Page 1

May 2018

Making it Work AREA ENTREPRENEURS MEAN BUSINESS

Mothers & Daughters

STYLE IS ALL IN THE FAMILY

Fur Crying Out Loud AN OASIS OF SERENITY

Cary Magazine, 301 Cascade Pointe Lane Cary, NC 27513

Transitions LifeCare

THERAPY DOGS AND THE PET PARADE


Swim. Meet. Summer is almost here, and you find yourself at an absolutely gorgeous pool. A cool breeze skims the shimmering surface, while overhead, a single cloud floats across the Carolina blue sky. Yes, it’s a pool, but there’s so much more to a 12 Oaks swimming pool than swimming. There’s tanning and tall drinks, favorite novels and cat naps. The ideal place for some alone time, the perfect backdrop for spending lazy summer days with family and friends. So, throw your suit on and don’t go swimming. It’s perfectly fine with us.

Homes from the mid $400s to $1 million+. 2008 Green Oaks Parkway, Holly Springs, NC 27540 919.557.6850 | 12oaksnc.com ©2018 WSLD 12 Oaks, LLC. Equal Housing Opportunity. The amenities and features described and depicted herein are based upon current development plans, which are subject to change without notice. Actual development may not be as currently proposed. References to housing products, builders and prices are subject to change without notice as well.


Cary is my home.

Delighting clients is my passion. Kristin Sutton Private Banker

Kristin is known for helping private banking clients in extraordinary ways. She especially loves working with her Cary neighbors. It’s amazing how much she gets done in a day. Family responsibilities. Community involvement in everything from the Chamber to Church to Cary Visual Arts. And she’s always prepared, present, and proactive for her Paragon Bank clients. She’d love to hear from you: 919.534.7355

5000 Valleystone Drive Suite 110 Cary, NC 919.415.4377 ParagonBank.com


Where Priceless

Family Memories Are Made

prestonwood.com (919) 467-2566

CARY MAGAZINE 3


Great Golf. Family Fun. Giving Back.

May 31 - June 3, 2018 TPC Wakefield Plantation, Raleigh

For tickets, information and volunteer opportunities visit

rexhospitalopen.com 2017 Web.com Tour CHARITY OF THE YEAR

Rex Hospital Open

4

MAY 2018

@Rex Open

@RexHospitalOpen

Fan Fairway Family Fun Thursday - Sunday Service Appreciation Day Sunday Food Trucks • Music • Face Painting


CRAVINGS, CRADLES and EVERYTHING in BETWEEN.

Pregnancy is a journey. At REX Women’s Center, we’re here to walk with you every step of the way.

LEARN MORE ABOUT our SERVICES at MYREXBABY.COM


in this issue Family Style: 18 Mothers and daughters show that true beauty is timeless

Pet Parade 79 Your aww-some animals are picture perfect

Reputation for 30 Quality in Business: Kathy and Stew Miller The New Venue 36 in Town:

Soft Skills: 87 Therapy animals

provide comfort and joy

Chatham Station

43

For Entrepreneurs, Help is Crucial

Cary Magazine: 46 We Know Western Wake

Tough Cookies: 94 Opening a restaurant

means hard work, long hours and a bit of luck

Smart Arts: 72 Creative classes engage

students, making learning easier and more fun

Bella was adopted by David and Amanda Williams of Apex from Neuse River Golden Retriever Rescue. “She is an expressive and beautiful soul,” the Williamses say about their Great Pyrenees/golden retriever mix. “She has an incredible sense of loyalty and love, paired with a strong will and a fearless devotion to protecting her pack. Being with her owners is her favorite thing, whether that’s an adventure in the mountains, hiking waterfalls, a run on the beach, sitting on the front porch on a warm from the Pet Parade on page 79.

6

MAY 2018

contributed photo

summer day or curled up beside us. See more


CARY MAGAZINE 7


in every issue

CARY • APEX • MORRISVILLE • HOLLY SPRINGS • FUQUAY-VARINA

May 2018 • Volume 15, Number 4

15

Things to Do This Month

26 101

We Love

EXECUTIVE

Bill Zadeits, Group Publisher Kris Schultz, Publisher EDITORIAL

Liquid Assets: Call the Hops by Fortnight Brewing

Company and Doc Porter’s Bourbon Whiskey

118

Nonprofit Spotlight:

CORRECTION:

Transitions LifeCare

In the March Liquid Assets column “Catch this Rye”

122

reviewing Defiant Rye Whiskey, Garden Adventurer: an ingredient for the Old

The Clan Cuphea

Fashioned cocktail was incorrectly listed. Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur, made from sour Marasca cherries, should

departments

10 12 106 125 130

be used in the cocktail.

Amber Keister, Senior Editor Emily Uhland, Lifestyle Editor Sarah Rubenoff, Copy Editor CONTRIBUTORS

L.A. Jackson David McCreary Nancy Pardue Jennifer Buehrle Williams PHOTOGRAPHY

Jonathan Fredin, Chief Photographer PRODUCTION

Jennifer Casey, Graphic Designer Lauren Earley, Graphic Designer Dylan Gilroy, Web Designer Beth Harris, Graphic Designer Matt Rice, Webmaster/SEO Rachel Sheffield, Web Designer Lane Singletary, Graphic Designer PUBLIC RELATIONS

S&A Communications Chuck Norman, APR

Editor’s Letter

ADMINISTRATIVE

Letters from Readers

ON THE COVER: Three puppies patiently pose at the SPCA of Wake County.

Dining Guide

These pooches have all found homes, but the nonprofit always has animals ready for

Happenings

adoption. For information, see spcawake.org

Write Light

Photo by Jonathan Fredin

in the next issue

Mor Aframian, Events & Marketing Kristin Black, Accounting Alexandra Blazevich, Events & Marketing Anthony Harrison, Events & Marketing Cherise Klug, Traffic Manager Lisa McGraw, Circulation Coordinator Valerie Renard, Advertising & Human Resources PUBLISHER EMERITUS

Ron Smith Cary Magazine © is published nine times annually by Cherokee Media Group. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. Subscriptions are $18/year. CARY MAGAZINE

Westview at Weston 301 Cascade Pointe Lane, Cary, North Carolina 27513 (919) 674-6020 • (800) 608-7500 • Fax (919) 674-6027 www.carymagazine.com This publication does not endorse, either directly or implicitly, the people, activities, products or advertising published herein. Information in the magazine is deemed credible to the best of our knowledge.

Ones to Watch

These 25 individuals help shape Western Wake into what it has become and what it will be in the future. 8

MAY 2018

Cary Magazine is a proud member and supporter of all five chambers in Western Wake County: the Cary Chamber of Commerce, Apex Chamber of Commerce, Morrisville Chamber of Commerce, Holly Springs Chamber of Commerce and Garner Chamber of Commerce. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All dwellings advertised are available on an equal-opportunity basis.


ALL NEW 2018 BUICK ENCLAVE HENDRICKBUICKGMCCARY.COM

115 Team Hendrick Way Cary, NC 27511

ALL NEW 2018 CHEVY TRAVERSE

100 AUTO MALL DRIVE CARY, NC 27511

844-361-8848 HENDRICKCHEVROLET.COM CARY MAGAZINE 9


Jonathan Fredin

e d i t o r ’s l e t t e r

Amber Keister cuddles with Kix, one of the models in our photo shoot at the Wake County SPCA. The group rehomes more than 3,500 animals annually, and these dogs were no exception. They all found homes within days of being listed on the SPCA website.

THERE ARE A COUPLE of things about dog lovers: They love to talk about their dogs, and they like to look at pictures of other people’s dogs. I should know what I’m talking about. I grew up with dogs, and my husband and I have owned one or more for the last two decades. So, from the Pet Parade photo contest to the adorable puppy photo shoot at the Wake County SPCA, this issue has been especially fun to put together. Especially meaningful has been all the stories you have sent in with your photos. Although the specifics are as different as every animal, a common theme has been joy — the joy and comfort that our pets bring to our lives. • When we come home, they greet us with head bumps, tail wags and kisses galore. • They take us for walks outside, helping us to relax, get some exercise and chat with our neighbors. • When we aren’t feeling well, they lie next to us on the couch, making us feel a little better just with their presence. • And they want to be with us, no matter where we are or what we are doing. Often our animal companions can give us the comfort that our human friends can’t. As pet therapy volunteer Melinda Corn said of her dogs, “They really make that connection with people. It’s just magical.” I hope that in reading these stories, you might experience a little of the magic that pets bring into our lives. Thanks for reading,

Amber Keister Senior Editor

10

MAY 2018


SPINE CENTER

JOINT REPLACEMENT

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Bone and joint health is a major component of your overall wellness and longevity. At Cary Orthopaedics, we offer comprehensive orthopaedic and spine care, with both surgical and non-surgical treatments. Our highly skilled, fellowship-trained physicians take a personal approach in treating patients, while working to ensure the best outcomes for each and every individual. Serving patients throughout the Triangle, we’re experts in motion, helping you live life to the fullest. Cary: 919.467.4992 Clayton: 919.467.4992 Holly Springs: 919.346.8651 Morrisville: 919.238.2440 Raleigh: 919.467.4992 Spine Center: 919.297.0000

Visit our online Interactive Body Map to get facts about joint pain and common orthopaedic conditions.

www.caryortho.com

CARY MAGAZINE 11


letters from readers

“Thanks Cary Magazine, for the nice article that gives a shout-out to ‘Carolina Catch’ as well as boosting North Carolina fish and shellfish.” Debbie Moose, author of “Carolina Catch: Cooking North Carolina Fish and Shellfish from Mountains to Coast”

Jump into Summer

Turn heads in a new outfit from Pink Magnolia Boutique. Shop your favorite styles online, or visit one of our two locations in Cary & Morrisville. THE MAGGY AWARDS

WINNER 2018

Parkside Town Commons 1205 Parkside Main St, Cary (919) 518-5532 Park West Village 3021 Village Market Place, Morrisville (919) 561-1769

lovepinkmagnolia.com 12 MAY 2018 PinkMagnolia1804.indd 1

3/29/2018 8:34:23 AM

“I recently came across your article on Debbie Moose’s new cookbook. As a representative of Zatarain’s here in New Orleans, I was surprised (and delighted!) to see Zatarain’s in the featured recipe for Chargrilled Blackened Cape Shark Fillet over Pineapple Salsa. Thank you for a wonderful article. It really did make my day.” Kacey M. Hill, Peter Mayer Advertising, New Orleans “Thanks again for putting Julia in the April Happenings section. We love Cary Magazine and can’t wait to see the next edition. Y’all do such a great job including great things in the magazine, it’s an excellent way to know what’s going on and to plan to attend various things we wouldn’t have otherwise known about.” Lauron Dott

“My husband and I found Washington, N.C., 13 years ago when we were ready to move from Maryland to get away from all the traffic in the metropolitan Washington, D.C., area. We couldn’t be happier that we found little Washington! The article is good but doesn’t go into what wonderful, friendly people are here and what a supportive community this is.” Beth Byrd, re. “The Original Washington” “The RelyMD story turned out so well — you all did such a great job. Thank you so much for the opportunity, and I hope we can work together again in the future!” Lindsay Priester, Rountree Communications

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Email letters to the editors to editor@carymagazine.com

Editors’ note: Submitted comments may be edited for length or clarity, and become the property of Cary Magazine.


Everyone says they are #1... We can prove it!

#1

In Sales In Volume In Units In Transactions In Relocation

#1 Real Estate Company in Central NC Come see why we’re #1.

HOWARD PERRY AND WALSTON *According to the Triangle Business Journal and Cartus Broker Network.

HPW.com


14 APRIL 2018


5

things to do

May

2

1 Photo by Rick Gardner

The Beer & Bacon Fest celebrates two of our favorite things at one festival. More than 75 beers and ciders will be available to sample, plus porky snacks from 15 restaurants and 10 gourmet bacon vendors. Saturday, May 19, noon–6 p.m., Koka Booth Amphitheatre. $39-$79. beerandbacon.com

3

Arts, crafts, music and festival food — the 38th Annual Apex Peakfest has all the ingredients for a fun day. The largest public event in town, Peakfest also raises money for community grants — so feel good about eating that funnel cake! Saturday, May 5, 9 a.m.–5 p.m., downtown Apex. apexpeakfest.com

4

A beautiful princess, a scary fairy and a terrible curse – the classic story of Sleeping Beauty comes alive as the Carolina Ballet presents the Russian masterpiece. The retelling includes Tchaikovsky’s timeless score and a fearsome dragon that must be slain by the prince. May 17-20, $32-91, Raleigh Memorial Auditorium. carolinaballet.com

Photo by Brian Hoyle

Morrisville's Town Hall Drive turns into a carnival at Springfest — complete with midway games and rides! Admission is free, but bring money to buy game tickets at the event. Saturday, May 19, 4–9 p.m. townofmorrisville.org, search “Springfest”.

5

Hot air balloons will fill the air over Fuquay-Varina’s Fleming Loop Park during the Freedom Balloon Fest. This annual Memorial Day weekend event includes live music, food trucks, arts and crafts vendors, plus tethered balloon rides and nightly “glows.” Admission is free, but balloon rides are $20 each. May 25-28. freedomballoonfest.com

CARY MAGAZINE 15


GOOD FOOD makes for GOOD TIMES. Whether the day’s plans include a picnic for two in a kayak, an oyster roast on the side porch, or a potluck cookout on the beach, we’re here to help you break bread with family and friends. Don’t spend time and energy lugging groceries over from the mainland. From fresh local seafood, to USDA Prime meats and local produce, to an extensive wine selection and gourmet deli, you’ll find just what you’re looking for and more. Savor breakfast or lunch at our newly expanded Maritime Market Café, or call ahead and for custom take-out appetizers or complete family meals. Save time when you order your groceries and meals on the Market’s website and have them waiting for you in your home when you arrive. Stay in-the-know about wine tastings, “Howl at the Moon” parties and special café dinners by visiting us online, following us on facebook or subscribing to our email. Don’t forget to call on Sweet Bay Catering for all your on-island special event needs too!

Hours vary seasonally | 8 Maritime Way | 910-457-7450 www.facebook.com/MaritimeMarket | claudepope@yahoo.com

www.maritimemarketbhi.com 16

MAY 2018

WELL-STOCKED DELI • CAFÉ SERVING BREAKFAST & LUNCH • FAMILY MEALS TO GO • GROCERY DELIVERY • ON-ISLAND CATERING • FRESH NC SEAFOOD • USDA PRIME MEATS • LOCAL PRODUCE

WELL-STOCKED DELI • CAFÉ SERVING BREAKFAST & LUNCH • FAMILY MEALS TO GO • GROCERY DELIVERY • ON-ISLAND CATERING • FRESH NC SEAFOOD • USDA PRIME MEATS • LOCAL PRODUCE

• GROCERY DELIVERY • ON-ISLAND CATERING • FRESH NC SEAFOOD • USDA PRIME MEATS • LOCAL PRODUCE • FINE WINES • GOURMET CHEESES •

• GROCERY DELIVERY • ON-ISLAND CATERING • FRESH NC SEAFOOD • USDA PRIME MEATS • LOCAL PRODUCE • FINE WINES • GOURMET CHEESES •


PLAN YOUR NEXT

Just off North Carolina’s southern coast, Bald Head Island’s 14 miles of uncrowded beaches and outdoor activities galore make it an exceptional getaway for the entire family. Call or go online to start planning your adventure.

877-344-7443 | www.ComeToBHI.com | vacations@bhisland.com

CARY MAGAZINE 17


e l y t S y l i m a F WRITTEN BY EMILY UHLAND

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Mothers and daughters show that

true beauty is timeless

Warm weather is upon us, and with it comes the shift from winter wools to spring’s fresh fashions. But Mother Nature’s seasons aren’t the only ones changing. As we evolve through the seasons of our lives, our perspectives on beauty and style shift with new experiences and growing confidence. Adorned in spring’s best trends, Western Wake’s fabulous moms and daughters share discoveries from their own journeys toward true beauty.

18

MAY 2018

found their st e v a h s l r i yle, he g t s A e really helped me stay yo ung. they’v

As a mom, very often you focus so much on your family — and not on yourself — that you can get kind of old-fashioned and stuck. The girls ... continue to force me to step outside my comfort zone. You can be any age and still be fashionable.” —

Donna

On Karly: Jumpsuit, $162 Jean jacket, $160

On Jen: Rattle Rock tunic, $126 Skinny ankle crop denim, $140

On Donna: Printed boatneck dress, $158 Dolman-sleeved cropped cardigan, $158

Clothing available at Peachy Keen Jewelry available at Joint Venture Jewelry *The Hankin family owns Joint Venture Jewelry and Peachy Keen boutiques.


ear and your personal style w u o y t a h W ut who you are o b a t o l a say without saying anything.

It’s an instant language that allows someone to connect with you.”

Karly

comes from wi e l y t thin. S

It’s not only about what you wear, it’s about how you feel from the inside. When you do put an outfit together and add the little details, it shows that you care about every little part of yourself.” —

Jen

Donna Hankin, with daughters Karly and Jen Hair styling by Reina Lawrence, Tess McSwain and Emily Sultzbach. Makeup by Kris Bright of Artisan Hair.

CARY MAGAZINE 19


d e c n e e u h v e r a o h l w f n m n s t i y o l e y l r l e a m y m g n i h c ts of how I wanted to shape my own. t a W n aspec ec rtai

Having similarities and differences really shaped us in different ways.” —

Riya, 18

ery v a s i le personal thin y t g. S

You have to be true to yourself and absolutely unapologetic for any criticism you may get. Until you give it a shot, you will never know what’s good for you.” —

Divya

Divya Thomas with daughter Riya

On Divya: Navy stripe bellsleeve dress, $45 Available at Pink Magnolia Necklaces, her own collection

Hair styling by Kat Harrison, makeup by Angela Sladeczek of Parlor Blow Dry Bar Cary.

20

MAY 2018

On Riya: Striped collared shirtdress, $92 Available at Scout and Molly’s


Age is just a numbe

r.

When people say, ‘This is age inappropriate,’ I don’t agree. If you are confident enough and you can wear it well — you can live to be 100 and still look fabulous. I think you have to have fun with style irrespective of how old you are.” —

Divya

We get a lot of our inspiration from travelling

.

I recently went on a trip to Nepal. Seeing how they dress made me want to assimilate that style.”

On Divya: Jeans, $68 Navy fringe shirt, $39 Available at Pink Magnolia

Riya

On Riya: Flutter-sleeve T-shirt, $48 Cropped jeans, $121 Available at Scout and Molly’s Necklaces, her own collection CARY MAGAZINE 21


y m hope that s y a w l a s a It w minant images in the do mainstream media Zoee feel like e k a m t ’ didn didn’t measure up s he

You can notice someone ’s style by watching the way t hey act.

Zoee, 12

or make her want to change how she looked. Watching her now makes me so proud, because I think she feels confident and pretty just being her unique self!” —

Erika Stewart with daughter Zoee

Erika

On Erika: Criss Cross crocodile print dress, $144 Earrings, her own collection On Zoee: Blue and white jumper, $72 Available at Peachy Keen

22

MAY 2018


My mom is

the most beautiful

when she i s feeling confident. —

Zoee

Zoee reinforces the truth ht at beauty is not only skin deep.

Zoee is beautiful, but it’s not just her eyes, her smile, her skin and her hair. What makes her most beautiful, to me, is her incredible heart and her selfless love for others.” —

Erika

On Erika: Tassel-sleeve striped dress, $110 Earrings, her own collection On Zoee: Floral romper, $158 Available at Peachy Keen CARY MAGAZINE 23


w beautiful a woman is is a result of how o h t u o b a h c u m So she conducts herself — her manners, grace and poise.

I always tell my daughters to be polite, dignified, pleasant and respectful. In regard to outer beauty, I’m a big believer in self-care. Take good care of yourself, and it shows in your outward appearance.” —

ial media c o s t e l n a You c e you, but don’t let it c n e u l inf influence you too muc h.

Don’t think you have to look a certain way, because girls on social media don’t really look that way either. Let beauty be art.” —

Cailyn, 16

Lauren Connelly with daughter Cailyn

On Lauren: Black tuxedo pant, $59 Mock turtleneck beaded shirt, $44 On Cailyn: Black crochet romper, $62 Available at Autumn and Avery 24

MAY 2018

Lauren


napologetically owns her u r e g a n e e t style. My

She wears it confidently and takes fashion risks all the time. I respect that and have started to do that myself. Almost anything you wear with confidence can look amazing.” —

Lauren

Get Styled Autumn and Avery Parkside Town Commons 1157 Parkside Main Street, Cary (919) 694-5410 autumnandavery.com Peachy Keen 250 Grande Heights Dr., Cary (919) 678-0092 thepeachykeen.com Pink Magnolia Park West Village 3021 Village Market Place, Morrisville (919) 561-1769 lovepinkmagnolia.com

On Lauren: Black tuxedo pant, $59 Blush button-sleeve shirt, $42 Necklace, $58 Bracelet stack, $78 Hair styling by Kat Harrison, makeup by Angela Sladeczek of Parlor Blow Dry Bar Cary.

On Cailyn: Blush eyelet dress, $76 Pink crystal necklace, $74 Bracelet stack, $78 Available at Autumn and Avery

Scout & Molly’s Park West Village 3031 Village Market Place, Morrisville (919) 465-7441 scoutandmollys.com Artisan Hair 5039 Arco St., Cary (919) 694-5755 artisanhaircary.com Parlor Blow Dry Bar Cary 302 Colonades Way, Suite 208, Cary (919) 880-3391 parlordrybar.com/cary CARY MAGAZINE 25


1 3

2

We Love! COMPILED BY ALEXANDRA BLAZEVICH | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

1. KEEP YOUR COOL You don’t have to shorten your long walks as summer warms up. Just pour water onto this Swamp Cooler dog vest from Ruffwear, and the three-layer design will cool down your pooch; $59.95. phydeaux.com

26

MAY 2018

2. TUFTS OF FLUFF This fleece snuffle-mat by Boo Bear Basics is perfect for your furry friends! Hide treats inside for your pets to sniff out and enjoy; $39.99. phydeaux.com

3. FARM FRESH FOOD Open Farm’s grass-fed dog food is grain-free, locally sourced and contains non-GMO veggies and legumes. Once the bag of pastureraised lamb is empty, bring it back to Phydeaux so it can be recycled and repurposed; $24.99. phydeaux.com


4

5

6

WHERE TO SHOP Phydeaux 6464 Tryon Road, Cary (919) 977-7103 phydeaux.com Good Grace’s Dog Treats Online only (919) 816-7885 goodgracestreats.com Ann Howell Bullard Online only annhowellbullard.com/shop

7

4. GRACE’S GOODIES Good Grace’s offers homemade, human-grade dog treats in a variety of flavors like Blue Suede Chews and P, B & YAY! Several varieties are entirely wheat-free, peanut-free and vegetarian to suit you and your pet’s lifestyle; $15. goodgracestreats.com

5 & 6. (TOTE)ALLY CHIC Look stylish and chic with these Henri Matisse-inspired purses by Ann Howell Bullard. Each handmade bag is one-ofa-kind and signed by Bullard herself; circle, $395; clutch, $250. annhowellbullard.com/shop

7. LADY IN RED From Ann Howell Bullard’s new Statement Square Collection, this purse is inspired by Henri Matisse and Mick Jagger; $395. annhowellbullard.com/shop

CARY MAGAZINE 27


7TH ANNUAL

SATURDAY, MAY 19

Enter Your Car!

9 A.M.  2 P.M.

D O W N T O W N C A RY AT ACADEMY ST. & DOWNTOWN PARK

Online by May 11: $10 At the event: $15 www.townofcary.org

What’s your auto motive? Reminiscing about classics? Checking out modern hot rods? Viewing an exotic car up close? Do all of the above as the coolest cars from all over the area line the streets of Downtown Cary. Bring the family and enjoy food, activities, and entertainment among the spectacular sights of these one-of-a-kind vehicles.

 ALSO AT W HEELS  Neighborhood ch atc Wat Watch

Personal wareness A Awareness

Public Services Se

Business Community

CARY PUBLIC SAFETY DAY

28

MAY 2018

sponsored by

HAGERTY YOUTH JUDGING PROGRAM

| (919) 319-4560 | www.townofcary.org


Because your smile is worth it! It’s time for that new smile!

Our patients are our main focus. We stress prevention, restoration and overall health while improving the smiles of those we serve. Our smile services include: veneers, non-metallic crowns, tooth-colored onlays and fillings, Zoom! chairside tooth whitening and Invisalign. Our digital ITero scanner replaces the need for messy impressions and provides accurate results with maximum patient comfort. We can restore your smile with implants.

We welcome new patients! Schedule a new patient exam and mention this ad to receive a complimentary take home tooth whitening kit or an electric toothbrush kit as a gift to you from us.

Please visit our website and read our reviews.

om www.CaryCosmeticDentist.c

431 Keisler Drive • Cary, NC 27518 • 919.859.1330

CARY MAGAZINE 29


Kathy and Stew Miller founded Yes Solar Solutions in 2009, their second small-business venture. The solar energy installation company, located in Cary, has benefited from North Carolina’s strong support of renewable energy with nearly five percent of the state’s electricity coming from solar. “It is a legacy business, preparing families for a sustainable future and using our resources wisely,” says Kathy Miller.

30

MAY 2018


contributed photo

Earlier this year, solar panels were installed at 433 West Main in Durham’s downtown loop. Developers of the 1973 building wanted to reduce energy costs while staying true to the site’s architectural style.

reputation for

QUALITY in business WRITTEN BY NANCY PARDUE PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

SO YOU WANT TO become an entrepreneur? Gather your gumption, because this could be your year. Ready capital and other economic indicators could make 2018 the best year ever for entrepreneurship, reports Inc. magazine. But what does it take to become a successful entrepreneur? Veteran entrepreneurs Kathy and Stew Miller of Cary know: They were the first owners of three Primrose Schools’ franchises in Cary, and in 2009 launched Yes Solar Solutions, serving clients including, locally, The Mayton Inn, Dorcas Plaza and Town of Cary Fire Station 8. “Stew and I both worked for a Fortune 200 company for a long time and traveled extensively, which began to be a challenge when our daughter, Catie, was born,” Kathy said. “We valued the training, management experience and processes of a large corporation, but longed for more control over our careers and fortunes, as well as our family life. I think we always knew we wanted to have our own business.” continued on page 32 CARY MAGAZINE 31


Yes Solar installed 18 panels on the Cary home of Jason Sacks and his family in June 2016.

contributed photo

continued from page 31

DOLLARS

& SENSE

DO: Have capital — either your own, a spouse or partner with a salary, or funding. DO: Have expertise in the field, or a franchise or partner with the expertise. DON’T: Have a partner, unless it’s your spouse or you can’t avoid it. DON’T: Assume you will start your business but have other people run it. It doesn’t work that way. DON’T: Be afraid to put a price on your value. Trying to be the low-cost alternative forces you to make short-term decisions about how to have a high-quality operation. — Kathy Miller, Yes Solar Solutions

32

MAY 2018

The Millers, like many couples who launch a business, understand each other’s strengths and pool their resources to their company’s advantage. But even with a solid business plan and loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration, entrepreneurship can be full of “dizzying challenges,” Kathy said. “If any part of the plan doesn’t work the way you expected, it is strictly up to you to figure it out,” she said. “The responsibility for your employees and their families, and the customers who depend on you, can be stressful. You must put their needs first. There were 80hour work weeks, coming in before dawn to a flooded classroom, or finding out the cook would be out, and I’d be in the kitchen.” Learning at a franchise

Though the couple chose a franchise as their introduction to entrepreneurship, they didn’t fully appreciate its operational support until they opened a second Primrose School. continued on page 34


Your children. Your family. Your health. Your well-being. Your transitions. Your place. WakeMed Cary Hospital From pregnancy and childbirth to everything and anything female, the care is both comprehensive and compassionate. Embracing you and your entire family with outpatient and inpatient surgery, specialty and subspecialty care, 24/7 emergency care, imaging rehab, and more. After all, when it comes to you, your health and the health of your family, you’re the decision maker. And the decision is clearly WakeMed Cary Hospital.

WakeMed Cary Hospital | 1900 Kildaire Farm Road | Cary, NC 27518 | 919.350.8000 | wakemed.org/cary-hospital CARY MAGAZINE 33


contributed photo

The United Church of Christ in Chapel Hill invested in a large solar system in 2016. Solar covers multiple roofs and a trellis, which makes the project visible to the community and congregation.

continued from page 32

“I had prided myself on our school being successful, because I was always there and could control the quality and the operations. When I realized I could not be in two places at once, I suddenly saw the true value of a franchise,” Kathy said. “Our greatest success came when we learned how to develop our employees instead of trying to do everything ourselves,” she explained. “I documented how to conduct a parent tour and trained the directors to follow the script. I documented each day of summer camp and wrote the menus. That enabled me to delegate with confidence, knowing both schools would operate within my system. “I also became a franchise advocate and served on the Primrose Franchising Company advisory board for many years.” In their post-Primrose life, Stew earned his general contractor license, and the couple began renovating properties to lease or flip. The work challenged their thinking on material reuse and recycling, and eventually led them to the solar power industry. “I see now it’s not so different from the work we did at Primrose,” Kathy said of Yes Solar Solutions. “It’s preparing a community for a sustainable life and contributing to the quality of life for families and businesses. It’s learning how to make long-term choices. Like Primrose, it’s a legacy business.”

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“The joy is seeing the impact you have on people if you do a good job … and being in control of your own destiny.” — Kathy Miller Invest for the long-term

The pursuit of excellence has been a trademark for the Millers, earning among the first Five Star licenses for Primrose. Yes Solar Solutions is the first East Coast company accredited by the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners and North Carolina’s first Tesla Powerwall Certified Installer. “I think a commitment to excellence is a prerequisite for success,” Kathy said. “When your name is on the door, you want to make sure it is associated with excellence. “Small businesses that don’t think long-term, or are in it for the quick buck, make a grave error,” she said. “If you don’t invest, even when you can’t afford it, in training, compensation, certifications, industry support, community responsibility and marketing, you won’t have the reputation and brand identity in the long run. “The joy is seeing the impact you have on people if you do a good job … and being in control of your own destiny.” t


Shop.Dine.Entertain

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CARY MAGAZINE 35


Partners Todd Mozingo and Sarah Shumay plan to open Chatham Station, Cary’s latest event space, this month. The pair are experienced entrepreneurs, Mozingo as owner of Raleigh’s Edible Art Bakery & Dessert Café and Shumay as founder of Sweet SaraBelle Weddings. “I think we both bring something different to the table,” she says.

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the new

VENUE in town

WRITTEN BY ALEXANDRA BLAZEVICH PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

UPON ENTERING CHATHAM STATION, guests are met with natural light and whitewashed brick. In advance of the venue’s May opening, tools, hanging wires and air-conditioning components occupy the airy event space. Behind the scenes, owners Sarah Shumay and Todd Mozingo are hard at work — booking clients, meeting with vendors and supervising construction workers. The space, complete with multiple bay doors, is the former home of Just Tires in downtown Cary. When finished, the venue will have an industrial-chic feel, welcoming both modern and traditional clientele. Shumay and Mozingo entered the event-planning and bakery businesses, respectively, seven years ago. When Chatham Station, a partnership between the two, opens this month, it will host brides, grooms and groups of all sorts. continued on page 38

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Workmen put the finishing touches on the interior of Chatham Station, which will feature 4,500 square feet of open meeting space and seven glass garage doors to let in natural light and breezes, should the weather permit.

continued from page 37

“We have been successful at listening to one other. We don’t tell each other what to do. We ask each other for the other’s input. We find some way to get things that the other wants. We compromise.” — Todd Mozingo, Chatham Station

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The partners

Each entrepreneur brings something different to the table from their former careers. Shumay, who comes from multiple generations of women in the hospitality business, says serving people is in her blood. She began her career as marketing director for a student housing facility, putting on events for college students, but she quickly realized her niche wasn’t planning bikini car washes or pizza parties. “I found that I was focusing on small details, focusing on the pizza party display and the candy buffet and things like that,” she said. She wanted something more of out a job in event planning, so she started her own business — Sweet SaraBelle Weddings. The detail-oriented Shumay styles her clients’

events with a personal touch. Mozingo studied law at UNC-Chapel Hill. When he changed course a few years into the practice, he decided to focus on something that made him happier — baking. He found his place at the venerable Edible Art Bakery & Dessert Café in Raleigh, which he took over in 2011. Mozingo says he acquired the ingenuity, determination and perseverance of a business owner at Edible Art, which has made his time there successful. “I don’t foresee that vision changing here,” he said, about Chatham Station. Shumay and Mozingo will combine their strengths to establish a wedding and event destination, all while building their respective, individual businesses.


C E L E B R AT I N G

YEARS

– A N N I V E R S A R Y–

The business

The idea for the venue formed when the pair met at various networking events and formed a friendship which grew into a partnership. The entrepreneurs come from different backgrounds, but the two realized they could form a successful business. “My business delivers something and then leaves, whereas Sarah is there for the entire event,” Mozingo said. “Someone who had creative vision that could complement mine, who had good organizational skills and managerial skills, as well as someone who knows what works well in venues and what doesn’t, would be good to partner with.” “I think we both complement the style really well,” agreed Shumay. “I think we both bring something different to the table. I am learning a lot from him and vice-versa. continued on page 40

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Now is the time to schedule a

landscape consultation

to be ready for fall planting

Artist’s renderings show how partners Todd Mozingo and Sarah Shumay expect the event space to look, with exposed brick, natural wood elements, metallic accents and natural light. They describe the environment as “industrial with a touch of glam.” continued from page 39

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“We both value our businesses. We value how we work with people, and so we both wanted that to translate through this space.” She plans to handle the day-to-day communication with clients, and Mozingo will consult with clients, drawing on his many years of experience as a wedding vendor. “We have been successful at listening to one other,” Mozingo said. “We don’t tell each other what to do. We ask each other for the other’s input. We find some way to get things that the other wants. We compromise.” While the idea for a venue like Chatham Station seemed natural to them, going through the process of finding a space and implementing their ideas had its challenges. It took the partners three years to find the right space and call it their own.

“There are so many great local businesses down here,” Shumay said. “Our business is hopefully going to grow some of those other businesses that already have a great reputation.” Mozingo and Shumay say they don’t have a specific number of events they want to hold each month. Instead, their focus is to make each person’s experience special when they attend or hold an event at Chatham Station. And that is the goal of Chatham Station: to bring together the resources downtown Cary and the Triangle have to offer, all while focusing on quality over quantity. “Providing a warm but upscale experience for people has always been our mission,” Mozingo said. “I think if we do that, and that reverberates throughout the community, then we will have been successful.” t


e! bl a l ai Av s on pti tO en m se Ba

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New Location!

- NOW LOCATED AT 950 High House Rd. Cary, NC 27513

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H ave you recently made a move? Whether you’ve moved across the country, across the state, or across town, we want to meet you to say hello & to help you with tips as you get settled. Our basket is loaded with useful gifts, information & cards you can redeem for more gifts at local businesses.

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for a complete schedule of events call or visit


For Entrepreneurs, Help is Crucial WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER

APEX ENTREPRENEUR Paul Levering says he was a painful employee, explaining that he would always see a better way of doing things. “I’ve been pretty much fired from any job I’ve ever had,” he said. Levering has started several businesses including FeatureTel, a Voice over Internet Protocol telephone company, which he led for more than eight years. He sold that company in 2011, and it was eventually acquired by Spectrum. He is now a partner at Bluehat Mechanical, a Commercial HVAC & Refrigeration company, and a professional business coach, helping others launch new ventures. When he was just starting out, Levering says he received valuable guidance from the Small Business and Technology Development Center at N.C. State University. Through the SBTDC, he enrolled in a course where he fine-tuned his business plan. “I’m the kind of person who likes to get guidance and help. I kind of flail and reach out,” said Levering, who is the former chair

of the Apex Chamber of Commerce. Having benefited from good advice at the beginning of his journey, Levering coaches other budding business owners. One common mistake he sees is founders trying to control everything. “Founders think they have to run the business and do everyPaul Levering thing,” he said. Just because you’ve founded the business, doesn’t mean you need to be the CEO.” After you start a business, he says it’s vital to figure out what your best role is. “Maybe you just like starting businesses and getting them going. Maybe that’s the part that excites you,” he said. The coaching and strategic side of the business gets Levering excited — whether it’s coaching his employees or mentoring other entrepreneurs in effective business practices. Once a company is off the ground,

Levering has found that entrepreneurs still need guidance and support. He gets some of that support through the Entrepreneurs’ Organization. The group, founded in 1987, is a global network of more than 13,000 business owners with 170 chapters in 58 countries. Membership is by invitation only, and the applicant must be the founder, co-founder, owner or controlling shareholder of a company that grosses more than $1 million annually. Levering is on the board of the Raleigh-Durham chapter and has been a member since 2009. He says the greatest benefit of the organization is the peer-to-peer learning. Within each chapter, smaller groups, called forums, are spun off. Each forum of six to nine peers becomes what Levering calls “a support group for entrepreneurs.” “Being responsible for a business and other people’s lives, that’s unique. Being with other people who are in the same boat as you is very educational,” he said. t

RESOURCES Launch My City — This effort through the Rotary Clubs offers training, access to capital and community support for budding entrepreneurs. Launch Apex is in the planning stages, and Levering says anyone interested should contact the town’s office of economic development, the Apex Rotary Club or the Apex Sunrise Rotary Club. launchmycity.org, apexeconomicdevelopment.org, apexrotary.org, apexsunriserotaryclub.org Paul Levering, Business Coaching and Professional EOS Implementation — levering.com SBTDC — The Small Business and Technology Development Center offers confidential, in-depth business counseling to mid-sized company business owners and management staff. Many of the services are free. sbtdc.org/offices/ncsu Wake Tech — The Center for Entrepreneurship has provided hundreds of entrepreneurs with training on how to start and grow a business, sales and social media. waketech.edu Entrepreneurs’ Organization — Support and information for leaders of established small businesses. eonetwork.org/raleighdurham Chambers of Commerce — Chambers offer networking opportunities and educational events on business topics.

KNOW YOUR MARKET Deanna and Colin Crossman own The Mayton Inn in Cary and The King’s Daughters Inn in Durham. Here are their tips: DO: Know your market. Talk to your future neighbors, businesses and town officials before making any final decisions, and throughout the process. You need to bring a service that’s needed and wanted to the area. DO: Be tied into the pulse of the community you’re about to join. It’s important that your business is the right fit for everyone. Plus, different perspectives bring out better ideas! DON’T: Underestimate the importance of being present once your business is open. You, as the entrepreneur, are personally invested. You need to set the tone, personality and culture of the business, and you can’t do that if you’re not around. — Deanna Crossman, The Mayton Inn

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“Giving back to our community is both a responsibility and an honor. The chance to uplift missions of importance is a part of the incredible service core our community needs. Marta’s is a place that celebrates that service! Marta’s gives us the chance to make a difference in our community, while celebrating the best in ourselves! And for that – Marta’s matters.” Kristye Brackett, Transitions LifeCare and Marta’s customer

Learn more at MartasofRaleigh.com North Hills Raleigh Adjacent to Renaissance Hotel 919-788-4200

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CARY MAGAZINE

WE KNOW

WESTERN WAKE Just like Cary Magazine knows Western Wake County, these individuals and companies are experts in their fields. Whether you’re looking for a veterinarian, a hair stylist or a place to grab a bite to eat, these local businesses can provide the top-notch services you need. Let them introduce themselves — they’d love to get to know you!


DIAMONDS DIRECT CRABTREE WE KNOW DIAMONDS. At Diamonds Direct, your love is celebrated through our passion for diamonds. In 1995, Diamonds Direct changed the landscape of fine jewelry retail by eliminating the middleman and selling diamonds directly to the end consumer. Our unique retail concept is accompanied by exceptional customer education, a vast selection of diamonds and fine jewelry, and customer service guarantees and warrantees that are unmatched in the industry.

We first introduced our concept to Raleigh in 2008 and are proud to continue to be the ultimate destination for fine jewelry in the greater Triangle area. Whether you are looking for a gift, an engagement ring, or wedding bands, we are here to help during all of life’s special moments!

Diamonds Direct 4401 Glenwood Ave, Raleigh, N.C. 27612 919-571-2881 DiamondsDirect.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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ARTISAN HAIR WE KNOW HAIR. Artisan Hair is a boutique luxury hair salon located in West Cary in Alston Town Center. We provide specialized hair services with a highly trained staff who utilize professional products. We are passionate about hair and the beauty industry. We love what we do, and we are here to share our passion with you in a professional and luxurious atmosphere. We have created a sleek and modern space where stylists love to work, and guests love to

visit and receive services. We cater to each of our guests’ needs, while our Artisans create fashion-forward looks that are customized to each individual’s lifestyle.

5039 Arco Street, Cary 919-694-5755 artisanhaircary.com @artisanhaircary


BLOCK & ASSOCIATES REALTY WE KNOW WHERE HOME IS. Sharon Schovain and Joshua Furr, with a combined half-century of proven results, are revving up for new rental business.

property owners lease their homes and depend on Joshua and Block to help them place high-caliber tenants, who will treat their homes with great respect!

Sharon created the concept for corporate rentals and developed Block’s leasing side of the business. She watched it grow as property owners, investors, area builders, realtors and corporations took advantage of her experience and integrity. She considers it a privilege to do business with each client.

Sharon and Joshua are racing to help you with your rental properties!

Residential Rental Specialist, Joshua Furr, has clinched the title once again as being the No. 1 independent leasing broker in Wake County for the seventh consecutive year. Each year, thousands of

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107 Edinburgh South Drive, Suite 100, Cary Sharon Schovain, Broker-In-Charge 919-459-6319 SSchovain@blockrealty.com Joshua Furr 919-606-3461 JFurr@blockrealty.com


AUTUMN & AVERY WE KNOW STYLE. Style is a fun reflection of your attitude and personality, and no one understands that better than Autumn & Avery. Autumn & Avery is a premier clothing boutique that takes pride in working with their customers to understand and develop their individual style. They enjoy working closely with their customers to help select pieces that will best comlement who they are. Autumn has traveled extensively to partner with designers across the country in order to create a unique store with a wide range of apparel, jewelry, handbags and shoes that will fit any woman’s signature statement style.

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The store has a beautiful industrial glam and modern design combination that further guarantees an inviting and exceptional personal shopping experience.

1157 Parkside Main Street, Cary 919-694-5410 autumnandavery.com autumn@autumnandavery.com


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WESTERN WAKE

HENDRICK CARY AUTOMALL WE KNOW PERFORMANCE. Hendrick Cary Auto Mall has a history of understanding performance. From Corvettes and Camaros to Dodge’s lineup of modern day muscle cars, our dealerships not only have a terrific inventory of enthusiast cars, but we also share a passion with our customers for them as well. But for us, performance also means caring about our teammates, caring about our people and caring about our community. As a

family-owned business, Hendrick Automotive Group focuses on the core values, and by working together, committing to continuous improvement and doing it all with integrity, we will perform for our customers as well. It is what sets our dealerships and our company apart from others.

caryautomall.com


DANIEL’S RESTAURANT & CATERING WE KNOW WHAT MAKES PEOPLE HAPPY. Daniel’s has been THE place to go for NY-style Italian “comfort” food for over twenty years. From freshly sautéed dishes featuring our long-simmered marinara sauce, lemony Piccata or Franchaise sauce, or rich decadent cream sauces, to hand-stretched pizza baked on a real stone, to made-in-house desserts, there is something for everyone.

host your special event for family, friends or business. Need an event catered off-premise? We do that, too!

We offer a wine list boasting over 900 selections (discounted on Wine Wednesdays), local craft beers and a full bar. Our Atrium Room is the perfect place to

1430 W. Williams Street, Apex 919-303-1006 danielsapex.com

Daniel’s offers our full menu available for takeout with many dishes available in large-sized trays to feed a crowd. Reservations are accepted.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


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CHATHAM WALK WE KNOW URBAN LIVING. Building on the revitalization underway in Downtown Cary, Jordan Gussenhoven with Chatham Street Commercial is pleased to announce their latest project, Chatham Walk, with a focus on urban living.

downtown living at its best – step out your front door and walk to an array of shops, a diverse blend of eateries, breweries, bakeries, parks and entertainment venues.

Chatham Walk is a boutique condominium collection that will feature 33 new condo residences with three distinct homes to suit your lifestyle. A first-of-its-kind offering in Downtown Cary, Chatham Walk will embody true urban living.

Located at the corner of Chatham Street and Urban Drive, Urban Living has arrived in Downtown Cary.

Featuring thoughtful design, refined finishes and amenities to suit your lifestyle; Chatham Walk will provide residents with the sought after lock-and-leave, 1-level, urban living all within the thriving Downtown Cary community. This is

Schedule your Appointment at our Sales Center: 215 E. Chatham Street, Suite 115, Cary 919-926-5527 ChathamWalk.com

Priced from the $320s-$450s. Sales and Marketing by Fonville Morisey Barefoot.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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WAKE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM WE KNOW EVERYONE LEARNS DIFFERENTLY Wake County magnet schools create well-rounded students by challenging them with programs tailored to their strengths and exposing them to new experiences. Innovative and pioneering programs challenge students to think creatively and analytically to solve problems, while diverse student body populations enable students to learn and see things from a different perspective. Wake County magnet schools provide students the tools they need to see things differently. Magnet schools enhance academic standards with innovative approaches to learning that maximize

54 APRIL 2018

student potential. Students at magnet schools are challenged with programming that exposes them to new experiences. And the diversity of the schools enable students to learn and see things from different perspectives. Magnets open doors of opportunity and spark the imagination of students, preparing them to become responsible citizens in a global society.

WCPSS Office of Magnet & Curriculum Enhancement Programs 5625 Dillard Dr., Cary, N.C. 27518 919.533.7289 www.wcpss.net/magnet

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY WE KNOW SUMMER CONCERT FUN. Each summer, the North Carolina Symphony brings its sweet sounds outdoors to Koka Booth Amphitheatre. The Symphony’s casual Summerfest series — presented by UNC REX Healthcare and hosted by the Town of Cary — creates special memories, as family and friends spread out blankets, lawn chairs, and picnics, and enjoy music under the stars in the picturesque setting. This summer, settle in next to the pines and Symphony Lake for 11 unique shows — including breathtaking classical masterworks, Rodgers and Hammerstein show tunes, Grammy Award-winning gospel sensation Blind Boys of Alabama, the greatest

hits of Tom Petty, jazz from Glenn Miller to Gershwin, family fun with favorite superhero themes and much more. Plus, the Summerfest experience goes beyond the music, with activities like Picnic of the Week contests and Instrument Zoos for the kids. For the best deal, purchase a pack of Lawn Flex Passes to use in any combination at Summerfest shows. (Kids under 12 are always admitted free on the lawn!)

Tickets and Information: 919.733.2750 ncsymphony.org

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DUCK DONUTS WE KNOW MADE-TO-ORDER. Donuts are a classic treat, a great equalizer, an affordable luxury. Can a donut really be all things to all people? Duck Donuts thinks so.

Busy morning? Duck Donuts has you covered. Be the office hero, and pre-order mouth-watering donuts by the dozen, platters of donut holes, and coffee for a crowd. We’ll have it ready for you! Party planning? Duck Donuts makes entertaining easy with flavor combinations to please every palate. From simple (cinnamon sugar) to sophisticated (key lime icing with raspberry drizzle & coconut, anyone?) to downright sassy (maple icing with

bacon pieces), Duck Donuts sets the stage for memorable meals and events.

Need Family Fun? Duck Donuts delivers the simple pleasure of watching your donuts from batter to box, hand-dipped and topped right in front of you. There’s even a step and viewing window to help our youngest fans take in the process. Smiles guaranteed!

Cary - 100 Wrenn Drive Durham - 5320 McFarland Road, Suite 140 Raleigh - 8323 Creedmoor Road duckdonuts.com


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STANLEY DENTISTRY WE KNOW SMILES. In the early ‘90s, new dental school graduate Dr. Bobbi Stanley, and her husband Robert Stanley, made the decision to open her dental practice in the heart of a fast-growing Cary. As a family dentist, she was able to help people with preventative care, orthodontics and cosmetic dentistry. Just when she thought life could not be better, her husband left his successful engineering career to go to dental school and join the family business. Fast forward to 2018 — and you have one of the largest comprehensive dental practices in North

Carolina. Dr. Bobbi Stanley continues to focus on family, cosmetic and restorative dentistry, as well as orthodontics. Dr. Robert Stanley relies on his background in engineering and renowned dental acumen to provide teeth in a day with guided dental implants, as well as offering oral surgery with a nurse anesthetist on staff. Ready to Find Your Smile? Don’t wait, call us today!

3731 N.W. Cary Parkway, Suite 201, Cary 919-415-0042 stanleysmiles.com


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GLENAIRE WE KNOW VIBRANT, RETIREMENT LIVING. Located in the heart of Cary, Glenaire is a nonprofit, nationally accredited continuing care retirement community. Glenaire’s location is optimal, and its reputation for excellence is unparalleled. Glenaire offers an enriched, vibrant lifestyle today with a solid plan for tomorrow. Glenaire’s personalized wellness program encourages residents to find better health in eight dimensions of wellness: physical, social, intellectual, spiritual, nutritional, environmental, safety and community outreach. This program focuses on

the whole person and provides opportunities that benefit the individual’s health and the community environment. Residents experience a culture of wellness in which everyone is encouraged to discover and enjoy his or her optimum level of health. It’s more than just fitness—wellness affects your mind, body and spirit. Stay involved…stay in control…stay motivated!

Glenaire Retirement Community 4000 Glenaire Circle, Cary 919-460-8095 glenaire.org


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WESTERN WAKE

WHISK WE KNOW HOW TO SPICE THINGS UP. Located in Cary and dreamed up by Dan and Diana Saklad, Whisk is a unique, locally owned store where you can find everything for the cook. And we are proud to have been honored as the USA’s Kitchenware Retailer of the Year! We love to cook, experiment, and play in the kitchen. Whether it is a party, a gathering with family and friends, or a simple family dinner, we have always found the kitchen to be the center of action in the house. Spending as much time as we do in the kitchen, we’ve come to understand how great kitchen gadgets,

gourmet ingredients, and cookware can really transform your entire cooking experience. We created Whisk as a place for you to feel that same enjoyment by introducing you to great kitchenware products, and enhancing your culinary knowledge and proficiency through our cooking classes!

Waverly Place Shopping Center 316 Colonades Way, Suite 214, Cary 919-322-2458 whiskcarolina.com


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WESTERN WAKE

ASHWORTH DRUGS WE KNOW TRADITION. For over 60 years, Ashworth Drugs has stood on the corner in downtown Cary, welcoming locals and newcomers alike. Pharmacists Cori Strickland and Paul Ashworth are committed to ensuring your visit to our pharmacy begins with a friendly greeting and prompt, attentive service.

In this fast-paced, ever-changing world we live in, it’s comforting to know some things remain the same.

Whether you are enjoying lunch from our Old-Fashioned Soda Fountain, or filling your prescriptions, you can trust us to deliver the same level of care you’ve relied on for generations.

105 West Chatham St., Cary 919-467-1877 ashworthdrugs.com

At Ashworth Drugs, Main Street Values are our way of doing business.


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WESTERN WAKE

THE CARY THEATER WE KNOW FILM. The Cary Theater staff is hard at work preparing to launch BEYOND: The Film Festival, a four-day cinematic experience to be held downtown this June. The festival is attracting filmmakers from across the country to showcase their works in screenplay and short film competitions that embody this year’s “hometown stories” theme. The community is invited to participate in a weekend of enjoyable cinema fun. Expect some unusually curious cinematic interpretations of that theme!

BEYOND takes place at The Cary, a beacon for our increasingly vibrant downtown. The Cary is committed to offering a unique setting to experience affordable art house cinema and live performances. Consider it your hometown destination for our very own film festival this June, plus a weekly entertainment schedule that’s far beyond ordinary.

122 East Chatham Street, Cary 919-462-2051 thecarytheater.com


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MELLOW MUSHROOM WE KNOW FAMILY NIGHT. It’s hard to believe we have been open for almost seven years. We are proud to be a part of Cary’s thriving community. We strive to integrate the classic with the innovative by offering an array of fresh pizzas, calzones, hoagies, salads and appetizers. Both vegetarian and vegan options along with gluten-free crust are also available. We feel very strongly that everyone deserves great pizza! At Mellow Mushroom, high quality and fresh and unique ingredients turn traditional pizza making into a modern work of art.

Join us for weekly trivia night on Wednesdays. We are open seven days a week; open Monday through Thursday 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., and Sunday 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. For more information on Mellow Mushroom Cary, visit mellowmushroom.com and follow us on Facebook. We also cater any event you can dream up.

4300 N.W. Cary Parkway, Cary 919-463-7779 mellowmushroom.com


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WESTERN WAKE

PRESTONWOOD COUNTRY CLUB WE KNOW THE PERFECT PACE OF LIFE. Prestonwood Country Club provides a picturesque atmosphere to escape the hustle and bustle of everyday life and create memories with those who matter most. Finding time to relax with family and friends is vital to experiencing a full life, and nearly 1,800 Triangle area families choose Prestonwood as their venue to do just that.

a scenic lunch with friends on the veranda, spend a beautiful summer day poolside with the kids, or play a round of golf with your buddies on one of three championship golf courses.

The Club’s outstanding recreational amenities coupled with truly personalized service offers the perfect setting for each member of the family to unwind. Enjoy

300 Prestonwood Parkway, Cary 919-467-2566 prestonwood.com

No matter how busy life gets, you can always find a relaxed pace at Prestonwood.

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PRESTON FLOWERS WE KNOW HOW TO SAY I LOVE YOU. We began this year under new ownership and are excited to serve you. Preston Flowers is passionate about flowers and the joy they bring to others. We offer a variety of fresh flowers and unique designs for special occasions or no occasion at all. A beautiful, fresh bouquet delivered to your loved one is just a call or click away. Preston Flowers can also help with all your wedding, special events and prom needs as well. 64 APRIL 2018

Not only a florist, but also a gift shop, offering items such as handmade soaps, hand-carved items, Silver Forest earrings and Willow Tree collectibles. We have a variety of potted houseplants and dish gardens, as well as silk wreaths and arrangements for your home. We invite you to visit us at the corner of Davis Drive and High House Road.

1848 Boulderstone Way, Cary 919-460-4625 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


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PRIMROSE WE KNOW EDUCATION. About Primrose® and Balanced Learning® At Primrose, we believe who children become is as important as what they know. That’s why our exclusive Balanced Learning approach emphasizes character development and life skills in addition to nurturing children’s intellectual, creative and physical development.

teachers gives every child the opportunity to reach his full learning potential.

Balanced Learning is created from the best early education wisdom to ensure we offer the highest quality early education and care possible. Meaningful daily classroom experiences weave learning and fun together for children, and a balance of purposeful play and nurturing guidance from

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Primrose Schools is a national family of dedicated professionals serving children, families and communities in our premier accredited early education and care schools.

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FAMOUS TOASTERY OF CARY WE KNOW BRUNCH. When you walk through the front doors of Famous Toastery of Cary, there are several things that you will notice: a stone patio with a fountain running, glass windows letting the light shine into a cozy welcoming space, filled with staff reminding you that every server is your server. So what does “every server is your server” mean? The answer may surprise you. It means every one of our staff, whether they are taking your order, bringing you food, checking on your table, or even just

passing by, is part of a team that wants to make your experience the best you’ve ever had. All of us here at Famous Toastery want to give you the best start to your day that we can, with fresh, quality food and a warm, welcoming atmosphere. Come meet our team, and learn why Toast is Famous!

316 Colonades Way, Suite 201, Cary 919-655-1971 famoustoastery.com/location/cary-nc/

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CARY MAGAZINE

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KOKA BOOTH AMPHITHEATRE WE KNOW ENTERTAINMENT. The folks at Cary’s Booth Amphitheatre may not make a great band themselves, but they know how to host legendary acts such as Paul Simon, Willie Nelson, Gregg Allman and of course, the North Carolina Symphony! In addition to the concert calendar, the venue nestled between a lovely four-acre wooded park and Symphony Lake is the home to a variety of cultural and

food festivals, movies and more. No wonder the Koka Booth Amphitheatre has been voted Best Music Venue by Cary Magazine for five years!

8003 Regency Parkway, Cary 919-462-2025 • 800-514-3849 boothamphitheatre.com

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FIVE GUYS WE KNOW FRESHNESS. Five Guys opened its first Cary location in 2007, and thousands of guests have been enjoying our burgers and fries throughout the Triangle ever since. The Five Guys concept was created in the late ’80s with one simple idea in mind: Become “the place” to get a fresh, juicy burger with all the toppings you could stuff between fresh-baked buns. Then and today, we serve only hand-formed burgers cooked to perfection on a grill along with fresh-cut fries cooked in pure peanut oil. Our food is fresh (there are no freezers in any Five

Guys), and our customers appreciate the homemade quality to it. With over 15 different toppings and sauces, there are 250,000+ ways for each guest to customize their burger! And, at many of our locations, you can customize a Five Guys milkshake the same way, with 11 different flavors and mix-ins. This is the reason why Five Guys has been honored with the Cary Magazine Maggy Award for “Best Burger and Fries” for 10 consecutive years!

fiveguys.com

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CARY FAMILY DENTAL WE KNOW HOW TO CHANGE LIVES. Cary Family Dental believes in the power of dentistry to change lives. Through its commitment to expertise, empathy and customized care, Cary Family Dental strives to restore the patient’s trust in the dentist and confidence in their smile. Dr. Allan Acton and his team have dedicated themselves to providing patients with comprehensive dental solutions, including cosmetic dentistry, dental implants, IV sedation, next-day dentures and more. Its mission is to provide state of the art dentistry

and excellent customer service in a way that makes coming to the dentist enjoyable. With its long-standing reputation of compassion in the community, Cary Family Dental continues to allow even the most anxious patients to begin to trust the dentist again.

1149 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary Second location coming soon! 919-336-5074 | carydental.com


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WESTERN WAKE

TOWN & COUNTRY VET. HOSPITAL WE KNOW THEY’RE FAMILY. Dr. Nick Ashford established Town and Country Veterinary Hospital in 1995 with a vision of providing affordable, high quality veterinary care to the Cary, Apex and Holly Springs area. He also wanted to separate out the boarding and grooming aspect of a veterinary hospital, so he and his staff could focus on pet health care. Therefore, Town and Country Animal Care Center, which provides boarding, grooming, training and doggy daycare, is located right next door to Town and Country Veterinary Hospital. Town and Country Veterinary Hospital is now owned by Drs. Nick Ashford and Amanda Groulx who

continue to strive to provide high quality veterinary medicine in a warm family-like atmosphere. Our comprehensive veterinary services include preventative care, internal medicine, radiology, dentistry and surgery. At Town and Country Veterinary Hospital our mission is to celebrate the human-animal bond through competent and compassionate animal health care. We care!

2010 N. Salem St., Apex (919) 363-6363 tcanimalcare.com

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For over 450 families, We’ve Helped Make home possible. Habitat for Humanity is a registered trademark of Habitat for Humanity International, Inc. Ply Gem, the Ply Gem logo and Home For Good are trademarks of Ply Gem Industries, Inc.

As the trusted leader in home exterior building solutions, Ply Gem creates products that make homes beautiful. From windows and siding to shingles and shutters, we have something for every style and budget. And we believe everyone deserves a place they love to call home.

We’ve teamed up with country music’s biggest stars and Habitat for Humanity® to help build over 450 homes in 70 communities with families in need of affordable housing. This year, Brett Young, Triple Platinum Artist, is joining us to revitalize neighborhoods here in the Triangle.

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At Lial Miller’s art class at West Cary Middle School, an assignment to paint a landscape includes lessons on perspective and design. “I teach a lot of principles and elements of art, composition,” he says. “What are you putting into your artwork? Why are you putting that there? What are you looking at? What is the science behind it?”

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Creative classes engage students, making learning easier and more fun WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

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W TOP: Outside his classroom, Lial Miller displays self-portraits painted by his former students at West Cary Middle School. Miller came to the school two and a half years ago to restart the visual arts program, which had been shelved for five years. ABOVE: Nikhita Kasireddy, left, and Kiki Bhattarai, both 13, chat as they work on their watercolor landscapes during Miller’s art class. Studies show that arts education helps students collaborate, receive and offer constructive criticism, and listen actively to others’ ideas.

ith so much attention given to STEM subjects these days, it might be easy to overlook the impact of arts education. But the value of the arts lies beyond learning to carry a tune or draw a straight line. In its Strategic Plan: Vision 2020, Wake County Public Schools lays out its mission to graduate students who can collaborate, be creative, communicate and think critically — the four C’s. “Those four important components happen every day in the art room,” said MarySwan Marshallsea, a visual arts educator at Pleasant Grove Elementary in Morrisville. “Allowing students to take creative risks and to be able to problem-solve — that starts at such an early age,” she said. “It gives them a sense of innovation, how to invent, how to create — all those things that are important for our next generation.” Teamwork and geography

A recent project demanded Marshal74

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sea’s third-graders use all four C’s with some geography thrown in. Each of seven groups researched a world city — New York City, Washington, Paris, Sydney, Stockholm, Mexico City and Nairobi, Kenya — and made large mixed-media landscapes. The Australia group, for example, did a huge picture of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. “It was fantastic,” she said. “The children loved it. They collaborated; they had to talk about the different ideas. Some of the children had to take the lead, whereas some of the group had to take a back seat.” In her classes, it is common for Marshallsea, who has taught art for more than 30 years, to incorporate lessons in language arts, reading, science and mathematics. Studies show this integration of art with other subjects helps engage students and enables them to retain information. Freddie Lee Heath, the senior administrator for arts education with Wake County Public Schools, says the best teaching environment is when all educators are working


“If you’ve got children who are academically very strong, and you’ve got children who are struggling, many times the arts can be a level playing field, because everyone goes in at the same place.” — Freddie Lee Heath, Wake County Public Schools together — helping students connect with the curriculum. “Arts should be a part of every subject,” he said. Better outcomes for all students

Heath also stresses that art and arts-integrated classes can better engage at-risk students. “The arts and the electives are one of the best ways for children who feel disenfranchised from the school day to feel like they are part of the school community,” he said. “If there’s a student who is not doing well in any of their classes, …when they get into the arts, physical education or some of the electives, it’s a chance for them to feel successful in the school day.” Lial Miller, a visual arts teacher at West Cary Middle School, agrees that art can be a level playing field. He also says the way it is taught encourages participation, work and perseverance. “I teach that there is no wrong answer in art, other than not trying. I don’t care if you are my best or worst artist as long as you are giving me an honest attempt,” he said. “As long as you’re working hard, I will not give you bad grades.”

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Lial Miller gives Jacob Zuncich, 14, a few tips on how he can make his black mountains stand out from each other. “There are so many different media and styles, that everybody can find something they enjoy and are good at,” says Miller.

Why art? Boosts literacy and English language skills: When art is combined with reading lessons, all students benefit, especially English-language learners and low-income students. Advances math achievement: Students who study music consistently score better on math assessments than their non-arts peers. Engages and motivates students to learn: Students who struggle academically are more likely to participate in the arts and artsintegrated classes. Develops critical thinking: Arts education develops students’ critical thinking skills — including skills for comparing, hypothesizing, critiquing and exploring alternative viewpoints. Source: Arts Education Partnership, 2013

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continued from page 75

One of Miller’s students has moved around a lot and frequently misses school. The young man says he likes drawing and painting, because “art gets my mind off stuff.” “If you look at his work, it’s more work than he’s done in a lot of his other classes,” Miller said of this student. “It’s cool what he’s doing for me, but really he’s doing it for himself. He just doesn’t know it.” Beyond the classroom

Hard work and participation are key to success in Miller’s classes, but he encourages his students to think outside the classroom. Several of his students have earned recognition in statewide arts competitions. And as a way to connect his lessons to real-world challenges, Miller looks for opportunities to partner with local businesses. “Last year, I just happened to be eating lunch at Ashworth’s Pharmacy, and the walls were kind of bare. I said to the owner, ‘Do


Alexis Cope, 14, draws an alien world with a purple sky populated by girls with wings. “Art is one of my biggest passions,” she says. “It’s really cool to be in art class, because at my elementary school we didn’t have one.”

“I don’t want everybody’s artwork to look alike, and I want them to be happy with their choices. … If you have a choice in the matter, you’re going to pour more heart and soul into it.” — Lial Miller, West Cary Middle you want some student work to display?’ ” Paul Ashworth had a better idea. It was the pharmacy’s 60th anniversary, and he asked Miller if the students could design T-shirts for the occasion. Out of dozens of submitted designs, two were chosen for the shirts, earning cash prizes for the artists. A third student was paid $40 for the winning slogan, “Serving Smiles for 60 Years.” “I was tickled that Mr. Ashworth would get involved with the students,” said Miller. “The next thing you know, he’s paying them big money for a T-shirt design.” West Cary students also designed holiday cards for S&A Communications, a division of S&A Cherokee, which also owns Cary Magazine. “Getting involved with our community is a great way for our school to show how hard these students work,” said Miller. These partnerships, he says, are also a way to remind the public that a vibrant arts education program can be valuable for the community as a whole — not just students.

Focus on the arts

These reminders are important, agrees Marshallsea, especially for those who might see arts as non-essential. Last year, many N.C. schools proposed cutting arts, music and physical education programs to pay for the classroom teachers needed to comply with a state directive to reduce class sizes in kindergarten through third grade. The change was to go into effect for the 2018–19 school year, but in February, the General Assembly voted to delay the class-size reduction until 2021–22. An additional $61.4 million a year was also set aside to pay for arts and P.E. teachers. “Even though for now we feel OK regarding arts in schools, we still need to focus on it,” said Marshallsea. “We shouldn’t overlook the wonderful things we have in Wake County, particularly in art, music, dance and drama. All those things help our children learn, grow and be the best that they can be.” t

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Pet Parade YOUR AWW-SOME ANIMALS ARE PICTURE PERFECT COMPILED BY AMBER KEISTER

“WHAT MAKES YOUR PET GREAT?” We asked that simple question, and your overwhelming answer was just as simple — because they give so much love and joy. They may beg for a treat or two, but that’s a small price to pay for good-morning kisses, romps in the mountains, walks in the park or cuddles on the couch. Our days were brightened by the adorable photos and stories you shared. Now it’s our turn to spread the love!

Milo, age 4 Milo, our British golden retriever, is a hero! He is one of 3,000 goldens enrolled in the Morris Animal Foundation “Golden Retriever Lifetime Study” — the largest, most comprehensive canine health study in the United States. The study’s purpose is to identify the nutritional, environmental, lifestyle and genetic risk factors for cancer and other diseases in dogs. — Becky and Mike Pezzoni, Wake County

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Pippi, age 5

Bailey, age 3 Large pointed ears, almond eyes and a fishhook tail — these details describe the outer beauty of my rescue, a Carolina dog named Bailey. While his big ears might be the first thing you notice, you’ll quickly see his heart is so much bigger. We are often approached by strangers on

My guinea pig, Pippi is the best companion. When I get home from work she immediately starts squeaking to say, “Hi.” I am a teacher, and she regularly tries to eat my students' lab reports. They laugh when they get a paper back with little chew marks. — Katie Bradshaw, Cary

the trail behind Park West Village, with comments like, “I’ve heard about Bailey — he’s like the canine mayor of Morrisville!” — Larisa and Jordan Bar, Morrisville

Reuben, age 5 What makes Reuben so special is how smart, loving and expressive he is. Reuben was a wonderful therapy dog for my dad when he was living with us in his final months. Reuben's companionship brought him joy every day. He certainly brings us joy. He loves riding with us in my husband's convertible, and he makes sure I get my exercise every day! — Pam and Jay Diamond, Cary 80

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Bailey, age 3 Pixie is a retired racing greyhound. I adopted her through Greyhound Friends of North Carolina in Oak Ridge, N.C. She is a perky, playful girl who has brought "greyt" joy to my life. — Kris Murgas, Apex


Sevie

Django, age 3

Sevie is a rescue pup that we adopted when he was 10 weeks old. He is named Sevie because he is the seventh child in a family of six kids. He loves to sneak under the covers and sleep in bed with us with his tail sticking out. He will lay down and roll over for a belly scratch as soon as he hears the word “down,” and he loves to give lots of kisses. — The Kenney Family: Lindsey, Brian, Maddy, Max, Jack, Callie, Faye and Decker, Holly Springs

Our lives changed for the better when our French bulldog

Daisy

entered our family three years ago. Even though he has a love-

Daisy is the tiniest Abyssinian/tabby mix, but thinks she is a dog. She is always carrying around a pipe cleaner, hoping I will stop and play fetch. She is happiest in my lap and will never let me go to sleep without a good snuggle session. Her motto is, “If I fits, I sits — in someone’s lap.”

hate relationship with his Frenchie sister, Zoe, he has been a joy to have in our family. Our 2-yearold daughter loves to throw the ball for him. He is the happiest when he is snuggling up close to someone or playing outside. — Ryan and Natasha Zellar, Cary

— Mary Calliham, Raleigh

Buddy, age 7 What makes Buddy great? It’s the way we start each morning once I get him out of bed. He loves to snuggle so it can take a while, but then you get the look from those brown eyes and all you can do is smile. The joy he brings into our lives on a daily basis cannot be measured with words; it’s all about the moments. It’s his reaction from getting a new toy or his long stare when asking for his evening treat. Buddy is beyond great for so many reasons, most of all, because of the love and happiness he brings into our lives. — Giselle Rojas and James Dalfino, Fuquay-Varina CARY MAGAZINE 81


SPCAwake.org/furball All proceeds beneďŹ t animals through the SPCA of Wake County.

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Dylan & Sadie, age 12

What makes Cinnamon Aero your pet great? and Winnie They are Border Moonpie, age 6 Collies — ‘nuff said. They are the greatest athletes ever, able to jump over a car to catch a Frisbee. They are also obedient and smart. I need to buy sheep, but they are against the HOA ordinances. — Matt and Chris Young, Cary

“The Girls” are not only sweet, loving, beautiful, and highly intelligent, but they are also social butterflies! As original co-founders of the Triangle Westie Clan, you will likely see them around the Triangle at local bars, restaurants, dog-friendly establishments or on Instagram @Dylan_Sadie_Westies. The one trait that cannot be denied is their endearing “Westietude” — a sassy, tenacious, fiercely loyal attitude that makes it clear who really rules the roost. — Kim Harvey and

Juli Monette, Cary Milo is the morale booster at Aware Senior Care’s offices in Cary. The caregiving business can be stressful, but his warm smile, wagging tail and soft brindle fur are always ready to help clients, visitors and employees feel better. Whenever emergency vehicles from Western Wake go by with their sirens on, he tries to imitate them with a low howl. This has earned him the nickname “Miloooooooooo” by the staff. He even has his own name tag! — Kyle Murray, Raleigh

Milo, age 4

Fozzy is Fozzy, age 5 curious about everything! He’s also very much a lap dog. If there is a lap to be found, he is in it, until something outside gets his attention and he runs out the doggy door to protect us. What a wonderful addition to our family. We were the lucky ones when we found him at Second Chance Pet Adoptions in 2016. — Julie and Rich Powsner, Cary

Miss Emily Duck, 9 months Miss Emily Duck is very brave and sweet. She survived a horrible hail storm we had here in Fuquay. After the storm she waddled out of the yard and joined our neighbors who were talking about the storm and started quacking as if to join in the conversation. — Barbara Luther,

Fuquay-Varina

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Yogi Bear, age 1 Yogi Bear the Newfoundland has never met a stranger. When you meet Yogi it’s like hugging your favorite teddy bear — only this bear barks and licks the people he loves! His favorite sport is football; he will take a football and run outside with it! His favorite treats are raw carrots and peanut butter. He makes a scene wherever he goes with his handsome

Riley was rescued from a shelter when he was surrendered by his previous owners at 2 and a half years old. We saw Riley looking sad in his kennel, and when we took him out to play, it was love at first sight. Riley loves giving kisses in the morning and greeting the mail lady, UPS man and the children as they come off the school bus. He came to us a little broken and scared, but he has been the best, most loyal dog we've ever had. Riley has truly changed our lives. — Emmy and Ben Meredith, Apex

stature and lovable spirit! — The Woodall family:

Kevin, Casey, Tyler, Grace and Noah, Cary

Kaylee, 8 mo. Kaylee was abandoned as a puppy and hit by a car. She has a plate in her pelvis and wire in her legs. Pawfect Match Rescue and Rehabilitation cared for her after her accident and coordinated her care. She was restricted to thirty steps a day for two months during recovery. She was given the all-clear three days before Christmas and came home with us that day. Happily, she has now fully recovered. — Karen and Gary Wrayno, Cary

Butter Cup, age 5

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Riley, age 12

Butter Cup, a boxer/Old English bulldog mix, is a rescue dog and loves me so much — almost as much as I love her. The first thing she did when I got her was dig in one of my large houseplants. I caught her in the act, and told her, “No!” She looked at me, turned right back around and kept on digging. There was dirt flying everywhere, and I could barely keep myself from laughing. She is the biggest ham ever, always making me smile and laugh — no matter what kind of day I am having. — Trish Davis, Angier


Oreo Cookie, age 8 My cat, Oreo Cookie, is such a beautiful boy. At night he will sleep right up next to me. If I have my hand there palm side up, he will place his head in it and kiss my hand. Oreo and the other cats go for walks in the woods with me. This shot was taken at Jordan Lake. — Jeanne Scott Luke is a gentle bull-in-a-china-shop that loves to cuddle. He is half pit bull-half boxer, and many people are scared of him by the way he looks. He is the kindest, sweetest pup you’ll ever meet. Hopefully those who meet dogs that look like Luke can start to believe not all pits are dangerous. You can tell by his teeth (the few he has) and his anxious nature, that he had a hard time before being adopted. Anyone can see how much he loves being loved by his new family. — Nicole Benham, Cary

Curtis Ray, age 5

Luke

Cosmo, age 9 Cosmo is a great dog for the love and support he gives our family. We rescued Cosmo from the SPCA of Wake County when he was a year old. He has so much energy all the time and loves to eat dog treats! He loves to be a "burrito," with a blanket wrapped around him. Although he may act like a tough dog with all his barks, he is such a sweetheart. — Lara Crochik, Cary

Five years ago, I found my forever home with that lady human, after meeting her at the treat place (Petco). I’m a pretty curious guy, and if you’ve ever seen me out, you know I’m friendly. When people first see me, they are intimidated by my big head, but then I swoon them with my pretty eyes. I like short walks, long naps and field trips, and I will do anything for food. — Marilu McQuilkin, Raleigh

CARY MAGAZINE 85


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Soft Skills

Pearl, a Great Pyrenees owned by Melinda Corn, visits seniors at The Glade Adult Day Center in Cary. “She just loves it, and to see the people’s eyes light up, it’s just wonderful,” says Corn of her therapy dog.

WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

PEARL, A 93-POUND Great Pyrenees, and her handler Melinda Corn stroll into the semicircle of eager seniors at the Glade Adult Day Center at Glenaire. Reaching hands stroke Pearl’s fluffy white head and back, and joyful chatter blossoms as the therapy dog visits each person in turn. “Isn’t she pretty?” “You can come whenever you want. Can she stay all day?” “This is better than medicine!” Mary Arthur, director of the Glade Center, says the seniors enjoy when the therapy dogs visit, and she sees clear benefits. “A lot of them don’t have pets at home. They’ve had pets all their life, and this is something that allows them to be around an animal,” she said. “It brings them so much joy when they see that dog come in here. It offers them a sense of calm, too. When they pet that soft fur, I see an instant smile on their faces.” Studies show that interacting with a friendly pet can lower blood pressure, calm anxiety, alleviate pain, reduce stress and improve a person’s mood. Animals are also a conduit for conversation.

Qualities of a good therapy dog • Calm, non-reactive • Tolerant of voices • Doesn’t mind being handled, petted and tugged on • Confident enough to go into unfamiliar places • People-oriented, able to make eye contact • Able to learn and obey commands • Willing to do the work • Have a caring, attentive handler who knows the dog well

continued on page 89 CARY MAGAZINE 87


“The dog makes them feel good and brightens their day. I wish have different participants who come each day.”

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she could come every day, because we Mary Arthur, Director of the Glade Center

contributed photo

Melinda Corn found her two dogs, Moose and Pearl, through Carolina Great Pyrenees Rescue. Moose, left, has been a therapy dog for about a year, and Pearl has been volunteering with Corn for about a year and a half. continued from page 87

Arthur says the seniors often start talking about pets they have owned in the past, recalling happy memories. “The dog makes them feel good and brightens their day,” said Arthur. “I wish she could come every day, because we have different participants who come each day.” Corn, who works at SAS, brings either Pearl or Moose, her other Great Pyrenees, to the center every other week. The pet therapy volunteer also goes to SarahCare Adult Day Care at Lake Boone Trail twice a month, and on the weekends, she often visits local assisted living centers such as Woodland Terrace or Brookdale in Cary. “With Pearl and Moose, when they go into a nursing home environment, memory care or dementia unit, Pearl gets lots of pets from her admirers, from left, Gaye Taylor, Earlie K., Maxine Pfeilshifter and Connie Joyner. Pfeilshifter, in purple, grew up with dogs but now lives in a small apartment with a caregiver. “This gives her the animal fix that she’s been dying for,” says Mary Arthur, director of The Glade Adult Day Center.

continued on page 91

CARY MAGAZINE 89


“You’ve got to have a dog with the right personality,” says Corn, who has been doing pet therapy since 2009. “The dog has got to be people-oriented, wanting to do the work and be engaged in it. You can’t pick just any dog to do it.”

Specialized training

• To walk on a leash beside the handler, not in front

To enroll in pet therapy training, the dog

• To calmly enter a building

and handler must go through obedience

• How to go around corners: The dog can’t go

training and pass the American Kennel

around corners first, because they could

Club Canine Good Citizen test. To be a

startle or jostle someone coming the other way.

therapy dog, they also learn these skills:

• To obey “leave it:” In a senior setting, medication might be on the floor or within the dog’s reach. The dogs are not allowed to take food or treats from those they visit. • To be at ease with wheelchairs and walkers

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Melinda Corn, left, also regularly visits SarahCare Adult Day Care in Raleigh, Woodland Terrace in Cary and Brookdale in Cary. “These guys just don’t sit still. They like to move around and walk,” she says of her dogs.

continued from page 89

the dogs put their heads up, and you see a little smile from the patients,” said Corn. She also brings her dogs to Citrix, as part of its corporate wellness program, and to N.C. State, where students can pet therapy dogs before finals at the Stressbusters: PetA-Pooch event. Before she became a volunteer, Corn would take the family dog to visit her grandmother, who had Parkinson’s disease. “When we went into the nursing home, the whole place lit up,” she said. Those visits made Corn understand the benefits of pet therapy, and inspired her to go through the training and certification in 2009 with her previous dog. Corn found her current two dogs through Carolina Great Pyrenees Rescue — Pearl about two years ago and Moose, six months later. “Moose is the most loveable dog in the world. He goes up to nursing patients, lays his head and gazes into their eyes. He’s got the soulful eyes,” said Corn. “They’re amazing, these two. “People think they’re these throwaway dogs, and they can do these magical things that we can’t do.” Specialized training

Corn and all of her dogs went through training at Start Them Right, a dog-training

business with classes in Cary and Pittsboro. In addition to obedience classes, partners Sherry Dodson and Laurie Ray offer pet therapy instruction roughly three times a year. “It’s not just obedience; it’s way beyond obedience,” said Dodson, a retired certified nurse practitioner. To be a good therapy team, the owner and dog must be able to work together well, she says. The dog should have a gentle nature and be people-oriented, and the human has to have patience and know their animal well. For the first class, the dog must lay quietly in an unfamiliar conference room. In other classes, the dogs are taken into senior living facilities, so they can get to know wheelchairs, walkers and elevators. The senior setting is a great way for the dogs to learn control, says Dodson. For another class, children are brought in to read to the dogs. For that exercise, dogs need to calmly interact with kids as young as 5. It’s important to not overwhelm the children, especially when they get excited. “They’re exposed to a variety of situations, a variety of people with different issues. Every team has a different personality,” said Ray, who is also a social worker specializing in geriatric care. “We help find the right fit.” At the end of training, pet therapy

“Dogs are just a great way to create a connection and a conversation with somebody you might not otherwise engage with.” — Laurie Ray, pet therapy instructor teams are certified through the Alliance of Therapy Dogs/Therapy Dogs Inc., a national organization. Making connections

Dodson and Ray also founded a local nonprofit to promote pet therapy and to support volunteers — Pets Engaging People/ People Engaging Pets or PEP. In addition to resources for training and certification, the group provides camaraderie and matches volunteers with requests. “Many people who go to other pet therapy classes, once they get that certification, they’re on their own,” said Ray. “People like to join PEP so they know what options are out there. It’s hard to go knocking on doors: ‘Would you like me to bring my dog in?’ There is more to it than that.” PEP volunteers visit retirement communities, schools, hospitals and homeless shelters. They also get calls from people requesting in-home visits for hospice patients. “They’re a support system for us, and often we visit people who are unable to have a dog for whatever reason,” said Ray. “There’s no lack of want. We can’t meet the needs or requests.” “I wish we could,” added Dodson. t Resources Start Them Right, startthemright.com Pets Engaging People-People Engaging Pets, petsengagingpeople.com CARY MAGAZINE 91


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CARY MAGAZINE 93


Corbett Shope, owner of Corbett’s Burgers & Soda Bar, has provided customers with made-to-order burgers, hot dogs and eclectic sodas since 2013. Larkin Staley, left, and daughter Lindsey Shope help him run the place.

WRITTEN BY DAVID MCCREARY

Tough

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Cookies Opening a restaurant means hard work, long hours and a bit of luck

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O

Owning and running a restaurant is not for the faint of heart. It’s financially risky, the hours are long, and it’s just plain hard work. The three entrepreneurs we highlight here are remarkable examples of the driving forces behind the local food-service industry. If you have the privilege of meeting them, consider thanking each one for making Cary’s dining scene so exceptional. PROPRIETOR: Corbett Shope RESTAURANT: Corbett’s Burgers & Soda Bar, Cary

As a former general manager at a popular fried-chicken fastfood restaurant, Corbett Shope stepped out on faith to forge his own path. In 2013, he opened his eponymous eatery that specializes in fresh burgers, hot dogs and eclectic sodas. Why burgers? Shope traveled to Siler City to examine Johnson’s Drive-In, an iconic burger joint. “I figured if the owner could make a living being open a short time each day, surely I could do something similar. Plus, opening my own place allowed me to be closed on Sundays,” he said. Business has increased every year at Corbett’s. Folks continue to discover the charming haven for juicy burgers, crispy waffle fries and more than 240 varieties of bottled sodas. “We have loyal regular customers, but new people come in every day,” said Shope, a Harnett County native who now lives in Apex with his wife and four children. Nestled in the back corner of an older strip shopping center, Corbett’s has survived and thrived thanks largely to positive word of mouth. A 2014 spread in Our State magazine also didn’t hurt. “The first six months we were open was tough, so the Our State piece helped get people talking and online reviews churning,” Shope said. “We’re among the highest-rated burger places in Cary on Trip Advisor, and Google and Yelp have us ranked at four-and-a-half stars [out of five].” Shope added that social media can be a help and hindrance to local restaurants. “I respond to every review,” he said. “If someone makes a negative comment, it gives me the opportunity to either set the record straight or apologize when we make a mistake.” Whenever you go to Corbett’s, you’re likely to find Shope flipping burgers over an open-flame grill. His daughters, Lindsey and Sarah, serve alongside him as managers. “We are committed to getting better each day, and we truly enjoy serving all our customers,” he said. 126 Kilmayne Drive, Cary (919) 466-0055 corbettsburgers.com

At Corbett’s, the meat is ground daily for the dozen burgers on the menu. They often come with homemade condiments including barbecue sauces made with A&W Root Beer or Cheerwine.

Shope stocks more than 240 varieties of bottled soda, including Sun Drop, Cheerwine, NeHi Grape and more than 40 brands of root beer. He also has Coca-Cola and Pepsi for the traditionalists.

continued on page 97 CARY MAGAZINE 95


Dai Nguyen, owner and executive chef at Eighty 8 Asian Bistro, was raised in Durham and learned to cook from his mother. He holds one of his specialty rolls, the Junk in the Trunk, which includes spicy tuna, spicy mayonnaise, avocado and wasabi.

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continued from page 95

PROPRIETOR: Dai Nguyen RESTAURANT: Eighty8 Asian Bistro, Cary

With his laid-back demeanor and warm smile, Dai Nguyen, owner and executive chef of Eighty8 Asian Bistro, recently greeted several guests and invited them to relax and enjoy a unique dining experience. Some visitors may expect to find just another place peddling buy-one-get-one-free sushi. Instead, Eighty8 delivers exotic fusion dishes that showcase Nguyen’s creative flair in the kitchen. Born in Vietnam but raised in Durham, the 39-year-old Nguyen never pursued formal culinary training. His mother taught him to cook. He also watched Food Network and traveled around the United States to explore various cuisines. Initially, Nguyen made a name for himself at Wasabi 88 in Greenville, N.C., an Asian hotspot he owned and operated for nearly 10 years. Life was going well, but then his father’s health declined. Nguyen decided to sell the business and move with his wife and two children to be closer to his parents. During the transition, his father passed away. Following the difficult change, Nguyen opened Eighty8 Asian Bistro as a fresh start to his career. The challenge he now faces involves building a buzzworthy business in a location that has seen other restaurants come and go. “We hope people will give us the opportunity to show them what we have to offer,” said Nguyen. Among the offerings at Eighty8 include first-rate sushi, Wagyu beef burgers, grilled sea bass and coffee-rubbed filet mignon. When you visit, order the ribeye-infused bulgogi eggroll appetizer with shaved ribeye. “We try to be unique,” Nguyen said. “America is a melting pot, so we blend different cultures into our dishes.”

As an Asian fusion restaurant, Eighty 8 has unique items like the Sushi Donut with tuna, salmon, avocado and sesame seeds over sushi rice filled with house guacamole.

“We try to be unique. America is a melting pot, so we blend different cultures into our dishes.” — Dai Nguyen Eighty8 Asian Bistro

Preston Walk 1077 Darrington Drive, Cary (919) 377-0152 eighty8bistro.com continued on page 99

CARY MAGAZINE 97


Tyler Watt, owner of the new Postmaster Restaurant & Bar, wanted to open a restaurant to complement his other downtown Cary business, Pharmacy Bottle + Beverage. The menu is inspired Southern with favorites like fried chicken with black-eyed peas and rice. 98

MAY 2018


“We’re being fun and

continued from page 97

PROPRIETOR: Tyler Watt RESTAURANT: Postmaster Restaurant & Bar, Cary

Make no mistake: Tyler Watt is a mover and shaker in downtown Cary. Three years ago, he opened craft beer and wine hangout Pharmacy Bottle + Beverage. Now he’s added a 50-seat Southern restaurant with a minimalistic atmosphere to his repertoire. Postmaster debuted in December 2017. “People would come into Pharmacy and ask, ‘Where do we go eat?’’’ Watt explained. “There are some great restaurants down here, but I felt like there was a need for something else. I decided to take a gamble.” Location was important to Watt, so when a space just around the corner from his beverage haunt became available, he jumped on it. “We also have parking out front, which is a bonus,” he said. The building is situated near the hotel that Cary founder and former postmaster Frank Page built. Inspired by the location, Watt named his restaurant as an homage. Postmaster serves up locally sourced, seasonal fare. “We touch coastal, Piedmont and the Appalachians,” said Watt, who grew up on the West Coast but attended Leesville Road High School and East Carolina University. He currently resides in Raleigh. From a well-designed open kitchen, shrewd chefs Chris Lopez and David Cain dish out virtuous eats like hominy hushpuppies, pickled root vegetables and crispy fried octopus. The menu changes often, which should please adventurous regulars. “We’re being fun and experimental,” said Watt with a smile. “We’re taking what the seasons give us, and we’re running with it.” Watt has curated the 15-stool bar with approachable vodkas, liquors and wine. And beer? “We only have six handles, but we have refined them to be quality products that pair well with food,” he said. So far people seem exceedingly receptive to Postmaster. It doesn’t hurt that Watt spends the lion’s share of his time there. “I’m here every night,” he said. “Eventually I’d like to move to downtown Cary, so I can ride a bike to work.”

experimental. We’re taking what the seasons give us, and we’re running with it.” — Tyler Watt Postmaster Restaurant & Bar

The Postmaster menu changes frequently, depending on what is seasonally available. For spring, crispy fried octopus is served with a pea salad.

160 E. Cedar St., Suite 100, Cary (919) 378-9493 postmastercary.com CARY MAGAZINE 99


Online 6/1/18

In Print 6/4/18

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In Person 6/14/18 <<

COME MEET THE 2018 HONOREES! Tickets available at

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100 MAY 2018

Presented by


liquid assets WRITTEN BY WHIT BAKER | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Call the Hops by Fortnight Brewing Company FORTNIGHT BREWING COMPANY, established in 2013, is Cary’s oldest brewery. It specializes in the use of English yeast and producing English-style beers. Since the New England IPA is a subcategory of India Pale Ale that is brewed with English yeast, it is no surprise that Fortnight entered the IPA scene with a New England IPA. As it is officially known in the 2018 Brewers Association style guidelines, the Hazy or Juicy IPA is characterized by a low bitterness and fruit flavors like apricot, papaya, passion fruit, orange or grapefruit. The fruit characteristics are due to the juiciness of the hops — not the addition of fruit. These beers are typically best drunk fresh, since the same particles that make the beer hazy and juicy break down the fastest and can cause unwanted flavors. Fortnight’s Hazy IPA is Call the Hops and comes in at 6.5 percent ABV. It features the Mosaic hop, named for its ability to produce a range of flavors from blueberry to pine when used in the brewing process. It also uses Citra, a hop known for its flavor offerings of citrus and stone fruit.

The aroma of the beer is high in bright zest and bitter pith. This is from the combination of hops. So many hops were used that there is a grassy note due to the pungency. The malt and yeast are not as noticeable because of the hops. The appearance of the beer is similar to freshly squeezed orange juice. The head is off-white, and the mix of grains in the beer lets the head stick around for a long time. Even 30 minutes after pouring, the head did not dissipate. The overall flavor of the beer is orange pith, orange peel, and reminiscent of orange juice with a hint of honey in the background. There is definitively a hoppy balance, with the emphasis placed on hop flavor over bitterness. The mouthfeel is low astringency, with medium carbonation to enhance the juicy body, giving a dry finish. Try Call the Hops with food dishes that have some richness and some citrus, such as orange chicken or a chocolate citrus dessert. Until next time, cheers!

Whit Baker is the brewmaster at Bond Brothers Beer Company in Cary. Having completed the Beer Judge Certification Program, he is experienced in evaluating professional and amateur beer in competitions. He is also an Advanced Cicerone, a certification which requires years of study and an expert knowledge of beer. CARY MAGAZINE 101


liquid assets Mint Julep Snow Cones What could make a mint julep even better? Turning them into adult-only snow cones. This recipe may not be traditional, but it’s sure to please at your Kentucky Derby party. And you’ll be proud to say that it’s made with a North Carolina bourbon. 2 cups turbinado sugar 1 cup fresh mint leaves, plus more for garnish 5 cups water 2 cups Doc Porter’s Bourbon 8 mint julep cups, optional but highly recommended Prepare mint simple syrup by boiling sugar, fresh mint leaves and water. Make sure sugar is fully dissolved. Cool to room temperature, and strain into a bowl using a fine mesh strainer. Add bourbon and stir. Divide evenly between two 9-by-13-inch baking pans and cover with plastic wrap. Make sure your freezer has room for these to lay flat, and freeze overnight. In the morning, remove from freezer and let rest for about 10 minutes. Using metal forks, scrape the tops to create the “snow,” making sure to soften any clumps. Scoop the snow into the mint julep cups, and place back in the freezer for a minimum of 30 minutes. To serve, place on tray and add a fresh mint garnish.

102 MAY 2018


Doc Porter’s Bourbon Whiskey WRITTEN BY MELISSA KATRINCIC | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

WHEN WE THINK OF bourbon whiskey, Kentucky distilleries and wellknown brands like Buffalo Trace and Pappy Van Winkle are often top of mind. However, unlike Tennessee whiskey, any distillery in the United States can make bourbon. The federal requirements for bourbon distillation are: • Produced in the United States • Must contain a minimum of 51 percent corn • Aged in new, charred oak containers (barrels) • Distilled to no more than 160 proof (80 percent alcohol by volume) • Entered into the barrel for aging at no more than 125 proof (62.5 percent alcohol by volume) • Bottled at 80 proof or more (40 percent alcohol by volume) As an inherently American spirit and long popular in the South, bourbon is one of the hottest categories of spirits. Many craft distilleries have begun to release their own, including some in North Carolina. So far, bourbon is in the barrel at several distilleries across the state, and several others are planning to make the spirit. One of the most promising N.C. offerings is Doc Porter’s Bourbon Whiskey from Charlotte. Doc Porter’s is a grain-to-glass distillery started by Andrew and Liz Porter. With grains sourced from North Carolina, the distillery is producing vodka, gin, bourbon and rye whiskey. Their bourbon whiskey uses a “high wheat” blend of 60 percent corn, 30 percent wheat and 10 percent malted barley. It is milled, mashed, fermented and distilled on site and aged in new, charred American white oak barrels for a minimum of eight months. The bourbon ages in various-sized barrels — 15, 20 and 25 gallons — which the Porters say “allows for a more intimate interaction with the oak.” The bourbon is a deep, dark amber color, no doubt due to the variety of oak barrels used in the resting process. On the nose, you get notes of toasted marshmallows, vanilla and fresh oak. A hint of fruity sweetness starts the sip, likely because of the higher wheat content, and is followed by caramel with some light spice. The woody notes come through nicely on the palate. The finish is smooth, bringing more lingering oak notes, and fades quickly. It’s a good sipper after dinner and fantastic in cocktails. Melissa Katrincic owns Durham Distillery, the No. 3 Craft Gin Distillery in the U.S. and home of the awardwinning Conniption Gin, with her husband Lee. She is also the former vice president of the Distiller’s Association of North Carolina.

interior and exterior plants gifts and landscape design 266 W. Chatham, Cary, 27511

919.234.0933 www.citygardendesign.com

CARY MAGAZINE 103


Honey-mustard Chops with a cherry sauce

The Triangle’s award-winning destination for cooks, foodies, chefs and gadget lovers.

Ingredients: 4 pork chops, bone-in

the chops with the honey-mustard wet rub until evenly coated. Let sit at room temperature for 30 minutes.

Brine: 6 cups ice water 1/4 cup kosher salt 1/4 cup sugar 1 sprig of rosemary

4. Prepare the cherry sauce. In a saucepan, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the garlic, stir and cook for about 2 minutes until fragrant. Add the wine, rosemary, honey, and cherries. Simmer the sauce for 20-30 minutes or until the wine reduces and the sauce thickens. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Remove the rosemary before serving.

Honey-Mustard Wet Rub: 2 tbsp whole grain, Dijon mustard 2 tbsp honey Sprinkle of kosher salt and pepper Cherry Sauce: 2 cups fresh cherries, pitted 3 tbsp butter 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 sprig of rosemary 1/2 cup red wine 1 tbsp honey Directions: 1. Make the brine by stirring together the ice water, kosher salt, sugar, and rosemary in a large bowl. Add the pork chops, cover and refrigerate 1 hour. 2. Prepare the honey-mustard wet rub by whisking the honey and mustard together. 3. Remove the pork chops from the brine, and pat dry with a paper towel. Sprinkle both sides with fresh ground pepper and a light dusting of kosher salt. Rub

5. Fire up the grill! Sear chops for 3 minutes on each side. Then, turn off one burner (or turn to low) to create a direct/indirect environment. Place the seared chops on the cooler, indirect side, and continue to cook until their internal temperature reaches 145 degrees F. 6. Once the pork chops reach 145 degrees F, place on a clean plate, and cover loosely with a tinfoil "tent" for about 10 minutes to allow the meat to rest. Serve the pork chops with the cherry sauce on top.

316 Colonades Way, Cary, NC | Mon. – Sat. 10 – 6 | Sun. 12 – 5 www.whiskcarolina.com | (919) 322-2458 104

MAY 2018


perfect pairing

Honey-mustard Chops

WRITTEN BY GLEN HAGEDORN | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

2016 Kurtatsch Pinot Bianco Sudtirol-Alto Adige DOC Pork, known for its succulent richness, is traditionally paired with fuller-bodied, flavorful white wines in many parts of the world. One fine example is pinot grigio sourced from the cool climate of Italy’s northern Alto Adige region. This is not your typical mass-produced pinot grigio but a wine with serious heft and typical mouthwatering minerality from grapes grown in dolomite limestone. The interplay of spice and fruit between the sweet-savory pork chop and Kurtatsch’s magnificent pinot grigio will dazzle your senses. $17.99

2016 Fleurs de Prairie Rose Cotes de Provence The 2016 vintage in Provence yielded perfectly balanced grapes due to the year’s generally mild spring and sunny, dry summer. Fleurs de Prairie is French for “wildflowers,” celebrating the beautiful fields of wisteria, lavender, poppy and sunflowers carpeting Provence. The wine’s pale salmon-pink hue belies the intensity of fruit and floral aromas, with juicy red-currant flavors complementing the cherry sauce in the dish nicely. $17.99

2015 Lujon Wine Cellars Pinot Noir Dundee Hills Pinot noir has a characteristic balance of sweet and savory flavors which marry perfectly with pork, and Oregon’s exceptional soils and mild climate produce some of the best pinot noir in the world. Lujon Wine Cellars Dundee Hills Pinot Noir combines black cherry, clove, fragrant rose, cocoa and dried herbs, with a steely acidity that slakes the palate with each sip. Following it up with another delicious bite of this delectably sauced grilled pork will send your senses into the sublime. $24.99

Glenn Hagedorn is a partner at Triangle Wine Company. Before his arrival in North Carolina, he obtained a degree from UC Davis in viticluture and enology and worked the journeyman winemaking circuit in Napa for many vintages. He currently holds a firstdegree certification with The Court of Master Sommeliers. CARY MAGAZINE 105


Dining Guide A SELECTION OF RESTAURANTS, BAKERIES, BISTROS AND CAFÉS

IN CARY, APEX, FUQUAY-VARINA, HOLLY SPRINGS AND MORRISVILLE Advertisers are highlighted in boxes

CARY Abbey Road Tavern & Grill “Great food … outstanding live music.” 1195 W. Chatham St., Cary; (919) 481-4434; abbeyroadnc.com Andia’s Homemade Ice Cream “Premium quality ice cream and sorbet.” 10120 Green Level Church Road #208, Cary; (919) 901-8560; andiasicecream.com Annelore’s German Bakery “Pastries using the finest local ingredients.” 308 W. Chatham Street, Cary (919) 294-8040 facebook.com/AnneloresGermanBakery

Academy Street Bistro “A fresh take on Italian-American cuisine in the heart of Cary.” 200 S. Academy St., Cary; (919) 377-0509; academystreetbistro.com Bellini Fine Italian Cuisine “Everything is made fresh from scratch in our kitchen.” 107 Edinburgh S. Drive, Suite 119, Cary; (919) 552-0303; bellinifineitaliancuisinecary.com

Ashworth Drugs “Quintessential place for freshsqueezed lemonade, old-fashioned milkshakes and hot dogs.” 105 W. Chatham St., Cary; (919) 467-1877; ashworthdrugs.com

ASHWORTH DRUGS 106

MAY 2018

Big Mike’s Brew N Que “Beers on tap to compliment locally sourced, farm-to-table BBQ.” 1222 NW Maynard Road, Cary; (919) 799-2023; brewnquenc.com Bonefish Grill “Fresh is our signature.” 2060 Renaissance Park Place, Cary; (919) 677-1347; bonefishgrill.com

Crosstown Pub & Grill “A straightforward menu covers all the bases.” 140 E. Chatham St., Cary; (919) 650-2853; crosstowndowntown.com

Bosphorus Restaurant “Traditional Turkish and Mediterranean cuisine in an elegant atmosphere.” 329-A N. Harrison Ave., Cary; (919) 460-1300; bosphorus-nc.com Bravo’s Mexican Grill “Extensive menu raises the ante considerably above the typical Tex-Mex.” 208 Grande Heights Drive, Cary (919) 481-3811; bravosmexicangrill.net Brewster’s Pub “Open late, serving a full food and drink menu.” ​ 1885 Lake Pine Drive, Cary (919) 650-1270; brewsterspubcary.com


Dining Guide Brig’s “Breakfast creations, cool salads and hot sandwich platters.” 1225 NW Maynard Road, Cary; (919) 481-9300; 1040 Tryon Village Drive, Suite 604, Cary; (919) 859-2151; brigs.com Chanticleer Café & Bakery “Family-owned restaurant serving up breakfast, lunch and specialty coffees.” 6490 Tryon Road, Cary; (919) 781-4810; chanticleercafe.com Chef’s Palette “Creative flair and originality in every aspect of our service.” 3460 Ten Ten Road, Cary; (919) 267-6011; chefspalette.net CinéBistro “Ultimate dinner-and-a-movie experience.” 525 New Waverly Place, Cary; (919) 987-3500; cinebistro.com/waverly Coffee & Crepes “Freshly prepared sweet and savory crepes.” 315 Crossroads Blvd., Cary; (919) 233-0288; coffeeandcrepes.com Corbett’s Burgers & Soda Bar “Good old-fashioned burgers and bottled soda.” 126 Kilmayne Drive, Cary; (919) 466-0055; corbettsburgers.com Craft Public House “Casual family restaurant.” 1040 Tryon Village Drive, Suite 601, Cary; (919) 851-9173; craftpublichouse.com Crema Coffee Roaster & Bakery “Family-owned and operated.” 1983 High House Road, Cary; (919) 380-1840; cremacoffeebakery.com Danny’s Bar-B-Que “All slow-cooked on an open pit with hickory wood.” 311 Ashville Ave. G, Cary; (919) 851-5541; dannysbarbque.com Doherty’s Irish Pub “Catch the game or listen to live music.” 1979 High House Road, Cary; (919) 388-9930; dohertysirishpubnc.com

The Butcher’s Market “Selling quality steaks and meat with unmatched hospitality.” 1225 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary; (919) 465-3082; thebutchersmarkets.com

Deans Kitchen + Bar “Creative comfort eats.” 1080 Darrington Drive, Cary; (919) 459-5875; deanskitchenandbar.com

Eighty8 Asian Bistro “An exotic twist on Asian cuisine.” 1077 Darrington Drive, Cary; (919) 377-0152; eighty8bistro.com

Hot Point Deli “Highest-quality cuisine at extremely reasonable prices.” 1718 Walnut St., Cary; (919) 460-6299; hotpointcary.com

Enrigo Italian Bistro “Fresh food made from pure ingredients.” 575 New Waverly, Suite 106, Cary; (919) 854-7731; dineenrigo.com

Jimmy V’s Steakhouse & Tavern “Certified Angus Beef … fresh seafood, Italian specialties, homemade desserts.” 107 Edinburgh South, Suite 131, Cary; (919) 380-8210; jimmyvssteakhouse.com

Five Guys Burgers and Fries 1121 Parkside Main St., Cary; (919) 380-0450; fiveguys.com Fresca Café & Gelato “French-styled crepes … gelato made with ingredients directly from Italy.” 302 Colonades Way #109, Cary; (919) 581-8171; frescacafe.com Goodberry’s Frozen Custard 1146 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary; (919) 467-2386 2325 Davis Drive, Cary; (919) 469-3350; goodberrys.com

Kababish Café “A celebration of deliciousness and creativity.” 201 W. Chatham St., Suite 103, Cary; (919) 377-8794; kababishcafe.com La Farm Bakery “Handcrafted daily … only the freshest ingredients.” 4248 NW Cary Parkway, Cary; 220 W. Chatham St., Cary; 5055 Arco Street, Cary; (919) 657-0657; lafarmbakery.com

Great Harvest Bread Co. “Real food that tastes great.” 1220 NW Maynard Road, Cary (919) 460-8158; greatharvestcary.com

Los Tres Magueyes “We prepare our food fresh daily.” 110 SW Maynard Road, Cary; (919) 460-8757; lostresmagueyes.com

Herons “The signature restaurant of The Umstead Hotel and Spa.” 100 Woodland Pond Drive, Cary; (919) 447-4200; theumstead.com/dining/restaurants-raleigh-nc

Lucky 32 Southern Kitchen “Exceptional renderings of classic Southern dishes.” 7307 Tryon Road, Cary; (919) 233-1632; lucky32.com/cary CARY MAGAZINE 107


Dining Guide

Duck Donuts “Warm, delicious and just the way you like them.” 100 Wrenn Drive #10, Cary; (919) 468-8722; duckdonuts.com/location/cary-nc Lucky Chicken “All of our beautiful Peru, with every dish.” 1851 N. Harrison Ave., Cary; (919) 338-4325; luckychickennc.net

Marco Pollo “Peruvian rotisserie chicken.” 1871 Lake Pine Drive, Cary; (919) 694-5524; marcopollocary.com

Patrick Jane’s Bar & Bistro “Life should be delicious.” 1353 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary; (919) 388-8001; patrick-janes.com

Maximillians Grill & Wine Bar “Global cuisine using locally sourced, seasonal ingredients.” 8314 Chapel Hill Road, Cary; (919) 465-2455; maximilliansgrill.com

Pizzeria Faulisi “Simple foods from a simple way of cooking: a wood-burning oven.” 215 E. Chatham St., Suite 101, Cary; pizzeriafaulisi.com

Noodle Boulevard “Ten variations on the ramen theme, covering a pan-Asian spectrum.” 919 N Harrison Ave., Cary; (919) 678-1199; noodleblvd.com

Rally Point Sport Grill “Lunch and dinner food in a pub atmosphere.” 837 Bass Pro Lane, Cary; (919) 678-1088; rallypointsportgrill.com

Once in a Blue Moon Bakery & Café “The fast track to sweet tooth satisfaction.” 115-G W. Chatham St., Cary; (919) 319-6554; bluemoonbakery.com

Red Bowl Asian Bistro “Each distinctive dish is handcrafted.” 2020 Boulderstone Way, Cary; (919) 388-9977; redbowlcary.com

Paisan’s Italian Ristorante “Authentic Italian food with a warm and inviting atmosphere.” 1275 NW Maynard Road, Cary; (919) 388-3033; caryitalian.com

Ricci’s Trattoria “Keeping true to tradition.” 10110 Green Level Church Road, Cary; (919) 380-8410; riccistrattoria.com

The one and only place for

award winning sushi and Thai!

“People that eat at my restaurant are more than

THE MAGGY AWARDS

just customers, they are friends and family.” - Sam Tedamrongwanish, Owner

WINNER 2018

THE MAGGY AWARDS

THE MAGGY AWARDS

WINNER

WINNER

2017

2016

WINNER 2015

HONORABLE MENTION 2014

HONORABLE MENTION 2013

HONORABLE MENTION 2012

106 Kilmayne Drive Cary, NC 27511 108

MAY 2018

HONORABLE MENTION 2012

HONORABLE MENTION 2012

919.467.5747

HONORABLE MENTION 2009

HONORABLE MENTION 2008

WINNER

www.sushithaicary.com

2007

WINNER 2006


Dining Guide Serendipity Gourmet Deli “Discovering the unusual, valuable or pleasantly surprising.” 118 S. Academy St., Cary; (919) 469-1655; serendipitygourmetdelinc.com Spirits Pub & Grub “Wide variety of menu items, all prepared in a scratch kitchen.” 701 E. Chatham St., Cary (919) 462-7001; spiritscary.com Stellino’s Italiano “Traditional Italian favorites with a modern twist.” 1150 Parkside Main St., Cary; (919) 694-5761; stellinositaliano.com

Gonza Tacos y Tequila “Award-winning Colombian-Mexican cuisine.” 525-105 New Waverly Place, Cary; (919) 653-7310; cary.gonzatacosytequila.com

Five Guys Burgers and Fries “Fresh ingredients, hand-prepared.” Visit fiveguys.com for area locations.

Ruckus Pizza, Pasta & Spirits “Great food always, with a side of good times.” 8111-208 Tryon Woods Drive, Cary; (919) 851-3999; 2025 Renaissance Park Place, Cary; (919) 677-3999; ruckuspizza.com

Sugar Buzz Bakery “Custom cakes … and more.” 1231 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary; (919) 238-7224; sugarbuzzbakery.com Taipei 101 “Chinese and Taiwanese. Serves lunch and dinner.” 121 E. Chatham St., Cary; (919) 388-5885; facebook.com/carytaipei101

Ruth’s Chris Steak House “Cooked to perfection.” 2010 Renaissance Park Place, Cary; (919) 677-0033; ruthschris.com/restaurant-locations/cary

Recognized by Cary Magazine readers as one of the best special occasion restaurants WINNER 2006

Hours: Mon-Thurs: 5-10pm Fri-Sat: 5-11pm

HONORABLE MENTION 2007

HONORABLE MENTION 2013

HONORABLE MENTION 2015

HONORABLE MENTION 2015

THE MAGGY AWARDS

THE MAGGY AWARDS

HONORABLE MENTION 2016

HONORABLE MENTION 2018

1130 Buck Jones Rd., Raleigh, NC, 27606 919.380.0122 \ ReysRestaurant.com

5 private rooms seating 6-200 guests! Contact: Christina Reeves at Christina@ReysRestaurant.com

CARY MAGAZINE 109


Dining Guide Thai Spices & Sushi “Freshest, most-authentic Thai cuisine and sushi.” 986 High House Road, Cary; (919) 319-1818; thaispicesandsushi.com The Big Easy Oven & Tap “Modern, Southern kitchen with New Orleans roots.” 231 Grande Heights Drive, Cary; (919) 468-6007; thebigeasyovenandtap.com

La Farm Bakery “Handcrafted daily … only the freshest ingredients.” Visit lafarmbakery.com for area locations.

Tangerine Café “From Thai to Vietnamese to Korean to Indonesian.” 2422 SW Cary Parkway, Cary; (919) 468-8688; tangerinecafecary.com

Lugano Ristorante “Italian dining in a comfortable and casual atmosphere.” 1060 Darrington Drive, Cary; (919) 468-7229; luganocary.com Tazza Kitchen “Wood-fired cooking and craft beverages.” 600 Ledgestone Way, Cary; (919) 651-8281; tazzakitchen.com/location/stonecreekvillage

The Original N.Y. Pizza “Consistent every visit.” 831 Bass Pro Lane, Cary; (919) 677-8484 2763 N.C. 55, Cary; (919) 363-1007 6458 Tryon Road, Cary; (919) 852-2242 theoriginalnypizza.com Totopos Street Food & Tequila “A walk through … Mexico City.” 1388 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary; (919) 678-3449; totoposfoodandtequila.com/cary Tribeca Tavern “Handcrafted burgers, homegrown beer.” 500 Ledgestone Way, Cary; (919) 465-3055; facebook.com/TribecaTavern

THE MAGGY AWARDS

WINNER 2018

Locally sourced, seasonal ingredients. Creative comfort eats. A place to wind down and savor life, family and friends. That’s what Dean’s Kitchen+Bar is all about. Every Sunday 11 a.m.- 2 p.m.

110

MAY 2018


Dining Guide Verandah “Southern casual environment in a modern, boutique hotel.” 301 A. Academy St., Cary; (919) 670-5000; verandahcary.com West Park Tavern “Great service, flavorful food.” 2734 N.C. 55, Cary; (919) 303-9300; westparktavern.com

APEX Mellow Mushroom “Beer, calzones and creative stonebaked pizzas.” 4300 NW Cary Parkway, Cary; (919) 463-7779 mellowmushroom.com Udupi Café “Authentic south Indian vegetarian cuisine.” 590 E. Chatham St., Cary; (919) 465-0898; sriudupicafe.com

Ruckus Pizza, Pasta & Spirits “Great food always, with a side of good times.” Visit ruckuspizza.com for area locations. The Urban Turban “A fusion of flavors.” 2757 N.C. 55, Cary; (919) 367-0888; urbanturbanbistro.com

Abbey Road Tavern & Grill 1700 Center St., Apex; (919) 372-5383; abbeyroadnc.com Anna’s Pizzeria “Piping hot pizzas and mouthwatering Italian food.” 100 N. Salem St., Apex; (919) 267-6237; annaspizzeria.com Belgian Café “From Brussels to Apex.” 1232 W. Williams St., Apex; (919) 372-5128; belgian-cafe.com Big Mike’s Brew N Que “Beers on tap to compliment locally sourced, farm-to-table BBQ.” 2045 Creekside Landing Drive, Apex; (919) 338-2591; brewnquenc.com

#TasteTheYummus

THE MAGGY AWARDS

THE MAGGY AWARDS

WINNER 2018

• Fresh Salads • Sandwiches • Kabobs

Catering Available For All Events!

Morgan Street Food Hall location coming soon! 1347 Kildaire Farm Road // Cary // 919-300-5586 9650 Strickland Road // Raleigh // 919-847-2700

HONORABLE MENTION 2018

We are an Italian dining ristorante with a comfortable and casual atmosphere. We strive to provide each guest with an experience they will remember. 1060 Darrington Drive, Cary (919) 468-7229 www.luganocary.com CARY MAGAZINE 111


Dining Guide

Salvio’s Pizzeria “Family owned and operated since 2005.” 2428 SW Cary Parkway, Cary; (919) 467-4600; salviospizza.com Buttercream’s Bake Shop “Wholesome, scratch-baked.” 101 N. Salem St., Apex; (919) 362-8408; buttercreamsbakeshop.com

Daniel’s Restaurant & Catering “Pasta dishes, hand-stretched pizzas and scratch-made desserts.” 1430 W. Williams St., Apex; (919) 303-1006; danielsapex.com Common Grounds Coffee House & Desserts “The highest-quality, locally roasted coffee.” 219 N. Salem St., Suite 101, Apex; (919) 387-0873; commongroundsapex.com

Tasu “Asian fusion cuisine, artfully mixing Chinese, Japanese and Thai Dishes” 525 New Waverly Place, Suite 103, Cary; (919) 544-8474; shikitasu.com/tasu-cary/home Doherty’s Irish Pub “Catch the game or listen to live music.” ​​5490 Apex Peakway, Apex; ​(919) 387-4100; dohertysirishpubnc.com

New Key lime icing! Thanks to all of our Customers for voting HONORABLE MENTION 2018 for Five Guys! THE MAGGY AWARDS

Parkside Town Commons Hwy. 55 & O’Kelly Chapel Rd. 919-380-0450 1075 Pine Plaza Drive APEX Next to COSTCO 919-616-0011

112

MAY 2018


Dining Guide Ruckus Pizza, Pasta & Spirits “Great food always, with a side of good times.” 1055 Pine Plaza Drive, Apex; (919) 446-6333; ruckuspizza.com Rudy’s Pub & Grill “Comfortable and familiar, just like home.” 780 W. Williams St., Apex; (919) 303-5061; rudysofapex.com

Sushi-Thai “Fresh sushi and Japanese cuisine alongside Thai favorites.” 106 Kilmayne Drive, Cary; (919) 467-5747; sushithaicary.com Five Guys Burgers & Fries 1075 Pine Plaza Drive, Apex; (919) 616-0011; fiveguys.com

Sassool “Serving authentic Lebanese and Mediterranean cuisine.” 1347 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary; (919) 300-5586; sassool.com Peak City Grill & Bar “Chef-crafted food in a … restored turn-of-thecentury hardware store.” 126 N. Salem St., Apex; (919) 303-8001; thepeakcitygrill.com

AMERICAN CUISINE MENU

Salem Street Pub “Friendly faces and extensive menu.” 113 N. Salem St., Apex; (919) 387-9992; salemstreetpub.com Skipper’s Fish Fry “Homemade from our own special recipes.” 1001 E. Williams St., Apex; (919) 303-2400; skippersfish.com Sweet Cheeks Bakery “Only the finest and freshest ingredients.” 803 E. Williams St., Apex; (919) 303-9305; sweetcheeksbakerync.com

Calzones & Strombolis Fresh from the oven made to order! Italian Desserts Homemade & delicious! We Provide Dine-In, Carry Out, Delivery and Online Ordering

CARY 919-467-4600 AMERICAN CUISINE MENU WITH A FRENCH FLAIR 200 S ACADEMY STREET

|

CARY

919.377.0509 ACADEMYSTREETBISTRO.COM

RALEIGH 919-981-5678

salviospizza.com CARY MAGAZINE 113


Dining Guide The Provincial “Fresh. Simple.” 119 Salem St., Apex; (919) 372-5921; theprovincialapex.com The Wake Zone Espresso “Your special home away from home.” 6108 Old Jenks Road, Apex; (919) 267-4622; thewakezone.com

FUQUAY-VARINA Anna’s Pizzeria “Piping hot pizzas and mouthwatering Italian food.” 138 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina; (919) 285-2497; annaspizzeria.com Aviator SmokeHouse BBQ Restaurant “All of our food is made in-house.” 525 E. Broad St., Fuquay-Varina; (919) 557-7675; aviatorbrew.com Cooley’s Restaurant 711 N. Main St., Fuquay-Varina; (919) 552-0543; facebook.com/CooleysRestaurant

Yuri Japanese Restaurant “For sushi fans and connoisseurs of Japanese cuisine.” 1361 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary; (919) 481-0068; yurijapaneserestaurant.com

CupCakeBite “Delicious sweet treats.” 512 Broad St., Fuquay-Varina; (919) 557-4300; cupcakebite.com

Donovan’s Dish “Chef-prepared meals to go.” 800 W. Williams St., Suite 112, Apex; (919) 651-8309; donovansdish.com

Jus’ Enuff Home Cooking “Homemade everything.” 736 N Main St., Fuquay-Varina; (919) 567-0587; facebook.com/JusEnuffHomeCookin

ASHWORTH DRUGS 105 W. Chatham St, Cary NC

WHERE YOUR GOOD HEALTH IS OUR BUSINESS Rx’s Filled Promptly & Professionally Old-Fashioned Soda Fountain Medical Equipment Sales & Rentals Therafirm Compression Hosiery FLA Orthopedic Supports Most Insurance & Med D Plans Accepted Rx Delivery Available

Paul Ashworth, R.Ph.

Cori Strickland, R.Ph.

919.467.1877 Mon.- Fri. 8:30 – 6:00 Sat. 8:30 – 3:30 114

MAY 2018


Dining Guide Los Tres Magueyes “We prepare our food fresh daily.” 401 Wake Chapel Road, Fuquay-Varina; (919) 552-3957; lostresmagueyes.com Rock Harbor Grill “An extensive menu of fresh dishes for lunch and dinner.” 132 S. Fuquay Ave., Fuquay-Varina; (984) 225-2256; rockharborgrillfuquay.com Stick Boy Bread Co. “Handcrafted baked goods from scratch … all natural ingredients.” 127 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina; (919) 557-2237; stickboyfuquay.com The Mason Jar Tavern “All the comforts of Southern hospitality with a modern twist.” 305 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina; (919) 762-5555; themasonjartavern.com Wingin’ It Bar and Grille “Serves lunch, dinner and drinks.” 1625 N. Main St., Suite 109, Fuquay-Varina; (919) 762-0962; facebook.com/winginitbarandgrille

HOLLY SPRINGS Happy Holly’s “Ice cream, milkshakes and shaved ice.” 527 N. Main St., Holly Springs; (919) 552-0637; happyhollys.com

The Mason Jar Tavern “All the comforts of Southern hospitality with a modern twist.” 114 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs; (919) 964-5060; themasonjartavern.com

Los Tres Magueyes 120 Bass Lake Road, Holly Springs; (919) 552-6272; lostresmagueyes.com

The Original N.Y. Pizza 634 Holly Springs Road, Holly Springs (919) 567-0505; theoriginalnypizza.com

Mama Bird’s Cookies + Cream “A unique spin on a timeless dessert.” 304 N. Main St., Holly Springs; (919) 762-7808; mamabirdsicecream.com

MORRISVILLE

My Way Tavern “Freshly made all-American foods.” 301 W. Center St., Holly Springs; (919) 285-2412; mywaytavern.com Rise Biscuits & Donuts 169 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs; (919) 586-7343; risebiscuitsdonuts.com Thai Thai Cuisine “Fresh authentic Thai food.” 108 Osterville Drive, Holly Springs; (919) 303-5700; thaithaicuisinenc.com

Alpaca Peruvian Charcoal Chicken “Unforgettable rotisserie chicken.” 9575 Chapel Hill Road, Morrisville; (919) 378-9259; alpacachicken.com Another Broken Egg Café “A totally egg-ceptional experience.” 1121 Market Center Drive, Morrisville; (919) 465-1079; anotherbrokenegg.com Babymoon Café “Pizzas, pastas, seafood, veal, steaks, sandwiches and gourmet salads.” 100 Jerusalem Drive, Suite 106, Morrisville; (919) 465 9006; babymooncafe.com

The place for Sushi enthusiasts and beginners of Japanese cuisine.

Locally Owned & Operated

QUALITY IS OUR RECIPE

HONORABLE MENTION 2017

RALEIGH

5045 Falls of Neuse Rd

1361 Kildaire Farm Road | Cary 919.481.0068

CARY

1225 Kildaire Farm Rd

919-809-8914

919-465-3082

Quail Corners at Millbrook Rd.

Saltbox Village Shopping Center

thebutchers-market.com

(In Shoppes of Kildaire Near Trader Joes) “Ahi Tower” our best seller, selected for the cover of Cary Magazine May/June 2011

www.YuriJapaneseRestaurant.com

CARY MAGAZINE 115


Dining Guide Bad Daddy’s “The quality of the beef and the toppings make our burgers stand apart.” 3300 Village Market Place, Morrisville; (919) 297-0953; baddaddysburgerbar.com B. Good “Health-conscious versions of fast-food favorites.” 1000 Market Center Drive, Morrisville; (919) 234-1937; bgood.com

Firebirds Wood Fired Grill “Steaks, seafood, chicken and ribs, all seared over local hickory, oak and pecan wood.” 3200 Village Market Place, Morrisville; (919) 653-0111; morrisville.firebirdsrestaurants.com The Full Moon Oyster Bar & Seafood Kitchen “Homemade recipes handed down over the years.” 1600 Village Market Place, Morrisville; (919) 378-9524; fullmoonoysterbar.com

Capital City Chop House “Perfect place for a business lunch or dinner or a quick bite before catching a flight.” 151 Airgate Drive, Morrisville; (919) 484-7721; chophousesofnc.com Clean Juice “Organic juices, smoothies and acai bowls.” 3035 Village Market Place, Morrisville; (919) 468-8286; cleanjuice.com

Nothing Bundt Cakes “Cakes are baked fresh daily, in a variety of flavors and sizes.” 2008 Market Center Drive, Unit 17130, Morrisville; (919) 694-5300; nothingbundtcakes.com Peppers Market and Sandwich Shop “Local baked breads, fresh in-house roasted meats.” 2107 Grace Park Drive, Morrisville (919) 380-7002; peppersmrkt.com

Georgina’s Pizzeria & Restaurant “Mouthwatering homemade Italian dishes.” 3536 Davis Drive, Morrisville; (919) 388-3820; georginaspizzeriaandrestaurant.com

Rise Biscuits & Donuts “Old school, new school, and specialty donuts.” 1100 Market Center Drive, Morrisville; (919) 377-0385; risebiscuitsdonuts.com

Los Tres Magueyes 9605 Chapel Hill Road, Morrisville (919) 481-9002; lostresmagueyes.com

Ruckus Pizza, Pasta & Spirits 1101 Market Center Drive, Morrisville; (919) 388-3500; ruckuspizza.com

Neomonde “A wonderful mix of traditional and contemporary Mediterranean menu items.” 10235 Chapel Hill Road, Morrisville; (919) 466-8100; neomonde.com

Saffron Restaurant & Lounge “Gourmet Indian dining experience.” 4121 Davis Drive, Morrisville; (919) 469-5774; saffronnc.com

Sunday - Wednesday 11:30 am - 12 am

J O I N U S A T O U R F A M I LY O F R E S T A U R A N T S

SHIKI

TASU

TASU

207 NC-54

8919 BRIER CREEK PKWY #109

525 NEW WAVERLY PL #103

SOUTHPOINT, DURHAM

919.484.4108

116

MAY 2018

BRIER CREEK, RALEIGH

9 1 9 . 5 4 4 . 8 4 74

WAVERLY PLACE, CARY

919.977.4037

SOUTHPOINT, DURHAM

207 NC-54

919.484.4108

Thursday - Saturday 11:30 am - 2 am

140 East Chatham Street, Cary 919.650.2853 crosstowndowntown.com


Dining Guide

Rey’s “Fine dining with a French Quarter flair.” 1130 Buck Jones Road, Raleigh (919) 380-0122; reysrestaurant.com

Smokey’s BBQ Shack “Meats are dry rubbed with love and slow smoked with hickory wood.” 10800 Chapel Hill Road, Morrisville; (919) 469-1724; smokeysshack.com

Taste Vietnamese “Prepared with passion and perfected through generations.” 152 Morrisville Square Way, Morrisville; (919) 234-6385; tastevietnamese.com

Annelore’s German Bakery “Pastries using the finest local ingredients.” 1249 Farmers Market Drive, Raleigh (919) 294-8040 facebook.com/AnneloresGermanBakery

Tra’Ii Irish Pub & Restaurant “An authentic and satisfying taste of Irish country cooking.” 3107 Grace Park Drive, Morrisville; (919) 651-9083; traliirishpub.com

Anvil’s Cheesesteaks “Authentic Philadelphia experience.” 2893 Jones Franklin Road, Raleigh (919) 854-0558 facebook.com/AnvilsCheesesteaks

Travinia Italian Kitchen & Wine Bar “Consistent service and quality food to keep patrons happy.” 301 Market Center Drive, Morrisville (919) 467-1718; traviniaitaliankitchen.com

Barry’s Café “A restaurant that honors firefighters.” 2851 Jones Franklin Road, Raleigh; (919) 859-3555; barryscafe.com

Village Deli & Grill “Wholesome homemade foods.” 909 Aviation Parkway #100, Morrisville; (919) 462-6191; villagedeli.net

The Big Easy Oven & Tap “Modern, Southern kitchen with New Orleans roots.” 222 Fayetteville St., Raleigh (919) 832-6082; thebigeasyovenandtap.com

RALEIGH

Flying Biscuit Café “Southern-inspired menu of comfort food made with fresh ingredients.” 2016 Clark Ave., Raleigh (919) 833-6924 flyingbiscuit.com/locations-2/Raleigh

Angus Barn “World-renowned for its service.” 9401 Glenwood Ave., Raleigh; (919) 781-2444; angusbarn.com

Daniel’s Restaurant & Catering

Cooking the BEST New York Italian food in Western Wake since 1993! THE MAGGY AWARDS

WINNER 2018

1430 W. Williams Street | Apex, NC 919-303-1006 danielsapex.com CARY MAGAZINE 117


nonprofit spotlight

Transitions LifeCare WRITTEN BY JENNIFER BUEHRLE WILLIAMS PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Open to the public, the gardens at Transitions LifeCare were created as a serene place for contemplation and healing. The labyrinth, located down the hill behind the sanctuary, is a focal point in the outdoor space. 118

MAY 2018

“HOW DO THEY MAKE such a horrible time the most positive experience it can be?” Almost two years after her father’s passing, Nicole Meyer Royster still has a hard time putting into words the level of care her father, Fred Meyer, received at Transitions LifeCare during his last six days on Earth — and what it meant to her and her mother, Marty. After being diagnosed with liver cancer in May 2016 and spending two “horrible” months in the hospital, he was referred to the nonprofit hospice facility in Wake County. The 45-year-old Raleigh native describes how feelings of chaos and stress were immediately replaced with feelings of comfort and peace. “You walk through the doors, and they knew immediately who we were,” Royster explained. “There was never any runaround. The nurses are fabulous communicators. There was no second-guessing. For us, that was so comforting. After two months of uncertainty (in the hospital), that is the best feeling in the whole wide world.” Seemingly small touches made a big impact: a gift basket waiting when they arrived, nurses who invited her mother to help bathe her dad with gentle care and dignity, and the tradition of staff and families lining the halls in silence when a deceased patient is taken from the facility. “When he passed, to have everyone line the hall for him — everything stops, the world is still. It’s amazing they do that,” Royster recalled, choking back tears. “You just wouldn’t think of that stuff or how important it is, but you take the positive memories and feelings with you. Being at hospice is like being where you know you should be … finally.” Transitions LifeCare CEO John Thoma receives powerful testimonies like that every day. The voice-


mails, emails, thank-you cards and donations are resounding validations of the work done and the dream realized through the construction of Wake County’s first hospice facility. “Our organization was founded because of this community. Folks have been so caring and generous with their support. I am blessed every day. I learn so much from the strength and dignity and the joy of life we experience through those we serve,” he said. A community resource

In the 27 years Thoma has worked with the organization, he has presided over tremendous growth in the number of people served, the services provided and the physical facility. Situated on nine acres off Trinity Road near the Cary/Raleigh line, the three-building campus (a grief center, a sanctuary and a hospice home) enjoys a convenient urban location in a pastoral setting. A 20-room facility with all the comforts of home opened in 2010, but there was a waiting list by 2014. A 10-room expansion, with two rooms for bariatric patients and four rooms equipped with technology to keep dementia patients from wandering, opened late last year. Residents aged 4 and older can receive hospice services either at home, in a facility or in one of the 30 rooms on campus. Last year, 7,000 patients were served — 1,000 of those in the hospice home. Thoma expects there will be a waiting list in three years or less due to rapid growth in the seven counties the nonprofit serves — Wake, Durham, Franklin, Chatham, Harnett, Johnston and Orange. To keep up with the growth, he anticipates adding two hospice teams and two palliative care teams in the next two years. In addition, Transitions LifeCare has built a reputation as a great resource for both counseling and education. Thoma made the conscious pivot in 2002 to emphasize being a professional resource in addition to providing care to seriously ill or dying patients. On any given day you will find professionals receiving continuing education in the grief center or members of the public attending work-shops on end-of-life planning or grief.

“Our organization was founded because of this community. Folks have been so caring and generous with their support. I am blessed every day. I learn so much from the strength and dignity and the joy of life we experience through those we serve.” — John Thoma CEO, Transitions LifeCare

The Kit Boney Grief Center houses a lending library that is open to anyone in the community. The adult and children’s books serve as resources for various types of grief.

A community legacy

Thoma is especially proud that every town and municipality in Wake County contributed to building the continued on page 121

The nonprofit added 10 rooms last year to care for hospice patients, bringing the number of rooms to 30. Last year roughly 1,000 patients were served at the hospice home, and another 6,000 were served in their homes or at another facility. CARY MAGAZINE 119


JOIN THE CLUB MAY SUN 3:00PM

6

12

SAT 7:00PM

25

FRI 7:00PM

JUNE SAT 7:00PM

2 =

120

SAT 7:00PM

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NORTH CAROLINA FC HOME GAME

13

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WED 7:00PM

SAT 7:00PM

=

23

SAT 7:00PM

NC COURAGE HOME GAME

NORTHCAROLINAFC.COM | NCCOURAGE.COM

MAY 2018


A labyrinth is an ancient symbol that represents wholeness. It combines the imagery of the circle and the spiral into a meandering but purposeful path. Labyrinths occur in all cultures and have long been used as tools for meditation, centering and healing.

continued from page 119

campus, as well as every level of government. The Town of Cary funds an annual grant for a home-based palliative care program. These contributions, large and small, carry great weight for Thoma. “Our shareholders are the community, our donors and our volunteers. We have to be the best, the most ethical, the most compliant,” he said. “It is very important to us to be good stewards and that we continue to earn their confidence.” This donor support was one of the first things Royster noticed when she arrived at the hospice facility. Names were everywhere — from the gardens, benches and bricks to the buildings, offices and art pieces. “There were so many names I recognized, or even knew personally,” she said. “It just spoke to me. I thought, ‘This community is so connected through this hospice center.’” While in the hospital with her father, Royster was thinking she needed to do more charitable giving, but to whom? The answer became clear after she experienced Transitions LifeCare. Now, her support allows others to experience the comfort and peace she did. “It is an amazing place, an amazing experience. I totally trust hospice,” she said. t

The Cosmic Post, located in the Grief Center Garden, was designed and created by Carrboro sculptor Mike Roig and made possible by a grant from the Cary Community Foundation.

CARY MAGAZINE 121


garden adventurer WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY L.A. JACKSON

Mexican Heather

Bat-faced plant

122

MAY 2018

The Clan Cuphea IN A PLANT GENUS, there are often many species, and being closely related, you might think most would exhibit some semblance of similarity in appearance. As sound as this might seem, I can blow that notion out of the water with the genus Cuphea — or what I impetuously sometimes call the Clan Cuphea. To illustrate my point, within this, er, clan, are three plants often seen in the spring at local garden centers with blooms that have plenty of visual sass to keep the flower border interesting during the growing season, but each does it in their own distinctly, delightfully different way: Cigar plant (Cuphea ignea): Also known as the “firecracker plant,” this Mexican native sports waves of slender, 1-inch-long, cylindrical blooms in shades of rich reds or flashy oranges tinged with light yellow accents that resemble miniature glowing cigars — or tiny firecrackers. Beyond such imaginative imagery, these odd flowers are also dependable magnets for butterflies, bees and hummingbirds, which is a standard trait for members of Clan Cuphea. The cigar plant can grow up to 3 feet tall with a similar spread, and as long as it is watered regularly, performs well in the summer sun. This perennial is only marginally hardy in Cary gardens, and as a result, is often planted as an annual. However the giant cigar plant (Cuphea micropetala), in


12 9

3 6

addition to being larger, is usually hardy enough to weather typical winters in this region. Mexican heather (Cuphea hyssopifolia): This popular perennial is a handsome plant with broad sweeps of ¾-inch, glossy, lance-shaped leaves forming the backdrop for Cigar plant petite, light purple, trumpet-shaped flowers that seem like they never want to stop blooming in the summer. It can top out at around 2 feet tall and wide. Mexican heather’s size makes it a prime candidate for understory or potted plantings in sunny locations. One advantage to keeping it in a moveable container is since this Central American native could be killed by a nasty winter, it can be picked up and sheltered during the coldest times. Simply treating it as an annual — it is not that expensive — is, of course, another option. Bat-faced plant (Cuphea llavea): Straight from Gotham City to your garden comes the batfaced plant. Its flowers, while rather small, are definitely weird — in a fun way. Close examination will reveal its bizarre blooms, each emerging alienlike from a 1-inch-long tube with two Lucifer-red petals flanking a hairy, purple center that does, indeed, look like a bat’s face — and sticking its tongue out, no less. Another import from Mexico, this strangely cute plant will normally mature to a rounded shape 18 inches high and wide. Bat-face abides by typical Clan Cuphea culture, meaning lots of sun and regular watering will keep it happy. It, too, is a tender perennial, so enjoy it as an annual or make plans for a comfortable “bat cave” this winter. L.A. Jackson is the former editor of Carolina Gardener Magazine. Want to ask L.A. a question about your garden? Contact him by email at lajackson1@gmail.com.

TIMELY TIP Annuals such as zinnias, salvias, million bells, marigolds and petunias can become long, lanky and lazy in the flower power department, but pinching the plants back when they are about 8 inches high will create branching, which leads to bushier growth and more blossoms. It is easy to do — just use your thumb and forefinger to squeeze the end tip off of each limb. Pampering these pretties with a diluted solution of low-nitrogen fertilizer once a month will also encourage a better parade of blooms through the summer.

Million Bells

To Do in the GARDEN

May

• After the foliage has faded on naturalized spring-flowering bulbs such as crocus, daffodil, snowdrops, grape hyacinth and Spanish bluebell, dig up and divide any clumps that have become overcrowded. How will you know they have become overcrowded? The most obvious sign is a noticeable drop in flower production. • It is warm enough now to round out the vegetable garden with plantings of such heat-seekers as Southern peas, okra, eggplant, hot and sweet peppers, lima beans and sweet potatoes. • Want fresh, backyard fruit that doesn’t require thinning or constant spraying? Try your green thumb at growing blueberry bushes, which can also be attractive ornamental additions to almost any landscape.

• Strawberries keep best if they are harvested early in the day. To help extend storage life, don’t wash or de-stem the berries until you are ready to eat them. • Tough plants for tough places such as parched, open areas and sunbaked hillsides include creeping juniper, ajuga and moss pink. • By the end of this month, the soil should be warm enough in annual vegetable and flower beds to allow the addition of a 3-inch layer of organic mulch to protect root zones from the baking heat of the summer and conserve ground moisture. • This month’s balmy temperatures signal it is time to bring houseplants outdoors for a summer vacation. Just be sure to locate them in areas that receive filtered shade most of the day to prevent sunscald.

CARY MAGAZINE 123


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MAY 2018

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happenings

Cary Magazine’s first events manager opens restaurant in Caribbean WRITTEN BY RON SMITH

contributed photo

FOR SHANNON REEDER, Cary Magazine’s first events manager, European influence. Since neither of us are fluent in Spanish, and her husband Brad, opening a restaurant in Belize is no joke. having that influence appealed to us and made a relocation easiWhile others may dream about living in the warm Carib- er. A lot of people have vacation homes on the island or permabean winds, the former owners of Goodnight’s Comedy Club in nently have moved here. We have discovered a lot of expats who Raleigh made it happen. live here year-round.” The entrepreneurial couple’s It took about a year for the Reednew restaurant is called Iguana ers’ restaurant concept to take shape. Juan’s Restaurant and Bar in “The more we investigated, the San Pedro, Belize. San Pedro is a more we realized that most of the tourist-oriented town on an island restaurants in San Pedro were either called Ambergris Caye, located off high-priced restaurants catering to the Belize mainland. high-end tourism or favoring the The Reeders, who owned local cuisine — primarily stewed Goodnight’s Comedy from 2006 chicken, rice and beans,” Brad conuntil 2013, liked the slower lifestyle tinued. “We believe there is a marin the Caribbean. ket in the middle.” “After the weekly stress of runIguana Juan’s menu includes ning Goodnight’s, we both wanted craft burgers, vegetarian entrees, Brad and Shannon Reeder something that was a slower pace,” fresh salads and sandwiches, and said Brad. “We owned the comedy rotating nightly dinner specials. club and restaurant through the There are also Central American recession, and when the economy favorites on the menu, such as recovered we were close to burnceviche, tamales, nachos, garnaches out. So we took a couple of years and more. for ourselves to regroup and think Brad says opening a business about the next step in our lives.” in a foreign country, or at least in Shannon was quick to point Belize, takes longer than he was out that they always loved to travused to. — Shannon Reeder el, and one of the places they had “Many times I had to put my Owner, Iguana Juan’s Restaurant and Bar often heard about was Belize. So slow-down-and-don’t-get-frustrated they did an exploration trip. hat on, take a deep breath and re“We fell in love with the country, the people and the culture,” mind myself that that is the reason I like Belize so much,” he said. “We she said. have made many friends here, friends who have also given us advice on The Reeders stayed in Hopkins in the southern part of the coun- starting the restaurant.” try for a few months doing odd jobs, splitting their time in Raleigh It has been a long road from Raleigh to Belize, but it has been where they own a home. As they got to know the country, they set rewarding for the Reeders. their sights on Ambergris Caye and San Pedro. “Where else can you go to work every day driving a golf “Belize is certainly a Central American country,” said Brad, cart, in shorts, wearing flip-flops and doing what you love?” t “but with San Pedro you have strong North American/Western asked Brad. “It’s the Caribbean life.”

“We fell in love with the country, the people and the culture.”

CARY MAGAZINE 125


happenings

ARCHIE COOK JR. WAS RECENTLY HONORED BY EVAN WILLIAMS BOURBON AS AN AMERICAN-MADE HERO. COOK WAS GIVEN $10,000 FOR THE CHARITY OF HIS CHOICE, VETERANS EMPOWERING VETERANS, BASED IN FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. THE NONPROFIT PROVIDES PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT, MEALS, CLOTHING AND OTHER RESOURCES TO VETERANS. COOK, A FORMER U.S. AIR FORCE MAJOR, OWNS SIGNATURE SMILES, A DENTAL PRACTICE IN CARY. SIGNATURESMILES-NC.COM

9th Annual Herbfest, hosted by the Friends The

of the Page-Walker, will be Saturday, May 5, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the grounds of the Page-Walker Arts & History Center in downtown Cary. Guests can visit craft and herb booths selling items related to gardening, herbs, native plants, perennials and nature. Other highlights include live butterfly releases, a silent auction, kid activities and the popular Young Friends bake sale. friendsofpagewalker.org 126

MAY 2018


Apex High School students Margaux Whitley, Amanda Marrott and Katelyn Holmes won first place at the state Family, Career and Community Leaders of America culinary competition held Feb. 9 in Charlotte. The team won a gold medal and $15,000 in scholarship money from the Art Institute and Johnson and Wales University. Each culinary team from across the state prepared and plated a three-course meal. In June, the Apex students will compete at the National FCCLA competition in Atlanta.

BRIAN BIZUB is the new chief executive officer at Raleigh Orthopaedic. He is the former CEO for Palm Beach Orthopaedic Institute in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Raleigh Orthopaedic has eight office locations including Cary, Garner, Holly Springs, North Raleigh and West Raleigh on Edwards Mill Road. raleighortho.com

CHESTERBROOK ACADEMY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS TYLER HUNT, REMY HORTON, MARK WHITE, WILLI VOLGESANG, DEREK HAN AND BRADY SMITH WON FIRST PLACE AT THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE ODYSSEY OF THE MIND COMPETITION HELD MARCH 24 AT WINGATE UNIVERSITY IN WINGATE, N.C. THE STUDENTS MOVE ON TO THE WORLDS COMPETITION, WHICH WILL BE HELD MAY 24-26. ODYSSEY OF THE MIND IS AN INTERNATIONAL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM THAT PROVIDES CREATIVE PROBLEM-SOLVING OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENTS FROM KINDERGARTEN THROUGH COLLEGE. CHESTERBROOKACADEMY.COM CARY MAGAZINE 127


happenings

Waltonwood Cary Parkway honored several residents at its first Ladies of Legacy Luncheon. The honorees are, from left, Louise Yarbrough, Mary Conyers, Sylvia Arthur and Joyce Hock.

Waltonwood Cary Parkway recently hosted a Ladies of

CKO KICKBOXING FRANCHISEES LIZ AND JAMES AGRO HELD A GRAND OPENING IN MARCH FOR THEIR NEW CLUB LOCATED AT

Legacy luncheon to celebrate Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s History Month. During the event, residents were

HEMLOCK PLAZA IN CARY. LIZ IS A

recognized with four different awards: the Humanitarian Award, won by Mary Conyers; the

FORMER KICKBOXING CHAMPION,

Entrepreneurship Award, won by Sylvia Arthur; the Kindred Heart Award, won by Joyce Hock;

WINNING THE NATIONAL TITLE AT

and the Ladies of Legacy Lifetime Achievement Award, won by Louise Yarbrough. Women were

THE 1998 WOMEN'S MIDDLEWEIGHT

nominated by family and friends for the awards, and the winners were announced the day of the

AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIP IN

luncheon. waltonwood.com/senior-living/nc/cary/waltonwood-cary-pkwy/

THE MARTIAL ART OF CHINESE KICKBOXING, SAN SHOU. CKO KICKBOXING CLUBS OFFER TOTAL BODY WORKOUTS FEATURING BOXING AND

HOLLYWOOD FEED, A NATURAL

KICKBOXING TRAINING TECHNIQUES.

AND HOLISTIC PET FOOD AND PRODUCT

Gather-Studios, a private co-

STORE, OPENED AT

working space is open at 417 Kildaire Farm

WAVERLY PLACE IN

Road in downtown Cary. Former

CARY ON MARCH 10.

CM Mover & Shaker Michelle Smith

HOLLYWOODFEED.COM

operates the space with her husband Ben

CKOKICKBOXING.COM/CARY.HTML

Smith of The Apothecary's Kitchen. shop.gathergoodsco.com 128

MAY 2018


Mary Holder has been named branch leader and broker-in-charge of the Allen Tate Companies’ Cary-Stonebridge office at 3420 Ten Ten Road, Suite 300, in Cary. allentate.com

Celebrating the donation to the AKC Canine Health Foundation are, from left, Dr. J. Charles Garvin, board president, Dr. Diane Brown, CEO, and Ann Viklund, Purina director of conformation.

AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB CANINE HEALTH FOUNDATION, A RALEIGH NONPROFIT COMMITTED TO BETTER HEALTH THE

FOR ALL DOGS, RECEIVED A $227,442 DONATION FROM THE NESTLE PURINA PETCARE COMPANY TO SUPPORT CANINE HEALTH. AKCCHF.ORG

Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina recently received a donation of $50,000 from Greg Lindberg, founder and The

LOCALLY MADE MARKET WILL HOST MORE THAN 35 LOCAL ARTISTS AND ARTISANS AT ITS MAY EVENT ON SUNDAY, MAY 6, NOON-4 P.M. AT THE MAYTON INN

CEO of Eli Global, a privately owned federation of independent companies operating in 15 different sectors worldwide. This donation is in support of the Food Bank’s Stop Summer Hunger campaign, and will help the organization distribute 100,000 pounds of fresh produce to children over the summer months. foodbankcenc.org

IN DOWNTOWN CARY. LOCALLY MADE MARKET AIMS TO CONNECT LOCAL ARTISANS WITH THE PUBLIC AND MAKE HANDMADE GOODS MORE ACCESSIBLE. LOCALLYMADEMARKET.COM

STEVEN A. SHAPIRO, A CARY PLAYWRIGHT, RECENTLY HAD HIS PLAY “WAITING ROOM” PRODUCED IN LONDON AS PART OF THE BRITISH THEATRE CHALLENGE. A COMPANION PIECE, “BEYOND THE WHITE NOISE,” WAS RECENTLY PUBLISHED BY LAZY BEE SCRIPTS. LAZYBEESCRIPTS.CO.UK

Terri Nier is the new director of catering at The Umstead Hotel & Spa in Cary. The Raleigh native most recently served as

Green Home Solutions, a mold removal company that uses

the private events director at the City Club in

environmentally friendly methods, is now open in Cary. greenhomesolutions.com

Raleigh. theumstead.com CARY MAGAZINE 129


write light

BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Mirrored aggression An Eastern bluebird flies at a perceived adversary reflected in my carâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s side view mirror. The territorial birds often peck at mirrors and reflective surfaces because they think other bluebirds are invading their territory.

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MAY 2018


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Cary Magazine May 2018  

Making it Work: Area entrepreneurs mean business. Cary Magazine's Pet Parade, Service Animals and Mother/Daughter Fashion.

Cary Magazine May 2018  

Making it Work: Area entrepreneurs mean business. Cary Magazine's Pet Parade, Service Animals and Mother/Daughter Fashion.