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car ter j. daniel portfolio


Con t e n ts Self-Directed Thesis •4-13 Database Natures • 14-19 Royal Danish Fish Collection • 20-25 Experience Jaguar • 26-31 Camp Bledsoe • 32-37 UT Agriculture Extension •38-39 Photography • 40-47


carter j. daniel intern architect e : carter.daniel13@gmail.com e : cdanie27@vols.utk.edu p : (423) 619 - 8377 i : carterdaniel13 w : https://bluedaniel13.wixsite.com/arch

statement

employment

I am a graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Design. Architecture is quickly becoming a field integrated with many professions, and as a designer I have always had an interest in pushing the architectural discourse to its limits while finding new ways to influence and analyze the way people experience their environment.

@elemi architects [chattanooga, tn] : summer 2012, 2013, 2014 : spring 2017 : urban, commercial, residential design through all phases

@surface architecture [chattanooga, tn] : summer 2015, 2016 : residential/spec home design and website design

@chattanooga engineering group [chattanooga, tn]

education

: summer 2013, 2014 : civil engineer intern

@university of tennessee coad [knoxville, tn] : : : : :

fall 2013 - spring 2018 bachelors of architecture (thesis 5th year) teaching assistant (4 semesters) faculty letter of commendation 2018 gpa - 3.5

@bauhaus - weimar university [weimar, germany] : : : :

summer 2017 prof. Jorg Springer international advanced architectural design program utk study abroad

@free school of architecture

[la, california]

: [potential] summer 2018

skills >digital : adobe creative suite : photoshop/illustrator/ indesign/premier/ after effects : autodesk suite : revit/autocad : 3DS max : rhino/grasshopper : microsoft office suite

>analog : : : : :

mandarin chinese (5 years) film photography eagle scout model making sketching


Inform at i o n Ag e o f H ys t e r i a

Project Preface: The following pages are excerpts from a booklet produced in preparation for the 5th year bachelor thesis studio. The booklet is composed of “zines� produced throughout the semester, each documenting the research, critique, and graphics being compiled for future use. The topics range from manifestos to famous advertising, interviews with designers, and architecture theory critique. The booklet intended to establish an account of the current state of the architecture discourse, and develop a response/manifesto as a datum to base following projects.

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5th Year•1st Semester

How To Dismantle An Atomic

an•arch•y a•revolution

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carter•daniel

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Inform at i o n Ag e o f H ys t e r i a

READ-ME : To begin with, these “zines” serve a multi-faceted purpose, all in relation to the current state of the design discourse. The first is method of analysis and collection needed to discuss the continuum today. The second purpose is purely a reflection upon the current state of the architecture profession as I, an architecture student, see it today. The work in this compiled “zine” is based on, and responds to many critiques of architecture. The work tries to situate itself in the line of prophetic, polemic works that emerged in times when architecture seemed lost. Through collecting, compiling, culling, and collaging fragments of arguments from antiquity to today, this work attempts to sort through the splintered conversation around architecture and design.

How-to : The following pages contain a series of ways to navigate the book. Each mash-up accentuates a thesis or a line of thinking important to the collective argument.

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see this area for wayfinding through the zine


5th Year•1st Semester

see this area for wayfinding through the zine

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Inform at i o n Ag e o f H ys t e r i a

To all, I would like to use this preface to provide some answers as to why this book is sitting on your desk. Since starting architecture school, I have tried to immerse myself in the current state of design society as much as possible. As some of you know though, this is a tricky task. How can we find our way in a messy, uncoordinated, and frankly unconcerned design continuum? Where do we fit in? How can we help? It is crucial before I continue that I take a second to recognize my own lack of credibility in this crazy world of architecture and that I choose to see it not as a hindrance, but as a strength in relation to this topic. The reason, I will explain later. That being said, I would implore you to humor me for the rest of this letter and then and only then weigh its credibility and content. What What What What

to to to to

collect? steal? shun? start?

These questions seems more poignant than ever in terms of the discourse of design today. In what seems to be an era of new eclecticism, what should architecture look like? Is a style necessary or have we moved past such ideas into a new epoch? Where are we going?

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5th Year•1st Semester

What designers should be focused on now more than ever is a culture of quality over quantity. Plain and simple. An anarchy must occur against a society of mass media and the bombardment of opinions. The majority of society today sees ideas skin deep instead of through thorough examination, and this paradigm must be shifted. The rise of social media and celebrities has allowed anyone and everyone to share uninformed opinions with faux credibility to unassuming ears. This is especially true in our profession. Architecture has been pushed to polarization and has left quality behind in the dust. On one hand star-chitects have become the sit-com of the profession, while big box stores are building infinite planes of fake brick veneer to contain our thirst for quantity. How did this schism occur? We as students and academics have a unique perspective, while maybe naive, unfettered by the business of what design has become. For us, architecture and design is pure. A perfect culmination of stolen ideas, life experiences, and intention. It is born from a place of true intent to create something of quality. We will never be content with work that warrants a complacent “good”, or a project that doesn’t start a fight. What happens if pure architecture isn’t just in school? What happens if projects arise that don’t play by the rules?

pg.50

pg.85/86

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Inform at i o n Ag e o f H ys t e r i a

11 Points of Architecture? 1. Pilotis - Replacement of supporting walls by a grid of reinforced concrete columns that bears the structural load is the basis of the new aesthetic. 2. How can we stimulate the creation of wealth? 3. The free design of the faรงade-separating the exterior of the building from its structural function-sets the faรงade free from structural constraints. 4. It should be useful and function well for the people using it. 5. How can we increase the number of people participating in the creation of wealth?

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5th Year•1st Semester

6. Roof gardens on a flat roof can serve a domestic purpose while providing essential protection to the concrete roof. 7. The free designing of the ground plan-the absence of supporting walls-means the house is unrestrained in its internal use. 8. How can we make sure people are obeying the rules? 9. It should stand up robustly and remain in good condition. 10. How can we compensate those who have not benefited from the wealth creation? 11. It should delight people and raise their spirits.

pg.27/28

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Inform at i o n Ag e o f H ys t e r i a On The Second Chance : Digital culture ushered in a new wave of machines and technologies built to increase our speed and efficiency in everything we do. This included the addition of concepts like cut, copy, paste, undo, redo, and etc into our vocabulary. With transistors and capacitors composing short term RAM (Random access memory) poised to never wear out, digital workflows are free to adapt to these easy shortcuts. What does this mean to the architectural discourse which prides itself on an artistic conscious and high quality craft? Computer aided design softwares have taken the place of drafting boards and pencils and negate the time it takes to draw a line. This in turn has led to a second chance fear or more commonly FOMO (fear of missing out). Whereas classical ways of learning “creation of space” tend to put a heavy focus on “getting it right” the first time, new systems have allowed for close estimation initially with fine refinements later. While sometimes this process can yield quality end results, these refinements are often left uncompleted and rough. Programs like Revit have become more management systems then design tools and never force the user to make a decision on spatial implications to further the scheme. The material of a wall and the thickness associated with it could be a central design elements of a project, and could be changed with the click of a button in late stages of the design process. The ability to iterate numerous variations is not inherently an issue, but the fact that the door is open to these changes, inherently complicates the creative workflow. We as students are at the crossing roads of the new technology of the day and the status quo of education. It is our job to determine which technology and which methods make it into workflows in a new age.

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5th Year•1st Semester

End of Jaydiohead

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Datab ase N at ure s • P i g e o n Fo rg e

“Junkspace represents a reverse typology of cumulative, approximative identity, less about kind than about quantity. But form-less-ness is still form, the formless also a typology . . . “ Rem Koolhaas•Junkspace

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5th Year•1st Semester

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Datab ase N at ure s • P i g e o n Fo rg e

Database Natures is an exploration into paraurban systems, using Pigeon Forge, Tennessee as a base camp. It explores what happens when nothing is immune to capitalism.

Golden Views

Tree Top Experiences

Crispy Ranges

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5th Year•1st Semester

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Datab ase N at ure s • P i g e o n Fo rg e

Dynamic Drawings were used to convey the fragmented accumulation of identities at different identified locations in Pigeon Forge.

Iconography was grafted into a framework meant to represent the highly flexible economicturned-spatial construct in Pigeon Forge. This system has created adjacencies indicative of the current condition.

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5th Year•1st Semester

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Den Kon g el i g e D a n s ke F i s ke s a m li ng

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Bauhaus Semester

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Den Kon g el i g e D a n s ke F i s ke s a m li ng

Den Kongelige Danske Fiskesamling (Royal Danish Fish Collection) is located in Copenhagen, Denmark and is a proposal for a new gallery for live and preserved fish. The design separates the types of displays into a plan for live fish and a tower for the preserved collection. This was done to allow for two distinct atmospheres, each tailored to the program. The below grade plane maximizes the experience of being underwater, and surrounds the occupant with aquariums of Scandinavian fish. The tower is lit through cuts on the brick facade and reflects a more classical atmosphere.

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Bauhaus Semester

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Den Kon g el i g e D a n s ke F i s ke s a m li ng

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Bauhaus Semester

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Exp erien ce J agu a r

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4th Year•1st Semester

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Exp erien ce J agu a r

Located just north of San Francisco on California’s famed Highway 1, the Experience Jaguar Center sits imposing on the rolling coast. A beautiful sleek object in the landscape, it houses and mimics the machines it holds inside. The Jaguar car brand prides itself on its ability to design complex, intricate machines contained in inspiring and beautiful forms. The parti of The Center creates a frame and an infinite plane to juxtapose the automobiles and their intended landscape. The two interior slices, above and below The Forum, contain the other necessary experience center program.

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4th Year•1st Semester

The Center operates as a machine, with program components on crane systems to engage or disengage The Forum floor. The top floor is used as a fly space, or holding area, for components such as brand history, technological innovation, model highlights, etc. The lower floor holds the garage and automobile storage and has access to the test track above through platform elevators.

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Exp erien ce J agu a r

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4th Year•1st Semester

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C a mp B l edso e

Camp Bledsoe is located in the heart of rural Appalachia on the site of New Deal CCC Camp. In order to continue the history and work that the site has hosted, the camp is a reflection of Appalachian architecture. The scheme contains apartments and studios for artists and designers in residency. The occupants would participate in educational outreach to the community in order to preserve the cultural identity of the area.

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3rd Year•1st Semester

An existing barn on the site is incorporated into the design as a public center for artistic or scientific studies. The main site is the center of a region sized network of trails and outposts that highlight significant features.

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C a mp B l edso e

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3rd Year•1st Semester

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C a mp B l edso e

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3rd Year•1st Semester

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U n iversi t y o f Te n n e ss e e • A g r i c u l t ure Ex t e nsi on

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3rd Year•2nd Semester

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Pho tog raphy • 35 m m

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Weimar, Germany 2017

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Pho tog raphy • 35 m m

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Weimar, Germany 2017

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Pho tog raphy • 35 m m

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France Tour 2017

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Pho tog raphy • 35 m m

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France Tour 2017

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Carter Daniel Portfolio  
Carter Daniel Portfolio  
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