Page 1

April 2018

INSIDE

2018 T RAN RESTAU E GUID

Local Seafood

GOOD FOR YOU, GOOD FOR N.C.

THE

HEALTH & WELLNESS VIRTUAL HOUSECALLS SEE YOUR DOCTOR ONLINE

RESET YOUR DIET WITH THE WHOLE30

Sunny Side Up EGGS ARE BACK ON THE MENU

Cary Magazine, 301 Cascade Pointe Lane Cary, NC 27513

ISSUE

VEGGIECENTRIC


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in this issue

The Health & Wellness Issue

Kites of All Kinds: 18 Scenes from Cary’s annual Kite Festival

22 The Doctor Will See You – Online Your Forever Home: 30 How universal design can

change your future

Local Fish: Good for you, 38 good for North Carolina

Rocking the Whole30: 46 Why a month with no cheese, chocolate or wine might be worth it

A Trilobite kite soars over kiting enthusiasts March 3 during Cary’s 22nd annual Kite Festival at Fred G. Metro Bond Park. See more photos

Jonathan Fredin

of the event on Page 18.

59 Premier Practices 73 The Good Egg Social Club Swings 105 Sidecar to a Timeless Tune

8

APRIL 2018


Your children. Your family. Your health. Your well-being. Your transitions. Your place. WakeMed Cary Hospital From pregnancy and childbirth to everything and anything female, the care is both comprehensive and compassionate. Embracing you and your entire family with outpatient and inpatient surgery, specialty and subspecialty care, 24/7 emergency care, imaging rehab, and more. After all, when it comes to you, your health and the health of your family, you’re the decision maker. And the decision is clearly WakeMed Cary Hospital.

WakeMed Cary Hospital | 1900 Kildaire Farm Road | Cary, NC 27518 | 919.350.8000 | wakemed.org/cary-hospital CARY MAGAZINE 9


in every issue

CARY • APEX • MORRISVILLE • HOLLY SPRINGS • FUQUAY-VARINA

April 2018 • Volume 15, Number 3

17

Things to Do This Month

54 83

We Love

EXECUTIVE

Bill Zadeits, Group Publisher Kris Schultz, Publisher EDITORIAL

Liquid Assets: The Mason Jar’s Happy Place Golden Lager and Tiny Cat Vodka

100

Garden Adventurer: ‘A’ for Acidanthera

Amber Keister, Senior Editor Emily Uhland, Lifestyle Editor Sarah Rubenoff, Copy Editor CONTRIBUTORS

Dree Deacon L.A. Jackson David McCreary Nancy Pardue PHOTOGRAPHY

Jonathan Fredin, Chief Photographer PRODUCTION

departments

12 14 86 108 114

Editor’s Letter

ON THE COVER: In the Whole30 diet, fruits,

Letters from Readers

vegetables, nuts and healthy proteins help get your eating habits back on track. Learn

Dining Guide Happenings

more about the plan from folks who have tried it, page 46. Photos by Jonathan Fredin

Write Light

Jennifer Casey, Graphic Designer Lauren Earley, Graphic Designer Dylan Gilroy, Web Designer Beth Harris, Graphic Designer Matt Rice, Webmaster/SEO Rachel Sheffield, Web Designer Lane Singletary, Graphic Designer PUBLIC RELATIONS

S&A Communications Chuck Norman, APR ADMINISTRATIVE

Mor Aframian, Events & Marketing Kristin Black, Accounting Alexandra Blazevich, Events & Marketing Anthony Harrison, Events & Marketing Cherise Klug, Traffic Manager Lisa McGraw, Circulation Coordinator Valerie Renard, Advertising & Human Resources PUBLISHER EMERITUS

Ron Smith Cary Magazine © is published nine times annually by Cherokee Media Group. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. Subscriptions are $18/year.

in the next issue

CARY MAGAZINE

Westview at Weston 301 Cascade Pointe Lane, Cary, North Carolina 27513 (919) 674-6020 • (800) 608-7500 • Fax (919) 674-6027 www.carymagazine.com

It’s the CM Pet Parade contributed photo

From dogs and cats to ducks and guinea pigs, meet readers’ pets, and learn what makes them great! 10

APRIL 2018

This publication does not endorse, either directly or implicitly, the people, activities, products or advertising published herein. Information in the magazine is deemed credible to the best of our knowledge.

Cary Magazine is a proud member and supporter of all five chambers in Western Wake County: the Cary Chamber of Commerce, Apex Chamber of Commerce, Morrisville Chamber of Commerce, Holly Springs Chamber of Commerce and Garner Chamber of Commerce. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All dwellings advertised are available on an equal-opportunity basis.


Thinking of selling your home? Worried that your house is out of style? We’ve got the buyers! Choose the #1 to Real Head to HPW.com findEstate the latest Company the to Triangle home tips andin tricks make your who manages 65% the house the best on theof block. relocation to the area.

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e d i t o r ’s l e t t e r

Jonathan Fredin

OUR PRIMARY GOAL here at Cary Magazine is to tell stories about Western Wake County and why it’s a great place to live. That simple mission shapes everything you see in the magazine — from our business and food coverage to our Maggy Awards and Women of Western Wake. It also explains why we consistently feature charities, nonprofits and volunteers in our pages. This issue we feature NAMI Wake County in our Nonprofit Spotlight, see page 102. This local affiliate for the National Alliance on Mental Illness aims to improve the lives of people who suffer from mental illness and their loved ones. Hundreds of volunteers offer concrete advice, coping methods and often a shoulder to lean on through support groups and classes throughout Wake County. NAMI and groups like it may not raise million-dollar budgets or have big staffs; rather, they measure their successes in small victories, like when volunteer Gordon Gogola describes how NAMI helps those who are hurting. “It’s an extremely safe place to talk,” he said, talking about the support group he leads. “You come in with all this angst and pent-up emotion, because there’s nowhere else you can go and talk about it while feeling safe.” All over Western Wake County, caring individuals like Gogola volunteer their time, talents and money to help others. These are the people who make our community a great place to live, and their generosity never ceases to inspire me. One of my greatest pleasures is to get to know them and share their stories with you.

Amber Keister makes announcements at Cary Magazine’s recent Meet the Maggys party.

Thanks for reading,

Amber Keister Senior Editor Note: Cary Magazine also highlights nonprofits in the Give Back section of our email newsletter, delivered every Thursday to your inbox. Sign up for the ENEWS at carymagazine.com, and you’ll find out about charity runs, book drives and volunteer opportunities of all sorts. 12

APRIL 2018


PLAN YOUR NEXT

Just off North Carolina’s southern coast, Bald Head Island’s 14 miles of uncrowded beaches and outdoor activities galore make it an exceptional getaway for the entire family. Call or go online to start planning your adventure.

877-344-7443 | www.ComeToBHI.com | vacations@bhisland.com

CARY MAGAZINE 13


letters from readers

Cary’s New Luxury Salon

ADDRESS

Alston Town Center Next to the new Whole Foods

5039 Arco St. Cary, NC 27519 CONTACT US

919-694-5755 artisanhaircary.com FOLLOW US

ArtisanHairCary

“Just a quick note as I’m reading your March issue to say, ‘Hats off to you and your staff.’ One of the best issues you guys have put out in a long time!” David Hughes, TravelHost of the Triangle magazine

“What a great surprise! My son, who lives in Raleigh and has a summer home on the Pamlico River in Washington, shared this article with us on Facebook. We have lived in Washington for almost 50 years and love it!” Opal Williams, Washington, N.C.

“I think this is one of the best trip articles we’ve seen on Jackson County. The photography really makes this article shine. I am so pleased with how this turned out.” Nick Breedlove, Jackson County Tourism Development Authority

“Thanks for the story about Washington. It is lovely!” Catherine Glover, Washington-Beaufort County Chamber of Commerce

“What a beautiful piece. Wow, I am blown away. And those photos — incredible. I love that we made the cover. It’s not what I envisioned my first cover girl shot to look like, but I’ll take it. Thank you so much for such a great piece.” Melissa Webb, Pineapple Public Relations

“Thank you for such a nice portrayal of Washington!” Lynn W. Davis, Washington Tourism Development Director “Thank you for following us and engaging with us on Instagram. Although we aren’t in Cary, we do pick up the magazine when we are over there to find cool places to eat and hang out.” Daniel Krenzer, Alamance Kaffee Werks

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Email letters to the editors to editor@carymagazine.com

Editors’ note: Submitted comments may be edited for length or clarity and become the property of Cary Magazine. 14

APRIL 2018


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16 APRIL 2018


5

things to do

April

3

1 Count on real, classic country when THE MALPASS BROTHERS perform at the Holly Springs Cultural Center. It’s music steeped in the legacy of the Louvin Brothers, Johnny Cash, Marty Robbins and Hank Williams Sr. April 6, 7:30 p.m., $36, 300 West Ballentine St., Holly Springs. hollyspringsnc.us, search Malpass Brothers.

2

Alice is a texting, tweeting, plugged-in girl of the digital age who turns topsy-turvy in ALICE @ WONDERLAND, presented by the Raleigh Little Theatre. The updated tale remains faithful to Lewis Carroll’s original — complete with Red Queen and White Rabbit. April 12-22; Thursdays and Fridays at 7:30 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 1 and 5 p.m.; $12-18; 301 Pogue St., Raleigh. raleighlittletheatre.org

4

Top-tier players compete at the ACC Men’s and Women’s Tennis Championships held at the Cary Tennis Park. Cheer your favorite team as they battle for the title. April 25-29; single day, $7-9; passes, $13-17; 2727 Louis Stephens Drive, Cary. townofcary.org, search Cary Tennis Park.

Two events, complete with live bands and cheer teams to egg you on, will take runners through tree-lined downtown Raleigh. So tie on your sneakers for the ROCK ‘N’ ROLL RALEIGH 5K at 8 a.m. Saturday, April 7, and the Rock ‘n’ Roll Raleigh half marathon at 7 a.m. Sunday, April 8. $49.99 and $99.99. runrocknroll.com/raleigh

Jonathan Fredin

5

Head to Cary’s Bond Park for the 25th annual SPRING DAZE arts and crafts festival with more than 170 North Carolina artists, entertainment on four stages, festival food and an Earth Day celebration. April 28, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 801 High House Road, Cary. townofcary.org, search Spring Daze. CARY MAGAZINE 17


PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

K ites

ABOVE: Sunny, breezy weather sent kites soaring March 23 during Cary’s 22nd annual Kite Festival at Fred G. Metro Bond Park. The festival included kite-making classes and a free kite contest, with awards given for “Best Crash” and “Highest Flying.” Kids and parents tested wind currents and kite-flying abilities with a variety of flat, bowed, delta and parafoil kites. RIGHT: Izzy Vouga, 6, gets driving assistance from her father, Greg Vouga of Fuquay-Varina, while flying a kite-boarding trainer kite.

18 APRIL 2018

of all

kinds


Cary resident Crystal Barron flies a rainbow-colored kite that matches her hair.

Four-year-old Daniel Beso of Cary test flies the creation he made in the kite-making class.

ABOVE: An inflatable trilobite kite, left, crosses paths with a smaller sail in the busy skies over Bond Park during the town’s annual kite festival. LEFT: A kiteeating tree claims another one.

CARY MAGAZINE 19


20

APRIL 2018


Concerts Near Five Guys

Friday, April 27

Friday, May 18

The Carolina Breakers

The Castaways

Friday, May 4

Friday, May 25

Gary Lowder and Smoking Hot

North Tower Band

Friday, May 11

The Carolina Breakers

The Tonez

Friday, June 1

Visit our Facebook page for up-to-date information! Beer and wine will be sold. Must be 21 or older and present a valid ID. A portion of the proceeds will benefit HopeSpring Village.

hopespringvillage.com No coolers permitted. Weather permitting. Events subject to change without notice. For information, contact drbgroupllc@drbgroupllc.com

Shop Dine Entertain Another Broken Egg Café Autumn & Avery Clothing Boutique Bank of America Brixx Wood Fired Pizza Chick-fil-A Chuy’s Tex-Mex Club Pilates Cold Stone Creamery Dickey’s Barbecue Pit Embassy Nails Spa Five Guys Burgers and Fries Flour Power Kids Cooking School Frank Theatres Cinebowl & Grille GNC Golf Galaxy Guitar Center

Halie’s Boutique Harris Teeter Hickory Tavern Hobby Lobby It’Sugar Jersey Mike’s Subs Learning Express Toys Massage Envy Mattress Firm Menchie’s Frozen Yogurt Noodles & Company Orangetheory Fitness Paisley Boutique Panera Bread Parkside Eye Care Parkside Family Dental

Persis Indian Grill Petco Phenix Salon Suites Pink Magnolia Boutique Signature Nail Spa Smallcakes A Cupcakery Smoothie King Sport Clips Starbucks Stein Mart Stellino’s Italian Restaurant Sunrise Dental Supercuts Szechuan Heat T-Mobile Target

Taziki’s Mediterranean Café Tijuana Flats UPS Verizon Wireless Waxing the City Which Wich Zaniac Learning

COMING SOON!

Courtyard Marriott Improv Comedy Club Peoples Bank Sushi at the Park Tri-City Family Medicine & Urgent Care

I-540 & NC 55 • Cary, NC 27519 I-40, exit 278 just 4 miles south on O’Kelly Chapel Road

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CARY MAGAZINE 21


Jessica Johnson and her daughter AnnaDale, 7, demonstrate how a virtual doctor visit can be more convenient for busy parents. The first adopters of the telehealth services tend to be younger and tech-savvy, says Dr. Bobby Park with RelyMD, based in Cary. “For the most part it’s 25- to 45-year-old females who are head of households. That’s our most used demographic, but we take calls from all across the state, from all age groups.”

22

APRIL 2018


The Doctor Will

See You

Online

Telemedicine can actually make it easier and cheaper to see a doctor — especially on weekends or late at night WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

O

ONE NIGHT LAST JANUARY, it was obvious to Judy Montgomery that her winter cold had turned ugly. “I was having a hard time catching my breath. And I was coughing so much, it was hard to sleep or do anything else. Plus I’m a senior, so I want to be very careful,” said Montgomery, who is 67. It could have been bronchitis or the bad flu that was going around, but she didn’t want to leave her Raleigh home. She felt awful, and it was after nine o’clock. Instead, Montgomery signed into the RelyMD website, and after a 10-minute wait, she was being seen by Dr. Gautam Khandelwal. Launched in 2015 by a Cary-based group of emergency doctors, RelyMD is a telemedicine service that allows patients to see a doctor and get diagnosed online.

Increasingly common, these video visits can help North Carolina health professionals treat patients in a timely and affordable way — without sacrificing quality of care. Montgomery’s primary physician practice, Avance Care of Raleigh, contracts with RelyMD to provide after-hours medical care. Because of this partnership, Khandelwal was able to see Montgomery’s electronic medical records. “He knew some of what was going on before he even talked to me,” she said. “He knew about my COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), that I was having problems sleeping because of the coughing. He got me starting my inhaler again, which I hadn’t been using. continued on page 25

CARY MAGAZINE 23


A 2014 decision by the N.C. Medical Board to allow virtual exams paved the way for Dr. Bobby Park and other physicians who wished to use telemedicine to see patients. “Before, you had to meet a physician in person to establish patient-doctor relationship. The big change is that now you can establish that relationship via telemedicine,� he says.

24

APRIL 2018


Common Complaints continued from page 23

“He didn’t rush me; he let me talk. He heard what my cough sounded like.” Khandelwal diagnosed Montgomery’s respiratory infection and called a nearby 24-hour pharmacy with prescriptions for a cough suppressant and an antibiotic. “I’d never used RelyMD before, and I was impressed,” she said. “It was really, really helpful.” The service isn’t covered by insurance, but it is far more convenient than a latenight visit to a hospital emergency room, and at $50 a consultation it is far cheaper. According to 2016 data from Blue Cross Blue Shield, a typical ER visit can cost nearly $2,000 with insurance copays running $500 or more. Affordable, high-quality care

RelyMD is the brainchild of Dr. Bobby Park, with Wake Emergency Physicians, PA. The group provides care at three area health systems: WakeMed Health and Hospitals, Johnston UNC Health Care and Granville Health System. “People come into the ER with primary care issues — non-emergencies — but they just have a hard time getting in with their regular doctor. They may not have a doctor; they may not have insurance. We wanted to figure out a way to provide services in an affordable, high-quality manner,” said Park. The notion for a telemedicine service came to Park after a virtual consult with his sister via smartphone. His niece had cut her hand, and by looking at photos of the injury, Park was able to tell his sister how to care for the wound — without a trip to the emergency room. His idea and telemedicine in general was given a huge boost when the N.C. medical board adjusted its guidelines in late 2014. The board recognized that doctors could effectively evaluate patients us-

These ailments and more can be diagnosed during a virtual doctor visit:

• Sinus infection

• Fever

• Sore throat

• Pink eye

• Allergies

• Rashes

• Cold and flu

• Vomiting and diarrhea

• Bronchitis

ing video technology, clearing the way for doctors to write prescriptions without an in-person visit. RelyMD now has more than 70 corporate clients including Capital Broadcasting. Park says their clients save money because employees visit the emergency room less often, and patients appreciate the convenience. “By the time you get into the car, drive to where you’re going, you could have generated an account, told us what’s wrong, and we could have seen you.” he said. “It’s huge for people who have issues with transportation.” To comply with privacy regulations, RelyMD patients log into a password-protected account on their computer or use a secure app for iPhone and Android phones. This makes it easy for patients to see a doctor wherever they are. “We believe this is the way of the future,” said Park. “It’s a way to solve a lot of issues with the rural health disparities. People in eastern North Carolina or the far western part of the state, they are struggling with health care access.”

“By the time you get into the car, drive to where you’re going, you could have generated an account, told us what’s wrong, and we could have seen you. It’s huge for people who have issues with transportation.” — Dr. Bobby Park, RelyMD

Mental health advantage

Technology can improve access to health care for everyone, agrees Dr. Diego continued on page 26 CARY MAGAZINE 25


contributed photo

RelyMD clients can log into a secure website on a computer or access the service on a tablet, phone or smart device using the mobile app. Usually within 10 or 15 minutes, a doctor from the Cary-based Wake Emergency Physicians, PA, will answer the call and give a video consultation.

continued from page 25

"One of the main barriers to getting access to mental health care services is the stigma that surrounds mental health. With this platform, patients do not have to leave their house to access a provider." — Dr. Diego Garza, Carolina Partners in Mental HealthCare 26

APRIL 2018

Garza, director of telehealth for Carolina Partners in Mental HealthCare, but vulnerable populations stand to be helped the most. “One of the main barriers to getting access to mental health care services is the stigma that surrounds mental health,” said Garza. “With this platform, patients do not have to leave their house to access a provider. The stigma that surrounds mental health practically disappears because nobody else knows you’re accessing those services.” Carolina Partners, the largest private mental health provider in North Carolina, launched its teletherapy program DIRECT CARE in late 2016. But when Garza joined the practice in June 2017, only 30 patients a month were using the service. Now, that number is around 400 people per month. Those living in rural areas without nearby mental health care providers like the service, but it’s also a hit with busy professionals. “Patients don’t have to spend money on gas, they can do it during their lunchtime, when they get home after working all day, weekends, holidays — they can basically

access the service 365 days a year — at any time during the day,” said Garza. “That’s why the service has become so popular.” Convincing insurance companies Blue Cross Blue Shield, Cigna and United Health Care to cover virtual mental health care services was another way Carolina Partners was able to add more teletherapy patients. Garza says his focus is now on Medicare and Medicaid. “As long as Medicaid isn’t on board, we’re missing a huge part of the population,” he said. “I’m working to bring in the vulnerable populations, the ones who actually need access to health care services the most.” Garza is confident that telemedicine will eventually become widely accepted. Its clear advantages — convenience, affordability and accessibility — make the service an easy sell. “Society is evolving at such a fast pace that we health care professionals, we need to evolve with it,” he said. “Not only to stay competitive in the market, but also because the patients’ needs are changing, and we need to address them in different ways. We have to adapt.” t


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APRIL 2018


“Marta's unique brands of clothing and accessories along with their customer service is fantastic. And, their dedication to assisting others is not just about clothes. Serving the community is important to me. Marta’s commitment to giving back to the Triangle through their fundraising efforts makes shopping here a win-win in my heart! And for that – Marta’s matters.” Kari Stoltz, Bank of America, Community Leader and Marta’s customer

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John Toebes demonstrates the home’s commercial pizza oven, the first to be installed in a local residence. The oven is surrounded by colorful semi-custom Talaverastyle tile, also reflected in the range hood. Coordinating solid color tiles are used in the backsplash.

30

APRIL 2018


Your Forever Home HOW UNIVERSAL DESIGN CAN CHANGE YOUR FUTURE WRITTEN BY NANCY PARDUE | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

FROM THE OUTSIDE, John and Mary Ellen Toebes’ brick ranch-style home is noteworthy because it sits on a 5.2-acre wooded lot in downtown Cary, where residential land can be hard to find. Open the door, and you’ll find that’s just the beginning of this home’s surprises. Brightly colored stucco walls, shuttered window boxes and reclaimed wooden beams evoke the open Spanish courtyards John loved when he lived in Madrid as a teenager. Above, a two-story electrochromatic skylight system controls UV rays and tints for an almost-instant “evening” charm. In the kitchen, Talavera-style tiles surround Cary’s first residential, commercialgrade pizza oven. And an 11-foot, dual-level island topper depicts the coast of the Spanish Mediterranean in recycled glass, mirror and mother of pearl, in a unique design created

by the Toebes and their interior designer, Sally Williams of Cary-based Colorful Concepts. The future in mind

But the biggest surprise of all is that this house was built using universal design standards to allow the world-traveling Toebes, in their 50s now, to age in place. They call it Hacienda Para Siempre, their forever home. “We are definitely still active and hope to be for a long time to come,” said John, “but we got a glimpse into our possible future from our own aging parents. They valued their ability to live independently, but navigating stairs and uneven surfaces made staying in their home difficult. So we thought we should make decisions for our future selves now, rather than have circumstances force change on us.” This forward thinking is growing in popularity among area homeowners, says the

Toebes’ homebuilder, Lewis Sadler of Carybased Sadler Construction. “People are looking at their homes as homes again and not stock options,” Sadler said, “and when you make that kind of longterm investment, you want it to last. “They understand that we are saving them money by eliminating the need to renovate their home later in order to stay in it. With over 10,000 people turning 60 every day in this country, the need is growing. “You can renovate the average home for $50,000 to $125,000, depending on your design and layout,” Sadler said. “The cost of moving to a (senior) community averages $40,000 to $70,000 per year for rent. In two to three years, you will have spent what it would cost to update your home and stay there.” continued on page 32

Cary homeowners John and Mary Ellen Toebes built their new home using barrier-free universal design standards that will enable them to age in place. Dubbing it Hacienda Para Siempre, their “forever home,” the Spanish courtyard style is inspired by John’s teen years living in Madrid.

CARY MAGAZINE 31


“People are looking at their homes as homes again and not stock options. And when you make that kind of longterm investment, you want it to last.”

An accessible drawerstyle microwave is built into the kitchen island.

— Lewis Sadler, Sadler Construction continued from page 31

The little things

Easy-open casement windows are among many universal design features in the Toebes’ residence. “A universally-designed home can be as unique and beautiful as any other home; it’s all in the design choices you make,” Williams said.

The list of universal design features incorporated into the Toebes’ home “goes on and on,” Sadler said, and includes step less entrances; curb less showers; appliances and switch plates located at accessible heights; pocket-door vanities in the bathroom and easy-open casement windows. “We’re enjoying unexpected little things too, like the touch-on, touch-off faucet in the kitchen and lights that turn on as you open doors or enter the closets,” said Mary Ellen. “Our biggest surprise is probably how much our granddaughter benefits from the universal design, with the sink and countertop height.” “And don’t underestimate the value of a flat home without stairs,” added John. “Moving things around is really easy now.” continued on page 35

Who to hire A contractor who is trained and experienced in universal design will also have experienced subcontractors, such as shower glass and tile installers who can properly install no-threshold showers. Should you want the assistance of an interior designer, be sure that designer is also trained and experienced in universal design. Source: Sally Williams (right), Colorful Concepts Interior Design, colorfulconceptsinteriordesign.com. 32

APRIL 2018


Wall murals add a touch of the Spanish Mediterranean to John and Mary Ellen Toebes’ hacienda-style home; interior designer Sally Williams of Colorful Concepts created the look with wallpaper. “The openness of the great room and dining room, with all the natural light flooding in from the massive skylights, is breathtaking,” Williams said. CARY MAGAZINE 33


Sadler Construction of Cary has been building and renovating for universal design for the past 15 years, but owner Lewis Sadler says demand is increasing. “With over 10,000 people turning 60 every day in this country the need is growing, and it will not slow down since the generation behind the Boomers is even larger.”

ABOVE: The centerpiece of the Toebes’ kitchen is an 11-foot, dual-height Environite island custom-designed by Sally Williams, featuring recycled glass, mirror, mother of pearl and multiple shades of resin. The counter captures the Spanish Mediterranean coast, from sand and sea to sky and mountains. RIGHT: Accessibility is key in the home’s bathrooms, which feature pocket doors in the two-level vanities to permit wheelchair maneuverability, and tilting mirrors. In the shower, a drop-down bench, dual water controls and a handheld option address future needs. 34

APRIL 2018


Builder Options North Carolina has two licenses for builders: Residential and Building, which requires Americans with Disabilities Act knowledge. For universal design applications, hire a contractor with a Building license. Research builders in your area. Is universal design work part of their business model? Call your local Home Builders Association to learn who builds universal design or has the Certified Aging in Place Specialist (CAPS) designation. The Home Builders Association of RaleighWake County can be reached at (919) 233-2033, or hbawake.com. To eliminate the chance of a builder missing something, use a plan company that knows universal design; Sadler uses Cary-based Lifestage Home Designs, lifestagehomedesigns.com. A less extensive alternative to universal design is Visitable, which requires one step-less entry and an accessible bathroom on the main level. Source: Lewis Sadler, Sadler Construction, sadlerconstructionnc.com

continued from page 32

The Toebes, after an extensive search, chose Williams to manage not their general décor, but their home’s key interior design elements, thanks to her ability to adapt highquality concepts to their unique requirements. “The Toebes were such fun to work with, very open to exploring new concepts and materials, and eager for a colorful palette throughout,” Williams said. “We’ve had clients incorporate universal design in renovation projects in the past, but this is the first new construction project we’ve had where the client was committed to incorporating as many universal design concepts into the entirety of their home as possible.” The venture was quite different from typical projects, Williams says, particularly

when it came to flooring materials. She used luxury vinyl tile throughout the home to provide a softer surface in case of falls, with the exception of a low-pile commercial grade carpet in the theater room and ceramic tile on the shower floors. Williams says universal design is truly for everyone. “Whether or not you’re aging or handicapped, an entire home with wide doorways and hallways feels much more spacious and comfortable than one with narrow doors and halls,” she said. “And who needs thresholds to trip on? A universally designed home can be as unique and beautiful as any other home. It’s all in the design choices you make.” t CARY MAGAZINE 35


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Croakers from Wanchese, N.C., are displayed on ice at the Locals Seafood booth at the Western Wake Farmers Market in Morrisville. Locals is at the market every weekend, but the croakers won’t be back until November.

LOCAL

FISH Good for you,

good for North Carolina 38

APRIL 2018


WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

W

hen it comes to healthy dinner options, fish is a great catch. “Fish has so much variety — in textures, in flavors. Then if you add shellfish in there — oysters, shrimp and clams. There’s just so much there, and so many things you can do with it,” said Debbie Moose, a Raleigh cookbook author. It’s also really good for you. The lean protein is low in saturated fats and cholesterol, and fish high in omega-3 fatty acids — such as N.C. trout — may actually reduce the risk of heart disease. The American Heart Association recommends eating at least two 3.5-ounce servings of fish each week. Given its versatility and health benefits, seafood should be a popular choice for dinner, but Moose says that isn’t so. “People still have a fear of fish,” she said. “People are afraid of overcooking it or undercooking it. They might overcook it and say, ‘Oh, this is terrible. I don’t like fish.’ It’s not that you don’t like fish, it’s that you didn’t cook it right.” In her new book, “Carolina Catch: Cooking North Carolina Fish and Shellfish from Mountains to Coast,” Moose describes several ways to cook fish properly. Much de-

pends on the thickness of the fish and its texture, but most cook up quickly — another advantage for busy consumers. Coastal bounty

And she says, buying local seafood can solve two common concerns about eating more fish — sustainability and cost. Overfishing has depleted some species, making them more expensive. And cheap imported seafood comes with hidden costs, says Moose. Environmental damage from shrimp farming in Asia has been well-documented, and the overseas industry in general is poorly regulated. But by eating lesser-known fish like monkfish, amberjack and black drum, consumers can get a quality product, help the environment and support N.C. fishermen. “With a little bit of effort, you can get something that’s much better for your family, much higher quality, and you’re benefiting people who live in the state,” she said. Changing Markets

Until recently, it has been difficult to find local seafood in the Triangle. Much continued on page 41

“Fish has so much variety — in textures, in flavors. Then if you add shellfish in there — oysters, shrimp and clams. There’s just so much there, and so many things you can do with it.” — Debbie Moose, Raleigh cookbook author CARY MAGAZINE 39


Katherine Nguyen, 2, helps her father, Hoan, pick up the catch of the day from Locals Seafood employee Nate Christensen at the Western Wake Farmers Market. Only 25 percent of Locals’ seafood is sold to retail customers, but founder Lin Peterson says the farmers markets are a great way to educate consumers about local fish.

40

APRIL 2018


COOKING TIPS Thin fish (flounder or tilefish): Pan sauté simply with some olive oil, green onions and sherry vinegar.

RALEIGH CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Thicker fish (monkfish, grouper or dogfish): Roast or broil in the oven, either with a sauce or in a foil packet. Steak-like (tuna, mahi or drum): Grilling is best, just oil your grill well or use a well-oiled grill pan. Source: Debbie Moose continued from page 39

of the state’s fish and shellfish is shipped north to large fish markets in Boston and New York, where fishermen can get better prices for their catch. Seeing the rise of the locavore movement, Ryan Speckman and Lin Peterson started Locals Seafood in 2010 with a cooler of Stumpy Point, N.C., shrimp and a pick up truck. Now the company makes four trips to the coast each week, bringing seafood to Raleigh for processing and distribution. “We saw a void in the marketplace,” said Peterson. “We’re only two or three hours from the coastline, so you’d think this product would

just be making it here. It isn’t, because the supply chains move everything to the north. “We go directly to the source; we focus on North Carolina fish. Just like the movement for local produce connects consumers to farms and farmers markets, we’re connecting consumers to the coast.” Locals Seafood can be found at area farmers markets including the Western Wake Farmers Market and the State Farmers Market in Raleigh. The company also operates a CSF, a community supported fishery, which provides subscribers with two pounds of fresh catch every week. continued on page 44

Nate Christensen holds a hybrid striped bass, which was raised at the Oak Grove Fish Farm in Washington, N.C.

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Debbie Moose grew up eating fish sticks, but now cooks seafood regularly. One of her favorites is soft-shell crab. “Fried soft-shell crab in the spring, I just love them,” she says. “They’re not like any other kind of seafood.”

42

APRIL 2018


FROZEN ASSETS Local seafood can become more affordable if you buy in season and freeze it, but use within six months for the best flavor. Fillets: Pat the flesh dry, and wrap

C E L E B R AT I N G

YEARS

– A N N I V E R S A R Y–

each fillet in heavy plastic wrap. Place the wrapped fillets in a freezer bag, press out the air and label.

Shrimp: Remove the heads, but don’t remove the shells. For shortterm freezing, place in a freezer bag, and squeeze out all the air. For longer-term freezing, place the shrimp in a freezer container and add cold water to cover. The water protects the shrimp from freezer burn.

Oysters and clams: These can be frozen in their shells. Before placing in a freezer bag, rinse and scrub the shells under cold water to remove any dirt. Source: Debbie Moose

CARY MAGAZINE 43


RECIPE Chargrilled Blackened Cape Shark Fillet over Pineapple Salsa From “Carolina Catch: Cooking North Carolina Fish and Shellfish from Mountains to Coast,” by Debbie Moose.

Once you have a good fish recipe, different species with similar textures can be substituted, says Debbie Moose. Although developed for cape shark, this recipe for blackened fillet with pineapple salsa works just as well with monkfish. Asian kale slaw with sesame oil and cider vinegar is a fresh alternative to traditional creamy coleslaw.

As part of a N.C. Sea Grant program to encourage the consumption of underused fish, chef Tim Coyne of Bistro-By-The-Sea in Morehead City developed this recipe using cape shark, also known as dogfish. If you cannot get cape shark, substitute with a white-fleshed fish. Makes 4 servings 2 cups diced fresh pineapple 1 tablespoon diced red bell pepper 2 slices pickled jalapeño 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro, plus sprigs for garnish Juice from 1 lime 1/2 teaspoon black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives 4 cape shark fillets (about 3 ounces each) Blackened seasoning (such as Zatarain’s or Emeril’s) Prepare the salsa by combining the pineapple, bell pepper, jalapeno peppers, chopped cilantro, lime juice, pepper and chives in a small bowl. Set aside. 44

APRIL 2018

Lightly dust the fish with blackened seasoning on both sides. Preheat the oven broiler, and place the fish on a nonstick baking pan or a pan sprayed with nonstick cooking spray. Broil until the fish is cooked through, about 5 to 8 minutes depending on the thickness of the fillets. To serve, spoon the salsa over the cooked fish and garnish with cilantro sprigs. Note: Instead of broiling, you can cook the fish on top of the stove in a sauté pan lightly coated with canola oil.

continued from page 41

Different, yet tasty

Like local produce, coastal seafood has seasons, too. On its website, Locals posts what is available at the weekend’s markets, and there is also a chart showing when different species will be most plentiful. “That’s what we give our customers at the farmers market,” said Peterson, “a glimpse of the seasons and what’s happening off our coast.” Consumers can save money by buying fish when it’s in season, and the more unfamiliar fish can be more economical. “We try to get people to take a chance on different species,” he said. “If you’re looking for salmon, we don’t have salmon off our coast. So amberjack is another large fish — it’s got a good fat content, and it’s firm and flaky like salmon.” As part of these education efforts, Locals also works with area chefs, getting them to branch out beyond tuna, mahi and flounder. Roughly 75 percent of Locals Seafood is sold to restaurants and retailers like Whole Foods and Weaver Street Market, says Peterson. Eateries with local seafood on the menu include The Provincial in Apex and Maximillian’s Grill and Pizzeria Faulisi in Cary. “When someone tries something that’s expertly prepared by a chef,” he said, “they’re more willing to try it at home.” And both Peterson and Moose agree, eating more North Carolina seafood is a good thing. t

LOCAL SEAFOOD RESOURCES N.C. Catch is a nonprofit that promotes the state’s coastal seafood, nccatch.org N.C. Sea Grant provides consumer information and more, ncseagrant.ncsu.edu/seafood Locals Seafood is at the Western Wake Farmers Market year-round, localsseafood.com Walking Fish delivers seafood to CSF subscribers in Raleigh, walking-fish.org The N.C. Department of Agriculture has recipes and more, ncagr.gov/markets/seafood


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Rocking

WRITTEN BY EMILY UHLAND PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

e l o h W 30 the

Why a month with

no cheese, chocolate or wine might just

be worth it.

Vegetables get promoted from side dish to main event during your Whole30. Options are nearly endless, from artichokes to zucchini.

46

APRIL 2018

Radiant

skin. Deeper sleep. Surging energy. Mental clarity. And yes, weight loss. All are results many report after finishing the Whole30 — a detox program that eliminates all grains, dairy, legumes, sugar and alcohol from your diet for 30 days. The restrictions are severe, but the goal is lofty: to help identify and eliminate foods and behaviors that could negatively impact your health. Developed in 2009 by Melissa and Dallas Hartwig, the Whole30 has steadily grown in acclaim, popularized by word-of-mouth testimonials and social media. The program’s founders have authored six books, maintain a comprehensive website and run active social media accounts — all as resources for a passionate community of more than a million “Whole30-ers.”


How to

Whole30

the

“Almost anyone could find some benefit in doing the Whole30,” said Jordan DeBoard, a registered dietitian. “People who know they have digestive issues are good candidates since it does eliminate common foods that are gut offenders.” Gut offenders can be any foods that may cause inflammation in your intestines. Foods like whole grains, beans, peanuts and dairy — ones we typically think of as healthy — are off-limits for the length of the program, allowing a person’s body to “reset” before adding these potential offenders back in. Plenty of vegetables, fruits, high-quality meats, nuts, eggs and healthy fats fill the Whole30 plate. “You will be eating plain, whole foods in their natural state. You are not going to be eating any foods with added sugars, additives, chemicals or food coloring,” said DeBoard. “Nutritionally that’s the greatest benefit of the program.” After the 30 days of elimination comes the reintroduction phase. Participants are instructed to add the forbidden food groups back into their diet one by one and see how they feel. Judge if beans, for example, cause any negative reactions.

Not

DA IR Y

Results

Thirty days without cheese or wine may sound like torture, but complaints tend to be muted by accounts of dramatic results. Most participants experience some weight loss, but it’s the “non-scale victories,” as the program dubs them, that define the program. “If you go into it just expecting weight loss, you are coming at it from the wrong approach. It’s so much more than that,” said DeBoard. While on the program, Apex resident Danie Summers says she felt an overall desire to live well. In January she completed her second round of Whole30. “Holistically, doing something that involves that much discipline snowballs into being easier to do other things that require discipline,” she said. “I take better care of myself in general when I’m doing it.” Summers came across the Whole30 through stories about her husband’s coworker. At first, she thought the program’s strict guidelines were the most absurd commitment she’d ever heard of. But one impression struck a chord —

Eat

This:

Meat,

choose organic and grass-fed as often as you can.

Seafood E G G Herbs

S

Vegetables (lots!)

atural FruitN U T S Nfa ts, Cocoinl ut o

such as avoc ados and olives

Spring and summer make great months to tackle the Whole30 because plenty of produce, like berries, lettuces, tomatoes, squash and okra, is in season and available locally.

continued on page 48

That:

Grains,

including wheat, oats, corn, rice and quinoa

Alcohol

Added sugars,

even maple syrup and honey

Legumes,

s including lentils, peanut soy of s form all and

Additives,

like carrageenan, MSG

or sulfites

CARY MAGAZINE 47


continued from page 47

the coworker began the program because she felt out of control of her own eating habits. Later, after a trip to visit family, Summers herself felt entirely thrown off her routine and unable to make her own food choices. “I don’t get to decide whether or not I eat the things that my grandmother just brought me,” she said. “So those coworker’s words came back to me, and I bought the e-book and read it on the plane ride home.” “My biggest takeaway is that it gave me the power to decide what is and what isn’t worth it. It’s not that I’m never going to eat ice cream again, but I may never eat Halo Top again,” said Summers.

in the

Kitchen

As a culinary professional, Nancy Whiteley saw the rise in popularity of the Whole30 firsthand. She completed the program nearly three years ago while she was in the early years of her personal catering busi-

Fresh herbs and citrus fruits are building blocks of delicious Whole30 dishes, says chef Nancy Whiteley. 48

APRIL 2018

ness called The Busy Bee Chef, which offers weekly meals for families delivered to their homes. When her clients asked for Whole30compliant meals, Whiteley was ready. She says with a limited list of ingredients, it is important to focus on flavor. “Add in lots of really good, fresh ingredients — a lot of fresh-squeezed citrus and fresh herbs,” she said. Since participants must prepare nearly every meal at home, Whiteley says to save effort by using recipes you are familiar with and “Whole30-ize” them. “To make my chili recipe, we have to leave out the sugar and beer and beans but can put in everything else,” she said. Get creative with your substitutions, she advises. Pick spaghetti squash or cauliflower rice instead of pasta. Trade tortillas for a taco bowl piled high with pico de gallo and guacamole. Wrap hamburgers in sturdy lettuce, like iceberg or romaine,

“It’s given me the freedom to pick and choose and not just desperately claw for the closest sweet thing to satisfy a craving.”

mers, ie Sum e30-er — Dan hol ime W two-t

in place of a bun. And be careful about prepared dressings and sauces, which often include added sugar or soy sauce. “I made all my salad dressings, and a stir fry sauce, from scratch,” said Whiteley. With its limitations on grains, legumes and even honey, the Whole30 is the most restrictive of the special diets she has cooked for, she says, but it is beneficial for resetting your metabolism and learning what’s making you feel bad. “Foods affect how we feel and how we act: our mood, energy, weight — everything.” t


S P I T TOP Power in

numbers

Enlist a spouse, partner or friend to Whole30 with you. You can share the planning and cooking tasks and keep each other accountable.

e r u t a d Rea the liter Start out on Whole30.com,

which contains a wealth of

“It felt good to get through the 30 days and look back and say, ‘I did it.’ And I learned how to cook these new things, and I learned how to make mayonnaise. It is a good feeling, a great way to reset.”

information and testimonials.

— Jordan DeBoard, one-time Whole30-er

Investigate some of the books written by Melissa and Dallas Hartwig: “It Starts With Food,” “The Whole30” or “The Whole30 Day by Day.”

Fully commit Eradicate the notion of a cheat day or

any slips for 30 days to experience maximum benefit.

Anticipate inevitable

challenges

Friends going out for drinks?

Birthday cake at the office?

Natural fats are an important component of every Whole30 meal. Nuts, seeds and avocados are great sources.

Don’t give yourself any excuses, and choose to stay the course.

Read Sweeteners and additives hide in food foods you wouldn’t expect. labels CARY MAGAZINE 49


You’ll need

Emergency Foods Inevitably the day will come when you have to work late, get stuck in traffic or just CANNOT wash another dish. Have compliant options on hand, particularly heat-and-serve proteins, to save you a hangry trip to the grocery store or a program-ending drive-thru run. Danie Summers recommends: Aidells Chicken and Apple Sausage, Costco’s Pulled Pork and Applegate Farms Uncured Beef Hot Dogs.

Beware of Whole30

House

Arrest

“It’s almost impossible to eat out and be strict Whole30,” said Jordan DeBoard. “You really have

to adjust your social life.” Find ways to socialize that aren’t food-centric.

dairy, t a e l l i t s I “ at the to be. h w w o n k I but re going g to a s e c n e u q e cons are goin Today you nd tomorrow do this, a are going you be sad.” o t — Nanc y Whiteley, one-time Whole30-er

Danie Summers advises scheduling your Whole30 for a low-key month, when you don’t have any special occasions, holidays or vacations planned. “In the

The

Carb Flu

first week or so, when your body is detoxing from the sugar and

the processed carbs, you can feel worse and more sluggish before you begin to feel better,” said DeBoard. “It will pass.”

skeptics

and

doubters Friends or family might get frustrated when you can’t join them for happy hour or taste test their latest baked creation. Prepare to answer the question, “So what can you eat?” many times throughout the month. Stay positive and let your results do the talking. The program probably sounded crazy to you at one time too.

50

APRIL 2018

Eggs and bacon are a go-to Whole30 breakfast, but with cereal, oatmeal, muffins and yogurt off limits, many struggle with adding variety to their morning meal. Last night’s leftovers, veggie bowls and sweet potatoes are all great options — especially when topped with a fried egg.


So Long,

Calorie

Counting As long as the foods are program approved, there’s no need to count calories or restrict portions while on the Whole30. “There’s really no reason to feel hungry. You can eat as much fruit and vegetables or even meat as you want. It’s really great to see that there is a healthy way of eating that you don’t have to be obsessed over your calories.” — Jordan DeBoard, one-time Whole30-er

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Nancy Whiteley of The Busy Bee chef prepping Whole30 foods in her home kitchen.

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Jonathan Fredin

H ave you recently made

Try this

at Home

Personal chef and caterer Nancy Whiteley shared one of her favorite Whole30-compliant recipes:

Moroccan Salad

with Champagne Vinaigrette

For the Salad:

Champagne Vinaigrette

1 cup butternut squash, peeled and cubed 1 cup red beets, peeled and cubed 2 tablespoons olive oil ⅛ teaspoon sea salt 5 cups romaine lettuce, rough chopped 1 cup arugula 2 medjool dates pitted and chopped 1 carrot, shaved 2 tablespoons toasted almonds 2 tablespoons dried, unsweetened cranberries ½ red bell pepper, large dice, or 1 jarred roasted red pepper, sliced 2 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and sliced Champagne vinaigrette (recipe follows)

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard ¼ cup Champagne vinegar 1 tablespoon lemon juice Pinch of salt and pepper ⅛ teaspoon turmeric ¼ teaspoon cumin ⅛ teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon paprika 1½ teaspoons fresh ginger, minced 1 tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped ½ cup neutral-flavored oil

Toss the squash and beets in the olive oil and sea salt. Roast vegetables at 400 degrees F for 40 minutes or until tender. Remove from oven and let cool. Toss lettuce and arugula in a large bowl to mix. Arrange the squash, beets, dates, carrot, almonds, cranberries, bell pepper and egg slices over greens in stripes.

In a blender, combine Dijon mustard, Champagne vinegar, lemon juice, salt, pepper, spices, ginger and parsley. With the blender running, drizzle in the oil until dressing is combined. Serve dressing alongside salad. Serves 4.


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Sunday worship: 8:30 and 11 a.m. www.christthekingcary.org 600 Walnut Street, Cary 919-467-8989

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SPECIAL SECTION

PREMIER PRACTICES

PREMIER PRACTICES To find the best medical care for your family, look no further. From the top of your head to the tips of your toes, these local professionals cover it all.

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CARY MAGAZINE 59


PREMIER PRACTICES

CAROLINA RETINA INSTITUTE, PC DR. AMIT KUMAR, MD 940 SE CARY PARKWAY SUITE 100 CARY, NC 27518 (919) 859-4511 CarolinaRetinaInstitute.com

'FOCUS ON THE ENTIRE PATIENT' Dr. Amit Kumar’s focus on the entire patient — instead of just treating the current symptoms of the eyes — is what sets his approach to medicine apart from other practices. Dr. Kumar started his practice more than 10 years ago, focusing on retinal eye diseases. To meet the health care needs and demands of his patients, who wanted to see just one doctor for their eye care needs, Dr. Kumar changed his business model from a pure Retina Practice to a Comprehensive Ophthalmology Practice. In an environment of high deductibles and copays, this model works well. It is especially helpful for elderly patients because it reduces their financial burden, as well as number of visits. “Our patients don’t have to go to multiple doctors for diabetes evaluation, glaucoma or cataracts,” said Dr. Kumar.

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He is able to medically and surgically treat most eye conditions, ranging from diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration and retinal detachments to cataracts and dry eyes — all in his practice. This model provides comprehensive care for patients while also helping them save time and money. Patients often get very anxious when it comes to illnesses associated with their eyes. Carolina Retina Institute is a Premier Practice because Dr. Kumar can put his patients at ease with a calm demeanor and “non-rushed” approach. He takes his time to explain the condition and treatment plan in simple terms so that every patient can understand the next steps in their eye care. The entire team at Carolina Retina Institute works hard to ensure the patient has a positive experience — from the moment they walk in the door to the end of their appointment.

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PREMIER PRACTICES

LOOK BETTER AND FEEL BETTER Dr. Renzo A. Zaldivar, the founder of Oculofacial and Plastic Surgery Consultants, opened the doors to his practice in 2011. Since that time, Dr. Zaldivar has been delivering compassionate, top quality care, and as a result the practice has grown tremendously. He has since brought on Dr. Peter Kreymerman, plastic surgeon; and Dr. Cassandra White, oculofacial surgeon. Dr. Zaldivar meticulously chose each physician he brought to the practice to ensure it was built around patient care and satisfaction. The Oculofacial and Plastic Surgery Consultants deliver a wide variety of services, both surgical and non-invasive. The physicians bring their own unique style to the services they provide. They specialize in aesthetic and reconstructive aspects of the face, eyelids, brow, orbital bones and

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tear duct system. Furthermore, they offer treatments for the rejuvenation of the skin such as Botox, fillers, Platelet Rich Plasma and Facial Fat Grafting. “Whether we are trying to stop time or fix any problems you might have, your goals are my goals. I will help you get there while maintaining a very natural look,” said Dr. White. “When they are seen by friends and family, they don’t know what happened. They don’t know what they had done, they just know the patient looks and feels better,” said Dr. Kreymerman. “We want to make sure you have an outstanding experience from beginning to end, throughout the process, have all your questions answered and make sure we are available if you need anything,” said Dr. Zaldivar.

OCULOFACIAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY CONSULTANTS DR. RENZO A. ZALDIVAR 3731 NW CARY PARKWAY CARY, NC 27513 (919) 443-2557 2018 NEW GARDEN ROAD, STE. C GREENSBORO, NC 27410 (336) 443-9300

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PREMIER PRACTICES

CARY ORTHOPAEDICS 1120 SE CARY PARKWAY SUITE 100 | CARY 101 LATTNER COURT | MORRISVILLE 600-A VILLAGE WALK DRIVE | HOLLY SPRINGS 600 NORTH PERSON STREET | RALEIGH SPINE CENTER: 1110 SE CARY PARKWAY SUITE 103 | CARY 100 GUY ROAD | CLAYTON

(919) 467-4992

caryortho.com

MOVING YOU TOWARD BETTER HEALTH AT CARY ORTHOPAEDICS With six convenient locations in the Triangle and a specialized team of over 45 orthopaedic and physical therapy providers, Cary Orthopaedics keeps you healthy and gets you back in motion! Whether you suffer from pain or injury caused by trauma, sports injuries or degenerative conditions, our expert orthopaedic physicians, spine specialists, physician assistants and physical therapists offer a full spectrum of surgical and non-surgical treatments. In addition to providing the highest level of care in general orthopaedics, we have centers of excellence in the subspecialties of sports medicine, spinal care, joint replacement and physical therapy.

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Why Choose Cary Orthopaedics?

Finding the best treatment for your bone and joint pain is our top priority. Our specialists utilize a comprehensive approach to patient care that is much more than just treating patients for their various ailments. All of our surgeons are dedicated to providing excellent inpatient and outpatient surgical care and are well versed on the most advanced surgical practices. Cary Orthopaedics’ friendly staff realize your time is valuable. We strive to schedule your appointment as quickly as possible, sometimes on the same day! Visit us in Cary, Morrisville, Holly Springs, downtown Raleigh or Clayton.

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PREMIER PRACTICES

A TALENTED AND CARING TEAM OF PROFESSIONALS When it comes to having a beautiful, healthy smile, experience matters. That’s what you’ll get when you trust your dental care to Dr. Patrick Lawrence, DDS and Dr. Shanup Gundecha, DMD, at Family and Cosmetic Dentistry. Our talented and caring team of professionals make you feel at home the moment you walk in the door. We pride ourselves in providing the best dental care in Cary for the entire family. We stress prevention, restoration and overall health while improving the smiles of those we serve. Our practice utilizes all the latest technology and superior materials as well as offering numerous amenities for your

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

comfort. Our digital ITero scanner replaces the need for messy impressions and provides accurate results with maximum patient comfort. Our smile services include ZOOM chairside whitening and Invisalign clear braces. We welcome new patients and would love to have you become part of our dental family! Schedule a new patient exam and receive a complimentary take-home tooth-whitening kit or an Oral B electric toothbrush kit as our gift to you. To learn more about our practice and read patient reviews please visit our website, CaryCosmeticDentist.com.

FAMILY AND COSMETIC DENTISTRY PATRICK LAWRENCE DDS SHANUP GUNDECHA DMD 431 KEISLER DRIVE | CARY (919) 859-1330

CaryCosmeticDentist.com

CARY MAGAZINE 63


PREMIER PRACTICES

GENERATIONS FAMILY PRACTICE 1021 DARRINGTON DRIVE SUITE 101 CARY, NC 27513 (919) 852-3999 generationsfamilypractice.com

A GROWTH SPURT SENDS GENERATIONS FAMILY PRACTICE TO A NEW LOCATION CARY, N.C. — The doctors at Generations Family Practice focus on caring for children as well as adults, and that means monitoring changes in growth. But the practice had its own growth spurt recently — one that led to a new office location. Generations Family Practice recently moved about one mile away from their old office. The new location offers more space, with 27 exam rooms, and more advanced technology, said Dr. Melanie Mintzer, a “Best Doctor” Maggy Award winner four years in a row. “Our patients will find a comfortable, spacious waiting room, plus new services

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such as on-site X-ray, a separate medical aesthetics spa and a new doctor. We’ve done this to accommodate the growth of the Cary area and the needs of our patients,” Mintzer said. “Most importantly, this change means we can keep the same high quality of personalized, individualized medical care." Generations Family Practice offers health services for the whole family, from pediatric on up, including acute care, chronic conditions, dermatology, mental health care and more. The award-winning team is accepting new patients at 1021 Darrington Drive, Suite 101 Cary, N.C., 27513.

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PREMIER PRACTICES

‘NATURAL RESULTS, LIFELONG CONFIDENCE’ Men and women from all over North Carolina seek out Davis & Pyle Plastic Surgery for their unsurpassed breast and body enhancements, personalized patient care and non-intimidating attitude around plastic surgery. What drives these people to Davis & Pyle Plastic Surgery is not the goal of perfection, most commonly people are just looking to improve something that’s been bothersome to them. This can be true whether patients are 54 or 24 — men or women. The practice’s award-winning Patient Care Team make it a priority that every person who visits the practice leaves sure of at least one thing — that there is nothing weird about considering plastic surgery. When plastic surgery works really well,

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

it doesn’t create something fake; it simply takes something that’s bothersome to a person and makes them not bothered by it. Through the most modern surgical technology and a dedication to personalized results, Dr. Glenn Davis, Dr. Jeremy Pyle and Dr. Benjamin Wood create an environment where a patient’s results can simultaneously be life-changing and look completely natural. On the other hand, many patients seek change, but prefer non-surgical options for their goals. For those men and women, Skin Raleigh is located across the hall with the most experienced team of any med-spa in the Triangle. After all, there’s a reason they were voted Best Place to De-Age!

DAVIS & PYLE SKIN RALEIGH 2304 WESVILL COURT RALEIGH (919) 785-1220 skinraleigh.com dpraleigh.com

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PREMIER PRACTICES

WAKE EAR, NOSE AND THROAT SPECIALISTS & WAKE SINUS CENTER 115 PARKWAY OFFICE COURT SUITE 201 CARY, NC 27518 (919) 851-5636 wakeent.com

FRIENDLY AND CARING STAFF Wake Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) Specialists is an otolaryngology practice where every employee believes in the total care of each patient. Many patients have told us that we have the friendliest and most caring staff around, and that makes us very proud! Our clinic is the vision of Dr. Pankaj Gupta. In 2010, he started Wake ENT Specialists to offer patients the opportunity to minimize office visits and be under the care of just one physician for all ENT concerns. We handle all aspects of ENT care, including allergy testing and treatment, sinus CT scanning and surgical intervention. The practice also features a hearing center for our patients with hearing loss and/or tinnitus. Dr. Gupta graduated from the nationally recognized Honors Program in Medical Education (HPME) from Northwestern University in Chicago. He then completed his residency in

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Otolaryngology, also at Northwestern. Dr. Gupta has been practicing as a boardcertified Otolaryngologist since 1997. His patients appreciate the time, attention and thoughtful care that he provides. Dr. Rebecca Lee graduated from the University of Louisville. She works closely with her patients and has built trusting relationships with them, since she sees many of them every three to six months for routine checks. Dr. Lee works in conjunction with Dr. Gupta to determine whether patients’ hearing issues require medical care, or may be resolved with hearing devices or alternate accessories. For our hearing loss and tinnitus patients who require hearing devices, Dr. Lee offers hearing consults at no charge to review available options. You can learn more about us at www.WakeENT.com, or call (919) 851-5636, Ext. 1 to make an appointment. SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


PREMIER PRACTICES

WOMEN’S HEALTHCARE YOU CAN TRUST As women, you’re tasked with busy home and work lives. We know self-care often falls to the bottom of your to-do list. Triangle Physicians for Women optimizes the time you spend with us by providing a one-stop shop where all annual ob/gyn and 3D mammography screenings can take place — in one place — on the same day. Additionally, our innovative health offerings address all gynecological issues, no matter your age or stage in life. We are proud to offer unique services such as MonaLisa Touch (for vaginal dryness) and Geneveve (for vaginal laxity) that can transform and rejuvenate your intimate relationship. DOCTOR, TEACHER, MENTOR, FRIEND

It is with the heaviest of hearts that we announce the death of our beloved Dr. Gerald Mulvaney (pictured back right). For decades, Dr. Mulvaney served thousands of women across the Triangle. His compassion, SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

humor, bright smile and heartwarming voice will always be remembered, along with his renowned clinical expertise. HIS LEGACY CONTINUES

Our Triangle Physicians for Women family has grown to ten providers, offering state-of-the-art medical advancements, coupled with highly trained Certified Nurse Midwifery methodologies, to bring you the ultimate in holistic women’s health care. Thanks to the foundation that Dr. Mulvaney laid for us, we continue to reach out to the women of Wake County. We are proud to announce the opening of a second location to serve the needs of the women in the Holly Springs/Fuquay Varina area. You can now see the same physicians and midwives at our Holly Springs location or the original Cary location. Call (919) 678-6900 to schedule your appointment today. We look forward to welcoming you into our family of care.

TRIANGLE PHYSICIANS FOR WOMEN 600 NEW WAVERLY PLACE SUITE 310 CARY, NC 27518 2116 WERRINGTON DRIVE HOLLY SPRINGS, NC 27540 (919) 678-6900 tp4w.com

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PREMIER PRACTICES

STANLEY DENTISTRY 3731 NW CARY PARKWAY SUITE 201 CARY, NC 27513 (919) 415-0042 stanleysmiles.com

www.stanleysmiles.com

FIND YOUR SMILE® There is never a dull moment for Drs. Robert and Bobbi Stanley. The Cary family dentists are parents of four and owners of Stanley Dentistry, a comprehensive practice near Preston. They are founders and lead instructors at Stanley Institute for Comprehensive Dentistry, a dental continuing education organization. In late 2017, they both added Ironman to their already impressive list of accomplishments. Dr. Bobbi Stanley and husband Robert started Stanley Dentistry in 1995 with a commitment to providing world-class dentistry with high quality materials. Dr. Robert Stanley had always been a partner in the business side of the practice, and Dr. Bobbi was the only dentist. In 2008, Dr. Rob joined the clinical side of the family business as a full-time dentist. “It just made sense personally and professionally for Rob to join me in practicing

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dentistry,” said Dr. Bobbi. “It is rare to go back to school for an entirely new career when you’re already a successful engineer. But he saw how much I truly enjoyed my work, had been interested in dentistry since spending time in his grandfather’s Chicago dental practice as a child and we both knew we are a phenomenal team,” she continued.
 The Stanleys complement each other in life, in business and in dentistry. Dr. Robert enjoys more detailed procedures like implants, root canals and oral surgery, while Dr. Bobbi focuses on general and family dentistry, cosmetics, orthodontics and Invisalign. The result is a practice that serves the dental needs of the entire family under one roof. At Stanley Dentistry, Find Your Smile® is not just a catchy slogan, it’s a way of life. Creating smiles is their passion and life’s work.

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PREMIER PRACTICES

AWARD-WINNING PLASTIC SURGERY— SINCE THE VERY BEGINNING Putting patient safety, satisfaction and beautiful outcomes first has been the herald of CARE Plastic Surgery. Dr. Brian S. Coan, Founder of CARE, is an award-winning, nationally renowned, board certified plastic surgeon. Recently voted Best Plastic Surgeon in Cary, Dr. Coan and CARE are no strangers to awards for safety and beautiful aesthetic results. After being featured on the Emmyaward winning television program “The Doctors,” and winning Best Plastic Surgeon in Durham, N.C., for seven consecutive years, CARE recently moved to a larger facility to meet increasing patient demand. Now located in Cary, the CARE office offers two state-ofthe-art operating facilities in a contemporary setting. As a destination spot for plastic surgery patients across the state and globe, the new location offers the convenience of a fiveminute drive to the RDU airport and a vaSPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

riety of international restaurants and hotels for out-of-town guests. Dr. Coan is an MIT graduate who brings his enthusiasm for technology in plastic surgery to CARE by incorporating virtual imaging to help patients visualize post-surgical results. CARE’s popular slogan, “Results so natural we hate calling our surgery Plastic,” was coined by a former patient who still raves about her CARE experience. CARE’s most popular treatments include the lunchtime liquid facelift, Botox injectables, body contouring, liposuction, breast and body procedures and facial rejuvenation. Dr. Coan is also passionate about supporting local education and is active in non-profit and philanthropic endeavors. When not consulting with patients or in the operating room, Dr. Coan enjoys spending time with his wife and two young daughters.

CARE PLASTIC SURGERY 2001 WESTON PARKWAY CARY, NC 27513 (919) 484-4884 careplasticsurgery.com

CARY MAGAZINE 69


RALEIGH’S NEW EVENT SPACE FOR WEDDINGS | RECEPTIONS | COROPORATE EVENTS Beautifully renovated building in Five Points area Covered terrace with skyline view Arched wood barrel ceiling Intimate to 500+ guests

thefairviewraleigh.com 919-833-7900 1125 Capital Blvd. Managed by THEMEWORKS 70

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@thefairviewraleigh.com Bohio Fine Arts Photography


MOMENTS

that matter most. Here at 12 Oaks, you’ll find that there are a variety of activities from which to choose, many of which you’ll find completely new and different. For example, wine tastings. Shopping and sightseeing excursions. Zumba and cooking classes. Gardening club. Personal training sessions. Our advice to you? Be open to anything… and schedule a lifestyle by your design. These are the moments.

Homes from the $400s to $1 million+.

2008 Green Oaks Parkway Holly Springs, NC 27540 919.557.6850 | 12oaksnc.com

©2018 WSLD 12 Oaks, LLC. Equal Housing Opportunity. The amenities and features described and depicted herein are based upon current development plans, which are subject to change without notice. Actual development may not be as currently proposed. References to housing products, builders and prices are subject to change without notice as well.

Nature trails in the morning and yoga in the afternoon.

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Time for yourself can be found again.

#myislandretreat

www.islandretreatspa.com

CARY’S MOST UNIQUE SHOPPING EXPERIENCE Preston Flowers • J & F Gemelli’s • Woof Gang Bakery • Weichert Realty Sport Clips • AAA Carolinas • BB&T • Verizon • Love All Tennis • Harris Teeter Park Cleaners • Lee Nail Spa • Planet Smoothie • The UPS Store • Republic of Yoga Kilwins Chocolates • Spa at Stone Creek • Cornerstone Pediatric • Red Bowl made • Tribeca Tavern • Jimmy John’s • Tazza Kitchen • Johnny Pizza’s Cary Gymnastics • Greek Fiesta • Chick-fil-A • Walgreens • F45 Training Coming Soon: Clean Eatz

www.stonecreekvillagecary.com HigH House & Davis | 919.467.8880

MASSAGE | FACIALS | NAILS  HAIR STYLING |  MAKEUP YOGA STUDIO FAR-INFRARED SAUNA   YOGA RETREATS SPA BOUTIQUE

OPEN YEAR-ROUND 6 Maritime Way BALD HEAD ISLAND, NC & 23 S. 2nd Street, Suite 51 WILMINGTON, NC 910-454-0333 www.islandretreatspa.com @islandretreatspa

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...a neighbor, someone you know, someone you can trust and respect. Call today and speak with a real person who cares about your family’s protection and security.

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512 WEST WILLIAMS STREET | APEX 919-362-8310 INFO@ROGERSINC.NET


The Good Egg WRITTEN BY DAVID MCCREARY | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

At Noodle Boulevard in Cary, soft-boiled ajisu eggs are a welcome addition to noodle bowls like the spicy seafood kimchi ramen.

FOR YEARS, we have been warned about eggs. The conventional thinking has been that they are high in cholesterol and should therefore be avoided or eaten infrequently. Now, recent scientific research indicates that eating eggs won’t increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, and one egg a day can actually lower the possibility of stroke. “Not only are eggs low-calorie, but each egg contains six grams of protein, vitamin D, choline, lutein and other nutrients with only 1.5 grams of saturated fat,” said Kari Garner, a registered dietician with UNC Physicians Network. This is good news for those of us who enjoy eating eggs. What’s more, we discovered three local restaurants serving up satisfying egg-centric dishes for lunch and dinner. Before you go, just remember the “everything in moderation” mantra! continued on page 74 CARY MAGAZINE 73


continued from page 73

“We put so much care into every burger we make. The seasoning, the quality of the beef and the toppings all make our burgers stand apart.” – Amanda Fairbanks, Bad Daddy’s Burger Bar

Noodle Boulevard

Bad Daddy’s Burger Bar

Specialty item: Ajisu egg

Specialty item: Sam I Am burger

On any given weekday, mostly at lunchtime, young urban professionals are seen negotiating chopsticks and slurping noodles at this cozy Asian café. Surely these millennials are on to something. Chef/owner Lek Phromthong, a native of Thailand, churns out 10 types of noodle soups. Chicken curry, spicy seafood kimchi and beef noodle rank as popular choices. Slow-cooked pork, beef and chicken deliver the protein for bowls chockfull of vegetables like baby bok choy, corn, bean sprouts and scallions. Several soups feature a delectable, softboiled ajisu egg. “This Japanese-style egg is marinated with soy, mirin, sake, ginger and garlic,” Phromthong said. The egg is also one of nearly a dozen extra toppings that include nori (edible seaweed), enoki mushrooms and fried wonton skin. While you’re there, try a hoisin-sauce-laden pork belly bun and a bottle of Australian ginger beer. The restaurant’s dining room seats about two dozen customers at the bar areas and tables. Vibrantly hued walls, custommade stools and industrial-style pipe foot rails provide an easygoing atmosphere. Phromthong’s wife, Sara, brings food to guests with a warm smile. Noodle Boulevard is closed on Mondays. Online and call-in ordering is available, as is drive-through pickup.

This Charlotte-based gourmet burger franchise has gained a loyal following here in Western Wake — recently winning a Maggy Award for Best Burger & Fries. And for good reason. Create your own 7-ounce concoction by selecting from among four kinds of buns, more than a dozen cheeses, 20 condiments and mouthwatering toppings like truffle aioli, jalapeno bacon and fire-braised pulled pork. “We put so much care into every burger we make,” said General Manager Amanda Fairbanks, who has worked with Bad Daddy’s for five years. “The seasoning, the quality of the beef and the toppings all make our burgers stand apart.” Amid the dozen premium burgers offered is the popular Sam I Am, which features two slices of American cheese, Boar’s Head rosemary ham, fresh pesto and an over-easy fried egg. Fairbanks said guests frequently request eggs as a supplemental topping for other meals. “People add them to burgers, chicken sandwiches, salads — pretty much everything,” she said. To accompany the burger, choose classic housecut french fries or habit-forming sweet potato fries. Also available are coleslaw, homemade potato chips, tater tots or fresh fruit at no additional charge. Be sure to request some lip-smacking-good Bad Daddy’s sauce for dipping your fries. “The sauce contains mayo, chipotle peppers, barbecue sauce and other secret ingredients,” Fairbanks said.

919 N. Harrison Ave., Cary (919) 678-1199 noodleblvd.com

3300 Village Market Place, Morrisville (919) 297-0953 baddaddysburgerbar.com continued on page 77

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Bad Daddy’s Sam I Am burger features ham, American cheese, pesto and an over-easy fried egg. Ask for extra napkins, as the result can get a bit messy.

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Lucky 32’s Voodoo Deviled Eggs rely on a few quality ingredients such as cage-free, local eggs, locally sourced bacon and the restaurant’s signature Voodoo Sauce.

Voodoo Deviled Eggs Courtesy of Lucky 32 Southern Kitchen Yield: 24 egg halves 12 hard-boiled eggs ½ cup Voodoo Sauce (available in jars at the restaurant or at lucky32.com/voodoo-sauce) ¼ cup mayonnaise 1 tablespoon Lusty Monk or other good-quality whole-grain mustard 4 tablespoons crisp-cooked bacon, crumbled 2 tablespoons chopped chives Using a sharp knife, cut all eggs in half lengthwise and remove the yolks to a mixing bowl. Arrange the egg whites on a serving platter. Combine Voodoo Sauce, mayonnaise, mustard and egg yolks; mix until smooth. Place mixture in a pastry bag, and pipe into egg whites. Garnish eggs with crispy crumbled bacon and chopped chives. Notes: Lusty Monk mustard is available at lustymonk.com. All recipes were originally designed for much larger batch size. This recipe has been reduced but not tested at this scale. Please adjust as to your taste.

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Sometimes it’s good to let flavors stand out for themselves. Our signature Voodoo Sauce adds some zest to the overall taste. — Dan Hoskins, Lucky 32 continued from page 74

Lucky 32 Southern Kitchen Specialty item: Voodoo Deviled Eggs

At venerable farm-to-table eatery Lucky 32 Southern Kitchen, keeping things simple ensures delicious outcomes. Take the Voodoo Deviled Eggs, an occasional side item containing only six ingredients, including bacon, mustard and mayonnaise. “Sometimes it’s good to let flavors stand out for themselves,” said New Jersey native Dan Hoskins, Lucky 32’s chef de cuisine. “Our signature Voodoo Sauce adds some zest to the overall taste.” Cage-free eggs are sourced from Cherokee County’s Andrews, N.C. Bacon comes from Hickory Nut Gap Farm in Fairview. “The deviled eggs show up on the menu at various times throughout the year,” Hoskins said. It’s best to call or check the menu online to see if they are available. Better yet: Make them yourself with the recipe provided. Spring is an ideal time to visit Lucky 32, which offers seasonal fare like the refreshing chilled avocado soup. “We get kind of funky with local produce in the spring,” Hoskins said, adding that the Interfaith Food Shuttle Farm grows many of the restaurant’s vegetables. Lucky 32 accepts lunch and dinner reservations online or by phone. Consider enjoying your meal on the restaurant’s serene outdoor patio. t 7307 Tryon Road, Cary (919) 233-1632 lucky32.com

CARY MAGAZINE 77


Legends live on in Corolla. Corolla.

Discover a land of wild wonder on the Currituck Outer Banks, North Carolina.

The legendary wild horses of Corolla, unique historical sites, family friendly beaches and mild coastal temperatures are just a few of the reasons why now is a great time to visit.

Call 877.287.7488 for a free visitor’s guide

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www.VisitCurrituck.com


NOW WELCOMING NEW PATIENTS

NO INSURANCE?? OUR PATIENTS DON’T NEED IT! ASK ABOUT JOINING OUR LOWERY MEMBERSHIP CLUB!

• No more waiting weeks for your crown WE DO THEM SAME DAY! • Esthetic and Comprehensive dentistry in a warm family environment • Sleep Apnea and snoring treatments

We welcome all insurance!! Same day appointments available

Cosmetic and Family Dentistry Siti A. Lowery, DDS PA FAGD

110 Preston Executive Dr. Suite 104, Cary, NC 27513 Phone 919-468-5501 www.lowerysmiles.com

CARY MAGAZINE 79


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perfect pairing

Grill-Roasted Potato Salad

WRITTEN BY GLEN HAGEDORN | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

2015 Weingut Steindorfer St Laurent Reserve Neusiedlersee Austria has long been lauded for its incredible white wines led by Gruner Veltliner, but red wines such as those made from the St. Laurent grape are wonderful food-pairing wines. Named for the patron saint of cooks, St. Laurentius, these wines combine earthy, red-fruit characters with a bracing acidity that cuts through rich, velvety preparations such as dressed salads. The smoky notes of the bacon and paprika will be well matched with deep cherry, spice and palateslaking minerality in this wine from Weingut Steindorfer. 92 points by International Wine Review.

2013 Big Vine Napa Valley Chardonnay Chardonnay is not known for its ability to pair with most foods, but its inherent fullness, solid orchard-fruit and soft texture match perfectly with a grill-roasted potato salad. The creaminess and oaky spice notes of the wine complement the richness of the herb-infused dressing and the sweet, savory quality of the Yukon Gold potatoes. 90 points by Wine Enthusiast Magazine.

2016 Domaine du Prince Costieres de Nimes Rosé The proximity of the vineyards to the Mediterranean Sea in France’s Costières de Nîmes region lend a tangy, salty flavor to this incredible grenache/ syrah blended dry rosé. “Garrigue” is the local term for the aromas of rosemary, juniper, thyme and lavender growing wild in this region. This wine is exceptionally aromatic with sweet scented herbs. Its flavors of crushed raspberry and a mouthwatering acidity will pair seamlessly with potato salad.

Glenn Hagedorn is a partner at Triangle Wine Company. Before his arrival in North Carolina, he obtained a degree from UC Davis in viticluture and enology and worked the journeyman winemaking circuit in Napa for many vintages. He currently holds a first-degree certification with The Court of Master Sommeliers.

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2857 Jones Franklin Road | Raleigh | Beside Barry’s Café | 984-200-1896 82 APRIL 2018


liquid assets WRITTEN BY WHIT BAKER | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Mason Jar Lager Company, Happy Place Golden Lager CONSUMING CRAFT BEER is easier than ever, and in the Triangle we are lucky to have quality craftsmanship surrounding us, often several options within a few miles. This local bounty means we consumers can figure out what we like in a beer and can find others that replicate that same flavor profile. Learning how to evaluate a beer makes it easier to consistently find tasty beverages. Evaluating a beer encompasses four aspects: aroma, appearance, flavor and mouthfeel. Aroma is evaluated first to make sure one can smell the volatile or fragile aromatics that will soon dissipate. Typically one tries to pick out hops, malt and yeast characteristics from the aroma. When weighing appearance, check how clear the beer is, the color of the foam, the size and shape of the bubbles and the color of the beer itself. Flavor accounts for the most points in professional scoring. An evaluator will taste for flavors from the four main ingredients of beer: hops, malt, yeast and water. Yeast will add fruity or spicy flavors. The malt adds flavors ranging from uncooked bread dough to coffee grounds. Hops add a grassy bitterness as well as a wide range of flavors from tropical fruit to pine sap and floral notes. Water is normally unnoticed, but certain waters can add mineral notes, make beers taste more crisp and bitter or accentuate the malt found in malty beers. Mouthfeel is often lumped in with flavor, but is defined as any physical sensation the beer provides. In mouthfeel an evaluator may first consider carbonation, or how much fizz is in the beverage. Mouthfeel also encompasses the beer’s creaminess, its body and how much alcohol you can taste. Recently I was lucky enough to sit down with The Mason Jar’s Happy Place Golden Lager. It is a beer brewed in the German Helles style, the most-consumed style of beer in Germany. Here’s how the beer breaks down according to the four aspects of evaluation. The Happy Place pours a light golden color with ivory foam. The bubbles are medium-sized and as a lager, the beer is clear enough to read through.

When you take a whiff of the beer, you have a malt-derived graham cracker, white bread dough and table water cracker. The hops give the impression of sage, freshly mowed lawn and wild flowers. There is also a faint red-apple aroma from the lager yeast used. When you drink the beer the sweet malt character is balanced by the bitterness and grassy herbal hop flavor. At 4.5 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), Happy Place is an easy-drinking brew. Now it’s your turn — grab yourself a Happy Place Golden Lager and compare it to my evaluation in the four aspects. Do you agree? Disagree? The best homework is to take the four aspects and try them across your other favorite beers. Cheers!

Whit Baker is the brewmaster at Bond Brothers Beer Company in Cary. Having completed the Beer Judge Certification Program, he is experienced in evaluating professional and amateur beer in competitions. He is also an Advanced Cicerone, a certification which requires years of study and an expert knowledge of beer. CARY MAGAZINE 83


liquid assets WRITTEN BY MELISSA KATRINCIC | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Tiny Cat Vodka WHAT VODKA is in your liquor cabinet? My bet is, for most of you, it starts with a “T” and ends with “OS.” This famous vodka may have started as a small craft, but it’s now one of the largest vodka brands in the country. Here at home, the significant growth in craft vodkas is also exciting. Today, there are 18 vodkas produced by North Carolina distilleries. In 2017 alone, the Triangle saw the launch of four new vodkas: Durham-based Graybeard Distillery’s Bedlam, Kinston-distilled Three Stacks Distilling Company’s Social House, Fuquay-Varina-based Gold Leaf Distillery’s Spell Maker and Durham Distillery’s Cold Distilled Cucumber Vodka. They join existing Triangle vodkas from TOPO and Fair Game Beverage. This category is growing because vodka inherently reflects its distillery and its distillery’s ethos. Specifically, grain-to-glass vodkas are identified by the type of grain and often the terroir of where the grain is grown, how it’s distilled and the water it contains. The vodka we’re featuring this month is Tiny Cat Vodka, distilled by Fainting Goat Spirits. Owned and operated by the Norman family, Fainting Goat Spirits is a fantastic distillery to visit. Located in downtown Greensboro, it has a wonderful tour that walks you through how the spirits are made. Tiny Cat Vodka is a grain-to-glass vodka made from organic red winter wheat that is grown in North Carolina. Tiny Cat won several prestigious awards in 2017 including a Gold Medal at Denver International Spirits Competition, Silver at the New York International Spirits Competition and Bronze at the American Distilling Institute Spirit Competition. On the nose, the sweetness of the wheat comes through immediately. For me, the aromas of wheat vodka and wheat whiskey are almost indistinguishable — the difference is in the taste. The goal for vodka is to get that soft, creamy and yes, neutral taste. Tiny Cat achieves this beautifully and with a bit of malt, too. While not as neutral as corn-based vodka, the wheat definitely adds to its personality. Where does that matter? Cocktails of course! Tiny Cat in a cocktail is best where the subtle sweetness of the wheat complements the cocktail’s balance. It’s the perfect choice for this chocolate martini.

Melissa Katrincic owns Durham Distillery, the No. 3 Craft Gin Distillery in the U.S. and home of the award-winning Conniption Gin, with her husband Lee. She is also the former vice president of the Distiller’s Association of North Carolina. 84 APRIL 2018

Tiny Cat Chocolate Martini • 2 ounces Tiny Cat Vodka • 1 ½ ounces Damn Fine Chocolate Liqueur • ½ ounce simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water) • ¼ teaspoon Ghirardelli sweetened cocoa powder • 1 tablespoon liquid egg whites Shake all ingredients vigorously with ice for about a minute. Strain into chilled coupe glass. Cheers!


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Dining Guide A SELECTION OF RESTAURANTS, BAKERIES, BISTROS AND CAFÉS

IN CARY, APEX, FUQUAY-VARINA, HOLLY SPRINGS AND MORRISVILLE Advertisers are highlighted in boxes

CARY Abbey Road Tavern & Grill “Great food … outstanding live music.” 1195 W. Chatham St., Cary; (919) 481-4434; abbeyroadnc.com Andia’s Homemade Ice Cream “Premium quality ice cream and sorbet.” 10120 Green Level Church Road #208, Cary; (919) 901-8560; andiasicecream.com Bellini Fine Italian Cuisine “Everything is made fresh from scratch in our kitchen.” 107 Edinburgh S. Drive, Suite 119, Cary; (919) 552-0303; bellinifineitaliancuisinecary.com

Ashworth Drugs “Quintessential place for freshsqueezed lemonade, old-fashioned milkshakes and hot dogs.” 105 W. Chatham St., Cary; (919) 467-1877; ashworthdrugs.com

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Academy Street Bistro “A fresh take on Italian-American cuisine in the heart of Cary.” 200 S. Academy St., Cary; (919) 377-0509; academystreetbistro.com

Crosstown Pub & Grill “A straightforward menu covers all the bases.” 140 E. Chatham St., Cary; (919) 650-2853; crosstowndowntown.com

Big Mike’s Brew N Que “Beers on tap to compliment locally sourced, farm-to-table BBQ.” 1222 NW Maynard Road, Cary; (919) 799-2023; brewnquenc.com

Bravo’s Mexican Grill “Extensive menu raises the ante considerably above the typical Tex-Mex.” 208 Grande Heights Drive, Cary (919) 481-3811; bravosmexicangrill.net

Bonefish Grill “Fresh is our signature.” 2060 Renaissance Park Place, Cary; (919) 677-1347; bonefishgrill.com

Brewster’s Pub “Open late, serving a full food and drink menu.” ​ 1885 Lake Pine Drive, Cary (919) 650-1270; brewsterspubcary.com

Bosphorus Restaurant “Traditional Turkish and Mediterranean cuisine in an elegant atmosphere.” 329-A N. Harrison Ave., Cary; (919) 460-1300; bosphorus-nc.com

Brig’s “Breakfast creations, cool salads and hot sandwich platters.” 1225 NW Maynard Road, Cary; (919) 481-9300; 1040 Tryon Village Drive, Suite 604, Cary; (919) 859-2151; brigs.com


Dining Guide Chanticleer Café & Bakery “Family-owned restaurant serving up breakfast, lunch and specialty coffees.” 6490 Tryon Road, Cary; (919) 781-4810; chanticleercafe.com Chef’s Palette “Creative flair and originality in every aspect of our service.” 3460 Ten Ten Road, Cary; (919) 267-6011; chefspalette.net CinéBistro “Ultimate dinner-and-a-movie experience.” 525 New Waverly Place, Cary; (919) 987-3500; cinebistro.com/waverly Coffee & Crepes “Freshly prepared sweet and savory crepes.” 315 Crossroads Blvd., Cary; (919) 233-0288; coffeeandcrepes.com Corbett’s Burgers & Soda Bar “Good old-fashioned burgers and bottled soda.” 126 Kilmayne Drive, Cary; (919) 466-0055; corbettsburgers.com Craft Public House “Casual family restaurant.” 1040 Tryon Village Drive, Suite 601, Cary; (919) 851-9173; craftpublichouse.com Crema Coffee Roaster & Bakery “Family-owned and operated.” 1983 High House Road, Cary; (919) 380-1840; cremacoffeebakery.com Danny’s Bar-B-Que “All slow-cooked on an open pit with hickory wood.” 311 Ashville Ave. G, Cary; (919) 851-5541; dannysbarbque.com Doherty’s Irish Pub “Catch the game or listen to live music.” 1979 High House Road, Cary; (919) 388-9930; dohertysirishpubnc.com Eighty8 Asian Bistro “An exotic twist on Asian cuisine.” 1077 Darrington Drive, Cary; (919) 377-0152; eighty8bistro.com

The Butcher’s Market “Selling quality steaks and meat with unmatched hospitality.” 1225 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary; (919) 465-3082; thebutchersmarkets.com Enrigo Italian Bistro “Fresh food made from pure ingredients.” 575 New Waverly, Suite 106, Cary; (919) 854-7731; dineenrigo.com Five Guys Burgers and Fries 1121 Parkside Main St., Cary; (919) 380-0450; fiveguys.com Fresca Café & Gelato “French-styled crepes … gelato made with ingredients directly from Italy.” 302 Colonades Way #109, Cary; (919) 581-8171; frescacafe.com Goodberry’s Frozen Custard 1146 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary; (919) 467-2386 2325 Davis Drive, Cary; (919) 469-3350; goodberrys.com Great Harvest Bread Co. “Real food that tastes great.” 1220 NW Maynard Road, Cary (919) 460-8158; greatharvestcary.com Herons “The signature restaurant of The Umstead Hotel and Spa.” 100 Woodland Pond Drive, Cary; (919) 447-4200; theumstead.com/dining/restaurants-raleigh-nc Hot Point Deli “Highest-quality cuisine at extremely reasonable prices.” 1718 Walnut St., Cary; (919) 460-6299; hotpointcary.com

Deans Kitchen + Bar “Creative comfort eats.” 1080 Darrington Drive, Cary; (919) 459-5875; deanskitchenandbar.com

Jimmy V’s Steakhouse & Tavern “Certified Angus Beef … fresh seafood, Italian specialties, homemade desserts.” 107 Edinburgh South, Suite 131, Cary; (919) 380-8210; jimmyvssteakhouse.com Kababish Café “A celebration of deliciousness and creativity.” 201 W. Chatham St., Suite 103, Cary; (919) 377-8794; kababishcafe.com La Farm Bakery “Handcrafted daily … only the freshest ingredients.” 4248 NW Cary Parkway, Cary; 220 W. Chatham St., Cary; 5055 Arco Street, Cary; (919) 657-0657; lafarmbakery.com Los Tres Magueyes “We prepare our food fresh daily.” 110 SW Maynard Road, Cary; (919) 460-8757; lostresmagueyes.com Lucky 32 Southern Kitchen “Exceptional renderings of classic Southern dishes.” 7307 Tryon Road, Cary; (919) 233-1632; lucky32.com/cary Lucky Chicken “All of our beautiful Peru, with every dish.” 1851 N. Harrison Ave., Cary; (919) 338-4325; luckychickennc.net CARY MAGAZINE 87


Dining Guide Pizzeria Faulisi “Simple foods from a simple way of cooking: a wood-burning oven.” 215 E. Chatham St., Suite 101, Cary; pizzeriafaulisi.com

Maximillians Grill & Wine Bar “Global cuisine using locally sourced, seasonal ingredients.” 8314 Chapel Hill Road, Cary; (919) 465-2455; maximilliansgrill.com Noodle Boulevard “Ten variations on the ramen theme, covering a pan-Asian spectrum.” 919 N Harrison Ave., Cary; (919) 678-1199 noodleblvd.com Once in a Blue Moon Bakery & Café “The fast track to sweet tooth satisfaction.” 115-G W. Chatham St., Cary; (919) 319-6554; bluemoonbakery.com

Duck Donuts “Warm, delicious and just the way you like them.” 100 Wrenn Drive #10, Cary; (919) 468-8722; duckdonuts.com/location/cary-nc

Paisan’s Italian Ristorante “Authentic Italian food with a warm and inviting atmosphere.” 1275 NW Maynard Road, Cary; (919) 388-3033; caryitalian.com

Marco Pollo “Peruvian rotisserie chicken.” 1871 Lake Pine Drive, Cary; (919) 694-5524; marcopollocary.com

Rally Point Sport Grill “Lunch and dinner food in a pub atmosphere.” 837 Bass Pro Lane, Cary; (919) 678-1088; rallypointsportgrill.com Red Bowl Asian Bistro “Each distinctive dish is handcrafted.” 2020 Boulderstone Way, Cary; (919) 388-9977; redbowlcary.com Ricci’s Trattoria “Keeping true to tradition.” 10110 Green Level Church Road, Cary; (919) 380-8410; riccistrattoria.com Ruckus Pizza, Pasta & Spirits “Great food always, with a side of good times.” 8111-208 Tryon Woods Drive, Cary; (919) 851-3999; 2025 Renaissance Park Place, Cary; (919) 677-3999; ruckuspizza.com

Patrick Jane’s Bar & Bistro “Life should be delicious.” 1353 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary; (919) 388-8001; patrick-janes.com

The one and only place for

award winning sushi and Thai!

“People that eat at my restaurant are more than

THE MAGGY AWARDS

just customers, they are friends and family.” - Sam Tedamrongwanish, Owner

WINNER 2018

THE MAGGY AWARDS

THE MAGGY AWARDS

WINNER

WINNER

2017

2016

WINNER 2015

HONORABLE MENTION 2014

HONORABLE MENTION 2013

HONORABLE MENTION 2012

106 Kilmayne Drive Cary, NC 27511 88

APRIL 2018

HONORABLE MENTION 2012

HONORABLE MENTION 2012

919.467.5747

HONORABLE MENTION 2009

HONORABLE MENTION 2008

WINNER

www.sushithaicary.com

2007

WINNER 2006


Dining Guide Spirits Pub & Grub “Wide variety of menu items, all prepared in a scratch kitchen.” 701 E. Chatham St., Cary (919) 462-7001; spiritscary.com Stellino’s Italiano “Traditional Italian favorites with a modern twist.” 1150 Parkside Main St., Cary; (919) 694-5761; stellinositaliano.com

Five Guys Burgers and Fries “Fresh ingredients, hand-prepared.” Visit fiveguys.com for area locations.

Ruth’s Chris Steak House “Cooked to perfection.” 2010 Renaissance Park Place, Cary; (919) 677-0033; ruthschris.com/restaurant-locations/cary

Sugar Buzz Bakery “Custom cakes … and more.” 1231 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary; (919) 238-7224; sugarbuzzbakery.com

Gonza Tacos y Tequila “Award-winning Colombian-Mexican cuisine.” 525-105 New Waverly Place, Cary; (919) 653-7310; cary.gonzatacosytequila.com

Taipei 101 “Chinese and Taiwanese. Serves lunch and dinner.” 121 E. Chatham St., Cary; (919) 388-5885; facebook.com/carytaipei101

Serendipity Gourmet Deli “Discovering the unusual, valuable or pleasantly surprising.” 118 S. Academy St., Cary; (919) 469-1655; serendipitygourmetdelinc.com

Tangerine Café “From Thai to Vietnamese to Korean to Indonesian.” 2422 SW Cary Parkway, Cary; (919) 468-8688; tangerinecafecary.com

Recognized by Cary Magazine readers as one of the best special occasion restaurants WINNER 2006

Hours: Mon-Thurs: 5-10pm Fri-Sat: 5-11pm

HONORABLE MENTION 2007

HONORABLE MENTION 2013

HONORABLE MENTION 2015

HONORABLE MENTION 2015

THE MAGGY AWARDS

THE MAGGY AWARDS

HONORABLE MENTION 2016

HONORABLE MENTION 2018

1130 Buck Jones Rd., Raleigh, NC, 27606 919.380.0122 \ ReysRestaurant.com

5 private rooms seating 6-200 guests! Contact: Christina Reeves at Christina@ReysRestaurant.com

CARY MAGAZINE 89


Dining Guide The Big Easy Oven & Tap “Modern, Southern kitchen with New Orleans roots.” 231 Grande Heights Drive, Cary; (919) 468-6007; thebigeasyovenandtap.com The Original N.Y. Pizza “Consistent every visit.” 831 Bass Pro Lane, Cary; (919) 677-8484 2763 N.C. 55, Cary; (919) 363-1007 6458 Tryon Road, Cary; (919) 852-2242 theoriginalnypizza.com

La Farm Bakery “Handcrafted daily … only the freshest ingredients.” Visit lafarmbakery.com for area locations.

Tazza Kitchen “Wood-fired cooking and craft beverages.” 600 Ledgestone Way, Cary; (919) 651-8281; tazzakitchen.com/location/stonecreekvillage

Lugano Ristorante “Italian dining in a comfortable and casual atmosphere.” 1060 Darrington Drive, Cary; (919) 468-7229; luganocary.com Thai Spices & Sushi “Freshest, most-authentic Thai cuisine and sushi.” 986 High House Road, Cary; (919) 319-1818; thaispicesandsushi.com

Totopos Street Food & Tequila “A walk through … Mexico City.” 1388 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary; (919) 678-3449; totoposfoodandtequila.com/cary Tribeca Tavern “Handcrafted burgers, homegrown beer.” 500 Ledgestone Way, Cary; (919) 465-3055; facebook.com/TribecaTavern Udupi Café “Authentic south Indian vegetarian cuisine.” 590 E. Chatham St., Cary; (919) 465-0898; sriudupicafe.com

THE MAGGY AWARDS

WINNER 2018

Locally sourced, seasonal ingredients. Creative comfort eats. A place to wind down and savor life, family and friends. That’s what Dean’s Kitchen+Bar is all about. Every Sunday 11 a.m.- 2 p.m.

90

APRIL 2018


Dining Guide West Park Tavern “Great service, flavorful food.” 2734 N.C. 55, Cary; (919) 303-9300; westparktavern.com

APEX Abbey Road Tavern & Grill 1700 Center St., Apex; (919) 372-5383; abbeyroadnc.com

Mellow Mushroom “Beer, calzones and creative stonebaked pizzas.” 4300 NW Cary Parkway, Cary; (919) 463-7779 mellowmushroom.com The Urban Turban “A fusion of flavors.” 2757 N.C. 55, Cary; (919) 367-0888; urbanturbanbistro.com

Anna’s Pizzeria “Piping hot pizzas and mouthwatering Italian food.” 100 N. Salem St., Apex; (919) 267-6237; annaspizzeria.com

Ruckus Pizza, Pasta & Spirits “Great food always, with a side of good times.” Visit ruckuspizza.com for area locations. Verandah “Southern casual environment in a modern, boutique hotel.” 301 A. Academy St., Cary; (919) 670-5000; verandahcary.com

Belgian Café “From Brussels to Apex.” 1232 W. Williams St., Apex; (919) 372-5128; belgian-cafe.com Big Mike’s Brew N Que “Beers on tap to compliment locally sourced, farm-to-table BBQ.” 2045 Creekside Landing Drive, Apex; (919) 338-2591; brewnquenc.com Buttercream’s Bake Shop “Wholesome, scratch-baked.” 101 N. Salem St., Apex; (919) 362-8408; buttercreamsbakeshop.com

#TasteTheYummus

THE MAGGY AWARDS

THE MAGGY AWARDS

WINNER 2018

• Fresh Salads • Sandwiches • Kabobs

Catering Available For All Events!

Morgan Street Food Hall location coming soon! 1347 Kildaire Farm Road // Cary // 919-300-5586 9650 Strickland Road // Raleigh // 919-847-2700

HONORABLE MENTION 2018

We are an Italian dining ristorante with a comfortable and casual atmosphere. We strive to provide each guest with an experience they will remember. 1060 Darrington Drive, Cary (919) 468-7229 www.luganocary.com CARY MAGAZINE 91


Dining Guide

Salvio’s Pizzeria “Family owned and operated since 2005.” 2428 SW Cary Parkway, Cary; 919-467-4600; salviospizza.com

Sassool “Serving authentic Lebanese and Mediterranean cuisine.” 1347 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary; (919) 300-5586; sassool.com

Common Grounds Coffee House & Desserts “The highest-quality, locally roasted coffee.” 219 N. Salem St., Suite 101, Apex; (919) 387-0873; commongroundsapex.com

Doherty’s Irish Pub “Catch the game or listen to live music.” ​​5490 Apex Peakway, Apex; ​(919) 387-4100; dohertysirishpubnc.com

Tasu “Asian fusion cuisine, artfully mixing Chinese, Japanese and Thai Dishes” 525 New Waverly Place, Suite 103, Cary; (919) 544-8474; shikitasu.com/tasu-cary/home Five Guys Burgers & Fries 1075 Pine Plaza Drive, Apex; (919) 616-0011; fiveguys.com

New Key lime icing! Thanks to all of our Customers for voting HONORABLE MENTION 2018 for Five Guys! THE MAGGY AWARDS

Parkside Town Commons Hwy. 55 & O’Kelly Chapel Rd. 919-380-0450 1075 Pine Plaza Drive APEX Next to COSTCO 919-616-0011

92

APRIL 2018


Dining Guide Rudy’s Pub & Grill “Comfortable and familiar, just like home.” 780 W. Williams St., Apex; (919) 303-5061; rudysofapex.com Salem Street Pub “Friendly faces and extensive menu.” 113 N. Salem St., Apex; (919) 387-9992; salemstreetpub.com Skipper’s Fish Fry “Homemade from our own special recipes.” 1001 E. Williams St., Apex; (919) 303-2400; skippersfish.com

Sushi-Thai “Fresh sushi and Japanese cuisine alongside Thai favorites.” 106 Kilmayne Drive, Cary; (919) 467-5747; sushithaicary.com Peak City Grill & Bar “Chef-crafted food in a … restored turn-of-thecentury hardware store.” 126 N. Salem St., Apex; (919) 303-8001; thepeakcitygrill.com

AMERICAN CUISINE MENU

Yuri Japanese Restaurant “For sushi fans and connoisseurs of Japanese cuisine.” 1361 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary; (919) 481-0068; yurijapaneserestaurant.com Ruckus Pizza, Pasta & Spirits “Great food always, with a side of good times.” 1055 Pine Plaza Drive, Apex; (919) 446-6333; ruckuspizza.com

Sweet Cheeks Bakery “Only the finest and freshest ingredients.” 803 E. Williams St., Apex; (919) 303-9305; sweetcheeksbakerync.com The Blistered Pig Smokehouse “Committed to all natural and sustainable meats.” 225 N. Salem St., Apex; (919) 446-3366; blisteredpig.com The Provincial “Fresh. Simple.” 119 Salem St., Apex; (919) 372-5921; theprovincialapex.com

Calzones & Strombolis Fresh from the oven made to order! Italian Desserts Homemade & delicious! We Provide Dine-In, Carry Out, Delivery and Online Ordering

CARY 919-467-4600 AMERICAN CUISINE MENU WITH A FRENCH FLAIR 200 S ACADEMY STREET

|

CARY

919.377.0509 ACADEMYSTREETBISTRO.COM

RALEIGH 919-981-5678

salviospizza.com CARY MAGAZINE 93


Dining Guide The Wake Zone Espresso “Your special home away from home.” 6108 Old Jenks Road, Apex; (919) 267-4622; thewakezone.com

FUQUAY-VARINA Anna’s Pizzeria “Piping hot pizzas and mouthwatering Italian food.” 138 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina; (919) 285-2497; annaspizzeria.com Aviator SmokeHouse BBQ Restaurant “All of our food is made in-house.” 525 E. Broad St., Fuquay-Varina; (919) 557-7675; aviatorbrew.com Cooley’s Restaurant 711 N. Main St., Fuquay-Varina; (919) 552-0543; facebook.com/CooleysRestaurant CupCakeBite “Delicious sweet treats.” 512 Broad St., Fuquay-Varina; (919) 557-4300; cupcakebite.com Jus’ Enuff Home Cooking “Homemade everything.” 736 N Main St., Fuquay-Varina; (919) 567-0587; facebook.com/JusEnuffHomeCookin

Daniel’s Restaurant & Catering “Pasta dishes, hand-stretched pizzas and scratch-made desserts.” 1430 W. Williams St., Apex; (919) 303-1006; danielsapex.com

Los Tres Magueyes “We prepare our food fresh daily.” 401 Wake Chapel Road, Fuquay-Varina; (919) 552-3957; lostresmagueyes.com

Donovan’s Dish “Chef-prepared meals to go.” 800 W. Williams St., Suite 112, Apex; (919) 651-8309; donovansdish.com

Rock Harbor Grill “An extensive menu of fresh dishes for lunch and dinner.” 132 S. Fuquay Ave., Fuquay-Varina; (984) 225-2256; rockharborgrillfuquay.com

ASHWORTH DRUGS 105 W. Chatham St, Cary NC

WHERE YOUR GOOD HEALTH IS OUR BUSINESS Rx’s Filled Promptly & Professionally Old-Fashioned Soda Fountain Medical Equipment Sales & Rentals Therafirm Compression Hosiery FLA Orthopedic Supports Most Insurance & Med D Plans Accepted Rx Delivery Available

Paul Ashworth, R.Ph.

Cori Strickland, R.Ph.

919.467.1877 Mon.- Fri. 8:30 – 6:00 Sat. 8:30 – 3:30 94

APRIL 2018


Dining Guide Stick Boy Bread Co. “Handcrafted baked goods from scratch … all natural ingredients.” 127 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina; (919) 557-2237; stickboyfuquay.com The Mason Jar Tavern “All the comforts of Southern hospitality with a modern twist.” 305 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina; (919) 762-5555; themasonjartavern.com Wingin’ It Bar and Grille “Serves lunch, dinner and drinks.” 1625 N. Main St., Suite 109, Fuquay-Varina; (919) 762-0962; facebook.com/winginitbarandgrille

HOLLY SPRINGS Happy Holly’s “Ice cream, milkshakes and shaved ice.” 527 N. Main St., Holly Springs; (919) 552-0637; happyhollys.com Los Tres Magueyes 120 Bass Lake Road, Holly Springs; (919) 552-6272; lostresmagueyes.com

Mama Bird’s Cookies + Cream “A unique spin on a timeless dessert.” 304 N. Main St., Holly Springs; (919) 762-7808; mamabirdsicecream.com My Way Tavern “Freshly made all-American foods.” 301 W. Center St., Holly Springs; (919) 285-2412; mywaytavern.com Rise Biscuits & Donuts 169 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs; (919) 586-7343; risebiscuitsdonuts.com Thai Thai Cuisine “Fresh authentic Thai food.” 108 Osterville Drive, Holly Springs; (919) 303-5700; thaithaicuisinenc.com The Mason Jar Tavern “All the comforts of Southern hospitality with a modern twist.” 114 Grand Hill Place, Holly Springs; (919) 964-5060; themasonjartavern.com The Original N.Y. Pizza 634 Holly Springs Road, Holly Springs (919) 567-0505; theoriginalnypizza.com

MORRISVILLE Alpaca Peruvian Charcoal Chicken “Unforgettable rotisserie chicken.” 9575 Chapel Hill Road, Morrisville; (919) 378-9259; alpacachicken.com Another Broken Egg Café “A totally egg-ceptional experience.” 1121 Market Center Drive, Morrisville; (919) 465-1079; anotherbrokenegg.com Babymoon Café “Pizzas, pastas, seafood, veal, steaks, sandwiches and gourmet salads.” 100 Jerusalem Drive, Suite 106, Morrisville; (919) 465 9006; babymooncafe.com Bad Daddy’s “The quality of the beef and the toppings make our burgers stand apart.” 3300 Village Market Place, Morrisville; (919) 297-0953; baddaddysburgerbar.com

The place for Sushi enthusiasts and beginners of Japanese cuisine.

Locally Owned & Operated

QUALITY IS OUR RECIPE

HONORABLE MENTION 2017

RALEIGH

5045 Falls of Neuse Rd

1361 Kildaire Farm Road | Cary 919.481.0068

CARY

1225 Kildaire Farm Rd

919-809-8914

919-465-3082

Quail Corners at Millbrook Rd.

Saltbox Village Shopping Center

thebutchers-market.com

(In Shoppes of Kildaire Near Trader Joes) “Ahi Tower” our best seller, selected for the cover of Cary Magazine May/June 2011

www.YuriJapaneseRestaurant.com

CARY MAGAZINE 95


Dining Guide B. Good “Health-conscious versions of fast-food favorites.” 1000 Market Center Drive, Morrisville; (919) 234-1937; bgood.com Capital City Chop House “Perfect place for a business lunch or dinner or a quick bite before catching a flight.” 151 Airgate Drive, Morrisville; (919) 484-7721; chophousesofnc.com Clean Juice “Organic juices, smoothies and acai bowls.” 3035 Village Market Place, Morrisville; (919) 468-8286; cleanjuice.com Firebirds Wood Fired Grill “Steaks, seafood, chicken and ribs, all seared over local hickory, oak and pecan wood.” 3200 Village Market Place, Morrisville; (919) 653-0111; morrisville.firebirdsrestaurants.com

The Full Moon Oyster Bar & Seafood Kitchen “Homemade recipes handed down over the years.” 1600 Village Market Place, Morrisville; (919) 378-9524; fullmoonoysterbar.com Georgina’s Pizzeria & Restaurant “Mouthwatering homemade Italian dishes.” 3536 Davis Drive, Morrisville; (919) 388-3820; georginaspizzeriaandrestaurant.com Los Tres Magueyes 9605 Chapel Hill Road, Morrisville (919) 481-9002; lostresmagueyes.com

Peppers Market and Sandwich Shop “Local baked breads, fresh in-house roasted meats.” 2107 Grace Park Drive, Morrisville (919) 380-7002; peppersmrkt.com Rise Biscuits & Donuts “Old school, new school, and specialty donuts.” 1100 Market Center Drive, Morrisville; (919) 377-0385; risebiscuitsdonuts.com Ruckus Pizza, Pasta & Spirits 1101 Market Center Drive, Morrisville; (919) 388-3500; ruckuspizza.com

Neomonde “A wonderful mix of traditional and contemporary Mediterranean menu items.” 10235 Chapel Hill Road, Morrisville; (919) 466-8100; neomonde.com

Saffron Restaurant & Lounge “Gourmet Indian dining experience.” 4121 Davis Drive, Morrisville; (919) 469-5774; saffronnc.com

Nothing Bundt Cakes “Cakes are baked fresh daily, in a variety of flavors and sizes.” 2008 Market Center Drive, Unit 17130, Morrisville; (919) 694-5300; nothingbundtcakes.com

Smokey’s BBQ Shack “Meats are dry rubbed with love and slow smoked with hickory wood.” 10800 Chapel Hill Road, Morrisville; (919) 469-1724; smokeysshack.com

Sunday - Wednesday 11:30 am - 12 am

J O I N U S A T O U R F A M I LY O F R E S T A U R A N T S

SHIKI

TASU

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207 NC-54

8919 BRIER CREEK PKWY #109

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BRIER CREEK, RALEIGH

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Thursday - Saturday 11:30 am - 2 am

140 East Chatham Street, Cary 919.650.2853 crosstowndowntown.com


Dining Guide Tra’Ii Irish Pub & Restaurant “An authentic and satisfying taste of Irish country cooking.” 3107 Grace Park Drive, Morrisville; (919) 651-9083; traliirishpub.com Travinia Italian Kitchen & Wine Bar “Consistent service and quality food to keep patrons happy.” 301 Market Center Drive, Morrisville (919) 467-1718; traviniaitaliankitchen.com

Rey’s “Fine dining with a French Quarter flair.” 1130 Buck Jones Road, Raleigh (919) 380-0122; reysrestaurant.com

Taste Vietnamese “Prepared with passion and perfected through generations.” 152 Morrisville Square Way, Morrisville; (919) 234-6385; tastevietnamese.com

Village Deli & Grill “Wholesome homemade foods.” 909 Aviation Parkway #100, Morrisville; (919) 462-6191; villagedeli.net

RALEIGH

Anvil’s Cheesesteaks “Authentic Philadelphia experience.” 2893 Jones Franklin Road, Raleigh (919) 854-0558 facebook.com/AnvilsCheesesteaks Barry’s Café “A restaurant that honors firefighters.” 2851 Jones Franklin Road, Raleigh; (919) 859-3555; barryscafe.com The Big Easy Oven & Tap “Modern, Southern kitchen with New Orleans roots.” 222 Fayetteville St., Raleigh (919) 832-6082 thebigeasyovenandtap.com

Angus Barn “World-renowned for its service.” 9401 Glenwood Ave., Raleigh; (919) 781-2444; angusbarn.com

Flying Biscuit Café “Southern-inspired menu of comfort food made with fresh ingredients.” 2016 Clark Ave., Raleigh (919) 833-6924 flyingbiscuit.com/locations-2/Raleigh

Annelore’s German Bakery “Pastries using the finest local ingredients.” 1249 Farmers Market Drive, Raleigh (919) 294-8040 facebook.com/AnneloresGermanBakery

The Pit “Authentic whole-hog, pit-cooked barbecue.” 328 W. Davie St., Raleigh; (919) 890-4500; thepit-raleigh.com

Daniel’s Restaurant & Catering

Cooking the BEST New York Italian food in Western Wake since 1993! THE MAGGY AWARDS

WINNER 2018

1430 W. Williams Street | Apex, NC 919-303-1006 danielsapex.com CARY MAGAZINE 97


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Join your neighbors at Cary’s Booth Amphitheatre for movie magic under the stars! Friday, May 25 Friday, June 8 Friday, June 15 Friday, June 22 Friday, June 29

Coco Wonder Woman Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Despicable Me 3 Paddington 2

Friday, July 13 Friday, July 20 Friday, August 10 Friday, August 17

Star Wars: The Last Jedi Cars 3 Beauty & the Beast: Sing-A-Long! A Wrinkle in Time

A portion of the Movies By Moonlight proceeds will benefit theWakeMed Children’s Hospital. For information on concerts, festivals and more visit www.BoothAmphitheatre.com

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At Renaissance at Regency, you can do just that! With low-maintenance single family homes, including first-floor Owner’s Suites, you can enjoy more time doing the things you love and less time worrying about costly home maintenance. Situated in Cary, Renaissance at Regency is just minutes away from everyday conveniences, Koka Booth Amphitheatre, Symphony Lake and offers access to miles of Greenway Trails. Experience living made easy at Renaissance at Regency!

Contact us to learn more or schedule a tour! | 919.948.3121 | StanleyMartin.com

1001 Regency Cottage Place, Cary, NC 27518 ©Stanley Martin Homes | Prices, features and availability subject to change without notice. Certain additional restrictions apply. Please see a Neighborhood Sales Manager for details. A-0392 | 02/2018

CARY MAGAZINE 99


garden adventurer

Acidanthera

‘A’ for Acidanthera WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY L.A. JACKSON

IF I WERE GRADING flowering plants for their possible inclusion in an ornamental garden, I would consider such common desirable traits as ease to grow, good looks and pleasant scent. But before giving out any report cards, I would also factor in one more attribute: undeserved infrequent use. With such a skewed system, I certainly give acidanthera an “A.” Sure, acidanthera sounds like a 1960s HaightAshbury rock opera, and to further muddy the waters, it has many alternate appellations — peacock 100

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orchid, Abyssinian gladiolus, sword lily and African gladiolus. Ditto for its botanical listing — variously classified as Acidanthera bicolor, Acidanthera murielae, Gladiolus murielae and Gladiolus callianthus. But from all these names, there are clues to the nature of this cutie. Acidanthera is a gladiolus kin originally from mountainous eastern Africa. Like a glad, it sends up slender blades of greenery before long flower stalks come out to play. And being from high country, it prefers well-draining growing ground. But this is where it gets a little weird: Acid-


12 9

3 6

TIMELY TIP anthera was introduced to Southern gardens in the late 1800s, and adapted well to our climate and soil conditions to the point of being an easy to grow and propagate heirloom plant. Now, do you know anyone who has it in their garden? Maybe its name(s) has made casual gardeners hesitant, but smart growers well appreciate acidanthera for dependability and beauty. Acidanthera is grown from small corms, which are best planted this month. They should be sited in an area with well-worked, loamy soil that receives full morning and early afternoon sun. Set the corms about 5 inches deep, and space them 4 inches apart. Sword-like foliage will soon rise to a height of 2 to 3 feet — and then the fun begins. In August, when many plants in the summer garden sulk, acidanthera (it’s deer-resistant, by the way) sends out long spikes topped with nodding clusters of white, orchid-like blooms streaked in burgundy with a captivating perfume that grows stronger as the sun starts to set. Planting in masses will only intensify this pleasant olfactory experience. Since acidanthera likes good drainage, it is perfect for pots. In fact, although the acidantheras in my garden have weathered winters well for years, I have still filled a few containers with their corms to enjoy on my deck. As the late autumn cold closes in, I simply snip off the faded foliage and tuck the pots away in a warm, dry area until the next spring. Still remain on the fence about inviting this exotic dancer to your summer garden party? I’ll add it is also a cheap date. This time of year, I can easily find acidantheras in local big-box garden centers as well as online, and they normally cost about five to six bucks for a dozen corms. L.A. Jackson is the former editor of Carolina Gardener Magazine. Want to ask L.A. a question about your garden? Contact him by email at lajackson1@gmail.com.

Late April is a prime planting time for dahlias. Their tuberous roots should be set in a morning to midday sunny spot that has mounded, well-worked soil. Since many dahlias can get tall and floppy, place a stake next to each tuber when planting to avoid disturbing roots later. Don’t water newly planted tubers. Dahlia After sprouts appear, begin watering at least twice weekly and applying small doses of low-nitrogen fertilizer monthly through the growing season. In late May, add a 3-inch layer of mulch to help conserve ground moisture. Pick off any spent blooms to encourage more summer flowers. Dahlias are marginally hardy in our area, so in the late fall, either dig the tubers up and store them (recommended), or take a chance on a mild, dry winter and leave them in the garden under 3 to 4 inches of fresh mulch.

To Do in the GARDEN

April

• Flowering annuals will benefit from an application of slow-release fertilizer at planting time, but to get them off to a quicker start, also water with a diluted liquid fertilizer for the first few weeks your pretties are in the garden. • Speaking of fertilizer, do you want the best production of fancy foliage from caladiums? Remember that caladiums, while pretty, are pigs. They need generous amounts of water and fertilizer on a regular basis in order to continue producing swanky new leaves through the growing season. • Scented geraniums are at their best when they are in the way. In other words, place them at the front of a border, on the corner of a path or close to a doorway where passersby will brush up against them, releasing the plants’ sensational aromas.

• Are you a seedy gardener? If so, the middle to end of this month is the time to start the warm-season vegetable patch by direct sowing the seeds of cucumbers, squash, corn, green beans, pumpkins, watermelons and cantaloupes. • Tomato transplants can also be added to the spring veggie garden after the third week of April. Sneaky tip: For a quicker, stronger start, take advantage of the warm soil close to the surface (which induces root growth) by setting the plants parallel to the ground in trenches rather than deep holes. Bury all but the upper 3 to 4 inches of each plant. • Putting up new bird houses this year? Although metal houses can look cute, stick with wooden ones instead — they are better at insulating nesting birdies from the worst of the summer sun.

CARY MAGAZINE 101


nonprofit spotlight

National Alliance on Mental Illness: Wake County WRITTEN BY DREE DEACON | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Ben Michael knows how difficult it can be to reach out and NAMI Wake’s work is supported by about 200 volunteers, talk about mental illness. including Chase. Most of the volunteers have either experienced “It can feel like the phone weighs a million pounds,” he said. mental illness themselves or have seen family members cope with Michael is a volunteer at the Wake County affiliate of the Naits challenges. tional Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). His mental health jourWhen a member of Chase’s family was diagnosed with a ney brought him to an education class at NAMI Wake in 2014, mental illness in 2011, she wasn’t sure where to turn until she and by 2016 he was a class mentor to other individuals hoping to found NAMI. learn more about mental illness. “It gives us a safe place where we can talk about what’s going “It’s hard to make that initial phone call if you’re struggling,” on in our current situations. We can share our stories,” she said. he said. “It’s hard to make that first support group. But take that “For volunteers, it’s a path forward.” leap, because there are people who Gordon Gogola started taking care about you.” education classes at NAMI to better unNationally, NAMI aims to imderstand a family member’s battle with prove the lives of Americans sufa brain disorder. He was approached “It’s hard to make that fering from mental illness. Locally, about becoming a class mentor, but iniinitial phone call if you’re NAMI Wake’s mission is more spetially declined. cific: support, education and advo“I said no, I was too damaged,” Gostruggling. It’s hard to cacy. Volunteers work to create safe gola said. “I had nothing to give anyone.” make that first support places for individuals and families to That was 23 years ago, and he has speak about their experiences with been volunteering with NAMI ever group. But take that leap, mental illness. The nonprofit ofsince — first in Texas and later in Wake because there are people fers free classes to help people learn County where he moved 18 years ago. about mental illnesses, why they ocHe coordinates NAMI Wake’s support who care about you.” cur and how to navigate life with group meetings, and facilitates some — Ben Michael them. Classes like Family-to-Family, meetings himself. Volunteer, Wake County’s National Peer-to-Peer and NAMI Basics tar“It’s an extremely safe place to talk,” Alliance on Mental Illness get various populations and provide Gogola said. “You come in with all this concrete coping skills. angst and pent-up emotion, because Andrea Chase, president of there’s nowhere else you can go and talk NAMI Wake’s board of directors, is dedicated to the group’s misabout it while feeling safe.” sion and has made a habit of saying, “Yes!” NAMI Wake’s sights are set on sustainability. Much of its “When I joined NAMI Wake in 2013, I just committed to it — I fundraising efforts aim to put the affiliate in a position where it took a leap — and I told myself, ‘I’m going to say, “yes,” to all things mencan hire dedicated staff. North Carolina is the only state in the tal health,’” she said. “Then when I joined the board in 2014, they were country where none of the NAMI affiliates employ paid staff. looking for someone to serve as president. I thought, ‘Why not me?’” Chase wants to change that. 102

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To keep its programs going, NAMI Wake County relies on hundreds of volunteers including, from left, Thomas Gehrmann, Tom Rooker, Gordon Gogola, Mary Scoot Honbarrier, Mimi Crews and Jeanne Harris.

contributed photo

“We’re not professional fundraisers; we’re peer-led,” she said. “We think the need is great here in Wake County, so we need a paid staff to help operate.” NAMI Wake conducts several annual fundraising events. Celebration of Courage, occurring each May, brings attention to the courage one needs to embrace their own experience with mental illness. During last year’s event, the nonprofit displayed 1,000 artificial irises on Rex Hospital’s main Raleigh campus, celebrating the art of Vincent van Gogh and reminding viewers of his struggle with mental illness. On April 14, NAMI Wake will host NAMIWalks at North Hills Midtown Park. The goal of that event is to raise awareness of mental illness in Wake County, erase stigma and boost advocacy efforts. Funds raised will be used to support the classes and programs NAMI Wake provides. “We serve Wake County residents. If 1 in 5 families are impacted by an illness, that’s 200,000 people who could be taking advantage of our services,” Chase said. “It’s not easy to talk about mental health, so we’re the ones to champion it.” nami-wake.org

NAMIWalks North Carolina This annual event raises awareness about mental illness, helps erase stigma and raises needed funds for classes and outreach efforts. The walk begins at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, April 14, at North Hills Midtown Park. Registration begins at 9 a.m. Sign up online at nami-wake.org. CARY MAGAZINE 103


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Sidecar Social Club Swings to a Timeless Tune WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

SIDECAR SOCIAL CLUB performs music from another era, spiked with an attitude that is all now. The band describes its influences as “speakeasy jazz to the bizarre cabarets of wartime Berlin, from the sounds of Latin American dance halls and the big band era to soulful R&B and 50’s rock, with a number of infectious originals sprinkled in.” Sidecar’s Aaron Bittikofer started playing the upright bass in college at Penn State. Except for a post-college sojourn with a jazzinspired rock band, he’s been playing jazz ever since — more than 30 years. “If you move to upright bass, you’re either going to play classical or jazz,” he said. “It’s elegant — things that are elegant have a timeless appeal, like a black tuxedo or a black dress. Jazz is American classical music; that’s our contribution to the world. I wish it were embraced more, because it is truly an American art form.” Other members of the band are Lisa Veronica Wood on vocals, Jim Crew on keyboard, F.O. Finch III on saxophone and Ed

Butler doing the honors on drums. The musicians had played together in various groups for years before Sidecar’s first official rehearsal in 2012. “One rehearsal happened, and when you’ve been playing enough years, you know when it’s right,” said Bittikofer. “We looked at each other at the end of the rehearsal, and said, ‘This is it; this is the band.’ We have a chemistry together that I haven’t had in any other band.” Sidecar regularly plays at Irregardless Café and Humble Pie in Raleigh. At the latter, swing and ballroom dance clubs often show up to practice their moves. “Our audience took to us right away, and we’ve been steadily building our audiences wherever we go,” said Bittikofer. “We’ve been really fortunate to be a danceable jazz group.” The band also injects a modern twist into its performances with reworked songs from Wham!, Cake and Queens of the Stone Age. These unexpected compositions are fun for the band, says Bittikofer, and help them connect to all sorts of audiences. t

See them Live Catch the band April 11 and 25 at Humble Pie in Raleigh. On Saturday April 14, the group will perform at Circa 1888 in Raleigh. sidecarsocialclub.com

ABOVE: Vocalist Lisa Veronica Wood, bassist Aaron Bittikofer and the rest of Sidecar Social Club performed danceable jazz at the 2018 Cary Magazine Meet the Maggys Party on Feb. 21. CARY MAGAZINE 105


MEET THE CARY • APEX • MORRISVILLE • HOLLY SPRINGS • FUQUAY-VARINA

MAGGYS

PRESENTED BY

THANK YOU

TO OUR SPONSORS

themeworks 106

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Daniel’s Restaurant & Catering

PRESTONWOOD C O U N T RY

CL UB

CARY MAGAZINE 107


WARDS THE MAGGY A

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

MEET THE MAGGYS

PRESENTED BY

Each year since 2006, Cary Magazine readers have cast their votes for their favorite people and places in Western Wake — the Maggy Award-winners. This year, for the first time, we invited readers to help us celebrate at the Meet the Maggys Party, presented by Coastal Credit Union. More than 500 guests came out to Prestonwood Country Club in Cary on Feb. 21 to network with winners, enjoy samples from Maggy-winning restaurants, and listen to music from Sidecar Social Club.

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CARY MAGAZINE 109


Jonathan Fredin

happenings

PAM HARTLEY WILL BECOME PRESIDENT AND CEO OF

Mr. Handyman of Western Wake County, owned by

Bruce and Robin

Foster, has earned the home service industry’s coveted Angie’s List Super Service

COMMUNITIES IN SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA ON APRIL 9. HARTLEY JOINS CISNC FROM MARBLES KIDS

Award. This award honors service professionals who have maintained exceptional service

MUSEUM WHERE SHE SERVED AS

ratings and reviews on Angie’s List in 2017. mrhandyman.com/western-wake-county

VICE PRESIDENT. CISNC IS A LEADING PARTNER IN WRAPAROUND SERVICES TO PROPEL STUDENT SUCCESS IN MORE THAN 300 SCHOOLS ACROSS

Cynthia Marshall, a former CM Woman of Western Wake, was hired by the Dallas Mavericks as interim CEO. Marshall was senior vice president of human resources at AT&T when she took on the additional role of chief diversity officer Jonathan Fredin

in 2015. She retired from AT&T last May.

THE STATE. CISNC.ORG

CKO Kickboxing is now open at 2974 Kildaire Farm Road in Cary. During group fitness classes, beginning to advanced members punch and kick heavy bags during their workouts. ckokickboxing.com

CHEFS FOR SENIORS, OWNED LOCALLY BY CHEF ZACH MERRITT AND HIS WIFE LINDSEY HESCH, IS NOW OPEN IN CARY. THE COMPANY’S PERSONAL CHEFS PREPARE MEALS FOR THE WEEK IN THE HOME. CHEFSFORSENIORS.COM/RALEIGH

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In 2017, Operation: Coming Home received $10,000 from the Holly Springs Rotary Club.

The Holly Springs Rotary Club will hold its 13th Annual Charity Golf Classic on Monday, April 9, at Devil’s Ridge Golf Club. The event will benefit Operation: Coming Home, which partners with the Home Builders Association of Raleigh to build homes for local military veterans wounded in combat. birdeasepro.com/HSRotaryGolf

JULIA DOTT OF CARY SUBMITTED A RIDDLE TO HIGHLIGHTS

Chiesi USA Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company headquartered in Cary, was recognized as a

MAGAZINE, AND HER

Top Employer in the United States for the

SUBMISSION APPEARS

third year in a row. Certification requires

IN THE MARCH 2018

assessment of 600 HR practices including

ISSUE IN THE “RIDDLES”

executive management, compensation and

SECTION. JULIA, 10, IS

benefits, and overall corporate culture.

THE CHILD OF LAURON

chiesiusa.com

MEDLEY DOTT AND JEREMY DOTT. EACH YEAR, HIGHLIGHTS READERS SEND THE MAGAZINE MORE THAN 35,000 SUBMISSIONS. HIGHLIGHTSKIDS.COM

THIS MONTH,

CLUB CHAMPION WILL OPEN A FITTING STUDIO AT 419 CROSSROADS BLVD. IN CARY. CLUB CHAMPION FITS, SELLS AND BUILDS CUSTOM GOLF CLUBS. CLUBCHAMPIONGOLF.COM

CARY MAGAZINE 111


happenings

Paula Brown Stafford, former Quintiles president, and

Lisa T. Grimes, founder of PurThread and a former CM Woman of Western Wake, are passionate about helping women more fully experience success, balance and fulfillment in their professional and personal lives. In their new book, “Remember Who YOU Are,” they share what they wish they had known at the outset of their careers 30 years ago. book.habergeon.com

The Umstead Hotel presents the artwork of Charlotte-based artist Elizabeth Bradford, which will be on exhibit April 1 through July 31. An art lecture and a reception will be held at the hotel 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, April 4. Bradford is known for her realistic depictions of nature — such as cattails flourishing in a duck pond. theumstead.com

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LORD CORPORATION, A GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY AND MANUFACTURING COMPANY BASED IN CARY, HAS BEEN SELECTED AS ONE OF THE HEALTHIEST 100 WORKPLACES IN AMERICA — RANKING NO. 29 — BY THE HEALTHIEST EMPLOYERS PROGRAM. LORD.COM

Raja Davidarulappan, owner of Children’s Lighthouse Learning Center in West Cary, was given the Rising Star award at the company’s recent convention in Las Vegas. The award honors franchisees with superior support of the

OFFICIALS AT

SEARSTONE BROKE GROUND ON FEB. 13 FOR

THE EXPANSION OF BRITTANY PLACE, THE HEALTH CARE FACILITY AT THE

brand and an outstanding commitment to the success of Children’s Lighthouse. childrenslighthouse.com

CARY CONTINUING CARE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY. THE EXPANSION WILL ADD 15 BEDS — NINE SKILLED NURSING BEDS AND SIX ASSISTED LIVING

IN HER NEW BOOK “THREE

BEDS — TO BRING THE EVENTUAL TOTAL TO 39 BEDS. SEARSTONE.COM

TEENS AND A TODDLER,”

MIA

WILSON OF CARY SHARES PRACTICAL ADVICE FOR RAISING CHILDREN WITH AN AGE GAP.

RHODA E. DOMPIER IS THE NEW PRESIDENT AND CEO OF

LIFE

THE AUTHOR AND EDUCATOR

EXPERIENCES. ON MARCH 12, SHE TOOK OVER FROM

IS THE PARENT OF A COLLEGE

THE RETIRING MARY MADENSPACHER, WHO HAD WORKED AT LIFE

GRADUATE, A COLLEGE SENIOR,

EXPERIENCES SINCE 1995. THE CARY-BASED NONPROFIT, WITH ITS FIVE SMALL BUSINESSES, OFFERS SATISFYING EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR ADULTS WITH VARYING DISABILITIES. LIFEEXPERIENCES.ORG

A COLLEGE SOPHOMORE AND A FOURTH-GRADER. 3TEENSANDTODDLER.COM

CARY MAGAZINE 113


write light

BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Wintry mess A mix of rain, sleet and snow from a late winter storm cover a windshield, making driving hazardous yet abstractly beautiful.

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CARY MAGAZINE 115

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Cary Magazine April 2018  

The Health & Wellness Issue: Doctors Make Virtual Housecalls, Dive into the Whole30 Diet, and Eggs are back on the Menu

Cary Magazine April 2018  

The Health & Wellness Issue: Doctors Make Virtual Housecalls, Dive into the Whole30 Diet, and Eggs are back on the Menu