Page 1


On the Cover… NW shore of Catawba Island Winter 2012 by AJE

3… Letter from the Press 4… Ice Fishing 7… Fire Department 8… Police Beat

IMPORTANT NUMBERS

10… The Arts

Catawba Island Township: Police, Non-emergency 419-797-2422 Fire, Non-emergency 419-797-2424 Trustees & Clerks - 419-797-4131 Zoning Office - 419-797-4131 Maintenance - 419-797-2460

12… Islands II 16… Township News 18… Around Town 20… Horoscopes & Classifieds on page

15 on page

6

Ottawa County: Sheriff - 419-734-4404 Commissioners - 419-734-6790 Auditor - 419-734-6740 Treasurer - 419-734-6750 Building Dept.- 419-734-6767 Prosecutor - 419-734-6845 Recycling - 419-734-6783 Dog Warden - 419-898-1368 Emergency Mgmt - 419-734-6900 Regional Planning - 419-734-6780 Engineer - 419-734-6777 Schools: Board of Education - 419-732-2102 Bataan Elementary 419-734-2815 Middle School - 419-734-4448 High School - 419-734-2147 Bus Garage 419-734-1516 Immaculate Conception School 419-734-3315 Utilities: Sanitary Engineer- 419-734-6725 Time Warner Cable - 888-683-1000 Ohio Edison - 800-633-4766 Verizon - 800-555-4833 Columbia Gas - 800-344-4077 Other Numbers: Magruder Hospital - 419-734-3131 Post Office - 419-732-3322 Visitors Bureau - 419-734-4386 Chamber of Commerce 419-734-4386 ∞


Winter 2012 Dear friends, If the mild winter continues, this could be the first time in years the lake wont freeze. Many locals were amazed to see the Miller’s Ferry running midFebruary. Some Catawba Island residents don’t recall hearing the ferry’s horn blast ever this time of year! For those part-timers that live in the “snow belt” appreciate the lake freezing over to cap Lake Effect snow. Sadly, many Catawba businesses were effected by the lack of ice fishermen.

Wishing Ben Richmond an enjoyable retirement and all the best for his future endeavors! Thanks for capturing the beauty of the area unlike no other.

In an effort to get the lake to freeze this year, those living on Put-in-Bay had their own “COW” burning ceremony! A large life-size paper-mache cow sculpture was floated in the bay and shot with a burning arrow causing it to catch fire. “COW” is an acronym for “Caused Open Water” so the symbolic cow was rid of in hopes the lake will freeze - winter wishes... Whether you are an avid ice fisherman or never tried your hand at it, check out the informational article about it on page 4. We offer part 2 of 3 of “The Islands” article by Pat Bristley in this issue. We have an introduction to an artist inspired by the beauty of our area in the Arts section, a year end Police Beat, an interesting article from the Fire Chief, updates from the Township and so much more!

Put-in-Bay resident’s “COW” burning ceremony in hopes of getting the lake to freeze. Story to the left. Photo courtesy of Billy Market of the Miller Ferry.

Marblehead Magazine - yep its true. We decided to expand! Marblehead Magazine will be a very similar publication to CI Mag but will be Marblehead Peninsula specific offering a circulation of approx. 4,800+ including Lakeside, Danbury and Johnson’s Island. We are finalizing details but if you are interested in advertising information or have stories, history, photos or artwork of the peninsula area to share, please contact me right away! Be sure to tell your Marblehead area friends too! Don’t Forget… to thank our advertisers! They helped keep the magazine coming to you during the off season and many of them advertise all year round! Be sure to thank them and tell them you saw their ad in Catawba Island Magazine. Thanks for reading! Hope to see you around town!

Andrea J. Elliott Publisher and Photographer, Catawba Island Press

Ice fishermen off the shores of Catawba Island in 2009 AJE

NAME________________________________________________________________ ADDRESS (Sorry, NO P.O. Boxes!)______________________________________________ CITY_____________________________________ STATE__________ ZIP__________ Subscriptions will start the month after we receive your order. If you want to start your subscription in a later month, please note it on your order. Sent monthly except January & February = one special Winter Edition. Mail Orders to: Catawba Island Press, 9841 State Road, North Royalton, Ohio 44133 with a Check or Money Order made Payable to Catawba Island Press. Subscriptions can also be ordered online at www.catawbaislandmagazine.com. Thanks!

January/February 2012

Catawba Island Magazine

3


Ice Fishing on Lake Erie’s Western Basin by Pat Bristley If it’s a cold February day in northwestern Ohio, you can be sure some men (and a few women) will take to the frozen water for the seriously popular sport of ice fishing. In the select fishing areas, like those near the south shore of South Bass Island, masses of ice shanty communities appear as soon as the ice is thick enough to hold them. Although ice fishing can occur any time of day or night, many fish (including walleye) are most active around dusk and dawn. I have never done any ice fishing myself, but I have tasted the product of friends’ sport. To my thinking, no fish tastes better than one caught through the ice. Ice angling is the sport of catching fish with lines and fishhooks or spears through openings in the ice on frozen bodies of water. Many fishermen sit on stools or five gallon buck-

Views of ice fishermen in 2009 from Sunset Park in the Catawba Cliffs. AJE

ets in the raw, open air, while others choose to remain warm in heated, comfy ice shanties. The heater is not

only for warmth but keeps the fishing hole, or holes, from freezing. A highly social activity, ice fishing generally occurs when several fishermen band together to share an ice shanty; or the one who spends a lot of time visiting nearby ice shanties chatting and checking to see what is biting and what equipment is being used. Snowmobiles, four-wheelers or other motorized vehicles drag the shanties onto the lake from launch areas or shorelines. Those used in Ottawa County are usually permanent shelters made of wood or metal with runners on the bottom for easy transport. The interiors may have a heater and one or more holes. There are, of course, shanties sporting satellite televisions, stoves, beds, mini kitchens and other luxuries. I’ve been told of Wisconsin and Minnesota shanties CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE

4

Catawba Island Magazine

January/February 2012


CONTINUED from PREVIOUS PAGE

as large as homes and situated on the lake most of the winter. Ice fishing gear is highly specialized. An ice saw or auger is used to cut the hole in the ice. If an auger is not available, an axe is another choice but not as efficient as an auger. A skimmer (a large metal spoon with holes in it) is used to remove new ice as it forms and to clear slush left from making the hole. Becoming increasingly popular is the use of a flasher. This is a sonar device that provides depth information, as well as indicating the presence of fish or other objects. Flashers display the movement of fish almost instantaneously. The bait being used can often be seen as a mark on the flasher, enabling the angler to position the bait in front of the fish. Clubbing is an old-time method of ice fishing seldom used today. The fisherman walks on clear ice in shal-

low water. When he sees a fish through the ice, he slams the club on the ice and the shockwave hits the fish. It’s temporarily paralyzed, giving the fisherman time to cut a hole in the ice to collect the fish. Another method is to use a light fishing rod with brightly colored lures or jigs with bait, often minnows. The angler sits by the hole, and lifts the pole every so often, producing a giggling effect. A “Tip-up” made of wood or plastic has a spool of line attached with a thin piece of metal that runs from the spool to the flag. A swivel is placed at the end of the line and a piece of fishing line with a hook is attached to the swivel. Bait is positioned on the hook and the hook dropped in the water. When a fish

January/February 2012

strikes the bait, the flag is lifted notifying the angler that he caught a fish. As he pulls in the line, he has a fight on his hands and should plan to allow the line to slip through his hands during the struggle. When he sees the fish's head, he lifts it onto the ice. One more ice fishing technique is spearfishing. A large hole is cut in CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

Catawba Island Magazine

5


CONTINUED from PREVIOUS PAGE

the ice and the angler takes a seat in a dark shanty and peers into the water while holding a large spear with four or five points with a line attached. The fisherman waits for fish to appear, then plunges the spear into the water. Many states allow only “rough fish” to be taken while spearfishing. A fish that is considered a rough fish in one region may be considered a desirable game fish in another due to cultural differences. The long nose gar is considered a rough fish and an undesirable nuisance in Ohio. The recommended depth of ice is 5 to 6 inches for sleds or snowmobiles; 7 to 12 inches for stripped-down cars; and 14 to 16 inches for trucks. Care must be taken, because sometimes ice will not form in areas with swift currents, leaving open areas that have thin ice coats on top. On Lake Erie, offshore winds can break off pans of ice stranding fishermen. That occurred in February, 2009 when a large number of fishermen had to be rescued by helicopter near Crane Creek in Ottawa County. One man who had fallen into the water died during the rescue flight. Lone ice fishing shanty off the Miller’s Ferry Dock, Catawba Island in 2009. AJE

Late-winter warm spells can destroy the texture of the ice. While of the required thickness, it will not support weight. It is called "rotten ice" and is exceedingly dangerous. Some fishermen carry self-rescue devices made of two spiked handles connected by a rope to pull themselves out of the water and onto the ice. Vehicles and ice shanties fall through the ice each year. Current environmental regulations require their speedy recovery. Divers must be hired and when the trouble occurs far from shore, helicopters may be needed for hoisting. Other risks associated with ice fishing include carbon monoxide fumes from fish shanty heaters and frostbite due to prolonged exposure to wind and low temperatures. ∞

6

Catawba Island Magazine

January/February 2012


Wives Night Dinner… Then and Now At the January 5, 1953 meeting of the Catawba Island Volunteer Firemen, “A motion was made and seconded that the $25.00 donation from Mrs. Mary H. Hilker be set aside as a fund for a supper for firemen and their wives. A motion was also made and seconded that the profits from the dance of January 31 be placed in this supper fund.” The first Wives Night Supper was held on a Saturday evening, February 14, 1953 (note Valentine’s Day) at the Cliff House and to be followed by a fireman’s sponsored Sweetheart Dance. The E.J. Steiner Band from Van Buren, Ohio was engaged to entertain the event. In the years since that initial evening, Wives Night has been held or considered to be held at the Catawba Island Club, The Greenhouse, Alpine Cliff House, Four Winds, Log Cabin, Traveler’s Inn, the Porter Road Chapel, and Brownie’s Jai-Lai Club in Gypsum. From the beginning days of the department, wives and resident benefactors have played a vital role in the development and operation of the Catawba Island Volunteer Fire Department. There were many concerns in the formative years—initial equipment and clothing, a location and firehouse facility, and a method of alarm and communications among

others. The firemen and their spouses spent countless hours in fund-raising projects including dances, baked good sales, raffles, various-styled public dinners and anything that could raise money for the newly initiated service. The spouses also played a key role in alarm communications. Although an alarm siren was sounded to notify firemen of a call, it was not always adequate, so each fireman and/or wife was assigned three other firemen to telephone and notify in the event the siren was not heard. This communication method also permitted the volunteer firemen’s wives the time and location of the emergency event in order to provide the necessary refreshments to the volunteers.

annual Wives Night. The purpose of the annual event is to say, in some small way, thank you to our wives or husbands, family and friends for supporting our service to the community. Without their daily understanding and encouragement our members would find it difficult if not impossible to leave their jobs, homes, warm beds, or dinner tables at any hour of the day to help a neighbor in need.

John Gangway, Fire Chief Ice Sculpture from Wives Night 2007

The continued spousal support over the years lead to the organization of the Catawba Island Volunteer Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary. Since its inception on April 29, 1974, the auxiliary has provided substantial services and funds for the betterment of the volunteer department. Some of the historical information is provided from edited excerpts from the February 10, 2001 program of the Wives Dinner. On February 11, 2012 the CIVFD celebrated its 59th

January/February 2012

Catawba Island Magazine

7


Catawba Island Township Police Department

Excerpts from the Call Summary December, 2011 and January, 2012. December 2 An Officer stopped a vehicle south on RT 53 after observing it driving into the bike path and left of center. Driver emitted the odor of intoxicating beverage and stated she had one glass of wine. Driver did poorly on the field sobriety test and was placed under arrest but refused and became combative trying to bite the officer. Assistance called and

driver was transported for processing. Driver charged with OVI, marked lanes, resisting arrest and assault. Don’s called to tow vehicle. December 10 Non injury Accident. Female driver northbound on RT 53 fell asleep at the wheel, went off the road and hit mailboxes and shrubbery.

December 11 Officer observed a vehicle traveling in excess of the speed limit drifting in the bike path and onto the grass. Officer sped up and stopped vehicle stopped on causeway. Driver was asked to perform a field sobriety test and was unsteady on his feet, had slurred speech and blood shot eyes. Driver searched and a knife along with 3 unopened beer cans were found on his person. He stated he had too much to drink and was taken into custody. This was the driver’s second offense in 6 years and third in 20 years. He refused BAC testing and was cited for marked lanes and DUI. Don’s towed vehicle. December 17 Officer observed two vehicles following closely. The lead vehicle weaved from the center line to the white line while breaking excessively and proceeded to pull into a driveway. Officer stopped the vehicle and driver stepped out stumbling towards the back of the car. The female emitted the strong odor of intoxicating beverage and explained to the officer things were bad in her life and began to get emotional. Driver did poorly on field sobriety test and was placed under arrest. Driver cited with OVI. December 18 Officer stopped a van for driving left of center. Driver did not have a valid drivers license. Passenger had a red Solo cup they admitted had vodka in it. Open container ticket issued to passenger. Driver cited for marked lanes violation and expired drivers license. December 29 Injury crash. A 2000 Hyundai Elantra turned around in the entrance to Marsh’s Edge and proceed back onto RT 53 where it struck a 2011 Mercedes head on.

8

Catawba Island Magazine

January/February 2012

CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE


Police Call Summary for December 2011 Total calls 147 including 5 thefts • 3 DUI CONTINUED from PREVIOUS PAGE

All victims transported. Hyundai driver cited for failing to yield right of way. January 3 Complaint of subjects shooting over the lake. No township ordinances about discharging firearms and subjects were shooting in a safe manor. January 5 Burglary reported at a Porter Road residence. Previous tenant allegedly broke into the property to take his belongings and also stole contractor’s tools. January 11 Fraud call received. Complainant received a call from her grandson stating he was in a wedding in Peru, was involved in a car accident and needed $1,000. She stated she couldn't come up with the money. Then a call came in from a police officer in Peru with wiring instructions for the money. Complainant could not reach her grandson who lived out of state so thought this was possible. Officer went to complainant’s house to take a report. While at the residence the complainant received a call from her grandson who said he was not in Peru. Then a call was received from someone posing as the FBI. The officer took the call and the caller hung up. ∞ Injury crash call from December 29, 2011.

January/February 2012

Catawba Island Magazine

9


Passion for Painting By Andrea J. Elliott Robin Roberts is devout painter and says its a calling from God to pursue this passion. “To me, painting is relaxing and my way of getting time with God and His creation. I want to soak it in, to understand it as well as I can, and then capture the special beauty in life as light and shadow splashes across the scene.� Robin has a love for the outdoors and enjoys plein air painting. He is a member of the Ohio Plein Air Society and competes at paint-outs in nearby Lakeside as well as juried out-of-state competitions. He began painting after studying Fine Arts in college and graduating with a Major in Graphic Design. Later in life he began his own successful company, Red Red Design, specializing in catalogue and merchandising design. CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE

10

Catawba Island Magazine

January/February 2012


CONTINUED from PREVIOUS PAGE

When painting, Robin depends on his design skills as a graphic designer, spirited brushstrokes and tonal unity. He takes pleasure in painting many different subjects everything from architecture to wildlife as well as cityscapes and rural scenes. When he can’t get outdoors, he works in his studio in Ashland, Ohio. “I see every painting as a journey of new opportunity and growth.” Some of Robin’s paintings of local scenery include a view of charter boats from Crabby Joe’s, hollyhocks in Lakeside, $2 pick-your-own pumpkins at Bergman’s as well as a lovely view from Harbor Island - to name a few. A painting of an old

vintage boat titled “Lyman in repair” caught my eye with it’s simple yet intriguing lines and color (previous page).

Robin plans on visiting Catawba Island again soon to create more paintings. His other work can be viewed at www.RobinRobertsFineArt.com.∞

During the summer of 2009, while staying with some friends on Harbor Island, Robin was inspired by the view across the water and captured it on canvas (below). The spot he chose was at the end of Shad Row looking across the harbor. “A guy actually told me the name of the marina that I was painting but I totally forgot what it was about 5 minutes later. All I know is I was relaxed, I was worshiping with some Matt Redman worship songs on the iPod and enjoying a morning of peaceful painting.”

January/February 2012

Catawba Island Magazine

11


tion homes, from simple beach houses to elaborate mansions. Only a few of the homes are used yearround. Those who remain in the winter grow much of their own food, fish and take care of their properties.

Lake Erie Islands Part 2 of 3 By Pat Bristley Middle Bass Island narrows and curves toward the east at its northern end. It was once covered with vineyards. Now it is covered with vaca-

In its early history, Middle Bass Island was inhabited by squatters. They lived by hunting and fishing, and occasionally went to the mainland to sell cedar logs. The squatters slowly gave way to industrious settlers. Lonz Winery is a beacon on Middle Bass Island, although its crumbling structure is now silent. Once it brought as many as 3,000 visitors to the island on summer weekends. Par-

Lonz Winery, Middle Bass Island painting by Jim Siemer

tygoers flooded its second floor terrace. But the live music, dancing and laughter are gone. On Saturday, July 1, 2000, the terrace collapsed, killing one man and injuring 77 others. The collapse left a gaping hole in the floor; rubble fell deep into an unoccupied wine cellar. Since that tragic day, the winery buildings have fallen into disrepair. The house once occupied by George Lonz is overrun with wildlife. Island residents dislike seeing the deterioration, but do not want to bring back the commotion caused by tourists. The winery is on the National Register of Historic Places. The author has vague memories of visiting a special place near Lonz’s, when young. I still remember the feeling of delight at seeing a yard full of animals and other constructions formed from rock by the owner. Middle Island is the southernmost point of Canada. However, 27 U. S. states lie at least partly north of it. Despite lying in Canadian waters, the island was privately owned for many years by U. S. citizens. A lighthouse was built there in 1872. It was deactivated in 1918. The 49-foot tower later burned down. An archaeological study in 1982, proposed that human occupation dated from 1000 to 1500 A. D. One site contained remains that may date back to 500 B. C. A few archaeologists claim the island has been inhabited for more than 10,000 years. CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE

12

Catawba Island Magazine

January/February 2012


CONTINUED from PREVIOUS PAGE

The island saw migrations from the United States in the 19th century. They included escaped slaves, escaped prisoners of war, and deserters from the Civil War - all seeking asylum in Canada. The island is also a natural migratory corridor for birds and animals. During Prohibition (1920-1933) the island was a way station for liquor en route to the United States. A bootlegger acquired acreage on the island and built a hotel that became the center of his rum-running activities. It was electrified and had a large screened-in porch overlooking the lake. The cellar held a casino carved out of bedrock. After liquor was legalized in the U. S., the hotel drew large crowds of tourists in the summer. Its kitchen was well known for its pheasant dinners. In the 19th century, Middle Island was covered with vineyards. Prior to 1950, there was an airstrip. Its runway began and ended in the lake. The island was purchased in 1999 by The Nature Conservancy and donated to the Canadian National Park system. It is now a conservation area. The most common species are cormorants, but several other species nest there, too. Cormorants are so plentiful that in 2008, park officials attempted to cull their numbers.

prompted a 1982 study by Parks Canada that recommended naming it a national natural landmark. Its ecological, historical, and aesthetic value led to its inclusion on the list of Areas of Natural and Scientific Interest. Middle Island is not open to visitors. Middle Sister Island was for sale in 2010. It consists of 9.5 acres. It is part of the Pelee Island Archipelago, and is the most natural and undisturbed of these islands. It has a hackberry-dominated forest. Other species include Rock Elm and Kentucky coffee tree. It is 15 miles south of Kingsville. It was a staging area for William

Henry Harrison's troops, prior to the Battle of the Thames in Ontario during the War of 1812. Middle Sister Island is composed of a dome of dolomite bedrock rising a few feet above the surface of Lake Erie. The shore is a mixture of cliffs, shelving bedrock and gravel beaches. Glacial grooves scar the bedrock. Guano from the population of cormorants interferes with tree growth on this island and nearby East Sister and Middle Islands. Milllionair’s Island, off Long Point, Ontario, is not shown on any maps. However, it is known to residents of the area as an exclusive CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE

Interest in preserving the island

January/February 2012

Catawba Island Magazine

13


northeastern tip of Catawba Point. It is part of Catawba Island Township. It was named Mouse Island for its small size. President Rutherford B. Hayes once owned the island. The Hayes family built two cabins and a tennis court, and supplied the island with running water. In the 1930s, after the island fell into disuse, fire or vandalism destroyed the structures on the island. Remains of the cabins’ native stone fireplaces can still be seen. John Mercer, of Oberlin, Ohio, now owns the island. Trespassers face fines. There have been several accidents when watercraft ran into the island after dark. Boats that draw more than 3 feet of water should avoid crossing between the island and Catawba Point, due to a limestone reef there.

CONTINUED from PREVIOUS PAGE

private hunting preserve. It presents a barrier to the entrance of a large private marsh on Long Point. Mohawk Island is a small island in Canadian waters. It was formerly known as Gull Island. It contains the ruins of the Gull Island Lighthouse, built in 1848 and decommissioned in 1969. It is close to Rock Point Provincial Park in Ontario. Currently, no

humans live on the island. It is an important nesting area for gulls, terns and cormorants. The Canadian government discourages people from visiting the island, since it has been set aside to protect nesting birds. No visits are permitted during the nesting season from April to July. Mouse Island is located off the

North Bass Island is about four miles north of South Bass Island. It was once a part of the “Connecticut Firelands." In 1820, officials called it “Bass Island No. 3” for tax purposes. The name North Bass is still used, although the name is now “Isle St. George.” In 1844, Rosswell Nichols was the first permanent settler. He arrived in a small boat with his wife and two brothers-in-law. Though squatters, they built a cabin and made other improvements. Nichols eventually leased the land by paying the annual taxes. In 1849, the George Wires family arrived on the island. Mr. Wires purchased a tract of 137 acres. The same year Nichols bought 114 acres. In 1853, Simon and Peter Fox, brothers of Mrs. Wires, purchased the remaining land. Grapes produced by wild grapevines on the island were of such quality that Simon Fox decided the soil and climate were adapted to the culture of grapes. He planted rootstock. The vines flourished, producing a bountiful crop. The price of land exploded. CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE

14

Catawba Island Magazine

January/February 2012


CONTINUED from PREVIOUS PAGE

New settlers began raising grapes. Soon, most of the island was covered in vineyards. The fishing industry was another North Bass occupation. Reefs and feeding beds surrounding the island brought large schools of fish to the area. Today, the State of Ohio owns 589 acres of the island. That area is expected to become a state park. The island has curving beaches of sand and gravel. North Harbour Island is part of the Pelee Island Archipelago. Its highest elevation is 571 feet. The tiny, privately-owned island has one home and a storage shed. Pelee Island is the largest island in Lake Erie. Pelee Island Township is comprised of Middle, Middle Sister, Hen, Big Chicken, Little Chicken, Chick, East Sister, and North Harbour Islands. The total area of the combined islands is 16.15 square miles.

restarted in the 1980s. The island grows about 5,000 acres of soybeans, 1,000 acres of wheat and 500 acres of grapevines. Pelee Island is connected to the Canadian and U. S. main lands by ferry service. The trip to Pelee Island from Sandusky ranges from one-anda-half to two hours. The Canadian ferry runs from Leamington and Kingsville from early spring until December. When ferries are not running, islanders can fly to the mainland by airplane. Pelee has about 250 permanent resi-

dents, but that number swells to over 1,500 during the summer. The island has for many years hosted a fall pheasant hunt that attracts hunters from Canada, the U. S., and other countries. The hunt brings needed dollars to the island after the summer season ends. Pelee Island is a good place to find special English china, such as Wedgwood. If you want to spend a day on the lake and visit our neighboring country, it is a good destination. However, now you need to take your U. S. Passport along. ∞ TO BE CONTINUED IN NEXT ISSUE

When settlers arrived on Pelee, a large part of the island was covered by a marsh. After the marsh was drained, the soil was found to be exceptionally fertile. Now the island is an agricultural community with a history of vineyards and wine making. The industry began in 1860. It died out in the early 20th century but View of Mouse Island from Catawba Island AJE

January/February 2012

Catawba Island Magazine

15


Catawba Island Township Board of Trustees Meeting Minutes December 13, 2011 Bills, including the last payroll, in the amount of $53,155.78 were approved and paid. Maintenance Supervisor Dan Barlow said the leaf vacuum truck has been repaired. He said they made the necessary rebuild repairs in-house at a significant cost savings and in a timelier manner than returning the truck to the manufacturer for repairs.

Fire Chief John Gangway said he needs two Trustees to serve on the Volunteer Fire Fighters’ Dependants Fund Board for 2012. He said this year Ernie Wylie and Louis Wargo were elected from the fire department and Ron Bauman volunteered to be the citizen member. John Gangway said he would like the Dependants Fund Board to meet briefly prior to the next Board of Trustees meeting to vote on a chairman. Jim Stouffer of the Catawba Island

Club introduced Ken Williams, Executive Director of Golf and Marketing for the Catawba Island Club. Jim Stouffer said they are looking for guidance in regard to the upcoming celebration of the Battle of Lake Erie integral to the War of 1812. He said a celebration has been proposed to occur in August of 2013 in the western basin where event planners would like to bring tall ships together to commemorate Commodore Perry’s Victory in the Battle of Lake Erie. Jim Stouffer said the Catawba Island Club may be interested in participating in the celebration and has put together an internal committee to explore some different concepts. He noted one concept would be to have an event in the township that invites the public within Catawba Island Township to come together as part of the celebration. A discussion took place regarding options and consideration for participation. Matt Montowski asked Dan Barlow if the maintenance crew would cut down some of the brush and debris along the causeway entering the township on Route 53. William Rofkar and Gary Mortus said the CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE

2011 Zoning Report For Catawba Island Permits Issued 73 Including: • Accessory Bldg./Pool 14 • Addition/Porch/Deck 30 • Commercial Building 2 • Fence 8 • New Home 17 Inspections 88 Fees Collected $8,855.65 16

Catawba Island Magazine

January/February 2012


CONTINUED from PREVIOUS PAGE

causeway is a state road and ODOT is responsible for its maintenance. Dan Barlow said he will call ODOT and ask them to address the issue. Meeting adjourned. Meeting Minutes December 27, 2011 Bills, including the last payroll, in the amount of $46,122.47. Gary Mortus made a motion to enter into a contract with the Ottawa County Engineer’s Office for roadside mowing for the calendar year 2012 at a reimbursement rate as outlined by the Engineer’s Office. Fiscal Officer Karen Shaw said she received a recorded Quit Claim Deed from the Ottawa County Commissioners for the township’s 16 acre nature trail purchased in 2003 and located at West Catawba Road. She said she recently discovered ownership had never been transferred from the county to the township and contacted the commissioners prompting the action. Chairman Matt Montowski turned the meeting over to Fiscal Officer Karen Shaw for the purpose of electing the Chairman for 2012. The following nominations were approved: William Rofkar for Chairman and Gary Mortus for Vice Chairman. The Trustees agreed to keep oversight of the following departments the same: Matt Montowski, Zoning; William Rofkar, Police and Fire; Gary Mortus, Cemetery and Roads.

The Trustees agreed William Rofkar and Gary Mortus will remain The Legislative Authority for the Volunteer Fire Fighters’ Dependants Fund Board. Jack Ziegler was appointed as alternate for a one year term on the Board of Zoning Appeals for 2012. Sandy Erwin was appointed a five year term on the Board of Zoning Appeals beginning in 2012. Larry Cline and Keith Fisher were appointed alternates for a one year term on the Zoning Commission for 2012. Paul Shaw was appointed to a five year term on the Zoning Commission beginning in 2012. Meridith Beck, John Smothers, and John Coppeler appointed to the Park Board for another term as stated in the Ohio Revised Code. William Rofkar said he does not believe our Parks Board members should apply herbicide in our parks

and wetland areas as he considers it an unnecessary risk. Vote on motion: Matt Montowski, aye; Gary Mortus, aye; William Rofkar, opposed. Motion carried. Meeting adjourned. ∞ Minutes herein are edited for space. Complete version available through the township administration.

The Trustees agreed Matt Montowski will remain on the Regional Planning Board and Gary Mortus will continue as the alternate. William Rofkar will remain on the Ottawa County 911 Advisory Board and the Port Clinton City School Business Advisory Board. William Rofkar will also attend the Ottawa County Health Department annual meeting.

January/February 2012

Catawba Island Magazine

17


Winter Scenes Show Feb 4, 5, 11, 12,18, 19, 25, 26, 2012; Mar 3 & 4, 2012 Main Street Vermilion 685 Main St. (SR 60), Vermilion 440.963.0772 View this collection of local artists and craftsmen working to promote the local art scene. ∞

The Wildlife Art of Bob Hines Feb 16, 2012 - Aug 14, 2012 Tues-Sat 9 am-5 pm, Sun 12-5 pm Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center, Fremont 419.332.2081 $7.50/adult, $6.50/senior, $3/child Ohio native Robert Hines (19121994) holds the distinction of being the only U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employee hired as a full-time artist. His official title was "National Wildlife Artist." Hines developed his love of nature growing up along the verdant banks of the Sandusky River in Fremont, Ohio. Despite almost no formal training, his artistic talent was recognized worldwide. Hines also was key in developing the federal Duck Stamp program and had one of his works accepted. This exclusive exhibit showcases his life and his work on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of his birth. Closed on Mondays. ∞

Annual Super Saturday Poker Tournament Feb 17 & 28, 2012 Kalahari Resort, Sandusky northcoastpokerchampionships.com Prize money and number of paid places is determined by the number of paid entries. Players must be at least 18. No refunds will be given. Please see website for more details.∞ 6th Annual Great Lakes Home & Flower Show Mar 2 - 4, 2012 Kalahari Resort, Sandusky 800.431.3343 ohiohomeshows.net ∞ March Boating Education Class Obtain your Ohio Certificate The Port Clinton Power Squadron has a two day ABC3 Public Boating course scheduled for Saturday March 3rd and 10th. The course cost is $45 and includes breakfast donuts, coffee, soft drinks and lunch each day. Materials include the United States Power Squadron ABC3 Book and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Boating Regulations. Family members may share materials for $15 for each additional member. Successful completion of the course will earn an Ohio Boater's CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE

18

Catawba Island Magazine

January/February 2012


CONTINUED from PREVIOUS PAGE

Certificate and a 6 months membership in the United States Power Squadron. The course will be held from 8 AM to 3 PM at the Firelands Presbyterian Church, 2626 East Harbor Road, Port Clinton, Ohio. To register for the class, call Wayne A. Walter at 419-960-9401 or email waynewalter3689@gmail.com. Check our website at portclintonpowersquadron.org for more information including an online registration link. ∞ Historical Series Program Mar 3, 2012 1 pm Maritime Museum of Sandusky 125 Meigs St., Sandusky 419.624.0274 "Great Lakes Women" presented by Betty Lou Higgins. Free with admission to the museum. ∞ Finnegan's Farewell: Interactive Comedy Dinner Show Mar 8 -10, 2012 Sandusky State Theatre, 107 Columbus Ave., Sandusky 877.626.1950 sanduskystate.com $39/person (dinner & show package) Come to an authentic Irish wake and pay your last respects to the dearly departed and beloved U.S. Postal worker, Patrick James Finnegan. Just before passing on, Paddy won $2.2 million at the slots and now it's time to read his will. Except first we have to find his missing corpse! Menu: Corned Beef & Cabbage, Chicken Frichia with Portabella Mushrooms, Boiled Potatoes, Garden Salad, Bread Twists, Mint Chocolate Chip Ice Cream and Coffee Bar. ∞

ets is Thursday, May 24 at 5pm. You can purchase the Advance Ride Tickets at Great Lakes Popcorn and Mary’s Blossom Shoppe in downtown Port Clinton. 419-734-5503 historicpc@portclinton.org ∞

tion, which is available at the Port Clinton Chamber of Commerce / Main Street Office, 110 Madison Street. For more information, contact Melissa Bayer at 419-239-9346. ∞

Farmers’ Market Vendors Needed Main Street Port Clinton is looking for vendors for the 2012 Port Clinton Farmers’ Market beginning June 9. Anyone interested in selling produce, plants, arts, crafts, baked goods, meats, or canned products can apply by completing a registration applica-

Walleye Festival Ride Tickets Advance Ride Tickets for the 2012 Main Street Port Clinton Walleye Festival are now available. Each ride ticket is $35 and good for the entire Walleye Festival weekend. The Walleye Festival will run from Thursday, May 24 to Monday, May 28 at Waterworks Park along the shores of beautiful Lake Erie. Deadline to purchase Advance Ride Tick-

January/February 2012

Catawba Island Magazine

19


By Starr Aquarius “The Water Bearer” January 20th thru February 19th Be true to yourself - Start on your right foot & stay on track. Pisces “Two Fishes” February 20th thru March 20th Now is the time to launch that idea you’ve been considering. Aries “The Ram” March 21st thru April 19th Enjoy the quiet of the winter evenings and amazing stars up above. Taurus “The Bull” April 20th thru May 20th Remember to savor those reflections of wonderful past memories. Gemini “The Twins” May 21st thru June 20th This is the time to detach & empathize - you’ll then be able to understand where that someone is coming from. Cancer “The Crab” June 21st thru July 22nd It’s time to break free from your rou-

20

Catawba Island Magazine

tine and take some time for yourself. Just Do It! Leo “The Lion” July 23rd thru August 22nd This is the time to tone down your presentation. You’re not the drill sergeant. Virgo “The Virgin” August 23rd thru September 22nd Now is the best time to ensure your own happiness! Libra “Scales” September 23rd thru October 22nd Be flexible concerning the rules you seem to impose upon yourself. Scorpio “Scorpion” October 23rd thru November 21st Share even more of your feelings this month as it will provide greater closeness. Sagittarius “The Archer” November 22nd thru December 21st With the moon in your sign, you’ll be empowered and on top of your game. Go for It! Capricorn “The Mountain Goat”

January/February 2012

December 22nd thru January 19th Open up conversations and look towards new ideas and possibilities for self improvement. ♥


Catawba Island Magazine  

Winer Issue 2012

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you