{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

August 2016

GOING PLACES OUR 2016 NOTABLE TEENS

FAMILY TIME

OLYMPIC SPORTS IN WESTERN WAKE

Reel It In

THE BEST CATCHES IN LOCAL SEAFOOD

Plus

ART, MUSIC AND MORE AS LAZY DAZE TURNS 40 Cary Magazine, 301 Cascade Pointe Lane, Cary NC 27513


.cation

Treat Your Family To A

Permanent Stay

Prestonwood.com (919) 467-2566


The Triangle’s destination for cooks, foodies, chefs, and gadget lovers. 15,000+ tools for cooking and entertaining. Cooking classes

Eat. Learn. Discover. Get Inspired! • 35 cooking classes and private parties each month. • 25 talented instructors.

We are a local, family owned, independent business staffed by a diverse group of culinary experts who really have a passion for cooking! Owners, Dan and Diana Saklad

Visit us in Cary at the beautiful Waverly Place Shopping Center (upper level). Just minutes from Raleigh and less than a mile from the interchange of US 1 and US 64.

• Cary, NC • Mon. – Sat. 10 – 6 • Sun. 12 – 5 www.whiskcarolina.com • (919) 322-2458 316 Colonades Way

WINNER 2015


UNC REX CANCER CARE EXPANDS WOMEN’S SERVICES TO CARY

General Medical Oncology | Gynecological Oncology Thoracic Oncology | Hematology Chemotherapy and Infusion Services REX HEMATOLOGY ONCOLOGY ASSOCIATES OF CARY 150 Parkway Office Court | Cary, NC 27518 . Meet Dr. Paola A. Gehrig MD, Professor and Director, UNC Gynecologic Oncology Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology

To schedule an appointment, call (919) 784-6100

We’re pleased to welcome Dr. Gehrig who specializes in the treatment of women to our dedicated team of cancer specialists at Rex Hematology Oncology Associates of Cary. Her expertise in Gynecologic Oncology will expand our services as we seek to provide comprehensive, expert care to Cary and the surrounding area.

rexhealth.com/cancer


SNINSKI & SCHMITT Family Dentistry A Better Life Starts With A Beautiful Smile!

Serving the Triangle for over 12 years! Quality and compassionate dentistry for the whole family

Trained and highly skilled in CEREC same day crowns! • NO More uncomfortable temporaries • NO More impressions that gag you

• Crowns are finished and delivered in ONE DAY! • Crowns are metal-free, highly aesthetic and long lasting CALL TODAY for a new patient exam or a free second opinion

100 Ridge View Dr, Suite 103, Cary, NC 27511 • (919) 467-2203 • cary@ssfamilydentistry.com 7252 GB Alford Hwy, Holly Springs, NC 27540 • (919) 600-6262 • jill@ssfamilydentistry.com

BEFORE

AFTER

Visit www.ssfamilydentistry.com


CARY AUTOMALL HAS IT ALL

www.CaryAutoMall.com


in this issue

Back to School 16 28

Notable Teens It’s a STEM World:

How Wake is working for the future

35

Educating the Modern Student: Crossroads Flex High School opens in Cary

45

Special Section: Excellence in Education

The Family Issue 56

Work the Room: Families and friends team up to solve puzzle rooms

64 Lazy Daze of Summer 90 Go for the Gold

Family Style

102 True to Life:

Cary 8-year-old Anva Gupta keeps his eyes on the ball while playing his father, Arvind, at the Triangle Table Tennis Center in Morrisville.

8 AUGUST 2016

Jonathan Fredin

Top athletes share lessons learned


Saturday, August 20th 12pm – 4pm Publix at Bradford - 1020 Bradford Plaza Way


in every issue

August 2016 • Volume 13, Number 6 EXECUTIVE

41

We Love

73 82

Restaurant Row: Great Catches

CARY • APEX • MORRISVILLE • HOLLY SPRINGS • FUQUAY-VARINA

Ron Smith, Executive Publisher Bill Zadeits, Publisher EDITORIAL

Nancy Pardue, Editor Amber Keister, Editor

Exclusive Dish: Chewy Chocolate Walnut Cookie from Chanticleer Café & Bakery

CONTRIBUTORS

L.A. Jackson Leah Keiter David McCreary PHOTOGRAPHY

86 110

Jonathan Fredin, Chief Photographer

Charity Spotlight: Gigi’s Playhouse

PRODUCTION

Garden Adventurer: Edible, Ornamental Spinach

departments

Jennifer Casey, Graphic Designer Ronald Dowdy, Graphic Designer Dylan Gilroy, Web Designer Beth Harris, Graphic Designer Amy Mangels, Graphic Designer Matt Rice, Webmaster/SEO Rachel Sheffield, Web Designer Jim Sleeper, Graphic Designer ADVERTISING

12 14 114 123

Kris Schultz, Associate Publisher

Editors’ Letters Letters from Readers

ON THE COVER: The Connecticut lobster roll from Cousins Maine Lobster, story page 73.

Happenings

Photo by Jonathan Fredin

Write Light

CARY MAGAZINE

10

AUGUST 2016

Jonathan Fredin

Smart, talented and making a difference — meet the Women of Western Wake!

at the Umstead Hotel.

ADMINISTRATIVE

Mor Aframian, Events Assistant & Online Community Manager Cherise Klug, Traffic Manager Lisa McGraw, Circulation Coordinator Valerie Renard, Human Resource Manager Kristin Tighe, Accounting Cary Magazine © is published eight times annually by Cherokee Media Group. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. Subscriptions are $18/year.

in the next issue

The 2015 Women of Western Wake

PUBLIC RELATIONS

S&A Communications Chuck Norman, APR

Westview at Weston 301 Cascade Pointe Lane Cary, North Carolina 27513 (919) 674-6020 • (800) 608-7500 • Fax (919) 674-6027 www.carymagazine.com This publication does not endorse, either directly or implicitly, the people, activities, products or advertising published herein. Information in the magazine is deemed credible to the best of our knowledge.

Cary Magazine is a proud member and supporter of all five chambers in Western Wake County. The Cary Chamber of Commerce, Apex Chamber of Commerce, Morrisville Chamber of Commerce, Holly Springs Chamber of Commerce, and Garner Chamber of Commerce. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.


Happy. Healthy. And, best of all, here. Health lives where you and your family live.

When it comes to the health of the ones you love, WakeMed Cary Hospital is one of the family. From 24/7 emergency services, imaging and advanced diagnostics to routine procedures, sophisticated surgeries and physicians specializing in orthopaedics, hearts, obstetrics and gynecology, urology and more, everything you need to keep everyone healthy is right here. And when you’re responsible for managing your family’s care, there’s just no substitute for that kind of peace of mind. Learn more at wakemed.org/caryhospital.

WakeMed Cary Hospital | 1900 Kildaire Farm Road | Cary, NC 27518 | 919.350.8000 | wakemed.org/caryhospital


editors’ letters Jonathan Fredin

Amber Keister, left, and Nancy Pardue at North Cary Park.

AFTER A SUMMER listening to what passes for public discourse from our politicians, I’m reminded of the adage “If you can’t say something nice, then don’t say anything at all.” I long for kindness — or at least silence. But for the ugliness to end, we need more people like José San Martin Ortiz, Fuquay-Varina honor student, Mexican immigrant and one of Cary Magazine’s Notable Teens. Lindsey Biller, José’s former counselor at Fuquay-Varina High, says he fights negative stereotypes in his everyday interactions with people. She tells of a discussion about illegal immigration in one of José’s classes. Most of the students were repeating the accepted wisdom on the subject, when José calmly explained that he and his family were undocumented and nothing like what they described. His classmates came away with a richer understanding of the complex issue. Not many teens would have spoken, knowing they faced an unsympathetic and possibly hostile audience. José’s courage, his modesty and his determination to succeed make him unique, says Biller. “He made me look at life differently, by just knowing him,” she said. I hope you find all of our Notable Teens inspiring. It has been a pleasure bringing their stories to you.

Amber Keister Editor 12

AUGUST 2016

IT’S MY FIRST day back from vacation as I write this, a day filled with hundreds of emails (literally), and a loooong to-do list. But thanks to a sweet and sassy 6-year-old who calls me Grammy, I’m smarter than I was pre-vacation, so I can handle it. Here’s what she taught me: 1. Ask questions. Lots of them, until you know what you need to know. 2. Eat all your chicken nuggets (or that salad)? Put away your toys (or folded the laundry)? Give yourself a high five. Know that you are awesome. 3. Eat ice cream. Try the neon blue flavor, or add M&Ms. 4. Tell silly stories. It’s OK if they all have the same ending, if that ending makes you laugh. 5. Wear your favorite dress every time it’s clean and available. Yes, that one. Life’s too short to be uncomfortable. 6. Be brave, and announce it loudly. In the pool. At the dentist. You’ll feel brave, and you might just inspire someone else. 7. Get up early, so you have time to play before hitting the road to soccer camp. Or the office. It makes for a happier day. 8. Saying, “I like your shirt,” is a good way to make a new friend. 9. Finally, read books. The best ones have pictures, of teddy bears or princesses or talking spoons. Oh, look. You’re already reading, what we call The Family Issue. Hope you enjoy it!

Nancy Pardue Editor


Peak performance.

SPINE CENTER

JOINT REPLACEMENT

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Cary Orthopaedics has long been known as a sports medicine specialist, helping both professional and recreational athletes play hard and play strong. But did you know we also offer comprehensive orthopaedic care for all types of bone and joint dysfunction – from trauma to injuries to degenerative conditions. Now with four locations in the Triangle, we’re experts in motion, helping all of our patients get back in the game of life.

Cary: 919.467.4992

Morrisville: 919.238.2440

Garner: 919.779.3861

Interactive Body Map helps you get facts about joint pain and common orthopaedic conditions.

www.caryortho.com

Spine Center: 919.297.0000


letters from readers June/July 2016

À La Mode SUMMER GET THE

SCOOP

Plus

MEET OUR RS 2016 MOVE S & SHAKER

OTS BRIGHT SP NY DAY FOR A SUN

Pointe Lane

, Cary NC

WIN CRICKET

, 301 Cascade

OVER BOWLEDS LOC AL FANS

Cary Magazine

PHOTOS

27513

“The issue is absolutely AMAZING! Thank you so much for including Chico’s.”  Kelsey McShane of Chico’s, New York “Still trying to find the words to express our deepest gratitude to Cary Magazine! What was already a dream come true to be IN the magazine, has turned into an even BIGGER, overwhelming moment in time to find out that we got the COVER, alongside our friends The Freezing Pointe! As a local family-owned business using recipes passed down from generation to generation, to say we feel like we’re honoring those who created these recipes would be an understatement.”  Kristin Cleve, Slice Pie Company “Thank you for including me in the Movers & Shakers issue. I loved reading about everyone else and am just so honored to be included with this group of amazing people in Cary! Congrats on a beautiful magazine, and thank you for all that you all do!”  Becca Smith, Smith & Smith, CPA, P.C. “Thank you so much for publishing our shortcake recipe. It looks great, and we’ve gotten wonderful feedback.” Sherród Faulks and Danielle Jones, Slice & Torte

“I picked up a copy of the magazine yesterday, and the Cary Photographic Artists photo essay looked great! Thanks again for the opportunity.” Barbara Guin, Cary Photographic Artists

“We had to move from our neighborhood in Cary, not only because the HOA didn’t allow chickens, but because our neighbors were aggressively against chickens … I don’t believe most subdivisions, especially newer developments, are ready to accept this type of sustainability. Neighborhood children, however, truly enjoyed having the birds around.”  Diana Locki “I was a clarinet player in high school band in Victoria, Texas when we were the first high school band to attempt Husa’s Music for Prague 1968. I will never forget the audience sitting in silence after the last movement … The applause was thunderous, and I will never forget the experience or, of course, the music. I wrote a poem to Mr. Husa, who was kind enough to respond, and I kept his letter for decades until both it and my poem became lost. I just want him to know that I still play my copy on LP record that our band recorded, and am hoping he remembers my admiration for him.” Michael Coone

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Email letters to the editors to editor@carymagazine.com

Submitted comments may be edited for length or clarity, and become the property of Cary Magazine. 14

AUGUST 2016


BACK

TO

SCHOOL

NOTAB L E TEEN S

Practice Makes Perfect VIOLINIST SEES CARNEGIE HALL APPEARANCES AS STEPS IN HER JOURNEY

WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

W

hen you hear that at age 16, violinist Deborah Kim has already played Carnegie Hall twice, it’s not surprising that she is hard-working and talented. What is surprising is that those highprofile performances aren’t the most memorable of her career. Deborah, a rising senior at Green Hope High, calls playing at Carnegie Hall, “a big step in my violin-playing journey.” But her most memorable musical experience happened while she was playing in her school’s chamber group. “We had two performances; the first one went OK, but for the second one I left my music off-stage, and I still managed to get through the concert,” she said. “The music was pretty easy, but I realized that practicing actually pays off.” Deborah has learned this lesson well. Many violinists start quite young, at 4 or 5 years old, but Deborah didn’t pick up the instrument until 10. When she reached high school she realized she was behind her peers. “I decided that I should catch up if I wanted to continue playing violin after high school,” she said. “After seeing performances of others who had started playing earlier, I realized I was way behind.” Reaching her goal required hard work, playing the violin for up to eight hours a day

16

AUGUST 2016

“MUSIC IS DEFINITELY GOING TO BE PART OF MY LIFE, NOT JUST WITH VIOLIN, BUT MAYBE MUSIC EDUCATION. I’M NOT SURE HOW I’M GOING TO PURSUE GERIATRICS, BUT I KEEP SETTING GOALS. MY DREAM HAS BEEN CHANGING FOR THE PAST TWO YEARS, BUT I THINK I’M GOING TO STICK WITH THIS ONE.” — DEBORAH KIM

the summer before her sophomore year. “I wanted to give up numerous times, but my mom helped me get through it,” Deborah recalled. All the effort paid off. Less than a year later, she came in second in the American Protégé International Piano and Strings Competition, and performed at Carnegie Hall in July 2015. She played there again in May 2016 as part of the American Fine Arts Festival Concerto Competition. Deborah says she was less nervous at her second appearance, but not completely comfortable. “After I got in and was set on doing

a performance, I slacked off and relaxed,” she said. “As a soloist at Carnegie Hall it was pretty stressful, because at the last minute I was regretting not practicing enough. The feeling after playing at Carnegie was greater. I felt like I was finally done; I accomplished something. But if I had to choose between the two, I’d rather play at a school concert.” Among other awards and accolades, Deborah won the Durham Symphony Orchestra Young Artist Competition this year and performed a solo with the DSO in April. “When she has a big goal, she’s thrilled to try it and achieve it,” said Shelley Livingston, Deborah’s violin teacher, who also performed with the symphony that night. Livingston, who is also conductor of the Duke University String School Youth Symphony Orchestra, says Deborah is selfassured, especially when it comes to music. This was evident when the teen was Duke Youth Symphony concertmaster last year. “She is soft-spoken, but she fires up when she’s performing,” said Livingston. “She leads by example. She is focused and works hard, so that inspires others to do the same when they’re around her. She is confident. She makes a wonderful concertmaster because she’s a really good leader in that continued on page 23


As a high school senior, violinist Deborah Kim is focusing on college: “In terms of violin, I plan to focus on repertoire for college admission, rather than chamber groups. Although it’s fun playing with friends, I think it’s time to focus on my studies just for college.”

CARY MAGAZINE 17


BACK

TO

SCHOOL

NOTAB L E TEEN S

Passion for Public Service JOSÉ ORTIZ AIMS TO OVERCOME STEREOTYPES, FOR A BETTER COMMUNITY

WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

J

osé San Martin Ortiz doesn’t want to be known as the Hispanic guy, the poor guy, or even the smart guy — not that he isn’t all of those. He wants to be the guy who is making a difference. “I want to have high hopes, because I don’t want to settle for less,” he said. “I want to make the biggest change I can make.” José, 18, graduated in June from Fuquay-Varina High School in the top 5 percent of his class. This fall he will attend Duke University as one of the first 30 beneficiaries of the Washington Duke scholarship, which supports talented students who are the first in their families to attend college. “Mom was so excited when I got the news,” he said of his acceptance letter. “I wish I’d filmed it. The family was jumping and screaming.” Duke was a reach school for him, but then, attending college at all was a reach. José is not a legal resident of the U.S. Born in Mexico, he was brought to the United States by his mother in 2005, along with an older sister and younger brother. A few years later, his father was deported, and the remaining family settled in North Carolina. “What really made me want to work in

18

AUGUST 2016

“I WANT TO HAVE HIGH HOPES, BECAUSE I DON’T WANT TO SETTLE FOR LESS. I WANT TO MAKE THE BIGGEST CHANGE I CAN MAKE.” — JOSÉ SAN MARTIN ORTIZ

government is seeing my mom struggle every day,” José said. “At any point, she could be pulled over and deported. That’s my biggest fear. I want to work in government to try and change that. Not only for Hispanics, but any immigrant who’s struggling. I want to help them.” He plans to study public policy and economics, with the goal of working in advocacy or politics. José isn’t sure how that goal will take shape, although he says his dream would be to work as a consultant in the White House. Lindsey Biller, José’s counselor at Fuquay-Varina High, says getting to know him has made her look at life differently. “No matter what circumstances are put on him, the adversity he’s faced and seen, he’s managed to rise above it,” she said. “He wants to beat the stereotypes that are on His-

panic immigrants. All he wants to do is make a difference.” José may not have a path to citizenship, but he does have legal standing thanks to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program enacted by the Obama administration in June 2012, just as José entered high school. He is exempt from deportation, and he has a work permit and driver’s license. He can attend college, but isn’t eligible for in-state tuition or financial aid at public universities. Because money has always been tight for his housekeeper mother and electrician stepfather, José knew his only college option was to earn a scholarship to a private school. “I didn’t have as many resources for success as other kids. My family is very, very poor,” he said. José used that as an incentive to work harder in school. He took as many Advanced Placement courses as he could, 12 in all. He earned the highest grade on the AP Statistics exam that his teacher had seen in 10 years. He won the Bobby Hamilton Award for overall excellence in math from FuquayVarina High. It all helped earn him the Washingcontinued on page 22


JosĂŠ San Martin Ortiz doesn't like to talk about the obstacles he's overcome, saying he'd rather focus on the opportunities he's had. Chief among these is his mother's influence. "I want to make her proud," he says.

CARY MAGAZINE 19


BACK

TO

SCHOOL NOTAB L E TEEN S

Do More & Be More HISTORY COMES ALIVE FOR SARAH WELSCH

WRITTEN BY NANCY PARDUE PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

I

t’s in her eyes and in her handshake: Sarah Welsch is a leader. The recipient of this year’s Outstanding Teen Volunteer Award in Cary, Sarah has been making an impact in local historic preservation since 2014 as Teen Council liaison on the board of the Friends of the PageWalker Hotel. The organization serves as guardian for the Page-Walker Arts & History Center, advocates for preservation of Cary historic sites, offers history education, and promotes the cultural arts. Sarah’s also led in forming the Young Friends of the Page-Walker Hotel, engaging other teens in local history and cultural arts. She calls the challenge “stretching herself.” “There’s a lot of stereotyping that teens aren’t able or motivated to be more involved,” said Sarah, 17, and a rising senior at Panther Creek High. “But there is definitely the capacity for us to do more, and be more, than people think. “I really enjoy working with the Friends. I love history, and they’ve swept me up into their passion. The Young Friends came out of that, wanting to get teens involved in local history.” The work is paying off, she says; she led planning and execution of the first Paint the Page art event for teens last fall, 20

AUGUST 2016

“TO ME, LEADERSHIP IS KNOWING WHEN TO GUIDE PEOPLE IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION AND WHEN TO STEP BACK AND BE A FOLLOWER AND LET THEM LEAD. IT’S EMPOWERING OTHERS TO ACT, TO WORK TOWARD A COMMON GOAL.” — SARAH WELSCH

featuring an exhibition, reception and judging by the likes of renowned Cary artist Jerry Miller. Under Sarah’s leadership, the Young Friends have doubled profits in their second annual fundraising bake sale, and now have their own section on the Friends’ main website. “Sarah’s building youth representation in Page-Walker membership and engaging youth in experiencing the history and cultural arts of Cary,” said Friends’ president Leesa Brinkley. “Paint the Page was a significant event to plan and execute,” Brinkley said. “Sarah was instrumental to its success by identifying and delegating tasks, keeping up with status and most of all, communicating effectively

with (sponsors and) everyone involved. She shows the ability to guide others, through collaboration and consensus. “It’s truly amazing to see a teen not only dedicated to historic preservation at such a young age, but one who we can depend on just as much as our other board members.” Founded more than 30 years ago by Anne Kratzer, the award-winning Friends organization will only become more diverse as today’s newcomers put down roots in Cary, Sarah says. “This is such a great place to live, and (in the future), I’d like to still see the things I grew up with, the historical homes around mine,” she said. “Development is good, and the town does a good job of making it cohesive and pristine, but I’d like to see things not get huge, in west Cary especially.” Of current concern for the Friends is the proposed relocation of the historic IveyEllington House as part of Cary’s downtown revitalization project. Located on West Chatham Street, the house is one of few surviving examples of the Gothic Revival style in Wake County. “I would hate to see it moved from the streetscape,” Sarah said. “It’s so important to continued on page 22


Sarah Welsch says teens have the “capacity to do more, and be more, than people think.” She’s proving it, one leadership role at a time.

CARY MAGAZINE 21


Welsch continued from page 20

Summer is coming to a close and we have the perfect items for back to school. From Lilly Pulitzer agendas to a new back to school outfit!

Y AWARDS

THE MAGG

ER WIN0N 16 2

Check us out online or come see us in the store. www.shopswaggernow.com Monday – Friday 10 am – 6 pm Saturday 10 am – 5 pm Lochmere Pavilion 2425 Kildaire Farm Road, Suite 503

/swaggerstyle

22

@shopswagger @swagger_gifts

AUGUST 2016

shopswagger

shopswagger /shopswagger now now

maintaining town history, and it could be utilized and appreciated where it is.” Sarah’s leadership skills have been honed by participation in the Shelton Challenge through The General Hugh Shelton Leadership Center, and the National Youth Leadership Conference in Washington, D.C. She applied those skills at Panther Creek High, building its once-struggling Key Club into one of the largest in the Carolinas district at 400 members, and setting strict expectations for all. The role as 2015-16 club president was, she says, “a huge undertaking.” In other words, it was just her style. “I like to work hard, have a goal and accomplish it,” said Sarah, who uses a color-coded system to stay organized — although she admits her room can get messy at times. “It brings me a lot of happiness to be part of something that makes an impact. “To me, leadership is knowing when to guide people in the right direction and when to step back and be a follower and let them lead,” she said. “It’s empowering others to act, to work toward a common goal.”

Ortiz continued from page 18

ton Duke scholarship, which includes tuition, expenses, paid internships and mentoring. Biller says José’s success is due to his work ethic and his family. “He’s been raised in an extremely loving and supportive family,” she said. “His mom has taught him the value of hard work, and that you can’t allow your circumstances to define you. Hard work has been instilled in him since he came to the United States.” José also relies on his friends and classmates to push and support him. Sophomore and junior years in high school, he was on the cross country and track teams, hitching rides with friends who had cars. Another friend helped him

“I LIKE TO WORK HARD, HAVE A GOAL AND ACCOMPLISH IT. IT BRINGS ME A LOT OF HAPPINESS TO BE PART OF SOMETHING THAT MAKES AN IMPACT.” — SARAH WELSCH

In her senior year at Panther Creek, Sarah will keep up the good work with Key Club and her school’s chapter of the National Honor Society, and serve as chief co-editor of the yearbook. She also will continue her appearances on the Town of Cary’s monthly episodes of BUD TV, and with the Friends, working to ensure the sustainability of Young Friends. Then it will be off to college, to double major in Spanish and perhaps political science. Sarah has two pieces of wisdom for other teens: “Listen to your mom, because she knows a lot, and try new things. Involve yourself in every aspect of them possible, until you find what you enjoy.” t

get hired at Mathnasium, a perfect fit for a math whiz like José. “I loved seeing kids understand a subject that is considered one of the hardest to wrap your head around,” he said. “Be it little kids finally understanding what it means to add two numbers, or highschoolers understanding trigonometry, it was always amazing to see the lightbulb light up.” But as much as he liked tutoring kids, his passion for public service was greater. José quit his job in June to prepare for Duke’s summer enrichment program. “I’m really good at math, but I don’t want to do it for a living,” he said. “If I’m an engineer I won’t make a change in the world. I just want to help people like me, and my mom.” t


Kim continued from page 16

way. You don’t have to talk when you play the violin.” Deborah also lights up when she talks about another of her interests — elder care. About a year ago, she was persuaded to join a friend and two other musicians for a performance at SearStone, a Cary retirement community. Deborah says the event was inspirational. “During the performance I saw a senior who was really enjoying the music,” she said. “Technically he was bothering us, but we all appreciated it because we knew he was trying to express how he felt when he heard the music.” After that experience, Deborah founded Senior Serenades, a Green Hope High service club which arranges musical performances at area retirement homes. She also started MUSE (Music Uniting Students and Elders), a similar ensemble which plays mostly in Chapel Hill. Listeners will sometimes cry during Senior Serenades performances, says Livingston. “Some will start clapping in the middle of her playing. It touches her deeply, and it’s really sweet,” she said. “Deborah’s finding out in this last year that she can be very expressive, and she can touch people with her music.” Deborah has spent this summer volunteering at SearStone’s assisted living facility Brittany Place, in order to learn more about the industry and explore possible careers. “I didn’t know I was into senior care, but playing for seniors helped me develop my dream to become a geriatrician,” she said. She’s not clear how her two passions will come together, but she is confident that with hard work, she will reach her goal. “Music is definitely going to be part of my life, not just with violin, but maybe music education,” Deborah said. “I’m not sure how I’m going to pursue geriatrics, but I keep setting goals. My dream has been changing for the past two years, but I think I’m going to stick with this one.” t

www.BlockRealty.com WEBSITE UPDATED HOURLY

The Triangle Area's Largest Agency Specializing in Single Family Rental Homes and Townhomes

Sharon L. Schovain Broker/Owner SSchovain@BlockRealty.com Direct Line 919-459-6319

919-459-6300

Introducing Our...

Delectable Summer Menu

Try new flavors that include Blueberry Icing, Oreo Crumble & delicious drizzles from Raspberry to Salted Caramel.

100 Wrenn Drive, #101 | Cary | 919-468-8722 8323 Creedmoor Road | Raleigh | 919-847-3800 6am-7pm daily duckdonuts.CaryNC

duckdonuts.RaleighNC

CARY MAGAZINE 23


STEP AWAY FROM THE TELEVISION AND STEP OUTSIDE YOURSELF Start your adventure today.

800.852.9506

ExploreBoone.com


BACK

TO

SCHOOL

David Clark, software engineer at Lord Corporation in Cary, uses a Lego helicopter created by his colleague, system safety engineer Casey Irvin, to demonstrate concepts behind the company’s Active Vibration Control System, used in commercial and military helicopters, and even cellphone technology, to Wake County schoolteachers who are working to bring real-world STEM education into their classrooms.

26

AUGUST 2016


STEM

World

It’s a

HOW WAKE IS WORKING FOR THE FUTURE WRITTEN BY NANCY PARDUE PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

ike children, they gathered around their instructor eagerly at LORD Corporation in Cary, applying pressure to metal to test the strength of rivets versus the company’s structural adhesives. The rivets pulled loose at 1,300 psi. They all jumped when the adhesive-held metal snapped loudly at 3,400 psi. Their next questions were how, and why? But these aren’t children. They’re Wake County schoolteachers, inside local companies to help them bring realworld, project-based learning to their students through a program dubbed Summer STEM. “Teachers know education, but they don’t know the problems faced in business,” said Teresa Pierrie, director of programs at WakeEd, a nonprofit collaborating with Wake County Public Schools and local businesses in this second annual program. “We knew if we could immerse them in the structure of business, they could build that new knowledge to deliver to students.

L

It’s authentic. It becomes a model for their students and for their fellow teachers.” STEM education — Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics — is not new in in our state; it dates to the 1950s and the development of Research Triangle Park. More than just another acronym, STEM is key to the future of our state’s economy, and to our country’s global competitiveness. Yet according to the 2016 STEM Index, created by U.S. News and World Report, STEM jobs are being created much faster than workforce-ready STEM graduates. In the largest public school system in North Carolina, leaders are working to change that. “STEM education has two goals,” said Paul Domenico, director of Curriculum Enhancement Programs for Wake County Schools. “One, it answers the ‘why’ for students, as in why am I learning this. “Two, a lot of our industry is built on continued on page 28

CARY MAGAZINE 27


BACK

TO

SCHOOL

“This is so cool,” says East Garner Magnet Middle School science teacher Brian Cole, right, of the magneto-rheological fluid developed by LORD chemists and used to control brakes, shocks and dampers in autos. The substance transforms from liquid to solid when magnetized. Cole’s goal in attending Summer STEM, a program that immerses teachers in local STEM businesses, was to make learning more fun for his students. Also pictured is Sarah Mallon of East Garner Middle School.

28

JANUARY AUGUST 2016 2016

continued from page 27

STEM, so it creates a pipeline, making specific connections with businesses and universities and community colleges.” Doug Lorenz, president of Automotive, Industrial and Electronic Assembly at LORD, says real-world corporate challenges are one reason LORD employees participate in mentoring, co-teaching, and externships for area teachers. As markets change and the company works toward future relevance and success, “We need the right people to help us do that,” he said. “That’s why these partnerships are so powerful.” More than science

Inside the helicopter lab at LORD, which develops systems to control motion and vibration, scientist Dan Barber demonstrated the concept behind the company’s magneto-rheological fluids. The teachers slid a powerful magnet over a proprietary iron powder-based liquid, and witnessed its quickthickening results. The substance is used to control

EXAMPLES OF STEM JOBS ▶ Network systems analyst ▶ Financial examiner ▶ Medical scientist ▶ Physician assistant ▶ Skin care specialist ▶ Biochemist

— Dr. Jenna Carpenter Dean of the Campbell University School of Engineering

brakes, shocks and dampers, and even in construction of earthquake-vulnerable buildings. “This is so cool!” exclaimed science teacher Brian Cole of East Garner Magnet Middle School, whose Summer STEM goal was to make learning more fun for his students. Science and English teachers Mary Grace Guthrie Kilder and Laura Dowd of Mills Park Middle in Cary, shared how they’re collaborating on cross-curricular projcontinued on page 30


GIRLS & STEM Paul Domenico says WCPSS academic data shows girls on par with, and sometimes outperforming, boys in STEM subjects — but a “disconnect” occurs when it comes to girls choosing

RESTORE

REMODEL FOR A CAUSE

STEM career fields. Dr. Jenna Carpenter, founding dean of Campbell University’s School of Engineering opening this fall, is a national figure in STEM education advocacy and passionate about bridging this STEM

Habitat Wake offers tax-deductible cabinet removal.

divide. “STEM permeates every industry, due to the prevalence of technology,” Carpenter says, yet 40 percent of female STEM grads choose non-STEM careers. And while two-thirds of college

dule Scheour y val remoay! tod

graduates are women, they represent just

Our professionally-trained team can remove your cabinets, appliances, and countertops and transport them to a ReStore for re-sale to the public. Proceeds support Habitat’s mission to help our Wake County neighbors purchase safe, affordable homes.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE OR CALL 919-744-2416

20 percent of engineering grads over the past 20 to 30 years.

TOGETHER, WE BUILD.

www.WakeReStore.org

So why aren’t more women in STEM careers? Carpenter says self-doubt plays a role. “Women think they must achieve

NEW CLIENTS RECEIVE 20% OFF FIRST VISIT

at exceptional levels to be successful as STEM professionals,” she said. “Then there’s the double-bind of being competent versus being liked, which is common for women in traditional male roles. But research shows both are

Experience one of our great services:

important for advancement.” Instead, she says, women should

• Deva Curl Specialist on staff • Color Services • Precision Haircuts • Waxing Services • Wedding Hair and Makeup • Keratin Treatments

seek to understand the reasonable expectations and standards for their jobs, and view their performance in context of the group spectrum. Carpenter encourages women to take advantage of opportunities to learn new

THE MAGGY AWARDS

Mon-Sat 8am-9pm Sun 10am-6pm

STEM skills and enhance existing ones. For students, she suggests parents and teachers set healthy expectations, encourage play and activities that children enjoy and are naturally good at, and that help them see the bigger picture. “STEM careers make the world a

WINNER 2016

High House Crossing Shopping Center 2751 NC Highway 55, Cary, NC, 27519 919.303.7775 ✂ twistedscizzorsonline.com

See facebook for monthly news and coupons.

better place,” she said, “and there are lots of paths to success.”

CARY MAGAZINE 29


BACK

TO

SCHOOL

continued from page 28

ects to show students the scope of STEM. Alyson Davis, university relations specialist and STEM manager at LORD, says students often don’t understand that broad career choices such as engineering offer multiple opportunities and career paths.

“You have to be able to articulate ideas, to influence customers in a way they can understand. Otherwise, it doesn’t matter how smart you are.” — Doug Lorenz The U.S. Department of Labor cites 100 different STEM occupations in various fields, and 70 percent of the fastest-growing occupations overall are in STEM, from biomedical engineer and network systems analyst to economist and skin care specialist. Beyond technical knowledge, STEM companies look for those able to work in cross-functional environments, solve problems creatively, and demonstrate strong communication skills, something Vernon Malone College & Career Academy Spanish teacher Clay Hergert promotes by requiring his students to prepare classroom presentations. “You have to be able to articulate ideas, to influence customers in a way they can understand,” said Lorenz. “Otherwise, it doesn’t matter how smart you are.” Keeping it real

Steve Parrott, president of WakeEd, says as Wake County Public Schools continues to execute its Vision 2020 plan to prepare students to reach their full potential in a complex world, “The emphasis on engaged teaching and learning contributes to students’ preparation in workplace skills, continued on page 31

30

AUGUST 2016

TOP: Dozens of teachers took part in this year’s Summer STEM program, experiencing hands-on learning that will help them bring real-world, project-based learning to their students. Local companies taking part say the benefit is two-fold: As markets change and companies work toward future success, “We need the right people to help us do that,” says Doug Lorenz, a LORD Corporation executive. “”That’s why these partnerships are so powerful.” BOTTOM: LORD employees Clark and Irvin explain the company’s In-flight Propeller Balancing System, originally designed for concrete factory ventilation fans but now used in aircraft, which increases engine life and reduces operating costs for LORD customers. For teachers like Mary Grace Guthrie Kilder and Laura Dowd of Mills Park Middle School, near left, sharing such applications for STEM learning is a boost for students.


breakout quote

AD

Teachers Diane Cadavid and Cassandra McClellan of Apex Friendship High learn from LORD scientist Dan Barber during Summer STEM, a program aimed at providing authentic experiences for educators tasked with educating the nation’s future STEM workforce.

continued from page 30

including the four C’s (of ) Collaborative, Creative, Effective Communicators, and Critical Thinkers, that are essential to today’s work setting. “There is a growing understanding of the need to engage with schools to guide teachers in creating relevant learning experiences that deepen STEM curricular understanding and expand student understanding of the many opportunities within STEM businesses and STEM professions,” Parrott said. Domenico, of WCPSS, notes that all Wake County secondary schools have alliances with local businesses to offer mentoring opportunities for students, and 28 Wake schools are part of the STEM Collaborative Network. He points to a multitude of options for Wake students and STEM, such as Wake

STEM Early College on the N.C. State campus, focused on engineering, and the Vernon Malone academy connected with Wake Tech, offering eight career pathways from nursing to game design. The Digital Media Academy at Middle Creek High in Apex equips students with communication technology skills to benefit them throughout college and career. And Athens Drive High has two STEM academies, Health Science Academy and Energy and Sustainability Academy, offering context-specific study and the opportunity to work with industry to extend learning outside the classroom. “There’s a different look and feel at each STEM school,” Domenico said, “and the concentrated approach filters into other classrooms. It’s amazing what and how students learn; we have to stay out in front of that.” t

STEM UP! WAKE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS wcpss.net WAKE ED wakeed.org NC STEM CENTER ncstemcenter.org NORTH CAROLINA SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION CENTER ncsmt.org TECH GIRLZ techgirlz.org GIRL DEVELOP IT girldevelopit.com US2020 us2020.org THE FORGE DOWNTOWN theforgedowntown.org

CARY MAGAZINE 31


SEPTEMBER

10 18 to

2016

RETURNING SEPTEMBER in

The Town of Cary is excited to once again be hosting this ATP Challenger Event on the USTA Professional Circuit. The week-long tournament will feature some of the same world-renowned talent appearing at the upcoming US Open Tennis Championships in New York. Qualifying rounds begin on Saturday, September 10 and run through Sunday, September 18. We welcome you to join us for a second year!

SPECIAL EVENTS Event Supporting Abilities Tennis Duke James Bonk Invitational Western Wake Tennis Association Charity Event

High School Invitational University Night Chamber Night Pro Am

TICKETS VOLUNTEERING and

For the full schedule, to buy tickets, and to apply for volunteer positions, please visit our website.

www.CaryTennisChampionships.com 32

AUGUST 2016


DISCOVER PRIVATE CLIENT SERVICES CLOSE TO HOME When your assets are growing and changing, standard banking services aren’t enough to meet your complex financial needs. Fortunately, Private Client Services from First Tennessee are available in your area. With a dedicated financial concierge who’s ready at your convenience, you’ll find it’s easier than ever to get the banking resources you need and the personal attention you deserve.

START A CONVERSATION AT FTB.COM/RALEIGHVIP OR CALL 919-789-2987 4801 Glenwood Avenue, Suite 100, Raleigh, NC 27612

PRIVATE CLIENT

|

COMMERCIAL BANKING

|

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

Charleston, SC | Charlotte, NC | Greenville, NC | Jacksonville, FL | Raleigh, NC | Richmond, VA | Winston-Salem, NC

©2016 First Tennessee Bank National Association. Member FDIC. www.firsttennessee.com


BACK

TO

SCHOOL

CROSSROADS FLEX, A HIGH SCHOOL WITH A FLEXIBLE SCHEDULE, OPENS IN CARY WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY PAUL CORY OF WAKE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM

SOMETIMES THE BEST WAY to keep kids in school is to let them spend more time outside the classroom. Crossroads Flex, Cary’s newest high school, opens this month with a flexible schedule that will benefit performers, athletes, students with jobs, or those with family responsibilities. “We have to be adaptive as a school system,” said Drew Cook, the Wake County Public School System’s senior director for high school programs. “Sometimes there are barriers and constraints that a more traditional school may have in meeting the needs of all students.” With a mix of online and in-person courses, the school will offer the 22 core classes needed for graduation, and a variety of electives. Small classes will be scheduled throughout the day, from early morning to early evening, at the school, located at 5651 Dillard Drive. “We see this as a reflection of national and international trends,” Cook continued. “The reality is digital learning and distance learning has become the norm in many cases, certainly at the post-secondary level.” continued on page 36 34

AUGUST 2016

Educating the

Modern Student


Keith Richardson, Crossroads Flex High principal, says one of his challenges in the new role will be personal: “I’ll have to challenge myself to be more flexible when it comes to a schedule and when it comes to having a routine day, having routine hours.”

CARY MAGAZINE 35


continued from page 34

YOU MADE US #1 AGAIN CARY! A special thank you to the eyecarecenter optometrists and staff who have developed lasting relationships and provided a personal touch every step of the way. YEARS OF SERVICE FOR EACH: Dr. Don Cloninger

36

Pat Foster

33

Karen Cloninger

30

Terry O’Grady

21

Melody Morton

20

Dr. David Weitz

19

Dr. Keel Godwin

18 6

Dr. Kathryn Manton

Serving the community for over 36 years! Thanks to all of our patients and associates for voting us Best Eye Doctor in Western Wake County. Visit eyecarecenter.com to see eye care in a new light. Cary Barnes & Noble Plaza | 720 SE Maynard Road | Cary, NC 27511

THE MA GGY AW ARDS

WINNER 201 6

919.467.0959

Mediterranean Cafe

HEALTHY & FRESH SALADS, SANDWICHES, KABOBS! CATERING AVAILABLE FOR ALL EVENTS! 1347 Kildaire Farm Road // Cary // 919-300-5586 9650 Strickland Road // Raleigh // 919-847-2700 Hours: Monday-Sunday 10am-9pm

WWW.SASSOOL.COM 36

AUGUST 2016

Initially, the school will partner with North Carolina Virtual Public Schools for its online courses. NCVPS is already serving nearly 2 million students in Wake County with a variety of classes including honors and Advanced Placement courses, foreign language and physical education. “We are seeing similar schools at both the district level and school level (a school within a school) pop up across the state. They typically start small, but they have had growth each year,” said Adam Renfro, outreach and support coordinator for NCVPS. “These schools are really instrumental in meeting the needs of the modern student.” The reliance on online classes means Crossroads Flex For more students must be information motivated, digiabout registration tally savvy and or classes, visit organized, says wcpss.net/ Tamani Anderson crossroadsflexhs Powell, director of marketing and communications for Wake County Public Schools. Excellent timemanagement skills will be vital to keeping up with the work. Students will be provided computers and other technical support if needed, she says. Students will have minimum hours they will be required to spend in class, as well as minimum hours they will need to be logged into online classes. “It is for a particular student, it is not for everybody,” said Powell. “It’s online; it’s anytime, but you still have to do the work. “It’s for any kid who feels a flexible schedule will work better for them. One (incoming) student said her mom has MS (multiple sclerosis). As her mother’s disease progresses, she wants to be able to stay home and help her mom. This is a way she can still have a connection with adults in school, but still do a lot online and be there to support her mom.” After the first round of applications in May, 66 students were accepted. Registration was extended through the summer, and officials anticipate reaching their target


of 100 enrollees by the first day of school, Aug. 29. Keith Richardson, the school’s new principal, spent five years at York Elementary in Raleigh where he was known for greeting every student by name. He looks forward to forging deeper relationships with the small group of high-schoolers at Crossroads Flex. “I’ll have the opportunity to get to know what their specific goals and interests are,” he said. “Just knowing that information is going to help me form relationships with those students, not just by name, but how we can best support them.” In addition to the principal, officials expect to hire three to four teachers, a counselor and an office manager. Depending on students’ needs, staff duties are likely to go beyond traditional job descriptions. Communication will be key, Richardson said, “especially meeting with students and families one-on-one, to determine progress of the students, their success and what their needs are. It will definitely be more than the traditional role of principal.” Students will come to the school at different grade levels, with different academic needs, says Richardson. Some may have more success in a small group, while others may require individual instruction. “It will be a challenge to make sure we are meeting the needs of those students. And meeting their needs during the time that they are available,” he said. “The purpose of this program is to meet them where they are with their schedule. That’s something you don’t find in a traditional school.” But for all the innovation, some things will remain the same, says Cook with Wake County Public Schools. “We’re still talking about the basics: the value of relationships, building rapport, trust and respect, and the social and emotional well-being of our students,” he said. “Sometimes when you start talking about technology and digital, people start thinking about robots. If anything (because of the size of the school) this model may allow us to do an even better job than we’re able to do in a more traditional setting.” t

Violets Boutique

Famous Toastery

Hand & Stone

Whisk

SHOP | DINE | UNWIND

vom FASS Oils and Spices

Shower Me With Love

CinéBistro | Color Me Mine | Elegant Stitches | Enrigo Italian Bistro | Esteem Me Famous Toastery | Finley’s Boutique | Fresca Café | Gigi’s Cupcakes | Gigi’s Boutique Hand & Stone | Menchie’s | My Salon Suite | Pure Body Fitness Studio | Red Hot & Blue Shower Me With Love | Taziki’s Cafe | TFTC Martial Arts | The Joint Chiropractic Triangle Wine Company | Tre Nail Spa | V’s Barbershop | Violets Boutique vomFass Oils & Spices | Waverly Artists Group | Whisk | Whole Foods

New: CorePower Yoga | Parlor Blow Dry Bar

At the intersection of Tryon and Kildaire Farm Road

WaverlyCary.com

|

CARY MAGAZINE 37


BEACHES +

river cruising

Besides sand and surf, there’s historic charm, nightlife, and a scenic Riverwalk lined with boutiques and cafes serving fresh seafood. It’s everything you love, plus beaches, too. All just a short drive away. Go with the flow and see where the water takes you.

WilmingtonAndBeachesWeekends.com

877-945-6386

Carolina Beach Kure Beach Wrightsville Beach

WINNER 2011

THE MAGGY AWARDS

HONORABLE MENTION 2012

WINNER 2013

WINNER 2014

WINNER 2015

Congratulations to Linda Ward! Thank you for voting us Best Attorney in Western Wake for 2016.

WINNER 2016

38

AUGUST 2016

790 s.e. cary parkway, suite 203 | cary, north carolina 27511 919.655.1990 | www.wardfamilylawgroup.com


® North Carolina

CARY MAGAZINE 39


1

2

3

We Love! COMPILED BY AMBER KEISTER | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

1. COOL CUSTOMER Insulating neoprene lunch sacks will keep food cold for hours. A shoulder strap is included for easy carrying, or clip onto a backpack with the handy carabiner, $22.99. stones-education. com

2. BRING YOUR OWN Collapsible lunch boxes, made of BPA-free silicone, are microwave, freezer and dishwasher safe. At 20.3 ounces, the container can hold a sandwich and chips or leftover lasagna; $18.99. whiskcarolina.com

3. EAT IN STYLE Pack a sandwich, small salad and toppings in this bento-style lunch box. The BPA-free containers are safe for the freezer, microwave and dishwasher; $27.99. whiskcarolina.com

CARY MAGAZINE 41


We Love!

1

2

3 1. STUCK ON YOU Magna-Tiles magnetic building sets allow countless construction projects. Small magnets embedded in each tile attract from every direction, so houses, cars and rockets click together easily. Magna-Tiles DX Clear 48-piece set, for ages 3 and older; $74.50. stones-education.com 42

AUGUST 2016

2. ON A ROLL In Tenzi, players get 10 dice and frantically roll until someone gets all his dice on one number. A card deck, sold separately, gives you 76 more ways to play the fast-paced game. Tenzi dice, for ages 7 and older, $14.99; 77 Ways to Play Tenzi card pack, $9.99. stones-education.com

3. SHAPE UP Kids learn about colors and shapes as they solve puzzles with Mighty Mind building shapes, for ages 3 to 8, $19.99. stones-education.com


CALENDAR GIRL Bright, beach-inspired agendas from Lilly Pulitzer keep you in style and on time for 17 months. Large agenda, $30; medium agenda, $24. facebook.com/ AshworthPrimandProper/

AA-B2B_2016-SWAGGER-4.6875x4.75.indd 2

7/7/16 2:34 PM

Retirement Planning • Investment and Wealth Management • Annuities

As a retired Marine Corps Officer, I have always focused on achieving my objectives and accomplishing the mission to help others and my family. With the breadth and depth of services provided by Raymond James, and working together as a team with me as a financial advisor, there is much we can accomplish to prepare for the future for yourself and for your family.

BOOKED UP Keep up with social engagements or to-do lists with these pretty 17-month planners from Spartina. Weekly planner, $29.50; mini weekly planner, $22. facebook.com/AshworthPrimandProper/

WHERE TO SHOP The Pink Pearl Shoppes of Kildaire 1331 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary (919) 600-2267 facebook.com/AshworthPrimandProper Stones Education Superstore 210 Hampton Woods Lane, Raleigh (919) 821-7210 stones-education.com Whisk Waverly Place Shopping Center 316 Colonades Way, Suite 214, Cary (919) 322-2458 whiskcarolina.com

Raymond James & Associates Brendan Michael Rodden CRPS® Financial Advisor

Brendan.Rodden@RaymondJames.com 919-918-4892 1380 Environ Way 3700 Glenwood Avenue, Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Suite 250, Raleigh, NC 27612

Raymond James & Associates, Inc. Member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC

Life and Disability Insurance • Education Planning/529 Plans • Tax Strategies

CARY MAGAZINE 43


THE MAGGY AWARDS

WINNER 2016

The flawless first day back starts here. Summer’s almost over, and the kids are headed back to school. When quality, honesty and your family’s safety matter, choose Atlantic Tire & Service. With locations in Cary, Raleigh and Durham, Atlantic Tire & Service is an award-winning tire shop offering expertise on the highest quality tires for cars and light trucks, OEM repairs and other automotive services. We’ll always make sure your vehicle is safe, whether it’s the first day, the last day, or any day in between!

®

Large Business Category

IMPORTANT TIP: Potholes, curbs, and speed bumps can cause your wheels to get out of alignment. You will know your tires are misaligned if you feel the car pulling to one side or the other. It can be a gentle pull, or in severe cases you might have to actually hold your steering wheel partially turned in order to simply drive straight. But it is normally not this obvious. Over time, you may notice your tires are wearing unevenly. Leaving your wheels misaligned can wear out the insides or outsides of your tires, create damage to steering rods, and cause accidents. VISIT ATLANTIC TIRE & SERVICE TODAY FOR A FREE ALIGNMENT CHECK & BRAKE CHECK

Schedule an appointment online today! www.atlantictireonline.com 1380 NW Maynard Road Cary, 919-319-1614

8681 Marvino Lane Raleigh, 919-268-4300

5412 South Miami Boulevard Durham, 919-941-0712

Hours: M-F 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m., Sat 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.


Excellence in

EDUCATION A look inside the top schools in Wake County

Branded Content Section

CARY MAGAZINE 45


Excellence in

EDUCATI N

CHESTERBROOK ACADEMY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Chesterbrook Academy Elementary School in Cary offers a challenging, well-rounded curriculum that helps children ages three through fifth grade master the core academics while developing important skills such as creativity, collaboration and communication. Students also enjoy a full array of specialty classes including art, music, physical education, foreign language and technology. The teachers create personalized learning plans for each child and work closely with parents and students to make learning fun, stimulating and meaningful. The school takes advantage of the rich resources

130 Towne Village Drive Cary, NC 27513 (877) 959-4181 cbaelementarycary.com

in the area to bring the curriculum to life through field trips, including the North Carolina Zoo, North Carolina Aquarium and Durham Museum of Life and Science. The four-acre campus, conveniently located off SW Cary Parkway, includes a soccer field, playground and newly renovated swimming pool. The school’s technology lab is outfitted with Promethean Boards, netbook laptops and iPad® digital devices. Chesterbook Academy Elementary School is accredited by SACS CASI, and the preschool program has a 5-star rating.

Chesterbrook Academy

®

Elementary School, 3 years – 5th Grade A private school education for the whole child Our challenging, well-rounded and technology-rich curriculum helps students master the core academics while developing skills such as creativity, problem solving and collaboration. • Personalized, project based learning • Specialty classes (art, music, technology, PE, Spanish) and electives • STEM projects including coding, robotics and Arduino

®

• iPad mobile digital devices as classroom learning tools ®

iPad® is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc.

OPEN HOUSE: Saturday, August 6, 10:00 am - 1:00 pm 130 Towne Village Dr. • cbaelementarycary.com • 877-959-4181 CBA_CaryMagazine_Jun16_7.125x4.75.indd 1 46 AUGUST 2016

6/27/16 11:11 AM

Branded Content Section


Excellence in

EDUCATI N

GRACE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL When families are asked what they like best about GRACE Christian School, overwhelmingly their responses include the words, “loving, caring, community, and academically challenging.” All elementary students enjoy small class sizes, instructional assistants, differentiated academic instruction, exposure to the arts, a library with a diverse collection, a hot lunch program, a secure playground that fosters exercise and imagination, and a well-equipped science lab. Kindergarten classroom activities include role play and experiential learning, as well as a variety of hands-on experiences allowing for a high level of student engagement, fine and gross motor skills development, and exploration beyond the classroom walls. A strong phonics-based reading program in kindergarten provides the foundation for reading instruction.

TK-6 CAMPUS 801 Buck Jones Road Raleigh, NC 27606 7-12 CAMPUS 1101 Buck Jones Road Raleigh, NC 27606

GRACE embraces technology at every grade level with SMART Boards in every elementary classroom, MacBook Air computers for every student in grades 4-12 and intentional instruction to develop age-appropriate skills in critical thinking, problem solving, communication and collaboration.

K-12 ACCREDITED - COLLEGE PREP BIBLICAL WORLDVIEW - DIGITAL LEARNING

(919) 747-2020

Advanced Placement® and www.gracechristian.net honors classes are balanced with opportunities to participate fully in fine arts, athletics, and community outreach. All are designed to encourage our students to develop their strengths and find God’s plan for their lives. Our goal is for GRACE students to graduate spiritually mature, academically prepared, and mentally confident. All GRACE teachers are degreed and certified educators who provide academic rigor while fostering a safe, loving, and caring environment. GRACE is accredited by both ACSI and AdvancEd (SACS) with the highest rating a school can receive.

TK-6 CAMPUS 801 Buck Jones Road Raleigh, NC 27606 Ph: (919) 747-2020

7-12 CAMPUS 1101 Buck Jones Road Raleigh, NC 27606 Ph: (919) 747-2020

www.GRACEChristian.net

A LOVING COMMUNITY THAT SPIRITUALLY AND ACADEMICALLY EQUIPS, CHALLENGES, AND INSPIRES. Branded Content Section

CARY MAGAZINE 47


Excellence in

EDUCATI N

919.481.2123 www.hopewellacademy.org admissions@hopewellacademy.org 101 Preston Executive Drive, Cary, NC 27513

Hopewell Academy provides a challenging and supportive environment for students with diverse learning styles. With small classes and personalized attention, our students become confident and responsible learners who achieve academic success in a university preparatory environment.

• Grades 6 to 12 • Accredited, university prep • Honors/Advanced courses • 12:1 student teacher ratio • Student-inspired electives, languages, trips • Active parent participation • Experienced, encouraging faculty • Founded in 2004

Enrolling Domestic and International Students in Grades 6-12

48 AUGUST 2016

HOPEWELL ACADEMY Hopewell Academy provides a challenging and supportive environment for students with diverse learning styles. Small classes and personalized attention help our students become confident and responsible learners to achieve academic success in a university preparatory environment. The world is changing. Hopewell is changing. With a new Board of Directors and new team, Hopewell is embracing its new future as an international, global, learning community featuring day and boarding students from Grades 6 to 12. Welcoming students from all over the world is one of the most effective ways to introduce students to cultural diversity. Every day Hopewell students acknowledge different perspectives and communicate clearly with diverse audiences, enabling students to become advocates for themselves and for others. Our students don’t just read about continents and culture, they actively engage 101 Preston Executive Drive with students from Cary, NC 27513 those cultures. Together (919) 481-2123 Hopewell students and www.hopewellacademy.org faculty use inquiry and an open mind to gain critical thinking skills and solve 21st century issues in challenging and collaborative classrooms. At Hopewell, it’s about analyzing issues in our community and our world, and creating change. Top global learning schools like Hopewell understand the need to model respect, citizenship, and critical thinking to initiate positive change throughout our world. Student-inspired academic and social activities lead to new perspectives that promote cultural understanding in everyday life. New digital tools in the classrooms remove barriers for finding information. The emphasis becomes using, discussing, and analyzing the information in small classroom settings of 12:1. Our faculty creates an atmosphere that is encouraging, inspiring, safe, and compassionate so students can focus on meeting rigorous academic standards. Hopewell believes that a better classroom leads to a better world. Visit us and experience Hopewell Academy’s new vision. Branded Content Section


Excellence in

EDUCATI N

PRIMROSE SCHOOLS Balanced Learning at Primrose Schools? More parents are recognizing the importance of enrolling their children in preschool to help them develop the right foundation for success in elementary school and beyond. Studies show that from birth to age 5, growth in all areas of development is rapid. Children form strong neural connections during this time as a result of their experiences with everyone and everything they encounter. The best programs go beyond helping children master basic academic skills by supporting their development into happy, confident, well-rounded individuals. “Informed parents look for preschool, pre-K and kindergarten programs that take a balanced approach to developing motor, social-emotional, creative and academic skills,” said Dr. Gloria Julius, VP of education and professional development for Primrose Schools. “It takes quality instruction, a wellrounded curriculum and a positive teacher relationship to prepare a child to succeed.” Parents have heard the term Steam in the news. STEAM is an educational approach to learning that uses Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics for guiding student inquiry, discussion, and critical thinking. The Primrose Balanced Learning® curriculum supports this and children’s innate desire to learn through investigation and experimentation. In the classroom, intentional experiences introduce children to new concepts and ideas in engaging ways. And the exploration doesn’t stop there. Children instinctively ask many questions and enjoy thinking and observing what surrounds them. Encouraging this curiosity helps nurture a love of learning in children and increases their ability to think critically and creatively. Primrose Schools is a national family of dedicated leaders serving children, families and communities in our premier accredited early education and care schools. For parenting tips, visit our Parenting blog at www.PrimroseSchools.com/360Parenting.

FACT:

There are valuable lessons involved in learning how to use a microscope.

BALANCED LEARNING® WAY:

Including how to share. SEE BALANCED LEARNING IN ACTION. CALL FOR A TOUR TODAY!

Infants–Private Kindergarten & After School*

Primrose School of Cary PrimroseCary.com | 919.481.3901 Primrose School at Holly Grove PrimroseHollyGrove.com | 919.567.1114 Primrose School at The Park PrimroseAtThePark.com | 919.468.8880 Primrose School of West Cary PrimroseWestCary.com | 919.363.2700 Primrose School at West Lake PrimroseWestLake.com | 919.662.1322 Each Primrose school is a privately owned and operated franchise. Primrose Schools® and Balanced Learning® are registered trademarks of Primrose School Franchising Company. ©2016 Primrose School Franchising Company. All rights reserved. See primroseschools.com for ‘fact’ source and curriculum detail. *Program offerings vary by location.

Branded Content Section

CARY MAGAZINE 49


Excellence in

EDUCATI N

Raleigh Christian Academy

19

77-2017

Now Registering for the fall! Daycare-12th Grade ABeka Curriculum Full Athletic Program College Preparatory Fully Accredited STEM Activities Certified Teachers Dual Credit Courses

2110 Trawick Road, Raleigh, NC 27604

919.872.2215 Non-Discriminatory Statement Beacon Baptist Church/Raleigh Christian Academy has a racially nondiscriminatory policy. That is, we do not discriminate against applicants and students on the basis of race, color, and national or ethnic origin.

50 AUGUST 2016

RALEIGH CHRISTIAN ACADEMY Beginning its 40th year of operation, Raleigh Christian Academy provides quality Christian education for families in the greater Raleigh area. It is the academy’s desire to help parents produce students who are equipped to face the challenges of tomorrow. Biblical principles are incorporated into every subject. Experienced and fully qualified teachers maintain high academic standards. Students are given opportunities to participate in award-winning and nationally recognized fine arts programs at Raleigh Christian Academy. A competitive athletic program is available for middle school and senior high school students. Students at Raleigh Christian Academy receive a wholesome, well-rounded education designed to help them build strong character, to develop physically, emotionally, and spiritually. The longevity of faculty members at the school provides children with teachers who are experienced, yet loving in their ap2110 Trawick Road proach. Raleigh, NC 27604 Raleigh Christian (919) 872-2215 Academy serves hunraleighchristian.com dreds of students in preschool through grade twelve. Using a traditional approach to education, RCA’s students have excelled in a structured academic environment. Scoring one and a half to three years ahead of their public school peers, Raleigh Christian Academy students thrive in a program that is college-preparatory, yet geared for the average student. And better yet, tuition at Raleigh Christian Academy is affordable! Make a difference in your children’s lives. Give them a distinctively different Christian education available at Raleigh Christian Academy.

Branded Content Section


Excellence in

EDUCATI N

RAVENSCROFT Equipping today’s students to succeed in tomorrow’s world. At Ravenscroft, we wondered – why wait to teach leadership skills to children? Why not integrate leadership learning into everyday classroom education for all children? In fact, why not teach children to use those leadership skills to be better students, artists, athletes and community members? Can those skills really be taught to children of all ages? YES they can! Ravenscroft has joined forces with the Center for Creative Leadership – one of the world’s top-ranked providers of executive education – to teach the citizen leadership skills that hundreds of business, government, nonprofit and education leaders have identified as crucial, but frustratingly rare, in today’s workforce. Together, 7409 Falls of Neuse Road we have created an Raleigh, NC 27615 innovative curricu(919) 848-6470 lum combining the best citizen leadership why.ravenscroft.org learning into the excellent academic program for which Ravenscroft is known. And we are teaching it to all of our students, in age appropriate ways, PreK - 12th grade. We call it Lead From Here. As early as pre-kindergarten, our Lead From Here trained faculty introduces students to a set of fundamental skills that they can apply to their academic, social, creative and athletic challenges. These citizen leadership skills include being accountable, resilient, growth minded, empathetic, inclusive, communicative, strategic, resourceful, adaptive and more. The result? High-achieving students with a leg up on academics and the real-world leadership skills they need to succeed in the future. Our Ravens are prepared to soar to great heights. How do we do it? The best way to understand how we teach it is to experience it yourself. We invite you to join us for a visit to learn more!

Branded Content Section

Learners become leaders. At Ravenscroft, students not only learn

to think, they learn to do. We pair a stimulating curriculum with collaboration, hands-on learning, and leadership skills. We graduate confident, well-rounded students who are prepared to thrive in a complex world as educated citizens and leaders.

Join us! Call to schedule a visit: 919.848.6470

7409 Falls of Neuse Road Raleigh, NC 27615

why.ravenscroft.org

CARY MAGAZINE 51


Excellence in

EDUCATI N

Resurrection Lutheran School RLS provides an educational experience that is Christ-centered and academically rich for children in grades Kindergarten through 8th grade.

Learning with Joy, Leading with Faith, Living with Purpose

Contact rosiecreasy@rlscary.org to schedule a tour today! 100 Lochmere Drive | Cary, NC 27518 919.851.7270 | rlscary.org 52 AUGUST 2016

RESURRECTION LUTHERAN SCHOOL Resurrection Lutheran School (RLS) is committed to educating generations of children in the training and instruction of the Lord. Because of this commitment, we provide a Lutheran educational experience that is Christ-centered as well as academically focused for children in grades kindergarten through eighth. RLS has grown from one class of eighteen kindergarten students in 2002 to a full K-8 elementary/middle school offering a Christ-centered, academically challenging and dually accredited educational alternative for families living in Wake County. Parents are attracted to our dedicated teachers, reputation in the community, caring Christian environment, active parent participation and enrichment opportunities. Students are empowered to play an active role in their own education and prepared to make “honors level� decisions in high school. Beginning in elementary school, students are moti100 Lochmere Drive vated to participate in a wide Cary, NC 27518 variety of extracurricular opportunities offered at Resur(919) 851-7270 rection Lutheran School to rlscary.org include basketball, volleyball, cheerleading, golf club, running club, robotics, MATHCOUNTS, Mock Trial, National Honor Society, drama, art, instrumental, choir, community service, educational travel, writing workshops and summer camp. At RLS, we place a high value on writing with a focus on both composition and intellectual depth. While technology is utilized to engage students and enhance learning, RLS students are encouraged to take the initiative to examine their natural curiosity through collaboration and a variety of interactive learning experiences. RLS families benefit from the strong congregational support offered by Resurrection Lutheran Church. Resurrection Lutheran Preschool (RLP) and Resurrection Lutheran Music School (RLM) provide additional educational opportunities for the entire family. Before and after school care is available. Visit www.rlscary.org to learn more about Resurrection Lutheran School. Contact Rosie Creasy, Admissions Director, 919-8517270 ext 35, to schedule a school tour or shadow day. Branded Content Section


Excellence in

EDUCATI N

ST. MARY MAGDALENE SCHOOL Leadership * Character * Excellence * Service St. Mary Magdalene School, located in the heart of Apex, is about to celebrate its seventeenth year. What can a student expect to find in a St. Mary Magdalene classroom? First and foremost, he or she can expect a vibrant community that is welcoming to all, certified faculty and staff who are devoted to the students, and a warm positive setting in which to learn. As a result, the turnover rate of the faculty is extremely low, providing a stable and consistent learning environment. Students should also expect to be challenged in all academic subjects. Once students are in the middle school grades, they may be placed in honors science and language arts classes or take up to two years of high school math. Younger students 625 Magdala Place may be placed in our academiApex, NC 27502 cally gifted program where (919) 657-4800 their studies will be enriched www.stmm.net with hands-on activities. In combination with their classroom studies, students can anticipate gaining a strong tie to their community. Because faith and spirituality are central to St. Mary Magdalene School, developing ethical, spiritual, and caring young people is just as important as developing sound thinkers. Through classroom and school-wide service projects, young people have the opportunity to help one another, local charities, and global causes. Additionally, as Apex’s only preschool-8th grade Catholic school, StMM caters to Catholic and non-Catholic families from all over the Triangle. The curriculum is enriched with technology, field trips, cultural arts performances, writers-in-residence, artists-inresidence, band, theater, Spanish, and much more. Before and after school, students will also find all sorts of clubs or sports to enjoy: chess team, Mathcounts club, golf team, an array of JV and varsity girls and boys sports, MLSM (a service club), STEM club, National Junior Honor Society, and the on-site garden helpers, to list just a few. St. Mary Magdalene is always creating new ways to reach each student. Come check us out. We think you’ll be impressed.

we pray. we learn. we care.

St. Mary Magdalene Catholic School 625 Magdala Place Apex, NC 27502 919-657-4800 www.stmm.net

CARY MAGAZINE 53


Excellence in

EDUCATI N

Explore your WCPSS Magnet and Early College Options

MAGNET AND EARLY COLLEGE SCHOOLS FAIR SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2016 Southeast Raleigh Magnet HS 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Magnet and Early College Schools enhance the North Carolina Essential Standards with innovative approaches to learning that maximize student potential. Magnets open doors of opportunity and spark the imagination of students, preparing them to become responsible citizens in a global society.

MAGNET AND CURRICULUM ENHANCEMENT PROGRAMS

WAKE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS Since 1982, Magnet Programs have offered educational choice in the community through a variety of innovative learning experiences either through a menu of electives or school-wide instructional delivery model. Magnets open doors of opportunity and spark the imagination of students, preparing them to become responsible citizens in a global society. The Leadership and Technology Pathway’s common essentials include hands-on programs and project-based learning experiences, the use of emerging technologies, with real world incorporation of community resources. The Gifted and Talented students explore a wide variety of subjects through core subjects and an extensive menu of elective courses that develop strengths and interests. Students have the opportunity to customize their academic programs by choosing elective courses according to their academic needs and interests. The International Baccalaureate (IB) students become increasingly knowledgeable and interested in www.wcpss.net international understandings, and actively work to effect positive change. Colleges and universities give special admissions consideration to students who take IB classes and earn an IB Diploma. Early college high schools blend high school and college in a rigorous yet supportive program; students enroll in college classes that allow them to earn free transferrable college credit. At Wake Leadership Academies, students complete their middle and high school academic program in single gender — all boys or all girls — learning environments. Language Immersion & Global Studies – Students are immersed in and learn in the target language (Spanish or Mandarin) all day. Beginning in 6th grade, two core courses are taught in target language. All middle and high school students participate in the Global Studies program.

Crossroads I, 5625 Dillard Drive Cary, North Carlolina 27518

www.wcpss.net/magnet 54 AUGUST 2016

Branded Content Section


Piazza at Stonewater | Cary 40 MEBANE

15

40

Ro xb oro Fa ye tte

vil

Fa ye tte

le

n mo rim cC y.

of n mo rim cC y. kw

P

3

13 22

W e

of

Fa lls

l Hill Rd C h ape .

Cente r St. Paddock View

1

2

ry Avent F er

Ten -Te n

5

14 m St.

1

Rd.

13

le Sa

Ten -Te n

211

13

ew Holly Springs N

Paddock View

14

HOLLY SPRINGS Harvest Point Dr.

Avent F e

Paddock View

FUQUAY VARINA

14

50

21

919-363-0655

2 The Manors

919-548-3808

2 Collections of Single Family Homes from the $300’s

at Salem Village Apex Single Family Homes from the upper $400s

3 Crestmont Apex

2 Collections of Single Family Homes from the low $400’s

4 Lake Castleberry Apex

2 Collections of Single Family Homes from the upper $500’s

919-500-0493

5 Woodall Estates Apex

919-525-4388

6 Piazza at Stonewater Cary

919-710-9590

7 Flowers Plantation - Trillium

919-884-9167

Single Family Homes from the low $400’s Single Family Homes from the mid $500s

Clayton Single Family Homes from the upper $100s

Ne us eR d. 50

42 New Bethe Churc h Rd l .

7 CLAYTON

12

42

BUS

7 CLAYTON

12

42

BUS

New Beth Chur el ch Rd .

Harvest Point Dr.

42

42

11

8 Brightwood Trails Durham

919-596-4087

16 Parks at

9 Chamberlynne Durham

919-321-0806

17 Bowling Green Wake Forest

919-435-1498

18 Drayton Reserve Wake Forest

919-488-4701

19 Homestead at Heritage Wake Forest

919-218-5502

Single Family Homes from the low $200’s Single Family Homes from the high $300’s

919-542-3317 Meadowview Pittsboro Single Family Homes from the upper $200’s Single Family Homes from the low 200’s

10 Brightleaf - The Glen Durham

919-328-0504

11 Amber Ridge Fuquay-Varina

919-285-3748

12 Sutton Springs Garner

919-622-4918

13 12 Oaks Holly Springs

919-428-0375

14 Morgan Park Holly Springs

919-219-5519

20 Salem Creek Apex

22 Salem Pointe Apex

15 Arbor Creek Mebane

919-201-3855

21 Stonemont Holly Springs

23 Town Hall North Morrisville

Single Family Homes from the low $300s Single Family Homes from the low $200s

919-215-3687

42

FUQUAY VARINA

Rd Purfoy .

1 Salem Village Apex

7 CLAYTON

HOLLY SPRINGS

21

11

BUS

Hill Rd.

d. rry R

11

Harvest Point Dr.

GARNER

Ten -T

New e n BetheRd Churc h Rd l . .

12 ew Holly Springs N

of

Tryon Rd.

1 GARNER

50

Rd.

Hill Rd.

Rd.

l Hill Rd C h ape .

Rd Purfoy .

ry Avent F er

Heritage Branch Rd.

GARNER

Rd Purfoy .

1

St.

2

TryoSPRINGS HOLLY n Rd.

FUQUAY VARINA lem Sa

1

Rd.

Rd.

Cent er St.

M ay n ard Rd . C a r Pkwy. y Hill Rd.

ew Holly Springs N

20

5

W e

W e M

St.

64

20

18

1

ay n ard Rd . C a r Pkwy. y

22

Tryon Rd.

Heritage Branch Rd.

M

Dr.

1

be im d. R

64

r l ym le Sa

Dr.

W

D a v is

Rd

64

4

3

rly

64

1

Heritage Branch Rd.

Rd.

18

1

D a v is

ham Gra Old

Green Le v e l

JORDAN LAKE

1

4

Cente r St.

2

ouse Rd. High H

st

n ard Rd . C a r Pkwy. y

22

20

5 64

gers

Rd.

gers

19

18

17 Ro

19

ouse Rd. High H

st

be im d. R

kw

ay

W

be im d. R

ha

323

rly

4

JORDAN n mo 64 rim LAKE cC y.

M

Dr.

W

ly C kel

Rd

Rd

l Rd.

64

64

l Hill Rd C h ape .

Green Le v e l

D a v is

ham Gra Old

ham Gra Old

pe

JORDAN LAKE

Lumley Rd. ouse Rd. High H

gers

1

23

Rd .

Brier Creek Pkwy.

st

Green Le v e l

Ro

19

Lumley Rd.

Fa lls

d. le R

l Rd.

P

M

kw T.W. A lexander Dr.

6

O

64

16

23 sv il

Lee

CHAPEL HILL

16

6

pe

10

l Rd.

M

le R

pe

P

d.

ha

Sou th

ly C kel

9

86

16

Brier Creek Pkwy.

17

Rd .

Lumley Rd.

ha

Ro xb oro

St.

8

6

O

O ly C kel

87 87

87

T.W. A lexander Dr.

Rd .

Brier Creek Pkwy.

87

54

sv ille

T.W. A lexander Dr.

CHAPEL HILL

sv ille

Avertte Rd.

d.

le R

Lee

vil

9

86

54

54

17 Ro

Lee

Avertte Rd.

Sou th

10

CHAPEL HILL

15

9

Fa ye tte

St.

8

Ro xb oro

86

54

MEBANE

10

vil

40

Sou th

54

119

8

St.

15

87

Avertte Rd.

54

Fa lls

87

MEBANE

Ne us eR d.

119

Ne us eR d.

119

Single Family Homes from the upper $200s Single Family Homes from the mid $300’s

2 Collections of Single Family Homes from the $300’s Single Family Homes from the upper $100s

Single Family Homes from the low 300’s 3 Collections of Single Family Homes from the $300’s

Coming Soon!

Call 800-787-0414

CalAtlanticHomes.com Prices, plans, and terms are effective on the date of publication and subject to change without notice. Square footage/acreage shown is only an estimate and actual square footage/acreage will differ. Map not to sale. Buyer should rely on his or her own evaluation of useable area. Depictions of homes or other features are artist conceptions. Hardscape, landscape, and other items shown may be decorator suggestions that are not included in the purchase price and availability may vary.


RooM Work The

Families and friends team up to solve puzzle rooms WRITTEN BY LEAH KEITER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

56

AUGUST 2016


You and your team are locked in a room with one hour to escape — but there’s a catch. To unlock the door to freedom, you have to solve a series of themed puzzles and riddles, and they won’t be quick or easy.

Our group searches for clues to unlock the secrets of Tic Toc Escapes’ haunted mausoleum room, hopefully before their 60-minute time limit runs out. Escape room games test groups’ cleverness, problem-solving ability and cooperation by challenging them to solve the riddles of a room in an hour to be able to escape. From left, Camila Correia, Stephen DelGaudio, Libby Boissy and Leah Keiter.

CARY MAGAZINE 57


62%

of 19- to 34-year-olds would rather pay for an experience than a product

58

JANUARY2016 AUGUST 2016

Anything can be a clue in an escape room, so participants from left, Camila Correia, Libby Boissy, Leah Keiter and Stephen DelGaudio study the mausoleum room’s coffin.


Tic Toc Escapes owner Mac Lawrence introduces our group to the concept of escape rooms, holding two balls to explain that everything is connected and part of a pattern.

T

his is an escape room, and it makes opening locks and solving the mystery behind a room full of knickknacks fun. “When we were younger we used to go outside and play games,” said Mike Horan, co-owner of Cipher Escape in Morrisville. “And then we went through a cycle where everyone played games on their phones, on the console, that’s all they did. Now, this is a different connection where you’re actually coming live, and you get to mix the two — experiential entertainment.” Escape rooms bring together bits of classic entertainment: “I Spy” photo riddles, hidden object puzzles, choose your own adventure books, and role playing video games. How it works

Each room has a theme, ranging from brewery to haunted mausoleum to entertainment “green room.” Rooms of various sizes can accommodate groups from two to 10,

“What the industry calls an ‘escape’ is to get out before the time runs out with three hints or less.” — Mark Lawrence

but the typical group is six people, says Mac Lawrence, part of the family ownership team of Tic Toc Escapes in Raleigh. Once groups are locked inside and the clock starts counting down, a game master watches their progress via video cameras. Players are allowed three hints that they can request anytime during the allotted time period. “What the industry calls an ‘escape’ is to get out before the time runs out with three hints or less,” said Mark Lawrence, the Tic Toc patriarch. For both Cipher Escape and Tic Toc,

most of the rooms have a successful escape rate between 25 and 35 percent. Escape depends on problem-solving and critical thinking. Both Cipher and Tic Toc feature wall-to-wall puzzles that require math, science, visual understanding, and sometimes small physical tasks. Often the puzzles build on one another; nothing in a room is coincidental. While the ideas of escape and puzzlesolving are common in each room, don’t think you’ll see the same kind of puzzle again and again. Both teams are impressively creative, and show that you truly can make anything into a game. Escape rooms are popular for corporate events, date nights and birthday parties. According to the Cassandra Report, a youth and millennial research outlet, 62 percent of 19- to 34-year-olds would rather pay for an experience than a product, which excontinued on page 60 CARY MAGAZINE 59


The discovery of playing cards leads the team to piece together patterns from clues in Tic Toc’s entertainmentthemed “green room.”

continued from page 59

plains the popularity of escape rooms with young adults despite an average ticket price of $25 to $35. Starting up

Horan and his wife, Lynn, started Cipher Escape accidentally on purpose. He had a long-standing love of puzzle games like Myst, so when the couple read about escape rooms they had to give it a try. After escaping their first room in Orlando, Fla., they looked at each other and thought the same thing: “We can do this.” They started looking for building space the next day. “We didn’t really think about doing it,” said Mike. “We just did it.” Cipher has grown from its family roots, bringing on additional staff beyond Mike and Lynn’s six children. In the next year, the couple plans to expand into another part of their building and open two more rooms. “Adrenaline,” said Lynn, on where the 60

AUGUST 2016

success of the escape room trend comes from. “It’s live; we have a big clock on the wall. People who like a challenge love this.” “There’s not a lot to do where you can have an entire family experience,” added Mike. “Where can we get someone who is youngest and someone who is oldest and they can come do something together?” For the Lawrence family, things happened a little differently. Two years ago, Mac Lawrence and his mother, Jane, were looking for a business opportunity that the family could get into together. They found their answer on an episode of TV’s “The Big Bang Theory,” which featured an escape room. “I wanted to do something that would be fun for everybody,” said Mac. Approaching their two-year anniversary this month, the Lawrence family is more than happy with their decision. “People ask, ‘What do you do for a living?’ and we say, ‘We make people laugh,’” said Jane. “There’s nothing like laughter.”

Like the Horans, Jane thinks much of the success of escape rooms comes from its wide audience appeal. “It’s multigenerational, and people can come in and laugh and enjoy each other,” she said. “That’s what made me really fall in love with the game.” “Everybody ends up contributing in some way,” added Marylu Lawrence. “We try to build for all different kinds of thinkers. Something over here will be more of a physical puzzle, and something across the room will be more for someone who likes math.” The best part, though? The immersive nature of the live game. “You completely forget that you’re in a room in a building,” said Lynn Horan. “You become completely immersed in that space.” Cipher Escape, Morrisville (919) 378-9362 cipherescape.com Tic Toc Escapes, Raleigh (984) 789-9978 tictocescapes.com


BY THE NUMBERS:

5 in the Triangle Nearly 20

Escape rooms In N.C.

300 In the U.S. With a combined 50+ years of veterinary experience, we provide quality and compassionate veterinary WINNE R care for your pet in a warm, 2016 friendly and clean environment.

THE MA GGY AW ARDS

“It’s such a rush when you finally find the last clue or get to the end of a puzzle you’ve been working on. You really forget it isn’t real.” — Stephen DelGaudio

2011

2013

2014

2015

WINNER

WINNER

WINNER

WINNER

WINNER 2010

WINNER 2011

WINNER 2012

Comprehensive Medical Care • General & Orthopedic Surgery • Digital X-ray • Ultrasound • Dentistry On-site Laboratory & Pharmacy • Online Pharmacy Cat Grooming • Purina & Royal Canin Prescription Diets • Boarding & Grooming Facility • Basic & Advanced Obedience Training • Acupuncture Extended Evening Hours • Weekend Hours

2010 N. Salem Street Apex, NC 27523 Phone: 919.363.6363 townandcountryvet@nc.rr.com www.tcanimalcare.com

While visiting Tic Toc, my friends and I decided to take on what Mac Lawrence described as one of their more challenging rooms – the music themed “green room.” When the seven of us went in and 60 minutes came up on the clock, I bet Mac $1 we would make it out with 10 minutes to spare. He said he thought we would make it in four. As one of us was decoding combinations, half the group would be at the other side of the room looking for cards to complete a poker hand, while the other half was searching drawers and boxes, trying to make the glitter decorating the outside into a clue. In the end, we got out with literally one second left (a Tic Toc first) after a lot of luck, three hints and some very quick thinking by everyone in the group. “I really liked that we all had to work together to use the clues we found,” said Anna Gomez. “I loved that we made it out with literally one second left on the clock,” said Camila Correia. — Leah Keiter CARY MAGAZINE 61


Cosmetic Dentist

Sedation Dentist

Implant Dentist

Family Dentist

Orthodontic Dentist

At Stanley Dentistry we care for the entire family under one roof. From orthodontics and cosmetics to family dentistry, dental implants and sedation, we're the only dental practice you'll ever need.

www.stanleysmiles.com 62

AUGUST 2016

919.415.0042


Nature trails in the morning and a refreshing dip in the pool in the afternoon. A wine tasting this weekend. Gourmet cooking class on Tuesday. And not a moment spent on an unmowed lawn. Easy living means your higher priorities get priority. Homes from the mid $300s to $1 million+ and townhomes from the $260s. Live well at 12 Oaks.

2008 Green Oaks Parkway | Holly Springs, North Carolina 27540 | 919.557.6850 | 12oaksnc.com Š2016 WSLD 12 Oaks, LLC. Equal Housing Opportunity. The amenities and features described and depicted herein are based upon current development plans, which are subject to change without notice. Actual development may not be as currently proposed. References to housing products, builders and prices are subject to change without notice as well. CARY MAGAZINE 63


Pictured on this and the next page are scenes from the 2015 Lazy Daze Festival.

Two Lazy Daze of Fun Celebrating Cary Festival’s 40th Anniversary WRITTEN BY LEAH KEITER • PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

64

AUGUST 2016


This year’s Lazy Daze Arts and Crafts Festival will double the fun in celebration of its 40-year anniversary! Instead of the traditional one day of food, arts and community celebration, Lazy Daze will be two days long and feature more than 300 artists from 17 different states. “Obviously the two days is the biggest change,” said Lyman Collins, cultural arts manager for the Town of Cary. “For many, many years people have asked why the festival can’t be two days and the main reason is that it’s impractical to shut down Academy Street for two whole days.” But as construction continues in downtown Cary, part of a revitalization project slated to be finished in early fall, Town Hall campus will host Lazy Daze for the second year. The location will leave Academy Street open and allow artists’ tents to be arranged in a circle instead of in lines. The festival had 325 open spots for artists from across the United States this year, and 41 of those chosen by the Lazy Daze jury are local. “It ensures a generally higher caliber of artist because they are reviewed,” said Collins of the jurying process. “Not suggesting that the artists not invited are not high caliber artists, but we have a limited number of spaces, and we had almost twice that many artists apply.” The jury is comprised of artists, citizens and members of the festival committee. Once an artist applies, the jury reviews slides of his work and offers scores, which are then compiled. Collins says the level of competition depends on the art category. “There are a lot of jewelers, there are a lot of potters. Something like sculpture or metalwork, we will have fewer artists applying. We want a balanced festival,” he said. The first year of Lazy Daze, in 1977, saw 100 artists and a block of space reserved on Chatham Street. The proceeds from that first event went to buying a tent for the Town of Cary’s recreation department. Over the course of the festival’s 40-year run, more than $650,000 has been raised and put back into the community. “It’s something that we are proud of, that the proceeds from the festival go back into the community in the form of grants,” said Collins. Programs and organizations like Cary Visual Art, Cary Players, Life Experiences and The Carying Place have been supported with the help of Lazy Daze, as well as projects like the Lazy Daze Playground at Bond Park. “To go from a tent to a playground is pretty good,” said Collins, reflecting on the festival’s growth. “When Lazy Daze first started in the late ‘70s, Cary probably had around 10,000 people and now it’s got over 150,000, so when you have something like Lazy Daze that is a tradition, it connects us back to that community that we were, and reminds us that we are still that same community, and that community is important for us and to us.” continued on page 65

CARY MAGAZINE 65


Art, With Heart: Lazy Daze features artists from far … and near COMPILED BY NANCY PARDUE PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

The Lazy Daze Arts & Crafts Festival brings hundreds of artists to Cary. This year, they’re bringing their talents from as far away as Alabama, Indiana, New York and even California. Among all these artists are 40 who keep shop right here in Western Wake. Meet a few of them here, then stop by and say hello while you’re enjoying Lazy Daze.

Kenneth Neilsen CARY POTTERY, CARY

Lazy Daze appearances: 5

continued from page 65

The 40th anniversary celebration will include five stages of entertainment, which will feature a wide array of musical styles, says Adam Bell, festivals and events supervisor for the Town of Cary. “The EyeCareNC stage will host beach music artists, and the Mr. Roof of Raleigh stage will serve as the location for

Lazy Daze Arts & Crafts Festival August 27-28 Town Hall Campus, Cary (919) 319-4560 townofcary.org

66

AUGUST 2016

bluegrass, blues and jazz artists,” Bell said. A Kid’s World stage will showcase kid-friendly entertainment. To get to Lazy Daze, shuttle stops will be available at Green Hope High School and Cary Towne Center; this year, the drop-off point has been moved to the intersection of Chapel Hill Road and Academy Street. Collins urges festivalgoers to take advantage of the shuttles, as downtown parking will be limited. “It’s always important for the community to have opportunities to come together and to experience things together,” said Collins. “It helps people feel that sense of community, and Lazy Daze has done that since the very beginning. That’s why it was created.”

In your booth: During the last Christmas season we developed a new style of altered torn vase that has been selling very well. We’ll have several styles of that and other fine art pieces on sale. And of course we will also bring lots of mugs and other functional houseware items.


Other jobs held: In high school I was a school bus driver; since I graduated in 1982, I have been making pottery full time. Potters wear a lot of different hats at the studio, so I have been a forklift operator, plumber, electrician, pipe fitter, welder, and general all-around inventor.

Your inspiration: Lately, I have been inspired by early 20th century art pottery forms, and pieces from such potteries as Rookwood, Roseville and Hull. Memorable response to your work: I received an actual hand-written thank you note from Grant Llewellyn, conductor of the North Carolina Symphony, after he was presented with one of my larger art bowls. Just for fun: Orange and white “road blocks” in honor of downtown Cary construction. Mostly it’s the local downtown residents who get the humor. >> facebook.com/CaryPottery

MA VIE DE BOHEME, CARY Lazy Daze appearances: Several

In your booth: I love to reinvent and re-create and recycle. My booth will be filled with reconstructed clothing that I make from sweaters and T-shirts that no longer have a home. Garments that were gently or greatly loved are turned into ponchos, skirts, tunics and coats for women, girls and even your furry friend.

Photo submitted by Marianne Smith

Favorite part of being an artist: Opening a kiln and finding that a new experimental glaze recipe turned out even better than I was hoping it would!

Marianne Smith

Other jobs held: Make-up artist, corporate sales, creative director, substitute teacher. My most important job is being a mom. Favorite part of being an artist: There are no rules. There is no right or wrong. Your inspiration: I tend to see beauty in the simplest of things. I love fashion, as it’s such a visual language and a great way to express who you are. I guess that’s why most of my creations are wearable. Memorable response to your work: Bringing a smile to someone’s face is one of the greatest compliments. Having people spend their hard-earned money to purchase something I’ve created is an amazing feeling. A woman bought one of my sweater coats to wear for her wedding. That was pretty special. >> etsy.com/shop/ShopMaViedeBoheme

Michele Yellin FOLK ARTIST, CARY

Lazy Daze appearances: This is the first. Your art: I make brightly colored, textured folk art from new and reclaimed wood, paste, acrylic paint, bottle caps, buttons, beads, found objects and twigs. I make birds that hang on the wall, but have started to expand my line to include elephants, rabbits and people. continued on page 68

CARY MAGAZINE 67


continued from page 67

Other jobs held: I have produced lamps in a small lamp factory, framed pictures, waitressed, worked in a dry cleaners, conducted telephone surveys, and worked in retail. I also volunteered at Cary Elementary School when my sons were young. Favorite part of being an artist: The actual process of creating — drawing my ideas, cutting and sanding wood, applying paint, adding the components to the piece. I lose myself in the making.

Photo submitted by Michele Yellin

Your inspiration: I like to see other artists’ work, especially in person. A short visit to an art museum or art gallery will get my creative spark going. Memorable response to your work: Years ago I donated a small ink and watercolor piece to an auction and later found out that the winning bidder redid her half bathroom, all the way down to the tile and fixtures, to go with her new artwork. That blew me away. >> micheleyellin.com/scenic_route_studio/Home.html

Robyn Johnston WHIMSICAL ROBYN, APEX

Lazy Daze appearances: About 7

Other jobs held: I was a veterinary technician for 30 years, and still work part-time.

Photo submitted by Robyn Johnston

In your booth: Garden art pieces including my birds and owls, planters, garden stakes, picture frames, and fairy doors. Plus, some larger pieces not available on Etsy. I use old china, break it up and reconstruct it into a new piece. And all of my pieces have their own names.

work want to know how I do it. It’s nice to make connections. It’s an affirmation.

Memorable response to your work: People smile as they approach the booth. Most say they’ve never seen anything like this before, and ask questions. Engineers and men who do tile

>> whimsicalrobyn.com, facebook.com/WhimsicalRobyn, etsy.com/shop/Whimsicalrobyn

68

AUGUST 2016

Photo submitted by Robyn Johnston

Your inspiration: I’ve cared for so many animals for so long, each with their own personality, that in a way my art is a tribute to them. I’m also inspired by the medium, to take pieces that would be discarded and create something brand new. That it’s not perfect is what lends it personality.


Photo submitted by Keith Veronesi

Keith Veronesi

KEITH’S WOODWORK, FUQUAY-VARINA Lazy Daze appearances: This will be my first! Your art: I work with over a dozen different species of domestic and exotic woods. I make everything from pens to cabinets, and turned items like bowls and peppermills, cutting boards, clocks, boxes. Just about everything I make is one of a kind, simply because no two pieces of wood are the same. Other jobs held: Network engineer, subcontractor, stay-at-home dad Favorite part of being an artist: The craftsmanship. Scratch that … it’s buying the tools! Your inspiration: Taking a pile of nothing and creating something functional or beautiful. Finding logs or cool exotic woods with rich color, mixing them together and seeing what happens. My inspiration comes simply from, “What if.” Memorable projects: A woman asked me to make something out of an old door from her grandparents’ house. I made four wall shelves and incorporated old door knobs and cabinet pulls from the house. That was a special and rewarding experience. When I’m out collecting logs, people will tell me they loved having that tree in their yard. I try to make a bowl from the wood as a thank you. It’s nice to see how appreciative they are for the knowledge that their beautiful tree is not going to waste. >> keithswoodwork.com, facebook.com/idealwoodshop

CARY MAGAZINE 69


THE CARY THEATER What’s Beyond Ordinary This Fall?

Art House Theater Day September 24 Celebrate the art house theater and the cultural role it plays in our community. It is a day to recognize the theaters that are passionately dedicated to providing access to the best cinematic experiences. Special film screenings all day!

Sick Chicks Film Festival November 5 An all day Film Festival devoted to showing short films in Horror, Sci Fi, Fantasy, and Suspense genres. Emphasis will be on female filmmakers. We will be showcasing work by some of the best indie filmmakers from NC and around the world.

Six String Presents Live Music Monthly Presenting live music each month at The Cary. Bringing to you the best in singer songwriters, blues, bluegrass, country, folk and acoustic music from NC and the nation!

122 70E. AUGUST Chatham St., Cary, NC 27511 2016

(919) 462-2051

thecarytheater.com


ShopDineEntertain

Check our Facebook page and

parksidetowncommons.com

for information about our events and more!

Upcoming Events! Ladies’ night out

Public Safety Event

At participating stores & restaurants

near Five guys

Third Thursday of the Month Through December 6pm – 9pm

Tuesday August 2 7pm – 9pm

Bank of America Brixx Wood Fired Pizza Chick-fil-A Chuy’s Cold Stone Creamery Embassy Nails Field & Stream Five Guys Burgers and Fries Flour Power Kids Cooking School Frank Theatres Cinebowl & Grille Golf Galaxy Guitar Center Halie’s Boutique Harris Teeter Hickory Tavern It’Sugar Jersey Mike’s Subs Learning Express Toys Massage Envy Menchie’s Frozen Yogurt Nishiki Sushi Noodles & Company Paisley Boutique Panera Bread Parkside Eye Care Parkside Family Dental Petco Pink Magnolia Boutique Signature Nail Spa Sleepy’s Smallcakes A Cupcakery Smoothie King Sport Clips Starbucks Sunrise Dental Supercuts T-Mobile Target Taziki’s Mediterranean Café Tijuana Flats Uncle Maddio’s Pizza Joint UPS Verizon Wireless Waxing the City

Coming Soon!

Another Broken Egg Café GNC Orange Theory Fitness Persis Indian Restaurant Phenix Salon Suites Stein Mart Stellino’s Italian Restaurant Which Wich

I-540 & NC 55 • Cary, NC 27519 I-40, exit 278 just 4 miles south on O’Kelly Chapel Road

parksidetowncommons.com

CARY MAGAZINE 71


restaurant row [ a g u i d e t o d i n i n g a t w e s t e r n w a k e ’s b e s t r e s t a u r a n t s ]

GREAT CATCHES WHERE TO SATISFY YOUR SEAFOOD CRAVINGS

WRITTEN BY DAVID MCCREARY PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

SUMMER IS PERHAPS the best time

of year to enjoy fresh seafood. Maybe it’s because many of us spend more time at the lake or the beach. Whatever the reason, we encourage you to savor more maritime fare this season. To make it easier, we reeled in three of the freshest and tastiest seafood catches in the area. From a fast-casual joint to a food truck to a full-service restaurant, Steamed Old Bay-seasoned peel-and-eat shrimp from Skipper’s Fish Fry in Apex are a seasonal favorite.

these choices will satisfy your hot-weather hankerings. continued on page 74 CARY MAGAZINE 73


Cousins Maine Lobster food truck appears regularly around town. Check the website for the weekly schedule.

continued from page 73

Cousins Maine Lobster

A food-truck franchise that benefited from an appearance on television’s “Shark Tank,” the Raleigh truck has gained a loyal following since rolling out in 2015. “I saw the show, and my husband said, ‘That’s what you need to do,’” said franchisee Deb Keller, a New Jersey native with a background in project management. Keller now compares cousins and Cousins Maine Lobster founders Jim Tselikis and Sabin Lomac to the brothers she never had. “They have been so genuinely warm and supportive,” she said. Her lobster is sourced from Maine’s middle coast, and shipments arrive at least twice a week. “We have such a huge Northeastern following, and our cuisine is really unique to the Triangle area,” said Keller. 74

AUGUST 2016

“OUR CUISINE IS REALLY UNIQUE TO THE TRIANGLE AREA.” — DEB KELLER

Not surprisingly, the biggest selling menu items are lobster rolls containing chunks of tail, knuckle and claw meat. The classic Maine version is served cold and mixed with Hellmann’s mayonnaise, while the Connecticut is tossed in butter and lemon then presented warm. The sweet, tender meat is piled onto a split-top Country Kitchen bun that’s buttered and toasted. Cousins Maine Lobster appears regularly at food truck rodeos, festivals, breweries and corporate properties. Check the website to follow the truck’s weekly schedule. Seasonal favorites: Shrimp tacos are flash-fried in canola oil and served on local

hand-fashioned flour tortillas with cabbage, pico de gallo and cilantro lime sauce. Recommended: Net some shareable lobster tots, which include tater tots crowned with warm Maine lobster, pico de gallo and cilantro lime sauce. Pair with an icy cold, bottled blueberry Maine Root soda and a whoopie pie for dessert. Surprising fact: Despite the popularity of the Maine roll, folks here in North Carolina prefer the Connecticut roll — even during the sweltering days of summer. “People here love the butter experience,” Keller explained. Prices: $10 for shrimp tacos to $14 for lobster rolls Cousins Maine Lobster (919) 867-6203 cousinsmainelobster.com/Raleigh


Shrimp tacos are served on hand-fashioned flour tortillas with cabbage, pico de gallo and cilantro lime sauce.

Lobster tots include tater tots with warm lobster, pico de gallo and cilantro lime sauce.

In the Connecticut, warm lobster is tossed in butter and lemon then piled onto a split-top bun.

Deb Keller, the local franchisee for Cousins Maine Lobster, says the truck has a strong following.

CARY MAGAZINE 75


Skipper’s blackened mahi-mahi is accompanied by sides of rice, green beans, hush puppies, and house-made tartar and cocktail sauces.

Skipper’s Fish Fry 1001 E. Williams St., Apex (919) 303-2400 skippersfish.com

Fried cod sandwiches come with coleslaw and fries.

76

AUGUST 2016


Skipper’s Fish Fry

Locals have found safe harbor at this 95-seat counter-service eatery ever since proprietor A.J. Dalola opened the doors in 2005. Chef Stephen Ashby deftly helms the kitchen, serving up sumptuous fried cod sandwiches along with perfectly executed platters overflowing with fresh flounder, scallops, clam strips and more. Skipper’s sources seafood locally and regionally, and everything is cooked to order. “There’s nothing that’s pre-made,” said general manager Michael Gorham. “We can accommodate whatever our guests want, whether “THERE’S it’s Calabash style, steamed, NOTHING grilled or THAT’S PREblackened.” MADE. WE CAN Go early ACCOMMODATE at lunchtime WHATEVER OUR to avoid the GUESTS WANT.” crowd. Even — MICHAEL GORHAM if you have to stand in line to place your order, generous portions make the wait bearable.

DS AWAR AGGY

THE M

ER WI2N0N 16

Celebrating our 1 year anniversary!

unique gifts • accessories • home décor • clothing onsite monogramming • Southern hospitality Halie’s Boutique 1209 Parkside Main St Cary, NC | 919-462-0902

haliesboutique.com

Seasonal favorites: Steamed items like Old Bay-seasoned peel-and-eat shrimp, oysters and snow crab legs attract legions of fans.

The place for Sushi enthusiasts and beginners of Japanese cuisine.

Recommended: Dive into the blackened mahi-mahi tacos with lime and cilantro slaw, pico de gallo and Baja chipotle drizzle. “It’s well worth the $1.50 upcharge for the mahi because of the flavor,” Gorham said. Finish your meal with a bowl of peach cobbler. Surprising fact: Virtually every item is made from scratch, including the habitforming tartar sauce, coleslaw and soups like lobster bisque and New England-style clam chowder. “We use our owner’s triedand-true recipes,” said Gorham. Prices: $6 for a fish sandwich to $18 for a house sampler platter

Follow us on social media for the most up to date sales and new arrivals:

QUALITY IS OUR RECIPE

1361 Kildaire Farm Road | Cary 919.481.0068

(In Shoppes of Kildaire Near Trader Joes) “Ahi Tower” our best seller, selected for the cover of Cary Magazine May/June 2011

www.YuriJapaneseRestaurant.com

CARY MAGAZINE 77


Moon rockers, left, are fresh oysters baked on the half shell under a spinach topping. Roasted blue cheese oysters, right, are topped with blue cheese crumbles, garlic, butter and bread crumbs.

Full Moon Oyster Bar and Seafood Kitchen

With five locations throughout the state, Full Moon’s motto is, “Come as a stranger, leave as a friend.” The Morrisville restaurant, operating since 2014, has become a convivial gathering spot. Nautical-themed walls and suspended fishing nets provide a laid-back beach vibe. There are no tables inside, so guests sit on stools at an elongated bar that spans the dining space. While eating, you might feel like you’re getting a crash course in oyster shucking. “We generally have seven to 10 varieties of oysters from up and down the East Coast,” said Ty Carethers, who serves as executive chef for the entire Full Moon operation. Whether you order oysters chargrilled, steamed or raw, you’ll be gratified. Don’t prefer oysters? The shrimp and grits entrée vies for attention, never mind garlic-tinged scallops, crab cakes filled with lump blue crab meat, and blackened salmon. Daily food and drink specials are available. Seasonal favorites: “There’s nothing bet78

AUGUST 2016

Raw oysters are popular in the summer.

ter in the summer than raw oysters and a cold beer,” said Carethers. The just-caught fish of the day makes for another solid option.

seafood you will eat this far inland, but landlubbers will also find certified Angus steaks and excellent beef ribs,” Carethers said.

Recommended: Moon rockers, Full Moon’s interpretation of Oysters Rockefeller, which are baked on the half shell with spinach, cheese and bacon. Roasted blue cheese oysters arrive topped with blue cheese crumbles, garlic, butter and bread crumbs.

Prices: $9 for a shrimp cocktail to $30 for a full combination platter

Surprising fact: “We offer the freshest

Full Moon Oyster Bar and Seafood Kitchen 1600 Village Market Place, Morrisville (919) 378-9524 fullmoonoysterbar.com


CARY MAGAZINE 79


$6 lunch Specials Monday-Friday 11am-4pm #1 2 one-topping slices with soft drink $6 #2 1/2 hoagie (changes daily) with chips and soft drink $6 #3 Grilled cheese, 2 cheese, bacon, tomato, red onion and avocado on marble rye with a cup of soup $6 THE MAGGY AWARDS

CARY, NC

4300 NW Cary Parkway Cary, NC 919-463-7779

WINNER 2016


GERIATRIC

We've been taking my daughter to Generations since she was born ~ they have been great. I like that Dr. Christine Macomber

WOMEN'S HEALTH

evaluates my daughter and her symptoms,

ADULT HEALTH

rather than relying

solely on CDC charts.

easy to work with , super accommodating , They are

PEDIATRIC

ACUTE CARE

and you always

know they have

your child's best interests in mind!"

CHRONIC DISEASE MANAGEMENT

~Josh

SKIN CENTRE

MINOR EMERGENCIES

What's your generations story? From cradle to rocker, no matter the generation, the practitioners at Generations Family Practice take pride in offering high quality, primary care to each patient. Family medicine is not only our focus, it is our passion. From preventive care or minor emergencies to pediatric, acute care, and skin care, our knowledgable staff is dedicated to positively impacting the health and well-being of our patients. But don't take our word for it...listen to the praises of our patients of all generations, both here and on our website. And share your Generations story ~ we'd love to hear it!

THE MAGGY AWARDS

THE MAGGY AWARDS

www.GenerationsFamilyPractice.com/Stories WINNER 2016

HONORABLE MENTION 2016

Call us today. (919)852-399

CARY MAGAZINE 81


exclusive dish

WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Chewy Chocolate Walnut Cookie by Chanticleer Café & Bakery Chewy Chocolate Walnut Cookies

Makes about a dozen 4-inch cookies 2½ cups (11 ounces) walnut halves 3 cups (14 ounces) powdered sugar ¾ cup (2.2 ounces) cocoa powder (use Dutch-process cocoa for a darker color and a more intense flavor) ¼ teaspoon salt 4 large egg whites (4 ½ ounces) 1 tablespoon vanilla extract

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. To toast walnuts, spread in a single layer on a baking sheet. Toast in oven for 8 to 10 minutes, or until the nuts are light brown and fragrant. Once walnuts are cool, chop coarsely. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. In a large bowl, combine the powdered sugar, cocoa powder and salt; mix with a rubber spatula until thoroughly blended. Stir in chopped walnuts, and mix until they are coated with dry mixture. Add egg whites and vanilla. Mix until batter is moistened; it should be thick and goopy. With an ice cream scoop or level 1/3 cup measure, scoop the batter onto the prepared baking sheets, about 3 inches apart. The cookies will spread considerably. Bake at 325 degrees for 16 to 18 minutes, or until the tops become shiny and small thin cracks appear on the surface of the cookies. Let cookies cool completely before removing from the pan. Store in an airtight container for up to two days. Note: If making smaller cookies, reduce the baking time slightly. 82

AUGUST 2016

The Chewy Chocolate Walnut Cookie is the most popular cookie at Chanticleer Café & Bakery. “Sometimes people will come in for breakfast, get a coffee and a cookie. For some people, that’s their breakfast,” says owner Craig Freeman.


FIRST-TIME CUSTOMERS at Chan-

ticleer Café and Bakery in Cary might be reassured by the staff when contemplating a Chewy Chocolate Walnut Cookie. Don’t be put off by the rough exterior, they say; the taste will win you over. But to owner Craig Freeman, the popular dessert is a thing of beauty. “I love the way they look,” he said. “They’re crack-y and shiny, but once you take a bite, that’s when they really start to shine. They have a crispy outside, and a soft, fudgy, brownie-like center. There’s a lot to love about this cookie.” The treat is gluten-free and dairy-free, so those on special diets can indulge their sweet tooth. But don’t let all those “frees” put you off. Packed with walnuts, the cookie is also full of chocolatey goodness. “It’s good for anybody except someone with nut allergies,” said Freeman. “There’s no butter in it, no egg yolks. There’s no fat in the cookie, except what is in the walnuts, and that’s your healthy omega-3 fatty acids. It does have a lot of sugar, so it’s not carbfree by any means.” He started making the cookie in New York while working at Payard Patisserie & Bistro, founded by renowned pastry chef François Payard. Freeman, a North Carolina native, returned to the Triangle in 2008 and opened catering company Edible Accolades. In June 2015, Freeman returned to the restaurant business with the opening of Chanticleer. Since then he has enjoyed meeting customers and getting to know the regulars who come in for Joe Van Gogh coffee and fresh-baked treats. “I see the same people coming in, every morning, every afternoon,” he said. “The biggest thrill for me is when someone comes up to me and says, ‘That was a great blank,’ or ‘That was the best blank I’ve ever had.’” Chanticleer is open 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily, serving fresh bakery items and lunch. Chanticleer Cafe & Bakery 6490 Tryon Road, Cary (919) 781-4810 chanticleercafe.com CARY MAGAZINE 83


Get your smile ready for Back To School! It’s Time For That New Smile!

Our patients are our main focus. We stress prevention, restoration and overall health while improving the smiles of those we serve. Our smile services include: porcelain veneers, Lumineers, porcelain crowns, tooth colored onlays and fillings, Zoom! chair side tooth whitening and Invisalign. Our digital ITero scanner replaces the need for messy impressions and provides accurate results with maximum patient comfort. We can restore your smile with implants.

We welcome new patients! Schedule a new patient exam and mention this ad to receive a complimentary take home tooth whitening kit or an electric toothbrush kit as a gift to you from us.

Please visit our website and read our reviews.

84

AUGUST 2016

.c o m t s i t n e D www.Car yCosmetic

431 Keisler Drive • Cary, NC 27518 • 919.859.1330


CALL US TODAY!

Custom build your home place on your choice of private, beautifully wooded 2 - 7 acre lots.

13

26 EXCLUSIVE HOMESITES • 2 - 7 Acre Homesites from $219,900 • Homesite and Custom Home packages from $850,000 Custom Builder Team: • Arthur Rutenberg Homes/ Hearthstone Luxury Homes • Bost Custom Homes • EDK Design Build • Hurst Home Company • Rufty Custom Homes

FOR BEST SELECTION CALL US TODAY!

Patrick A. O’Neal, Broker-in-Charge (919) 806-3262 | (919) 795-0356 cell trecnc.com

“The Nest” by Bost Custom Homes

“The Nest”, is a beautiful luxury home by Bost Custom Homes that is placed perfectly on 3.73 acres in Carolina Crossings. As you can see it has a stately design and an exterior with subtle stone accents for added style. Inside it offers spacious living for your family and for entertaining. In addition it also has an abundance of family living space with a total of four bedrooms and four and a half baths, including the Master and a large guest suite on the first floor. Upstairs it has a spacious room that can be used as your very own private home theater or game room. In total this stunningly designed home has a total 3,929 square feet of heated living space, with an additional 1,328 of unfinished and unheated space for storage or future expansion of the living space. This home place provides acres for gardening, fruit trees, and even a small vineyard if desired.

Sales & Marketing by


charity spotlight

GiGi’s Board: from left, Caroline Moore, site coordinator, Michelle Schwab, Rachel Geer, Jeanhee Hoffman, president, Denise Lloyd, Maria Romano, Michelle Pfeiffer

Community Spirit: Gigi’s Playhouse WRITTEN BY NANCY PARDUE PHOTOS BY JOHN CONTE PHOTOGRAPHY

BOOSTING THE POTENTIAL of another human being is one of the greatest gifts you can give. At GiGi’s Playhouse, potential is what it’s all about. Opened in June, this nonprofit achievement center serves adults and children with Down syndrome, offering educational and therapeutic programs at no charge, and opportunities for families to share ideas and support. Programs at GiGi’s Playhouse are focused on developing social, speech, motor and vocational skills, empowering people to achieve their greatest potential. Resources are available to equip new parents, and coming this fall is “GiGi U,” a progressive learning program for adults, with goal development and small group skills in86

AUGUST 2016

struction, physical fitness and work opportunities. The local center is the 31st GiGi’s Playhouse location in North America. “Families can view the calendar of activities online, and just come,” said local outreach leader Michelle Pfeiffer. Her own children, including daughter Anna, who has Down syndrome, are among the regulars at GiGi’s Playhouse. Pfeiffer is known locally as the founder of Anna’s Angels Foundation, which funds Down syndrome research. The two organizations are not formally connected. “Anna has always inspired me, but to see the young parents here at GiGi’s Playhouse … it brings me great joy to put my time and energy into helping to bring this to

Kudos for founder: GiGi’s Playhouse founder Nancy Gianni, who attended the local center’s grand opening on June 18, has been named a 2016 CNN Hero for her efforts to empower those with Down syndrome.


The grand opening of GiGi’s Playhouse on June 18 attracted many supporters.

our community, as a place to feel loved and have fun,” Pfeiffer said. “Our area has such a need, especially for teens and adults, to help bridge the gap after high school. Our vision is to have an adjacent business to provide jobs, such as a café. The more we invest in them, the more productive they can be in our society.” The community is investing: More than $180,000 was raised to launch the center, and businesses such as PMC Commercial Interiors of Morrisville have donated goods and services. Volunteer professionals are stepping up to provide speech and physical therapies. And thanks to Chapel Hill photographer Lili Engelhardt, a fundraising book will be available this holiday season through GiGi’s Playhouse, Anna’s Angels, the Triangle Down Syndrome Network, and Amazon. Portraits and stories of local families are chronicled in “Beautiful Souls: Down Syndrome Through the Eyes of the Ones We Love.” “GiGi’s Playhouse is simply a place,” said Jeanhee Hoffman, president of the new center. “It is a place for our children and adults with

Down syndrome to come for our therapeutic programs. It is a place for our families to have a support system. It is a place to educate and bring awareness to our community about our individuals with Down syndrome to simply accept them into our community.” “Disability is not an excuse”

Steve and Marie Meckman of Cary first heard about GiGi’s Playhouse via an online parent chatroom, then from friend Caroline Moore, who is now on staff at GiGi’s as site coordinator. “It’s generated quite a bit of excitement,” said Steve Meckman. “It’s very beneficial to our community, and a great resource. “Our children may be less functional than normally developing kids, but they still have potential and abilities, and they still need to be pushed,” he said. “Disability is not an excuse.” The Meckmans’ son Ben, 14, is proof. Diagnosed with Down syndrome and autism, Ben works out at a local gym to counter the predisposition for low muscle tone that accompanies Down syndrome.

He may struggle with simple math, yet Ben can recognize birds by sound, and memorizes detailed facts about African wildlife, his dad says. And Ben enjoys being with people even though he has difficulty interacting. The camaraderie at GiGi’s Playhouse helps, and the family is exploring the center’s numerous programs. Pfeiffer points out that it’s not necessary to have a family member with Down syndrome to visit GiGi’s Playhouse. You can donate, or volunteer in various roles such as tutor, program leader and clean-up crew; teen volunteers are welcome, too. “GiGi’s Playhouse is a place for the community,” Pfeiffer said. “It offers opportunities to be with people with Down syndrome, to get comfortable. And it’s our common cause, to help families.” GiGi’s Playhouse Down Syndrome Achievement Centers Swift Creek Shopping Center 2887 Jones Franklin Road, Raleigh, at intersection of Tryon Road (919) 307-3952 gigisplayhouse.org/Raleigh CARY MAGAZINE 87


LAZY DAZE 2016 Cary’s Town Hall Campus Saturday, August 27 9 a.m.- 6 p.m. Sunday, August 28 12:30 p.m.- 5 p.m.

An end-of-summer tradition in Cary!

ART

FOOD

Join in the festivities at the 40th Annual Lazy Daze Arts & Crafts Festival — a day filled with art, music, food, and good old-fashioned fun! This year the festival has been extended to two days and will remain on Cary’s Town Hall Campus.

MUSIC (919) 319-4560 www.townofcary.org


CARY MAGAZINE 89


90

AUGUST 2016


Claire Barnett, 13, takes aim at her target while practicing during a Junior Olympic Archery Development class at the NC Archery Center in Raleigh.

GO GOLD fo� �he

Family Style

Western Wake offers Olympic sports for family fun WRITTEN BY LEAH KEITER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Instead of just curling up on the couch with your family to watch the Olympics this month, why not try competing yourself? You won’t have to fly to Brazil — we’ve found local options for fan favorites like archery, fencing and table tennis. They’re perfect for the whole family to experience Olympic-sized excitement, with familiar faces as your competition. continued on page 92

CARY MAGAZINE 91


Kevin Franklin, 12, takes aim during a Junior Olympic Archery Development class at the NC Archery Center in Raleigh.

continued from page 91

NC ARCHERY CENTER While sports like swimming and track and field may get the most press coverage during the Summer Olympics, archery took the gold in the 2012 games as the most watched sport on cable channels, according to NBC, with more than 1.5 million viewers. Movies like “The Hunger Games” and “Brave,” with their straight-shooting heroines, have boosted the sport’s recent popularity. Justin Rogers, owner of North Carolina Archery Center in Raleigh, says archery’s long history also gives it staying power. “Archery goes back and predates everything,” said Rogers. “It’s the oldest weapon. Cavemen were using spears and bow and arrows. The history behind it and all the different forms, you could go on about it for days.” Rogers’ personal history with archery dates to his childhood, using a bow and arrow to hunt with his dad on the farm where he grew up. These days he can still often be found with a bow in his hand, but for teaching instead of hunting. After five years of working at a large outdoor supply store, 92

AUGUST 2016

Rogers opened the archery center as a way to give more specialized attention to a sport he says is truly for everyone. “I grew up playing every sport on the planet,” said Rogers. “I played football, baseball, basketball. Those other sports aren’t as inclusive as archery. You have to be an athlete for a lot of those other sports. In archery, I taught a girl who has spina bifida, who shot in a wheelchair.” The Archery Center offers introductory classes, private lessons, and even a six-week course that prepares students for the center’s Junior Olympic Archery Development program. “We have kids who compete in everything from local to state to national tournaments,” Rogers said. “Some shoot nationally, some just come and do it for fun and earn pins from us as their scores improve.” The center also hosts a statewide tournament sponsored by the National Field Archery Association, or NFAA, that’s popular with young archers, partly because it’s held at the center’s 20-lane indoor range.


153 West Chatham Street, Cary NC 27511 919-467-8126 • 919-467-8175 (fax) John Miller

CPCU, CIC, CBIA, CRIS jmiller@adcockagency.com

Call us for your next insurance review.

Chris Ham

CPCU, AAI cham@adcockagency.com

Proudly representing for over twenty years

Giving Back Being a Junior Achievement volunteer is a great opportunity to give something back to the community.

Let Their Success Be Your Inspiration! 4900 Waters Edge Drive, Suite 175 ∙ Raleigh, NC 27606

(919) 821-2100 ∙ www.jaoenc.org

Your new home for world-class haircuts. TOP: Davis Lingner, 12, holds a pin he earned at his Junior Olympic Archery Development class as he poses for a photo with coach Brian Barnett. ABOVE: Archers practice at the NC Archery Center.

Families looking to explore archery can sign up for private group lessons. Rogers says the age recommendation is 8 and older, but admits that it varies; his own kids have been shooting since they were 4. For these private lessons, the center provides equipment. The intro class offered at NCAC is $60. “Anybody can pick up this sport,” said Rogers. “You can pick up a bow and arrow and see results. And that’s what separates it to me — literally anybody can do it.” NC Archery Center 6718 Old Wake Forest Road, Raleigh (919) 676-6799 ncarcherycenter.com

Classic Barber Shop Apex, NC

licensed barbers

best hair cut in western wake

straight razor shaves

422 East Williams Street | Apex, NC 27502 | Monday-Friday 9am - 6:30pm | Saturday 8:30am - 3pm

919.387.9470 | www.classicbarberapex.com CARY MAGAZINE 93


Sixteen-year-olds Kenan Ratliff, left, and Eduardo Marin face off during practice at Apex Fencing Academy, at Middle Creek Community Center.

APEX FENCING ACADEMY For Igor Moreno and Kriszti Hovanyi, fencing is more than just a hobby — they both fenced growing up, which landed them spots on the Ohio State University fencing team where they met. After they married and had children, the couple realized they wanted to pass on the fencing tradition, and started teaching the sport privately at home. In 2010, they moved the lessons from their bonus room to the Middle Creek Community Center, and Apex Fencing Academy was born. “It’s a really cool sport,” said Hovanyi. “It’s unique in that it has so many different skills that you need to develop. You actually have to do a lot of tactical thinking while you do a lot of difficult physical exercise.” One of the oldest traditions in Olympic history, fencing 94 AUGUST 2016

has been a staple of the summer games since 1896 in Athens. There are three types of weapons in fencing: foil, epee and sabre. Foil and epee are taught at the academy because these are the easiest and safest weapons to handle; sabre is the only weapon considered to be a “cutting” weapon, meaning that in addition to points being scored with the tip, they can also be scored with edges and surfaces of the blade. Beyond the physical skills of agility, balance, hand-eye coordination, speed and timing, both Moreno and Hovanyi praise fencing for the mental skills it requires. “It is extremely tactical, and you really get to use your analysis skills because you have to understand what your opponent is doing and then find your strengths,” said Moreno. Hovanyi added, “The mental aspect is really where I think fencing shines over other sports.”


BELOW, FROM TOP: Colson Combs, left, Stephen Kubik and Kenan Ratliff talk shop during a break during fencing practice at Middle Creek Community Center. CENTER: Stephen Kubik, left, faces off with Bilal Sayid. BOTTOM: Colson Combs, left, and Bilal Saiyid, both 13, train during Apex Fencing Academy practice.

Apex Fencing Academy has many options for families interested in exploring the sport, including siblings fencing against one another, parent and child duels, and child classes. Families just starting out can try the Beginning Fencing I class; it ranges from five to eight sessions, and costs around $100, not including equipment rental. All Apex Fencing Academy classes are held at Middle Creek Community Center. Registration is available at townofcary.org; follow the link to “Register for Programs & Classes.” Moreno and Hovanyi say the most popular reason children come to fencing is movies like “Lord of the Rings” and “Pirates of the Caribbean” that show sword fighting and duels. “We get emails all the time from parents saying, ‘I got my kid a “Lord of the Rings” sword and he can’t put it down. He’s 2, when can he start?’” Moreno said with a laugh. “If parents knew that fencing was out there, there would be a lot more attention to it.”

Apex Fencing Academy 123 Middle Creek Park Avenue, Apex (919) 771-1295 apexfencing.net

CARY MAGAZINE 95


Cary 8-year-old Anva Gupta keeps his eyes on the ball while playing his father, Arvind, at the Triangle Table Tennis Center in Morrisville.

TRIANGLE TABLE TENNIS

Eleven-year-old Ganning Xu returns the ball while playing his mother, Chengjin, at the Triangle Table Tennis Center in Morrisville.

With an estimated 40 million players at the competitive level and millions more playing recreationally worldwide, table tennis has earned the title of most widely played sport featured in the Olympic Games. Ann Campbell’s son was one such competitive player, and after spending years crisscrossing the country from New York to California to attend competitions, she realized that a center closer to home would help families like her own. “After traveling and repeatedly seeing multiple people from the Triangle who were meeting at these remote events, I realized there was a core of dedicated players in the area. But there was no dedicated place for players to play seven days a week and (a place to) bring in qualified coaches,” said Campbell. Now, two years later, Triangle Table Tennis in Morrisville is the largest table tennis facility in the United States, and the permanent home of USA Table Tennis’ display of artifacts, which include items from the early days of the sport as well as plaques of USATT Hall of Fame members. It has been declared an International Training Hot Spot by the International Table Tennis Federation, one of only five others with that distinction in the nation. continued on page 98

96

AUGUST 2016


Your Neighborhood Family Dentist We value each patient as if they were a member of our family and we offer our treatments based on what is best for your needs.

GENERAL DENTAL // COSMETIC DENTAL // KIDS AND FAMILY // EMERGENCY VISITS

We accept all major insurances and we have an alternative insurance plan for those without dental insurance.

3420 Ten-Ten Road, Suite 310 // Cary, NC 27518 // 919-342-8509

kildairefamilydental.com

CARY MAGAZINE 97


continued from page 96

USATT has also declared the center one of just 10 National Centers of Excellence. “This was an industrial facility that was completely renovated,” said Tom Gabriel, the center’s manager. “The best thing is when you see a place like this that was built to be used on a large scale, when we have tournaments or leagues or lots of lessons and you see it fill up with players, that’s when it’s really fun.” Many options are available for families looking to explore table tennis, like the center’s open hours during the day, which cost $12 a person, although Gabriel recommends private group lessons for beginners. “You want to get the technique right,”

98

AUGUST 2016

he explained. “Then you can go into a group and practice with a partner or go into a competitive league.” In addition to individual and group lessons, the center offers memberships of varying lengths, which include extra perks like discounts on merchandise at the pro shop and access to the center’s fitness room. More than anything, Gabriel encourages families to join for the fast-paced fun. “It’s just such an exciting sport to play,” he said. “It’s also so accessible, no matter who you are, and it doesn’t discriminate between men and women or young and adult. It’s just a sport that seems to lend itself to being open to everyone.”

TOP: Beda Jain and son Aditya, 10, challenge Jain’s son Aryan, 14, to a game of table tennis. BOTTOM, FROM LEFT: Aditya Jain and his father, Beda, team up in a game of table tennis at the Triangle Table Tennis Center in Morrisville. Carson Park-Walters, 15, plays his father, Mike Walters. Cary 8-year-old Anva Gupta keeps his eyes on the ball while playing his father, Arvind.

Triangle Table Tennis 2900 Perimeter Park Drive, Suite 200, Morrisville (919) 388-0272 triangletabletennis.com


 Celebrating 20 Years of Sparkle

WARDS AGGY A M E H T

Register Now for Fall Classes!

ER WI2N0N 16

CDP

683-A Cary Towne Blvd., Cary | 919-467-7040

www.carydance.com


ASHWORTH DRUGS 105 W. Chatham St, Cary NC Phone 467-1877

WE FILL YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS PROMPTLY AND WITH THE COURTESY YOU DESERVE

Providing Protection for Your • Home • Auto • Business • Life • Health

...a neighbor, someone you know, someone you can trust and respect. 512 West Williams Street | Apex, NC 919-362-8310 | info@rogersinc.net www.rogersinc.net

Call today and talk to a real person who cares about your family’s protection and security.

Proudly Representing

– Full Service Pharmacy – Old-Fashioned Soda Fountain – Medical Equipment Sales & Rentals – Nat-Rul Vitamins & Remedies – Hallmark Cards & Gifts – Most Insurance Cards Accepted – Free Daily Rx Delivery – All Medicare Part D Plans Accepted

Paul Ashworth, R.Ph. Cori Strickland, R.Ph.

919.467.1877 Mon.- Fri. 8:30 – 6:00 Sat. 8:30 – 3:30

WINNER 2006

HONORABLE MENTION 2007

Recognized by Cary Magazine readers as one of the best special occasion restaurants

THE MAGGY AWARDS

HONORABLE MENTION 2013

HONORABLE MENTION 2016

Hours: Mon.-Thurs.: 5-10pm Fri.-Sat.: 5-11pm

1130 Buck Jones Rd., Raleigh NC 27606 100

AUGUST 2016

5 private rooms seating 6-200 guests!

HONORABLE MENTION 2014

Contact: Christina Reeves Sabin Christina@ReysRestaurant.com HONORABLE MENTION 2015

919.380.0122 ReysRestaurant.com


Ask us about our same day

crowns!

CARY MAGAZINE 101


Elena Betchke, an Olympic silver medalist in figure skating, coaches 9-year-old Jasmine Ye at the Polar Ice House in Cary.

102

AUGUST 2016


True to Life Top athletes share lessons learned, on the ice and in the water WRITTEN BY NANCY PARDUE PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

“Negative thoughts interrupt your self-confidence, and separate you from your goal. … Once you say, ‘I want this,’ commit. That’s true in everything.” — Elena Betchke, Olympic medalist and coach

ONCE UPON A TIME a little girl in Russia had a dream … and it came true. But it wasn’t quite that simple for Olympic figure skater, silver medalist and coach Elena Betchke. “I just did it,” said Betchke, of riding the bus and subway to the rink before and after school. “The rink was an old orthodox church, with mirrors all around. I was age 5, 6. “When I was 7 they built a new facility. I tried out at the open house and was chosen. Once you were picked for the (Russian Skating Federation’s) junior or senior team, your training expenses were covered. Then the expectations came in.” continued on page 104 CARY MAGAZINE 103


Elena Betchke, with her student Jasmine Ye, says “It’s OK to hear, ‘this is not working.’ Step back, look at what you could do better, and get back to work.”

Tune In Watch the 2016 Summer Olympic Games, Aug. 5-21 on NBC TV, nbcolympics.com. For more, see olympic.org/ rio-2016-summer-olympics.

104

AUGUST 2016

continued from page 103

By age 14 Betchke was fully committed to skating, after a period of “lollygagging” that got her dismissed from training at 12. She begged her way back onto the team, and became a pairs skater. “Without a goal you are in limbo. That break was just missed time. I could have mastered triple jumps sooner, if I would have trusted my coach 100 percent and not allowed myself unnecessary drama,” she said. “Negative thoughts interrupt self-confidence, and separate you from your goal. If I hadn’t done that, my medal would be gold.” Betchke has earned top international honors multiple times on the ice, with partners including Denis Petrov. Known for inventive moves such as the “impossible death spiral,” the two earned Olympic silver in 1992, just after the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. They took the podium as part

of the Unified Team, minus the flag and anthem of their native land. Betchke skated professionally with Stars on Ice from 1993 to 2000, alongside notables such as Kristi Yamaguchi, and officially moved to the U.S. in 1996. Today, Betchke lives in Garner with her children, Alex and Sophia, and her mother. She coaches more than 20 figure skaters at Polar Ice House locations in Cary and Garner, from ages 5 to 40-plus. “Self-discipline is a big factor; the mental work is the toughest,” she said of her artistic sport, and her life. “At any age the D word — desire — has to be there. “Once you say, ‘I want this,’ commit. That’s true in everything. Even now, I go to bed early, exercise — structure life around my commitment. It’s my lifestyle.” Life on the ice and in front of judges has continued on page 106


Bald Head Island Limited & Southern Living Present

A Southern Living Inspired Three-Day Event Weekend at Cape Fear Station on Bald Head Island, NC

OyStEr RoAsT WiNe DiNnEr

wHoMe ToUrSx BeEr, WiNe & CoCkTaIlS TaStInG

SoUtHeRn DeLiCaCiEs CoNcErT UnDeR ThE StArS

SuNdAy BrUnCh Featuring the Culinary Skill of Southern Living Test Kitchen Director Robby Melvin & Live Performance by The Midatlantic.

LEARN MORE

ePURCHASE

TICKETS

a t W W W. R O A S T T O A S T C O A S T . C O M


Mike Lewis / Ola Vista Photography

Ashley Twichell at the Open Water National Championship April 8 in Miromar Lakes, Fla.

“I put in all the work, day in and day out … if I can say I’ve done everything I possibly could, then no matter what happens, it’s still a success.” – Ashley Twichell, swimmer

106

AUGUST 2016

continued from page 104

The deep end

taught Betchke a few things about handling pressure. “It’s OK to hear, ‘this is not working.’ Step back, look at what you could do better, and get back to work. At bedtime I write down my mistakes, to learn, and save big decisions for when I’m fresh. Tomorrow is a new day. I forgive myself and move on.” Whether you win or lose in life, Betchke says, practice good sportsmanship. “Be kind and respectful, no matter what others do,” she said. “I teach my children to be positive, and care about what they represent.” She emphasizes that while striving to be the best is a worthy goal, perfection isn’t. “Perfect doesn’t exist,” Betchke said, “but adaptability is important on a daily basis. I can adjust my behavior but never my fundamental beliefs. Respect, trust and commitment, I will never compromise.”

While Betchke’s competitive days are behind her, Ashley Twichell is in deep — water, that is. In April Twichell beat out six world champions to win the USA Swimming National Open Water Championship, on the final stroke. And in May, she won the 1,500-meter freestyle in the Arena Pro Swim Series. Now, after tough Olympic trials in late June, Twichell, 27, is setting aside her Olympic dream yet again, after placing fifth in the women’s 800-meter freestyle finals. There were just two spots open on the Olympic team. Twichell has missed out on the Olympic Games before, also by the tiniest of margins. And in 2015, she was sidelined by a frustrating rotator cuff surgery that kept her out of the water for eight weeks. “It’s all forced me to keep things in perspective,” she said. “How lucky am I to compete, and to travel to six continents and


Mike Lewis / Ola Vista Photography

THEATRE IN THE PARK MAINSTAGE/2017 Become A Season Member for the best value & earliest opportunity to purchase A Christmas Carol tickets before the general public!

FEB 10 - 26

by Adrienne Earle Pender

Ashley Twichell took the 10-kilometer national title in April at the USA Swimming Open Water National Championships. She won with a time of 2 hours, 1 minute, 51.78 seconds.

countless countries? My medals are prized possessions of course, but more important are the friendships and memories created.” A competitive swimmer since age 6, Twichell broke multiple school records in the pool at Duke University before graduating in 2011 as an NCAA All-American. “But senior year, I knew I wasn’t ready to be done. I happened to be invited to an open water camp that started that June,” said Twichell, who trains in Cary with Ashley Twichell Raz Cuparencu, the former head coach of the Triangle Aquatic Center Titans. ​“Looking back, it was a huge risk, moving across the country to California. It was tough; we swam 60 miles a week, spent five hours a day in the water. But at the conclusion of camp were the open water nationals. I came in third, and that qualified me for my first internationals,” she said. The win took Twichell to the 2011 FINA World Championships in Shanghai, China, where her team took gold and she was “shocked” to earn an individual bronze. That bronze medal changed the course

APRIL 7 - 23

of her swimming career, into the unpredictable arena of open water swimming, which had become an Olympic event in 2008. “In the pool you have one lane, lane lines and walls. I swim in lakes and rivers, with different temperatures, tides and currents,” Twichell said. “You can only control what you do. You have to adapt, such as when someone tries to break away. “It’s forced me to not get so hung up on what I have planned. Our coaches say not to waste mental energy stressing. Conserve that energy and use it to deal with what’s thrown at you.” That’s good advice for life, too. “I enjoy the challenge, and love the feeling during and after a tough practice. For me, the mental pressures are tougher than the physical,” Twichell said. “It’s about staying positive, and not doubting yourself.” And when it comes to competing alongside the best in the world? “If you dream big and have lofty goals, the reward can be fantastic but the risk is not fun,” Twichell said. “But I’d regret not having these goals. Even not achieving them outweighs the what-if questions. “I put in all the work, day in and day out,” she said. “If I can say I’ve done everything I possibly could, then no matter what happens, it’s still a success.” t

by Ernest Thompson

JULY 21AUG 6

The True Story of Florence Foster Jenkins, the Worst Singer in the World

by Peter Quilter

SEPT 22OCT 8

by Barbara Field

adapted from Mary Shelley's novel

Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts

DEC 7-11

Durham Performing Arts Center

DEC 15-18 TheatreInThePark.com 919.831.6058 CARY MAGAZINE 107


There is no app for this.

Reconnect with the ones you love on the shores of the Currituck Outer Banks, NC.

The legendary wild horses of Corolla, unique historical sites, remote beaches and mild coastal temperatures are just a few of the reasons why now is a great time to visit.

Call 877-287-7488 for a free visitor’s guide

108

AUGUST 2016

www.VisitCurrituck.com


TUESDAY NIGHTS:

KIDS EAT FREE Kids 10 and under receive a free kids meal with the purchase of an entrée, platter or large sandwich.

Every other Tuesday, David the Magician, or one of his assistants, will be at our Beryl Road and Morrisville locations doing face painting and balloon animals. [ 8/2, 8/16, 8/30 ] On the alternate Tuesdays, free locally sourced ice cream with every kids meal! Plus sidewalk chalk for kids of all ages and, if it rains, we’ll have crayons and butcher’s paper for aspiring artists. Remember us for your catering needs, from small drop off orders to large full-service events. Menu includes breakfast trays, boxed lunches, reception platters, and buffet packages. We also feature a wide variety of vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options.

BECOME A FREQUENT FOODIE! • Receive rewards on purchases • Celebrate your birthday with a dessert on us • Track your progress on earning your next reward

w w w. n e o m o n d e .c o m


garden adventurer

WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY L.A. JACKSON

Edible, Ornamental Spinach SPINACH IS NOT ONLY an easy vegetable to grow,

but it is also a healthy treat low in calories and high in vitamin A, vitamin C, iron and calcium. However, besides being a beneficial edible, spinach has ornamental possibilities that should not be overlooked. If you want to start spinach from seed, scatter them in the veggie patch around the middle of this month while the weather is still warm, to aid germination and enable the plants to reach a decent size before the first chilly winds of autumn. Liberally sow seeds a half-inch deep in rows one foot apart. When the seedlings appear, thin them to about six inches apart. Using set plants instead of seeds will, of course, get the spinach crop off to a faster start, but there is one more advantage: Young plants can be strategically placed so their solid, constant green foliage infiltrates flower beds as a contrasting verdant backdrop for such favorite autumn ornamentals as Spinach dusty millers, gazanias, mums, marigolds, violas and pansies, to make their bright colors pop even more. Just remember that if you do interplant spinach with ornamentals, avoid usLeaf ’, which produces lots of leaf and little stem. Gardeners who opt ing garden chemicals not recommended for veggies. for smooth-foliage cultivars will find them easier to wash and prepare Like all leafy vegetables, spinach thrives on nitrogen. A simple for meals than the wrinkled-leaf varieties (also known as Savoy) that sprinkling of common 8-8-8 or 10-10-10 at planting time, followed have plenty of nooks and crannies for dirt, dust and six-legged critby an additional application in late September, should adequately ters to hide. encourage a bountiful fall harvest. And since spinach is sensitive to You don’t have to be in a hurry to harvest spinach before the first soil with a low pH — typical of Carolina clay — it wouldn’t be a bad frosts because these hardy plants can stand temperatures down to 20 idea to add a dusting of lime at planting time. degrees F. Actually, a little bit of frost helps to Fast-growing spinach needs plenty of water, so keep the hose sweeten the taste. As for picking spinach, pick handy if the rains don’t come. Also, mulch will help preserve ground often, and go for the outer, older leaves first. moisture as well as prevent nutrient-robbing weeds. And just what cultivar should you grow? ‘Bloomsdale LongL.A. Jackson is the former editor of CaroStanding’ is a fairly common selection that can be found in most lina Gardener Magazine. Want to ask L.A. a garden shops. As an alternative, consider ‘Avon’ with its dark green, question about your garden? Contact him by slightly crinkled leaves; ‘Space’, a vigorous-growing choice; or ‘Baby’s email at lajackson1@gmail.com. 110

AUGUST 2016


To Do in the

GARDEN

12 9

3 6

August • Beets, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, kale, lettuce, mustard greens, radishes, spinach and turnips can also be planted now. For transplants, try to plant on a cloudy day and provide a little bit of shade during the worst of the afternoon heat for at least their first week in the garden. For seeds, rule No. 1 is never let the planting beds dry out. • Gardeners, don’t forget thy warm-season veggies! You still have time at the beginning of this month to replant such fast-maturing summer vegetables as squash, cucumbers and tomatoes. • Allow a few plants of such free-seeding herbs as dill, basil and chive to mature and produce seeds in the garden, which will readily re-sprout as volunteers in the garden next spring. • Hollies and pyracanthas will benefit from additional waterings if the rains don’t come, because if stressed by hot, dry conditions, they could drop their immature berries. • It’s bulb planting time. No, not tulips, daffodils and such, but rather fall-blooming pretties such as colchicums, sternbergias and autumn-flowering crocuses. Set in the garden now, they will quickly emerge, mature and flower in the waning heat of early autumn. • It is not too soon to think about extending the fall garden — ever thought about making a cold frame? This easy-to-build structure will help protect propagated cuttings, pots of forcing bulbs and tender lettuce plants from early cold snaps. • How easy is it to build a cold frame? For a simple, basic plant protector, just form five bales of hay into a horizontal “C” shape and cover it with a clear plastic sheet. • It is also not a bad idea to think about starting a compost pile. Toss any grass clippings or spent plants into a bin or onto a pile and continue adding organic “fuel” through leaf fall in the autumn. • Wash and refill the birdbath at least once a week. Also, after big rains, wipe down the bird feeder, as standing water in the tray can cause seed to spoil.

Rose hips

TIMELY TIP Most roses — the main exceptions being many hybrid teas — will produce rose hips after their flowers fade. If these small fruits are clipped off, the plant won’t waste energy into their development, which would be at the expense of future flower production.

We are an Italian dining ristorante with a comfortable and casual atmosphere. We strive to provide each guest with an experience they will remember.

However, rose hips are not only edible but packed with vitamin C. Their tart flavor has often been used to add a tasty snap to teas, syrups, jellies and sauces, so think about allowing a few clusters to develop for culinary experimentation purposes — just be sure they haven’t been sprayed with pesticides. If this first foray into using rose hips in foods has you hoping for more, consider planting a few Rugosa roses — they are the champs when it comes to producing impressive harvests of plump fruits.

Open 7 days a week Mon.–Thurs. 11:30 a.m.–9:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat. 11:30 a.m.–10:30 p.m. Sun. 11:30 a.m.–9 p.m. 1060 Darrington Drive, Cary (919) 468-7229 www.luganocary.com

CARY MAGAZINE 111


SearStone for the disbelievers.

“This place is unbelievable. I can’t wait until I’m your age.”

If you didn’t know this was a retirement community, you’d never believe it. SearStone is changing people’s expectations regarding senior living. You expect the convenience, security and value. What you may not expect is a perfect location with just about everything you could want or need—all within walking distance. You probably didn’t realize how affordable we are, either. We’re not just changing the way you think about retirement, we’re changing the way you experience it.

17001 SearStone Drive Cary, NC 27513 www.SearStone.com

Call 1-877-785-2721 to receive your FREE information kit.

trade your HEAVINESS for

happy legs

No matter the type of legs you have, or the symptoms from which you suffer, the Triangle Vein Clinic can help. With years of experience, a focused commitment to vascular care and a top-notch staff and facility, you’re ensured the best care around. Schedule your consultation today!

919-851-5055 | www.triangleveins.com Dr. Victor A. Medina is the Go-To Guy for all of your vein issues! 112

AUGUST 2016


CARY MAGAZINE 113


happenings

Celebrating CM’s Movers & Shakers PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Cary Magazine’s 2016 class of Movers & Shakers gathered on July 11 for a celebration of who they are, and their contributions to our Western Wake community. The event, following the second annual Movers & Shakers magazine feature, was held at Bond Brothers Beer in Cary for our honorees in business, philanthropy, the arts, and education.

114

AUGUST 2016


happenings COMPILED BY JESSICA WIGHT AND NANCY PARDUE

Patrick Jessee, who teaches earned the Diamond Coach Award by the

THE DEVIL’S RIDGE MEN’S GOLF ASSOCIATION is seeking

National Speech & Debate Association’s

sponsors for its 13th annual charity

speech and debate at Cary High School,

golf tournament, set for Sept. 28

Honor Society, recognizing excellence and

at Devil’s Ridge Golf Club in Holly

longevity in speech and debate. He was

Springs, and benefiting Alzheimer’s

among coaches recognized at the National

North Carolina. Sponsorship levels

Speech & Debate Tournament in Salt Lake

range from hole sponsor at $100 to

City, Utah on June 16. speechanddebate.org

elite sponsor at $5,000. To date, the tournament has raised more than $250,000 for area charities. Pictured from the 2015 event are Alice Watkins of Alzheimer’s NC, Greg Fishel and Debra Morgan of WRAL, and tournament chair Don Moore. devilsridgecharityclassic.com

Local nonprofit The Caring Community Foundation will host its 15th annual Teresa Porter

PAY IT FORWARD FUNDRAISER on Saturday, Sept. 10 at Noah’s in Morrisville, to support area cancer patients with needs such as rent, utilities and transportation. The event includes food, beer and wine, raffles, games, dancing, live and silent auctions, mobile bidding, and live music with The Retros. Live auction items include a trip for two to the CMA awards and tickets to see Jimmy Fallon live. caringcommunityfoundation.org

FuquayVarina Community Center is Wake County’s first Now open at the

instructional community kitchen, offering hands-on cooking classes aimed at preparing nutritious foods. A John Rex Endowment

Pictured are, top left, Howard Udell, Lee Frankel and Stefanie Khan; top right, Kimberly Logel and Lisa Matthis; bottom right, Lisa Matthis and Jeanne Howard.

The first-ever

CARY ACADEMY PTAA fundraiser was

grant awarded to the town covered 70

held May 7, the day of the Kentucky Derby, with a Derby theme that included

percent of the $100,000 cost of the kitchen. fvparks.org

emcees Kim and Penn Holderness, live and silent auctions, and “play betting” on horses. caryacademy.org CARY MAGAZINE 115


happenings

H ave you recently made a move?

Waltonwood residents participate in the kick-off walk around the community.

Residents at

Whether you’ve moved across the country, across the state, or across town, we want to meet you to say hello & to help you with tips as you get settled. Our basket is loaded with useful gifts, information & cards you can redeem for more gifts at local businesses.

ANN BATCHELOR 467-3512 BETH HOPPMANN 302-6111

116

AUGUST 2016

WALTONWOOD CARY PARKWAY senior

living community took part in National Senior Health and Fitness Day on May 25, learning exercises for skills they’d like to improve, including strength, balance and flexibility. waltonwood.com


Coins and Precious Metals BUY • SELL • TRADE

COINS

GOLD

S I LV E R • D I A M O N D S • E S TAT E J E W E L R Y • F L A T WA R E 2857 Jones Franklin Road • Raleigh, NC 27606

KUMAR COURT

WALNUT STREET

TRYON ROAD

919-461-0014 • jewelsbyjr@yahoo.com

STREET

SF

NE

JO

AD RO

CAMPBELL ROAD

WALNUT

Owners: Jeff Reid & Josh Bobbitt, American Numismatic Association IN

KL

N RA

Bring in your old treasures!

2857-A Jones Franklin Road Raleigh // Beside Barry’s Café

A

SAKS of Treasures

Coins Partner

Take home some new ones!

984-200-1896 SAKS-of-Treasures-Consignment CARY MAGAZINE 117


happenings

The Holly Springs Chamber of Commerce has launched the new

CENTER STREET MARKET, to run in conjunction with the weekly Holly Springs Farmers Market on Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Center Street

Three young women are the latest graduates of

CORRAL on June 4, the Cary

Market adds offerings by local artisans, small businesses and

nonprofit serving at-risk girls who have experienced trauma and abuse, offering academic

pop-up shops. facebook.com/

tutoring, mentoring and equine-assisted psychotherapy. Each graduate will attend college

CenterStreetMarket

this fall, maintaining the program’s 100 percent college admission goal. Pictured are Edi and horse Giselle, Courtney and Alchemy, and Norah and Chester. corralriding.org

The

CENTER FOR VOLUNTEER CAREGIVING of Cary has been selected from among 35 applicants as winner of the second annual Blueforest Gives Back campaign by video production company Blueforest Studios of Raleigh. Blueforest will create and donate a video

Winners of the 2016

Cary Chamber of Commerce

Excellence Awards, presented May 19, are Patrick Jane’s Gourmet Pizza Bar, Small Business of the Year; Ovesco Endoscopy USA, Innovation; Lifetime Learning Academy, Community Service; Catering by Design, Work Environment; Davis Drive Middle School, Entrepreneurial Award in Education; Jerry “J” Wilton Miller Jr., Luther Hodges Business Ethics Award, presented by the Rotary Clubs of Cary; and Dorcas Ministries, the Charitable Partners Award. carychamber.com 118

AUGUST 2016

focusing on how center volunteers are positively impacting the lives of seniors and adults with disabilities and why volunteering with them is a rewarding task. volunteercaregiving.org


The Carying Place, a nonprofit that teaches homeless, working families with children life skills for attaining independent living, raised $125,000 at its 15th annual benefit auction, buffet and dance, held April 29, at Prestonwood Country Club. Net proceeds from the event will be used to support the annual average of 23 families in TCP’s program and 16-week transitional housing program. thecaryingplace.org

Susan Braun, CEO of The V Foundation for Cancer Research and a 2014 Cary

Chuy’s

Grand opening events at restaurant in Parkside Town Commons, Cary, raised $4,630 for the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle. The funds were presented by general manager James Fisher on May 26. chuys.com and foodshuttle.org

Magazine Woman of Western Wake, has received the 2016 Partners in Progress Award given by the American Society of Clinical Oncology for her dedication to enhanced cancer prevention, treatment and patient care. The V Foundation has funded more than $150 million in cancer research grants since 1993. jimmyv.org

Recipients of the 2016 Women in Culinary Leadership Grant by the James Beard Foundation include

Shelby Manus of Apex, who will complete a 12-month, backof-house program overseen by Cindy Hutson of Ortanique restaurant in Miami.

TAZZA KITCHEN, located at 600 Ledgestone Way in

More than 60 women applied to the

Now open in Cary is

mentoring program for aspiring chefs and

Stone Creek Village, offering a menu highlighting fresh ingredients sourced from regional

restaurateurs. jamesbeard.org/education/

farmers and suppliers, sustainably harvested seafood, and pastured meats cooked in a wood burning brick oven. tazzakitchen.com

women-culinary-leadership-program    CARY MAGAZINE 119


happenings

Ashley Judd will be keynote speaker at the annual fundraising

Seaman Clark Lane

Actress

dinner of The Foundation of Hope for Research on Sept. 15 at the Angus Barn Pavilion in Raleigh. The dinner and auction event has raised $4.4 million for research and treatment of mental illness. walkforhope.com/2016-evening-of-hope

The seventh annual

Rock Your World

benefit concert held May 21, at RallyPoint Sport Grill in

SARAH KLINE from Apex

Cary, raised $108,105 for Hope for Haiti Foundation and

Ensign

Fanconi Anemia Research Fund. rockyourworldraleigh.com

received her Lt. j.g. collar devices from Lt. Matt Garcia-Bragiel during her promotion

Eric Wilson of Apex, a master trainer at O2 Fitness in Cary, was

ceremony on the USS Makin Island (LHD 8) flight deck. Makin Island is home-ported in San

named Corrective Exercise Specialist of the Year by The BioMechanics Method.

Diego, undergoing the basic training phase in

Wilson will serve as a spokesperson on corrective exercise for The BioMechanics

preparation for a scheduled deployment this

Method, and received a cash award, memberships with leading health and fitness

fall. facebook.com/ussmakinisland

organizations, and an equipment package from TRX Training. o2fitnessclubs.com

The Moving Truck is Leaving! Are you ready to learn about your new community?

Your local welcome team is ready to visit you with a basket full of maps, civic information, gifts, and gift certificates from local businesses. From doctors to dentists and restaurants to repairmen...we help newcomers feel right at home in their new community! For your complimentary welcome visit, or to include a gift for newcomers, call 919.218.8149. Or, visit our website, www.nnws.org.

CARY | APEX | MORRISVILLE | HOLLY SPRINGS | FUQUAY-VARINA | GARNER ANGIER | WILLOW SPRING | CLAYTON | CLEVELAND 120

AUGUST 2016


Jonathan Fredin

Purple Cloth 5K

Scenes from the benefiting Dorcas Ministries. The fifth annual race was held May 14 at Bond Park in Cary. dorcas-cary.org

Leah Charbonneau

Dade Hundertmark of Cary, a firstyear student at Hollins University in Virginia, spent six weeks in intensive study of the Arabic language this summer at the ArabAmerican Language Institute in Morocco. She undertook the study as part of her plan to apply the study of law and business ethics to work in Africa. hollins.edu

SEARSTONE continuing care retirement community presented the second annual Ageless Hero Awards on May 17. Recipients pictured, from left, are Brian Blum, Person of the Year; Laura Kay House of Silver Connections, Business of the Year; Jeanette Lee, Hero of the Year 55+; and Unika BoyceCooley, Student of the Year. Not pictured is Dr. William Dunlap, Lifetime Achievement Award. searstone.com

The Town of

Fuquay-Varina on June 1 opened

Triangle Rowing Club rowers Lauren Armpriester of Apex, a 2016 graduate of Grace Christian School,

its new state-of-the-art Public Service Center, which combines

and Hunter James of Cary, a graduate of Green Hope High

staff and equipment from the town’s Public Works, Public

School, have committed to row for the UNC-Chapel Hill and

Utilities and Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources Maintenance

University of Alabama college teams, respectively. Armpriester

Department into one central location, for greater efficiency in

plans to pursue a law degree after majoring in business at Chapel

delivering services. The center replaces various facilities around

Hill. James plans to major in engineering and minor in music.

town, many 50 years or more old. fuquay-varina.org

trianglerowing.org CARY MAGAZINE 121


write light

BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Chip teeth

122

AUGUST 2016

A squirrel emerges from a park trash can with a ruffled potato chip in its mouth.


NO ONE SEES YOU LIKE WE DO. The way we see it, image is everything. So we specialize in everything imaging. From prevention and detection to diagnosis and intervention. All provided in 20 Triangle locations by more than 150 certiďŹ ed technologists and subspecialty radiologists. Every one of them with the unique ability to see beyond the patient to the person inside.

G

BO I

G MA

IN

DY

RO

I

MA G

NEU

IN G

VA

VE

IN

T

TH

-C

ERA

PET

PY

MRI

P E D I AT

ST IMAGING

RIC I M AGIN G

BREA

SC

R

PH

Y

U

LA

IM

AG

IN

G

ORT

HO PEDIC I M AGING

M

M AM

OG

RA

Be seen by people who specialize in you at WakeRad.com.

Profile for Cary Magazine

Cary Magazine August 2016  

Notable Teens, Olympic-inspired fun, local seafood, Lazy Daze and more

Cary Magazine August 2016  

Notable Teens, Olympic-inspired fun, local seafood, Lazy Daze and more