, Joshua Huburn2, Martin Grayson2, Cecily Morrison2 MIT Media Lab rebklein@media.mit.edu

1

Microsoft jhuburn@gmail.com mgrayson@microsoft.com cecilym@microsoft.com 2

(AM) Room 1 | Talk 3: Subtlety and Expressivity | Morning Session | Day 1

Technology advances have set the stage for intelligent visual agents, with many initial applications being created for people who are blind or have low vision. While most focus on spatial navigation, recent literature suggests that supporting social navigation could be particularly powerful by providing appropriate cues that allow blind and low vision people to enter into and sustain social interaction. A particularly poignant design challenge to enable social naviga足tion is managing agent interaction in a way that augments rather than disturbs social interaction. Usage of existing agent-like technologies have surfaced some of the difficulties in this regard. In particular, it is difficult to talk to a person when an agent is speaking to them. It is also difficult to speak with someone fiddling with a device to manipulate their agent. In this paper we present SNaSI, a wearable designed to provoke the thinking process around how we support social navigation through sub足tle interaction. Specifically, we are interested to generate thinking about the triangular relationship between a blind user, an com足munication partner and the system containing an AI agent. We explore how notions of subtlety, but not invisibility, can enable this triadic relationship. SNaSI builds upon previous research on sen足sory substitution and the work of Bach-y-Rita (Bach-y-Rita 2003) but explores those ideas in the form of a social instrument.

Keywords: vision impaired; ai, wearable fashion; assistive device

39


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 1: Subtlety and Expressivity Talk 1: The materiality of digital jewellery from a jeweller’s perspective

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

40


41 Wallace, Koulidou, Duncan, Lawson, Trueman, Craig, Fisher, Morrissey, Montague, Welsh | The materiality of digital jewellery from a jeweller’s perspective


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 1: Subtlety and Expressivity Talk 2: Wearing Digital Shimmers: A fashion-centric approach to wearable technology

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

42


43Tomico | Wearing Digital Shimmers: A fashion-centric approach Mackey, Wensveen, Wakkary, Hupfeld, to wearable technology


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 1: Subtlety and Expressivity Talk 3: SNaSI: Social navigation through subtle interactions with an AI agent

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

44


45| Kleinberger, Huburn, Grayson, Morrison SNaSI: Social navigation through subtle interactions with and AI agent


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Flâneur’s Phonograph: A flâneur shift in urban exploration Po-Hao Wang1, Yu-Ting Cheng2, Wenn-Chieh Tsai1, Rung-Huei Liang1 1 National

Taiwan University m10210118@mail.ntust.edu.tw, joe.wctsai@gmail.com liang@mail.ntust.edu.tw

2 Eindhoven

University of Technology y.cheng@tue.nl

(AM) Room 2| Talk 1: Contested Narratives | Morning Session | Day 1

Two of the often discussed perspectives of experiencing a place are the tourists’ lens and the residents’. Noticing the recent rise of atypical tourism, where tourists want to pursue the “live-there” experience, and the rising focus of shifting residents’ attention from mundane day-to-day life, we propose the concept of flâneur as an alternative state. With ‘research through design’ approach, we present our exploration, including (1) gamification for making the sense of place, (2) using situationist-inspired-cards for residents to explore familiar place, and (3) using street photographers’ quotations as inspiration for alternative experience of listening to a city. With these explorative findings, we design Flâneur’s Phonograph, a sound collecting and experiencing device for soundscape, which aims at invoking the flâneur experience during the exploration, and enabling engaging experience different from the perspective of a tourist or a local resident. It invites the users to open up their auditory senses to the places by providing 3 different monitoring modes and 3 types of microphones. We further analyse the qualitative results from investigating a resident and a tourist with our design, make critical reflection, and constructively understand what the flâneur could be in the new technological contexts.

Keywords: flâneur; urban exploration; soundscape; situationist

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

46


7½ and weekend alarm: Designing alarm clocks for the morality of sleep and rest Anne Spaa1, Ron Wakkary2,3, Joep Frens3, Abigail Durrant1, John Vines1 1 Northumbria

University anne.spaa@northumbria.ac.uk, abigail.durrant@northumbria.ac.uk, john.vines@northumbria.ac.uk

2 Simon

Fraser University rwakkary@sfu.ca

3 Eindhoven

University of Technology j.w.frens@tue.nl

(AM) Room 2| Talk 2: Contested Narratives | Morning Session | Day 1

Although clocks facilitate good timemanagement, they have been used in ways that are detrimental to wellbeing. For example, alarm clocks are used to force a person to wake before they have had sufficient sleep and the ambient presence of clocks encourages a constant and sometimes unnecessary need for punctuality. In this paper, we discuss two alarm clocks that are designed to respect wellbeing, improving the ethics of user-object and designer-object relationships. ‘7½’ runs for exactly seven-anda-half hours, regardless of when it was started, allowing a healthy amount of sleep. ‘Weekend Alarm’ hides its clock face over the weekend, when keeping to time may be less important. The clock designs were purposeful but did not always fit with conventional expectations on functionality. We discuss the process of designing these artefacts for the morality of sleep and rest, and how we came to propose the addition of some unconventional functions to their conventional designs. To inform our reflection on our design approach, we evaluated the devices with two types of participants: two temporary owners, who experienced discomfort but were able to cope with 7½ during the three-week trial, and six design experts who provided critical reviews of both designs.

Keywords: postphenomenology; morality; material speculation; counterfunctionality; clocks; time

47


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 2: Contested Narratives Talk 1: Flâneur’s Phonograph: A flâneur shift in urban exploration

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

48


49

Wang, Cheng, Tsai, Liang | Flâneur’s Phonograph: A flâneur shift in urban exploration


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 2: Contested Narratives Talk 2: 7½ and weekend alarm: Designing alarm clocks for the morality of sleep and rest

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

50


Spaa, Wakkary, Frens, Durrant, Vines51 | 7½ and weekend alarm: Designing alarm clocks for the morality of sleep and rest


A smartphone in the nursery Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Paulina Yurman Goldsmiths, University of London p.yurman@gold.ac.uk

Through experiments in design, this research explores the role of smartphones for mothers and young children. Forming part of the material paraphernalia surrounding mother and child, smartphones are used as connection with work or social realms, as entertainment, pacification and educational resource, thus blurring boundaries between the private and the public and between work and play. As a result, smartphones offer competing discourses that this research explores.

(AM) Room 2| Talk 3: Contested Narratives | Morning Session | Day 1

Keywords: smartphones; motherhood; drawing; making; toys; experimental; critical design; inventive methods

Through the processes of drawing and making, a series of experimental designs were created to develop this research space. Evoking behaviours brought by the use of smartphones during childcare, these designs present mothers as complex users and explores the possibilities for design to reshape our relationship with technologies in family life. The development of these proposals formed a first exploratory stage in this research. A second stage took place in the encounters between people and the designs. Through narratives that were suggestive and open to multiple interpretations, the proposals encouraged conversations about motherhood and the implicated role of smartphones. As research objects, they allowed for discoveries both for me as researcher and for those that encountered them.

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

52


Room 2: Contested Narratives Talk 3: A smartphone in the nursery

Yurman | A smartphone in the nursery

53


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Crafting sympoietic artifacts: Making sonic needlepoint with nonhuman partners Raune Frankjaer Aarhus University frankjaer@cc.au.dk

(AM) Room 3| Talk 1: More-than-Human Partnerships | Morning Session | Day 1

Craft-based approaches are increasingly gaining attention in the field of HCI and interaction design research. These approaches require the development of a wide array of acute sensitivities towards both physical and digital materials and their composite qualities; skills which constitute valuable tools in the inquiry in areas of digital–material research. In this paper, I describe the use of craft and craftbased thinking in the research and design of digital artifacts, exemplified by a sonic needlepoint lace fabric. The lace functions as a speaker broadcasting bioelectrical signals from an adjoined plant. The project is part of an ongoing research into the properties of combining craft with digital technology to mediate nonhuman data outside human perception. Drawing on Tim Ingold, I describe the development process of the lace as a sympoietic approach, which transcends from physical making into modes of thinking, that are inclusive of a wide array of human as well as nonhuman others, e.g. organisms, materials and forces as partners in the design process.

Keywords: sonic lace; singing tree; craft-based hci; sympoietic artifacts

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

54


Mineral accretion factory : an underwater production process with a positive impact on the environment David Énon ESAR, France me@davidenon.net

(AM) Room 3| Talk 2: More-than-Human Partnerships | Morning Session | Day 1

Keywords: slow design; coral; artificial reef; biorock; alterproduction

Mineral Accretion Factory is an alternative production system of objects and furniture based on the artificial reef production process developed by architect Wolf Hilbertz (Symbiotic Process Laboratory) and biologist Thomas J. Goreau to restore coral reefs and seabed (fauna, flora). This project is a reflection on an alterproduction from poor materials, primary technical devices, in relation to the economic and environmental context. Mineral Accretion Factory consists of the immersion of a steel structure (the object’s skeleton) connected to a low-voltage supply (solar panel or windmill). A redox reaction starts, the object is self-generated, made of a material created from the ocean’s minerals. M.AF. demonstrates that a different ways are possible for production: •integrated within a natural setting (no factory) •using a basic apparatus and high scientific knowledge (low-tech + high-tech = wild-tech) •respecting biological production cycles (slow-tech) •effortlessly and costlessly This research program through design gives rise to the possibility of setting up production processes that have a positive impact on the environment. It participates in the emergence of wildtech as defined by the French anthropologist Yann-Philippe Tastevin. The project started in 2012 in Indonesia on Gili Trawangan island. Today, it continues on La Réunion island with the school of art in a research center on turtles.

55


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 3: More-than-Human Partnerships Talk 1: Crafting sympoietic artifacts: Making sonic needlepoint with nonhuman partners

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

56


57

Frankjaer | Crafting sympoietic artefacts | Sonic lace


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 3: More-than-Human Partnerships Talk 2: Mineral accretion factory : An underwater production process with a positive impact on the environment

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

58


Enon | Mineral accretion furniture

59


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

REP(AIR): An olfactory interface for bike maintenance and care Cayla Key and Audrey Desjardins University of Washington cayla@uw.edu adesjard@uw.edu

(AM) Room 3| Talk 3: More-than-Human Partnerships | Morning Session | Day 1

In this paper we present Rep(AIR), a research-through-design olfactory interface for communicating moments of wear and tear on a bicycle. Rep(AIR) was designed as a probe in an autobiographical design inquiry to uncover qualities of the relationship between humans and objects as they relate to breakage and repair. Key used Rep(AIR), along with a personal probe notebook, on a 12 day international cycling trip to reflect on and document repairs and maintenance. We share findings from our analysis which extend the discourse on repair to include moments of wear, maintenance, and care as a part of the ongoing process of everyday use; recenter functionality to the human-object team, rather than the object alone; and highlight teamwork and collaboration as a way to challenge the hierarchical human-object narrative. We conclude by noting the role of Rep(AIR) as a tool which gave the bicycle a voice—revealing the often uncommunicated experience of wear and tear on an object.

Keywords: olfactory interface; bicycle; autobiographical design; maintenance; repair; care

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

60


61

Key and Desjardins | REP(AIR): An olfactory interface for bike maintenance and care


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 3: More-than-Human Partnerships Talk 3: REP(AIR): An olfactory interface for bike maintenance and care

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

62


63

Key and Desjardins | REP(AIR): An olfactory interface for bike maintenance and care


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

14:00 Process I: From Iteration to Co-Creation Talk 1 (p.65) Domestic widgets: Leveraging household creativity in co-creating data physicalisations Talk 2 (p.66) Connected Resources: A Research through Design approach to designing for older people’s resourcefulness

Room 1: Sustained Co-Creation

Chaired by Paul Coulton (Lancaster University)

Talk 3 (p.67) Empowering young adults on the autistic spectrum: Reframing assistive technology through design

Talk 1 (p.74) CoCoCo: Co-Designing a Co-design toolkit for Co-bots to empower autistic adults Talk 2 (p.75) Enabling relationships in a co-creative process with children Talk 3 (p.80) EthnoďŹ ction: Agency and representation in digital ethnography

Talk 1 (p.84) Collaborative craft through digital fabrication and virtual reality Talk 2 (p.85) Enticatypes: Exploring how artifacts can entice conversation on craft values in digital making Talk 3 (p.90) Crafting material innovation and knowledge through interdisciplinary approaches

Room 2: Inclusion and Empowerment Chaired by Marije de Haas (Loughborough University)

Room 3: Collaborative Craft

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

Chaired by Angella Mackey (Eindhoven University of Technology)

64


Domestic widgets: Leveraging household creativity in co-creating data physicalisations David Verweij, David Kirk, Kay Rogage and Abigail Durrant Northumbria University david.verweij@northumbria.ac.uk, david.kirk@northumbria.ac.uk, k.rogage@northumbria.ac.uk, abigail.durrant@northumbria.ac.uk

(PM) Room 1| Talk 1: Sustained Co-Creation | Afternoon Session | Day 1

Keywords: internet of things; co-creation; research toolkit; physical visualizations; family; research through design

The home environment is a complex design space, especially when it has multiple inhabitants. As such, the home presents challenges for the design of smart products. Householders may be different ages and have differing interests, needs, and attitudes towards technology. We pursued a research-through-design study with family households to envision and ‘co-create’ the future of data-enabled artifacts for their homes. We have iteratively developed domestic research artefacts for these households that are open, data-enabled, physical visualizations. These artefacts - called Domestic Widgets - are customisable in their design and functionality throughout their lifespan. The development process highlights design challenges for sustained co-creation and the leveraging of household creativity in (co-creation) research toolkits. These include the need to allow and inspire iterative customization, the need to accommodate changing roles within the home ecology, and the aim that such design should be inclusive for all family members (irrespective of age and technical proficiency), whilst maintaining a role and purpose in the home. We invite the RTD community to critically discuss our, and other, open and iterative end-user designs for sustained co-creation. By presenting unbuilt and interactive pre-built Domestic Widgets, we interactively foster engagement with practises of sustained co-creation.

65


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Connected Resources: A Research through Design approach to designing for older people’s resourcefulness Masako Kitazaki1, Iohanna Nicenboim1, Elisa Giaccardi1, Lenneke Kuijer2, Louis Neven3, Benjamin Lopez4 1 Delft

University of Technology masako.kitazaki@gmail.com, I.Nicenboim@tudelft.nl, e.giaccardi@tudelft.nl

2 Eindhoven

University of Technology s.c.kuijer@tue.nl

3 Avans

University of Applied Sciences lbm.neven@avans.nl

4 Philips

Design Benjamin.Lopez@philips.com

(PM) Room 1| Talk 2: Sustained Co-Creation | Afternoon Session | Day 1

Connected Resources are a family of combinable devices that add digital capabilities to mundane objects, in order to support everyday strategies of resourcefulness in older people. Using Connected Resources as an example, this paper describes designing for older people’s resourcefulness using an RtD process. Here, the artifact dimensions of openness, which is needed when designing for resourcefulness, are generated through an experimental study with prototypes. The dimensions of a variety of use were identified during a participatory session in which uses for prototypes in the everyday practices of older people were explored. Finally, design considerations to ensure older people’s different levels of independence from technology were determined. The paper first describes three working prototypes built during the first design iteration. It then moves on to showcase two studies conducted with these prototypes and the insights in relation to the variables of openness and variety. Finally, we discuss how these insights were used to redefine functionalities and interaction qualities in the second iteration, and how these insights influenced the prototypes’ shape, materiality and semiotics, as well as the conceptualization of data visualizations on the online platform. Lastly, we provide a reflection of the knowledge generated in the RtD process.

Keywords: smart objects; internet of things; connected everyday; gerontechnology; research through design

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

66


Empowering young adults on the autistic spectrum: reframing assistive technology through design Jelle van Dijk, Melina Kopke, Niels van Huizen, Loes van Uffelen, Laura Beunk University of Twente jelle.vandijk@utwente.nl, j.c.vanhuizen@student.utwente.nl

(PM) Room 1 | Talk 3: Sustained Co-Creation | Afternoon Session | Day 1 Keywords: empowerment; autism; assistive technology; ubiquitous computing; tangible interaction; domestic technology

Increasingly, assistive technologies are designed to ‘empower’ people with cognitive and social challenges. But what does it mean to say technology empowers? In a four-year participatory Research-through-Design project we addressed this question. Eleven autistic young adults participated in designing MyDayLight: an IoT system supporting self-management of domestic activities. Contextual inquiry, co-design, design reflection, prototype deployment and embodied interaction theory were woven together in an iterative reflective process. This allowed us to critically address certain background assumptions that typically underly common understanding of assistive technologies. We present three reframings of our evolving concept of ‘empowering technology’: 1) From ‘planned reminder’ to ‘situated attention grabber’ 2) From ‘supporting action’ to ‘scaffolds for developing your own supportive routines’ 4) From ‘assistive product’, to ‘co-design tool in a larger transformational process’. In contrast to empowerment as ‘self-sufficiency’, MyDayLight embodies a developmental-experiential interpretation of empowerment. It helps users experiment with reconfiguring their own environment, reflect on their experiences and gradually develop more grip on life. The design artifacts enabled young adults on the spectrum and their care-givers to share, question- and reframe implicitly held understandings and to imagine and explore new ways for assistive technology to play an empowering role in a person’s life-world.

67


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 1: Sustained Co-Creation Talk 1: Domestic widgets: Leveraging household creativity in co-creating data physicalisations

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

68


69 widgets: Verweij, Kirk, Rogage, Durrant | Domestic Leveraging household creativity in co-creating data physicalisations


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 1: Sustained Co-Creation Talk 2: Connected Resources: A Research through Design approach to designing for older people’s resourcefulness

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

70


71 Kitazaki, Nicenboim, Giaccardi, Kuijer, Neven, Lopez | Connected Resources: Key and Desjardins | Rep(AIR) A Research through Design approach to designing for older people’s resourcefulness


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 1: Sustained Co-Creation Talk 3: Empowering young adults on the autistic spectrum: Reframing assistive technology through design

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

72


73 and Beunk | Empowering young adults on the autistic spectrum: Van Dijk, Kopke, Van Huizen, Van Uffelen Reframing assistive technology through design


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

CoCoCo: Co-Designing a Co-design toolkit for Co-bots to empower autistic adults Suhaib Aslam, Jelle van Dijk and Edwin Dertien University of Twente writetosuhaib@gmail.com, jelle.vandijk@utwente.nl, e.dertien@utwente.nl

(PM) Room 2 | Talk 1: Inclusion and Empowerment | Afternoon Session | Day 1

Autism impacts 5 million people in the EU. Research has shown social robots as enabling robot-assisted therapy or providing assistance in everyday activities. However, given the strong heterogeneity of the target group, it proves to be difficult to design generic, one-size-fits-all assistive applications. Various toolkits have emerged for self-building of robots, yet these still require considerable technical skill. More importantly, such toolkits lack guidance in a structured design process, to uncover and translate real needs into coherent product concepts that can actually be built. To fill this gap, we engaged in CoCoCo (Co3), an exploratory study to empower autistic adults to truly design their own (non-preprogrammed) collaborative robots. The Co3 toolkit of linkable building blocks guides designer and autistic participant through an iterative co-design process. The toolkit itself has been co-designed, evaluated and tested with autistic adults at a FabLab-inspired activity centre for autistic individuals. We discuss how the toolkit elements are padded with cognitive and communicative scaffolding to bridge imagination and communication-related gaps in the interaction between designer and autistic participant. We present Co3, a first step in open-source, scalable, democratized design of social assistive robots, with the aim to increase inclusiveness and democratization.

Keywords: participatory design; autism; social robots; socially assistive robotics; empowerment; co-design

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

74


Enabling relationships in a co-creative process with children Roberta Bonetti 1, Nitzan Cohen2 and Seçil Uğur Yavuz2 University of Bologna roberta.bonetti3@unibo.it 1

Free University of Bozen-Bolzano nitzan.cohen@unibz.it secil.uguryavuz@unibz.it 2

(PM) Room 2| Talk 2: Inclusion and Empowerment | Afternoon Session | Day 1

The aim of this paper is to describe methods, instruments, and the entire iterative process of an action-research realized by a designer and an anthropologist. The project was conducted through co-design workshops together with 324 participants (8-15 years old) and as a result an interactive object “Emotion Capsule” was created. The project raises critical questions about the use of artefacts and digital technology while involving children in the design process, inviting them to explore their needs, desires, and dreams through creating a new object. In our process, various artifacts and tools were used, as pretexts to explore needs and to facilitate motivation and co-participation. The Emotion Capsule was realized as a working prototype, which then was used in 12 classrooms. The prototype is embedded with sensors and actuators, collecting the participants’ unexpressed emotions and sharing them with others anonymously. It turns intangible things like sentiments into a tangible experience in which participants can freely express themselves and reflect on their common problems. The qualitative data obtained during our activities were analyzed through design and anthropological perspectives. The paper reflects on the iterative nature of the collaborative design process and how human and non-human entities co-create themselves in a sustainable way.

Keywords: co-design; interaction design; action research; anthropology of education; design ethnography

75


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 2: Inclusion and Empowerment Talk 1: CoCoCo: Co-Designing a Co-design toolkit for Co-bots to empower autistic adults

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

76


77

Aslam, van Dijk, Dertien | Co-Designing a Co-design toolkit for Co-bots to empower autistic adults


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 2: Inclusion and Empowerment Talk 2: Enabling relationships in a co-creative process with children

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

78


79

Bonetti, Cohen, UÄ&#x;ur Yavuz | Enabling relationships in a co-creative process with children


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Ethnofiction: Agency and representation in digital ethnography John Morrison Edinburgh Napier University j.morrison@napier.ac.uk

(PM) Room 2| Talk 3: Inclusion and Empowerment | Afternoon Session | Day 1

This paper profiles methodological aspects of a doctoral project which is exploring the ways a research strategy harnessing lens-based digital media can contribute to the construction of new ways of knowing and understanding in a social problem space currently dominated by quantitative research. The studies presented, focused on problematizing issues of agency and representation in the context of university policy designed to support inclusion and achievement for care experienced people who are underrepresented in Scottish higher education. To reframe the prevalent deficit discourse, key questions explored were, how can we enable people with lived experience of the care system be authors of their own narratives? And how can we use the participatory creative design process and outcomes for building bridges of empathy & understanding between the service users, service providers and wider audiences? The unique proposition of the research centres around an exploration on the social affordances of lens-based digital media, such as augmented and virtual reality in ethnographic practices. The design process as an emergent conceptual model and digital artifacts are presented as technological vignettes, which developed from relationship-centred service design activities within my teaching and fieldwork in community spaces.

Keywords: empowerment; autism; assistive technology; ubiquitous computing; tangible interaction; domestic technology

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

80


I am an eye, an algorithmic eye. I an interactive system, show you a world as only I can see it. My path leads to the creation of a fresh perception of the world. I decipher in a new way a world unknown to you. Appropriated from Dziga Vertov

81


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 2: Inclusion and Empowerment Talk 3: Ethnofiction: Agency and representation in digital ethnography

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

82


83

Morrison | Ethnofiction: Agency and representation in digital ethnography


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Collaborative craft through digital fabrication and virtual reality Nithikul Nimkulrat1, Aaron Oussoren2, Hélène Day Fraser2 and Keith Doyle2 1 OCAD University nnimkulrat@faculty.ocadu.ca 2 Emily Carr University of Art + Design aoussoren@ecuad.ca, hfraser@ecuad.ca, kdoyle@ecuad.ca

(PM) Room 3 | Talk 1: Inclusion and Empowerment | Afternoon Session | Day 1

This paper examines the collaborative practice between an analogue and a digital craft practitioner. It aims to illuminate ways in which digital tools can be used to translate handcrafted objects in collaborative craft practice and to address the following questions: 1) What forms of knowing and meaning making evolve in collaborative research through design practice? 2) What does it mean to explore material in Computer Aided Design (CAD) through Virtual Reality (VR)? Originating with a hand-knotted artifact, the study begins with the transformation of an analogue form into digital format using a range of techniques. These activities act as both a review of digital fabrication capabilities and an exploration of new thinking mechanisms offered by this emerging hybrid practice. The study broadens our understanding of the maker’s role within the capabilities and limitations of digital tools. Each iteration of digitally-fabricated objects was documented and reflected upon. This collaborative practice acts as a catalyst for established disciplines within art and design to collide and interact. Outcomes include mapping workflows within digital and analogue material practice, and reflection on how the materials and methods used in digital fabrication have the potential to expand the meanings connected to the things that are produced.

Keywords: cad; collaborative practice; digital fabrication; hybridization; new craft; virtual reality

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

84


Enticatypes: Exploring how artifacts can entice conversation on craft values in digital making Erica Vannucci, Justin Marshall and Jayne Wallace Northumbria University erica.vannucci@northumbria.ac.uk, justin.marshall@northumbria.ac.uk, jayne.wallace@northumbria.ac.uk

(PM) Room 3| Talk 2: Inclusion and Empowerment | Afternoon Session | Day 1

Keywords: craft; hand-made; digital craft; craft values; pragmatism; enticatypes; practice-based research

In this paper we will focus on two bodies of work which used digital design and manufacturing technologies in their inception and production; one produced by an experienced digital maker (Marshall) and the other by a novice maker (Vannucci). We are proposing these sets of works as Pragmatic enticatypes (artifacts that sit between prototypes and provotypes to entice conversation). We will describe and discuss the outcomes of a workshop where the participants, many of whom were craftspeople and designers, tried through our enticatypes to get under the skin of the dichotomies that can still persist between machine/digital produced and handmade objects. We will exemplify the role our artifacts played in the workshop and the participants’ reflections and discussions raised across, and between, the analogue and the digital in relation to: novelty in contrast to originality, authenticity as a mark of respect for tradition, control as a measure of competence and competence as a measure of skill. Moreover, as first attempt at enticatypes, we will underline their shortcomings in this workshop in order to discuss how very different craft results, both using a Research through Design approach, could potentially lead an audience to different types of conversations, interactions and outcome. And how a highly hands-on group of participants, such as craftspeople, recognises and interprets different qualities in the same artifacts.

85


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 3: Collaborative Craft Talk 1: Collaborative craft through digital fabrication and virtual reality

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

86


87

Nimkulrat, Oussoren, Day Fraser, Doyle | Collaborative craft through digital fabrication and virtual reality


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 3: Collaborative Craft Talk 2: Enticatypes: exploring how artifacts can entice conversation on craft values in digital making

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

88


89 exploring how artifacts c Vannucci, Marshall, Wallace | Enticatypes: an entice conversation on craft values in digital making


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Crafting material innovation and knowledge through interdisciplinary approaches Claire Felicity Miller Royal College of Art claire.miller@rca.ac.uk

(PM) Room 3 | Talk 3: Inclusion and Empowerment | Afternoon Session | Day 1

This paper presents material artifacts created at the early stages of a practice-based PhD— the focus of which is to highlight, through practice, a third space that emerges as disciplines intersect— specifically textile design and material science. Ceramic fibres (high temperature insulators), anti-static stainless steel fibres (conductive materials) and carbon nanotubes (1d carbon nano materials) were chosen as departure points for exploration. This paper presents images alongside their written explainations to draw attention to the processes and approaches that have been used in the material developments. A ‘soft’ approach, driven by curiosity, intuition and playfulness, is taken to engage with these materials and is explored alongside a ‘hard’ approach, as a means to uncover this third space. Engineered materials, which have been synthesized and manufactured using systematic and scientific approaches are considered to be from this ‘hard’ domain— such as ceramic fibres, that although can be woven or knitted are not in current material palettes used by textile designers. New methods and ways of working were developed to take forward into the PhD enabled by the textile designer working tacitly with unfamiliar materials and understanding how insights from one sphere, might, when used in another, potentially reveal new knowledge and material innovations.

Keywords: material innovation; material exploration; smart textiles; interdisciplinary; textile design thinking

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

90


Room 3: Collaborative Craft Talk 3: Crafting material innovation and knowledge through interdisciplinary approaches

91

Miller| Crafting material innovation and knowledge through interdisciplinary approaches


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Image: Objects that Withdraw | Iohanna Nicenboim in collaboration with Daniel Suarez “A virus for digital fabrication codes, which makes objects unique, and thus impossible to be captured by object recognition. The project is an exploration on how Things could hide from different cameras, including a Kinekt, by altering their materials and shapes.�

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #panel1 #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

92


16:30 Panel I: New Agencies and Alignments in RtD Design is rapidly being widened and disrupted by data technologies such as the Internet of Things, Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence. This has a profound effect on Research through Design (RtD) too. As technology begins to enable the things we make to make things too, and with increased autonomy, designers will need a finer understanding of the recursive relationship between the ‘people who make things,’ the ‘things that make other things,’ and the ‘things that make people’. Algorithmically enabled and connected, things can generate identity (or hamper it) by curating content, produce care (or discrimination) by performing assistance, and generate value (or not) by arranging smart contracts. This new relationship collapses the traditional division between participation (at design time), interaction (at use time), and the (planned) creation and distribution of products and services that design has inherited from previous practices of skilful crafting and industrial design manufacturing – shifting the locus of design to uncharted territories. So how can designers participate in this expanded, emergent world of design? And with whom, or what, will they be doing their part? For example, how can teams of diverse human experts and artificial agencies be aligned in a RtD project, doing the things that include design? Who (or what) has to participate, when and how – in what role? How can artificial perspectives be brought into the design process thoughtfully and responsibly? How to critique (not just vet) the assumptions and design decisions that get encoded in an algorithm, and the interactions the algorithm is enabled to learn from? How to develop capacity for ethical responses to be shared between distributed entities, humans and nonhumans? 93


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Our panel of academics and practitioners Johan Redström, Larissa Pschetz, James Pierce and Iohanna Nicenboim, chaired by Elisa Giaccardi, will explore, discuss and debate these tensions and trajectories, in dialogue with the audience.

Panel I:

Elisa Giaccardi is Professor and Chair of Interactive Media Design at Delft University of Technology. From 2018, she also holds a visiting position as Professor of Post-Industrial Design at the Umeå Institute of Design, Sweden. She received her PhD from Plymouth University in 2003. She previously worked at CU Boulder (USA) and Universidad Carlos III Madrid (Spain). After working in metadesign, collaborative and open design processes, she has during the last years focused on the challenges that a permeating digitalisation means for the field of design. Her recent research in thing centered design engages with things in new ways, with the starting point that things now hold both perception and possible agency (e.g., AI), and thus participate in design and use in ways that previous industrially produced objects could not. She’s editor of the book “Heritage and Social Media: Understanding heritage in a participatory culture” (Routledge 2012).

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #panel1 #wednesdaymarch20th #day1

Johan Redström is Professor in Design at Umeå Institute of Design, Umeå University (Sweden). He has previously been Rector of Umeå Institute of Design, and before that Design Director of the Interactive Institute (Sweden). He received his PhD from Göteborg University in 2001, where he also became Docent in Interaction Design in 2008. Working with research through design based on combining experimental practice with design philosophy, he has done research in areas such as emerging technologies and traditional materials (e.g. on IT+Textiles), design and sustainability (e.g. on design, energy consumption and awareness) and more recently reconceptualisations of ‘things’ in light of new digital forms of making and using. His most recent books are “Making Design Theory” (MIT Press 2017) and “Changing Things: The future of objects in a digital world” together with Heather Wiltse (Bloomsbury 2019).

94


Larissa Pschetz is a Lecturer in Design Informatics and Product Design at the University of Edinburgh. She completed a Microsoft-funded PhD in 2014, exploring social and political implications of particular approaches of time in design through the concept of Temporal Design. She has previously worked at research centres such as IBM Watson in Cambridge MA, Microsoft Research in Cambridge UK and Microsoft Research Asia, as well as at Interaction Design offices in Germany, such as IxDS in Berlin and HID in Hamburg. Her research focuses on Interaction Design and related areas of Human-Computer Interaction, Social Sciences and Humanities, and is currently focused on the pursuit of an inclusive Internet of Things and on the impact of smart contracting on everyday interactions.

James Pierce is an Assistant Professor of Design at California College of the Arts, a researcher at UC Berkeley Center’s CITRIS and Banatao Institute, and an affiliate of the UC Berkeley Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity. His interdisciplinary research practice combine methods from design, engineering, social sciences, art, and the humanities. As a design researcher, he practices and reflects upon design as a mode of inquiry, critical engagement, and speculative exploration. His current research investigates issues of privacy, cybersecurity, trust, and fairness with emerging interactive, connected, and artificially intelligent technologies. Pierce has published over 50 peer-reviewed and edited articles, including multiple Best Paper awards and nominations, in journals and conference proceedings spanning the fields of Human-Computer Interaction, Ubiquitous Computing, and Design.

95

Iohanna Nicenboim is a Berlin-based interaction designer and researcher, with a background in Digital Media and Industrial Design. A recipient of the Internet of Things Awards for Design Fiction and ThingsCon Fellow, her work has been presented at several international exhibition venues and conferences, including FutureEverything, Transmediale, Milan Design Week, Dutch Design Week, CHI and DIS. As a researcher, she has focused on IoT and more recently on AI, following a Research through Design process within a more-thanhuman approach. As a designer, she has produced speculative scenarios and fictional artifacts, to provoke discussion on the roles of digital and connected technologies on our future lives. She will soon start a Microsoft-funded PhD at the Connected Everyday Lab, Delft University of Technology.


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

18:00 Exhibition Concept and Opening The exhibition is the heart of the RTD conference, putting the practice; front and centre of the discussions that will take place in the next few days. We are very excited to work with the historical space offered to us by the Science Center Delft, enabling us to show a diversity of perspectives and approaches to design, craft and research. It has given us a unique opportunity to extend and challenge our expectations of an exhibition by setting it up as a landscape that extends and connects with the different spaces of the conference. There is no fixed boundary between the ‘exhibition space’ and the ‘discussion space’. They move and creep into each area as conversations evolve and connect. This fluidity of experience we hope will enable you to seamlessly encounter and re-encounter the work over the next few days of the conference, enriched with thought-provoking discussions along the way. This is also the first time that we are creating a ‘living’ exhibition, as conversation grows, annotation from the Documentation process will be accumulated and displayed alongside the exhibits, drawing attention to links and frictions between work. As Exhibition Curators, we are incredibly excited to welcome you to the RTD conference, and hope that the work will inspire you to explore the friction and shifts in your work.

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #exhibitionopening #wednesdaymarch20th

96


Day 2 Thursday, March 21st 09:00 Rooms of Interest Knowledge: From Interactions to Future States 10:30 Break 11:15 Making Space | Mapping RTD 13:00 Lunch 14:00 Rooms of Interest Process II: From Products to Diagramming 15:45 Break 16:00 Bus transfer to Het Nieuwe Instituut 17:00 Panel II Policy and Governance of RtD 19:00 Walk to Boompjes for dinner 19:30 Conference Dinner 22:00 Bus transfer to Delft

97

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

09:00 Knowledge: From Interactions to Future States Talk 1 (p.99) Experiencing the future mundane Talk 2 (p.102) A vision of a radical change towards a sustainable future: Speculated and applied Talk 3 (p.103) Provoking the debate on euthanasia in dementia with design

Talk 1 (p.108) Resisting plastics for ambiguous results Talk 2 (p.109) Crafting bioplastics: Materially reconďŹ guring everyday food practices Talk 3 (p.114) The parameters required to support a woman in motion

Talk 1 (p.116) Soma Bits: Mediating technology to orchestrate bodily experiences Talk 2 (p.117) Dismantling feminist biology through the design of etextiles Talk 3 (p.121) Puppetry as an alternative approach to designing kinesthetic movements

Room 1: Radical Future States

Chaired by James Pierce (California College of the Arts and University of California Berkeley)

Room 2: Forms of Resistance

Chaired by Anne Spaa (Northumbria University)

Room 3: Bodily Experiences

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

Chaired by Marco Rozendaal (Delft University of Technology)

98


Experiencing the future mundane Paul Coulton1, Josepth Lindley1 , Adrian Gradinar1, James Colley2, Neelima Sailaja2, Andy Crabtree2, Ian Forrester3, Lianne Kerlin3 Lancaster University p.coulton@lancaster.ac.uk

1

2

University of Nottingham

3

BBC R&D

(AM) Room 1| Talk 1: Radical Future States | Morning Session | Day 2

Through the design, development and implementation of the Living Room of the Future (LRoTF), we build upon existing work to progress two strands of research. The first explores how media broadcasters may utilise Object-Based Media (OBM) to provide more immersive experiences. Created in conjunction with the BBC R&D the LRofTF utilizes OBM to dynamically customise television content according to audiences’ personal, contextual and derived data. OBM works by breaking media into smaller parts or ‘objects’, describing how they relate to each other semantically, and then reassembling them into personalized programmes. In addition to this media-delivery aspect, the LRoTF explores data protection issues that arise from OBM’s use of data by integrating with the privacy-enhancing Databox system. The second research focus develops understandings of Design Fiction. While the ‘World Building’ approach to Design Fiction describes strategies that place emerging technologies in potential futures, this work expands the scope of these prototypes to create a world within which audiences co-produce a ‘lived’ experience of the future as an ‘Experiential Design Fiction’. By combining the audience’s context with the fiction’s diegesis this research demonstrates a method for extrapolating today’s emerging technologies to create an immersive experience of a possible mundane reality of tomorrow.

Keywords: design fiction; immersion; perceptive media; internet of things; privacy; experiential futures

99


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 1: Radical Future States Talk 1: Experiencing the future mundane

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

100


101 Crabtree, Forrester, Kerlin | Coulton, Lindley, Gradinar, Colley, Sailaja, Experiencing the future mundane (Image: Vicky Barlow BBC R&D)


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

A vision of a radical change towards a sustainable future: Speculated and applied Lizette Reitsma and Stina Wessman RISE Interactive lizette.reitsma@ri.se, stina.wessman@ri.se

(AM) Room 1 | Talk 2: Radical Future States | Morning Session | Day 2

In order to stay within planetary boundaries, it is said that we should change our societies in radical ways. In this paper, we propose and design an alternative future state, acknowledging such a radical change. Embodied as individual climate goals, we take a Speculative Research through Design approach, thereby positioning participants in such a radically different future system. To shape this speculative system, we engaged experts through interviews and a future vision- and backcasting workshop. We translated this vision of a radical change towards a sustainable future, into the concept Spilltime, in which a carbon budget is central. It consists of a CO2e pulse, a CO2e coach, an ambient interface and a CO2e reflection offering detailed information. Utilizing wearable technology, video tracking and a Wizard of Oz approach, we embedded the Spilltime concept in the lives of six participants. Thereby, we were able to provide high resolution real time CO2e feedback in relation to the activities the six participants engaged in. With this Speculative Research through Design approach, we managed to embody experiences of (radical) future states and enter a deeply reflective space to uncover stories of opportunity and despair around a carbon literacy.

Keywords: speculative research through design; transition design; sustainability; climate goals; carbon budget; vision

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

102


Provoking the debate on euthanasia in dementia with design Marije de Haas, Sue Hignett and Gyuchan Thomas Jun Loughborough University m.de-haas@lboro.ac.uk, s.m.hignett@lboro.ac.uk, g.jun@lboro.ac.uk

(AM) Room 1 | Talk 3: Radical Future States | Morning Session | Day 2

Keywords: speculative design; critical design; prototyping; euthanasia; dementia

Dementia affects 47 million people worldwide. It is a collection or consequence of many illnesses with symptoms including deterioration in memory, thinking and behaviour; it is a terminal disease. The fear of dementia leads people to request euthanasia. Euthanasia in dementia rarely happens because the dementia symptoms conflict with the due care criteria; a person requesting euthanasia must confirm the request at time of death and must be undergoing hopeless suffering. Once dementia has progressed, the euthanasia ‘wish’ can no longer be confirmed, and assessing suffering in a person with dementia is difficult. Having a reliable dementia diagnosis is essential in order to be able to make a decision for an ‘early’ euthanasia. This paper describes a Speculative Design to explore what options should be considered for receiving a dementia diagnosis in order to plan a death. A branding strategy was developed for the Planned Death company, who advocate an early diagnosis for making end-of-life decisions. The branding includes company identity, website, diagnostic kit, diagnostic delivery strategy, and end-of-life support. Additionally a short documentary was developed describing the Planned Death Company’s motivation and a client testimonial. Responses to the documentary were collected with a carefully selected group of participants through a survey and in-depth interviews. The responses were rich and sparked debate. Many new questions arose to do with patient autonomy and social structures.

103


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 1: Radical Future States Talk 2: A vision of a radical change towards a sustainable future: Speculated and applied

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

104


105

Reitsma and Wessman | A vision of a radical change towards a sustainable future: Speculated and applied


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 1: Radical Future States Talk 3: Provoking the debate on euthanasia in dementia with design

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

106


107

De Haas, Hignett, Jun | Provoking the debate on euthanasia with design


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Resisting plastics for ambiguous results Jeroen Peeters1, Rosa van der Veen1, Ronald Helgers1, Olov Långström1, Martina Bambi1,3, Nigel Papworth1, Ambra Trotto1,2 RISE Interactive jeroen.peeters@ri.se, rosa.v.d.veen@ri.se, ronald.helgers@ ri.se, olov.langstrom@ri.se, nigel. papworth@ri.se, ambra.trotto@ri.se 1

Umeå School of Architecture ambra.trotto@umu.se 2

Università di Bologna martina.bambi@studio.unibo.it 3

(AM) Room 2 | Talk 1: Forms of Resistance | Morning Session | Day 2

Keywords: constructive design research; 3d printing; digital fabrication methods; resistance; ambiguity; design process; making

This paper illustrate present a constructive design research process centred around 3D printing with a wood-based material. This process was highly explorative: it involves the development of a new material and the use and hacking of a machine to materialize a design intention. Along the way, elements of craft emerge, as the designers develop skills in navigating the tensions that exist between material, machine and design intention. We present the process of navigating this design space by unpacking the act of making, using a digital fabrication technique, through a lens of craftsmanship. We employ the notions of ambiguity and resistance, to understand the factors and forces at play that may not typically be considered to be part of a highly automated digital fabrication method, such as 3D printing. As a result of this detailed reflection, new parts of the design space were articulated. All resistances appear as a result of the tension between and designer’s skills and intention, capabilities of the machine and possibilities of the material, all materialised in the Printed Future Vase. This publication contributes to the development of a new additive manufacturing method, and increases our awareness of what factors and forces are at play in this new additive manufacturing method, in which the development of the designer’s tacit skills have been articulated more explicitly.

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

108


Crafting bioplastics: Materially reconfiguring everyday food practices Jekaterina Aleksejeva, Paul Biedermann, Iulia Gavriliuc, Ona Orlovaite, Danielle Wilde University of Southern Denmark aleksejeva.jekaterina1990 @gmail.com, paul-biedermann.91@gmail.com, iuliaelena94@gmail.com, ona.orlovaite@gmail.com, d@daniellewilde.com

(AM) Room 2 | Talk 2: Forms of Resistance | Morning Session | Day 2

First proclaimed an amazing innovation, now plastic permeates everything—our homes, food, earth, oceans, many living creatures, including ourselves. The use of plastic is problematic, but hard to change. It is culturally situated, commercially embedded, learned, ingrained, often automatic. And, while alternatives are available, they can be hard to find and more expensive than their plastic counterparts. To engage with this issue, we undertook a design-based investigation of DIY bioplastic, edible and hyper-compostable tableware. Our aim was to render such alternatives more accessible. DIY recipes are available online. Yet, often lack vital information to make their use easy. We discovered how to ‘tame’ fabrication of plastic alternatives by adding information about cooking and curing to the recipes. Our experiments suggest that ‘at home’ production of bioplastics and the accompanying re-design of cutlery and tableware, engender new, more sustainable, eating habits by—literally—designing new ways of eating. They also afford reframing of food ‘waste’ into material resource. We present a hand-made book and material sample set that make our findings tangible and accessible to design researchers, amateur gastronomists, DIY enthusiasts, and others curious about plastic alternatives. Our findings support a move of scientific practices from the lab to people’s homes.

Keywords: bioplastics; diy practices; sustainabillity; plastic alternatives; materiality; research through design

109


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 2: Forms of Resistance Talk 1: Resisting plastics for ambiguous results

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

110


111 Bambi, Papworth, Trotto | Peeters, van der Veen, Helgers, LĂĽngstrĂśm, Resisting plastics for ambiguous results


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 2: Forms of Resistance Talk 2: Crafting Bioplastics: Materially reconfiguring everyday food practices

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

112


113 Wilde | Aleksejeva, Biedermann, Gavriliuc, Orlovaite, Crafting bioplastics: Materially reconfiguring everyday food practices


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

The parameters required to support a woman in motion Marloes ten Bhömer Kingston University London info@marloestenbhomer.com

(AM) Room 2| Talk 3: Forms of Resistance | Morning Session | Day 2

‘A Measurable Factor Sets the Conditions of its Operation’ is an on-going research project and series of publicly exhibited materials originally developed through the Stanley Picker Research Fellowship at Kingston University. This paper outlines the method, process and contextual underpinnings of the project, which aims to rethink the ways in which shoes are designed by shirking traditional approaches. It instead employs an engineering method based on structural parameters, informed by biomechanical factors, required to support a high-heeled foot while in motion. Through continuous critical reflection on the method as it was being developed, I identified areas of study necessary to understand and unpick the gendered connotations of the high-heeled shoe, which in turn informed the artistic framing of the project and additional filmic work. In so doing the work expands on the discourse surrounding high-heeled shoes and the gendering of different disciplines and objects.

Keywords: research methodology; gendering; shoe types; culural connotations; contextualizing; identity

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

114


Room 2: Forms of Resistance Talk 3: The parameters required to support a woman in motion

115

Ten Bhรถmer | Bluepanelshoe | The parameters required to support a woman in motion


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Soma Bits: Mediating technology to orchestrate bodily experiences Charles Windlin1, Anna Ståhl2, Pedro Sanches1, Vasiliki Tsaknaki1, Pavel Karpashevich1, Madeline Balaam1 , Kristina Höök1 Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm windlin@kth.se, sanches@kth.se, tsaknaki@kth.se, pavelka@kth.se, balaam@kth.se, khook@kth.se 1

RISESICS anna.stahl@ri.se 2

(AM) Room 3 | Talk 1: Bodily Experiences | Morning Session | Day 2

The Soma Bits are a prototyping toolkit that facilitates Soma Design. Acting as an accessible ‘sociodigital material’ Soma Bits allow designers to pair digital technologies, with their whole body and senses, as part of an iterative soma design process. The Soma Bits addresses the difficulty we experienced in past Soma Design processes — that articulating of sensations we want to evoke to others, and then maintaining these experiences in memory throughout a design process. Thus, the Soma Bits enable designers to know and experience what a design might ‘feel like’ and to share that with others. The Soma Bits relate to three experiential qualities: ‘feeling connected’, ‘feeling embraced’, and ‘being in correspondence’ with the interactive materials. The Soma Bits have a form factor and materiality that allow actuators (heat, vibration, and shape-changing) to be placed on and around the body; they are easily configurable to enable quick and controllable creations of soma experiences which can be both part of a first-person approach as well as shared with others. The Soma Bits are a living, growing library of shapes and actuators. We use them in our own design practices, as well as when engaging others in soma design processes.

Keywords: somaesthetic interaction design; design process

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

116


Dismantling feminist biology through the design of etextiles

2

We present the design of a toolkit that explores textile materials with electronics as interaction material for intimate health literacy, and method for engaging women in self-care. This toolkit includes a series of artifacts designed for research. A range of design and craft techniques were used, and materials explored, as medium to engender conversations between communities of women on practices of intimate care. The toolkit consists of a set of materials for the following two activities 1) body mapping and 2) do-it-yourself (DIY) wearable eTextiles. We pre­ sent findings from our case study that included iterations with the toolkit within four discrete workshops, and a total of 22 women and girls age range 15-52.

(AM) Room 3 | Talk 2: Bodily Experiences | Morning Session | Day 2

Our approach draws from feminist biology to assi­ milate notions of embodiment and bodily functions in ways that are conducive to knowledge production. Within this study we put a focus on interweaving aesthetics with the material landscape of electronic textiles and the body; making with and through DIY artefacts supported by technology-enabled materials, to shape and strengthen knowledge of processes within and between bodies. We contribute a designerly approach to creating bodily awareness through hands-on engagement with crafting technology.

Teresa Almeida1, Ko-Le Chen2, Rob Comber1 and Madeline Balaam1 Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm talmeida@kth.se, rcomber@kth.se, balaam@kth.se 1

Newcastle University k.l.chen2@newcastle.ac.uk

Keywords: intimate care; toolkits; etextiles; feminist biology; woman-centered design

117


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 3: Bodily Experiences Talk 1: Soma Bits: Mediating technology to orchestrate bodily experiences

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

118


119 Windlin, Ståhl, Sanches, Tsaknaki, Karpashevich, Balaam, Höök | Soma Bits: Mediating technology to orchestrate bodily experiences


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 3: Bodily Experiences Talk 2: Dismantling feminist Biology through the Design of eTextiles

Almeida, Chen, Comber and Balaam | eTextile Toolkit

120


Puppetry as an alternative approach to designing kinesthetic movements Kensho Miyoshi Royal College of Art kensho.miyoshi@network.rca.ac.uk

(AM) Room 3| Talk 3: Bodily Experiences | Morning Session | Day 2

‘Kinesthetic empathy’ refers to the experience of kinetic sensations of observed movements. It becomes a useful lens for designers to explore the aesthetic quality of the movements of designed objects (e.g. fans, doors, clocks, robots) from an embodied perspective. It also empowers them to imagine and create alternative beings of everyday objects and their movements. In this way, it could eventually lead to rethinking our embodied relationship to the artificial world, especially physical movements of objects and spaces. This paper presents a practice-based research in which four product designers including the author proposed imaginative kinetic products informed by kinesthetic empathy. Rather than moving quickly from ideation to prototyping functional, mechanical motions, our approach was experimental, i.e. we conducted a more flexible and intuitive exploration of movements in collaboration with ‘unusual’ partners for product designers—puppeteers. The collaborative design process exposed us to unseen benefits and challenges of adopting puppetry as a means to design kinesthetic movements of objects. By bringing together each practitioner’s reflection on their design processes and outcomes, the paper concludes by proposing a new design approach to kinesthetic movements that bridges product design and puppetry.

Keywords: kinesthetic empathy, puppetry, movement qualities, everyday objects, kinesthetic design

121


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 3: Bodily Experiences Talk 3: Puppetry as an alternative approach to designing kinesthetic movements

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

122


123

Miyoshi | Puppetry as an alternative approach to designing kinesthetic movements


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

124


11:15 Making Space | Mapping RTD Making Space is a feature of the RTD conference format since 2015. The rationale behind this session is to create dedicated space in the programme for attendees to pull focus on the exhibition and more performative work. Making Space also creates opportunity for generative activities to take place between attendees in response to the exhibits. In previous years, Making Space has featured walking tours, musical performances, and demonstrations at exhibition stands that have incorporated attendee participation including acts of making. This year, the ambition is to introduce activities that enable attendees to co-create artefacts that express statements about Research-though-Design (RtD) practice. The Documentation Chairs invite all attendees to engage in the challenge of ‘visualising the landscapes of RTD 2019’, as a selective representation of state-of-the-art in RtD practice. Activities include map making - the co-creation of a series of different maps - in response to graphic provocations relating to the presented artefacts from RTD2019. The resultant maps will be displayed in the exhibition, and will be made available on the conference website following the event. Attendees will be invited to work together in groups to map RTD 2019 using materials, templates and a set of prompts provided by the Chairs. The mapmaking activities are based on on the conference theme of Method & Critique. Feedback already provided by attendees on the exhibition will serve as further inspiration for ‘mapping the conference’ . In keeping with the experimental tradition of RTD, the aim is to provide space in the programme for active, co-creative reflection on the exhibited work that is generative and that captures and sparks rich debate.

125

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #makingspace #mappingrtd #day2


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

14:00 Process II: From Products to Diagramming Talk 1 (p.127) Speculative diagrams: Experiments in mapping Youtube Talk 2 (p.130) Leaky sensor fields: Deviating, accelerating, and restraining the smart home Talk 3 (p.132) Research through board game design

Talk 1 (p.134) ‘Blueprints’ physical to digital: Curation of media to support ongoingness Talk 2 (p.135) We are all programmers now: From bits to blobs Talk 3 (p.140) Unpacking Solemaker into a model for UPPSS

Room 1: Critical Design Tactics

Chaired by Heather Wiltse (Umeå Institute of Design)

Room 2: Unboxing, Blueprinting and Hacking

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

Chaired by Justin Marshall (Northumbria University)

126


Speculative diagrams: Experiments in mapping Youtube Betti Marenko1, David Benqué2 University of the Arts London b.marenko@csm.arts.ac.uk 1

Royal College of Art mail@davidbenque.com 2

(PM) Room 1| Talk 1: Critical Design Tactics | Afternoon Session | Day 2

The notion that the future has a ‘shape’ is a deep-rooted construct, the cornerstone of how chance is mediated, for example through the ‘distributions’ of probability theory. Algorithmic prediction, via machine learning, builds on these shapes and amplifies their complexity and authority. While the problematic effects of this predictive regime and the preemptive politics it supports are objects of concern for scholars and practitioners across the humanities, social sciences, art, and philosophy, design is surprisingly disengaged from this conversation. Instead, it is either concerned with data visualization, often without questioning its positivist ontology, or with ‘seamless’ non-interfaces which effectively seek to remove choice. Against this backdrop, our proposal brings together design theory and design practice to interrogate current modes of algorithmic prediction and the construction of subjectivity enabled by ‘choice design’. Our designed artifacts are diagrams to think through practice about the shape(s) of the possible. Rather than designing predictable futures, we aim to use diagram-making to expose and reframe choice design. These design artifacts - initial and ongoing experiments in mapping YouTube recommendations - are a series of computational diagrams that weave together the tools of computational prediction, critical design practice, and theory.

Keywords: algorithmic prediction; diagrams; recommendation; critical data visualization

127


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 1: Critical Design Tactics Talk 1: Speculative diagrams: Experiments in mapping Youtube

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

128


129

Marenko, BenquĂŠ | Speculative diagrams: Experiments in mapping Youtube


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Leaky sensor fields: Deviating, accelerating, and restraining the smart home James Pierce University of California, Berkeley pierjam@berkeley.edu

This project examines the proliferation of leaky sensor fields by studying and redesigning smart home security cameras. This work begins with a set of close Based on close studies of existing smart home security cameras, Through a series of design explorations that accelerate, diverge, and restrain smart cameras, this research then explores scenarios to help us speculate about the future of smart homes and as ways of understanding the present.

(PM) Room 1| Talk 2: Critical Design Tactics | Afternoon Session | Day 2

Keywords: internet of things; iot; privacy; security; speculative design; critical design; design research; smart home; smart city

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

130


Room 1: Critical Design Tactics Talk 2: Smart home redirects: Accelerating, restraining, and deviating smart connected devices

131

Pierce | Leaky sensor fields: Deviating, accelerating, and restraining the smart home


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Research through board game design Haider Akmal and Paul Coulton Lancaster University h.a.akmal@lancaster.ac.uk, p.coulton@lancaster.ac.uk

(PM) Room 1| Talk 3: Critical Design Tactics | Afternoon Session | Day 2

This research presents the design of a board game that explores issues related to privacy, ethics, trust, risk, acceptability, and security within the Internet of Things (IoT). In particular, it aims to assist players in developing mental models of the increasing hybrid digital/physical spaces they inhabit in which notions of public and private are increasingly blurred. The game is based on an Heterotopical Model for Inter-Spatial Interaction, inspired by Michel Foucault’s essay “Of Other Spaces”, which can act as a lens for designing IoT products and services. In the game players: explore the spatial division between physical and virtual; and are rather exposed to its procedural rhetoric which highlights how notions of public and private are in constant flux and must be constantly renegotiated as they add or make connections with any new IoT devices they encounter. As the meaning of any game only emerges through play, it was developed through iterative play-testing in which player experience was evaluated against the intended rhetoric. This led to a number of fundamental re-designs and proved useful for evaluating the model itself. This discussion highlights that while game design research somewhat sits apart from more general design research it aligns closely with research through design.

Keywords: game design; board game; internet of things; philosophy; heterotopia; research through design

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

132


Room 1: Critical Design Tactics Talk 3: Research through board game design

133

Haider Akmal, Paul Coulton | Research through board game design


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

‘Blueprints’ physical to digital: curation of media to support ongoingness Jayne Wallace1, Nantia Koulidou1, Trevor Duncan1, Shaun Lawson1, Julie Trueman1, Claire Craig2, Helen Fisher2, Kellie Morrissey3, Kyle Montague3, Daniel Welsh3 Northumbria University jayne.wallace@northumbria.ac.uk 1

2

Sheffield Hallam University

3

Newcastle University

(PM) Room 2| Talk 1: Unboxing, Blueprinting and Hacking | Afternoon Session | Day 2 Keywords: ongoingness; design method; curation of digital media; end of life, dementia and bereavement; craft

Through describing ‘Blueprints’, a series of fabric collages, we detail a method for translating physical properties of objects into digital materialities of media compilations. This method has emerged within a piece of design research seeking to develop new ways to curate digital media to support ongoingness. The project context centres on working firstly with people who have a life limiting illness, secondly people living with an early stage of dementia and thirdly people who are bereaved. Ongoingness is a theoretical construct denoting an active dialogical component of ‘continued bonds’, which is an approach within bereavement care championing practices that enable a continued sense of connection between someone bereaved and a person who has died. ‘Blueprints’ are fabric collages made from scraps of fabric symbolising digital media (in this case photographs) from 2 people – one bereaved and one now deceased. The physical qualities that result from making the fabric collages (variation in layerings, thicknesses, stitching, fraying) each map onto directions for how the corresponding digital media will be composed in a compilation, and serves as a collaborative method of curating media in new ways. The ‘Blueprints’ method enables us to research if and how physical making of things can serve as a gentle way to engage with the complexities of media curation. It considers the potential value of indirect ways of curating digital media to enable ongoing connections between people through the unexpected compilations that the method creates.

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

134


We are all programmers now: From bits to blobs Emily-Clare Thorn1, Anthony Quinn2, Steve Benford1, Boriana Koleva1, William Preston1, Richard Mortier3 and Stefan Rennick Egglestone1 University of Nottingham emily.thorn@nottingham.ac.uk 1

University of the Arts London a.quinn@csm.art.ac.uk 2

University of Cambridge richard.mortier@cl.cam.ac.uk 3

(PM) Room 2| Talk 2: Unboxing, Blueprinting and Hacking | Afternoon Session | Day 2

Presented here is a research-through-design exploration into a collaborative process of developing a computer technology in which the visual designer has control. This paper presents the iterative negotiations and key turning points in the process of developing commissioned artifacts used to create and push the boundaries of the software. During this process visual designers learned how to creatively exploit the technology, hack the parameters, work around rules and play with accidents to create technologically enriched interactive patterns. We discuss the designer’s role in this software development process as the link between the technology and the user. There is a shift from the seperation of programming codes and adding imagery later to designing imagery that is interactive.

Keywords: visual markers; topological; threshold; patterns; mobile applications patterns

135


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 2: Unboxing, Blueprinting and Hacking Talk 1: ‘Blueprints’ physical to digital: Curation of media to support ongoingness

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

136


137 Wallace, Koulidou, Duncan, Lawson, Trueman, Craig, Fisher, Morrissey, Montague, Welsh | ‘Blueprints’ physical to digital: Curation of media to support ongoingness


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 2: Unboxing, Blueprinting and Hacking Talk 2: We are all programmers now: From bits to blobs

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

138


139 Thorn, Quinn, Benford, Koleva, Preston, Mortier, Rennick Egglestone | We are all programmers now: From bits to blobs (Image: Wallpaper by Elizabeth Jeal and Lilli Cowley-Wood


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Unpacking Solemaker into a model for UPPSS Troy Nachtigall 1, Oscar Tomico 1,2, Stephan Wensveen 1 and Ron Wakkary 1,3 Eindhoven University of Technology t.r.Nachtigall@tue.nl, o.tomico@tue.nl, s.a.g.Wensveen@tue.nl, r.l.Wakkary@tue.nl 1

ELISAVA otomico@elisava.edu 2

Simon Fraser University r.l.wakkary@sfu.edu 3

(PM) Room 2| Talk 3: Unboxing, Blueprinting and Hacking | Afternoon Session | Day 2

Solemaker research is a collection of four RtD projects related to personalized shoemaking. Across these projects, we created 272 material samples that explore how to make shoes that are digitally fabricated for the individual.. This shoe personalization system utilised soft materials, 3D printing, digital embroidery, laser cutting and our own digital tools. Achieving Solemaker meant hundreds of material samples for only a few research products; all were algorithmically generated. Our work exemplifies a change in making and craft practices through digital fabrication. In design theory, this is encapsulated in a model of digital personalization known as Ultra Personalized Product Service (UPPS). To investigate these links in the context of our material and making approach, we compared our hybrid craft practise to the model of UPPS using a system of physical boxes. We unpacked our work into boxes representing the model. This afforded ways to map projects together by means of a common language. This resulted in previously unseen connections, new understandings of the theoretical model, and new enabling transitions between model pillars. We present our unpacking “material sample boxing” process, a refined definition of the model, and the “physicalised” enabling transitions between the UPPS model stages.

Keywords: personalization; shoemaking; digital fabrication; 3d printing; design practice and theory; ultra-personalized product service systems

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #thursdaymarch21st #day2

140


Room 2: Unboxing, Blueprinting and Hacking Talk 3: Unpacking Solemaker into a model for UPPSS

141

Nachtigall, Tomico, Wensveen, Wakkary | Unpacking Solemaker into a model for UPPSS


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Thursday Night Live Het Nieuwe Instituut, Rotterdam

Image: Ianus Keller, 2005

16:00 A Bus transfer is arranged to bring you to Het Nieuwe Instituut

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #panel2 #thursdaymarch21st #day2

142


17:00 Panel II: Policy and Governance of RtD Het Nieuwe Instituut organizes exhibitions, workshops, residencies and events that approach the various design sectors from an integrated perspective. Informed by an understanding of contemporary technological, economic, cultural and social shifts, Het Nieuwe Instituut offers RTD 2019 a unique opportunity to promote a more integral approach to design that is grounded in and bound up with the principles of changing value systems and conflict.

Research through Design is the designerly contribution to the creating of new knowledge. Knowledge that can be used by others. And brought about by designerly interventions such as speculating about the future, making prototypes, and engaging with complexity and ambiguity without necessarily trying to ‘box them in’. Over the past decade design has grown into a scientific discipline, which is not only worthy as an object of study, but is also offering a unique contribution to the ways new knowledge can be produced. Research through Design (RtD) falls in that latter offer, with the core contribution of opening ‘a not-yet-existing future’ by making and [using] prototypes and other artefacts. These new ways of doing research involve embracing complexity and ambiguity, reframing the object of study during a project, and often working with a broad set of stakeholders in different roles. This offers a number of challenges to the way research projects are organized, planned, and funded. For example, what are the criteria by which a RtD proposal should be judged? How can practitioners (e.g., design agencies) be involved during the project, if they are not in the role of researchers, and yet provide essential value to the design actions? What forms of deliverables and dissemination should be expected? How can a project be re-arranged when a re-framing requires new parties to take part in the collaboration? How do these needs fit the current disciplinary spectrum of funding institutions?

143


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Our panel of academics, practitioners and policy makers Janneke van Kersen, Kees Dorst, Paul Hekkert and Christine De Lille, chaired by Pieter Jan Stappers, will debate around these questions, in dialogue with the audience.

Panel II:

Pieter Jan Stappers is Professor of Design Techniques Delft University of Technology, Industrial Design Engineering. His research focuses on emancipating the role of users in the doing of design, and of designers in the doing of research. Together with Liz Sanders at MakeTools.com, USA, and Froukje Sleeswijk Visser at TU Delft he works at contextmapping techniques and participatory design. Over the past two decades he has researched, written, and taught about the roles of design skills, methods, visualization and prototyping in the bringing about of new designs and new knowledge. Together with Elisa Giaccardi he reviewed the Research through Design (RtD) literature, and co-chairs the RTD conference 2019.

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #panel2 #thursdaymarch21st #day2

Janneke van Kersen is coordinator of the Social Science and Humanities research for the so called ‘topsectoren’ (industrial bound research) and the National Science Agenda (Societal bound research). In the context of these programming activities she focusses on research methods as ‘ artistic research’ and ‘research through design’. She was responsible for the development of the Research through Design programme together with officers from the NWO domain for technical and applied sciences. From the early ‘90’s on she has been working in the field of creative industries either within universities, cultural institutions or the national government always advocating a strong role for digital humanities, arts and design research.

144


Kees Dorst is Professor of Design Innovation at the University of Technology Sydney’s Faculty of Transdisciplinary Innovation, and the founding director of the Design Innovation Research Centre and the NSW Designing Out Crime research centre. Over the course of his academic career he has co-founded four new University departments/schools and faculties. He has published many articles and several books – including ‘Understanding Design’ (2003, 2006) and ‘Design Expertise’ (2009), with Bryan Lawson. His most recent books are ‘Frame Innovation - create new thinking by design’ (2015) ‘Designing for the Common Good’ (2016) and ‘Notes on Design’ (2017). He is currently also a member of the Advisory Group for the UN Development Program, overseeing the creation of platforms around the world to achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Paul Hekkert is full professor of Form Theory at the faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology. Paul conducts research on the ways products impact human experience, values and behavior. In 2011 he received a personal research grant (VICI) from the Dutch Science foundation (NWO) to develop a Unified Model of Aesthetics. Paul was member of a committee of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences for developing a research assessment protocol for design and engineering disciplines. He is co-founder and former chairman of the Design and Emotion society and former chairman of the executive board of CRISP, a national collaborative research initiative for and with the Dutch creative industries. He is currently member of the Dutch Creative Council and captain of science of the Top Sector Creative Industries.

145

Christine De Lille leads the Innovation Networks research group at The Hague University of Applied Sciences, the Netherlands in combination with her work at the faculty of Industrial Design Engineering at Delft University of Technology. Her research interests lie in design material in systems, designing organizations and role of design in research from a broad multi-disciplinary background combining both applied and fundamental research. Christine is member of the core-team of the Network for Applied Design Research, is a board member of the Design Management Network and has facilitated the NWO Research through Design projects in reflecting on their results.


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Conference Dinner I’s a refreshing 21 minute walk from Het Nieuwe Instituut to the dinner location ‘Boompjes’, at the river Maas. Address: Boompjes 701 3011 XZ Rotterdam At 22:00 hours a bus transfer is arranged to bring you back to Delft!

Manhattan @River Maas Originally designed by Mecanoo Architects in 1989, Restaurant Boompjes reopened this location in 2016. The restaurant has an amazing panoramic view of the Willemsbrug and the ‘Hef ‘ on one side, and the Erasmus Bridge and the new high-rise buildings on the other side. A beautiful and appropriate scenery for our Conference Dinner, that is offered to you by the Dean of the Faculty of Industrial Design to celebrate the lustrum of 50 years of existence of the faculty.

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #conferencedinner #thursdaymarch21st

146


Boompjes Rotterdam

147


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Don’t want to take the bus back to Delft? Some nice clubs and bars are located in the Witte de Withstraat, a cultural hotspot with laid back pubs and a somewhat alternative crowd. Perfect bars for a drink are Café NRC Rotterdam and Café de Witte Aap. 148


Day 3 Friday, March 22nd 09:00–10:00 Town Hall Meeting RTD Conference Series 09:00 Documentation | Sharing RTD Reflection on action for conference dissemination 10:30 Break 11:15 Rooms of Interest Dissemination: From Documentation to Engagement 13:00 Lunch 14:00 Closing Provocation Elvin Karana 15:00 Conference Wrap-Up 15:30 Exhibition Take-Down

149

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #fridatmarch22nd #day3


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

11:15 Dissemination: From Documentation to Engagement Talk 1 (p.151) Docu-Design or a reality check Talk 2 (p.154) Design with neotribes Talk 3 (p.155) EthnoVis: Developing an interactive visualization as a designerly tool and process of longitudinal data analysis and communication

Talk 1 (p.160) Research through Design for accounting values in design Talk 2 (p.161) Critical Journal / Contextual Portfolio: A framework for documenting and disseminating RtD as scholarly research

Room 1: Postcolonial Engagements

Chaired by Audrey Desjardins (University of Washington)

Room 2: Documentation Acts

Chaired by Abigail Durrant (Northumbria University)

Talk 3 (p.166 ) Design synthesis: An act of Research through Design

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #fridaymarch22nd #day3

150


Docu-Design or a reality check Elizabeth Hale1 1 CyDRe

ESADSE lib.hale@live.fr

(AM) Room 1| Talk 1: Postcolonial Engagements / Morning Session | Day 3

Keywords: documentation; ethnography praxeology; ground research; ambition; locally centric; refugees

Design, through current social transitions, has been invited to stand up and face the multidimensional geopolitical issues of our time. With this emerging demand, designers and researchers are challenging the limits of their discipline. This research project, based on time spent in the Calais Jungle (France’s largest and oldest informal Refugee Camp) reconsiders designer’s role(s) in social and contextual transitions. I realized rapidly on the ground, with much bewilderment, that the role I could have in this specific context as a designer was unbeknown to me. In face of the urgency of the situation, the Jungle’s inhabitants had become autonomous and by no means needed me, as a designer, to dictate their needs. However, it seemed primordial to be a witness to this ever transitional and both spatially and culturally evolving community of refugees who had created this world-town or town of the future. I instinctively used what design tools I had in order to record this reality, becoming an on the ground design-researcher. I started composing data comprising installations, objects, videos, maps, texts and recordings. This practice, later named docu-design, used design to designate and document a context by materializing realities and creating artifacts in the same manner you would produce proof. Reflecting on this approach, is it possible to determine a way in which design could engage itself socially, culturally and politically, by preparing specific territories in order to act locally-centrically?

151


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 1: Postcolonial Engagements Talk 1: Docu-Design or a reality check

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #fridaymarch22nd #day3

152


Hale | Docu-Design or a reality check

153


Design with neotribes Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Nicolas Marechal, Damia Bonafont Clara Koscielniak, and Pipe Amatayakul University of the Arts London n.marechal@lcc.arts.ac.uk, dbonafont@gmail.com, clara.koscielniak@gmail.com, tapanon.a@gmail.com

(AM) Room 1| Talk 2: Postcolonial Engagements / Morning Session | Day 3

The neotribe is a sociological concept which postulates the return of tribes in a contemporary form. French sociologist Michel Maffesoli sees them as an emotional community, sometimes ephemeral, changeable in composition and which often lacks organisation and routinisation, in contrast to the original form of a tribe. This paper reflects on three interactive design projects made to test this theory, undertaken in 2017 and 2018. The projects were developed around three tribes: the People’s Fridge, the Freegans in Brixton (London) and the Tuskers on the EVE Online game. These groups are of interest because of their strong purpose and shared values. The notion of emergence is of particular interest in their development as it unites ethnographic and design approaches. This paper explores the research (divergence) and the making process (convergence). The research engages with theory and object analysis as catalysers. Finally, the process allows us to explore concepts such as DIY citizenship, the gift economy, values in an online game community and critique the notion of ‘smart’ in the Internet of Things. Hence, we hope this methodology allows more designers to contribute to a subject that goes beyond practice.

Keywords: community based design; social innovation; interaction design; tribes

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #fridaymarch22nd #day3

154


EthnoVis: Developing an interactive visualization as a designerly tool and process of longitudinal data analysis and communication Abhigyan Singh1, 2 and Natalia Romero Herrera1 Delft University of Technology a.singh@tudelft.nl, n.a.romero@tudelft.nl

1

2 NHL Stenden University of Applied Sciences abhigyan.singh@gmail.com

(AM) Room 1| Talk 3: Postcolonial Engagements / Morning Session | Day 3

In this paper, we report on an interactive visualization that served multiple purposes and diverse roles in a research-through-design (RtD) study. The visualization is part of the study on the sociocultural factors that shape energy exchanges between households. It showcases an ethnographic data combined with quantitative logs collected for 11 months, comprising of around 1200 energy exchanges between 27 energy-receiving households and one energy-giving household in a rural village in India. In this paper, we reflect on how designing the visualization as a process as well as the visualization as a tool, played three significant roles in the RtD study. First, as a process, it helped design researchers to select, reduce, and summarise qualitative and quantitative findings and find connections between them. Second, interactive visualization as a tool became a means of disseminating longitudinal data. Third, interactive visualization as a boundary object enabled interaction, cooperation, and collaboration amongst designers, researchers, engineers, and anthropologists. Overall, we suggest to the design research community to consider designing of an interactive visualization as a way to make sense of longitudinal collected in a RtD project and to utilize their design skills for such creative ways of analysis and knowledge dissemination.

Keywords: interactive vizualisation; ethnography; longitudinal data; energy exchange; rural India; research through design

155


Frictions and Shifts in RTD #rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #fridaymarch22nd #day3

156


Room 1: Postcolonial Engagements Talk 2: Design with neotribes

157

Marechal, Bonafont, Koscielniak, Amatayakul | Design with neotribes


Frictions and Shifts in RTD #rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #fridaymarch22nd #day3

158


Room 1: Postcolonial Engagements 2: Talk 3: Design with Neotribesan EthnoVis: Developing interactive visualization as a designerly tool and process of longitudinal data analysis and communication

159 Singh, Romero Herrera | EthnoVis: Developing an interactive visualization as a designerly tool and process of logitudinal data analysis


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Research through Design for accounting values in design

Irene Conversano, Livia del Conte and Ingrid Mulder Delft University of Technology irene.conversano94@gmail.com, liviadc@hotmail.it, i.j.mulder@tudelft.nl

(AM) Room 2| Talk 1: Documentation Acts / Morning Session | Day 3

Although Value Sensitive Design offers a theoretical and methodological framework to account for values in design, many questions and controversies are left. The current work aims to contribute to this value debate, by taking stock of large Research through Design (RtD) programs including their developed artifacts, to explore to what extent the explicit and tacit knowledge generated enabled actors to make public and cultural values explicit. Differently put, seven ongoing RtD projects have been studied in an elaborate RtD process articulated in three phases, differentiating in their focus: 1) understanding the values involved in the RtD projects; 2) share insights to steer peer debate on Research on Values, and 3) co-analyse the data and generate further insights. The current research brings forward two main contributions to the RTD community. On the one hand, using ongoing RtD projects in an RtD approach provides a kaleidoscopic perspective on how research and design constantly inform each other through the application of design. On the other hand, the adoption of this kaleidoscopic RtD approach in the context of multidisciplinary research on values acts as a catalyst that generated knowledge and insights to stimulate the debate on accounting values in design research.

Keywords: artifacts; awareness; definition; ethics; explicit; tools, values

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #fridaymarch22nd #day3

160


Critical Journal / Contextual Portfolio: A framework for documenting and disseminating RtD as scholarly research Zoë Sadokierski University of Technology Sydney zoe.sadokierski@uts.edu.au

(AM) Room 2| Talk 2: Documentation Acts / Morning Session | Day 3

This paper presents a two-part framework for documenting and disseminating Research through Design (RtD) as a scholarly activity, intended primarily for designers new to scholarly research and students developing Research through Design (RtD) as a mode of inquiry. The first part of the framework provides guidelines for documenting RtD through a Critical Journaling practice, which emphasises chronologically capturing and reflecting on: contextual research, self and peer critique, and regular ‘overview maps’, alongside iterative design processes. The second part argues for disseminating RtD projects through Contextual Portfolios, which situate design artefacts alongside key insights from primary research, innovative design processes, and self and peer critique, in order to explicitly frame contributions to scholarly knowledge. The framework is demonstrated using an ongoing RtD project ‘Endgame’; I show how ‘research data’ drawn from my Critical Journaling practice is used to produce Contextual Portfolios, in order to present the research in different contexts. The paper concludes by highlighting the challenges of demonstrating scholarly rigour underpinning RtD that is ‘equivalent’ to traditional scholarly publications and suggests ‘open access peer review’ and an RtD community publishing model, supported by university presses.

Keywords: journaling; portfolio; documentation; speculative diagrams; peer review; research through design

161


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 2: 1: Postcolonial Documentation Engagements Acts Talk 1: Docu_Design Research through Design for Or a Realityvalues accounting Check in design

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #fridaymarch22nd #day3

162


163

Conversano, Del Conte, Mulder | Research through Design for accounting values in design


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 2: Documentation Acts Talk 2: Critical Journal / Contextual Portfolio: A framework for documenting and disseminating RtD as scholarly research

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #fridaymarch22nd #day3

164


165

Sadokierski | Critical Journal, Design Artefact, Contextual Portfolio


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Design synthesis: An act of Research through Design Caroline Claisse1, Daniela Petrelli2 and Nick Dulake2 Northumbria University caroline.claisse@northumbria.ac.uk, claisse.caroline@gmail.com 1

ShefďŹ eld Hallam University d.petrelli@shu.ac.uk , Nick.Dulake@designfuturesgroup.com 2

(AM) Room 2| Talk 3: Documentation Acts / Morning Session | Day 3

We present a reflective practice where challenges of assembling, making sense of and drawing conclusions from co-created materials were addressed through a process of design synthesis that improved the clarity and meaning making during the interpretation process. In this paper, we illustrate our point by presenting a set of design research artifacts resulting from design synthesis: a manifesto, a scale model, a set of storyboards and illustrated characters. Inspired by the arts and creative practice in other disciplines such as film making, we adapted these methods as a means of transforming participants’ contributions into inspirational resources for interactive design. This process encouraged the production of new creative and active forms of documentation and enabled us to handle interpretation in a way that embraced the inspirational and provisional nature of our creative and participatory processes. By doing so, we broaden the current practice of documentation in design and show how our process of design synthesis can serve the purpose of co-creation. Finally, we encourage design practitioners to adapt and develop design-based methods to filter and externalize insights, making their thinking tangible for them and others so they can be collectively discussed, tested and reflected upon to inspire future ideas.

Keywords: design synthesis, documentation; co-creation; interpretation; inspiration; process

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #fridaymarch22nd #day3

166


167


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Room 2: Documentation Acts Talk 3: Design synthesis: An act of Research through Design

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #fridaymarch22nd #day3

168


169

Claisse, Petrelli, Dulake | An act of Research through Design


Frictions and Shifts in RTD

14:00 Closing Provocation: Elvin Karana The Art and Science of Materials Elvin Karana is Professor of Bio-based Art and Design at the Centre of Applied Research for Art, Design and Technology (CARADT) in the Netherlands, bringing together researchers and practitioners from Avans University of Applied Sciences and Willem de Kooning Art Academy. She received her PhD in 2009 from Delft University of Technology, where she is also currently Associate Professor at the Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, leading the research group Materials and Fabrication Design. She has been investigating the complex nature of our experiences with materials for over fifteen years, and founded in 2015 the international research group Materials Experience Lab (materialsexperiencelab.com), which she leads jointly with Valentina Rognoli (Politecnico di Milano). The Materials Experience Lab has recently been featured by Materials Today as “one of the leading labs helping shape the future of materials development”. She is the main editor of ‘Materials Experience: Fundamentals of Materials and Design’ (Elsevier 2014).

Materials express meanings, ideas, beliefs; they compel us to think, feel and act in certain ways. Giving emphasis to materials’ role in design as experiential and yet deeply rooted in their inherent properties, in this closing Provocation Elvin Karana will explore and navigate the productive shifts and creative tensions between materials science and artistic practice in her material-driven design work.

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #closingprovocation #fridaymarch22nd

170


Credits

General Chairs

Elisa Giaccardi (TU Delft, Umeå Institute of Design) Pieter Jan Stappers (TU Delft) Submissions Chairs

Debbie Maxwell (University of York) Annika Hupfeld (TU/e) Ingrid Mulder (TU Delft) Exhibition Curators

Marco Rozendaal (TU Delft) Geke Ludden (University of Twente) Joyce Yee (Northumbria University) Documentation Chairs

Catelijne van Middelkoop (TU Delft) Lenneke Kuijer (TU/e) Abigail Durrant (Northumbria University) Workshop Chairs

Tomasz Jaskiewicz (TU Delft) Ian Lambert (Edinburgh Napier University) Coordination and Production Chair

Marijke Idema (TU Delft)

Valorization and Outreach Chairs

Daan van Eijk (TU Delft) Christine de Lille (The Hague University of Applied Sciences) Student Volunteers Chairs

Mariet Sauerwein (TU Delft) Abhigyan Singh (TU Delft) Visual Identity, Web Design & Promotional Material

Ryan Pescatore Frisk (Strange Attractors Design)

171

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #conference #organization #credits


Programme Committee

Frictions and Shifts in RTD

Amy Twigger Holroyd (Nottingham Trent University) Jo-Anne Bichard (Royal College of Art) Ben Kirman (University of York) James Pierce (California College of the Arts, University of California Berkeley) Jane Norris (Richmond University, The American University in London) Julia Keyte (Bath Spa University) Katharina Vones (Edinburgh Napier University) Martyn Dade-Robertson (Newcastle University) Nithikul Nimkulrat (OCAD University) Paul Coulton (Lancaster University) Peter Buwert (Edinburgh Napier University) Sarah Morehead (Northumbria University) Tobie Kerridge (Goldsmiths, University of London) Tom Jenkins (IT University of Copenhagen) Tommy Dylan (Northumbria University) David Chatting (Goldsmiths) Jonas Löwgren (Linköping University) Dan Lockton (Carnegie Mellon University) David Kirk (Northumbria University) Chris Csikszentmihalyi (Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute) Guy Schofield (University of York) Ilpo Koskiken (UNSW Sydney) James Auger (Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute) John Fass (Royal College of Art, London College of Communication) Simon Bowen (Newcastle University) Jayne Wallace (Northumbria University) John Vines (Northumbria University) Larissa Pschetz (Edingburgh College of Art) Sam Vettese (Edinburgh Napier University) Chris Speed (Edingburgh College of Art) Matt Harkness (Emily Carr University of Art and Design) Jana Macalik (OCAD University) John Morrison (Edinburgh Napier University) Miguel Bruns (TU/e) Rens Brankaert (TU/e) Elvin Karana (CARADT, TU Delft) Typefaces

Audree (Nikola Djurek) IBM Plex (Mike Abbink/IBM, Bold Monday)

Thank you!

#rtd2019 #researchthroughdesign #conference #credits #sponsors #thankyou

172