Page 1

March/April 2016

INSIDE

ND WEEKE AYS GETAW

Great Escape YOUR GUIDE TO NC TRAVEL

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in this issue

The Travel Issue Let’s Talk about 18 the Birds and the Bees

In Their Elements: 96 Cary sculptors on nature and art

33 Great Escapes: Hiking local trails 106 Art in Bloom Take the High Road: 44 A pictorial tour of the High Country Travel Plans: 56 5 Must-See NC Festivals

63 Weekend Getaways

82 The Essence of India

While the mountains are beautiful any time of year, the scenery is truly spectacular when the leaves turn. Take a pictorial tour of the North Carolina mountains, page 44.

Photo by Jonathan Fredin

8

MARCH/APRIL 2016


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in every issue

CARY • APEX • MORRISVILLE • HOLLY SPRINGS • FUQUAY-VARINA

March/April 2016 • Volume 13, Number 3

28 77 90 110

Garden Adventurer: L.A. Jackson on Planning for Bees

EXECUTIVE

Ron Smith, Executive Publisher Bill Zadeits, Publisher

We Love

EDITORIAL

Nancy Pardue, Editor Amber Keister, Editor

Restaurant Row: Lucky 32 Shines Inside and Out

CONTRIBUTORS

L.A. Jackson David McCreary

Charity Spotlight: Miracle League of the Triangle

PHOTOGRAPHY

Jonathan Fredin, Chief Photographer

departments 12

Editors’ Letters

14 114 122

Letters from Readers

PRODUCTION

Melissa Borden, Graphic Designer Jennifer Casey, Graphic Designer Ronald Dowdy, Graphic Designer Dylan Gilroy, Web Designer Amy Mangels, Graphic Designer Matt Rice, Webmaster/SEO Rachel Sheffield, Web Designer Jim Sleeper, Graphic Designer

ON THE COVER: No. 12 “Tweetsie,” a 98-year-old, coal-fired

Happenings

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PUBLIC RELATIONS

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Jonathan Fredin

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in the next issue

CARY MAGAZINE

Westview at Weston 301 Cascade Pointe Lane Cary, North Carolina 27513 (919) 674-6020 • (800) 608-7500 • Fax (919) 674-6027 www.carymagazine.com

Free ways to play

This publication does not endorse, either directly or implicitly, the people, activities, products or advertising published herein. Information in the magazine is deemed credible to the best of our knowledge.

The best things in life are free, so look at some cars, listen to music and We’ll even pick up the tab! 10

MARCH/APRIL 2016

Jonathan Fredin

enjoy the outdoors.

Cary Magazine is a proud member and supporter of all five chambers in Western Wake County. The Cary Chamber of Commerce, Apex Chamber of Commerce, Morrisville Chamber of Commerce, Holly Springs Chamber of Commerce, Fuquay-Varina Chamber of Commerce and Garner Chamber of Commerce. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.


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Jonathan Fredin

editors’ letters

I NEVER THOUGHT of myself as someone with a

close relationship with nature. As a child, I spent more time at the library than climbing trees, swimming or riding bikes. But my conversation with Diana Hackenburg, of the Triangle Land Conservancy, made me think again. “Past generations have a lot of memories of being outside,” she said. “They remember having a favorite tree in their neighborhood or going to a farm.” While I grew up in St. Louis, every summer we would spend weeks at my grandparents’ farm in northwest Missouri. We kids would leave the house in the morning, returning for supper with sweaty faces and dirty feet. We’d ramble through fields playing complicated wargames. We’d wade in the shallow creek, looking for crawdads and frogs. We’d follow my grandmother to the garden and pick corn, tomatoes and green beans for supper. We’d spend countless hours trying to master the stilts and slingshots that my grandfather made for us. By the time we returned to the city, we’d be sunburnt, bug bit and longing for the next visit. So perhaps it is not surprising that as an adult, I have always loved hiking. Walking in the woods and wading in the occasional creek gives me a familiar sense of peace. I hope you too will discover the beauty of nature this spring.

Amber Keister Editor 12

MARCH/APRIL 2016

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

That might sound silly to say in March, but here’s why it feels that way: My determined hubby has rebounded from a tough December surgery. And when all is well in his world, it is in mine too. Like colorful sprinkles on top of that sundae, snow and ice are no longer in the forecast and I’ve put away the Mister Rogers cardigans. I’m back to exercising at the Y. And I’ve finally used up that holiday-themed hand lotion that made me smell like a chocolate-covered cherry. Like a sweet reward, I’ve picked up my head and discovered springtime. We hope you have the same feeling while perusing this issue. It’s a celebration of the season, a reminder that after a long winter there are green trails to hike, fun places to visit, and dining to enjoy al fresco. Spring is also a great time to become more involved in our community: Read up on how to become a baseball buddy. Plant a habitat for our busy pollinating friends. Shop locally, but make a difference globally. Enjoy the rewards of spring … and pass ‘em on. Thanks for reading,

Nancy Pardue Editor


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letters from readers

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The Food Issue

“Thank you for such a wonderful feature in the current issue. I am so obsessed with the photo of Deanna and Colin (Crossman) in the tub. I told Deanna she has to blow that up into a massive poster and hang that somewhere in the hotel.” Taryn Sher, The Mayton Inn

“Thank you for featuring Muddy Dog Roasting Company in the We Love section of February’s Food Issue. The photos are fabulous! We have enjoyed reading Cary Magazine since its inception.” Debbie Pellegrini, co-owner Muddy Dog Roasting Company

“What a great issue, Cary Magazine, and I’m not just saying that because of page 70. Thanks for hanging out with us! Can’t wait to be neighbors!” Deanna Crossman, The Mayton Inn, via Facebook

“Thank you Cary Magazine and S&A Communications for all your support in promoting Mardi Gras Kickoff, presented by the Cary MacGregor Rotary Club.” Patrick McCoy, via Facebook “Thanks Cary Magazine for highlighting Chief Fahnestock! Great article! Great Chief of Police! Great lady!” Town of Fuquay-Varina, via Facebook

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Email letters to the editors to editor@carymagazine.com

Editors’ note: Submitted comments may be edited for length or clarity, and become the property of Cary Magazine. 14

MARCH/APRIL 2016


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Let’s Talk About the

BIRDS & THE BEES

18

MARCH/APRIL 2016


Will Stuart, Audubon NC

WRITTEN BY NANCY PARDUE

Two-thirds of bird species in the Southeast are declining due to habitat issues, says Curtis Smalling of Audubon North Carolina. Connecting homeowners and local nurseries to help by using native plants in their landscapes, Audubon’s Bird-Friendly Communities initiative offers a curated plant list and year-round tips.

A FRIEND IS A FRIEND ... even if he has wings. So say Richard and Carôn Lazar of Apex, who have launched an effort to make their corner lot a subdivision sanctuary for the pollinators necessary to human food supply. “Like everything else in life, it’s been an evolution,” said Carôn. “I began as a decorative gardener. When you become an advanced gardener, you see how interconnected everything is. The move to organic and beneficial gardening is learning about the most sophisticated system in the world, nature. In the case of pollinators, one person’s weed is a pollinator’s food.” To boost the bees, these two educators and authors planted organic clover across their front lawn. But the clover took over and neighbors didn’t like it. “The clover was growing higher and higher,” Carôn said. “But by the time it was cut down we had not just bees but an incredible array of pollinators, including a purple iridescent one I’d never seen and neither had our neighbor, Anne Burroughs, who’s also an environmentalist.” Burroughs also discovered a new wild beehive which developed during a two-month period, because there was a local food supply to feed it. Before the move to golf course-like turf lawns, the Lazars say, clover was 10 percent of the normal lawn mix. That readily-available food source is a tremendous benefit to pollinators, adds nitrogen to the soil, creating a lawn that needs less fertilizer, and saves water because it requires less irrigation. continued on page 20

CARY MAGAZINE 19


Carôn Lazar

Jonathan Fredin

continued from page 19

LEARN MORE From our Garden Adventurer, L.A. Jackson, page 28 Get Audubon NC’s 2016 Bird-Friendly Native Plants list, nc.audubon.org In Cary: Beekeeping is allowed on residential lots; call the Planning Department at (919) 469-4082. Rent a hive: See Bee Linked at ncagr.gov or Mike’s Honeybees, mikeshoneybees.com

They’ve now achieved that 10 percent clover-to-grass mix in their yard. Carôn has also landed a seat on the board of their Homeowners Association, to advocate for more nature-friendly guidelines. So far the board has allowed clover beds neighborhood-wide for those wishing to plant it, use of both solar panels and permeable driveway pavers, and has explored use of horticultural vinegar in areas where appropriate, for weed control and storm water management as an alternative to chemical herbicides. The Lazars also want to encourage the spread of organic wildflower seeds in neighborhood common areas, offering pollinators a buffet of choice; that is being discussed. Richard said, “My thought is that we’re looking at 393 homes here in Brighton Forest by the end of the year. If even 200 homes treat this seriously, we’re managing to take real action.” 1 in 3

Action is indeed necessary, says Michael Childers, president of the Wake County Beekeepers Association and at age 35, one of its youngest members. “Bees have a hand in one of three bites of the food we eat,” said Childers, whose own front yard is manicured using organic methods, while dandelions and clover grow 20

MARCH/APRIL 2016

in the backyard. “We have to find a way. “It used to be common that everyone had two hives on their property, for honey, and the bees took care of themselves,” said Childers, who keeps 250 hives. “That process has deteriorated. Bees go out to breed, but there aren’t enough hives. “And though developers usually replant, often it’s with non-native plants that don’t produce nuts or fruit, because clean-up is easier. Those plants are more decorative than functional.” Add in exposure to commercial pesticides and the infiltration of pests like varroa mites and hive beetles, and the results of inferior habitat are clear, Childers says: Lack of genetic diversity means bees with deformed wings that can’t fly, and white bees suffering lack of pigment. In California, a lack of bees has led to expensive truckloads of them being shipped in for almond pollination. And in China, humans are doing the work of absent bees, handpollinating pear trees using chicken feathers. Want to help? Childers suggests planting bee-friendly lavender, clover and buckwheat. The tulip poplar tree is fast-growing and sports large yellow flowers great for bees. Provide a bird bath or swimming pool, because bees require lots of water; they especially like salt water. Or boost pollination by renting a honeybee hive for your garden.


Jonathan Fredin

For the birds

Allison Bailey of Cary is using her yard to benefit nature, from a birding standpoint. One by one, she’s replacing the landscape of her home in the Kingswood neighborhood with native plants, as part of Audubon North Carolina’s Bird-Friendly Native Plants of the Year program. Pledging “no green thumb required,” this planting-with-a-purpose approach offers year-round tips, a curated plant list, and connections to the local nurseries that grow them. Why native plants? They thrive with little attention, endure weather, resist pests, and provide food for adult birds and nestlings, from protein-packed caterpillars in the spring to seeds and fruits for energy in the winter. Bailey says in attending her first Audubon Society chapter meeting, she was bothered to learn that native plants often can’t survive the growth of invasives such as English ivy. “As a middle child, I didn’t like that,” she said with a laugh. “And I thought that all plants feed birds, but they don’t. And once I knew that the insects on trees go to baby birds in the nest, I had to help.” She is, by planting small native trees like dogwood, eastern redbud and “fringe,” known for its pretty and fragrant hanging flowers. Bailey also plants evergreens like yaupon holly, and adds color with summerblooming coreopsis, salvia and purple asters,

along with butterfly weed to attract her children’s favorite pollinators. She volunteered to recruit local nurseries for the Audubon program, including Garden Supply Co. in Cary, and The Garden Hut in Fuquay-Varina. “(Growers) already know the value of natives,” she said, “but I introduced them to the Audubon program because I love how much sense it makes. I love that natives feed and shelter birds. Plus they need less time, money and water and are tougher and bloom longer, so you get more bang for the buck. “Natives reflect our natural history. My grandmother knew that, and it’s a tradition to carry on.” Like family

Birds have traditions too, says Curtis Smalling, director of Land Bird Conservation for Audubon North Carolina. “People often don’t think about birds as individuals, but birds like cardinals, titmice and chickadees are permanent residents with us. They come back to the same places to nest each year,” he said. “If you improve the circumstances in your yard, you’ll see the same birds. They’re like members of your family.” Today, two-thirds of bird species in the Southeast are declining due to habitat issues, Smalling says.

Richard and Carôn Lazar of Apex, far left, are working to make their yard a sanctuary for bees and other pollinators by planting organic clover beds in their front yard, left. In joining the board of their homeowners association, Carôn has helped develop guidelines allowing clover beds neighborhood-wide, and advocates for use of horticultural vinegar for weed control as an alternative to chemical herbicides. The Lazars backyard, above, is covered in pine straw to provide shelter for insects and other creatures. “The plain truth is that protecting the pollinators starts with us humans,” Richard said.

“Bees have a hand in one of three bites of the food we eat. It used to be common that everyone had two hives on their property, for honey, and the bees took care of themselves. That process has deteriorated. Bees go out to breed, but there aren’t enough hives… We have to find a way.” – Michael Childers, president of the Wake County Beekeepers Association

continued on page 22 CARY MAGAZINE 21


Will Stuart, Audubon NC

15 YEARS

The possible lifespan of a cardinal; it returns to its favorite nesting spots year after year.

6,000

Number of caterpillars consumed by a single nest of chickadees in two weeks’ time.

1,500

How many insects one chimney swift can eat per hour. Native plants like beautyberry help feed the birds.

3 MILES

The radius of a beehive

SWARM

A natural process by which bees divide and create a new hive.

OH NO

To a bee, chemical weed killer Sevin Dust looks like a pollen granule to carry back to the hive and feed its larvae.

HIGH-TECH Beekeeping devices include measures of hive weight as indicators of bee flight, food consumption, and honey production. Source: Curtis Smalling of Audubon North Carolina, and Michael Childers of the Wake County Beekeepers Association

22

MARCH/APRIL 2016

continued from page 21

“In most of North Carolina’s urban areas, 75 to 85 percent of plant material is non-native. And popular plantings like Bradford pear and crepe myrtle offer few insects. All of this contributes to the lack of available food,” he said. “Coupled with that are direct threats such as predators from raccoons to cats and dogs, and birds crashing into windows. We have to be more proactive. It’s about restoring balance.” To reduce threats to birds, Smalling recommends that bird feeders be placed less than 5 feet from a window, or more than 25 feet away, to reduce the window crash zone. Hang old CDs on windows

to reflect light and alert birds, add an exterior screen, or UV reflective bird tape or tint, which is invisible to humans. And if you have a cat, keep it inside or add a bell to its collar, he says. As for your landscape, Smalling suggests replacing common invasives with selections from the 2016 BirdFriendly Native Plants list, available at nc.audubon.org. “You don’t have to be a plant expert; Audubon North Carolina will help, through our website and our partners like the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service and the North Carolina Wildlife Federation. continued on page 24

“People often don’t think about birds as individuals, but birds like cardinals, titmice and chickadees are permanent residents with us.” – Curtis Smalling, director of Land Bird Conservation for Audubon North Carolina


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Will Stuart, Audubon NC

Allison Bailey is replacing the landscape of her Cary home with native plants as a refuge for birds. “I love that natives feed and shelter birds,” she says. “Plus they need less time, money and water and are tougher and bloom longer, so you get more bang for the buck.” Many non-natives don’t produce nuts or fruit for the birds and bees, says Michael Childers of the Wake County Beekeepers Association. He suggests planting bee-friendly lavender, clover and buckwheat; the tulip poplar tree is also great for bees, sporting large yellow flowers.

continued from page 22

Will Stuart, Audubon NC

“And don’t be overwhelmed and do nothing,” Smalling said. “Actions can be small — choose a native plant, reduce collisions, put up a bird box. Collectively, they make a big difference for species in decline.” Back in Apex where the clover grows out front, the Lazars have also taken nature-friendly measures in their backyard. Covered completely in pine straw, it provides shelter for insects and other creatures, and requires no mowing or feeding. Plants are watered using drip irrigation. This year, Carôn will build a bee house from bamboo or hollow tubes as a place for her bee friends to live in this peaceful retreat, where moss deliberately grows through pavers and an antique Italian well holds center stage. “There’s hardly a morning we don’t have at least three deer, half a dozen squirrels, turtles and a variety of birds, including a very territorial mockingbird who knows this is his yard,” Carôn said. “I think of it as a dinner party — not all guests are alike, but as long as the quality of the guests are similar, they each bring interesting and different perspectives to the table.” “Carôn has taught me empathy and appreciation for all life,” Richard said. “And the plain truth is that protecting the pollinators starts with us humans.” t

24

MARCH/APRIL 2016


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CARY MAGAZINE 25


40

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11

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Prices, plans, and terms are effective on the date of publication and subject to change without notice. Square footage/acreage shown is only an estimate and actual square footage/acreage will differ. Map not to sale. Buyer should rely on his or her own evaluation of useable area. Depictions of homes or other features are artist conceptions. Hardscape, landscape, and other items shown may be decorator suggestions that are not included in the purchase price and availability may vary.


garden adventurer

WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY L.A. JACKSON

Landing pads. True to the old saying, bees are always busy, so they would rather not spend too much time maneuvering in and through a flower to get at the pollenladen center. That is why they buzz at the sight of single flowers with flat faces. Dahlias, zinnias, Queen Anne’s lace, daisies, cosmos, marigolds, clematis and asters all fit the bees’ bill for user-friendly, flat surface blooms with easy-to-reach pollen.

A bumblebee on a flat dahlia flower.

Fragrant fly-in. Like people, bees are attracted to sweet smells, so think about adding perfumed plantings that are any combination of forget-me-nots, heliotrope, nasturtium, phlox, four o’clocks, soapwort, nicotiana or honeysuckle. Herbs can be helpers as well, especially pleasantly scented ones such as hyssop, basil, rosemary, sage, catnip, lavender, borage, chamomile, thyme, marjoram and bee balm.

Plan Bee WANT TO ATTRACT more bees into your garden? Here is a list of tips and plant suggestions that will help make your growing spaces more bee-coming to these friendly flying insects.

Go wild. Naturally, bees favor native plants, and there are many from the wild that can do double duty as great visual additions to cultivated garden beds. Including any indigenous eye-catcher such as foxglove, yarrow, liatris, goldenrod, ironweed, turtlehead, sunflowers, Joe-pye weed, penstemon, swamp milkweed, Echinacea, black-eyed Su28

MARCH/APRIL 2016

sans or gaillardia is a good way to enjoy a two-fer — beauty and the bees. Reproduction reduction. As plant breeders continue to create bigger, bolder, brighter introductions, many of the new-fangled cultivars lose other traits, including the ability to reproduce, resulting in flowers with little or no pollen for bees. If you are not sure the selections you are thinking about buying are packing useful pollen, just ask the folks at your local friendly garden shop, or simply go with two sure bets — native plants and heirloom varieties.

Color their world. Bees are also drawn visually to flowers. It seems yellow is their favorite color, followed by blue, purple and white. Interestingly, bees are color blind when it comes to red — it looks like a shadowy black to them that fades into the foliage. However, there are some plants with red blooms that have ultraviolet coloring mixed in, making them appear to be an agreeable blue to bees. These include pansies, corn poppy and bee balm. Critical mass. Whether you go with colors or scents to attract bees, remember, one or two plants won’t turn too many of these fuzzy flyers around, so put out a more obvious “Welcome” sign in the form of mass plantings that flow in broad sweeps through the garden. L.A. Jackson is the former editor of Carolina Gardener Magazine. Want to ask L.A. a question about your garden? Contact him by email at lajackson1@gmail.com.


To Do in the

GARDEN

12 9

3 6

March

We have everything you need for Summer 2016!

• After their flowers fade, forsythias can be pruned. To maintain their natural flowing shapes, concentrate on cutting back only older, larger branches that overreach their bounds. • Don’t be so quick to heavily mulch beds containing summer annuals. Allow the sun to warm the garden soil until at least mid- to late April to get heat-loving seeds and young plants off to a faster start. • Before grass and other groundcovers begin to grow, survey stepping stones in the garden and reposition any that are not level or have become loose. • Also, while the landscape is still at rest,

Coleus

walk about the yard and clean up any sticks or stones that could become missiles when lawn mowing begins.

April • If you like the sight of flitting hummingbirds, keep in mind that they are attracted to such plants as crabapple, redbud, honeysuckle, lilac, bee balm, salvia, azalea, weigela and coralberry. • Two secrets for a full-flowering clematis: 1) Make sure it gets plenty of sun (five to six hours a day); and 2) keep the roots cool with a 3- to 4-inch thick covering of organic mulch. • Dahlias can be planted as soon as the threat of frost has passed. Include a support stake in each planting hole to avoid damaging the root system or tuber later. • The middle to end of April is early veggie planting time, so get a jump on the growing season by adding

TIMELY TIP If you are thinking about growing such popular plants as lettuce, snapdragons, ageratums, balloon flowers, petunias, coleus, osteospermums, columbines, nicotiana and impatiens from seed outside in the garden this year, let the sun help for better germination. These seeds are a bit odd because they need light to properly sprout. The best planting technique is to simply scatter the seeds over a prepared bed in a sunny location and then lightly press them into the soil surface with your hand, keeping the ground evenly moist while waiting for sprouts to appear. Resist tucking these light-loving seeds any deeper into the dirt; such “over-planting” will easily become a burial.

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such heat-loving edibles as tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, green beans and squash to the garden.

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CARY MAGAZINE 29


Ask us about our same day

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No matter the type of legs you have, or the symptoms from which you suffer, Dr. Medina is the ‘Go-to-Guy’ for all of your vein issues. With years of experience, a focused commitment to vascular care and a top-notch staff and facility at his fingertips, you’re ensured the best care around. And he’s got a pretty great sense of humor, too! Schedule your consultation today! 115 Crescent Commons Drive, Suite 200, Cary, NC 27518 | 919-851-5055 | www.triangleveins.com

32

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GREAT ESCAPES

HIKING LOCAL TRAILS IS A CHANCE TO UNWIND AND ENJOY NATURE CARY MAGAZINE 33


Vickie Sell, previous page, and others take part in an organized group hike at Umstead State Park, led by outdoor writer and guide Joe Miller, above, second from left. Time spent in nature can have both physical and mental benefits, Miller says.

WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

A

s we make our way through the forest, leaves crunch underfoot, a slight breeze whispers among the treetops, sunlight slants through bare branches, and quiet conversations respect the peace

that settles upon us. We tramp up and down, across streams, over bridges, escaping the traffic and to-do lists — if only for a couple of hours. But even a short time in nature can have lasting benefits. Researchers say people can concentrate better, be more creative and even heal faster after looking at clouds, listening to a stream or hiking in the woods. 34

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Joe Miller, a Cary-based outdoor writer and guide, says he sees this effect all the time. “There’s just something about getting away from technology — kind of flipping a switch,” he said. “Just getting out in the woods can have a profound impact on people.” Since 2013, Miller has organized hikes like a recent outing in Umstead State Park which was part of Quintiles' corporate wellness program. Originally he thought the benefits of getting desk jockeys out on the trails would be physical, but that was only part of the story. “Really the benefit is the stress relief and being able to get away from the office for even just a short amount of time,” he said. “People will show up directly from work, and they are so frazzled. But after about 5


minutes on the trail, their whole disposition has changed completely.” Lifelong hiker Chris Underhill, of Cary, agrees. “When I get out on the trail, I forget everything that’s pressing on me and concentrate on the trail in front of me and the beauty all around me,” he said. “It relaxes me and puts me in a better frame of mind.”

Underhill, 65, appreciates the area’s network of greenways but prefers a more natural setting like the Mountains-to-Sea Trail. There are 105 contiguous miles of the trail in the Triangle, and roughly 77 miles of unpaved footpath meander from the Eno River State Park in Durham to Falls Lake Dam north of Raleigh. “We are so fortunate to have so much public land as we do in the Triangle,” said Underhill, who has helped maintain the trail, volunteering with the Friends of the Mountains-to-Sea Trail, since 2004. “We really are fortunate to have that situation this close to a major metropolitan area. We’ve got a lot of public land that is going to stay public land,” he continued. The wealth of places to enjoy the outdoors makes the Triangle a great place to live, says Diana Hackenburg, with the Triangle Land Conservancy. “We enjoy a really high quality of life here, and part of that quality of life is the outdoor opportunities,” she said. “Part of that also is clean air, clean water, access to local farms and food — all of these things are related to the land.” The TLC places a premium on protecting wildlife habitat and wetlands, so the group encourages visitors to experience the

Triangle Land Conservancy

Places to go

continued on page 37

Although the trail at Swift Creek Bluffs Nature Preserve in Cary is short, it winds through massive beech trees and across a narrow floodplain. In spring, the creek which gives the preserve its name is a breeding ground for spring peepers and other frogs. Wildflowers such as trout lily and bloodroot can also be seen starting in late February.

CARY MAGAZINE 35


The Johnston Mill Nature Preserve in Orange County, owned by the Triangle Land Conservancy, has about 3 miles of trail. It’s an attractive place to go after work in the summer because the mature forest canopy provides shade, cooler temperatures and the New Hope Creek, top, runs through it. Joe Miller calls it “a nice little escape.” 36

MARCH/APRIL 2016

Triangle Land Conservancy

Triangle Land Conservancy

Triangle Land Conservancy


continued from page 35

outdoors and learn about the land. “You can see some really diverse habitat,” said Hackenburg. “That’s another cool thing about hiking in the Triangle — it’s not all just forest. There are different types of forests, streams, rivers, wetlands and grasslands. Once people get out and explore, they can see that diversity.” Miller is also a fan of the TLC’s properties. For hiking, he suggests visiting Swift Creek Bluffs, Johnston Mill and Horton Grove nature preserves. “Triangle Land Conservancy has some great properties that a lot of people don’t know about, and it’s some of the best hiking in the Triangle,” he said. “Some of the trails aren’t very long, but they are great little escapes and they’re pretty close to where people live.” Something for everyone

The accessibility of local trails makes it easy to get outdoors, and hiking itself is an easy activity for most. “So many people can do it,” Miller said. “It’s a lifelong activity; that makes it attractive. It’s not something you have to do a lot to remain proficient at.” It is also extremely versatile. Depending on your mood and energy level, a hike can be a strenuous workout or a slow stroll in the woods. Either approach gets people outside and moving. “With a good pair of shoes and a little bit of time, anyone can go out and hike,” agreed Hackenburg. “It’s something you can do at any age. You just have to decrease or increase the challenge level that you give yourself, whether that is mileage or the terrain of the trail.” Mike McKinney, 67, has enjoyed hikcontinued on page 38

TOP: Group hikes offer the chance to learn about local land. RIGHT: Quintiles employees Kevin Benz and Damien Fernandez wait for cyclists to cross a bridge in Umstead State Park. CARY MAGAZINE 37


Kellsey Lequick of Durham and her dog, Shadow, wade in a creek during a hike in Umstead State Park.

“Every time you go out is a little bit different, maybe you’re in a different mood. There’s just so many things that come into play, but I’m always grateful to be out there.” — Joe Miller, outdoor writer and guide on Umstead State Park

38

MARCH/APRIL 2016

continued from page 37

ing and being outdoors since he was a kid. The Cary retiree also volunteers with the Friends of the Mountains-to-Sea Trail, and hikes regularly with a local outdoor group. “It’s a great way to meet people and enjoy interesting conversations while walking and enjoying nature,” he said. “Plus it helps me stay physically fit.” Hackenburg says one of the conservation group’s challenges is encouraging young people to spend more time outdoors, forging that connection that will keep them interested in protecting the land. “Past generations have a lot of memories of being outside, not necessarily hiking, just spending time outside,” said Hackenburg. “They remember having a favorite tree

in their neighborhood or going to a farm. I’ve met so many kids now who have never been in the woods, or don’t even know the woods exist 5 or 10 miles from their house.” One way the TLC is trying to attract a younger crowd is with its Hiking Challenge, she says. The activity allows TLC members to find and rate a trail and share nature photos online. Miller also encourages his hike participants to take and share pictures. “Hiking has had a reputation of being something that older people are more into, but a lot of younger people really enjoy it,” he said. “And a benefit to getting people out early in life is they develop a keen appreciation of the natural world and the importance of preserving it.” continued on page 40


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Austin Whitehead, left, and Phil Cox, during a hike at White Pines Nature Preserve with Grand Trees of Chatham, a Triangle Land Conservancy partner organization.

“Getting outside, immersing yourself in nature is stressrelieving for a lot of people. It gives you a chance to reconnect with nature: hearing birds, looking at green leaves.” — Diana Hackenburg, Triangle Land Conservancy 40

MARCH/APRIL 2016

continued from page 38

TRIANGLE LAND CONSERVANCY

RESOURCES

PRESERVES triangleland.org/explore/nature-preserves

GET GOING NC getgoingnc.com

Joe Miller’s outdoor adventure blog. He is the author of 100 Classic Hikes in North Carolina and Backpacking North Carolina, both from UNC Press. MOUNTAINS-TO-SEA TRAIL ncmst.org

Part of the N.C. State Parks sys-

triangleland.org/explore/hiking-challenge

Swift Creek Bluffs Nature Preserve 7800 Holly Springs Road, Raleigh A mile-long trail on 23 acres White Pines Nature Preserve 548 South Rocky River Road, Sanford About 2.5 miles of trails on 275 acres Johnston Mill Nature Preserve 2713 Mount Sinai Road, Chapel Hill

tem, the trail stretches 1,150 miles from

Roughly 3.5 miles of trails on 296 acres

the Great Smoky Mountains to the Outer

Horton Grove Nature Preserve

Banks. Segment 10 winds from the Eno River State Park in Durham to Falls Lake Dam north of Raleigh.

7360 Jock Road, Bahama Roughly 8 miles of trail on 708 acres


Triangle Land Conservancy

NORTH CAROLINA STATE PARKS ncparks.gov

Eno River State Park 6101 Cole Mill Road, Durham About 28 miles of trail on more than 1,000 acres Raven Rock State Park 3009 Raven Rock Road, Lillington Nearly 20 miles of trail on 4,684 acres William B. Umstead State Park 1800 North Harrison Ave., Cary About 22 miles of hiking trails on 5,599 acres

CARY MAGAZINE 41


Chetola Resort at Blowing Rock

“SAVOR Blowing Rock” Packages April 14-17, 2016

Create Your Own “SAVOR” Package Accommodations for two or three nights and two tickets to the Grand Wine Tasting on Saturday, April 16th.

Deluxe “SAVOR” Package Accommodations for two or three nights, two tickets to the Grand Wine Tasting, $50 Gift Card to Timberlake’s Restaurant at Chetola.

3rd Night Free “SAVOR” Package

SAVOR Blowing Rock is the former Blue Ridge Wine & Food Festival

Available only in condominiums. Combine with any above package. Optional add-ons include tickets to Reserve Wine Tastings, Registration for Chetola Corkscrew 5K

Two night packages start at $195 per person, $390 per couple

R E S TAU R A N T

42

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800-243-8652 Chetola.com


GERIATRIC

I visited the Generations' Skin Centre to see if they could help remove acne scarring on

What a great experience ! Laurie Glodowski was very knowledgable my face.

WOMEN'S HEALTH

ADULT HEALTH

about the Rejuvapen

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by calmly talking me through the whole

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What's your generations story? From cradle to rocker, no matter the generation, the practitioners at Generations Family Practice take pride in offering high quality, primary care to each patient. Family medicine is not only our focus, it is our passion. From preventive care or minor emergencies to pediatric, acute care, and skin care, our knowledgable staff is dedicated to positively impacting the health and well-being of our patients. But don't take our word for it...listen to the praises of our patients of all generations, both here and on our website. And share your Generations story ~ we'd love to hear it!

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Take the

High Road PHOTOS BY JONATHAN FREDIN

At a mile above sea level, the view from atop Grandfather Mountain is breathtaking and memorable. This rugged mountain is also significant because of the more than 70 species of rare, threatened and endangered plants and animals that can be found there, according to the N.C. State Park website. 44

MARCH/APRIL 2016


THE MOUNTAINS call to us, their distant peaks

inviting a closer look. Millions of people every year heed that call and flock to the North Carolina High Country. Warm weather visitors can enjoy climbing Grandfather Mountain, riding the Tweetsie Railroad, fly-fishing, horseback riding and other outdoor activities. Breathtaking views of changing autumn leaves enchant driv-

ers along the Blue Ridge Parkway. In winter, skiers and snowboarders head for the slopes. We invite you to tag along as photographer Jonathan Fredin explores Boone, Blowing Rock and several of the area’s many attractions. And should you plan your own visit this year, the sights, shops, restaurants and activities are sure to keep you entertained — no matter the season.

CARY MAGAZINE 45


ABOVE: High on Grandfather Mountain, visitors take in the view from a rocky outcropping at the Mile High Swinging Bridge, below. Access to the overlook is a short hike from the parking lot. Other, more challenging trails include MacRae Peak and Attic Window Peak. These trails are equipped with cables and climb ladders, and are not recommended for novice hikers. RIGHT: Built in 1952, Grandfather Mountain’s mile-high Swinging Bridge is the highest in America. Linking two rocky peaks, the bridge tends to sway in high winds.

46

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TOP: The country estate of textile entrepreneur and conservationist Moses Cone is cited as one of the most popular destinations on the Blue Ridge Parkway. Near Blowing Rock, Moses Cone Memorial Park has something for everyone, beginning with Flat Top Manor, a 20-room, 13,000-square-foot Colonial Revival style mansion built in 1901 that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The first floor of the manor houses Parkway Craft Center, which features handmade crafts by hundreds of regional artists. ABOVE: The second floor, which is only accessible by ranger-led tours, showcases the leaded glass windows, tile and woodwork common in Colonial Revival architecture.

ABOVE: The view from the house reveals the beauty of Blowing Rock and the 3,500-acre estate. LEFT: Visitors can hike or ride horseback through forests and meadows on 25 miles of trails, including a pathway that leads down to Bass Lake. Several stables in the area provide camping and parking for horse rigs, as well as rental mounts and guided tours.

CARY MAGAZINE 47


TOP and ABOVE: For those looking for upscale accommodations, Chetola Resort at Blowing Rock is a premier mountain lodge destination. The 87acre resort, nestled in the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains and overlooking Chetola Lake, offers 42 rooms and suites and 100 condominiums. LEFT: Fine dining is available onsite at Timberlake’s Restaurant, which serves inspired dishes like Venison Osso Bucco, a slow-roasted deer shank with vegetables and herbs in red wine demi-glace.

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ABOVE: Known for its mixed big game grill and local foods, the Gamekeeper Restaurant is ranked among Boone’s top restaurants. Much of the building structure itself is composed of natural stone, which lends a rustic, natural feel to the dining experience. LEFT: For dessert, try the GK Bread Pudding, a bourbon and caramel bread pudding, with crumbled nut topping and Chantilly cream.

One of the top sellers on the Gamekeeper menu is the spiced rubbed emu fan filet with shiitake mushroom risotto and sundried tomato jus.

CARY MAGAZINE 49


TOP: No. 12 “Tweetsie,” a 98-year-old, coal-fired steam locomotive, pulls into the station at Tweetsie Railroad in Blowing Rock. Touted as one of the nation’s first theme parks, the railroad and Wild West-themed adventure has been entertaining families since 1957 with its steam locomotive rides, amusement park rides, attractions, shops and restaurants. ABOVE and LEFT: Seth Bodie, 8, of Greensboro lets his imagination run wild while watching a train robbery show, left, during a three-mile train ride through the scenic Blue Ridge Mountains.

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MARCH/APRIL 2016


TOP: Right next door to Tweetsie Railroad, High Gravity Adventures offers thrill-seekers of all ages the opportunity to test their climbing and balancing skills on an outdoor aerial playground that reaches heights of 50 feet. The park consists of more than 75 aerial elements, including bridges, tight-rope walks and floating foot loops, all interconnected with built-in steel cable lifelines that make navigating the park safe and fun. ABOVE: HGA Marketing Director Alicia Green demonstrates how to use harnesses and personal safety tethers during a brief “Ground School� orientation that is required before taking that first vertical step.

After a day of adventures in Blowing Rock, a short drive to McKethan Brothers Barbeque in Boone will satisfy the hungriest of appetites. The landmark specializes in smoked meats, homemade sauces and classic southern sides and desserts.

CARY MAGAZINE 51


Peter Kolb of Dunedin, Fla., angles for rainbow trout while fly-fishing guide Dustin Coffey looks on during a wading trip in the Watauga River in Valle Crucis. Fly-fishing wade trips, float trips and vacation packages are available through Chetola Resort, an Orvis-endorsed fly-fishing lodge.

ABOVE: Seven-year-old William Gurley of Durham shows off the emeralds he found while gem hunting at Doc’s Rocks Gem Mine on Highway 321 in Blowing Rock. RIGHT: Visitors to the popular destination purchase buckets of mine ore that are then sifted at a water flume to reveal the gems, as General Manager Tim Grinnell demonstrates.

52

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The family-owned Lost Province brews authentic craft beers like this flight of Chill Pilz German Pilsner, Alpine Meadows Saison, Bumpkins Pumpkin and Honey Brown American Brown Ale.

The pub also serves a savory menu that includes soups, salads, cheese boards and wood-fired wings, vegetables and pizzas.

If you work up a hunger and thirst while touring historic downtown Boone, Lost Province Brewing Co. is a notable destination microbrewery and gastropub.

IF YOU GO Chetola Resort at Blowing Rock (800) 243-8652 chetola.com Doc’s Rocks Gem Mine (828) 264-4499 docsrocks.net

The Gamekeeper Restaurant (828) 963-7400 gamekeeper-nc.com Grandfather Mountain (800) 468-7325 grandfather.com ncparks.gov/grandfathermountain-state-park

High Gravity Adventures (828) 386-6222 highgravityadventures.com Lost Province Brewing Company (828) 265-3506 lostprovince.com McKethan Brothers (828) 265-2828 mckethanbrothers.com

Moses Cone Manor and Park blueridgeheritage.com/ attractions-destinations/ moses-cone-manor Tweetsie Railroad (800) 526-5740 tweetsie.com Regional information visitnc.com/high-country

CARY MAGAZINE 53


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Visit our 15,000 SQ.FT. designer showroom today to see our collection of Hot Spring, Caldera & Fantasy Spas!

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Congratulations to Linda Ward! Thank you for voting us Best Attorney in Western Wake for 2016.

WINNER 2016

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790 s.e. cary parkway, suite 203 | cary, north carolina 27511 919.655.1990 | www.wardfamilylawgroup.com


Elite Mountain & Triangle Properties since 1997

Shanaaz Eisenberg

Blowing Rock’s Niche-Boutique Realtor President/Broker in Charge 828.295.6861 ofďŹ ce 828.773.6050 cell shanaazrealtor@gmail.com


Easels in the Gardens, Edenton Dates: April 15-16 Drive time from Cary:

Kip Shaw

2 hours, 20 minutes Info: cupolahouse.org/easels-inthe-gardens.php

Travel Plans: 5 Must-See NC Festivals WRITTEN BY NANCY PARDUE

The mountains are calling, and I must go: So said American naturalist John Muir, founder of the Sierra Club. Maybe your preference is heading to the coast instead, or somewhere in between. Whatever your favorite destination, North Carolina has it. As you hit the road for spring and summer adventures, here are five must-see festivals across our beloved state — stop by as you’re passing through, or make them the go-to reason for your trek!

Easels in the Gardens, Edenton

Recognized by Forbes.com as one of America’s Prettiest Towns, historic Edenton is home to this biannual event benefiting the 1758 Cupola House, a National Historic Landmark. “Tours of fine gardens FUN FACT: The first colonial lush with beautiful spring capital of N.C., Edenton is home blooms will be offered, while to the state’s oldest courthouse, noteworthy artists paint inbuilt in 1767 and still in use. terpretations of these horticultural gems en plein air,” said Nancy Nicholls, Chowan County Tourism Development Authority director. Celebrate at the Garden Party, offering fabulous food and an art auction, enjoy strolling musicians, learn from workshops such as Floral Design, Gardening, and Outdoor Entertaining, and let the kids take up a brush at the children’s plein air painting corner. 56

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The Cupola House has stood watch from the north shore of Edenton Bay since 1758, and has been dubbed the most studied building in our state for its unusual architectural features, original furnishings including a 1750 London clock, and its Colonial Revival Gardens. Easels in the Gardens also features tours of private gardens, and the family-friendly Boogie on Broad street dance, this year featuring The Band of Oz. Nicholls also notes another Chowan County gem: Its longestrunning event is the Pilgrimage Tour of Homes & Countryside, begun in 1949 and next set for April 2017, offering tours of private homes at least 100 years old, hosted by docents in period costume. MORE AREA FUN: Derby Day, May 7, chowanarts.com; Edenton Music & Water Festival, June 3-4, facebook.com/pages/Edenton-Music-and-Water-Festival; Heritage Farm Fest, June 4, facebook. com/heritage.association1


North Carolina Azalea Festival, Wilmington

Wilmington and Beaches Convention & Visitors Bureau

Wilmington and Beaches Convention & Visitors Bureau

The charm and pageantry of this weeklong celebration draw people from near and far, to take part in more than 50 events ranging from concerts and art shows to visiting ships, a street fair and the arrival of Queen Azalea to the annual garden party. It’s been named a Top 20 Event in the Southeast by the Southeast Tourism Society. “The North CarFUN FACT: olina Azalea Festival is More than 1,000 Wilmington’s longestvolunteers are running festival, now needed to stage in its 69th year,” said the fest’s 50Connie Nelson of plus events. the Wilmington and Beaches Convention & Visitors Bureau. “Several factors contribute to its longevity, not the least of which is the commitment by festival officers, staff and volunteers. North Carolina Azalea Festival, Wilmington Dates: April 6-10 Drive time from Cary: 2 hours Info: ncazaleafestival.org Headliner: The Avett Brothers

Connie Nelson, Wilmington and Beaches CVB

“The festival continues time-honored traditions such as the garden party, Saturday parade, two-day street fair along Wilmington’s award-winning riverfront, and associated events such as the Cape Fear Garden Club Azalea Garden Tour and the Historic Wilmington Foundation’s Azalea Home Tour.” Headlining this year’s festival are acclaimed Carolina quartet The Avett Brothers on April 7, and country singer Chase Rice on April 9. Featured artist for the 2016 fest is watercolorist Mary Ellen Golden of Wilmington. MORE AREA FUN: 2016 Carolina Cup stand-up paddling competition, April 19-24, wrightsvillebeachpaddleclub.com; Coastal Carolina Trainfest, April 23-24, coastalcarolinatrainfest.org; Carolina Beach Music Festival, June 4, pleasureislandnc.org continued on page 58 CARY MAGAZINE 57


continued from page 57

Carthage Buggy Festival Committee

Carthage Buggy Festival, Carthage

Carthage Buggy Festival, Carthage Date: May 7 Travel time from Cary: 1 hour Info: thebuggyfestival.com

Once upon a time, carriages were essential to life in rural North Carolina, and the “Cadillac of carriages” was made in Carthage at the Tyson and Jones Buggy Company, the largest factory in Moore County until the advent of the auto. The town’s annual festival celebrates this heritage; over the years locals have sought out and acquired more and more T&J buggies to view and to ride — and kids always ride free. Along with buggy rides, the day includes vintage tractor and classic car shows, children’s activities, arts and antiques, live bands, and more than 125 food and craft vendors. This year’s fest, the 28th annual, promises to be the best yet, says Karen O’Hara with the Town of Carthage, with entertainment from the Union Pines High School Band, Martin Luther King Children’s Choir, and more. “To truly appreciate what the Buggy Festival means to the community and to visitors, it has to be seen firsthand,” she said. “Only then can you see the historic buggies, classic cars and exquisite arts, crafts and antiques, hear FUN FACT: The town’s buggy the sounds of bands playing, smell the aromas factory reached its peak in 1890, from the food vendors, and experience the joy turning out 3,000 vehicles a year. and pride of an entire community celebrating The last was delivered to Neil its heritage.” Blue of Raeford, in 1925. The crowning of Ms. and Mr. Buggy Festival takes place too, thanks to nominations by students at Carthage Elementary School on why their favorite adult should win. And in true community spirit, the all-volunteer Buggy Festival Committee saves only enough proceeds from the festivities to launch the next year’s fest. The rest of the monies go — where else? — back into the community. By the way, Carthage is just eight miles from Pinehurst, host to world-class golf courses and site of the 2014 U.S. Open. MORE AREA FUN: Stoneybrook Steeplechase, April 9, facebook.com/stoneybrooksteeplechase; Spring Antiques Street Fair, May 7, antiquesofcameron.com; Revolutionary War re-enactment, Aug. 6-7, facebook.com/houseinthehorseshoe

MORE FESTIVAL FUN Fire on the Mountain Blacksmith Festival, Spruce Pine April 23 downtownsprucepine.com

Plott Fest, Maggie Valley June 18-19 plottfest.org Celebrating the official state dog, the plott hound!

MerleFest, Wilkesboro April 28-May 1 merlefest.org

N.C. Black Bear Festival, Plymouth June 3-5 ncbearfest.com

Hang Gliding Spectacular, Nags Head May 13-16 hangglidingspectacular.com Fire on the Mountain Blacksmith Festival, Spruce Pine

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Sneads Ferry Shrimp Festival, Sneads Ferry Aug. 13-14 sneadsferryshrimpfestival.org


Brevard Music Center

Artistic Director Keith Lockhart leads the Brevard Music Center Orchestra in the 2015 season finale.

Brevard Summer Music Festival, Brevard Dates: June 24 through Aug. 7 Drive time from Cary: 4.75

hours

BMC

John Allen

Info: brevardmusic.org/festival

A performance of Mozart's Cosi fan tutte

Banjo stars Abigail Washburn and Béla Fleck

Brevard Summer Music Festival, Brevard

Name a genre, and this festival has it: Each summer more than 400 gifted students study at the Brevard Music Center under renowned faculty and guest artists to present more than 80 concerts across multiple genres, for FUN FACT: Founded in 1936 as your under-the-stars listena summer music camp for boys, ing pleasure. the school moved to Brevard in This year marking its 1944, became co-educational, th 80 anniversary season, the and was called Transylvania festival offers firsts including Music Camp before being the operatic world premiere renamed in 1955 as Brevard of Falling Angel, the inauMusic Center. gural Jazz Institute, and the Dvořák in America Festival, plus artists like Grammy-winning banjoist Béla Fleck and pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet, performing Gershwin. “This year more than any other, we celebrate the thousands of BMC alumni — talented young men and women who have

taken the stage here and around the world to raise classical music to new heights,” said Brevard Music Center President and CEO Mark Weinstein. “Bring a friend and enjoy a spectacular season of symphony, opera, pops, chamber and jazz. On the lawn, under the stars, or in an intimate hall, this is the place to witness performances as captivating as the view.” Another highlight of this year’s fest is the return of celebrated Brevard alumni including conductor Robert Moody and composer Mason Bates, who will perform Bates’ Rusty Air in Carolina, a piece inspired by his time at Brevard Music Center. Best of all, nearly half of the festival’s concerts are free and open to the public, and picnics are welcome on the lawn. MORE AREA FUN: White Squirrel Festival, May 27-29, whitesquirrelfestival.com; Evening at Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute, second Fridays, pari.edu continued on page 60

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Town of Valdese

continued from page 59

2016 Waldensian Festival, Valdese

We are an Italian dining ristorante with a comfortable and casual atmosphere. We strive to provide each guest with an experience they will remember.

Open 7 days a week Mon.–Thurs. 11:30 a.m.–9:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat. 11:30 a.m.–10:30 p.m. Sun. 11:30 a.m.–9 p.m. 1060 Darrington Drive, Cary (919) 468-7229 www.luganocary.com

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Traced to the days of the Biblical apostles, the Waldensians suffered years of religious persecution and exile in Switzerland. This unique festival celebrates their “Glorious Return” to their FUN FACT: native Northern Italy, This summer following a remarkable marks the 49th mountain battle. consecutive The first group of season of the settlers to Burke County outdoor drama arrived in 1893, where From This Day locals continue to craft Forward, telling the wines of their herithe story of the tage and have recreWaldensians, ated the buildings of the founders of Waldensian Valleys in Valdese. Italy. “From the traditional Waldensian Meal to the British Car Show at the Old Rock School, the whole town is open to celebrate,” said Morrissa Angi, community affairs director for the Town of Valdese. “The Waldensian Festival is an event to bring back friends of the past and at the same time make first time visitors, repeat visitors.” The festival features tours of the Waldensian Heritage Museum, Trail of Faith and the winery, built in 1930, where an all-volunteer staff still employs manual methods of wine production. The festival’s bocce tournament, aka lawn bowling, is in keeping with Valdese

2016 Waldensian Festival, Valdese Dates: Aug. 12-13 Travel time from Cary: 3 hours Info: facebook.com/waldensianfestival

tradition, and the day includes the Great Waldensian Footrace, an open air art competition, live music, and more than 170 food and craft vendors. From This Day Forward, an outdoor drama written by Burke County native Fred Cranford, performed mid-July through mid-August each year, depicts the tale of the Waldenses. MORE AREA FUN: Red White & Bluegrass Festival, July 1-3, redwhiteandbluegrassfestival.com; Piedmont & Western Railroad Museum Open House, Aug. 13, pwrr.org t


close to home, but

a world away

A Day on the Water Is Just a Short Drive Away Located less than two hours from Cary, Little Washington is the perfect destination for a day trip or a weekend getaway. Historic downtown Washington offers restaurants, art galleries, boutique shopping, and antique stores, all just steps from our scenic waterfront. Let our rich history, natural beauty, and Southern charm set the stage for a memorable day on the water or a relaxing overnight stay.

plan your trip: LittleWashingtonNC.com


WEEKEND

getaways

You’ve been longing for it all winter: A warmweather escape to a seaside place where you can stretch out in the sun, and bury your toes in the sand. The good news is that while we’re all waiting for warm weather, you have plenty of time to plan your trip! Sun-soaking? Wave-riding? Seafood heaven? Whatever your daydreams are calling for, the North Carolina coast has it. Turn the page for your guide to the perfect summer!

Photo by Jonathan Fredin

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Island Time.

Just a few hours from the Triangle, Bald Head Island offers a true change of pace. Here, time is measured by the ebb and flow of the tide, rather than clocks or calendars. You’ll arrive by passenger ferry, then travel the island by golf cart, bike or on foot. Fourteen miles of uncrowded beaches and outdoor activities galore make it an exceptional getaway for the entire family. Call or go online to start planning your retreat.

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B A L D HE A D I S L AND N O RT H

C AROL I N A

877-344-7443 | www.ComeToBHI.com


Life in the Slow Lane Golf carts are the preferred mode of transportation on this cape island, where the speed limit is just 18 miles per hour.

Bald Head Island NORTH When you board the ferry for the 20-minute ride to Bald Head Island, you leave your car behind, along with the stress of the mainland world. Bald Head is the southernmost of North Carolina’s cape islands, marked by the legendary Cape Fear. Heralded for its natural beauty and environmental sensitivity, the island is a haven for an array of wildlife, including nearly 200 species of birds, dolphins, loggerhead turtles, alligators, deer, foxes, and a variety of fish.

CAROLINA

To Do

With 10,000 of the island’s 12,000 total acres set aside as nature preserves, choosing which environment to explore first can be a tough decision. Ocean beaches stretch for 14 miles, while a winding tidal creek is perfect for paddling by kayak or stand up paddleboard. The maritime forest, with its miles of walking trails, beckons hikers. Spend the day at the beach. Play the Bald Head Island Club golf course, one of the best in the Carolinas. Climb Old Baldy Lighthouse, circa 1817. Explore the island’s wildlife through programs offered by the Bald Head Island Conservancy. Be sure to set aside time to relax at the island’s welcoming spa. Where to Stay

Vacation rentals are available along the beach, fronting the marsh, tucked within the forest, or surrounding the island’s 10-acre marina. Whether you’re looking for a cozy cottage for a couple’s getaway or a spacious home large enough for the

entire family, Bald Head Island Limited Property Management offers the island’s best vacation rentals. To learn more, visit ComeToBHI.com.

Club and Bald Head Island Club dining room can’t be beat. For a quick meal on the go, check out the Maritime Market Café, located at the center of the island.

Getting Around

Inside Scoop

You’ll leave your car on the mainland and board a passenger ferry to Bald Head Island. Once you’re there, you’ll get around by golf cart, bicycle, or your own feet, resulting in a more relaxed, easygoing pace.

July and August bring the biggest crowds, but insiders know that Bald Head Island is at its best in the spring and fall when the weather is mild, so set aside some time for a long weekend getaway. Roast & Toast on the Coast, a Southern-Living inspired event weekend held Oct. 7-9, 2016, brings together the best in Southern food, fine wine, craft beer and live music. To learn more about Bald Head Island, visit ComeToBHI.com.

Local Eats

Enjoy a meal with a view at the island’s two harborside restaurants, MoJo’s on the Harbor and Delphina. For more elegant dining, the oceanfront Shoals

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There is no app for this.

Reconnect with the ones you love on the shores of the Currituck Outer Banks, NC.

The legendary wild horses of Corolla, unique historical sites, remote beaches and mild coastal temperatures are just a few of the reasons why now is a great time to visit.

Call 877-287-7488 for a free visitor’s guide

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www.VisitCurrituck.com


The Wild Horses of Corolla Currituck Outer Banks residents for the last 400 years, these majestic creatures roam freely on Currituck’s Northern beaches.

Currituck OUTER Tucked away on Currituck’s northern Outer Banks lie twenty-four miles of pristine beaches. A portion of the beach is so remote that it’s only accessible by four-wheel-drive vehicles. Visitors may choose to do as little or as much as their hearts desire in this unspoiled coastal paradise. Shop for unique coastal treasures, dine on local cuisine, take a Corolla wild horse tour, or climb the Currituck Beach Light House. The choices are endless. Named one of the “Best Family Beaches on the East Coast” by Foder’s Travel, the Currituck Outer Banks truly has something for everyone.

BANKS

To Do

Where the road ends on Currituck’s Outer Banks, wild Spanish Mustangs have roamed the shores for centuries. Many visitors set out to explore these remote beaches by taking a wild horse tour. Seeing these creatures in their natural habitat can be an unforgettable experience. Many visitors climb the Currituck Beach Lighthouse or spend an afternoon touring the Whalehead in Historic Corolla (a 1920s era house museum). With its mild climate, golf, surfing and kayaking can be enjoyed nearly year-round on the Currituck Outer Banks. Relax

The Currituck Outer Banks beaches are some of the most tranquil on the East Coast. The perfect place to put up your feet and enjoy a good book, listen to the waves, or just close your eyes and breathe in the vitamin sea. Spend a relaxing afternoon sampling wines from local vineyards or shop for treasures at eclectic, one-of-a-kind shops.

Where to Stay

Whether your vacation plans are for a week or a weekend, there are accommodations to meet your needs on the Currituck Outer Banks. Vacation rental homes offer amenities including swimming pools, hot tubs, in-home theaters and petfriendly options. There is also an oceanfront hotel, an Inn and a luxurious bed and breakfast. Whatever your budget, you will find comfortable accomodations to meet your needs. Local Eats

Take some time to sample our famous, mouth-watering North Carolina barbecue and freshly caught seafood at one of the local

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resturants. Currituck also has two vineyards and a brewery, all offering award-winning flavors. Inside Scoop

Leave early and make plans to stop along the way. There are many unique shops and farm markets that you won’t want to miss. First, stop by Trip Advisor’s No. 1 suggestion, the Welcome Center in Moyock. There you’ll find valuable information, maps, clean restrooms, free coffee and a healthy dose of southern hospitality. For more information and a free Visitor’s Guide, contact Currituck Outer Banks Tourism at 877-287-7488 or visit the official Currituck OBX tourism website at visitcurrituck.com. CARY MAGAZINE 67


On the Waterfront From sunrise to sunset, enjoy a variety of shops, restaurants, and activities found along Wilmington’s scenic Riverwalk.

Wilmington AND Named America’s Best Riverfront in USA TODAY’s 10 Best Readers’ Choice awards, Wilmington is a “must see” among destinations in the Southeast. It has everything vacationers love about a historic Southern city plus three beautiful island beaches all just minutes away. With so many exciting new additions to these locales, there are more reasons than ever to go with the flow… and see where the water takes you.

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BEACHES

Riverwalk

Running nearly two miles along the Cape Fear River, Wilmington’s scenic Riverwalk is lined with shops and waterfront restaurants, making it the perfect place to enjoy dinner and drinks, sunset views, or a leisurely stroll. Horse-drawn carriages and walking tours make it easy to explore the nearby 230-plus block National Register Historic District, filled with churches, classic architecture, moss-draped live oaks, brick-lined streets, and antebellum homes.

first-class amenities and services for boats of all sizes and types just a few blocks from downtown Wilmington.

New Attractions

Craft Beer Scene

Construction on the northern end of Wilmington’s riverfront will bring all-new options for fun on the water, including two new restaurants, a 186-room Embassy Suites hotel beside the Wilmington Convention Center, and an amphitheater for live music. In addition, the new Port City Marina, a protected deepwater marina situated on the city’s Riverwalk, offers state-of-the-art floating concrete wet slips and

Home to six new microbreweries with two more slated to open this year, Wilmington is fast becoming a craft beer destination. The city has been named among “America’s Beeriest Beach Towns” and the “Best Cities for Beer Drinkers.” It’s easy for visitors to find all the popular watering holes, including Wilmington’s first microbrewery, Front Street Brewery, with guides like the Wilmington Ale Trail and the Port City Brew Bus tour.

The Airlie Oak Tree, a 467-year-old live oak tree at Airlie Gardens.

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Tours & Trails

There are a variety of sightseeing tours and enchanting trails to keep everyone entertained. In addition to the return of Ribbit The Exhibit, a collection of 20 larger than life frog sculptures scattered throughout Airlie Gardens, there are self-guided tours of famous TV and film locations, as well as hiking and biking trails, scenic boat cruises, and tours for foodies. Celebrated Dining

Just last year, historic downtown Wilmington was named the #1 Best Al Fresco Dining Neighborhood, in USA TODAY’s 10 Best Readers’ Choice awards,


Catch of the Day The marina at Wrightsville Beach is a great place to grab lunch or dinner on the waterfront.

and it’s easy to see why. From traditional Southern fare to fresh coastal cuisine, everything here is served with a side of stunning waterfront views. With more than 15 blocks of cafes and restaurants in downtown alone, this city makes sure no one goes home hungry. Carolina Beach

There are a lot of beaches in North Carolina, but only one as colorful as Carolina Beach. Now, visitors can find new additions alongside their favorite attractions. The seaside boardwalk, named among “America’s Most Awesome Boardwalks” by Budget Travel, received an 875-foot extension that features benches, swings, and connects the main beach to the marina.

paddle tours, and overnight excursions through Paddle NC. Kure Beach

Visitors to Kure Beach can relax and reconnect in a peaceful, small-town atmosphere that’s reminiscent of the kind of naturally beautiful beach they visited as kids. Exciting additions to nearby attractions give even long-time Kure Beach fans yet another reason to return. Among other improvements, Fort Fisher State Historic Site has added 19 interpretive exhibit

panels along the site’s ¼-mile-long trail. At the other end of history, animatronic dinosaurs will invade the outdoor garden at the North Carolina Aquarium at Fort Fisher. These life-size beasts will roar, spit, and wow guests through fall. Visitors can look forward to the return of the Aquarium’s popular butterfly exhibit as well. Wrightsville Beach

Known for its clean, spacious beach and crystal blue waters, island adventure awaits at Wrightsville Beach. Named one of the world’s

best surf spots by National Geographic and among the “Last Best American Beach Towns” by National Geographic Traveler, the area is home to world-class surfing, paddle boarding, kite boarding, and more, as well as an active social scene and some of the best seafood around. From its bustling nightlife to the pedestrian-friendly downtown, it’s no wonder so many families return to spend time on the island year after year. For trip ideas, call 877-945-6386 or visit WilmingtonAndBeaches.com

It’s easier to stay and play oceanfront in Carolina Beach with a new Hampton Inn & Suites opening late summer. Plus, there are more watersports to enjoy thanks to new beach cruiser, kayak, and surfboard rentals from Tony Silvagni Surf School, and new day-touring tandem and single kayaks, parkSpecial Advertising Section

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Annapolis M A R Y L A N D The allure of Chesapeake Bay is captured perfectly by time spent in the capital of Maryland. Sitting on the bow of a small sailboat pushed by a friendly breeze in the froth of big water is so freeing that you quickly understand the pull of a seafaring life. Welcome to Annapolis, one of America’s most historic cities connected and cemented by its status as America’s Sailing Capital, Maryland’s State Capitol and home to the United States Naval Academy.

Obviously, it’s an understatement to say Annapolis is a mecca for people with a passion for waterborne fun. There are sailing schools, regattas and weeknight races to whet your appetite. Then, there are a host of public cruises, private charters, kayaking, canoeing and paddle boarding opportunities to round out the beckoning aquatic adventures. Nothing establishes Annapolis’ watery leanings quite like its relationship with the Naval Academy, which has been training officers for the Navy and Marine Corps since 1845. Yet for many, the Naval Academy remains shrouded in mystery. There are plenty of ways to learn more about this important American institution and its proud heritage. You can explore the Naval Academy “Yard” with a guided tour that provides an up-close glimpse of what life as a midshipman is really like. Maryland’s State House is the oldest in continuous legislative use in the nation. It is also the only state house to serve as

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our country’s Capitol, when the city reigned as the nation’s first peacetime capital from November 1783 to August 1784. Not surprisingly, all four of Maryland’s signers of the Declaration of Independence had homes in Annapolis. Each of the homes is still standing, and three of them are open to the public. Sustaining you during your Annapolis adventure is taken seriously, too. Accordingly, dining, nightlife and cultural offerings are prolific. All of it, of course, is enhanced by the picturesque waterfront backdrop. There also is plentiful access to the bounty of the bay – Maryland crabs and other seafood, and an energetic, happy-to-be-here vibe.

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Maryland’s capital city is home to a thriving visual and performing arts community. Annapolis and the Chesapeake Bay host dozens of fine art galleries – including 20 within walking distance of one another in downtown Annapolis. The newlyrenovated Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts is the performance venue for the Ballet Theatre of Maryland, Annapolis Opera Company, and Live Arts Maryland. One of the world’s most renowned small concert venues, Rams Head On Stage, lives in downtown Annapolis, featuring national acts on a nightly basis. Annapolis is your perfect “small town” getaway, with big city adventures. Take a few minutes to discover for yourself at VisitAnnapolis.org


Duplin County NORTH Centrally located in Eastern North Carolina, Duplin County is easy to find but hard to forget! Our visitors are drawn to us by our deep roots in history, small town charm, and that special southern-style hospitality that keep them coming back. Whether traveling alone, with friends and family or arriving with a group of fellow adventurers via a bus tour, the many flavors of Duplin County offer a little something for everyone.

Liberty Hall

CAROLINA

To Do

While here, you’ll enjoy exploring our collection of quaint small towns. Slow down, relax, and discover how life “was” on a plantationstyle estate. History and the antebellum south are alive and well in the town of Kenansville. Enjoy the beautifully restored Greek-revival style architecture of Liberty Hall, the ancestral home of the Kenan Family, one of North Carolina’s and Duplin County’s most prominent families of the day ... The historic landmark is filled with fascinating period furnishings and artifacts, including the wedding dress worn by Mary Lilly Kenan when she married Henry Flagler in 1901, at what was then known as “the wedding of the century.” While in Kenansville, see the newly curated Cowan Museum of Science and History. You’ll learn about North Carolina’s history in agriculture and take an up-close look at everyday ways of living “back then.” Schedule a visit at Tarkil Branch

Duplin County Veterans Museum

Homestead Museum, in Beulaville, to see a collection of historic homes and farm buildings dating back to the 1700s. Tarkil Branch today is a working farm that provides group tours, has nature trails to roam, and even hosts an annual Antiques Day. Before you leave Beulaville, drive three miles down Fountaintown Road and stop at The Bulk & More Store for some heavenly fresh baked muffins and a unique assortment of candies, bulk flour and grains, baking mixes and yummy ingredients. Duplin County is known for its heritage in agriculture and particularly for our muscadine grapes. Wine enthusiasts for over 40 years have made Rose Hill’s Duplin Winery a world

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famous destination. Come enjoy the fun and friendly atmosphere, free tastings and tours, and have lunch at The Bistro before you leave. In Duplin County you can also celebrate our wine culture at our many festivals and events. Stop in Downtown Wallace and visit the shops and boutiques, or pop into Riverside Barn Antiques, a 12,000-squarefoot antique super-store with an ever-changing assortment of antiques and collectibles. Or visit Downtown Warsaw, the home of the longest running Veteran’s Day celebration, and visit the Duplin County Veterans Museum. Give us a call at 910-296-2181 or visit our website, uncorkduplin.com. CARY MAGAZINE 71


Edenton CHOWAN

April in Edenton

Spring in Edenton is a sight to behold as gardens come alive with flowers abloom, making it the perfect time to visit and enjoy Easels in the Gardens, April 1516, 2016. To Do

The Cupola House Association invites you to join them for Easels in the Gardens featuring two days of Gardens, Art and Artists, Music, Food, Workshops, Art for Children, Artists’ Paint Out and more.

Friday evening the Boogie on Broad street dance, brought to you by Destination Downtown Edenton, will feature Raleigh’s own Band of Oz. Bring the family out for a night of everyone’s favorite beach tunes and dance the night away under the stars. A FABULOUS Garden Party Saturday with food, drink, music, art sale and auction will give everyone a time to celebrate all that has taken place over the two days of touring and seeing these incredible artists at work. Tickets include all activities for both days. Advance ticket price is $30. Tickets will be $35 on days of the event. Children 14 years of age and under free; groups of 15 or more are $20 each with advance purchase. Additional information about this event and all events throughout the year can be found at VisitEdenton.com or by calling 800-775-0111. Other April Highlights

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COUNTY

ways, either by foot or by trolley with guided tours available Tuesday – Sunday. The Penelope Barker House Welcome Center and Historic Edenton State Historic Site give our visitors the special attention needed to put into place what a day of touring should entail. History, Shopping, Dining and Fine Accommodations are always among the special features since Edenton is rich in those amenities. For those who love being on the water, Edenton Bay Cruises on the LIBER-TEA with Captain Mark Thesier give an opportunity to experience what can be seen and shared through this scenic tour along Edenton Bay. This

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all-electric, eco-friendly launch can comfortably accommodate 6 passengers. Themed & private charters are also available. Edenton Harbor offers protected dockage with nine transient boat slips, restrooms and showers along with kayak rentals ready for launching. Nestled along Edenton Bay is the recently restored 1886 Roanoke River Lighthouse, a NC Historic Site, open to the public for touring daily 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. When you combine our seasonal activities with what is offered to visitors on a year-round basis, Edenton becomes a favorite to all those who not only travel here but for those who live here as well.


New Bern NORTH Located in Eastern North Carolina and nestled between the beautiful Neuse and Trent Rivers, New Bern is a 300-yearold waterfront destination full of rich history and charm. It was North Carolina’s first state capital, home to Tryon Palace, the Birthplace of Pepsi-Cola, the site of Civil War Battles and host to Mumfest, one of the state’s top ranking annual events.

CAROLINA

To Do

New Bern has something for everyone – small-town charm, a storied history, outdoor recreation, exceptional restaurants and a growing art and retail scene. For many centuries prior to its formal settlement, the Tuscarora Indians called this stretch of land home. New Bern’s story begins in 1710, when a group of Swiss immigrants navigated to a peninsula of land surrounded by the Neuse and Trent Rivers and named the area for Switzerland’s capital, Bern. From 17471775, New Bern functioned as the seat of North Carolina’s colonial government. After the Revolutionary War, the town anchored the newly formed state government until the state capital was moved to Raleigh in 1792. In its heyday, New Bern was regionally dubbed “The Athens of the South.” New Bern’s Historic Downtown District features a diverse array of restaurants: breakfast fare at Baker’s Kitchen, waterfront

dining at Persimmons, local seafood at MJ’s, Indian cuisine at Bay Leaf and Southern delicacies at The Chelsea and 247 Craven. If you’re in the mood for a cold beverage, you can enjoy a night out on the town starting at the Brown Pelican, the Thirsty Bruin, or Bear Town Market. One of the great things about this charming town is “walkability.” A few steps in any direction will allow you to take advantage of a unique shopping experience that includes: Mitchell Hardware general store, Peacock’s Plume, Surf Wind Fire, Carolina Creations, Fine Arts at Baxters Gallery and much more.

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During your stay, make sure to visit Tryon Palace, the NC History Center and The Birthplace of Pepsi, which offers an unforgettable experience for the entire family. We’ve spent over 300 years preparing for your visit. Give us a call at 800-437-5767 or visit our website, VisitNewBern.com

CARY MAGAZINE 73


Onslow County NORTH Onslow is one of North Carolina’s oldest counties and is situated along the coast just sixty miles north of Wilmington ... a place where nature’s been kind, the past truly fascinating and the present a source of continuing pride. While here, you can catch a ride on an ocean wave where pirates used to roam, paddle a wilderness river as Native Americans did 500 years ago, see newly hatched baby sea turtles start their life’s journey to the sea, explore historic sights and museums and take pride in our U.S. Marine Corps and the largest Marine Expeditionary Force in the world assembled at Camp Lejeune and MCAS New River.

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CAROLINA

To Do

If you’re not relaxing and passing time at our beaches, learning is an exciting experience in Onslow County. Whether it’s stopping in one of our unique museums to discover our area’s rich history, to visiting Lejeune Memorial Gardens and Freedom Fountain in Jacksonville to honor our nation’s military and fallen heroes, to celebrating wonders of nature at our one-of-a-kind parks, farms and sea turtle projects, Onslow offers everyone encounters of a special kind. Outdoor Recreation

Enjoy the breathtaking beauty outdoors, where the abundance of waterways along the New River and White River is a true paddling paradise. Venture to Bear Island and be rewarded with vivid memories of one of the most unspoiled beaches on the Atlantic. Accessible by ferry from Hammocks Beach State Park, Bear Island has 3.5 miles of pristine beach and offers backpacking, primitive camping, swimming, wildlife viewing and shelling. If you enjoy boating and

kayaking, take advantage of Jacksonville Landing boat and kayak launch, or bring your golf clubs to enjoy year-round golf at our interesting and challenging courses. Where to Stay

From luxurious beachfront condos to rustic country cabins, or luxurious cottages along waterways, to bed and breakfasts and contemporary hotels, Onslow County has a wonderful variety of accommodations to suit your needs and is conveniently located to many coastal destinations and points of interest such as our own charming historical town of Swansboro, to Emerald Isle, New Bern, Beaufort and Wilmington.

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A visit to Onslow County wouldn’t be complete without enjoying a meal at one of our famous waterfront restaurants in Swansboro. Or, you may want to experience some award-winning fresh-caught seafood in Sneads Ferry, and some mouth-watering authentic North Carolina barbeque or international cuisine in Jacksonville. Whatever your palate, you will discover a variety of flavors here. For more visitor information, visit onlyinonslow.com


Town of Surf City NORTH Discover the Magic

Beaches and Waterways

It’s all about the magic. Your magic may be witnessed through the touch of sand on your feet, the scent of the breezes that bathe Topsail Island or the motion of the waters, stretching toward a deep blue sky. Perhaps it is a pod of dolphin passing by or a flock of shore birds passing overhead. Whatever your magic, it’s here in Surf City.

Generations of visitors have enjoyed Surf City, owing to its clean and uncrowded beaches that have become a hallmark of the town. 35 designated public beach access points, all of which offer free parking, provide convenient access.

CAROLINA

From our maritime forests, to our wetlands, to our waterways, our broad biodiversity offers up a great setting to explore the sights and sounds of an extensive variety of plant and animal life. Lying west of Surf City, Topsail Sound separates the island portion of the town from the mainland. This narrow body of water, with its nearby creeks, estuaries and wetlands provides the perfect setting for canoeing, kayaking, stand up paddleboarding, water and jet skiing, birding and fishing. Topsail’s Turtles

Surf City is a sanctuary for loggerhead and other varieties of endangered sea turtles that

typically nest on its shores from May through October. Surf City is the home of the Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center, whose volunteers care for injured sea turtles and then return them to their ocean home. Topsail Tradition

Surf City has been the commercial heart of Topsail Island for over 65 years. The town has grown from a small fishing village that was home to a handful of families to a year-round community of some 2,500. Visitors enjoy Surf City as “the way the beach used to be,” quiet, serene, peaceful and bucolic. Cross our iconic ‘swing

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bridge,’ step back into the past, begin your family tradition or continue one. Heading Here

Located just off the southeastern North Carolina coast, Surf City is easily accessible from the Triangle, from I-40 and US Route 17, via NC Highways 50 and 210.

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1

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We Love! COMPILED BY AMBER KEISTER | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

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3. GLASS IS ALWAYS GREENER This Phoenician green glass pitcher is made from recycled glass in the West Bank, $69; silk paper flowers from Bangladesh, $6 each. tenthousandvillages.com/raleigh

CARY MAGAZINE 77


We Love!

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4 1. MOOD INDIGO Ten Thousand Villages is a nonprofit, fair trade retailer offering handicrafts by artisans in more than 30 countries. Place Gerbera daisies in this cobalt Egyptian vase for a striking focal point, $39. tenthousandvillages.com/raleigh

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2. FRESH OUTLOOK This handmade paper and dried-flower frame is made in the Philippines, $14. tenthousandvillages.com/raleigh

3. STYLISH SET The Sea Collection uses sterling silver fittings in each coordinating piece. Round pendant necklace, $28; matching earrings with fixed hooks, $25. chilean-charm.com

4. WHAT’S ON YOUR WALLET? The young and young at heart will be charmed by these felted-wool coinpurses, $6.95 each. tibetanhimalayangifts.com


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CARY MAGAZINE 79


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Special thanks to Whole Foods for preparing the food

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restaurant row

Chicken tandoori wings with rice, chickpea salad and house-favorite cilantro chutney at Cilantro Indian CafĂŠ, which has grown from a small takeout spot to feature a vibrant dining room.

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[ a g u i d e t o d i n i n g a t w e s t e r n w a k e ’s b e s t r e s t a u r a n t s ]


The Essence of India WRITTEN BY DAVID MCCREARY • PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Offering exotic flavors, textures and aromas, Indian restaurants have proliferated across the local area. Here we profile five that stand apart from the crowd. Cilantro Indian Café

What began as a small takeout joint has blossomed into a sit-down outpost complete with a bi-level dining area, vibrant colored walls and whimsical signs containing quotes from the likes of Mahatma Gandhi, Eleanor Roosevelt and Muhammad Ali. Co-proprietor Tavassum Rahmen’s food celebrates the rich flavor profile of her native northeast India. She runs the restaurant alongside her husband, Mustafa Ansari. The owners source herbs and vege-

tables from the Raleigh Farmer’s Market. Popular menu items include lamb biryani, chicken tikka masala and delectable roghni naan bread. “The bread is a not a traditional tandoori or pita, but it has its own unique texture that is somewhere in the middle,” Ansari said. Served with each dish, the signature cilantro chutney contains just the right balance of spiciness and citrusy zest. Wash it down with a refreshing mango lassi, aka Indian smoothie.

Don’t miss the made-in-house desserts. Order the aptly named Messy Mocha Cake or the Cardamom Pistachio Cheesecake, which brilliantly melds distinct ingredients to capture the true flavors of India. Cilantro Indian Café 107 Edinburgh South Drive MacGregor Village, Cary (919) 234-1264 cilantroindia.com continued on page 84

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continued from page 83

Dawat Indian Restaurant

Overheard at Dawat: “This place serves the best Indian food in the Triangle.” Based on the lunchtime crowd still going strong at 2 p.m., there’s evidence to support such a pronouncement. Although business hums, the long, narrow dining room is still quiet enough to carry on conversation without raising a voice. Pendant lights hang above a mixture of simple booths and tables. Chef/owner Harinder Singh offers an impressive range of vegetarian and nonvegetarian options, including kadai paneer, which is Indian cottage cheese in masala sauce, spinach-infused lamb saag, chicken mango and lobster curry. A midday buffet allows diners to sample a variety of house favorites such as samosas, butter chicken and the vegetarian biryani. “It’s not unusual to have people waiting for a seat at lunchtime,” said Singh, a native of India’s Punjab region. No doubt they crave the clay-oven fired kebabs, never mind the 10 varieties of specialty breads. Be advised: If you approach the restaurant from the south on Davis Drive, you’ll have to make a U-turn to get there. It’s a small inconvenience for a tasty payoff. Dawat Indian Restaurant

3735 Davis Drive #105, Morrisville (919) 924-0503 dawatnc.com

North Indian food is well-represented at Dawat, including the popular tandoori chicken.

“This place serves the best Indian food in the Triangle.” – overheard at Dawat 84

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Nazara Indian Bistro

The Indian word “nazara” means “beautiful scenery,” and that’s entirely fitting for this posh new restaurant. Indigo-toned walls are lined with chic white banquettes under contemporary light fixtures that provide soothing illumination. Nazara embodies the fulfillment of a dream for longtime friends Satnam Singh and Mangal Singh, who are not related. The two natives of India had wanted to open a restaurant together for years. “Both of us have been involved in the restaurant business since we were 16 years old,” said Satnam, who operates as owner/ manager while Mangal serves as executive chef. “We have a passion for providing fresh, good quality food for our guests.” The chicken seekh kebob, adraki lamb champe and shrimp

kerala curry are solid selections that exhibit the chef ’s ability to create traditional and contemporary Indian dishes. “The menu includes special creations you won’t find anywhere else,” said Mangal. “The murg mussalam, or chicken drumsticks, is a popular spicy dish. It’s my mother’s recipe, and the meat is slow-braised for four hours.” Nazara offers a daily lunch buffet with diverse options. “There are many different sauces and curries for people to try,” Mangal said. Nazara Indian Bistro 1945 High House Road, Cary (919) 694-5353 nazaranc.com continued on page 86

Dishes like the tandoori mix and the seafood kerala curry keep Nazara patrons happy. Nazara means “beautiful scenery,” an apt description of the restaurant’s dining area. CARY MAGAZINE 85


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Rajbhog Café offers 100-percent halal dishes from across the Indian subcontinent, and an allyou-can-eat lunch buffet.

continued from page 85

Rajbhog Café

The café’s slogan, “a taste of India,” is appropriate, as diners take an eclectic culinary expedition across the subcontinent. Try the savory appetizer chaats from the west, tandoori dishes from the north or Bengali sweets from the east. An all-you-can-eat buffet is available at lunchtime daily and keeps customers coming back. “All our meats are 100 percent halal,” meaning prepared according to Islamic law, “including lamb, chicken and goat, whether it is from the buffet or ordered

from the menu,” said owner Deep Patel, originally from Gujarat. A market section contains prepackaged spices and nuts, while a spacious display case teems with exquisite specialty sweets like milk-based confections burfi and halwa and deep-fried jalebi, which is similar to funnel cake. “Sweets are made fresh daily,” said Patel. Rajbhog Café 3607 Davis Drive, #111, Morrisville (919) 585-5333 rajbhogcafe.menu continued on page 88


Spicing Things Up What happens when two successful information technology professionals meet and decide to pursue a food products venture? Ask Anupama Singh and Neha Avasthi, now neighbors and stay-at-home moms who completed a Planning the Entrepreneurial Venture class at Wake Tech and then launched the enterprising Apex Food Company. “We are women of Indian origin but have spent a long time here in the United States,” said Singh. Their products include Piaz gourmet onion relish and Zukti, a zesty, sweet-andsour tamarind sauce.

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“Our products are based on centuries-old Indian recipes, but they have evolved to suit American taste buds,” Singh revealed. “They are made to transform everyday foods like pizza, burgers, fries, wings and salads into gourmet specialties.” Piaz and Zukti, both certified Got to Be NC products, are available for purchase for $8.99 per bottle at apexfoodcompany.com.

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Saffron’s Nihari lamb shank is fall-off-the-bone tender thanks to a slow braise.

continued from page 86

Saffron Restaurant & Lounge

Maggy Award winner Saffron is no stranger to accolades. The upscale restaurant consistently churns out Indian delicacies refined by intricate culinary techniques. Acclaimed Executive Chef Manohar Arya finesses traditional and modern Indian dishes with aplomb. Try the satisfying bestseller chicken tikka masala, the Nihari lamb shank or the robust Andhra kingfish curry. Prefer vegetarian? Go for the dal Bukhara, or black lentil. “We have been in the heart of the RTP for 10 years, and our food attracts all types of clientele,” said owner and north India native Raj Tiwari. “We focus on providing fresh, healthy food every day.” It’s all served in a pristine, modern dining room with striking 20-foot ceilings. “We do not have typical Indian décor but more of a merger between the east and the west,” said Tiwari. Saffron presents a lunch buffet seven days a week. Save room for some rewarding carrot halwa pudding or mango mousse, as dessert. The Dahi Malai Kebab, a vegetarian dish featuring kebabs made with yogurt, cheese and pimentos.

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Saffron Restaurant & Lounge 4121 Davis Drive, Morrisville (919) 469-5774 saffronnc.com


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CARY MAGAZINE 89


restaurant row

[ a g u i d e t o d i n i n g a t w e s t e r n w a k e ’s b e s t r e s t a u r a n t s ]

Lucky 32 Shines Inside and Out WRITTEN BY DAVID MCCREARY PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

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Full service, al fresco dining is a springtime draw at Lucky 32 in Cary. On the menu? Grilled salmon and savory sides paired with pot liquor and cornbread, left, and Hickory Nut Gap-sourced pulled pork over Johnny cakes drizzled with voodoo sauce, below right.

WHEN IT COMES to outdoor dining there are patios, and then there is Lucky 32 Southern Kitchen’s terrace, quite possibly the ultimate al fresco oasis in Cary. The restaurant’s spacious, stone-imbued area features 27 umbrella-shaded tables surrounded by impeccably manicured gardens and understated iron railing. You’ll even find rosemary grown on site, and yes, it is used in the Lucky 32 kitchen. Revel in this serene, inviting spot while eating lunch, dinner or weekend brunch this spring. You’ll find it hard to believe you are dining just steps away from a bank, a hotel and even a large hospital. “We don’t consider the terrace an extra space or an afterthought, but we treat it just like a regular section inside the restaurant,” said affable General Manager Shane Garrity, who has worked in the Cary eatery for nearly 10 years. “We focus on providing the same attention to detail that we offer in the main dining room.” continued on page 93 CARY MAGAZINE 91


“We don’t consider the terrace an extra space or an afterthought, but we treat it just like a regular section inside the restaurant. We focus on providing the same attention to detail that we offer in the main dining room.” – Shane Garrity, General Manager

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Umbrella-shaded tables on the Lucky 32 terrace are surrounded by manicured gardens and iron rails; seating is first come, first served. Linger over dessert here, like the Petite Dessert Ensemble below, with grasshopper cheesecake (gluten-free made with European Schär cookie crust), peanut butter cream pie with graham cracker crust, and buttermilk chess pie with fruit coulis.

continued from page 91

Seating on the terrace is accessible on a first come, first served basis. Go early to have the best chance, especially weekdays at lunchtime when business is always bustling. Whether you enjoy core menu selections like the savory pulled pork on Johnny cakes, grilled salmon with Texas Pete glaze or a choice from the seasonal menu, you’ll appreciate first-rate, locally sourced cuisine. It’s Southern-inspired cookery with sensible, farm-to-table execution. “Many people are foodies and appreciate the seasonal changing menu,” said Garrity, who hails from Pittsburgh and moved to Cary to work with Lucky 32. “Just as many people come here because they love

the professional service, the ambiance and the convenient location.” A primary emphasis of the restaurant’s mission involves providing guests with the highest quality food and drink at a good value. “We hold ourselves accountable to this, and we’re also committed to buying local products, so the flavors are as fresh and nutritious as possible,” Garrity said. Among the restaurant’s North Carolina artisan suppliers are Old Mill of Guilford in Oak Ridge for grits; Goat Lady Dairy in Climax for chévre, which is goat cheese; Hickory Nut Gap in Fairview for pork and ground beef; and Pleasant Bee Honey in Raleigh. Felicia McMillan, executive chef and general manager of Lucky 32 in Greensboro, agrees that offering locally sourced ingredients is essential to fulfilling the restaurant’s core objective. “We love supporting local growers and purveyors,” she said. “It’s important to pay homage to our roots and also make awesome food.” Among the awesome fare this spring are fried green tomato eggs benedict with bacon for brunch; Bibb lettuce with Jerusalem artichoke (sunchoke) pickles; Little River, S.C.sourced she-crab soup topped with a touch of sherry by request; and Carolina mountain trout with redeye vinaigrette and crispy black-eyed peas. Then there’s the venerable pot liquor and cornbread. The cooking approach isn’t fussy, just delicious. Whatever you do, don’t leave without trying the versatile and habit-forming voodoo sauce. It’s also available for purchase in 16-ounce jars. Lucky 32 Southern Kitchen 7307 Tryon Road, Cary (919) 233-1632 lucky32.com

CARY MAGAZINE 93


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At his studio space at Liberty Arts in Durham, Christian Vagn Hansen is surrounded by works in progress and bits of scavenged metal that will go into future projects.

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in their

ELEMENTS Cary sculptors talk about nature and the importance of public art WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER • PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

W

hen thinking about outdoor activities, looking at sculpture is likely not the first thing that comes to mind. But local advocates of public art invite you to think again. “If things are out in public, they are a little more accessible; maybe you can touch it,” said Catherine J. Howard, executive director of Cary Visual Art. “Sculptures that have interesting textures are a great incentive and invitation to engage with the work physically. Many of the sculptors I know wholeheartedly want kids to climb on it, to touch it, to crawl through it — to engage with it. That’s what makes the work alive. Outdoor sculpture can be so alive.”

Cary sculptor Christian Vagn Hansen agrees. “People should be interacting with sculpture,” he said. “Sometimes people are intimidated by sculpture, but standing and looking at the piece isn’t the total experience.” Hansen and Phil Hathcock, another Cary sculptor, have had their work featured in the juried Cary Visual Art’s annual Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition — Hathcock in 2014 and 2015, Hansen in 2013 and 2014. And each relishes that moment when initial puzzlement turns to understanding. “When people interact with art, it expands their mind, their horizons,” said Hathcock. “I think it opens up a whole world for people who just see shopping malls, cars

In his outdoor workspace in Cary, Phil Hathcock arranges stones, wood and metal into intriguing sculptures. “We try to manipulate the stone no more than we have to to get the point across,” he says.

continued on page 99

CARY MAGAZINE 97


In his Durham studio, Hansen uses a variety of techniques — heating, pounding and grinding — to shape metal into forms inspired by nature. “Trying to create natural, rounded forms in metal is a challenge,” he admits.

“Material isn’t what drives me, not metal for the sake of metal. It’s all about the finished product. I use whatever is the best material for the piece.” Hansen’s “Harlequin” was part of the 2014-2015 CVA Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition. It is now on display in Chapel Hill. 98

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— Christian Vagn Hansen, Cary sculptor


continued from page 97

and traffic — and then they see this piece. Whether they like it or not, it really doesn’t matter.” “I like making things that people have to stop, look at and figure out a little bit,” said Hansen. Although different in their approaches, both Hathcock and Hansen draw inspiration from the natural world. So their work, in particular, seems at home in an outdoor setting. Christian Vagn Hansen

Although he has drawn and painted since he was a child, Hansen didn’t start making sculpture until five years ago. A neighbor talked him into attending an informal metal-working event in Moncure, N.C., led by Kevin Eichner, sculptor and art director at the Moncure Museum of Art. “All of a sudden I was in love with building something of a permanent nature,” said Hansen. He learned to weld and manipulate metal, and has since participated in castings, in which artists catch molten ore in sand molds. He still works primarily in metal, although that is not his only medium. “Material isn’t what drives me, not metal for the sake of metal,” he said. “It’s all about the finished product. I use whatever is the best material for the piece.” Hansen owns Abodia, a property management firm, and spends his spare time at his Liberty Arts studio space in Durham. He calls the environment “a great facility to explore things,” and appreciates that he can ask his fellow artists for help with thorny issues. “Much of my inspiration comes from nature — seeds and pods,” he said. “Nature is the best builder, plus it’s aesthetically pleasing in its design and natural architecture. Although trying to create natural, rounded forms in metal is a challenge.” He describes muscling a metal rod

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into a complex s-curve to suggest the gentle slope of a seed pod. Nearby, a huge abstract flower dips low on a graceful stem, its head comprised of many smaller parts, bringing to mind a dandelion seed head or hydrangea bloom. “The larger pieces are more about the overall feeling they give,” Hansen said. “They are abstract in nature, but somehow familiar. The smaller, more whimsical pieces have to have something that catches someone’s eye. They still have to have that certain elegance. I look at a picture of a real bird, and the shape of the neck brings the idea of a bird to mind.” He attributes his fascination with sleek, efficient forms to his Danish parents and the Scandinavian furnishings of his childhood home. “I want to create an effect with as little as possible,” he said. “There’s a certain elegance to creating an impression with as few pieces as possible.” Phil Hathcock

A self-taught artist, Hathcock has worked with stone all his life. For years he and his father sold stone for construction and landscaping. Now Hathcock owns Natural Stone Sculptures, a Cary landscaping business that specializes in Japanesestyle gardens. “The landscape work we do is closely intertwined; even the hobbies that I do are closely intertwined with the work I do,” he said. “It’s pretty much a life of art and nature.” In his spare time Hathcock enjoys hiking along riverbeds, searching for fossils, gemstones, and Native American artifacts of all kinds, especially carved arrowheads and stone tools. He is inspired by the skillful shaping of one stone with another. This love for nature aligns with his appreciation of Eastern design. Hathcock says he is inspired by the work of Isamu Noguchi, a sculptor, furniture designer and landscape architect who was one of the first to


Phil Hathcock has worked with stone all his life, and now owns Natural Stone Sculptures, a Cary landscaping business that specializes in Japanese-style gardens. His business and his hobbies are intertwined. “It’s pretty much a life of art and nature,” he says.

“When people interact with art, it expands their mind, their horizons.” — Phil Hathcock, Cary Sculptor use the natural shape of stones in his work. “I work with the stone as little as possible,” said Hathcock. “We’ll go to quarries in western North Carolina and we may look through a million tons of big stones that are the waste product of quarrying for stone flooring. We look through them to pick out one that might be a set of wings for a butterfly.” Once he finds that one stone in a milcontinued on page 102 CARY MAGAZINE 101


UPCOMING CVA EVENTS MARCH 26: Sketching with the Sculptures APRIL 24-JUNE 12: Yoga with the Sculptures, 2-3 p.m. Sundays MAY 6: ‘CVA Collects’ Barbeque, 5-9 p.m. in downtown Cary ■ For more information about these and other Cary Visual Art events, visit caryvisualart.org ■ To see more of Hathcock’s work, visit naturalstonesculptures.com ■ To see more of Hansen’s work, visit christianvagnhansen.com

continued from page 101

lion, he and his assistant will haul it back to the open-air studio. He will assess the rock, moving it around, pairing it with other stones, or adding metal to enhance its shape or display it to the best effect. Importance of public art

Phil Hathcock and his team install his sculpture, “Windstone,” in downtown Cary in July. The piece, constructed of slate, aluminum, copper and brass, will be on display until June 17.

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Hathcock’s piece “Windstone,” constructed of slate, aluminum, copper and brass, will be on display in downtown Cary until June 17. The CVA invites the public to come out and experience this and other sculptures, placed along Academy Street. “Since public art is often a surprise — you just run across it — it really helps you to open your eyes and see a little bit more of what is happening around you,” said Howard, of CVA. Both artists appreciate the opportunity to have their work displayed in the community. “I give CVA a lot of credit for creating opportunities for artists and to the town for its support of public art,” said Hansen. “It’s great seeing people’s reaction to the art.” When art is in public spaces, more people have a chance to interact with it, they say. “It’s more about getting something natural and beautiful out for people to enjoy,” said Hathcock. “In art, it’s definitely not about the money. It’s just about letting people enjoy it.” t


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Scenes from the 2015 Art in Bloom; this year’s event offers lavish floral exhibits, workshops, and a family-friendly scavenger hunt.

Welcome Spring With

Art in Bloom WRITTEN BY NANCY PARDUE

PHOTOS COURTESY OF N.C. MUSEUM OF ART

A 2015 master class is led by Shane Connolly.

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Blend springtime and flowers, and the result is pure art. Especially at the North Carolina Museum of Art, where 56 floral masterpieces created by world-class designers will be yours for the gazing beginning April 7, during the second annual Art in Bloom festival. “After last year’s successful launch of Art in Bloom, we are thrilled to host this flowerfilled festival for our visitors once again,” said NCMA Director Lawrence J. Wheeler. “This year we have exciting new speakers, a different group of creative and talented floral designers, and even more works of art to be interpreted as beautiful floral arrangements.

“It’s the perfect event to welcome spring.” At Art in Bloom you can go beyond perusing the lavish works on exhibit to learn from locally and internationally-renowned floral artists, in workshops and classes ranging from Bonsai for Beginners to Edible Landscapes, to Your DIY Wedding. Take a master class and enjoy lunch alongside French-born Olivier Giugni, pioneer of the leaf-wrapped vase that adds depth and movement to his creations. Or follow celebrity wedding designer David Beahm as he presents Extraordinary Flowers, Extraordinary Destinations. And get up-close with Raleigh de-


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Master Class and Lunch Friday, April 8 10:30 a.m. Presentation: Bloom Where You’re Planted Friday, April 8 3 p.m.

Hands-on workshops and classes are open to all skill levels.

OLIVIER GIUGNI ART IN BLOOM When: April 7-10 Where: North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh

Designer Hitomi Gilliam presents at the 2015 Art in Bloom.

signer Steve Taras of Watered Garden Florist as he combines earthy elements with beautiful blooms in his presentation, Re-creating Nature. Don’t be shy — no floral or artistic knowledge is required to attend these Art in Bloom events. In small, hands-on classes, instructors will work with students of all skill levels. Other highlights of Art in Bloom include Papermaking from the NCMA Landscape; Impressions of an Heirloom Garden; and Bloom Where You’re Planted, a handson class with floral photographer Ashley Woodson Bailey. For the family

More good news: This four-day fest is not just for grown-ups. For example, families can take part in a clue-filled, self-guided scavenger hunt appropriate for ages 5 and older, aimed at helping children make personal connections with art, and complete with interactive drawing components.

Admission: $10 for museum members, $15 for nonmembers, free for children 6 and younger. Additional fees apply for select events. For the full schedule: ncartmuseum.org

And in a parent-child workshop led by Cydney Davis English of The English Garden in Raleigh, kids 5 to 14 can create floral designs in pottery. “It’s an opportunity for a shared art-making experience with an expert floral designer,” said Laura McManus, NCMA youth and family program coordinator. “We will select a vibrant palette of flowers and foliage inspired by the colors and textures of art in the museum’s collection. Using these elements, we will create a modern, Biedermeier-influenced design playing off the color wheel.” Families can also collaborate in creating origami and paper flowers, with a little help from museum staff. The goal of these family activities — and the entire festival, is simple. “It’s to provide a meaningful and memorable visit to the NCMA,” McManus said, “through hands-on, active learning.” t

Master Class and Lunch Thursday, April 7 10:30 a.m. Presentation: Living Art Thursday, April 7 3 p.m.

CYDNEY DAVIS ENGLISH Parent-Child Floral Workshop: Blooms and Brushstrokes Sunday, April 10 2 p.m.

STEVE TARAS Presentation: Re-Creating Nature Thursday, April 7 10:30 a.m. Presentation: Celebrating with Flowers Sunday, April 10 3 p.m.

DAVID BEAHM Master Class and Lunch Saturday, April 9 10:30 a.m. Presentation: Extraordinary Flowers, Extraordinary Destinations Saturday, April 9 3 p.m.

CARY MAGAZINE 107


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charity spotlight

WRITTEN BY NANCY PARDUE PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Jack “The Hammer” Yarborough has been playing in Miracle League of the Triangle since its founding in 2006. He’s earned the moniker for his power swing, which consistently sends the ball over the fence.

BATTER UP PLAYERS NEVER strike out, are guaranteed to score a run, and get to choose their own walk-up tunes. That’s how things work at Miracle League of the Triangle, where children and adults with special needs experience the thrill of crossing home plate. “I’m Jack, ‘The Hammer,’” said Jack Yarborough of Cary, a nickname he’s earned for his power swing, which consistently 110

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Miracle League of the Triangle

sends the ball over the fence. Jack’s dad and team coach, Frank Yarborough, said, “The Miracle League has been life changing for us. It’s such a great time. The kids believe in themselves, and baseball is a tool for them to achieve amazing things.” Established in Cary in 2006 by businessmen Robin Rose and Tony Withers, the nonprofit is one of 250 Miracle League organizations worldwide offering America’s

favorite pastime to those with special needs, in a safe, accepting environment. “Kids are celebrated here,” said Director of Baseball Operations Cyndy Vagle, who’s mom to player Aaron. “What I like best is that it encourages kids to achieve at their maximum level, and puts big smiles on their faces. “Everybody becomes a big family, and makes connections,” she added. “Parents of


special needs children are used to fighting for their kids. I tell them, ‘You don’t have to advocate here — relax. We’re here to serve you.’ There’s that level of acceptance.” Vagle recalls one Miracle League player who halted a game in order to allow another child to complete his first-ever trip around the bases on foot rather than in a wheelchair. “There was so much cheering, and not a dry eye in the place,” Vagle said. “Thousands of miracle moments happen on this field.” For Emily Wollum of Cary, dubbed “Violin Girl” for her off-field musical pursuits, Miracle League has become a family endeavor: Dad Steve coaches, mom Tonya cheers, and brother Christopher serves as her buddy — each player is paired with a volunteer buddy during games. “The league is great for families,” Steve said, “and it lets kids be kids.” Get In the game

Serving about 400 players each season, ages 5 and up, the Triangle league in 2015 also launched adult play and a competitive camp. Executive Director Benjy Capps, who began his Miracle League journey in 2006 as a volunteer on behalf of his son, Micah, says two goals led to the creation of the adult league. “One was (to give) the adult population of people with special needs a chance to experience the same things youth do: To belong to a team, enjoy some baseball, and gain confidence as well as exercise. “Two, our senior league was too full, as it was originally set up for high school players,” Capps added. “We had over 20 players who had graduated but still wanted to be part of the league. This opened more spots in the senior league to be filled by players waiting to move up and new players. “We’ve also introduced the Advanced Players Academy, to give the more competitive players a place to learn and play games.”

At bat is Emily “Violin Girl” Wollum, so dubbed for her off-field musical pursuits. Miracle League of the Triangle is a family affair for the Wollums: Emily’s brother Christopher serves as catcher during this impromptu practice session and her buddy during games, while dad Steve pitches.

Pictured from left are Jack Yarborough, Executive Director Benjy Capps, Director of Baseball Operations Cyndy Vagle, and Emily Wollum.

Vagle manages the league’s volunteers, including 150 coaches, a crucial part of Miracle League of the Triangle. “We utilize over 6,000 volunteer hours per year and 1,000 individual volunteers. They are very important to our program and how it runs,” Capps said. From local high school and college baseball teams serving as player buddies, to a 75-year-old coaching grandpa, volunteers ages 12 and older lend a hand on game days and at special events. Training is provided.

MIRACLE LEAGUE The spring season launches on March 22 for adults and April 1 for youth. For more information on becoming a volunteer, sponsor or player in the league where no one sits the bench, visit miracleleagueofthetriangle.com.

CARY MAGAZINE 111


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happenings

Photographed by Jonathan Fredin

The Best of Western Wake gathered in downtown Cary on Feb. 4,

for their favorite people and places in the Maggy Awards, always

as Cary Magazine and The Mayton Inn welcomed the 2016 Maggy

with an emphasis on “local.” Honorees enjoyed sneak-peek tours

Awards winners for a celebration of community. Each year since

of the new inn and its culinary offerings, and took part in a raffle

2006, Cary Magazine readers by the thousands cast their votes

benefiting Dorcas Ministries. Here’s a look at some of the fun!

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happenings THE SOUTHERN WOMEN’S SHOW

Applications are now open for the

Friends of the Page-Walker Hotel History Scholarship, awarded annually to a high school senior who is a Cary resident, and who exhibits an aptitude and interest in the study of history and the humanities. The $750 award may be used for any educational

will take place April 22-24 at the North Carolina State Fairgrounds in Raleigh. The event features celebrity guests, shopping and workshops on food,

CINÉBISTRO at Waverly Place has donated $3,298 to the Kay Yow Cancer Fund, marking 50 percent

fashion, beauty, health and fitness, business, home, travel and more. southernshows.com/WRA

of proceeds from sales of pink-colored cocktails named The Cure and Pink

Bond Park Community Center

related expenses. Deadline to apply is

Flower, as well as a Raspberry Almond

May 9. friendsofpagewalker.org

Joy dessert. The nonprofit Fund works

Hayes: Whimsical Travels, a solo

to raise funds for women’s cancer

art exhibit by the Chapel Hill-based

research. Pictured, Kay Yow Cancer

mixed media artist, March 1 through

Fund Executive Director Stephanie

April 30. The free exhibit features

Glance, center, with CinéBistro sales

colorful designs based on cities

and events manager Tara Schaup and

and inspirations from nature. Bond

Parkside Main St. Owner/operator

general manager Jim Russo. cinebistro.

Community Center is at 801 High House

of the Cary store is James Fisher. The

com/waverly

Road in Cary. cinchayes.com

Set to open its second Triangle location in March is

Chuy’s Tex-

Mex, at Parkside Commons, 1035 restaurant has selected the Inter-Faith

will present Cinc

Nazim Hikmet Poetry Competition

Food Shuttle as its official charity

The eighth annual

partner, and will support its BackPack

will be held on Sunday, April 10 at the Page-Walker Arts & History Center in Cary,

Buddies program through food and

during National Poetry Month. This year’s festival will honor the poet Rumi in addition

monetary donations and fundraising

to the winners of the poetry contest, and include music and a Turkish feast. Admission is

opportunities. chuys.com

free. nazimhikmetpoetryfestival.org

Follower of Bernard van Orley, “The Pentecost,” circa 1530, oil on panel; courtesy of NCMA.

NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART presents Actual State, a rare

Now through July 9, the

opportunity for visitors to watch a conservator restore a painting in the galleries. On select days during the exhibition, NCMA conservator of paintings Noelle Ocon will bring back to life damaged 16th century Flemish painting The Pentecost, a process normally completed only in the conservation lab. Actual State will be the first in a series of permanent collection focus exhibitions highlighting the work of the NCMA’s Conservation Department. ncartmuseum.org

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happenings

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published his novel, The Frost and the Belle, a suspense thriller about a father’s desperate attempt to keep his son with autism alive after a tragedy during a family camping trip. Mathis is a service dog trainer and the operator of nonprofit, Ry-Con Service Dogs, for children with autism. The book is available at Amazon. com. ry-con.com

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happenings The Selects Hockey prospect development program has selected 12-year-old

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Sculpture artists from across the nation are invited to participate in the

2016 CARY VISUAL ART OUTDOOR SCULPTURE EXHIBITION, July 15, 2016 through June 16, 2017. This exhibition offers artists the opportunity to display their sculptures throughout downtown Cary. Deadline for entry is March 21. Also, the application period for the second annual CVA Young Cary Artist Scholarship Program runs through March 21, offering $2,500 scholarships to high school seniors to pursue the arts in college. caryvisualart.org 118

MARCH/APRIL 2016


happenings

Hunt for Hope Raleigh will take

The second annual

place on May 7 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Rally Point Sports Grill in Cary, located at

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1837 N. Harrison Ave. A family-friendly scavenger hunt, the event raises money toward research for a fatal disease known

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Giving Back Being a Junior Achievement volunteer is a great opportunity to give something back to the community.

2016 Rock ‘n’ Roll Raleigh Marathon, ½ Marathon & 5K, which will take place on April 9-10 in downtown Raleigh. All participants are welcome to join

TEAM V, the foundation’s official

Let Their Success Be Your Inspiration! 4900 Waters Edge Drive, Suite 175 ∙ Raleigh, NC 27606

(919) 821-2100 ∙ www.jaoenc.org

endurance training and fundraising team. Net proceeds of Team V will be awarded to cancer research and related programs. New this year, Team V members are eligible to participate in the 5K and Remix Challenge, offering the chance to win four medals

townofcary.org

throughout race weekend. run4v.org

Now through April 25 at 5 p.m., register

En Plein Air: Paint the Town, for Cary’s third annual

which will take place on May 7. Artists can register at the Cary Arts Center, 101 Dry Ave., or download the entry form at townofcary.org. CARY MAGAZINE 119


happenings MICHAEL TOVE of Cary has teamed up with retirement experts from across the country to co-author a new book titled, “What You Don’t Know About

Liz McDonald has been appointed as the general manager of Koka Booth Amphitheatre in Cary, bringing more than a decade of experience with a variety of entertainment venues and touring productions. Most recently she served

Retirement Income

as facility director for SMG theatre venues in Jacksonville, Fla., but has ties to the

Can Hurt You!” Tove,

Triangle, where she attended Enloe High School and performed with the North

also president and

Carolina Theatre. McDonald replaces Becky Colwell, who was recently appointed

founder of Cary financial planning

general manager of The Greek Theatre in Los Angeles. boothamphitheatre.com

firm AIN Services, contributes his expertise in two chapters, Markets, Required Minimum Distributions, And The 4% Rule, and How Healthcare Cost Impacts Retirement Planning. The book is available on Amazon.com.

Engineering, planning and consulting services firm Jonathan Fredin

Michael Baker International has appointed Robert “Bobby” Lewis, P.E., to oversee the company’s offices in Cary, Asheville, Greensboro and Charlotte, which

MR. HANDYMAN of

serve as the home for nearly 70 engineering,

Western Wake County, owned by Bruce

design, aviation and planning experts.

and Robin Foster, has earned the

This appointment comes as a number of North Carolina’s key metropolitan areas anticipate substantial population growth in the coming decades. Lewis spent nearly 25 years with the NCDOT, where he spearheaded legislative revenue reform efforts to increase NCDOT’s annual budget.

service industry’s coveted Angie’s List Super Service Award. Award recipients have met strict eligibility requirements, which include an A rating in overall grade, recent grade and review period grade. The company must be in good standing with Angie’s List, pass a background check and abide by Angie’s List operational guidelines. mrhandyman.com/western-wake-county

mbakerintl.com

THE TOWN OF CARY has awarded 31 local nonprofits a total of $35,000 in grant funding from the 2015 Lazy Daze Arts & Crafts Festival. Since its inception in 1980, the Lazy Daze Arts & Crafts Festival has awarded more than $600,000 to the community. This year, Lazy Daze will expand to two days on Town Hall Campus, Aug. 27-28. For a list of grant recipients, search “Lazy Daze Grants” at townofcary.org.

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MARCH/APRIL 2016


Retirement Planning • Investment and Wealth Management • Annuities

Find Us Here

As a retired Marine Corps Officer, I have always focused on achieving my objectives and accomplishing the mission to help others and my family. With the breadth and depth of services provided by Raymond James, and working together as a team with me as a financial advisor, there is much we can accomplish to prepare for the future for yourself and for your family.

Harris Teeter Kroger Food Lion Downtown Apex FastMed Urgent Care Cary Amtrak

Raymond James & Associates Brendan Michael Rodden

N.C. Farmers Market Cary Public Library Mellow Mushroom ... and many more local businesses View all pickup locations at www.carymagazine.com/ Find-Us-Locations

Financial Advisor

Brendan.Rodden@RaymondJames.com 919.784.8347 3700 Glenwood Avenue, Suite 250, Raleigh, NC 27612

Raymond James & Associates, Inc. Member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC

Life and Disability Insurance • Education Planning/529 Plans • Tax Strategies

The Moving Truck is Leaving! Are you ready to learn about your new community?

Your local welcome team is ready to visit you with a basket full of maps, civic information, gifts, and gift certificates from local businesses. From doctors to dentists and restaurants to repairmen...we help newcomers feel right at home in their new community! For your complimentary welcome visit, or to include a gift for newcomers, call 919.218.8149. Or, visit our website, www.nnws.org.

CARY | APEX | MORRISVILLE | HOLLY SPRINGS | FUQUAY-VARINA | GARNER ANGIER | WILLOW SPRING | CLAYTON | CLEVELAND CARY MAGAZINE 121


write light

BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Big Sky A dramatic convergence of clouds, contrails and sunbeams create an otherworldly backdrop as a couple walks the dam at Fred G. Bond Metro Park in Cary.

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MARCH/APRIL 2016


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Cary Magazine March/April 2016  

Travel and Outdoors: N.C. mountains, plan for birds and bees, benefits of hiking

Cary Magazine March/April 2016  

Travel and Outdoors: N.C. mountains, plan for birds and bees, benefits of hiking