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On the Cover… Schraidt Farm tractor on NW Catawba Road by AJE

3… Letter from the Press 4… Catawba Grown 9… Cottage Inn 11… Restaurants & Entertainment 12… The Arts

IMPORTANT NUMBERS Catawba Island Township: Police, Non-emergency 419-797-2422 Fire, Non-emergency 419-797-2424 Trustees & Clerks - 419-797-4131 Zoning Office - 419-797-4131 Maintenance - 419-797-2460

14… Police Beat 17… Fire Department 18… Township News 20… Around Town 23… Island Horoscopes 24… Classifieds on page

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Ottawa County: Sheriff - 419-734-4404 Commissioners - 419-734-6790 Auditor - 419-734-6740 Treasurer - 419-734-6750 Building Dept.- 419-734-6767 Prosecutor - 419-734-6845 Recycling - 419-734-6783 Dog Warden - 419-898-1368 Emergency Mgmt - 419-734-6900 Regional Planning - 419-734-6780 Engineer - 419-734-6777 Schools: Board of Education - 419-732-2102 Bataan Elementary 419-734-2815 Middle School - 419-734-4448 High School - 419-734-2147 Bus Garage 419-734-1516 Immaculate Conception School 419-734-3315 Utilities: Sanitary Engineer- 419-734-6725 Time Warner Cable - 888-683-1000 Ohio Edison - 800-633-4766 Verizon - 800-555-4833 Columbia Gas - 800-344-4077 Other Numbers: Magruder Hospital - 419-734-3131 Post Office - 419-732-3322 Visitors Bureau - 419-734-4386 Chamber of Commerce 419-734-4386 Bassett’s Market 419-734-6506 ∞


August, 2011 Dear friends, Though it seems that summer is winding down on the island, things are really heating up with the press! We are happily celebrating our anniversary as we move on to volume 4 of Catawba Island Magazine. I am still amazed with the amount of history our little island offers. From Indians to farmers and fishermen and once having 5 hotels and 4 dance halls even 3 wineries at one time, Catawba has exciting tales to tell and we will never run out of great informative articles and stories! Feel free to let us know if there is a story you want to hear. In 2009, our anniversary issue was titled “Peach Season” and featured a picture of the Schraidt’s red barn - it sold out almost instantly. This year we are honored to have an article written by Bob Schraidt about memories of a boy growing up on a Catawba peach farm. A special thank you to the Schraidt’s for their contribution. Whether it was under the stars or beneath the glittery lights of a dance hall, ballroom dancing was very popular along the shores of Catawba Island in the 1920s. After researching the history of Gem Beach and publishing the article on it in last month’s issue, I have decided to follow In-up with the history on another popular dance hall on Catawba - the Cottage Inn. Whether it was the waltz, a masquerade ball or cake walk, everyone wore their “Sunday Best” to the Inn. Times have changed and the Cottage Inn is long gone but good times and great memories are still had by all who live on or visit Catawba Island. It seems as though the new place for locals and visitors alike to go socialize is now the Catawba Inn the “Food Beer” bar. Live entertainment and a large deck overlooking the lake make for a close replacement to the old Cottage Inn - though ballroom dancing and wearing your “Sunday Best” is not the norm here. If you haven't been to the Catawba Inn, Lindsay Smith reviews it on page 11. Plus we offer you a chance to win a $25 gift certificate to the Catawba Inn if you can figure out this month’s Sudoku puzzle! Along with our usual arts section, township news, Police Beat, CIVFD update and around town info, we are giving away round trip tickets for the Miller Ferry if you can solve our Scavenger Hunt puzzle. See page 22 for a Jim Siemer art poster giveaway too! Thanks for reading! Hope to see you around town.

Andrea J. Elliott Publisher and Photographer, Catawba Island Press Sunrise from Pebble Beach background photo by AJE

NAME____________________________________________________________________ ADDRESS (Sorry, NO P.O. Boxes!)___________________________________________________ CITY_______________________________________ STATE__________ ZIP___________ Subscriptions will start the month after we receive your order. If you want to start your subscription in a later month, please note it on your order. Sent monthly except January & February = one special Winter Edition. Mail Orders to: Catawba Island Press, 9841 State Road, North Royalton, Ohio 44133 with a Check or Money Order made Payable to Catawba Island Press. Subscriptions can also be ordered online at www.catawbaislandmagazine.com. Thanks!

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house remains standing where my father, Gustav Schraidt and all his siblings were born as well as my brother, John and sister, Rosemary. I was the youngest.

Memories of growing up on a Catawba peach farm By Bob Schraidt I was born in 1928 on the 20-acre

fruit farm across from the Catawba school. My grandparents, Henry and Balbena Schraidt, bought the farm in 1885 when they moved to the mainland from Put-in-Bay. The

Alberta peaches were grown, a variety which ripened over a two-week period around the first part of September, and he and mother would work all year for that two week pay day. Since it was during the great depression there were a lot of men traveling the country looking for work, so finding help to pick peaches was not a problem—keeping them out of jail after the first pay day was the problem. Dad soon figured out a way to keep them from going to go to town and getting into trouble. He also grew sour cherry trees which ripened around the first of August and he would make a 50-gallon barrel of cherry wine. By the time the Alberta peaches were ripe the wine was still not fully aged but fit to drink. Dad would offer the pickers as much cherry wine as they could drink and they soon forgot all about town. Most of the peaches were sold to truckers who came around during the day and ordered the number of bushels they wanted. Dad and the crew would pick all day and the trucks would come in the evening to load up. Mom, John and Rosemary would sort and ready the peaches for the truckers. We also took care of any retail customers that stopped by. The packing house was on the east side of West Catawba Road and the peach orchards were on the west side of the road. We had a 1927 flatbed truck. When I was about ten years old and big enough to reach the truck’s pedals and able see over the steering wheel, I assumed from my brother the task of driving between the packing house and the orchard to bring the peaches in. The pickers would load the truck and Mom and we kids would unload it in the packing house. CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE

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We never had an inside toilet. The outhouse sat back from the road between the barn and the coal shed. I have pleasant memories of sitting there with the door ajar watching the traffic go by. I would listen to the music of the mud dobbers (wasps) building their mud nests while thumbing through the toy sections of the Sears and Roebuck and the Montgomery Wards catalogs. The catalogs functioned in the place of toilet paper—no one had money for store-bought toilet paper. It seemed the first pages to go were the women’s corset section, and the last, the toy sections. Winter was a different story and no one lingered in the outhouse. A couple of cedar roofing shingles were missing from the roof creating a small hole there. Sifting snow would drift down through the hole onto the seat making it necessary to clear it away before settling in. This was particularly challenging at night if nature’s call was so urgent there was no time to find the flashlight, and of course, there was no electricity in the outhouse. As far as I could see, the only advantage winter had over summer was the smell was not nearly as bad.

Dad would drive Mom and us kids into town every two weeks to buy groceries and chicken feed at the mill. When the banks failed in 1929 the bank kept all the savings Dad and Mom had. The first thing Mom would do is go to the bank to learn whether she could draw money out for groceries. I remember the bank allowing her to begin five dollar withdrawals in the early 30s. We lived a lot better than many of the city folks because we raised much of our own food. CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE

Bob Schraidt with his father and sister in front of the old peach packing house that once stood on NW Catawba Road pictured on the opposite page. The Schraidt barn featured on the cover of our 2009 anniversary issue below. Photo by AJE.

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Catawba kindergarten class in 1933. Photo courtesy Bob Schraidt.

We always had a horse, a milk cow, chickens and a big garden. There are a lot of things you can get from a cow. We had milk, butter and cottage cheese. To keep the cow fresh (producing milk), Dad would take her to a farm with a bull and in nine months she would bear a calf. We would raise the calf for several months and then butcher it for meat. Since we didn’t have refrigeration, the iceman came at least once a week, as well as the bread man. Sometimes the milkman delivered milk, but usually only when the cow went dry shortly before the birth of her calf. Sometimes in the summer The Lafer Brothers came around with their mobile grocery store in a big truck. Mom would go out and buy grocery items she ran short of between trips our trips town. Our horse’s name was Topsy. Dad had a five-acre piece of land at the corner of West Catawba Road and Beach Club Road. It was about a third of a mile from the main farm. He would load the single-bottom plow on a wagon and old Topsy would pull us to the work site where Dad would then hitch Topsy to the plow. A single-bottom hand plow required both hands to steady the plow with the horse’s rein hung around Dad’s shoulders. This meant Dad had to control the horse with voice signals—gee and haw. I can’t remember which was right and which was left. I remember gee and haw was interspersed with a lot of cuss words when Topsy didn’t mind her signals. I don’t think she paid any more attention to the cuss words than she did to gee and haw. When the plowing was finished and we were on our way home, Dad would hitch Topsy back up to the wagon and sometimes let me take the reins. It seemed my chances of driving on the way home were in direct proportion to the amount of cussing it took to get the plowing done. CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE

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Because we didn’t get to town much where the barber shops were, Mom would give me a quarter and send me down the road to Elba Rhodes (Don Rhodes’ mother) for a haircut. A quarter doesn’t seem like much today, but when she would send me to the Lafer Brother’s store at the end of Catawba, I could buy two loafs of bread and have a nickel left for a box of Cracker Jacks. I couldn’t wait to get home to see what the prize was. We made our own fun back then. In the winter I would hurry home after school and quickly get my chores done so I could join the other kids skating on the Beach Club Pond. In the summer we swam at the fish dock at the end of Moores Dock Road, which is now Catawba Island State Park. The fish dock was owned by Pete Roberts who let us borrow the rowboats that were a part his fishing operation. One day Dick Brand, his sister Donna Jean, Don Emke and I went out in a rowboat for a summer swim. When Don dove in he lost his bathing suit and the only thing we had to cover him up was Donna Jean’s straw hat—I still wonder if Donna Jean ever got her hat back. My best friend was John Rofkar who lived just down the road. CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE The Schraidt barn and peach orchard in spring. Photo by Andrea J. Elliott

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We played together every day. As John’s Dad was interested in nature, he would catch rattlesnakes. I remember he would hang the snakes

in a burlap sack in their tool shed. John and I would make little toy boats or cars in that tool shed, and I can still hear the snakes shaking their rattlers at us.

Back then there were eight grades in the Catawba School, but in 1933 there a surplus of money left over from a WPA project. WPA was a New Deal program to get people back to work during the depression. The Catawba School Board decided to hire a local unemployed teacher to teach a kindergarten class until the money was gone. The funds ran out the following spring and that was the end of kindergarten at Catawba school until more recently. After college and completing my obligation in the Army, I married and went to work for the Army. The last 13 years of my 30-year career were spent at the Pentagon when I retired in 1979. I couldn’t wait to get out of Washington and back to Catawba to grow peaches. Peach marketing has changed considerably since I was a child working the farm with my Dad. Vacationing tourists have replaced the truckers that hauled peaches to the cities. Instead of growing peaches for the wholesale market, I now focus on retail sales, which results in planting several varieties that ripen at different times thus extending the season. I enjoy it so much more as the people we meet are wonderful. Watching a customer bite into a peach, I see their pleasure as the juice runs down their chin. Peach farming now is a lot of fun, but not at all lucrative. I always say I worked my entire career to make enough money to lose it growing peaches. ∞ The Schraidt barn as it stands today. AJE

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COTTAGE INN By Andrea J. Elliott Formal dancing was popular in the 20s, 30s and early 40s. Whether it was under the stars or beneath the glittery lights of a dance hall, ballroom dancing to the sounds of a big band was once the thing to do along the shores of Catawba Island. The Cottage Inn was one of four dance halls on Catawba; all of which have since been demolished or used for other purposes. Built by W. Traub from Sandusky in 1895 The Cottage Inn was a three story, twelve room hotel with a restaurant facing the lake and served as Catawba’s first dance hall. It was built on the location of Catawba’s first hotel called the Catawba Island House, which had burned down in its first year of operation in 1874. The Cottage Inn was a landmark overlooking Lake Erie just south of the old fruit shipping dock - presently the Miller Ferry Dock. It boasted a ballroom that doubled as a dining room and was one of 4 large wood frame buildings that once stood near the point offering hotel services with sought after lake views and summer breezes. Dance enthusiasts paid a set fee at the door and enjoyed dancing to local orchestras that played at the Inn year round. Some dances included; the lancers, waltz, two step, fox trot and the biggest craze of the 20s - the Charleston. There were also marathon dances, masquerade balls and cake walks held. No matter your choice of dance, ladies and gentlemen always arrived at the Cottage Inn in their ―Sunday best‖. Model-Ts were available and affordable to many at the time. The Inn provided ample parking to those patrons who drove there. The inside of the Inn was exclusively for dancing after dinner was served. CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE

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With the increase of auto traffic to the Lake Erie Islands and inadequate parking for the ferry, in 1950 the J. P. Cagney estate sold the Cottage Inn along with a few acres of an old adjoining peach orchard to the Miller Boat Livery. In 1951, the Miller Boat Livery razed the Inn and used the area as a parking lot and shipping and receiving area - its current use to this day.∞ A special thank you to Don Rhodes for his contributions to this article. CONTINUED from PREVIOUS PAGE

In the winter, chairs lined the perimeter of the dance floor for onlookers. In the summer, those not dancing socialized on the large screened-in

front porch occasionally peering in through the windows at the dancers and out across the lake. Although there was other nearby hotels, The Cottage Inn was the only to offer a dance floor. This combined with its beautiful Catawba point setting made the Cottage Inn the most desirable destination. During the 1920s, interest in ballroom dancing at the Inn declined as other dance halls on Catawba opened and prohibition came into effect. The Cottage Inn continued to serve patrons up until the late 1940s.

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If you have photos or memories of the Cottage Inn you would like to share, contact Andrea J. Elliott at 440-724-8382 or by email at catawbaislandpress@gmail.com.


The Catawba Inn By Lindsay Smith The Catawba Inn, located a block south of the Miller Ferry dock on the point of Catawba Island, attracts locals, tourists, and the Put-In-Bay bound. It’s not uncommon to walk into The Inn and see a table of golfers, a table of men in town for a fishing trip, and three people you went to high school with. Inside The Catawba Inn, you’ll find a large bar, a pool table, and plenty of seating to enjoy a Winter Wednesday Party or a Buckeye’s football game. The bartenders, Kylah, Stacy and Valerie, are some of the best in the area. They have all worked at The Inn for many years and are comfortable working the crowd, on their own, on busy nights. The bartenders pour a strong drink, and are great at their jobs. New to The Catawba Inn this season is an expanded patio bar, a great place to watch an Indians game or enjoy live entertainment during the summer. On Thursdays throughout the summer, the patio hosts live bands from 7 to 10 pm. Local favorites such as The Colin Dussault Trio, Kaptain Kurt and BE Mann are scheduled. Live entertainment is also provided on some Saturday nights and Sunday afternoons.

The Inn’s BBQ sauce with a twist. There are nightly food specials throughout the year: Mondays are Meatloaf Madness, and Tuesday’s feature Tacos and Meximelts—3 for $5. Wednesday is Burger Night, while Thursday offers pork tenderloin dinners for $7.99. Perch and walleye specials are available on Friday. Food is served until 11 pm during the summer. The Catawba Inn operates 365 days a year, opening at 11am daily except a few holidays, when the bar is only open in the evening. Beverages are served in the bar until 2:30am during the summer, making The Inn the place to conclude your evening. Shuttle service is available on the weekends. They will pick up and drop you off safely at home at no charge (tipping is always welcome). To request shuttle service, call 419366-4655.

A tasty Perch Salad and Catawba Island Iced Tea (top shelf Long Island Iced Tea) at the Inn. AJE

ience and, dare I say, appeal. The combination of live entertainment— in the winter inside the restaurant/ bar and summertime on the patio— and its close proximity to many homes on Catawba make The Inn a popular place to meet up with friends on any night of the week. For more details on the entertainment schedule, visit the Inn’s website at www.catawbainn.com, or stop in and see for yourself. ∞

There are frequently a lot of opinions floating around about The Inn, but there’s no denying its conven-

If you’re looking to grab a bite to eat before heading to Put-In-Bay, or just to eat at a nearby tavern, The Inn offers a large selection. They have everything from homemade soups, to burgers and sandwiches, to pizza. The Chicken Nachos, Cheeseburger Salad, and Chicken Bacon Ranch Wrap are three of my favorites. If you’re in the mood for pizza, but want something a little different, I recommend the Chicken Licker Flatbread. It has grilled chicken, bacon, tomatoes, cheese and Licker Sauce,

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Now we can concentrate on the more positive side of collecting. Most of what follows is taken from an article by Thomas R. Reynolds, owner of Thomas Reynolds Gallery. It was published in the September, 2004 issue of Plein Air Magazine. For reasons of space saving, I paraphrased much of the article, but kept the essentials. The article was titled ―Seven Secrets of Collecting Art‖. Don’t be too quick to buy. Go to museums, galleries, auction houses. Let your eye learn what is good, and what is better-what you like, and what you love. I like this one, ―Later on, when you find yourself remembering the one that got away, you’ll learn the corollary to this rule: Don’t be too slow to buy, either, when love comes along‖.

Detail of an oil painting from Rick and Mary Dziak’s collection .

Collecting Art A Series By Rick Dziak In the last couple of articles I wrote about some of the things to watch out for in your quest for fine art.

Collect in depth. Find a few artists whose work moves you, and invest in them. This will often provide the added satisfaction of forming a bond not only with a piece of art, but also with the artist. Here’s one I should have heeded years ago. ―Stretch yourself and buy CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE

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one strong painting, even if it costs more than you’d planned to pay, rather than buying half a dozen inexpensive or minor works. Ask if you can pay over a period of time. This will also limit the stack of ―but it was cheap‖ things that end up under your bed when you grow tired of them.‖ Be aware of the pecking order. Oils are at the top of the art-world hierarchy and carry the highest values and prices. Acrylics and pastels are usually a step down. Original works on paper—watercolors, drawings, and the like—are often valued lower, but they are also usually less expensive, which can make them an attractive way to begin or build your collection. When you get down to reproductions (prints) the price and value go down more, depending on the process and number made. Consider plein air work. They are often smaller, and thus less expensive. The best plein air paintings have a spontaneous quality that captures a moment, or offers a fresh insight into a familiar scene. This one I think may be the most important. ―Buy what you like. Buy with your gut, not with your head. If something speaks to you, or makes you smile or stays with you, pay attention. Chances are that connection will endure and grow richer through the years. And another corollary, also important: Like what you buy, because you will likely be living with it for a long time. Aside from the Picassos and Monets, there is a limited resale market for art.‖ So, in summation, I say, educate yourself, go for the best you can, and have some fun as you pass through the ―post-poster phase‖ and into the promised land of original art. ∞

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Catawba Island Township Police Department

Excerpts from the Call Summary July, 2011. July 1 Call received from Orchard Isle regarding a golf cart accident. Driver stated she was operating in careless manor in an open field and tipped the cart. The golf cart had oversize tires and a lift kit. Driver emitted odor of intoxicating beverage and was charged with underage consumption and released to her father.

July 6 Call received regarding highly intoxicated female near ferry dock. Female wearing only multicolored bikini and stated she was trying to get home. Subject admitted drinking three Margaritas and three Bloody Mary’s. Subject cited for underage consumption. Female became emotional and attempted physical damage to herself with keys.

Subject incarcerated and mother contacted to bring her additional clothing. July 7 Call received regarding a suspicious vehicle. Juvenile driver with four others stated they were staying on a boat at Gem Beach. The boat owner was contacted and indicated no one should be on the boat. Bag of marijuana was found in juvenile’s vehicle. Juvenile transported to police station for parents to pick up. Juvenile displayed turbulent behavior and charged with disorderly conduct, possession of paraphernalia and marijuana. Others released to their parents. July 8 Call received regarding abandoned watercraft at a marina. Owner of 18-foot aluminum StarCraft could not be located. Vessel had been reported stolen from Kelley’s Island. July 13 Loud party complaint received from Gem Beach. Officer observed four subjects outside with beer and other subjects inside residence. Upon arrival subject yelled ―Cops!‖ Subject caught trying to climb out back window. Back up called. Ten adults and two juveniles charged with underage consumption. Parents called to pick up juveniles. Remaining 75 beers dumped down drain by subjects. July 20 Burglary reported from Catawba Woods. Complainant left to run errand and upon return found window open and prescription medication missing. Under investigation. July 22 Call received regarding a Little Avenue house struck by lightning. CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE

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Police Call Summary for July 2011 Total calls 338 including 6 theft from cars • 7 fireworks • 15 lockouts • 9 crashes • 6 golf cart on roadway • 15 underage consumptions CONTINUED from PREVIOUS PAGE

July 22 While on patrol officer observed two males near Catawba Woods on NW Catawba Road; one was urinating towards traffic. Subjects were charged with public intoxication and sent home. July 22 Officer observed an intoxicated male lying in middle of road with a female attempting to help him up. Male stated he took a sleeping pill. EMS called but treatment was refused. Subjects transported to residence. July 23 A 2010 Jeep observed driving left of center near Woodland Drive. Vehicle drifted onto grass then back onto road and was stopped. Driver stated he was trying to quash argument between a couple in backseat and admitted to drinking earlier that day. Driver had a .118 BAC and was charged with DUI and marked lanes violation. July 24 Call received regarding possible impaired female driver on ferry. Officer observed driver with can of beer. Driver stated she had two beers on the island. Driver had a .174 BAC and charged with DUI and open container. July 30 While on patrol officer observed vehicle southbound on NE Catawba Road traveling into opposite lane of travel. Driver pulled into Holiday Inn and stopped after driving around building. Subject stated he was trying to make a phone call while driving. Driver observed with slurred speech and was swaying during interview. Driver had a .198 BAC and was charged with DUI and marked lanes violation. ∞

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Letter from the Chief August 2011 We are fortunate to be surrounded by water. Beautiful vistas, boating, fishing, swimming and all types of water-related recreation are abundant here. As firefighters, we are required to operate in, on and around the water. This includes responding to any type of water-related incident such as boating accidents, drowning and search and rescue calls. Some of the more complex rescues include victims falling or driving off the high cliffs in the area, vehicles being driven into the water, boat fires or boating accidents that occur in difficult to reach locations, often in poor weather conditions.

referred to as ―turn out gear‖ and if wearing all articles of this gear it is often called ―full turnouts.‖ What happens if a firefighter falls into the water in full turnouts? Our firefighters recently participated in a training session to learn responsive action if they should fall into the water while wearing full turnouts. Even with all of the heavy clothing and equipment on, a firefighter does not sink to the bottom immediately. Trapped air inside the gear allows for some buoyancy which hopefully gives the firefighter enough time to self-rescue. With firefighters in the water and in their gear, methods for quick but

CIVFD training session. Photo courtesy CIVFD.

systematic gear removal were also taught. Several other training topics were covered including in-water spinal immobilization, response to diving accidents and a review of dive team search patterns and equipment familiarization. Rocky Piacintino of the Catawba Moorings Marina graciously offered the use of the marina’s pool for this vital training. I would like to thank Rocky and his staff at The Moorings for their generous support of our department. John Gangway, Fire Chief

The CIVFD is very fortunate to currently have six members that are certified SCUBA divers. Like all members, these divers are firefighters first but many are also EMTs, department officers or hold other additional roles in the department. We respond to several water emergencies every year in Catawba Island Township and anywhere another agency requests our assistance. In addition to responding to these types of water emergencies, many of our ―normal‖ operations occur very close to the water or on boats, docks and around marinas or waterfront homes. These circumstances can not only be hazardous for the victims but also for our firefighters who are required to work in these areas, many times in full firefighting protective clothing. This protective clothing is sometimes

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Catawba Island Township Board of Trustees Meeting Minutes July 12, 2011 Motion made to approve and pay the bills, including the last payroll, in the amount of $47,339.89. All voted aye. Motion carried. Police Lieutenant John Gangway said the fall collection for prescription drugs will be October 29 at the police station.

Tim Wasserman, Director of the Ottawa, Sandusky, Seneca Joint Solid Waste Management District talked about the possibility of a permanent prescription drug drop off box at the police station and offered their assistance. John Gangway said they received written confirmation of $2,800 for the trade in of the 2008 police vehicle. He said only $200 was offered for the 2004 police vehicle. The Trustees agreed to offer the 2004 police vehicle for auction on Govdeals.com Dan Barlow said he called the state in regard to the causeway. He said they agreed to send another crew to eliminate the weeds on both sides of the causeway. Dan Barlow said the township mailboxes were recently knocked down by a driver and they decided to consolidate the three boxes to one and relocate the mailbox to the entrance of the administration parking lot. Dan Barlow asked the Trustees if they had considered the bid he presented at the last township meeting for a new tractor. William Rofkar asked if the scoop was detachable. Dan Barlow said it is detachable. Dan Barlow said he believes they are giving the township a very good trade in value. Gary Mortus made a motion to contract through the State Cooperative Purchasing Program to purchase a John Deere Utility Tractor Model 5085M, with Rotary Cutter and Loader options including the specified trade in of a 485 Case Tractor and two mowers, from Bay Tractor Co. for the amount of $41,198.42. William Rofkar seconded the motion. All voted aye. Motion carried. CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE

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Catawba Island Township Administration Building on opposite page. Miller Ferry Dock above. AJE

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thoughts on curbside recycling.

Matt Montowski asked Dan Barlow to contact the state about cleaning up the weeds at Pebble Beach. Dan Barlow agreed to do so.

Terry Thompson suggested holding a work session with the Trustees, Solid Waste Management, and interested residents to further discuss curbside recycling options so that everyone is on board with the program. Gary Mortus said he would be in favor of a work session. He said he would like to see something get started as soon as possible.

Terry Thompson, Area Municipal Marketing Manager for Republic Services, also known as Allied Waste Services, discussed possible options for a residential curbside recycling program for Catawba Island Township. Tim Wasserman of Solid Waste Management shared his

option of curbside recycling. Bill Rofkar said the Trustees would be supportive and he would like to see a program in place. Meeting adjourned. ∞ Please note that meeting minutes are edited for space. The full version of these meeting minutes can be obtained through the township administration. Thanks.

Matt Montowski said he would like residents of the township to have the

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Catawba Island Outdoor Yoga Join us again this summer for Backyard Garden Yoga at the home of Ann Segaard, 4396 East Beach Club Road, Catawba Island. The weekly classes continue through the end of August. These one hour sessions are taught by Linda Green, certified yoga instructor and the cost is $7 per class. For more information contact Linda at 419-635-2337.∞ The Salvation Army offers Tools for School program

The Salvation Army-Port Clinton Service Unit is accepting applications for the Tools for School program. The Port Clinton Service Unit’s ―Tools for School‖ program will assist local families in financial need of school supplies and book bags.. Applications for this program can be picked up and dropped off now through August 31st, at the local Salvation Army office located at The Sutton Center – 1854 E. Perry Street, Suite 800, Port Clinton. This program is completely supported by The Ottawa County Community Foundation, The Harry Stensen Memorial Fund and local donations. If you are interested in making a donation to this program, please send your donation to The Salvation Army-PCSU, 1854 E. Perry Street, Suite 800, Port Clinton, Ohio 43452. ∞ Port Clinton Farmers Market Adams Street Park, Port Clinton Aug 27, 2011; Sep 3, 2011; Sep 10,

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Pebble Beach AJE

2011; Sep 17, 2011; Sep 24, 2011 9 am-1pm The market provides the community with access to a wide variety of fresh, local, in-season farm produce and other locally made products as well as high quality handmade crafts in historic downtown Port Clinton. 419.734.5503 Riverfront Live! North Jefferson Street Pier Port Clinton Aug. 19 & 26, 2011 6:30-8 pm Free live music every Friday night through August; many different musicians playing along the Portage River in downtown historic Port Clinton. CONTINUED on NEXT PAGE


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Treasure Island Day Kelleys Island Sept. 10, 2011 9 am-3 pm Come to Kelleys Island and search for treasure at this islandwide yard sale. Maps will be available the day of the event. ∞ Milan Melon Festival Sept. 3 - 5, 2011 Village Square (SR 113), Milan milanmelonfestival.org This is the 53rd Annual Labor Day weekend celebration with rides, games, contests, antique car show and live musical entertainment. The Grand Parade is on Sunday afternoon. The famous muskmelon ice cream and watermelon sherbet are the must-have treats. It's all found in charming Milan, Ohio.∞ Woodcarver Show Sept. 10, 2011 10 am-5 pm Merry-Go-Round Museum 301 Jackson St., Sandusky 419.626.6111 merrygoroundmuseum.org More than 25 woodcarvers will demonstrate their art and creations.∞ Historic Weekend Perry's Victory & International

Peace Memorial, Put-in-Bay Sept. 9 - 11, 2011 Fri 7:30-8:30 pm, Sat 11 am-7:30 pm, Sun 11 am-4 pm Join us in the evening for a Traditional Flag Retirement Ceremony, Saturday - Historic encampment opens at 11 am, Battle of Lake Erie Commemoration Ceremony and parade begins at 2:30pm, followed by Sailors Life Program and ice cream social and the Toledo Symphony. Sunday honor 100 years of Boy Scouting at our 9:30 am ceremony. Historic encampment is open from 11 am-4 pm. ∞

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By Jim Siemer This Lake Erie TRIFECTA poster is dedicated to my father Jim Siemer. My dad loves fishing and I have fond memories of fishing with my dad up on Lake Erie. When I asked my dad what were the most popular fish up on Lake Erie, he stated emphatically: Walleye, Yellow Perch and Small Mouth Bass!

WIN a LAKE ERIE TRIFECTA Poster by emailing us your Catawba Island fish tale, story or memory to catawbaislandpress@gmail.com. Winners chosen by random from emails received before August 30, 2011. Submissions may be published. Good luck!

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I painted this watercolor last on Middle Bass Island during the 4th of July Celebrations. I can't begin to convey how much I love being up on Middle Bass Island. I hope this Lake Erie TRIFECTA Poster will inspire others to visit the Lake Erie Shores & Islands and fish in one of the most beautiful places in the world. I did not want to do a traditional fish poster. I believe that this Lake Erie TRIFECTA poster is fun, colorful and dynamic. The word Trifecta fits perfectly the fact that Walleye, Yellow Perch and Small Mouth Bass are the three most popular fish up on Lake Erie. I tried to convey that these three fish were in a race to your dinner table. I hope I didn't just offend any vegetarians. This Lake Erie TRIFECTA poster is

August 2011

available in Lake Erie gift shop and galleries is currently available online at LakeErieArt.com. ∞


By Starr Leo “The Lion” Loyal - Loving - Lethal July 23rd thru August 22nd During your ―star‖ month it’s easy for you to shine. Be the Hero that others see you as. Virgo “Virgin” August 23rd thru September 22nd Advancing your romantic skills should be #1 on your agenda during August.

Aries “The Ram” March 21st thru April 19th Have faith that the new idea you’re considering is a sound one. You should pursue with courage. Taurus “The Bull” April 20th thru May 20th You are coming into a very favorable time during which you can accomplish a great deal. There is no reason to doubt yourself or your abilities.

Gemini “The Twins” May 21st thru June 20th You have a winning style that melts others - enjoy good times with family & friends this month. Cancer “The Crab” June 21st thru July 22nd Keep conversations moving forward this month. The ball’s in your court. ♥

Libra “Scales” September 23rd thru October 22nd Pressure seems to build during this month, but you can handle it with your strong tolerance and adaptation to change. Scorpio “Scorpion” October 23rd thru November 21st August brings tension to relationships. Remember to pay close attention to what’s best for all concerned. Sagittarius “The Archer” November 22nd thru December 21st Avoid letting a minor complaint escalate into a wrestling match. Try not to ―get hot‖. Capricorn “The Mountain Goat” December 22nd thru January 19th Examining relationships is your major concern at this time. Be openminded & objective. Aquarius “The Water Bearer” January 20th thru February 19th Expect changes in August. Remember it’s healthier to make the first move than to react to what’s thrust upon you. Pisces “Two Fishes” February 20th thru March 20th Handle a personal matter quietly this month. Discretion will be your power.

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Catawba Island Magazine  

August 2011 Catawba Grown

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