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POR FOLO CARSON ALEXANDER DRAIN

G R A D U AT E

AR CHIT ECT UR E 2014-16


Letter of Motivation. I believe architecture should have life . It should be empathetic towards the cultural values of a c o m m u n i t y, y e t c h a l l e n g e w h a t i s c o n v e n t i o n a l i n o r d e r t o p r o g r e s s a n d b e t t e r a s o c i e t y. I t s h o u l d a d d r e s s t h e changing lifestyles of the new millennial and interact with the beliefs of the past. This is my philosophy that I have striven to adhere to during my architectural studies. The concept of fluidity; that is being able to change and adapt to the social circumstance and immediate environment. This is also a motivator for wanting to travel over seas to study and wor k, gaining a new perspective on design and living environments that are are half a world apar t from New Zealand, and how to adapt and proffer new ideas and influences. My final semester was a self-initiated explorator y concept designing a school in a remote, rural area of Nepal in the Himalayans with strong ties to New Zealand (the school was funded by NZ climber Sir Edmund Hillar y). Khumjung Village School (1961) is situated at an altitude of 4,000 metres and was damaged in the 2015 Nepalese ear thquake. The proposal was to design a program where the replacement school could be integrated within the community as a m u l t i f u n c t i o n i n g e n t i t y. W i t h o u t m o n e y, t h e c o m m u n i t y could collaboratively build together to create something of cultural, educational and technological significance. The obstacles to such a project included the high altitude which makes wor king conditions difficult for contractor s unused to the altitude, isolated mountainous terrain; a five day trek from the road and light aircraft access, a firmly engrained caste system and religious differences, seismic activity coupled with primitive construction techniques and a limited scope of construction materials, low socio economic and wealth diver sity with a fickle governmental influence. As illustrated in my por tfolio submission, my architectural proposal addresses these parameters through design and execution intent. I video-inter viewed a prominent educator and climber who was involved in the Khumjung School education programs and the Himalayan Tr u s t F o u n d a t i o n , t o g a i n a n i n s i g h t i n t o t h e c u l t u r a l , s o c i a l and educational circumstance of the area. For that project I won the JASMAX sustainability design award.

I am per sonally invested in how architecture evolves in extreme environments; reaching adulthood and studying at secondar y and ter tiar y levels in a disaster zone. My hometown in Christchurch, New Zealand was devastated by a series of ear thquakes from 2010 with a magnitude of 7.1 on the Richter scale. I experienced fir sthand what it was to be in a difficult urban environment where for about five year s the architectural development was stagnant and poetr y was found instead in what was coined as ‘transitional architecture;’ temporar y installations which under challenging political, economic and social circumstance, flourished and extr uded optimism. This difficult environment where growth was simultaneously over shadowed by demolition and the p o i g n a n t r e m i n d e r o f d a n g e r, w a s a n i n t e r e s t i n g j u x t a p o s i t i o n that informed my design of a transitional business hub in the fir st semester of year three -a brief of my own writing. The challenge of design in an environment where land is unstable, the urban surroundings are precarious and there is little infrastructure and funding prompted the design of a temporar y pavilion constr ucted entirely from recycled materials by the stakeholders themselves who had little m o n e t a r y i n v e s t m e n t t o o f f e r. T h i s w a s a n i n v a l u a b l e d e s i g n experience which informed my initiative in designing a educational faculty in rural Nepal. As indicated, I am passionate about renewable, sustainable architecture . I believe that architecture should have the ability to adapt and grow as an organisation or entity changes, reforming the consumerist and throwaway attitude o f o u r s o c i e t y. I ’ m i n t e r e s t e d i n h o w t h i s p h i l o s o p h y a p p l i e s in extreme environments where often the built environments a r e v e r n a c u l a r, c o n s t r u c t e d w i t h l o c a l c r a f t s m a n s h i p a n d technology; and also investigating how architecture can be progress with the integration of outsourced technologies a n d p h i l o s o p h y, w h i l e s t i l l r e s p e c t i n g a n t h r o p o l o g i c a l v a l u e s . I have enclosed my application as per your recommendations and I thank your for the oppor tunity to progress in the world of architectural design.

Carson Drain


NDEX

K H U M J U N G V I L L AG E SCHOOL

P A V I L L I O N B U S I N E S S H U B

C O N T E R M P O R Y A R T G A L L L E R Y

H I L L S I D E R E S I D E N C E

M O D U L A R AC C O M M O DAT I O N


KHUMJUNG 2016 august; third year

K H U M J U N G , N E PA L

Khumjung Vllage School (Alt 3970m)

N E PA L

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Khumjung School N E PA L (alt. 4000m) built 1961 by S i r E d m u n d H i l l a r y, s u f f e r e d in the 2015 Nepalese ear thquake. The proposal is to take an established facility that has been integrated and accepted by the village c o m m u n i t y, a n d d e s i g n a replacement primar y and secondar y school for the 2000 inhabitants.

H I G H A LT I T U D E

I N AC C E S S A B L E T E R R A I NCASTE

I S O L AT E D

E X T R E M E C L I M AT E

SYSTEM

S E I S M I C AC T I V I T Y RELIGIOUS DIFFERENCES S A N I T AT I O N

N O H E AT I N G P R O V I S I O N

L I M I T E D N AT U R A L R E S O U R C E S

POLITICS

PRIMITIVE CONSTRUCTION LOW SOCIOECONOMIC

f r e e h a n d s k e t c h o f S i r E d m u n d P e r c i v a l H i l l a r y. 1 9 1 9 - 2 0 0 8

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Mt Everest 8550m

Cho Oyu 8188m

Lhotse 8501m

Ama Dablam 6812m

Khumbila 5751m

Khumjung Village

Khumbila 5751m

Khumjung School

Khumbila 5751m

Khumjung Village 3970m

Khumbila 5751m

Ama Dablam 6812m

Khumjung Village

f r e e h a n d D R AW I N G S O F T H E K H U M J U N G E N V I RO N M E N T

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Himalayan school design wins architectural award 16 Nov 2016

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A design for a Nepalese school originally established by Sir Edmund Hillary won third year Bachelor of Architectural Studies student Carson Drain the inaugural sustainability award recently. Bachelor of Architectural Studies student Carson Drain the inaugural Jasmax sustainability award with this design for a school in the Himalaya, originally built by Sir Edmund Hilary.

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The award was established by Jasmax who will sponsor it for five years. Drain’s design for the challenging project was informed by his love of humanitarian work. “Originally the site was the first school that Sir Edmund Hillary built in 1961. He built a collection of them as part of the Himalayan Trust and this was the first one I looked at. I talked to my grandfather and it turns out he knew the guy who was running the school, Jim Strang, who is teaching the Nepalese teachers how to teach the New Zealand curriculum.” Drain interviewed Strang, including the interview as part of his exhibit in the EXIT end of year show, along with a model of the school and concept plans. The concept design shows the inaccessibility of the school, high in the Himalayan sherpa village of Khumjung. Social sustainability was a strong focus of the design. The site also demanded this – at 4000m, four to five days walk from the nearest road, the project demanded collaboration, reuse of materials and sensitivity to the social fabric of Khumjung Village, essentially a Sherpa village, with a mix of wealth and poverty and different religious views. Bachelor of Architectural Studies student Carson Drain the inaugural Jasmax sustainability award

“Everything you bring, it has to be carried in. They have an airfield nearby but it's only for light materials. So I've http://www.ara.ac.nz/news-and-events/news/himalayan-school-design-wins-architectural-award with this design for a school in the Himalaya, originally built by Sir Edmund Hilary.

got different aspects of the community coming together to create something that is owned and operated by the community. The award was established by Jasmax who will sponsor it for five years.

The concept design shows the inaccessibility of the school, high in the Himalayan sherpa village Khumjung.

Social sustainability was a strong focus of the design. The site also demanded this – at 4000m, four to five da walk from the nearest road, the project demanded collaboration, reuse of materials and sensitivity to the soci fabric of Khumjung Village, essentially a Sherpa village, with a mix of wealth and poverty and different religiou views.

“Everything you bring, it has to be carried in. They have an airfield nearby but it's only for light materials. So I'v got different aspects of the community coming together to create something that is owned and operated by community.

“For example the materials they've got out there, the sherpas have to bring them up. Then how the men wou Page 1 of 3 able to assemble the design, the children and the elderly would be able to help create the structure and the women would be able to weave the panels for the internal spaces.”

“For example the materials they've got out there, the sherpas have to bring them up. Then how the men would be Drain’s design for the challenging project was informed by his love of humanitarian work. able to assemble the design, the children and the elderly would be able to help create the structure and the women would be able to weave the panels for the internal spaces.” “Originally the site was the first school that Sir Edmund Hillary built in 1961. He built a collection of them as part of the Himalayan Trust and this was the first one I looked at. I talked to my grandfather and it turns out he knew the guy who was running the school, Jim Strang, who is teaching the Nepalese teachers how to teach the New Zealand curriculum.” Drain interviewed Strang, including the interview as part of his exhibit in the EXIT end of year show, along with a model of the school and concept plans.

http://www.ara.ac.nz/news-and-events/news/himalayan-school-design-wins-architectural-award

Drain's design maximises solar gain to capture the sun's warmth as there are no resources availa Page 1 of 3 for heating the buildings.

The current school is a traditional bricks and mortar building that has been partially destroyed by earthquakes “They predicted that due to the Himalayan fault, there will likely be another earthquake in 10 years, so that is influence into my design, how to seismically protect it.”

Drain's design maximises solar gain to capture the sun's warmth as there are no resources available for heating the buildings.

To do this, Drain used the concept of a Gabion basket; a steel basket that holds rubble and stone and has mo flexibility than traditional building methods. Also improving on traditional design, Drain would open the buildin the south to make the most of solar gain and capture heat. In the resource-challenged villages, warm building are given a low priority, but with good design the children could be warmer while they learn.

The current school is a traditional bricks and mortar building that has been partially destroyed by earthquakes. “They predicted that due to the Himalayan fault, there will likely be another earthquake in 10 years, so that is an influence into my design, how to seismically protect it.”

Drain plans to travel to Scandinavia next year with a view to studying his Masters there, attracted by the

To do this, Drain used the concept of a Gabion basket; a steel basket that holds rubble and stone and has more flexibility than traditional building methods. Also improving on traditional design, Drain would open the building to the south to make the most of solar gain and capture heat. In the resource-challenged villages, warm buildings are given a low priority, but with good design the children could be warmer while they learn.

Breeze Rober tson

http://www.ara.ac.nz/news-and-events/news/himalayan-school-design-wins-architectural-award

page 4.


Monopitch long run rooing iron at pitch to deflect snowfall

Steel rivots attaching recycled windshields to tensioned cabling locally sourced and manufactored fabric louvre insulative panels which orient to the sun managing solar absorbion

Lightweight truss carried in pieces and assembled onsite Cabling windshields are fixed to which ties down the roof in wind

Diagonal cable cross bracing

Anchored tensioned cable which fixes roofing member s

I video inter viewed NZ Khumjung t e a c h e re d u c a t o r J i m S t r a n g ( H i m a l a y a n Tr u s t & Q S M recipient) to understand the social context and the educational circumstance of rural Nepal.

page 5 .


The design is passive solar and uses local and recycled materials that are applicable to the environment and circumstance. The walls are constructed from gabion baskets -the cages easily transpor table and seismically stable. The south facing facade is south facing for solar gain and is fully glazed with a cabled system having recycled car windshields which are laminated, UV treated and stackable for transpor tation.

SCHOOL

26,400 800

6,500 800

2,900

800

12,600

6,600

1,600

3,200

COOKHOUSE

GREENHOUSE

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

roofing iron insulation membrane trusses cabling gabion stone walls framing and plastic anchor blocks landscaped corridor insulated louvres windshield facade

TOILET BLOCK

SCHOOL GROUNDS

N nor th s c SCALE a l e 1 1:1000 :1000 @ a3

GSEducationalVersion

scale 1:250 @ a3

page 6.


sherpas: material to site

children/elderly: gabion walls

men: roof & windshield faรงade

women: insulation materials

page 7.


The philosophy of this project was community integ ration; looking at how without money a community could collaboratively build together and create something of cultural, educational, technological significance.

page 8.


teepee form development

An entrepreneurial business hub in a central city location, the pavillion has the flexibility to adapt and cater for a variety of tenants

page 9.


BUSINESS PAVILLION TRANSITIONAL BUSINESS HUB Inexpensive and highly versatile transitional

architecture

2016 may; third year

page 10.


INTERNAL ELEVATION NORTH

INTERNAL ELEVATION EAST

I N T E R N A L N O R T H E L E V AT I O N

42,000

I N T E R N A L E A S T E L E V AT I O N

3,100

INTERNAL ELEVATION SOUTH

INTERNAL ELEVATION WEST

I N T E R N A L S O U T H E L E V AT I O N

I N T E R N A L W E S T E L E V AT I O N

1:500 SCALE

1,800

Condemned land + volunteer labour + salvaged materials -Pavillion is relocated when land becomes tenated again.

3,000

29,000

P RO S P E C T I V E S I T E D R AW I N G S .

2

Ground Floor (1)

The Thorncrown chapel designed by E. Fay Jones where the relationship between solid and void is a critical design component. This fluidity between space is what this proposal hopes to accomplish; a entrepreneurial business hub in a central city location, where the building is reduced to the structural and servicing essentials with the flexibility to adapt and cater for a variety of tenants. The site is located adjacent to the EPIC business hub, encouraging an interchange of clients and resources.

The Thorncrown chapel designed by E. Fay Jones where the relationship between solid and void is a critical design component. This fluidity between space is what this proposal hopes to accomplish; a entrepreneurial business hub in a central city location, where the building is reduced to the structural and servicing essentials with the flexibility to adapt and cater for a variety of tenants. The site is located adjacent to the EPIC business hub, encouraging an interchange of clients and resources.

The Thorncrown chapel designed by E. Fay Jones where the relationship between solid and void is a critical design component. This fluidity between space is what this proposal hopes to accomplish; a entrepreneurial business hub in a central city location, where the building is reduced to the structural and servicing essentials with the flexibility to adapt and cater for a variety of tenants. The site is located adjacent to the EPIC

page 11.


butyl roofing membrane flashing insulation cavity plywood sheet 30mm (2400x1200mm0) plywood internal lining perimeter joist 3800mm (overlaps into adjoining module) joists 2400mm steel cap bolted to structure to secure cross lap joint internal space -walls formed by thermal roller blinds upper perimeter joist 2400mm (100x100mm) lower perimeter joist 2400mm (100x100mm) blocking member for end of module group 1400mm (100x100mm) vertical structural member 3320mm (200x200mm) shared by adjoining module

SCALE

1

Generic Axonometry

1:20 @ a3

1:20

page 12.


RUBBLE

VAC A N T / D O R M A N T P R O P E RT Y

TIMBER

PYLON

RECYCLED TIMBER

SS T ECE L RD R A P M E TA L UMS

Condemned land

+

POLES

TRUCK CANOPY PA L L E T S

volunteer labour

+

salvaged materials

This concept explores the fluidity of space and the seamless transition through the interior and external spaces. The space is constructed from timber struc足tural members which interlink, similar to a teepee structure. Spaces are enveloped by a tem足porary, removable membrane which provides the external shell and internal partitions. It will have waterproof, acoustic and insulation properties and will permit the alteration of spaces within the structure by simply wrapping the membrane around the structural members as de足sired. Services are ducted below the floor underground to be procured as necessary by ten足 ants. The structural members

Tissue paper sketch model

page 13.


CO O

S I T E N E G O I AT I O N

L

DI

RE

MA

M

O

TE

VA

NA TE

TE

RI

Y

DE

SI

S

NC

GN

AL

NA V O L U N T E E R A S S E M B LY

ground

STRUCTURAL MODELS

page 14.


GALLERY

CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY

2015 october ; second year

The ceiling is suspended canvas draper y that can be raised or lowered as it is required for exibition spaces.

The GALLERY of CONTEMPORARY ART is centr alized around movement. How the spatial dynamics of the galler y change the psychological j o u r n e y o f v i s i t e r s a n d t h e s w a m p y, wild imperfections juxtapose the crisp, a r t i f i c i a l f o r m s o f t h e g a l l e r y, c r e a t i n g a sanctuar y of ar t.

page 15.


how we feel ing different environments? Enclosed/Exposed

central core canvas structure -hooped suppor ts

ripples. of canopy and galler y relationships. adjustable galler y ceiling space for intimate viewing or grand presence

page 16.


Project 118 Clifton Tce is divided up into small dwellings of a 'village' where each hut e x e m p l i f i e s the role of the different members and elements

RESIDENTAL 1 1 8 C L I F TO N T E R R AC

a house that embodies the social environment of a village

2015 august; second year

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page 18.


VIEWS

S E P E R AT E G U E S T H O U S E / S T U D I O

P R I VAC Y TIMBER

S E P E R AT E D M A S T E R

B U I LT I N S TA G E S

D I S P L AY O F A R T C O L L E C T I O N POOL

L I B R A R Y / W I N D O W S E AT

S U S TA I N A B L E LOUVRES

1.5 MIL BUDGET

-CLIENT REQUIREMENTS

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ACCOMMODATION 2015 may; second year

M O D U L A R A C C O M M O D AT I O N

Adaptable accommodation; sleeping pods, living & sanitary units.

page 21.


Junction points for columns

Structural columns (ser vices run through core)

pitched ceiling

Insulated panels (fireproofed) Internal steel linings Alternate window & door units

Wo o d f l o o r p a n e l & f u r n i s h i n g s Reclined headboard for ergonomic posture Closet

N IO

N RU

UC

ST

Foundation: filled with ballast & dug in ground (Or used as overhead storage for lower units)

E US T EN

PI N

ST

G

RESALE

UD

CO

IP

RE

N

NS

IO

TR

CT

SH

Constructed from prefabricated p a n e l s .  M o d u l e s a r e f l a t p a c k e d & shipped to anywhere in the wor ld to be assembled quickly u s i n g u n s k i l l e d l a b o r. Units fix together creating multi-pod spaces that stack atop o n e a n o t h e r.

CO

DESIGN

Subfloor frame (ser vices below)

BRIEF Refit out an existing building with student acommodation for a uni campus.

BEDROOM MODULE page 22.


From Left Charcoal Medium, Graphite, Oils page 23.


Portraiture commissioned work


gestural sketches of Switzerland

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‘ A s a n a r c h i t e c t , y o u d e s i g n f o r t h e p r e s e n t , w i t h a n a w a r e n e s s o f t h e p a s t , f o r a f u t u r e w h i c h i s e s s e n t i a l l y u n k n o w n .’ SIR NORMAN FOSTER

page 27.

graduate ARCHITECTURAL portfolio  

CARSON DRAIN

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