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r u o y s i s i Th . t c i r t s i D Park

Master Plan s e i t i l i c a F d n a s k r a P 2018


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Parks and Facilities Master Plan 2018 Board of Commissioners Dan Bird Anthony Del Preto Brenda Gramann John Jaszka Jacqueline Jeffery Tim Powers Brian Sokolowski

Executive Director

Jim Reuter

Senior Leadership Staff

Dave Haring, Director of Recreation Sue Rini, Director of Finance & Administration Bill Rosenberg, Director of Parks, Facilities, & Production

DW Recreation Consulting

Dannielle Wilson, President www.DWRecreationConsulting.com (262) 515-2877 Map edits provided by: Wight & Company, www.wightco.com, 630.969.7000


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Table of Contents Chapter 1: The Plan ...................................................................................................................................... 3 2018 Themes, Goals and Objectives ......................................................................................................... 5 Tracking Tool ............................................................................................................................................. 7 Chapter 2: The Path ...................................................................................................................................... 9 Introduction .............................................................................................................................................. 9 The Planning Process ................................................................................................................................ 9 Previous Plan Recommendations ........................................................................................................... 10 Accomplishments .................................................................................................................................... 11 Major Project Details .............................................................................................................................. 13 Annexations ............................................................................................................................................ 15 Partners ................................................................................................................................................... 15 Chapter 3: Our Community ........................................................................................................................ 17 Demographics ......................................................................................................................................... 17 Market Potential ..................................................................................................................................... 21 Chapter 4: Parks and Facilities ................................................................................................................... 25 Park Inventory ......................................................................................................................................... 25 Park Classifications.................................................................................................................................. 28 Level of Service ....................................................................................................................................... 29 Facility Inventory..................................................................................................................................... 31 Office Inventory ...................................................................................................................................... 32 ADA Transition Plan ................................................................................................................................ 33 Chapter 5: Voice and Vision ....................................................................................................................... 35 Community Needs Assessment .............................................................................................................. 35 Parks & Facilities Master Plan Engagement Survey ................................................................................ 36 Acquisition .............................................................................................................................................. 38 Capital Improvement .............................................................................................................................. 39 Alternative Revenue ............................................................................................................................... 39 Facility Trends for Consideration ............................................................................................................ 40

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Appendix Section Table of Contents Appendix A: Carol Stream Park District Maps Map A: Park District Boundary Map Map B: Existing Land Use Map Map C: Multi-Use Trail Map Gretna Caboose, Armstrong Park

Map D: Comprehensive Map Maps E-G: Service Area Maps • Map E: Mini Parks • Map F: Neighborhood Parks • Map G: Community Parks Maps H-O: Amenities Maps • Map H: Aquatic Facilities • Map I: Baseball/Softball • Map J: Basketball • Map K: Community Center • Map L: Football/Soccer • Map M: Outdoor Tennis • Map N: Special Use • Map O: Trails

Slepicka Park

Appendix B: 2017 Parks and Facilities Master Plan Draft Plan Engagement Survey Results Appendix C: ESRI Reports Appendix D: 2017 Parks and Facilities Master Planning Workshop Notes Appendix E: 2017 Community Needs Assessment Report Appendix F: 2015 Revenue Generation Plan Appendix G: Years In Review - 2015, 2016 Appendix H: Simkus Recreation Center Business Plan Appendix I: Capital Improvement Plan

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Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Chapter 1: The Plan A Parks and Facilities Master Planning process is one that creates a long-term vision for the District over the next five to ten years. Organizing thoughts, concepts, and ideas into one single document, in a way that everyone understands, ensures everyone can follow along on the same page throughout that timeframe. For the purposes of this planning process, the Parks and Facilities Master Plan is arranged into the following categories: Themes:

Themes are values-based concepts that weave through every future planning decision.

Goals:

Goals focus on desired outcomes. They are major, broad-brush strokes of initiatives to be accomplished.

Objectives: Objectives describe how a goal will be accomplished.

Once these first three layers of the framework are established, then tactics – the specific, measurable tasks that help accomplish an objective – can be developed. Tactics may or may not be adjusted along the way, as changes in one may impact the other. For example, if one tactic is to complete an assessment and the second is to follow through on the results, if the assessment determined no further action was warranted then the second tactic is no longer applicable. Community demographics data, community needs survey data, market potential, staff workshops, Board of Commissioners workshops, and a community engagement survey of the draft plan content were all planning stages that resulted in the plan exhibited on the following pages. The culmination of the planning process – “the plan” – has been placed in Chapter One of this document because of its stature as the most important segment of the planning process. It needs to be easily accessible and clearly represented. The plan image on the next page provides a visual reference to the interconnections of the plan elements. Then, the detailed text version of the themes, goals, and objectives are listed. Chapters Two through Five and the Appendices all contain information that informed the process and are included for reference purposes.

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a. Create, fund and maintain a Parks and Facilities Repair and Replacement Plan. b. Implement and maintain the Parks and Facilities Standard of Care Plan. c. Continue to expand and improve trails and parks. d. Simplify property maintenance. e. Proactively address preventative maintenance program.

a. Engage and educate the Community to reduce vandalism of parks and facilities. b. Maintain brand identity through all parks and facilities in an effort to create a welcoming environment.

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan 2018-2027 a. Analyze the need for outdoor winter facilities. b. Evaluate outdoor aquatic facility and consider future options and/or needs. c. Explore alternative indoor space possibilities within the community. d. Continuously evaluate acquisition and repositioning opportunities with the consideration of additional operating costs. e. Continue to implement the ADA Transition Plan to remove physical barriers.

Foster a Safe and Welcoming Environment

Take Care of What We Have

Fiscally Responsible Develop Parks & Facilities

Strong Community Reputation

Improve Financial Position

Provide Positive Community Benefit Meet Needs of Changing Demographics

a. Respond to the anticipated growth in the mature adult age segment. b. Add and enhance parks in underserved areas and expand amenities to better-serve a growing culturally diverse community.

Operate Parks & Facilities Efficiently

a. Improve Fund balances to reach targeted levels. b. Pursue alternative revenue sources. c. Maximize profit margin through utilization of cost recovery guidelines. d. Partner to reduce costs. e. Continue to pursue new grant opportunities. f. Reduce expenses and apply cost saving measures to parks and facilities operations. g. Creatively use park and facility spaces. h. Maximize rental opportunities. i. Expand and enhance Sponsorship Programs. j. Expand the use of community volunteers in parks and facilities operations.

a. Complete a staffing needs assessment for parks and facilities. b. Assess space and storage utilization at Parks and Facilities. c. Develop processes to improve operation efficiency. d. Conduct a facility scheduling analysis to increase percentage of capacity.


2018 Themes, Goals and Objectives The 2018 Parks and Facilities Master plan itself – those subsequent details that make up the Park District’s desired outcomes for Parks and Facilities – is outlined below.

Carol Stream Park District Themes Themes weave through all goals, objectives, and tasks of the Carol Stream Park District

Fiscally Responsible • Maximize resources • Sustainable • Financial stewardship Strong Community Reputation • Engage in and embrace partnerships • Focus on community needs • Encourage engagement • Effectively communicate, to promote awareness and interest • Innovative and reactive to trends Provide Positive Community Benefit • Health & Wellness • Environmentally responsible • Accessibility • Meet the needs of changing demographics • Parks as neighborhood/community gathering spaces

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Carol Stream Park District Goals and Objectives 1. Take care of what we have a. b. c. d. e.

Create, fund and maintain a Parks and Facilities Repair and Replacement Plan. Implement and maintain the Parks and Facilities Standard of Care Plan. Continue to expand and improve pathways/trails and parks. Simplify property maintenance. Proactively address preventative maintenance program.

2. Improve Financial Position a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. j.

Improve fund balances to reach targeted levels. Pursue alternative revenue sources. Maximize profit margin through utilization of cost recovery guidelines. Partner to reduce costs. Continue to pursue new grant opportunities. Reduce expenses and apply cost saving measures to parks and facilities operations. Creatively use park and facility spaces. Maximize rental opportunities. Expand and enhance Sponsorship Programs. Expand the use of community volunteers in parks and facilities operations.

3. Operate Parks and Facilities Efficiently a. b. c. d.

Complete a staffing needs assessment for parks and facilities. Assess space and storage utilization at Parks and Facilities. Develop processes to improve operation efficiency. Conduct a facility scheduling analysis to increase percentage of capacity.

4. Meet needs of changing community demographics

a. Respond to the anticipated growth in the mature adult age segment. b. Add and enhance parks in underserved areas and expand amenities to better-serve a growing culturally diverse community.

5. Develop Parks & Facilities a. b. c. d.

Analyze the need for outdoor winter facilities. Evaluate outdoor aquatic facility and consider future options and/or needs. Explore alternative indoor space possibilities within the community. Continuously monitor acquisition and repositioning opportunities with the consideration of additional operating costs. e. Continue to implement the ADA Transition Plan to remove physical barriers.

6. Foster a Safe and Welcoming Environment

a. Encourage safety awareness. b. Engage and educate the Community to reduce vandalism of parks and facilities. c. Maintain brand identity through all parks and facilities in an effort to create a welcoming environment.

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Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Tracking Tool One of the most difficult parts of any master plan is working the plan. The goals, objectives, and tactics may be written, but keeping track of their progress can be daunting over the course of five to ten years. An electronic project planner has been developed for Carol Stream Park District staff, to help them set timelines and track their progress through the entire course of the plan. The tool is dynamic; as the staff adjust a task’s duration period, the visual representation will automatically adjust. The tool will allow for point-in-time reporting and complete transparency of the progress.

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Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Chapter 2: The Path Introduction The Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan is a mechanism by which the agency can plan for its future – to be positioned to act intentionally and respond quickly when necessary. Establishing a common vision ensures that staff, the Board of Commissioners, and constituents understand the District’s direction over the next five to ten years.

Stonebridge Park

The last plan update was completed in 2009, which itself was an update of a 2003 plan. The District has shown a commitment to continuous planning though both the master plan updates and consistent strategic planning. The district has completed a total of three master plans and/or updates: • • •

1993 by Thompson Dyke & Associates 2003 by the district’s planning staff 2009 by Brusseau Design Group, LLC.

The District’s intent with the 2018 parks and facilities master plan update was to account for the numerous changes and progress that has occurred since 2009. The goal was to create a relevant, usable tool that would help lead their team through the next several years. Project status updates and goal modification were also expressed outcomes. Maintaining the high standards that accompany the title of Illinois Distinguished Accredited Agency was also an important factor of this update process. Engaging the community in the planning process with stakeholder meetings, a community needs survey, and a draft parks and facilities master plan feedback opportunity was an essential priority set by both the staff and Board of Commissioners. The update process was to establish a vision for the next five to ten years and a tool by which long-term progress can be tracked and achieved.

The Planning Process The planning process began by conducting a community needs assessment, where stakeholders were interviewed by a third-party service and a subsequent survey was developed. The mailed, statistically valid survey process was completed in 2017. The parks and facilities master planning process began with a kick-off meeting, followed by separate workshops conducted with staff, the senior leadership staff members, and the Board of Commissioners. The subsequent draft plan was posted on the District’s website for online viewing. Community feedback about the plan could be provided through an electronic survey, the link to which was located on the District’s website as well as within an email “blast” that was sent to the District’s database of emails. The plan document was then modified accordingly. Specific tactics and corresponding target dates were established by a staff work group, which fed into the creation of the timeline tracking tool. This dynamic tool provides a point-in-time snapshot of the plan progress, both in summary and detail format, and should help the District “work the plan” over the course of the next five to ten years. Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan

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Previous Plan Recommendations Chapter 2 of the 2009 master plan document provided a review of the 1993 Master Plan, 2003 Master Plan, and 2008 Indoor & Outdoor Recreation Facilities Study, where it summarized the improvements that had not yet been accomplished that were still relevant to the 2009 plan creation.

2003 Master Plan Seven ideas were identified in bullet-point format, that conceptually match the desired direction of the District today. Because many of the seven so closely match the discussions that occurred as a part of the current planning process, they are included below: • • •

• • •

Identified 20 sites for potential acquisition. The current plan expresses an intent to maintain a pulse on acquisition opportunities. Develop a comprehensive on and off-street pathway system. Paths and trails continue to be a high-priority for residents. Expand and link the pathway system to local destinations wherever possible. Despite continued progress throughout the community since 2003, sights are still set on continued path development: a new link to McCaslin Park is at the top of the list. Acquire, develop and renovate a system of parks, facilities and open space that are attractive, safe, functional and available to all segments of the community. Safe, welcoming parks and facilities and providing for the underserved are current objectives. Coordinate parkland acquisition with long-range growth and development planning based on district standards. New acquisition standards have been defined in the current plan. Preserve and protect environmentally significant areas for public enjoyment and education. Promote environmental best management practices throughout the district.

2009 Master Plan Fifteen (15) Goals were set as a part of the 2009 plan. Despite being all titled “goals”, they were actually a mixture of themes, goals, and objectives. The image below provides a visual summary of the 2009 plan’s intended outcomes:

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Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


This image, created by DW Recreation Consulting, recalibrates the 15 goals from 2009 into a format that more clearly articulates the District’s vision at the time. (Note that goals A, D, and H were omitted from the visual; for analysis purposes, these items were redundant and/or obsolete.) The 2009 plan document’s appendices tracked the “completeness” of the 1993 and 2003 plans, which were presented in a tactical manner; down to the detail, for example, of the addition of a water fountain at a specifically named park. Fourteen years later (at the time of this analysis) it seems less important to track whether or not a park bench was replaced and more important to ensure future strategies are intentional, responsible, and strategic. Subsequently, this planning document will not focus on whether or not those items left over from 2003 are not complete. Rather, it will focus on the items from the 2009 plan that are still relevant as well as the current, point-in-time needs of the district as they relate to future planning. The three concepts denoted in yellow in the graphic on page 10 (involve stakeholders, community needs, funding) were relevant themes in 2009 and are still relevant today. The past ten years have continuously focused on these three thematic concepts and have again been woven into the current plan. Strategy development, top-notch facilities, and exploration are concepts that this current plan would define as goals: broad-brush intentions that set direction. These goals have maintained their relevancy and are woven into the current plan as well. Finally, the items located in the blue sections of the image are objectives, the measurable ways in which goals are achieved. With exception to the clean water objective, all the others have been visited over the course of the past ten years at least once, but still actually maintain a current relevant status once again. For example, lighting in the parks was something that needed investigating, was determined as not a prioritized action item, but now returns as a possible consideration once again.

Accomplishments The ten years since the last master plan was written have encompassed some dramatic changes throughout the district. In 2010, voters supported a $37 million referendum to accomplish two main objectives: take care of the Park District’s current assets and build a new recreation center with indoor pool, walking track and fitness center. Projects large and small have been completed as a result of that referendum funding. The list of parks and facilities projects that have been accomplished as well as several key community partnerships is commendable. In addition to the referendum funding, several grants have been secured to support the projects with more than just District funds. • • • • •

$240,000 Illinois Clean Energy Community Foundation for LEED Design of Fountain View Recreation Center, 2014 $100,000 Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO), ADA Restroom and Concessions Building, 2014 $388,000 Illinois Open Space Land Acquisition and Development Grant, McCaslin Park amenities, 2014 $2 million Illinois Department of Natural Resources Park and Recreational Facility Construction (PARC) grant, Fountain View Recreation Center, 2013 $50,000 Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) Grant, IL-64 trail underpass lighting, 2012

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2009

Year

2013

2012

2011

2010

2016

2015

2014

2017 12

Accomplishment

Cambridge Park & Charger Court playgrounds Maintenance Building Lake George shoreline stabilization Glenbard North High School turf field Simkus Recreation Center office renovation Stonebridge & Sundance Park playgrounds Slepicka Park silo renovation Bark Park dog park Jirsa, Memorial, and Tedrahn Park playgrounds Kuhn Road Trail Steve Ravanesi Trail McCaslin Park water/sewer Aldrin Community Center Farewell and Demolition McCaslin Park Artificial Turf McCaslin Park Restroom and Concession Building IL-64 underpass lighting Fountain View Recreation Center Barbara O’Rahilly Volunteer Park playground McCaslin Park playground in the hub Pleasant Hill East playground Coral Cove Climbing Wall Friendship Park swings Veterans Trail bike path Carolshire Park McCaslin Amenities added Simkus Recreation Center roof replaced Coral Cove amenities added Administrative Offices move to Simkus Paving at Hampe, Slepicka, Walter Parks Bierman Park playground Horizon Park partnership with C.S. Library Klein Creek Flood Mitigation Project in Armstrong Park completed Armstrong Park ball fields 2, 3, 4 Armstrong Park path reconstructed Armstrong Park field 1 renovated Bierman Park swings KidsWorld playground at Armstrong Park Playground Rules Signs Standardized Heritage Lake retaining wall Simkus HVAC and internal renovations Armstrong Park Restroom Building Installed

Notes 280 Kuhn Armstrong Park Shared use agreement Conversion of former stage

On leased IDOT land Connectivity to regional trail Connectivity to Great Western Trail

Fitness Center, Indoor Pool, Gymnasium, Track

Near Elk Trail Land deeded to Park District Splash Pad, Bankshot Court, Pavillion Cabanas, Shade canopy, Dumping bucket spray feature

New disc golf course Relieved residents of local flooding problems Returned to use

Original playground was replaced All parks Bierman Park Flush toilets

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Major Project Details The Park District has experienced several major changes in parks and facilities over the last ten years. Its two largest parks have undergone major renovation, a new recreation center was constructed, and vacant land was developed into a new park. Comparatively speaking, these projects represent a lot for a single park and recreation agency to tackle in a relatively short amount of time. A progressive outlook combined with a Board that has taken advantage of opportunities as they arise has resulted in a plethora of increased services to the Carol Stream Park District community.

Armstrong Park In 2014, an intergovernmental agreement was created between Carol Stream Park District, Village of Carol Stream and DuPage County Stormwater Management Commission for the Klein Creek Flood Mitigation Project in Armstrong Park. The park and surrounding neighborhood had experienced flooding of historical proportions in 2010 and 2012. The partnership was formed as collaborative effort to reduce the effects of flooding on the park’s neighbors. A portion of the park was relinquished to DuPage County, so the agency could construct a tworeservoir system that operates when water elevations in Klein Creek increase in order to divert floodwaters from the majority of the nearby Armstrong Park neighborhood. Additional Park District gains included the assistance with the adjustment of park amenities, parking lot paving, and the demolition of the Aldrin Community Center, an aged facility in need of extensive repair or replacement. The reservoir project was completed in 2015. The Park District’s cost for the reservoir was originally $490,700. The County received grants (Federal funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development) and shared the cost savings, which reduced the Park District’s contribution to $150,000, saving $340,700. Ball field renovations to fields 1, 2, 3, and 4, walking path reconstruction, sled hill relocation and new foot bridges were all park amenities renovated as a result of the flood mitigation project. KidsWorld playground was originally built as a volunteer community-build project in 1998. There was a great sense of community pride in KidsWorld, as the volunteers raised money, designed, and voluntarily built the structures. Unfortunately, the structure aged beyond its useful life, and so town hall meetings were held in 2013 to engage the community in the process of replacing KidsWorld. In 2016, the playground was replaced with new structures. The spirit of the original project was incorporated into the new design, complete with the re-use of wooden fence slats and peaks from the prior structure into the arched entryway. Names engraved on those slats continue to honor the community’s initiative.

Fountain View Recreation Center In response to the community’s expressed desire for an indoor walking/jogging track, larger fitness center, and indoor pool, the Park District listened to the feedback gained from the 2008 community survey and made plans for Fountain View Recreation Center. Funding for the center was approved by residents in a 2010 referendum. Construction began in October 2012. In 2013, the 90,846 square foot building opened its doors, featuring: Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan

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Gymnasium with three basketball courts (which can be converted to two high school size courts) 7,500 square feet Fitness Center featuring free weights, cardio and strength machine 25 Yard, 8 lane indoor swimming pool Warm water therapy pool Three multi-purpose rooms for park district programming and private rentals • Dedicated room for special recreation programs through Western DuPage Special Recreation Association • Locker rooms with showers and sauna • Two dedicated group fitness studios • Indoor walking track Fountain View Recreation Center • Child care room The building was constructed to be environmentally friendly, and received a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver designation by the United States Green Building Council. Eco-friendly features include a geothermal heating/cooling system and permeable pavers in the parking lot, which has enabled the center to be eligible for a grant from the Illinois Clean Energy Community Foundation (ICECF). • • • • •

The building is located adjacent to the Village of Carol Stream’s Town Center land. In fact, 6 acres of the 23-acre Town Center plot were sold to the Park District to make the construction possible; an intergovernmental agreement between the two entities provides additional parking for Fountain View patrons.

Horizon Park The Carol Stream Library District has ownership of a plot of land along Kuhn Road that had remained vacant for several years. Long-term plans to build on that site had not come to fruition, and so the Park District offered to partner with the Library to provide a new recreational amenity for the community. The land is currently leased to the Park District, which maintains a nine-target disc golf course at what is now called Horizon Park.

McCaslin Park In 2010, the park received a $3.5 million redevelopment funded by both the 2010 referendum and Illinois Department of Natural Resources Open Space Land Acquisition and Development (OSLAD) Grant. New amenities gained through the project included: four lighted artificial turf infield ball fields in a hub formation with a playground and concession/washroom building in the center, a splash pad, a Bankshot court, a picnic pavilion, a sand volleyball court, shade structure near the cricket field, an updated accessible fishing pier, and paved walking paths. A concrete bean bag toss game and permanent checkerboard add to the new picnic pavilion area. Final renovations were completed in 2015.

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McCaslin Park

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Annexations Another element of the District’s growth and development was the annexation of land into its boundaries. The incorporation of adjacent areas not already a part of the municipal entity can occur both voluntarily and involuntarily, with the general intent to increase public services. Eight properties were formally annexed into the Carol Stream Park District between 2009 and 2017. The most notable of these was the annexation of 120 acres at Gary Avenue and Lies Road, which was initiated by the Village of Carol Stream to align taxing bodies. All others were relatively small parcels, with both Carol Stream and West Chicago addresses.

Partners Carol Stream Park District has exemplified a strong belief in being a cooperative, engaging partner with other local governments, community groups and service providers. Together with its partners, the Park District has been able to provide value-added services to the community and reduce total tax payer expense time and time again. The District is seen as a leader in the industry when it comes to creative partnering. A list of current partners is included here: American Cricket Conference

Illinois Department of Transportation

Benjamin School District 25

Illinois Riverwatch

Bloomingdale Township

Milton Township

Carol Stream Chamber of Commerce

Pleasant Hill School

Carol Stream Cool Cities

Purple Martin Society

Carol Stream Fire Protection District

Rotary Club of Carol Stream

Carol Stream Public Library

Village of Carol Stream

College of DuPage

Village of Glendale Heights

Community Consolidated School District 46

Wayne Township

Community Consolidated School District 93

Western DuPage Special Recreation Association

Community Unit School District 200 County of DuPage DuPage Forest Preserve Forward DuPage Coalition Glenbard District 87

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan

Wetlands Mitigation Wheaton Academy Wheaton Bible Church Winfield Park District

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Chapter 3: Our Community Demographics Understanding the community’s current make-up by age, race, and income as well as any predictions of future changes assists with establishing the appropriate long-term direction of services. The data used for the analysis were obtained from Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI), the largest research and development organization dedicated to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and specializing in population projections and market trends. All data were acquired in December 2016, and reflect actual numbers as reported in the 2010 US Bureau of the Census and demographic projections for 2016 (current) and 2021 as estimated by ESRI. The infographic below provides a quick snapshot of who lives in Carol Stream. Considering a footprint of less than ten square miles, Carol Stream has educational levels and earning power higher than the national average. For comparison purposes, the national median income was $59,039 in 2016 whereas the median household income in Carol Stream was $75,115. National levels of educational attainment in 2016 were 32% bachelor’s degree or higher and 56.4% high school or some college; locally the percentages were 39% and 52% respectively.

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Income Income level is an important factor when considering whether or not a community can afford capital improvement projects. Half (50%) of the community earns less than $75,000 per year, half (50%) earns more than $75,000.

Overall, Carol Stream’s income is anticipated to grow by approximately 5.4% by the year 2021. The largest anticipated growth is in those households earning $25k-$34k (29%) followed by $150k-$199k (14.7%). The largest anticipated decline in income segments are in those households earning $35k-$49K (46.7%), followed by $50k-$74k (20.5%).

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Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Race and Ethnicity Another area that impacts future decision-making is the current picture of race and ethnicity in the community, and any predicted shifts therein. Integrating the information into the planning process can ensure that the future parks and facility decisions reflect the cultural needs of the CSPD community make-up. This graphic represents the current picture of CSPD, as of 2016.

The United States Census Bureau separates race and ethnicity measures. The majority of the community (67%) is white, 17% Asian, and 6% each reported being some other race alone or black alone. 15.8% of Carol Stream residents consider themselves to be of Hispanic origin.

Over the 10-year span of 2010 to 2021, the Carol Stream race and ethnic picture has shifted and is expected to continue to shift. The white alone population is decreasing, with an anticipated shift from Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan

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67.1% in 2016 to 63.5% in 2021. The Asian alone population is increasing and is anticipated to grow from 17.1% in 2016 to 19.0% in 2021. Growth in people of Hispanic origin was 14.2% in 2010, 15.8% in 2016, and is anticipated to be 17.7% in 2021. Note for informational reference: The United States Census defines “Asian” as “a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent, including, for example: Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malesia, Pakistan, the Philippine Island, Thailand, and Vietnam.”

Age The age of a community and any likely shifts in age as a percentage of the whole help plan for the future needs of the individual groups and subsequently the whole community. In regards to Carol Stream, three of every four people (75%) are adults: 64% ages 20-64 and 11% over the age of 64 years.

According to the US Census and predictions by ESRI, the following shifts in population are expected by the year 2021:

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Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


In Carol Stream, the most significant shift in population is anticipated in the Mature Adult (65+ years) category, from 4,407 to 5,719 (1,312), or 29.8% increase. Two age groups are anticipated to either stay about the same: • •

Adults will only drop by less than 150 people, or .6%; early childhood will likely stay the same, but may drop by 6 or .3% Youth will decrease by about 200 people, or 3.9%; teens will drop by about 185, or 7%

Age data helps with the parks and facilities master planning process to inform the decision-making process. As applied to facility needs for example, if a decision had to be made between building a senior center or teen center, based on this data alone, CSPD will more likely have the population to support a senior center.

Market Potential A mechanism to assess the recreational behaviors of a group and to subsequently predict needs is to utilize consumer behavior data. Recreation trends information was derived from Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI), specifically from a report entitled Sports and Leisure Market Potential. This data is based upon national propensities to use various products and services, applied to the local demographic composition of the Carol Stream boundaries. Usage data were collected by Growth for Knowledge Mediamark Research and Intelligence, LLC. (GfK MRI) in a nationally representative survey of U.S. households. MPI (Market Potential Index) measures the relative likelihood of the adults in the specified area to exhibit certain consumer behavior or purchasing patterns compared to the U.S. An MPI of 100 represents the U.S. average. Product/Consumer Behavior Participated in Pilates in last 12 months Participated in tennis in last 12 months Participated in golf in last 12 months Participated in ice skating in last 12 months Participated in aerobics in last 12 months Participated in skiing (downhill) in last 12 months Participated in bicycling (mountain) in last 12 months Participated in jogging/running in last 12 months Participated in yoga in last 12 months Attend sports events Attended rock music performance in last 12 months Participated in weight lifting in last 12 months Went to beach in last 12 months Played board game in last 12 months Participated in baseball in last 12 months Participated in bicycling (road) in last 12 months Participated in soccer in last 12 months Participated in volleyball in last 12 months Participated in boating (power) in last 12 months Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan

Expected # Adults/HHs 1,145 1,589 3,555 940 3,216 1,033 1,463 4,959 2,630 8,571 3,520 3,658 9,159 4,628 1,666 3,591 1,386 1,180 1,918

Percent 3.7% 5.1% 11.4% 3.0% 10.3% 3.3% 4.7% 15.9% 8.4% 27.5% 11.3% 11.7% 29.3% 14.8% 5.3% 11.5% 4.4% 3.8% 6.1%

MPI

133 128 125 123 122 122 121 120 120 120 119 118 118 117 116 116 116 116 115 21


Participated in book club in last 12 months Did Sudoku puzzle in last 12 months Participated in hiking in last 12 months Attended dance performance in last 12 months Did furniture refinishing in last 12 months Went to museum in last 12 months Did photo album/scrapbooking in last 12 months Attended country music performance in last 12 months Participated in bowling in last 12 months Did baking in last 12 months Went to live theater in last 12 months Participated in canoeing/kayaking in last 12 months Participated in swimming in last 12 months Attended adult education course in last 12 months Participated in word games in last 12 months Participated in basketball in last 12 months Participated in softball in last 12 months Participated in walking for exercise in last 12 months Visited an indoor water park in last 12 months Read book in last 12 months Participated in Frisbee in last 12 months Participated in backpacking in last 12 months Went on overnight camping trip in last 12 months Played cards in last 12 months Cooked for fun in last 12 months Danced/went dancing in last 12 months Participated in motorcycling in last 12 months Went to art gallery in last 12 months Attended auto show in last 12 months Did photography in last 12 months Played billiards/pool in last 12 months Did crossword puzzle in last 12 months Participated in trivia games in last 12 months Participated in target shooting in last 12 months Played bingo in last 12 months Did birdwatching in last 12 months Played musical instrument in last 12 months Participated in archery in last 12 months Attended classical music/opera performance/12 months Played chess in last 12 months Participated in football in last 12 months Did painting/drawing in last 12 months

1,012 3,590 3,541 1,595 1,198 4,364 2,013 1,990 3,304 7,545 4,554 1,936 5,345 2,360 3,723 2,848 1,173 9,161 1,022 11,571 1,441 1,021 3,994 5,175 7,608 2,671 968 2,466 2,537 3,353 2,540 3,502 1,686 1,532 1,305 1,412 2,112 869 1,329 1,022 1,467 1,902

3.2% 11.5% 11.3% 5.1% 3.8% 14.0% 6.4% 6.4% 10.6% 24.2% 14.6% 6.2% 17.1% 7.6% 11.9% 9.1% 3.8% 29.3% 3.3% 37.1% 4.6% 3.3% 12.8% 16.6% 24.4% 8.6% 3.1% 7.9% 8.1% 10.7% 8.1% 11.2% 5.4% 4.9% 4.2% 4.5% 6.8% 2.8% 4.3% 3.3% 4.7% 6.1%

115 115 114 114 114 114 114 113 112 112 112 111 111 111 111 110 110 110 110 109 108 107 107 107 107 107 106 106 106 106 105 105 105 104 104 104 104 103 102 101 100 100

This activity data applies to parks and facilities planning in that the propensity to participate in various activities can subsequently imply the type of facilities needed for the activity to take place. The top six active and passive activities in both MPI rating and expected number of households should be given the highest consideration in future planning: Top six active activities in both MPI and Expected Number of Households • Went to beach in last 12 months 22

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


• • • • •

Participated in golf in last 12 months Participated in jogging/running in last 12 months Participated in aerobics in last 12 months Participated in weight lifting in last 12 months Participated in bicycling (road) in last 12 months

Top six passive activities in both MPI and Expected Number of Households • Attend sports events • Did baking in last 12 months • Played board game in last 12 months • Went to a museum in last 12 months • Went to live theater in last 12 months • Did Sudoku puzzle in last 12 months

Recreation Spending Potential In addition to the likelihood to participate, the likelihood to spend money on recreational activities and/or products can also be examined. The chart below identifies key recreational spending data relative to Carol Stream’s parks and facilities master planning. ESRI’s Spending Potential Index (SPI) is household-based, and represents the amount spent for a product or service relative to a national average of 100. The full report data can be found in Appendix C.

Recreational Spending

Fees for Participant Sports, excluding trips Fees for Recreational Lessons Bicycles Membership Fees for Social/Recreation/Civic Clubs Winter Sports Equipment

Spending Potential Index

127 126 124 120 117

Average Amount Spent

$113.96 $154.98 $32.18 $229.15 $5.86

Total

$1,656,006 $2,252,158 $467,609 $3,330,041 $85,198

Interpreting this data into parks and facilities planning, the evidence of spending on participant sports having both a high spending potential index and high total spending amount could indicate continued spending on current facilities and potential increased spending on any new sports-based venues in consideration. Carol Stream households are already spending over $3 million per year on membership fees to social/recreation/civic clubs; although the spending potential index is relatively high compared to the national average of 100, consideration should also be given to the predicted shifts in median income levels. Bicycles and winter sports equipment were specifically included in this report as a result of trail/path importance ranking in the community needs assessment as well as the interest in additional winter sports opportunities.

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Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Chapter 4: Parks and Facilities Park Inventory The Carol Stream Park District manages 43 parks. In some of the parks, the District has sole ownership and responsibility for the land, maintenance, and amenities. In others, it is the lessee, maintaining the space as a recreational amenity (e.g. Bark Park, Community Park, and Horizon Park), or in an intergovernmental agreement to provide the amenity with another agency (e.g. Glenbard North turf field). Whether or not the District owns the land is irrelevant; the most important point is the District has a degree to which it is involved in providing a service to its residents through that space. A goal in providing parks and open space to a community is to ensure a variety of park types and park amenities are spread throughout the district. An inventory matrix of each park’s amenities can be a helpful visual, to show at a quick glance all the district has to offer and to also provide a reference point to residents looking for specific activities. The next two pages of this document illustrate the most current park and amenity inventory of the Carol Stream Park District. Each park has its own row, and the corresponding columns indicate if the amenity can be found there. (see pages 26 and 27)

Additional Resources In addition to land managed by the Park District, other community resources contribute to the overall access to recreational space throughout the district. Parcels owned by the Village of Carol Stream, School Districts, and private churches also provide access to green space in the community. These additional resources are listed below: Resource Kuhn Road Detention Site Shelborne Detention Site Town Center St. Andrew open space St. Luke open space Illinois Prairie Path/Great Western Trail Red Hawk Preserve Timber Ridge Preserve West Branch Preserve Benjamin Middle School Carol Stream Elementary School Cloverdale Elementary School Evergreen Elementary School Glenbard North High School Heritage Lakes Elementary School Jay Stream Middle School Pleasant Hill Elementary School Roy DeShane Elementary School Spring Trail Elementary School Western Trails Elementary School

Owner Village of Carol Stream Village of Carol Stream Village of Carol Stream St. Andrew Church St. Luke Catholic Church DuPage County DuPage County DuPage County DuPage County School District 25 School District 93 School District 93 School District 25 School District 87 School District 93 School District 93 School District 200 School District 93 School District 93 School District 93

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan

Total Acres (estimated) 10 8 17 .5 8 4.5 mi. 17.97 1,102.00 631.00 1.00 2.50 3.00 2.00 12.50 3.00 4.50 1.00 2.00 6.00 2.00 25


Carol Stream Park District Park Amenities Inventory

302 Kuhn Road adjacent to 280 Kuhn Rd. 1253 Woodlake Drive

6 Blue Heron Park 7 Cambridge Park

745 Castleton Court

8 Carolshire Park 9 Charger Court Park 10 Community Park

840 N. Gary Ave.

11 Elk Trail Recreation Center 12 Evergreen Lakes Park

160 W. Elk Trail

13 Fair Oaks Central Park 14 Fair Oaks Natural Area - East 15 Fair Oaks Natural Area - West

1320 Birchbark Trail

16 Friendship Park

797 Allison Lane

17 18 19 20

25W149 Doris

Gerald R. Weeks Park (East) Gerald R. Weeks Park (West) Glenbard North HS Fields Hampe Park

760 Woodhill Drive 1351 Charger Court 745 Thornhill Drive 1041 Buckskin 1284 Birchbark Trail 700 Fair Oaks Road

1N170 Morse Street 990 Kuhn Rd 297 W. Lies Road

21 Heritage Lake

Pathway-adjacent to Bierman

22 23 24 25

2N540 Kuhn Rd.

Horizon Park Jan Smith Park Jirsa Park Kent Park

26 McCaslin Park 27 Memorial Park 28 Mitchell Lakes Park 29 Murray’s Meadows 30 Papoose Park 31 Park on the Green 32 33 34 35

Pleasant Hill Park Post Office Park Red Hawk Park Shining Waters Park

36 37 38 39 40

Slepicka Homestead Park Spring Valley Park Stonebridge Park Sundance Park Tedrahn Park

41 Tokarski Park 42 Veterans Park 43 Walter Park Classification Key C = Community Park M = Mini Park NA = Natural Area NP = Neighborhood Park S = Sports Facility

26

925 Kuhn Road 1363 Rose Avenue 955 Woodhill Drive 27W650 North Avenue, West Chicago

.33 73.00 3.00 13.00 40.00 .50 6.50 1.50 1.00 63.00 .65 14.00 2.00 4.00 4.00 .50 7.00 10.00 21.00 7.40 4.00 8.40 3.00

M C NP C C M N M M C M NP NP NA NA M NP NP S C NA NP NA NP NP

32.00 C .50 M 200 Elk Trail 23.00 NA 1235 Adler Lane 3.50 NA 887 Papoose Court 1.00 M 1N547 Bob O’ Link, Winfield .50 M 1N251 Harriet Street 10.00 NP 450 Fullerton Ave 2.50 S 651 W. St. Charles Road 42.00 C 874 Oswego Drive 6.25 NA/NP 1301 Lily Lane 5.00 NP 1370 Spring Valley Drive 6.00 NP 1016 Birchbark Trail 3.00 NP 538 Yardley Drive 2.50 NP 1286 New Britton Drive 8.00 NP 450 Blackhawk Drive .50 M 200 E. Lies Road 20.00 NP 970 High Ridge Pass 4.50 NP Totals 458.53 342 Thunderbird Trail

* *

* * *

1 1

* * *

* *

*

* *

1 1 1

1

.86

Disc Golf

.18

2

Cricket Field

1

Bocce Court

4

Boating

2.32 .12 .34 1.46

Bags Court

Basketball Court

391 Illini Drive

Chair Playwith ground AGE AGE Body Chair has Sand 2 to 5 5 to 12 Harness Only Pit

Trails (Miles)

Park Location 181 Appomattox Trail

Classification

Park Name Appomattox Park Armstrong Park Barbara O'Rahilly Volunteer Park Bark Park Bierman Park

ADA SWING CHAIR

Baseball/Softball

1 2 3 4 5

Acreage

Playground Age Rating

2 *

2

*

*

*

*

*

* *

1

1

1

1

.42

5 *

*

*

* *

*

*

*

*

*

.80 1

* *

.27

1

1 1

4

2 1

2

*

.27 1.11 2

2

1

1 1 1

*

16

4

.14 1

*

* *

2

.96

.43

* *

1

.64

*

1

21

9

3

6

10.32

4

1 15

1 17

2

4

1

Approximations using DuPage Co. website map tools.

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan

1


McCaslin Park Memorial Park Mitchell Lakes Park Murray’s Meadows Papoose Park Park on the Green Pleasant Hill Park Post Office Park Red Hawk Park Shining Waters Park Slepicka Homestead Park Spring Valley Park Stonebridge Park Sundance Park Tedrahn Park Tokarski Park Veterans Park Walter Park

1

* * *

*

*

* *

* * * *

*

*

1

2

*

*

Volleyball Court (sand)

Tennis Court

Splash Pad

*

* *

Soccer

Sled Hill

Skate Park

Restrooms - Flush (Seasonal)

Picnic Shelter

Pavilion (Picnic Shelter)- Rentable

Off-leash dog area

*

1 1

1

* *

*

*

1

* *

2 1

1

1

2

2

1

* *

* *

1

*

1 1

*

1

*

1

Natural Area

Mini-Golf

*

* *

* * 1

*

Roller Hockey Rink

*

Historical Markers

Garden Plots Rentable

Football

Fishing

Exercise Stations

1

Restrooms Portable (Seasonal)

Appomattox Park Armstrong Park Barbara O'Rahilly Volunteer Park Bark Park Bierman Park Blue Heron Park Cambridge Park Carolshire Park Charger Court Park Community Park Elk Trail Recreation Center Evergreen Lakes Park Fair Oaks Central Park Fair Oaks Natural Area - East Fair Oaks Natural Area - West Friendship Park Gerald R. Weeks Park (East) Gerald R. Weeks Park (West) Glenbard North HS Fields Hampe Park Heritage Lake Horizon Park Jan Smith Park Jirsa Park Kent Park

Drinking Fountains

Park Name

*

1

*

1

4

*

1 2 1

* *

*

1

*

2

*

*

*

1

3

*

1

*

1

*

* *

2 3

*

* * 6

1

16

3

1

17

1

7

10

3

* 10

1

1

2

9

1

4

6

Updated: November 2017

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan

27


Park Classifications Carol Stream Park District parks have been divided into five classification types listed below:

Park Location 181 Appomattox Trail 745 Castleton Court 797 Allison Lane 342 Thunderbird Trail 1N547 Bob O’ Link 450 Blackhawk Drive 160 W. Elk Trail 1351 Charger Court 887 Papoose Court 840 N. Gary Ave.

Shining Waters Park (Playground) Fair Oaks Central Park Sundance Park Barb O’Rahilly Volunteer Park Kent Park Stonebridge Park Walter Park Slepicka Homestead Park Spring Valley Park Cambridge Park Gerald R. Weeks Park (East) Horizon Park Tedrahn Park Jirsa Park Gerald R Weeks Park (West) Pleasant Hill Park Evergreen Lakes Park Veterans Park

874 Oswego Drive 1320 Birchbark Trail 538 Yardley Drive 302 Kuhn Road 955 Woodhill Drive 1016 Birchbark Trail 970 High Ridge Pass 1301 Lily Lane 1370 Spring Valley Drive 760 Woodhill Drive 25W149 Doris 2N540 Kuhn Rd. 1286 New Britton Drive 1363 Rose Avenue 1N170 Morse Street 1N251 Harriet Street 1041 Buckskin 200 E. Lies Road

28

Totals

PARK Appomattox Park Blue Heron Park Friendship Park Memorial Park Park on the Green Tokarski Park Elk Trail Recreation Center Charger Court Park Papoose Park Carolshire Park

Classification

• •

Mini Park: less than 2 acres, with minimal to no amenities Neighborhood Park: generally more than two acres, with multiple recreation amenities Community Park: a large-acre space, usually with multiple recreation amenities and a regional draw due to the quantity, size, and/or uniqueness of amenities Natural Area: open space with no amenities, focused on preservation and passive enjoyment Sports Facility: access to a sports field, with no park acreage Acreage

• • •

.33 M .50 M .50 M .50 M .50 M .50 M .65 M 1.00 M 1.00 M 1.50 M Mini Parks Total

6.98

1.75 NP 2.00 NP 2.50 NP 3.00 NP 3.00 NP 3.00 NP 4.50 NP 5.00 NP 6.00 NP 6.50 NP 7.00 NP 7.40 NP 8.00 NP 8.40 NP 10.00 NP 10.00 NP 14.00 NP 20.00 NP Neighborhood Parks Total

122.05

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Pathway-adjacent to Bierman 1235 Adler Lane 1284 Birchbark Trail 700 Fair Oaks Road 925 Kuhn Road 874 Oswego Drive 200 Elk Trail

Post Office Ball Field Glenbard North HS Fields

450 Fullerton Ave 990 Kuhn Rd

13.00 C 21.00 C 32.00 C 40.00 C 42.00 C 63.00 C 73.00 C Community Parks Total NA 3.50 NA 4.00 NA 4.00 NA 4.00 NA 4.50 NA 23.00 NA Natural Areas Total 2.50 S S Sports Fields Total Total Acreage

Totals

Heritage Lake Murray’s Meadows Fair Oaks Natural Area - East Fair Oaks Natural Area - West Jan Smith Park Shining Waters Park (Pond) Mitchell Lakes Park

Classification

Bark Park Hampe Park McCaslin Park Bierman Park Red Hawk Park Community Park Armstrong Park

Park Location adjacent to 280 Kuhn Rd. 297 W. Lies Road 27W650 North Ave, West Chicago 1253 Woodlake Drive 651 W. St. Charles Road 745 Thornhill Drive 391 Illini Drive

Acreage

PARK

284.00

43.00 2.50 458.53

Level of Service The 2009 Master Plan thoroughly outlined the history of how the parks and recreation industry has tried to develop standard practices in regards to land acreage quantity and facility assets. It outlines the evolution of the National Recreation and Park Association’s (NRPA’s) ‘ten acres for every 1,000 residents’ standard, but also that NRPA also advocates for communities to establish their own local standard. Agencies are now moving away from trying to meet a general, standardized number of acres per 1,000 to a more customized assessment based on their own community’s unique features and circumstances. Benchmarking with like-sized communities and their respective departments/agencies/districts has become the goal. A way in which this is achieved is through NRPA’s Park Metrics database, a tool that park and recreation providers across the country have used to upload their data and compare themselves to other agencies like themselves. The Carol Stream Park District supported a “13 acres per 1,000” standard in 2003 and again in the 2009 Master Plan document. As seen in the chart below, the District currently has 11.35 acres per 1,000 – above the basic national standard yet below its own previous expectations. However, when compared against the current Park Metrics benchmarking data for communities with a population between 20,000 and 49,999, the average acres per 1,000 residents was 9.6 acres. Comparatively speaking, Carol Stream Park District has a solid lead over other like-sized agencies nationwide, as well as over the long-standing national standard. Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan

29


NRPA Recommended Level of Service Acres NRPA per NRPA Recommended CSPD 1,000 Recommended Acres per Acreage residents Acreage 1,000 Mini Park Neighborhood Park Community Park Natural Area Sports Facility

6.98 122.05 284.00 43.00 2.50

0.17 3.02 7.03 1.06 0.06

20.20 80.81 303.03 0 0

0.5 2 7.5 0 0

Totals

458.53

11.35

404.04

10.00

Park Metrics Benchmark: 20,000-49,999 Residents Acres per CSPD 1,000 Benchmark Benchmark per Acreage residents Acreage 1,000 Park Totals

458.53

11.35

387.88

9.6

Surplus / Deficiency -13.22 41.24 -19.03 43.00 2.50

54.49

Surplus / Deficiency

70.65

NRPA has also established some basic standard measurements broken down by park classification, 0.5 acres per 1,000 residents for mini parks, 2 for neighborhood parks, and 7.5 for community parks. Although agencies are not depending on these breakdowns as much as they once were before, it can still be a simple exercise to ensure a balanced service offering is maintained. Because the Carol Stream Park District’s “surplus” in both NRPA’s standard total acreage figure and the Park Metrics figure are so high, the agency can be confident in its current service offerings. Additionally, benchmarking with communities the same size, the average quantity of parks was one for every 1,901 residents; Carol Stream has one park for every 939.6 residents – which far exceeds the current national average for its comparison population group. Park Metric data is also available for outdoor asset benchmarking. Using the comparison group with the same population range of 20,000-49,999, the chart below shows how Carol Stream Park District compares to its peers:

Outdoor Asset Benchmarking Basketball courts Community Gardens Diamond fields: baseball - adult Diamond fields: baseball - youth Diamond fields: softball fields - adult Diamond fields: softball fields - youth Diamond fields: tee-ball 30

Benchmark per Park Metrics 1 per X residents 6,875 26,639 21,277 5,509 10,656 9,157 15,310

Desired Quantity 5.9 1.5 1.9 7.3 3.8 4.4 2.6

CSPD's Quantity

Surplus / Deficiency

17 1 7 15 0 0 6

11.1 -0.5 5.1 7.7 -3.8 -4.4 3.4

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Dog Park Ice rink (outdoor only) Multipurpose synthetic field Multiuse courts - basketball, volleyball Overlay field Playgrounds Rectangular fields: football Rectangular fields: cricket Rectangular fields: field hockey Rectangular fields: lacrosse Rectangular fields: multipurpose Rectangular fields: soccer - adult Parks

29,683 21,698 17,802 12,956 8,364 3,010 16,914 29,941 19,250 14,737 6,952 10,065 1,901

1.4 1.9 2.3 3.1 4.8 13.4 2.4 1.3 2.1 2.7 5.8 4.0 21.3

1 0 0 0 2 37 3 1 0 0 7 9 43

-0.4 -1.9 -2.3 -3.1 -2.8 23.6 0.6 -0.3 -2.1 -2.7 1.2 5.0 21.7

Something to keep in mind about this data is that it is self-reported, which means the interpretation of how assets are classified can vary. Agencies can choose to classify based on a field’s actual use within the last season or two, or can report based on the possibilities within the space. There is a certain level of subjectivity in the asset reporting that should be considered when conducting comparisons.

Facility Inventory Carol Stream Park District owns and operates six facilities: three year-round recreation centers, two seasonal recreational facilities, and one maintenance building. Evergreen School gymnasium was a cooperative build, where a shared use agreement exists for that space. There is also a concession stand building at McCaslin Park.

Building

Location

Use

Coral Cove Water Park Coyote Crossing Mini Golf Elk Trail Recreation Center Fountain View Recreation Center

849 W Lies Rd 27W650 North Ave 160 W. Elk Trail 910 N. Gary Ave

Maintenance Garage Simkus Recreation Center

280 Kuhn Rd 849 W Lies Rd

Outdoor water park, seasonal Miniature Golf, seasonal Preschool, Early Childhood Classes Fitness Center, Indoor Pool, Gymnasium, Walking Track, Multipurpose Rooms, Child Care, Offices Maintenance Operations, two offices Gymnasium, Gymnastics Gym, Multipurpose Rooms, Administrative Office

The needs and desires of each community are especially unique, and therefore facility standards are even more difficult to standardize. Park Metrics data does exist for some types of facilities; a comparison to those communities with 20,000-49,999 residents is depicted below:

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan

31


Facility Benchmarking Recreation centers Gyms Community centers Senior Center Fitness center Performance amphitheater Nature centers Stadiums Ice rink Teen centers Indoor track Arena

Benchmark per Park Metrics 1 per X residents 25,500 23,000 27,320 31,428 32,224 31,934 32,267 24,320 24,167 29,569 32,279 26,820

Desired Quantity 1.6 1.8 1.5 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.7 1.7 1.4 1.3 1.5

CSPD's Quantity

Surplus / Deficiency

3 6 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

1.4 4.2 -1.5 -1.3 -0.3 -1.3 -1.3 -1.7 -1.7 -1.4 -0.3 -1.5

It is also prudent to note that the Carol Stream community does have other facilities that help foster recreational and/or leisure time experiences, including the College of DuPage, Outreach Community Center, Carol Stream Public Library, Carol Stream Ice Rink, and DuPage Training Academy. Maps of the Park District, updated from the 2009 master plan using DuPage County Geographic Information System data, are located in Appendix A.

Office Inventory The 2009 Master Plan identified 2,495 square feet of additional office space that was needed. At that time, offices were located at Aldrin Community Center, the Maintenance building, and Simkus Recreation Center. With the construction of Fountain View Recreation Center, the office spaces formerly at Aldrin essentially shifted to Simkus, and some of the recreation team that had been at Simkus shifted to Fountain View. In the midst of that change, the parks and facilities team conducted an office space study in 2012 and found that 56% of the office spaces met standards and 44% were below standards. The below standards group needed a combined 665 square feet to elevate to the ‘meet the standards’ designation. That study was conducted while the administrative team was in a temporary location. Now that the administrative offices have moved into the former fitness space within Simkus, and additional office space was added to Fountain View, the current scenario has become more equitable. Today, 79% of the workstations meet or exceed office space standards and 21% are below. The square feet needed to fully meet the standards is 414, which shows a 38% improvement within the last five years. The largest spatial discrepancy occurs with the workspaces assigned to staff classified in the Management Level 1 office space standardization category: 56% meet standards and 44% do not. One of four (25%) of senior leadership team does not meet standards, two of 18 non-management staff (11%) do not meet standards, and one of the supervisory level staff (14%) does not meet standards.

32

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


ADA Transition Plan In 1990 the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was passed, mandating that all municipal facilities be fully ADA accessible. Transition plans for existing facilities that needed physical updates were allowed to be written; those plans must define and outline how the agency intends to reach the end-goal of total physical accessibility. The Carol Stream Park District has a formal transition plan in place, which was last updated in 2012. Each Park District facility has been thoroughly assessed for accessibility, and the subsequent report document has a listing of those items that need adjustments, replacements and/or renovations. As capital improvement plans are made and projects like facility or park renovations occur, implementation of all the recommended changes should take priority. Continued progress toward total compliance and accessibility must be demonstrated. The Park District has included accessibility improvement as an intended outcome of the current parks and facilities master plan. Funding for the removal of physical barriers can be a significant obstacle; however, the Park District has demonstrated the commitment to work the plan. One method is to allocate portions of the special recreation tax levy to help offset the expense of removing physical barriers.

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan

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Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Chapter 5: Voice and Vision Community Needs Assessment The Office of Recreation and Park Resources from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign conducted a community-wide Hampe Park recreation study in 2017. In their final report, the University describes the purpose of the study as, “to assess the residents’ participation rates, attitudes, priorities, and future interests for the Carol Stream Park District’s parks, programs, and facilities.” The quantity of completed surveys received and the spatial distribution of the responses were “reliable and generalizable by research standards.”

Study findings The study findings that directly relate to parks and facilities planning will be reviewed here. The full report, with complete study results, can be found in Appendix E. Participation The facilities with the most participation and the most frequent participation (more than 25 visits in the past year) were Walking Pathways/Trails, Parks, and the Fitness Center. The facilities visited the least in the past year were Mini Golf, Indoor Pool, and Outdoor Athletic Fields/Courts. Top reasons for not participating at all were cost and lack of need/interest. Satisfaction Of those respondents who were active users, 74% responded as satisfied/very satisfied with parks and facilities, rating the Fountain View Indoor Track (90%), McCaslin Park and Sports Complex (84%), and Walking Paths at Armstrong Park (84%) as the three facilities with the highest individual satisfaction. Conversely, the facilities with the highest individual dissatisfaction ratings included the Sled Hills at Armstrong Park (29%), Sled Hills at Weeks Park (18%), and Grass Athletic Fields (17%). From a maintenance and care perspective, 78% of active users were satisfied/very satisfied overall. The indoor walking track (91%), exterior appearance of facilities (90%), and interior appearance of facilities (88%) received the highest satisfaction rating scores; portable restrooms (19%), grass athletic fields (10%), and outdoor pool and locker rooms (9%) received the lowest dissatisfaction scores. Not surprisingly, the facilities that received the strongest measures of satisfaction were the newest and/or those with the newest updates. This shows that users have noticed and appreciate aesthetically pleasing, well-kept facilities. Prioritization One section of the questionnaire offered a list of improvements and/or priorities, and asked the respondent to prioritize the top four items that should have budget allocations directed towards them. Take Care of What We Have ranked number one in total responses (45%), followed by Walking Paths and Outdoor Ice Rink. The importance of this ranking is that if/when funding is either identified or becomes available, the degree to which backing for a particular amenity/park/facility is now already known to the District. For example, if a grant for new trails that is focused on connectivity to existing amenities is announced, the District will already have data that walking paths were the second-highest Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan

35


rated item and that a trail to McCaslin Park was in the top 54% of answers – which would assist in the grant application process. Opinions A majority of respondents, 84%, felt that the Park District both “provides well-maintained parks, playgrounds, and sports fields,” and “provides a safe, enjoyable environment for myself and my family.” The District can and should feel good about its overall positive sentiment expressed in the survey.

Comparison to previous feedback Walking/biking paths were considered the most important outdoor facility to 54% of 2008 respondents and 37.7% in 2017 – and was the second-highest scoring item in both surveys. Although there was not a specific question that referenced the concept of taking care of what we had in 2008, the interpretation of the responses did lead to that summation. When asked the specific question in 2017, the result was resounding support of the “Take Care of What We Have” concept, with 45% of respondents selecting that budget allocation. As a point of reference, all of the previous years’ survey results were summarized in the 2009 master plan document. Because needs of a community change over time and due to survey methodology not aligning, no additional comparisons will be made to previous results in this report.

Parks & Facilities Master Plan Engagement Survey In October 2017, an electronic survey requesting feedback on the proposed Themes, Goals and Objectives in the Parks and Facilities Master Plan Update was conducted. The full survey tool, distribution data, and responses can be found in APPENDIX B.

Summary of community feedback: The total number of open-ended responses was 190. The chart below depicts the sentiments shared in those responses by assignment to 12 summarized categories. Feedback Summary Community Engagement/Listening 4% Clarifying Questions Posed 4% New Parks/Facilities /Amenities, 6%

Critical of Themes/Goals 4%

Staff Performance/Staffing 7% Overall Affirmation 9% Operational Comments 10%

36

Needs Actionable Items/Details 4%

Existing Parks/Facilities 16%

Programming Suggestions 13% Specific Theme/Goal Comments Financial: 12% affordability, taxes, fees 11%

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Categorized data that feeds into the summary (above) are depicted in the figure below: Topics Specific Theme/Goal Comments Overall Affirmation Clarifying Questions Posed Critical of Themes/Goals Needs Actionable Items/Detail Financial: affordability, taxes, fees Programming Suggestions Operational Comments Existing Parks/Facilities New Parks/Facilities/Amenities Community Engagement/Listening Staff Performance/Staffing

Themes 14 13 3 4 2 6 14 4 6 2 6 5 79

Goals 10 6 7 4 6 16 14 17 28 11 2 9 130

Total 24 19 10 8 8 22 28 21 34 13 8 14 209

Percentage 11.5% 9.1% 4.8% 3.8% 3.8% 10.5% 13.4% 10.0% 16.3% 6.2% 3.8% 6.7% 100.0%

Subtotal

33.0%

Directly Related to Plan Document

67.0%

Suggestions /Comments Related to the Park District

There were 79 comments regarding Themes and 130 for Goals and Objectives. Theme comments varied, with no strong trends in responses; the biggest trend was simply an expression of overall affirmation (13) followed by references to affordable pricing (5). Goals and Objectives also received a variety of responses; however, a few trends did emerge. The bullets below represent a few key concepts derived from the responses: •

Eleven of the 98 respondents to Question 4 (11%) referenced the indoor pool. Three of 90 respondents to Question 2 (3%) referenced the indoor pool. Pool closures due to staffing and structural challenges are the main catalysts for customer sentiment that could be described as disappointed and frustrated. The indoor pool was by far the most consistent topic communicated throughout the feedback. 3.8% of respondents observed that the content for which they were providing feedback was not detailed, actionable items by which to achieve measurable results. Although this was by design, to request the big-picture level of involvement from the community, it appears that the thorough responders wanted specifics. Desires for new parks, facilities, and amenities were expressed by 13 (6.2%) of respondents. Ideas included outdoor winter facilities (2), trails/paths (2), more parks/indoor parks (2), a senior room, maintenance free park benches, mile markers on pathways, emergency call boxes, indoor soccer facility, and youth sports facilities. Improvements to a variety of existing facilities were mentioned: Friendship Park, Armstrong Park washroom placement, Fountain View fitness service desk, Coral Cove Water Park, path repair, fitness equipment, baseball facility improvements, removal of noxious species, and the sled hill. Two comments were made that referenced the general maintenance of the parks; as one respondent stated, “the parks have not been maintained well this summer.” One person commented about soccer field maintenance. Two others specifically called out Fountain View grounds and the “park on WoodLake Dr.”

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan

37


Responses that were phrased as questions posed back to the district asked for clarification (i.e. rationale for the mature adult objective) as well as questioned why the district did not have things like a preventative maintenance program in place or whether or not the district had already been pursuing grant opportunities. Specific reference to the plan itself was made by 11.5% of respondents. A variety of suggestions were provided on themes, anywhere from grammatical suggestions and word choices to how choices are made. Reputation received two comments; one stating the word reputation does not reflect the bullets and the other stating the focus should be on stewardship. In regards to goals and objectives, partnerships were specifically commented on five times, underserved was referenced twice, meeting the needs of changing demographics was specifically referenced twice, and one agreed that the repair and replacement plan was “on target”.

Programming and Operational suggestions accounted for nearly one-fourth (23%) of all comments. It is recommended that these pieces of feedback be addressed in a venue outside of the master plan update process. The feedback received from this survey can be used to determine the level of support from the community and to ensure the direction is on-target. Considering that comments of overall affirmation (i.e. “good job” with no other feedback) were given by 9% of respondents and less than four percent were specifically critical of the themes and/or goals, the average ratings of 85 and 86, and also noting a general positive rather than negative tone in the text, the community can be described as supportive of the master plan. A “stay the course” recommendation is given regarding the Themes and Goals. The mix of perspectives offered in the feedback can be incorporated into specific Objectives and Tactics. The only specific recommendation for change is to consider adding an objective that specifically calls out the indoor pool.

Acquisition As a forward-thinking agency, the Park District should continue to monitor what acquisition opportunities there are to continuously improve the amenities and services to its constituents. Preserving park land for community recreational use and enjoyment is a core concept in the Carol Stream Park District’s mission. When opportunities arise to add additional land to the District, consideration should be given to the potential investment. The following factors are suggested areas for investigation when making acquisition decisions: • • •

38

The District should be in a financial position to purchase the land and have the fiscal and personnel resources to maintain the land. The parcel should be “high and dry” in respect of the land elevation being high enough and grades sloped enough to not retain standing water. The parcel size shall be large enough to supply those additional amenities in which the community has already expressed interest. The latest community needs survey showed that residents are most interested in recreational amenities that require larger amounts of space, like trails/paths and an outdoor ice rink.

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


• •

Any new land acquired should contain approximately 90% of “useable space”, meaning the parcel should be able to be developed to support specific recreational uses and amenities. Parcels that are misshaped, mostly watersheds, or unbuildable due to preexisting conditions should be considered with caution and an environmental assessment should be utilized. Accessibility to the space should be considered. Users must be able to reasonably access the space without obstruction, generally from a public street or public property. Maintenance vehicles and equipment must have means by which to access the site and parking or potential future parking should be considered. Beyond simply adding acreage to the Park District’s area of responsibility, there should be a greater value gained by the additional land. Value can be attained, for example, through new access to an existing parcel, links between existing parcels/trails, the addition of a new amenity/recreational opportunity, or expansion of a high-demand service. When possible, the new land should expand offerings to areas identified as underserved in the community. Care should be taken if there are historic, cultural, or protected resources on the site.

The addition of the land can be made through the following mechanisms: • • • •

Land Purchase Partnerships Donations and Gifts Jurisdictional Transfer

Capital Improvement A tool to help fiscally plan for large projects in the District is the agency’s Capital Improvement Plan (CIP). An ever-changing document, it ebbs and flows as predictions of cost are made and then actual bid amounts and expenses come to fruition. The District maintains a CIP document in spreadsheet format, and supports it with a summarized narrative provided to the Board of Commissioners on a regular basis. Upon the completion of the 2018 parks and facilities master planning process, CIP updates that reflect the new goals and objectives can be made accordingly. The current executive CIP summary can be found in Appendix I.

Alternative Revenue The two primary revenue sources for park districts are tax dollars and earned revenue from fees and charges. As a means to rely less on those two sources, agencies often look to other revenue sources to supplement funding. Traditional sources of alternative revenue are federal, state, and local grants. Considering the state of Illinois’ current fiscal difficulties and political climate, state funds that park districts typically relied upon (e.g. Park and Recreational Facility Construction, Open Space Land Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan

39


Acquisition and Development) have been frozen indefinitely. Subsequently, federal and local grant opportunities are more likely to be available. Some federal sources are outlined below. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) uses grants and cooperative agreements help the agency fulfill its mission to, “…keep Americans safe and healthy where they work, live and play.” Funding for CDC programs are announced and administered through the www.grants.gov website. The National Park Service has partnered with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to create the Parks, Trails, and Health Workbook – a tool to assist with the development of parks and trails and incorporating public health considerations into that development. The workbook can be found at www.cdc/gov/healthyplaces, and funding/partnering opportunities for trail projects through the Rivers, Trails, and Conservation Assistance Program can be found at www.nps.gov/orgs/rtca. The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) is funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Grants are awarded primarily to projects that assist with affordable housing, to anti-poverty programs and for infrastructure development. One key priority identified with the awards include activities that will benefit low to moderate-income areas. Two identified spaces in the District are Community Park and Carolshire Park. A General Section document is published by HUD annually that outlines the current fiscal year’s requirements; the 2017 document is located here: https://www.hud.gov/sites/documents/2017NOFA_GENSEC.PDF Nontraditional sources of alternative revenue can be defined as utilizing your agency’s skill sets and/or assets to create revenue streams that have not been utilized before. Historic examples include bringing service to the user (e.g. corporate on-site fitness classes), committing to relationships with long-term renters (e.g. Church groups), merchandise sales (e.g. logowear), and usage agreements (e.g. cell towers in parks). These ideas were once deemed non-traditional; however, they become commonplace after the passage of time. Being creative with agency resources and finding new ways to meet customer needs are key to developing nontraditional revenue sources.

Facility Trends for Consideration Based on community feedback and opportunity within the Carol Stream Park District, the following facility trends were matched as potential facility development opportunities.

McCaslin Park – a “Winter Park” destination As a means to capitalize on facilities and space the District already owns, expanded year-round services at the Coyote Crossing Mini Golf facility are proposed. The building usually closes during the winter months; instead, keep it open as a warming house, where snow equipment can be rented (e.g. snow shoes) and warm beverages and light snacks can be purchased. Encourage outdoor activities like crosscountry skiing, and snowshoeing. The park’s most enticing factor is its warm indoor restrooms and warming house. The sales of the warm beverages, light snacks and net program/event revenue would ideally off-set the staffing expense.

40

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


A temporary ice rink in McCaslin park could be considered as a part of the “winter park” concept. There is space for a rink and the amenity was ranked third in budget allocation priorities in the latest community survey. That said, a thorough cost-benefit analysis should be completed for this amenity, as outdoor ice rinks require a tremendous amount of staff time (and subsequently funding) to maintain.

Bike Parks A developing trend in the parks and recreation is the creation of sites for safe bike riding skill development. Pump tracks are bike tracks that encourage a pumping motion to propel the bike instead of peddling. Created with natural materials into the park landscape or with modular, formed materials, pump track developers are touting the tracks’ inter-generational and multi-skill use. Pump tracks are generally small, whereas flow tracks are larger and offer a more developed “flow” experience through the ups, downs, and curves of the trail. Combined trails at bike parks can offer additional skill development features such as jumps.

Ideally, a bike park would be accessible via existing trails within the park system, allowing users to ride their bicycles to the location. Classes and clinics could provide a small amount of revenue to help cover upkeep; some bike parks are fee-based.

Indoor Artificial Turf What was once considered a luxury, indoor artificial turf facilities have become more prevalent nationwide. Both public and private facilities are adding artificial turf to their inventories. Because of this increased presence, consumers’ desire for “the latest and greatest” in their community has increased as well. Demands on young athletes to train year-round and the need for practice and game space that is not weather-dependent have also driven the desire for more indoor artificial turf facilities. These demand factors, coupled with the nationwide obesity epidemic (and subsequent push to keep youth active and healthy), are driving more park districts to consider indoor artificial turf. Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan

41


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Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


DW Recreation Consulting

Parks and Facilities Master Plan Electronic survey, October 13, 2017 – November 1, 2017

DW Recreation Consulting November 2, 2017 Appendix B: Engagement Survey

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


CSPD Parks and Facilities Master Plan Update: Community Survey – Proposed Themes, Goals and Objectives Survey Statistics: Distribution • Survey link sent via E-blast to 7,919 addresses • 1,804 opened; 23% open rate, 502 clicked • www.csparks.org website: 15 pageviews • Facebook: • Carol Stream Park District; 1,066 people reached, 23 post clicks, 5 link clicks • Fountain View Fitness: 2,470 people reached, 44 post clicks, 18 link clicks • Adult Sports: 258 people reached, 4 post clicks, 3 link clicks • Youth Sports: 2,141 people reached, 9 post clicks, 3 link clicks • Carol Stream Parks Foundation: 1,677 people reached, 10 post clicks, link clicks • Bark Park: 173 people reached, 12 post clicks, 8 link clicks • Coyote Crossing Mini Golf: 145 people reached, 2 post clicks, 0 link clicks • Coral Cove Water Park: 573 people reached, 10 post clicks, 3 link clicks • Twitter: 180 Impressions, 1 total engagement

Response Rates • Total Number of Respondents: 414 o Question 1: I believe these Themes provide a solid foundation for the Parks and Facilities Master Plan ▪ 414, 100% ▪ Average Score: 85 (100-point scale) o Question 2: Please add any additional comments regarding the above-mentioned Themes here: ▪ 91, 22% ▪ Open-ended o Question 3: I believe these Goals and Objectives appropriately provide direction for the Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities for the next five to ten years. ▪ 367, 89% ▪ Average Score: 86 (100-point scale) o Question 4: Please add any additional comments to the above-mentioned Goals here: ▪ 99, 24% ▪ Open-ended • 33% of the open-ended comments were directly related to the plan • 67% of the open-ended comments applied to the Park District as a whole Appendix B: Engagement Survey

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Timeline of Survey Completions 267 (64%) on the first day

Summary of community feedback: The total number of open-ended responses was 190. The chart below depicts the sentiments shared in those responses by assignment to 12 summarized categories.

Feedback Summary Community Engagement/Listening 4%

Critical of Themes/Goals 4%

Clarifying Questions Posed 4%

Needs Actionable Items/Details 4%

Existing Parks/Facilities 16%

New Parks/Facilities/ Amenities, 6%

Programming Suggestions 13%

Staff Performance/Staffing 7% Overall Affirmation 9% Operational Comments 10%

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

Financial: affordability, taxes, fees 11%

Specific Theme/Goal Comments 12%

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Categorized data that feeds into the summary (above) are depicted in the figure below: Topics Specific Theme/Goal Comments Overall Affirmation Clarifying Questions Posed Critical of Themes/Goals Needs Actionable Items/Detail Financial: affordability, taxes, fees Programming Suggestions Operational Comments Existing Parks/Facilities New Parks/Facilities/Amenities Community Engagement/Listening Staff Performance/Staffing

Themes 14 13 3 4 2 6 14 4 6 2 6 5 79

Goals 10 6 7 4 6 16 14 17 28 11 2 9 130

Total 24 19 10 8 8 22 28 21 34 13 8 14 209

Percentage 11.5% 9.1% 4.8% 3.8% 3.8% 10.5% 13.4% 10.0% 16.3% 6.2% 3.8% 6.7% 100.0%

Subtotal

33.0%

Directly Related to Plan Document

67.0%

Suggestions /Comments Related to the Park District

There were 79 comments regarding Themes and 130 for Goals and Objectives. Theme comments varied, with no strong trends in responses; the biggest trend was simply an expression of overall affirmation (13) followed by references to affordable pricing (5). Goals and Objectives also received a variety of responses; however, a few trends did emerge. The bullets below represent a few key concepts derived from the responses: •

Eleven of the 98 respondents to Question 4 (11%) referenced the indoor pool. Three of 90 respondents to Question 2 (3%) referenced the indoor pool. Pool closures due to staffing and structural challenges are the main catalysts for customer sentiment that could be described as disappointed and frustrated. The indoor pool was by far the most consistent topic communicated throughout the feedback. 3.8% of respondents observed that the content for which they were providing feedback was not detailed, actionable items by which to achieve measurable results. Although this was by design, to request the big-picture level of involvement from the community, it appears that the thorough responders wanted specifics. Desires for new parks, facilities, and amenities were expressed by 13 (6.2%) of respondents. Ideas included outdoor winter facilities (2), trails/paths (2), more parks/indoor parks (2), a senior room, maintenance free park benches, mile markers on pathways, emergency call boxes, indoor soccer facility, and youth sports facilities. Improvements to a variety of existing facilities were mentioned: Friendship Park, Armstrong Park washroom placement, Fountain View fitness service desk, Coral Cove Water Park, path repair, fitness equipment, baseball facility improvements, removal of noxious species, and the sled hill. Two comments were made that referenced the general maintenance of the parks; as one respondent stated, “the parks have not been maintained well this summer.” One person commented about soccer field maintenance. Two others specifically called out Fountain View grounds and the “park on WoodLake Dr.”

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Responses that were phrased as questions posed back to the district asked for clarification (i.e. rationale for the mature adult objective) as well as questioned why the district did not have things like a preventative maintenance program in place or whether or not the district had already been pursuing grant opportunities. Specific reference to the plan itself was made by 11.5% of respondents. A variety of suggestions were provided on themes, anywhere from grammatical suggestions and word choices to how choices are made. Reputation received two comments; one stating the word reputation does not reflect the bullets and the other stating the focus should be on stewardship. In regards to goals and objectives, partnerships were specifically commented on five times, underserved was referenced twice, meeting the needs of changing demographics was specifically referenced twice, and one agreed that the repair and replacement plan was “on target”.

Programming and Operational suggestions accounted for nearly one-fourth (23%) of all comments. It is recommended that these pieces of feedback be addressed in a venue outside of the master plan update process. The feedback received from this survey can be used to determine the level of support from the community and to ensure the direction is on-target. Considering that comments of overall affirmation were given by 9% of respondents and less than four percent were specifically critical of the themes and/or goals, the average ratings of 85 and 86, and also noting a general positive rather than negative tone in the text, the community can be described as supportive of the master plan. A “stay the course” recommendation is given regarding the Themes and Goals. The mix of perspectives offered in the feedback can be incorporated into specific Objectives and Tactics. The only specific recommendation for change is to consider adding an objective that specifically calls out the indoor pool.

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Appendix A: Survey Tool

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Appendix B: Engagement Survey

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Appendix B: Engagement Survey

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Appendix B: Qualitative Responses Q1

1

Q2

95

Q3

Q4

50

These are great goals, but direction is more than just a goal; it has to be balanced with logistics. This looks like a wish list (and an admirable one!), but how would these goals be any different than the aim of every park district in the country?

2

100

3

50

4 5

53 100

6 7

92 86

1.What are pathways throughout the community? 2. For outdoor winter facilities: ice-skating, Sled hill, cross country skiing, a cabin or facility for changing, warming up, etc. This can also be used for party rentals, etc. Perhaps build this 100 area in the West Branch Forest Preserve. It would be a bonus if the grounds in front of Fountain View could be maintained better. the green spaces are overrun with weeds, and some people seem to thinks that the street lamp outside the front door is an appropriate place to lock a 80 bicycle. Curious to know what #5 is based on. Have "mature adults" expressed that facilities or programs don't currently meet 73 their needs? 94 These goals and objectives look good, however, it is difficult to understand if they will provide appropriate direction without insight into the current state of the CSPD and 92 Facilities. 82

I think the park district facilities are very well kept and 100 provide a welcoming community atmosphere. 71 99

When looking for financial partnerships hopefully that will allow rates to decrease for the use of the facilities for its members so it is more affordable and economical resulting 100 in an increase of participants from the community. 95 100

8 9 10

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

100 100 93 90 100 99 100 75 100 none 100 95 81 100 90 100 91

27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

100 100 100 96 75 85 100 100 87 90 31 89 90

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

97 96 80 100 99 100 75 100 Love the focus on outdoor winter activities 100 100 70 100 90 100 95 There are several parks in our town which have been rebuilt. This is great however some of them need swing sets to be put back in the play areas. Example park on 100 WoodLake Dr 100 100 98 90 72 100 82 100 90

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


40

99

41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48

100 Seems like you covered all the bases. 100 90 100 75 100 100 52

49 50

100 Agree! 66

99

For #4 I hope we expand programs for 4-7 yr olds that are NOT during the day. Children of working parents cannot participate in sports programs and other activities that 100 meet at 4pm during the week. 91

51 52 53

100 90 60

54 55 56

We have beautiful parks, playgrounds, and facilities now. Please make sure that you plan to take care of them. That 100 will keep the residents happy. 84 85

57 58

14 These are just ideas without any substance 100

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

The only thing I would add is that I feel seat belts should be installed on the Park District buses we use for the Senior 100 Forever Young trips. 100 93 100 100 100 100 49 I am glad that you are responding to educating about vandalism. Friendship park has vandalism inside the tall slide and many small children use that park. Luckily they are small enough that they can't read, but it feels very opposite 100 to Carol Stream values. 86

Right on target with maintaining a repair plan, and 100 partnering with others to save money. 92

Sounds good but still requires how plan will be 49 implemented. 100

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

100 71 85 98 63 100 94 95 86

68 69 70 71 72

0 49 45 100 100

73 74 75 76

keep prices affordable in all areas for all ages. Haven’t actively participated recently

I am not firmilar with the "master plan"

Just include more bike paths In your positive community benefit in the health and wellness you must include silver sneaker in your programs. Seniors can't effort your fees. Since there was open the health club I been calling to see if you will accept silver sneakers. The answer is silver sneakers didn't approve your club. More than four three years and nobody is doing nothing to corrected. I am very appointment with the general manager, director Etc . If these is a public a assume we al pay taxes. Please do something to correct this? Thank you for your kidneys?

Stop working to apply for awards and really listen to the residents. Stop with the "fluff" and maintain our facilities and provide quality programs

50 100 53 90 none

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

Love all the walking paths in my area. Use them daily and 100 they are kept up. Thank=you!!! 75 Sounds good to keep up with aging and active adults 96 97 100 100 95 More trails easier connections 95 80

Do they forget about SILVER SNEAKER in your programs 57 50 100 They look good and are a sound plan The park district talks the talk but doesn't walk the walk. I think the board is out of touch with how poorly the park district is run. Burnt out lights at the pool that don't get replaced, unresponsiveness to email questions, no interest in developing a pickleball program (one of the fastest 60 growing sports) 100 36 92 none Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


77 78 79 80

Those themes cover all the areas I would deem important. 100 Sustainability is huge. 75 100 92

81 82 83 84 85

70 100 98 40 100

86 87

76 79

88 89 90

0 45 100

Sounds like a lot of buzz words that you pay a marketing firm to come up with. Why not pick 5 well worded themes that most Carol Streamers can relate to??? Don't care for our Carol Stream Park District. They only have gambling trips for seniors and their parties used to be 3 a year and they always have been very cheap prizes and games. Have joined other park districts cause they care about their seniors.

92

Leadership is key to achieving your themes or goals. I believe 100 you have good leadership and community support Should focus on supplying programs and events for the 82 community

93

100

91

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

One point missing here is how great the staff is that I've dealt with over the years at all park district facilities. These are outstanding people who are very willing to help in any situation. This is a great compliment to those people and 100 the folks who hired them. 90 100 90 The goals as laid out seem somewhat nebulous, not much 71 detail 100 98 29 100 Way too much. If you spread yourself thin you won’t 80 accomplish much. Pick 3 or 4 of these goals. 100

76 100 100 95 4

looks good This plan needs more detail. I don’t like how ambiguous the share resources with partners is.

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Perhaps there should be an emphasis on community 94 91 involvement in programs/facilities. 95 100 96 99 97 100 98 96 Flexability of space and resources. Family oriented 99 98 100 91 101 50 Nothing

102 103 104 105

91 90 78 96

106

90

Financially I think we also need to make sure our choices are extensible and reusable, so we don't invest in equipment or facilities that need to be replaces when obsolete, but rather can be expanded upon or updated easily.

Good plan. Not sure what is meant by partnerships or with whom. Also unsure of what is meant by meeting needs of changing demographics.

107 100 Appendix B: Engagement Survey

89

I use the walking track, some machines, free weights, the pool & sauna. We have a full membership. I would like: to be able to belong on a monthly basis (we are gone 4 months a year), with no re-enrollment fee. Allow adults only to swim without a lifeguard. LIfetime FItness had this arrangement, and it was fine. Having summer lessons & school group lessons reduces lap swim times. The pool becomes quite cloudy & dirty with paper, hair and unidentified bits. It should be cleaned constantly when the groups use it. Swim caps s/be used. THe exercise mats need to be replaced; they are dirty and unappealing. The Community Park needs more maintenance. walking paths need to be retopped with asphalt.

99 100 95 Important to consider repair and maintenance costs. 100 99 49 Nothing

100 90 80 98 Good goals.

We would love some improvements made to Friendship Park. A big piece of equipment was taken out and never 100 replaced. Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


108 109 110 111 112 113

100 93 75 100 100 100

100 93 100 100 I especially like the idea to explore adding more indoor parks, as my husband has a rare blood disease and cannot be in sunlight, yet still loves playing sports with our young children. If we had batting cages and indoor playing 100 areas/playgrounds, he could fill an empty void in his life. 100 75

114 100 N/A 115 0 116 75 The park district is not a For Profit Organization. While fiscal decisions are important the primary goal is how you can improve the lives if your patrons. Also, you need to take 117 13 better care of your employees. 118 100 All fine 119 93 Health and wellness for ALL AGES 120 99 121 100 I have confidence that the board operating parks and 122 95 recreation will make the right decision. 123 70

124 100 Appendix B: Engagement Survey

11 100 93 99 100

Staffing is not addressed. Unbelievable that facilities (Such as indoor pool) cannot open because you do not have staff available! Enlarge warm water pool. Don't overlap warm water classes with forever young classes

95 82

75

It’s great to “take care of what we have―, but improvements still need to be made. The washroom at Armstrong park is in a horrible location and needs to be moved closer to the ball fields. The setup at Fountain View Fitness is not efficient. Why is the Fitness Desk so far away from the stairs? Coral Cove is so old...it needs to be

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


updated with a larger water park with more up to date features.

125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143

100 100 90 97 50 100 100 46 100 66 98 100 100 94 100 100 76 49 100

144 100 145 86 146 52 Appendix B: Engagement Survey

I would increasing park shelter rental and reducing cost of 99 gym membership to get more villagers to join. 100 90 100 75 100 100 81 86 100 100 100 96 100 100 100 55 Encourage good team spirt, respect one another. This is good for the youth to learn Not to be a bully. Treat others 100 as you want to be treated. 84 50 Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


147 148

149 150

97 90

89

75

as far as being fiscal responsible I think the Carol stream public should have the ONLY say in anything that is built with our MONEY or money being spent.

0

need a room for seniors to play card or dice or board games like Wayne Township and bloomingdale

151 100 152 100 153 79 154 55 155 87 Affordable 156 50 157 92

158 100 159 99 160 96 161 99 sounds great 162 100 163 100 Appendix B: Engagement Survey

#1 we do? OR don't? have a preventive maintenance program in place Already ? #2 why aren't we already pursuing grant opportunities. What exactly do you mean by partnering to reduce costs example please. If we partner with a 2nd or 3rd party won't we have to spend more money to use them or would there business just take over the Responsibilities. #4 " expand amenities in under serviced and culturally diverse areas " We live in Carol stream not Chicago !!!!. I gave 100% . I do how ever 100 question some of the master plan . so many activities for children not much for seniors except day trips some of those are too expensive or too 76 much walking make sure to survey the schools--elementary, middle and 100 HS levels to see what the kids are interested in. enhance fitness programs to continue to attract members 100 to want to go to Fountain View 84 56 95 65 Need more parks for kids 95 Considerations: More maintenance free park benches on trail routes. Mile markers on park pathways or signage 100 with park mileage info. 100 92 100 awesome! 100 100

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


164 90 165 100 166 100 167 68 168 75 169 170 171

172 173

70 93 90

97 56

174 0 175 95 176 75 177 58 178 100

85 100 100 71 90 The theme of "Strong Community Reputation" doesn't seem to me to adequately reflect the ideas listed below it.

You should look for the initial reaction of everybody that comes to the parks and watch them say "WOW"! I think the CSPD already have a plan in place and really don't care what the community thinks Second one is the best option

Responsible to the environment for future populations, 179 90 preserving green space. 180 90 The main theme should be "Parks and Facilities" 181 100 182 95 183 100 Ask the fitness center participants what they want in classes instead of constantly changing and adding classes that no 184 100 one is interested in. 185 56 186 49 Appendix B: Engagement Survey

90 49 100

73 73 0 100 67 64 75

It shouldn't be about the Park District as much as it should be about the families that visit and the local families that grew up in Carol Stream. The CSPD already had priced themselves way beyond what they have to offer

90 When looking at hours I think family hours at the indoor pool need to be addressed...very disappointed in the lack of 100 hours for kids ! 100 If you want to be fiscally responsible, why would you look to expand outdoor winter facilities? Use what you have 75 efficiently without raising the tax rate. 50 Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


187 51 188 100 189 80 190 100 191 53 Good idea 192 97 193 85 194 50 Blah blah 195 93 196 67 197 85

198 199 200 201 202

51 50 77 99 50

52 95 90 95 73 Good goals 100 94 50 Do not change the fitness center hours 91 42 No silver sneakers program for seniors 90

Park District is poorly run. Lots of issues with refs, umpires, conditions of fields. Events are unorganized and not though out. I have communicated issues in the past and never received any response.

I even see classes for seniors included at the fitness center as 203 100 well. 204 90 205 100 206 95 207 208 209

60 79 91

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

1 50 85 99 52

Safety at parks is a big concern. We need lighting, maybe motion sensor lighting to show teens, drug dealers hanging out at these parks at night. Same with improving safety on our trails. Emergency call boxes lighting, direction signs.

I like that you are concerned with the changing 98 demographics (age wise) as well as the other areas. 90 72 100 Paths need repair. Fitness equipment often isn't working 40 properly. Don't see much for adults 70 No raised taxes 94

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224

One thing that you need to look into is getting the young families more involved in the park district. Having talked to my neighbor, she is under the impression that she has to buy a whole year membership, when she can only afford maybe buying a class for her children.

81 50 93 91 85 fully encapsulates every aspect 99 47 100 90 100 50 48 100 100 Some of the staff require customer service education 95

225 63 226 93 None at this time 227 79 228 100 The park district must also take into account some of the outrageously high costs charged to its consumers such as 229 90 membership to Fountain View Fitness Center! 230 92

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

90 51 I place the lowest importance on number5 99 100 89 100 100 75 100 70 37 100 95

49 76 97 100

75

Disappointed in the Aqua Class schedule always changing for other groups. Also, pool closures. The pool is the only thing I am able to use in the Fitness Center because of my physical limitations. I pay full membership yet we are always pushed aside if anyone else needs the pool. No comment

Consider a goal of REDUCING the cost of membership to the fitness center!

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245

Be sure all areas of the town are considered for all levels not just the "Town center." Continue to develop the "town 100 center" working with the village and schools. 82 80 Changing demographic. What does that mean? Do I need to 69 move out? 100 100 80 100 Keep everyone well informed about progress or changes in 87 advance. 95 If the pool has to be closed because of the lack of lifeguards 100 could we lap swimmers use the track on those days? 100 99 100 100

246 100 247 66 248 100 249 69 250 89 251 75

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

100 86

30 90 80 100 87 54

None at this time.

100 100 97 100 100 94 72

I like the idea of finding ALTERNATIVE sources of revenue-DON'T INCREASE OUR TAXES PLEASE!

90 75

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


252 60 253 100 254

75

255 91 256 100 257 80 258 259 260 261 262

53 Employee service and development. I would like to thank everyone on the board for doing a great job. I would like to see more 5K races

I'm all about fiscally responsible as the main goal. These are tough times but we need to streamline in our household and 100 community 75 100 90 98

263 99 264 100

Being sure that any park land does not contain noxious species (ex. Canadian Thistle) would demonstrate responsibility toward the community.

265 100 Appendix B: Engagement Survey

70 93 100 90

Stick to hours posted- if facility is closed within those hours , post it. Calling does not help - no one knows! Improve baseball facilities. Make sure adult teams understand that they may be playing next to child teams - the adult teams need to act appropriately- no swearing, yelling, throwing bats after an ump makes a bad call. Not sportsman like and giving carol stream a bad image and name. You need to have a plan for the people working at these facilities. Partner up with surrounding communities to reduce duplicate programs

96 79 100 85 97

99 90

69

Facility schedules (i.e. indoor pool) are regularly impacted by electrical outages, and (guard) scheduling issues. Overscheduling by community school use also impacts resident use of the facility. Investigate and resolve these with a priority to keeping a facility like FV functional for everyone, including an expanding senior membership.. I think we have to hold vendors like the architects and electricians that chose and installed the failed lights at the indoor pool at fountainview. Also, the wrong sized vaults for the geothermal should be the responsibility of the vendor and not the park district. Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


266 68 267 100 268 85 269 85 270 80 271 100 272 100

273 95 274 82 275 100 276 95 277 95 278 93 279 99

280

72

100 80 76 90 100

It’s a good guideline, just need to see the plan in action and make sure you have the right people in place to execute it effectively and efficiently

96 The cost for the park district facilities workout don't are similar to lifetime fitness so I am not sure how this is benefiting the residence in terms of promoting health.

281 100 Seems pretty comprehensive to me! 282 85 283 100

284 285 286

99 84 95 95 95

It all sounds very well planned. Including maintaining and improving the environment as well as keeping costs down and including the community in all areas of improvement. It’s important to inform, educate and include the community in the plan to make it stronger and more successful

80 75 90

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

45

65 85 100

I don't agree with the overlapping use of park district facilities with GBN. Not all of Carol Stream is in that district, seems like a free ride for them

Indoor soccer facility should be considered. You are losing too many soccer players and teams to places like Glendale 100 Heights and St Charles 94 Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


287 75 288 100 289 99

75 100 90

290 81 291 100 292 82 293 100 294 78 295 85

76 97 81

296 75 297 80 298 100 299 62 300 90 301 302 303

49 98 91

Second bullet point of #4 - you make seem like culturally diverse areas will get more amenities than the non diverse areas. Parks should be equal across the board - not better because of race or economic factors. In terms of winter facilities, before looking at need and use, it would be appropriate to fix the existing sled "mound". It isn't a hill (see Northside park in Wheaton as an example). Partner as you talked about above with other community construction projects and have them place extra clean fill to build that hill up. The ship sailed on using the fill from the city hall excavation already. But fix that and you will have a better idea of how many people use winter facilities. Numbers of users are way down from when the hill was on the south side of Armstrong park because of the shallow, slow hill.

61 75

They are very generic and sound like every other businesses goals

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

75 80 100 71 100

It is inexcusable to have to shut down the pool because of staffing issues.

56 85

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


304

44

305 100 306 0 307 90 308 100 309 76 310 100 311 100 312 90 313 85

314 88 315 100 316 86

The Themes sound good, but will the Park District adhere to them? The Fitness Center is above and beyond what the Park District should be focusing on. There are private fitness centers that can be utilized, saving the taxpayers money. The Simkus Center was built and discarded only to build another larger fitness center. The Park District has not shown itself to be financially responsible. nothing is there to take advantage of for seniors on low income for free some of the themes are ridiculous and money spent unwisely

50

The Park District needs to contain costs. I really like the goal of maintaining parks and facilities. I feel 100 that the parks have not been maintained well this summer. 0 92 100 77 100

Well considering building facilities that would be consistent as the community grows and changes please keep in mind the safety of the parks and play areas versus just the esthetics

85

97 100 100

317 50 318 69 319 100

51 100 100

I can usually find something but cannot, they look 320 100 comprehensive and inclusive. 321 86

100 100

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

Should this really be a goal 'Operate Parks and Facilities Efficiently'. Seems that this should be a task that the district should be doing.

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


322 84 323 80 324 100

76 100

Since the community is aging, more thought for senior 325 100 activities would be kind to consider. 326 98 I live in Glendale heights and regularly walk CS parks. 327 95 328 93 Doing a good job so far!!! 329 79 330 77 Weight the programs offered to the age demographic of our 331 57 residents.

332

83

My main concerns would be taxes I'm paying out as well as cost of programs. In addition upkeep of parks and keeping them safe and useful.

Engage the community in assessment and commitment to projects

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

100 94 95 93 80 84 87

95

I like the partnership idea. Regarding the statement, "develop pathways through the community." Some bike and walking paths come to dead ends. Hopefully, completing them by making them lead somewhere is included in the ideas being developed here. Also, as a senior, I would appreciate additional consideration in activities offered. I have been asking FOR YEARS, that seniors be offered memberships allow attendance at water classes only and/or active agers classes only, similar to lap swim memberships. Many seniors never use equipment at Fountainview and full memberships are expensive even with the senior discount.

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


*Programming for the arts *Outdoor environmental science programming...bugs, rocks, plants *Continued programming 333 100 for seniors 334 73

335 70 336 100 337 75 338 86 339 72

340 49 341 100 342 100 343 100

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

Consider adding a CS Historic District with the St. Stephen Cemetery & prairie, Great Western Trail and Daniel Kelley home. I know this will take awhile...but it will allow you to partner with other Village organizations, provide Historic, cultural, environmental, recreational, athletic, educational and more programming. Plus it will be located in an underserved area. Also...Community Park is beautiful. Work to expand promotion and programming in this 100 forgotten park. 85 I believe we need to do a better job maintaining the fields that we have. Our soccer fields are poorly maintained at times. Kids practice and play on fields that have holes in the field. When the grass gets cuts they leave the grass 61 trimmings all over.

71

22 100 100 100

It is a disgrace that the indoor pool sits empty and hours are constantly cut! Get this resolved! Pay guards more or find a manager that life guards want to work under!

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


344 49 345 86 346 100

347

Subject: Silver Sneakers program The surrounding park districts including Wheaton, Itasca, Bartlett , and Glen Ellyn offer Silver Sneakers, not just a small discount for their older residents .When will the Carol Stream Park District board consider Silver Sneakers which would help a lot of older residents who may not be able to afford a monthly cost , What is the reason that they will not consider the benefit this would provide older residents and if they have considered it , what is the reason they have not provided it. I inquired with the fitness manager and was told ", I did contact the safety manager regarding the Silver Sneakers program We have investigated this program thoroughly and there are several reasons why we are not participating at this time. One of the main reasons was that their workout tracking system was not compatible with our software. This is a major component for the success of this program. With over 3,000 members we have to be able to track the usage of eligible Silver Sneakers members." This does not: Engage in and embrace partnerships Focus on community needs Encourage engagement especially-Meet the needs of changing demographics

89

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

0 95 75

70

Respond to growth in mature adult age segment. After several inquires about implementing the Silver Sneakers program it seems the Carol Stream Park district will not or is not able to involve a significant group of older citizens as most of the surrounding park districts are more than willing to do.

I am concerned by your comments regarding revenue sources. Expanding rental opportunities can mean less access to facilities and parks for individuals and catering to special groups with deep pockets.

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


348

75

Are they in any particular order? Fiscal should be last. Nitpicky, but bothersome when bullet points are not in agreement - some are statements with a verb, some are descriptors. Bullets in the 2nd theme are redundant. Embrace should precede engage for partnerships. Encourage that engagement is separate? Engaging with someone else? Confusing. Generally being "reactionary" is not a positive thing and is the opposite of innovating - do you want to be the leader or follow what everyone else does? Points in the 3rd theme replicate bullets above environmentally responsible is too similar to Sustainable. Meet needs repeats Focus on needs

349 100 350 90 351 98 352 70 353 100 354

97

355

80

don't concentrate on reputation, that comes with successful stewardship.

It is great that the Carol Stream Park District has taken the time to be responsible and transparent with the tax payers 356 100 money. 357 90 358 52 no Appendix B: Engagement Survey

#1 "Maintaining" a plan really isn't a goal. #4 - how are you going to ensure that what you implement is what these groups want? #5 - evaluate, analyze, investigate. So what? THEN what? Are there additional ways to reduce 75 vandalism? Seems limiting to only mention one tactic. It would be nice to see that all parks have updated facilities 100 and be well-maintained. 95 98 Act like the District has the ability to manage its future. The 40 list given reads like a complaint list with wishful solutions. 100 Developing a plan on how to serve the under served areas 97 are very important for the community I believe the special needs community should be addressed. WDSRA simply does not have enough programming. The park district should be willing to place individuals based on their appropriate age grouping vs. their biological age 70 grouping. Although I don't think that the parks are in the shape that they should be in, it's nice to know that you are working to provide the means for the improvements to be made...it all comes down to how your going to fund it which ties into 100 the first question of the survey. 100

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


359 90 360 100 361 100 362 94 363 86 364 100 365 90

Provide Positive Community Benefit •Health & Wellness •Environmentally responsible •Accessibility •Meet the needs of changing demographics •Parks as neighborhood/community gathering spaces

I miss the baseball and football games at the Armstrong Park. 366 70 Bring it back. 367 100 368 86 369 90 370 90 371 51 372 90 373 86 Partnerships are good but networking with other park districts and other organizations should be included. 374 90 Incorporate building a strong network. 375 59 376 80 377 100

378

28

How about when you sell a year long pass to the pool it is good for a year? That the freaking pool is not closed with only a day notice via a sign only visible to those there every day. That you stop giving the pool to all these swim teams That adults (who are the ones paying for the place) Stop getting treated like second class citizens????????

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

88 100 100 99 95

•Maximize rental opportunities •Respond to growth in mature adult age segment. •Expand amenities in underserved and culturally diverse areas.

75 99 85 79 89 52

100 include neighboring areas without the higher fees. 87 Nothing is mentioned about goals for kids facilities for 49 sports. 100 So you want to bring in more outside groups to further diminish members access to Fountain view? Are you INSANE? 17 Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


379 91 380 50 381 80 382 91 383 100 384 72 385 100 386 100 387 90 388 90 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399

76 87 83 95 84 100 The plan sounds workable 100 100 74 100 80

400 100 No additional comment 401 100 402 100

403

95

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

98 96 94 100 53 100 95 What's missing are the metrics used to measure goal 49 accomplishment. What, when, who, level of success. 83 84 95 84 100 OK 80 100 71 100 100 The ability to navigate the Village on foot safely would be 100 wonderful. 100 100

95

I did not see a place to comment on specific things, such as the fitness center. I'm so disappointed that the hours have recently been limited. I understand the lack of lifeguards, but it seems that more an more groups are using the pool which limits the hours people like me can enjoy its use. Thus, I have not been at the center for some time.

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


I believe there should be a statement about equality. Often times it seems as if the boys programs are given preferential treatment over the girls. (i.e. better fields, practice and 404 100 game times) Ensure programs are affordable. Health membership too 405 96 expensive. More exercise classes that are affordable. 406 100 407 100 408 93 409 85 410 100 Warm water pool needs to be redesigned. The slant to 5’ is too sharp and not easily usable during aerobic classes. Expand the pool to match the length of the lap pool. Classes become too crowded in the warm water pool. Thanks for all you have done in your aquatic programs. I try to get there at 411 94 least 4 days/week. 412 90 413 63 414 100

Appendix B: Engagement Survey

100 Can we have more "green" environmental options? Solar 97 power, recycling at all buildings, more recycle events. 100 100 87 85 100

90 59 100

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Demographic and Income Profile Carol Stream Village, IL Carol Stream Village, IL (1711332) Geography: Place Summary Population Households Families Average Household Size Owner Occupied Housing Units Renter Occupied Housing Units Median Age Trends: 2016 - 2021 Annual Rate Population Households Families Owner HHs Median Household Income

Census 2010 39,720 14,265 10,248 2.78 9,849 4,416 35.5 Area 0.38% 0.39% 0.29% 0.28% 1.33%

2016 Number Percent 927 6.4% 975 6.7% 1,307 9.0% 1,580 10.9% 2,464 17.0% 2,138 14.7% 3,208 22.1% 1,231 8.5% 703 4.8%

2021 41,180 14,815 10,634 2.78 10,107 4,708 38.0 National 0.84% 0.79% 0.72% 0.73% 1.89% 2021 Number Percent 949 6.4% 930 6.3% 1,847 12.5% 1,077 7.3% 2,045 13.8% 2,120 14.3% 3,644 24.6% 1,443 9.7% 759 5.1%

Census 2010 Number Percent 2,575 6.5% 2,555 6.4% 2,862 7.2% 3,301 8.3% 2,726 6.9% 5,605 14.1% 5,353 13.5% 6,951 17.5% 4,378 11.0%

$75,115 $88,714 $31,589 2016 Number Percent 2,399 5.9% 2,544 6.3% 2,668 6.6% 2,645 6.5% 2,866 7.1% 6,262 15.5% 5,153 12.8% 6,084 15.1% 5,381 13.3%

$80,249 $94,216 $33,555 2021 Number Percent 2,393 5.8% 2,390 5.8% 2,618 6.4% 2,460 6.0% 2,209 5.4% 6,613 16.1% 5,816 14.1% 5,238 12.7% 5,725 13.9%

1,704 4.3% 1,051 2.6% 659 1.7% Census 2010 Number Percent 28,069 70.7% 2,438 6.1% 116 0.3% 5,810 14.6% 7 0.0% 2,194 5.5% 1,086 2.7%

2,585 6.4% 1,135 2.8% 687 1.7% 2016 Number Percent 27,095 67.1% 2,474 6.1% 114 0.3% 6,929 17.1% 12 0.0% 2,513 6.2% 1,268 3.1%

3,555 8.6% 1,427 3.5% 737 1.8% 2021 Number Percent 26,135 63.5% 2,748 6.7% 119 0.3% 7,833 19.0% 15 0.0% 2,901 7.0% 1,430 3.5%

Households by Income <$15,000 $15,000 - $24,999 $25,000 - $34,999 $35,000 - $49,999 $50,000 - $74,999 $75,000 - $99,999 $100,000 - $149,999 $150,000 - $199,999 $200,000+ Median Household Income Average Household Income Per Capita Income Population by Age 0-4 5-9 10 - 14 15 - 19 20 - 24 25 - 34 35 - 44 45 - 54 55 - 64 65 - 74 75 - 84 85+ Race and Ethnicity White Alone Black Alone American Indian Alone Asian Alone Pacific Islander Alone Some Other Race Alone Two or More Races Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

Prepared by Esri

5,633

14.2%

2016 40,404 14,532 10,479 2.78 9,965 4,567 36.5 State 0.22% 0.21% 0.11% 0.15% 1.32%

6,398

15.8%

7,272

17.7%

Data Note: Income is expressed in current dollars. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2010 Summary File 1. Esri forecasts for 2016 and 2021.

Appendix C: ESRI Reports

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Demographic and Income Profile Carol Stream Village, IL Carol Stream Village, IL (1711332) Geography: Place

Prepared by Esri

Trends 2016-2021 Annual Rate (in percent)

1.8 1.6 1.4 1.2 1 0.8 0.6

Area State USA

0.4 0.2 0

Population

Households

Families

Owner HHs

Median HH Income

Population by Age 16 14

Percent

12 10 8 6 4

2016 2021

2 0-4

5-9

10-14

15-19

20-24

2016 Household Income $35K - $49K 10.9%

25-34

35-44

45-54

55-64

65-74

75-84

85+

2016 Population by Race 65 60 55

$25K - $34K 9.0% $15K - $24K 6.7%

$50K - $74K 17.0%

<$15K 6.4%

$200K+ 4.8% $75K - $99K 14.7%

$150K - $199K 8.5%

$100K - $149K 22.1%

50 45

Percent

0

40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

White

Black

Am. Ind.

Asian

Pacific

Other

2016 Percent Hispanic Origin: 15.8%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2010 Summary File 1. Esri forecasts for 2016 and 2021.

Appendix C: ESRI Reports

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan

Two+


Sports and Leisure Market Potential Carol Stream Village, IL Carol Stream Village, IL (1711332) Geography: Place

Prepared by Esri

Demographic Summary Population Population 18+ Households Median Household Income Product/Consumer Behavior Participated in aerobics in last 12 months Participated in archery in last 12 months Participated in backpacking in last 12 months Participated in baseball in last 12 months Participated in basketball in last 12 months Participated in bicycling (mountain) in last 12 months Participated in bicycling (road) in last 12 months Participated in boating (power) in last 12 months Participated in bowling in last 12 months Participated in canoeing/kayaking in last 12 months Participated in fishing (fresh water) in last 12 months Participated in fishing (salt water) in last 12 months Participated in football in last 12 months Participated in Frisbee in last 12 months Participated in golf in last 12 months Participated in hiking in last 12 months Participated in horseback riding in last 12 months Participated in hunting with rifle in last 12 months Participated in hunting with shotgun in last 12 months Participated in ice skating in last 12 months Participated in jogging/running in last 12 months Participated in motorcycling in last 12 months Participated in Pilates in last 12 months Participated in skiing (downhill) in last 12 months Participated in soccer in last 12 months Participated in softball in last 12 months Participated in swimming in last 12 months Participated in target shooting in last 12 months Participated in tennis in last 12 months Participated in volleyball in last 12 months Participated in walking for exercise in last 12 months Participated in weight lifting in last 12 months Participated in yoga in last 12 months Spent on sports/rec equip in last 12 months: $1-99 Spent on sports/rec equip in last 12 months: $100-$249 Spent on sports/rec equip in last 12 months: $250+ Attend sports events Attend sports events: baseball game - MLB reg seas Attend sports events: basketball game (college) Attend sports events: basketball game-NBA reg seas Attend sports events: football game (college) Attend sports events: football game-NFL Mon/Thurs Attend sports events: football game - NFL weekend Attend sports events: high school sports

Expected Number of Adults/HHs 3,216 869 1,021 1,666 2,848 1,463 3,591 1,918 3,304 1,936 3,800 1,407 1,467 1,441 3,555 3,541 762 1,277 1,202 940 4,959 968 1,145 1,033 1,386 1,173 5,345 1,532 1,589 1,180 9,161 3,658 2,630 2,009 2,108 2,633 8,571 3,505 965 1,244 2,197 991 1,842 1,466

2016 40,404 31,215 14,532 $75,115

2021 41,180 32,271 14,815 $80,249

Percent 10.3% 2.8% 3.3% 5.3% 9.1% 4.7% 11.5% 6.1% 10.6% 6.2% 12.2% 4.5% 4.7% 4.6% 11.4% 11.3% 2.4% 4.1% 3.9% 3.0% 15.9% 3.1% 3.7% 3.3% 4.4% 3.8% 17.1% 4.9% 5.1% 3.8% 29.3% 11.7% 8.4% 6.4% 6.8% 8.4% 27.5% 11.2% 3.1% 4.0% 7.0% 3.2% 5.9% 4.7%

MPI 122 103 107 116 110 121 116 115 112 111 99 114 100 108 125 114 99 90 98 123 120 106 133 122 116 110 111 104 128 116 110 118 120 112 110 116 120 122 107 135 123 116 128 99

Data Note: An MPI (Market Potential Index) measures the relative likelihood of the adults or households in the specified trade area to exhibit certain consumer behavior or purchasing patterns compared to the U.S. An MPI of 100 represents the U.S. average. Source: These data are based upon national propensities to use various products and services, applied to local demographic composition. Usage data were collected by GfK MRI in a nationally representative survey of U.S. households. Esri forecasts for 2016 and 2021.

Appendix C: ESRI Reports

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Sports and Leisure Market Potential Carol Stream Village, IL Carol Stream Village, IL (1711332) Geography: Place Product/Consumer Behavior Listen to sports on radio Listen to baseball (MLB reg season) on radio often Listen to football (NFL wknd games) on radio often Watch sports on TV Watch on TV: alpine skiing/ski jumping Watch on TV: auto racing (NASCAR) Watch on TV: auto racing (not NASCAR) Watch on TV: baseball (MLB regular season) Watch on TV: baseball (MLB playoffs/World Series) Watch on TV: basketball (college) Watch on TV: basketball (NCAA tournament) Watch on TV: basketball (NBA regular season) Watch on TV: basketball (NBA playoffs/finals) Watch on TV: basketball (WNBA) Watch on TV: bicycle racing Watch on TV: bowling Watch on TV: boxing Watch on TV: bull riding (pro) Watch on TV: Equestrian events Watch on TV: extreme sports (summer) Watch on TV: extreme sports (winter) Watch on TV: figure skating Watch on TV: fishing Watch on TV: football (college) Watch on TV: football (NFL Mon/Thurs night games) Watch on TV: football (NFL weekend games) Watch on TV: football (NFL playoffs/Super Bowl) Watch on TV: golf (PGA) Watch on TV: golf (LPGA) Watch on TV: gymnastics Watch on TV: horse racing (at track or OTB) Watch on TV: ice hockey (NHL regular season) Watch on TV: ice hockey (NHL playoffs/Stanley Cup) Watch on TV: marathon/road running/triathlon Watch on TV: mixed martial arts (MMA) Watch on TV: motorcycle racing Watch on TV: Olympics (summer) Watch on TV: Olympics (winter) Watch on TV: poker Watch on TV: rodeo Watch on TV: soccer (MLS) Watch on TV: soccer (World Cup) Watch on TV: tennis (men`s) Watch on TV: tennis (women`s) Watch on TV: track & field Watch on TV: truck and tractor pull/mud racing Watch on TV: volleyball (pro beach) Watch on TV: wrestling (WWE) Interest in sports: college basketball Super Fan Interest in sports: college football Super Fan Interest in sports: golf Super Fan Interest in sports: high school sports Super Fan Interest in sports: MLB Super Fan Interest in sports: NASCAR Super Fan Interest in sports: NBA Super Fan Interest in sports: NFL Super Fan Interest in sports: NHL Super Fan

Prepared by Esri

Expected Number of 4,978 686 650 20,219 1,894 3,744 1,652 8,018 7,595 4,971 5,072 6,121 6,821 1,327 1,040 1,008 2,304 1,296 908 2,017 2,222 3,224 1,846 8,657 11,771 12,401 12,491 5,024 1,509 2,519 790 3,603 3,650 786 1,501 1,353 9,612 9,254 1,941 1,115 1,701 2,893 2,905 2,821 1,770 652 1,534 853 954 2,034 607 702 1,526 746 1,820 4,547 1,059

Percent 15.9% 2.2% 2.1% 64.8% 6.1% 12.0% 5.3% 25.7% 24.3% 15.9% 16.2% 19.6% 21.9% 4.3% 3.3% 3.2% 7.4% 4.2% 2.9% 6.5% 7.1% 10.3% 5.9% 27.7% 37.7% 39.7% 40.0% 16.1% 4.8% 8.1% 2.5% 11.5% 11.7% 2.5% 4.8% 4.3% 30.8% 29.6% 6.2% 3.6% 5.4% 9.3% 9.3% 9.0% 5.7% 2.1% 4.9% 2.7% 3.1% 6.5% 1.9% 2.2% 4.9% 2.4% 5.8% 14.6% 3.4%

MPI 107 99 105 105 104 87 90 114 110 107 108 112 113 95 107 101 92 81 86 108 109 103 89 108 111 110 108 113 102 98 90 124 124 99 95 97 114 114 111 76 102 105 111 109 100 70 110 86 81 99 94 72 89 71 98 107 97

Data Note: An MPI (Market Potential Index) measures the relative likelihood of the adults or households in the specified trade area to exhibit certain consumer behavior or purchasing patterns compared to the U.S. An MPI of 100 represents the U.S. average. Source: These data are based upon national propensities to use various products and services, applied to local demographic composition. Usage data were collected by GfK MRI in a nationally representative survey of U.S. households. Esri forecasts for 2016 and 2021.

Appendix C: ESRI Reports

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Sports and Leisure Market Potential Carol Stream Village, IL Carol Stream Village, IL (1711332) Geography: Place Product/Consumer Behavior Member of AARP Member of charitable organization Member of church board Member of fraternal order Member of religious club Member of union Member of veterans club Attended adult education course in last 12 months Went to art gallery in last 12 months Attended auto show in last 12 months Did baking in last 12 months Went to bar/night club in last 12 months Went to beach in last 12 months Played billiards/pool in last 12 months Played bingo in last 12 months Did birdwatching in last 12 months Played board game in last 12 months Read book in last 12 months Participated in book club in last 12 months Went on overnight camping trip in last 12 months Played cards in last 12 months Played chess in last 12 months Played computer game (offline w/software)/12 months Played computer game (online w/software)/12 months Played computer game (online w/o software)/12 months Cooked for fun in last 12 months Did crossword puzzle in last 12 months Danced/went dancing in last 12 months Attended dance performance in last 12 months Dined out in last 12 months Participated in fantasy sports league last 12 months Did furniture refinishing in last 12 months Gambled at casino in last 12 months Gambled in Atlantic City in last 12 months Gambled in Las Vegas in last 12 months Participate in indoor gardening/plant care Attended horse races in last 12 months Participated in karaoke in last 12 months Bought lottery ticket in last 12 months Played lottery 6+ times in last 30 days Bought lottery ticket in last 12 months: Daily Drawing Bought lottery ticket in last 12 months: Instant Game Bought lottery ticket in last 12 months: Mega Millions Bought lottery ticket in last 12 months: Powerball Attended a movie in last 6 months Attended movie in last 90 days: once/week or more Attended movie in last 90 days: 2-3 times a month Attended movie in last 90 days: once a month Attended movie in last 90 days: < once a month Movie genre seen at theater/6 months: action

Prepared by Esri

Expected Number of Adults/HHs 3,715 1,503 844 843 1,232 1,275 603 2,360 2,466 2,537 7,545 5,582 9,159 2,540 1,305 1,412 4,628 11,571 1,012 3,994 5,175 1,022 2,244 2,435 3,088 7,608 3,502 2,671 1,595 15,596 1,563 1,198 4,863 667 1,483 2,866 925 949 12,492 3,871 1,268 5,688 6,221 7,642 20,423 750 1,954 3,474 12,439 9,146

Percent 11.9% 4.8% 2.7% 2.7% 3.9% 4.1% 1.9% 7.6% 7.9% 8.1% 24.2% 17.9% 29.3% 8.1% 4.2% 4.5% 14.8% 37.1% 3.2% 12.8% 16.6% 3.3% 7.2% 7.8% 9.9% 24.4% 11.2% 8.6% 5.1% 50.0% 5.0% 3.8% 15.6% 2.1% 4.8% 9.2% 3.0% 3.0% 40.0% 12.4% 4.1% 18.2% 19.9% 24.5% 65.4% 2.4% 6.3% 11.1% 39.8% 29.3%

MPI 101 113 88 103 105 110 86 111 106 106 112 107 118 105 104 104 117 109 115 107 107 101 109 114 109 107 105 107 114 111 120 114 114 93 120 99 115 88 107 105 107 100 111 114 110 99 107 110 113 113

Data Note: An MPI (Market Potential Index) measures the relative likelihood of the adults or households in the specified trade area to exhibit certain consumer behavior or purchasing patterns compared to the U.S. An MPI of 100 represents the U.S. average. Source: These data are based upon national propensities to use various products and services, applied to local demographic composition. Usage data were collected by GfK MRI in a nationally representative survey of U.S. households. Esri forecasts for 2016 and 2021.

Appendix C: ESRI Reports

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Sports and Leisure Market Potential Carol Stream Village, IL Carol Stream Village, IL (1711332) Geography: Place Product/Consumer Behavior Movie genre seen at theater/6 months: adventure Movie genre seen at theater/6 months: comedy Movie genre seen at theater/6 months: crime Movie genre seen at theater/6 months: drama Movie genre seen at theater/6 months: family Movie genre seen at theater/6 months: fantasy Movie genre seen at theater/6 months: horror Movie genre seen at theater/6 months: romance Movie genre seen at theater/6 months: science fiction Movie genre seen at theater/6 months: thriller Went to museum in last 12 months Attended classical music/opera performance/12 months Attended country music performance in last 12 months Attended rock music performance in last 12 months Played musical instrument in last 12 months Did painting/drawing in last 12 months Did photo album/scrapbooking in last 12 months Did photography in last 12 months Did Sudoku puzzle in last 12 months Went to live theater in last 12 months Visited a theme park in last 12 months Visited a theme park 5+ times in last 12 months Participated in trivia games in last 12 months Played video/electronic game (console) last 12 months Played video/electronic game (portable) last 12 months Visited an indoor water park in last 12 months Did woodworking in last 12 months Participated in word games in last 12 months Went to zoo in last 12 months Purchased DVDs in last 30 days: 1 Purchased DVDs in last 30 days: 2 Purchased DVDs in last 30 days: 3+ Purchased DVD/Blu-ray disc online in last 12 months Rented DVDs in last 30 days: 1 Rented DVDs in last 30 days: 2 Rented DVDs in last 30 days: 3+ Rented movie/oth video/30 days: action/adventure Rented movie/oth video/30 days: classics Rented movie/oth video/30 days: comedy Rented movie/oth video/30 days: drama Rented movie/oth video/30 days: family/children Rented movie/oth video/30 days: foreign Rented movie/oth video/30 days: horror Rented movie/oth video/30 days: musical Rented movie/oth video/30 days: news/documentary Rented movie/oth video/30 days: romance Rented movie/oth video/30 days: science fiction Rented movie/oth video/30 days: TV show Rented movie/oth video/30 days: western

Prepared by Esri

Expected Number of Adults/HHs 9,707 9,066 6,409 9,298 3,882 6,000 2,647 3,842 4,933 5,840 4,364 1,329 1,990 3,520 2,112 1,902 2,013 3,353 3,590 4,554 6,646 1,395 1,686 3,307 1,658 1,022 1,294 3,723 4,259 1,167 865 1,538 2,474 1,510 1,440 4,927 8,488 2,307 8,110 5,700 3,787 813 2,532 844 1,116 3,220 2,357 2,476

Percent 31.1% 29.0% 20.5% 29.8% 12.4% 19.2% 8.5% 12.3% 15.8% 18.7% 14.0% 4.3% 6.4% 11.3% 6.8% 6.1% 6.4% 10.7% 11.5% 14.6% 21.3% 4.5% 5.4% 10.6% 5.3% 3.3% 4.1% 11.9% 13.6% 3.7% 2.8% 4.9% 7.9% 4.8% 4.6% 15.8% 27.2% 7.4% 26.0% 18.3% 12.1% 2.6% 8.1% 2.7% 3.6% 10.3% 7.6% 7.9%

MPI 110 112 116 109 112 106 105 105 111 114 114 102 113 119 104 100 114 106 115 112 121 117 105 101 117 110 93 111 122 110 106 95 123 127 105 112 110 107 107 114 113 94 92 91 99 110 98 98

760

2.4%

84

Data Note: An MPI (Market Potential Index) measures the relative likelihood of the adults or households in the specified trade area to exhibit certain consumer behavior or purchasing patterns compared to the U.S. An MPI of 100 represents the U.S. average. Source: These data are based upon national propensities to use various products and services, applied to local demographic composition. Usage data were collected by GfK MRI in a nationally representative survey of U.S. households. Esri forecasts for 2016 and 2021.

Appendix C: ESRI Reports

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Sports and Leisure Market Potential Carol Stream Village, IL Carol Stream Village, IL (1711332) Geography: Place Product/Consumer Behavior Rented/purch DVD/Blu-ray/30 days: from amazon.com Rented DVD/Blu-ray/30 days: from netflix.com Rented/purch DVD/Blu-ray/30 days: from Redbox HH owns ATV/UTV Bought any children`s toy/game in last 12 months Spent on toys/games for child last 12 months: <$50 Spent on toys/games for child last 12 months: $50-99 Spent on toys/games for child last 12 months: $100-199 Spent on toys/games for child last 12 months: $200-499 Spent on toys/games for child last 12 months: $500+ Bought any toys/games online in last 12 months Bought infant toy in last 12 months Bought pre-school toy in last 12 months Bought for child last 12 months: boy action figure Bought for child last 12 months: girl action figure Bought for child last 12 months: action game Bought for child last 12 months: bicycle Bought for child last 12 months: board game Bought for child last 12 months: builder set Bought for child last 12 months: car Bought for child last 12 months: construction toy Bought for child last 12 months: fashion doll Bought for child last 12 months: large/baby doll Bought for child last 12 months: doll accessories Bought for child last 12 months: doll clothing Bought for child last 12 months: educational toy Bought for child last 12 months: electronic doll/animal Bought for child last 12 months: electronic game Bought for child last 12 months: mechanical toy Bought for child last 12 months: model kit/set Bought for child last 12 months: plush doll/animal Bought for child last 12 months: sound game Bought for child last 12 months: water toy Bought for child last 12 months: word game

Prepared by Esri

Expected Number of Adults/HHs 1,308 3,864 7,055 550 10,487 1,566 933 2,015 3,042 1,742 2,488 2,229 2,017 2,242 931 703 2,098 3,203 1,364 2,907 1,449 1,441 1,867 1,242 1,192 3,851 669 2,734 1,107 899 2,272 570 2,947 803

Percent 4.2% 12.4% 22.6% 3.8% 33.6% 5.0% 3.0% 6.5% 9.7% 5.6% 8.0% 7.1% 6.5% 7.2% 3.0% 2.3% 6.7% 10.3% 4.4% 9.3% 4.6% 4.6% 6.0% 4.0% 3.8% 12.3% 2.1% 8.8% 3.5% 2.9% 7.3% 1.8% 9.4% 2.6%

MPI 104 107 120 77 104 85 110 102 106 118 112 107 95 99 98 89 100 104 102 103 96 101 90 109 102 108 83 112 101 117 100 92 104 86

Data Note: An MPI (Market Potential Index) measures the relative likelihood of the adults or households in the specified trade area to exhibit certain consumer behavior or purchasing patterns compared to the U.S. An MPI of 100 represents the U.S. average. Source: These data are based upon national propensities to use various products and services, applied to local demographic composition. Usage data were collected by GfK MRI in a nationally representative survey of U.S. households. Esri forecasts for 2016 and 2021.

Appendix C: ESRI Reports

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Sports and Leisure Market Potential Carol Stream Village, IL Carol Stream Village, IL (1711332) Geography: Place Product/Consumer Behavior Bought digital book in last 12 months Bought hardcover book in last 12 months Bought paperback book in last 12 months Bought 1-3 books in last 12 months Bought 4-6 books in last 12 months Bought 7+ books in last 12 months Bought book (fiction) in last 12 months Bought book (non-fiction) in last 12 months Bought biography in last 12 months Bought children`s book in last 12 months Bought cookbook in last 12 months Bought history book in last 12 months Bought mystery book in last 12 months Bought novel in last 12 months Bought religious book (not bible) in last 12 mo Bought romance book in last 12 months Bought science fiction book in last 12 months Bought personal/business self-help book last 12 months Bought travel book in last 12 months Bought book online in last 12 months Bought book last 12 months: amazon.com Bought book last 12 months: barnes&noble.com Bought book last 12 months: Barnes & Noble book store Bought book last 12 months: other book store (not B&N) Bought book last 12 months: mail order Listened to/purchased audiobook in last 6 months

Prepared by Esri

Expected Number of Adults/HHs 5,006 6,990 10,588 6,649 3,664 5,626 9,306 7,945 2,288 3,046 2,694 2,643 3,874 5,228 2,161 2,282 1,658 2,297 812 7,463 6,454 1,231 5,272 3,566 519 1,676

Percent 16.0% 22.4% 33.9% 21.3% 11.7% 18.0% 29.8% 25.5% 7.3% 9.8% 8.6% 8.5% 12.4% 16.7% 6.9% 7.3% 5.3% 7.4% 2.6% 23.9% 20.7% 3.9% 16.9% 11.4% 1.7% 5.4%

MPI 121 107 108 109 111 105 109 111 99 108 105 107 111 107 105 97 96 128 124 124 119 130 115 100 73 123

Data Note: An MPI (Market Potential Index) measures the relative likelihood of the adults or households in the specified trade area to exhibit certain consumer behavior or purchasing patterns compared to the U.S. An MPI of 100 represents the U.S. average. Source: These data are based upon national propensities to use various products and services, applied to local demographic composition. Usage data were collected by GfK MRI in a nationally representative survey of U.S. households. Esri forecasts for 2016 and 2021.

Appendix C: ESRI Reports

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Recreation Expenditures Carol Stream Village, IL Carol Stream Village, IL (1711332) Geography: Place Demographic Summary Population Households Families Median Age Median Household Income

Tv/Video/Audio Cable & Satellite Television Services Televisions & Video Audio Rental of TV/VCR/Radio/Sound Equipment Repair of TV/Radio/Sound Equipment Entertainment/Recreation Fees and Admissions Tickets to Theatre/Operas/Concerts Tickets to Movies/Museums/Parks Admission to Sporting Events, excl.Trips Fees for Participant Sports, excl.Trips Fees for Recreational Lessons Membership Fees for Social/Recreation/Civic Clubs Dating Services Toys/Games/Crafts/Hobbies Toys/Games/Arts/Crafts/Tricycles Playground Equipment Play Arcade Pinball/Video Games Online Entertainment and Games Stamp & Coin Collecting Recreational Vehicles and Fees Docking and Landing Fees for Boats and Planes Camp Fees Payments on Boats/Trailers/Campers/RVs Rental of RVs or Boats Sports, Recreation and Exercise Equipment Exercise Equipment and Gear, Game Tables Bicycles Camping Equipment Hunting and Fishing Equipment Winter Sports Equipment Water Sports Equipment Other Sports Equipment Rental/Repair of Sports/Recreation/Exercise Equipment Photographic Equipment and Supplies Film Film Processing Photographic Equipment Photographer Fees/Other Supplies & Equip Rental/Repair Reading Magazine/Newspaper Subscriptions Magazine/Newspaper Single Copies Books Digital Book Readers

Spending Potential Index 111 109 115 116 92 115 122 119 122 120 127 126 120 123 112 112 111 121 115 99 119 127 123 113 126 114 110 124 126 110 117 124 106 124 119 114 112 117 122 111 108 103 114 115

Prepared by Esri

2016 40,404 14,532 10,479 36.5 $75,115 Average Amount Spent $1,331.39 $979.07 $253.30 $94.80 $1.21 $3.01 $706.60 $62.62 $80.87 $64.18 $113.96 $154.98 $229.15 $0.85 $127.70 $112.25 $4.60 $2.62 $3.81 $4.43 $128.28 $9.75 $44.46 $54.22 $19.85 $189.06 $59.94 $32.18 $18.82 $51.90 $5.86 $6.58 $10.16 $3.62 $65.32 $1.05 $8.48 $27.85 $27.94 $146.19 $45.30 $10.58 $47.27 $43.04

2021 41,180 14,815 10,634 38.0 $80,249 Total $19,347,747 $14,227,882 $3,680,973 $1,377,583 $17,546 $43,760 $10,268,306 $909,925 $1,175,215 $932,606 $1,656,006 $2,252,158 $3,330,041 $12,353 $1,855,695 $1,631,204 $66,836 $38,021 $55,314 $64,318 $1,864,227 $141,707 $646,130 $787,985 $288,403 $2,747,385 $871,055 $467,609 $273,420 $754,251 $85,198 $95,603 $147,656 $52,588 $949,294 $15,262 $123,250 $404,721 $406,060 $2,124,391 $658,335 $153,722 $686,868 $625,464

Data Note: The Spending Potential Index (SPI) is household-based, and represents the amount spent for a product or service relative to a national average of 100. Detail may not sum to totals due to rounding. Source: Esri forecasts for 2016 and 2021; Consumer Spending data are derived from the 2013 and 2014 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor

Appendix C: ESRI Reports

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


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Appendix C: ESRI Reports

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Appendix D: Parks and Facilities Master Planning Workshop Notes

Engaging in brainstorming exercises can be a powerful way to enlist all opinions and ideas. Unfortunately, not all ideas can be included in a final plan product. Numerous ideas were generated in the staff and Board of Commissioners parks and facilities master planning workshops. The workshop notes are included below as a way to remember those items that may not have been included in the final plan – this time – but could be revisited again in the future. Listing of all ideas generated in the Themes, Goals, and Objectives workshops:

Combined Themes Fiscal Responsibility Maximize Resources Reputation Partnerships Community Focus / Engagement Communication Accessibility Innovative Modern Environmentally Responsible Health & Wellness Sustainability Community Benefit Changing Demographics Take Care of What We Have

Carol Stream Park District Combined Goals G: Take care of what we have G: Improve Financial Position G: Generate Revenue G: Operate Efficiently G: Meet needs of changing community demographics G: Improve/Enhance/Develop Parks & Facilities G: Maximize facility usage and opportunities [Acquisition (new term? – purchase is not realistic)] G: Inclusion G: Community Engagement G: Expense Control G: Investigate Community Communication Opportunities G: Capture Bigger Market G: Increase Safety Appendix D: Workshop Notes

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Carol Stream Park District Combined Goals and Objectives G: Take care of what we have: O: Repair & Replacement Plan O: Develop Standard of Care O: Trails/Parks â&#x20AC;&#x201C; continue to expand and improve O: Coral Cove Water Park O: Prioritize Our Resources [parks, facilities, timeline] O: Create and Implement a Repair & Replacement Plan O: Simplify - Review current properties to see how we can make it easier to maintain O: Plan for large capital projects (i.e. CCWP Liner) O: FVRC O: Repair & Replacement Plan O: Storage O: Preventative Maintenance Program O: Space Utilization O: Elk Trail O: Server room Update (more outlets) G: Improve Financial Position O: Fund Balances O: Pursue Alternative Revenue Sources O: Increase Profit Margin G: Generate Revenue O: Partner to reduce costs O: Investigate new grant opportunities O: Alternative Revenue Sources O: Reduce Expenses / Cost Savings O: Innovative Programs O: Expand Rentals O: Sponsorships G: Operate Efficiently O: Complete a staffing needs & training assessment for parks/facil (more staff, better trained) O: Better Utilize current space, supplies O: Building Hours O: Processes O: Scheduling O Sharing Resources G: Meet needs of changing community demographics O: Mature Adults O: Ethnic backgrounds/cultures O: Parks in Underserved areas G: Improve/Enhance/Develop Parks & Facilities O: Path to McCaslin (2) O: Sled Hill (2) Appendix D: Workshop Notes

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


O: Add amenities O: New Water Park O: Driving Range O: Theatre O: Racquetball O: Gymnastics Warehouse O: McCaslin Warehouse O: Outdoor Track O: Outdoor Fitness Equipment O: "Actual" ADA Playground O: Farmer's Market O: Indoor Turf O: Batting Cages O: Lazy River O: Ice Rink G: Maximize facility usage and opportunities [Acquisition (new term? – purchase is not realistic)] O: Exploring indoor space possibilities O: Development of alternative land and facility plans O: Capacity G: Inclusion O: Race/Ethnicity O: Underserved Parks O: Low Income O: All Ages G: Community Engagement O: Coffee with the Commissioner O: Party in the Park G: Expense Control G: Investigate Community Communication Opportunities {PD policies/regs, new amenities, new initiatives} O: Improve and develop effective communication methods O: Mobile Marketing G: Capture Bigger Market O: Non-Resident Targeting O: Scholarship O: Non-Resident Pricing: Make more affordable G: Increase Safety O: Increase Security Awareness O: Lights O: Park Police/Security Guards O: Staff Training Unassigned: Trails/paths master plan: part of Village's plan Parks and facilities are Gathering places, like their neighborhood’s “downtown” Appendix D: Workshop Notes

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


Increase Efficiency Outdoor Pool Future Staffing Levels Reduce complaints by 5% Brand Alignment and Awareness Reactive to New Trends Identify accessibility areas of concern Affordability for All Income Levels Develop IGA's for properties we now maintain Tools & Resources (software) Annex McCaslin Possible Strategic Plan Items: Continue to attract "go getter" employees & volunteers Continued Inter-Departmental Relations Properly realign job responsibility and compensation needs (i.e. lifeguards and service desk) Customer Recognition Staffing/Competitive Wages Division of Responsibility Staff Training

Appendix D: Workshop Notes

Carol Stream Park District Parks and Facilities Master Plan


2015 Revenue Generation Plan

October 27, 2014

Jim Reuter Executive Director

2015 Revenue Generation Plan

Page 0


To: From: Date: Re:

Park Board Executive Director October 27, 2014 Revenue Generation Plan EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Carol Stream Park District is a public service agency. This plan suggests ways to possibly increase revenues and still meet the citizens’ needs for recreation, cut back on expenses (that we can control) associated with the district and still provide recreation opportunities for the Carol Stream Community. The goal is for the Park District to improve the budget net or net revenue to offset or support special events, programs that are a necessity but don’t produce a profit and to plan for funding the infrastructure and equipment through the Repair and Replacement program. So, in addition to presenting ways to increase gross revenue, the plan addresses ways to minimize costs. To compile this plan the Senior Leadership Team gave their comments/suggestions and the Executive Director made sure to reach out to the entire staff from all of the areas to ask for their suggestions on how to increase revenues. All of their ideas are included at end of this report. The important part was to have buy-in from all of the employees and to get people to think out-of-the-box. Some of the ideas are great and some not so much, but the buy in was the important part. Seeing that a similar plan to this was compiled in 2012 it was felt that it should be continued to be used as the template for this 2015 Revenue Generation Plan. Please note that staff does not provide dates when some of the revenue enhancing actions should take place. This is intentional. It’s important that there be full board support and backing before engaging in some of the potential actions. It is the intent that individual concepts and actions will be presented to the Park Board before staff begins, however, some of the ideas are so good and so easy to implement that they may be in place before the board actually gets to absorb this report. The Carol Stream Park District Revenue Plan continues to ask, “How can we best maximize revenue and minimize expenses by excelling at what we do best?

2015 Revenue Generation Plan

Page 1


Supplement tax revenues to minimize the reliance on property taxes We’ve made up the phrase, “Right size tax revenues.” This means that the District should be collecting the property taxes which are legitimate and ethical, not just authorized. The items below suggest several ways in which the District may attain the logical tax revenues. Encourage voluntary annexation of properties located in unincorporated areas that border on the Park District boundaries. Logically and legally apply non-capped funds wherever appropriate. This means that bond proceeds and special recreation funds should be used, always within the bounds of the law, but also when the expenses are justifiably connected to capital projects and special recreation services. Develop a quality of life message that may attract new homeowners to our now established, award-winning, safe, educational, and fun community. Annex “finger” of Hanover Park at Army Trail Road, between Kuhn Road and the Jewel store. “Sales” of Service The 2014 budget estimated for new revenue of $1,382,105 from CSPD fees and charges for programs, rentals, passes, memberships, etc. — sales of services. This is where the district brings in most of its earned revenue and so it only makes sense to look at ways to increase the sales of our “best-selling” products; FVRC swim, fitness, walking track, etc. Of all of the potential revenue enhancing opportunities, this area holds the greatest potential. If you increase fees by just 10%, that is another $138,000 in gross revenue; and about $48,000. The methods listed below do not require much explanation. Also, several are part of the current Strategic Plan. •

Examine fee structure, pricing computations, program offerings and workloads. In some areas we have inexplicable variations in the prices of similar programs. An effort to resolve this with what is known as the matrix system will be examined along with a sales audit. A couple of our “sister” park districts use this matrix system to determine what programs are your cash hogs, what programs do “alright” and may do better with a little enhancement and what programs are “dogs” and should revamped or not be offered anymore. In the same light, this matrix system may help adjust the work loads of staff which in some opinions is lopsided. Staff will also be examining a “sales audit” that has been a successful tool for a neighboring Park District. Concentrate on “in-demand” services, add more value to existing programs and increase revenues.

Develop a Cost Recovery model/policy that will set certain goals for certain areas of our services to reach. For example: Special Events should have a goal where 25% of that event is subsidized.

Examine raising the non-resident fees.

2015 Revenue Generation Plan

Page 2


Continue to improve customer service.

Quality-- “Improving the Experience.” The better the quality, the more desirable the experience, the higher the volume of “sales”.

Continue to offer and expand hi-return programs (tournaments, leagues, fitness track, drop-ins, etc.)

Continually expand the customer base as possible and logical. For example, Board policy allows employees of resident businesses to get resident rates and Fitness center membership are offered SD93, SD25, GNHS, P-Hill

Continue to examine “gaps” in service. (Days between school and camp), days off of school in each district and holiday days off.

Rentals Expand our rental offerings: •

Fields: Opportunities exist for high schools to rent McCaslin fields early in the spring; for tournament organizers to rent McCaslin; for adult soccer teams/leagues to rent soccer fields. Our IGA with Glenbard 87 allows for the rental of CSPD time on Weber field.

Gyms: CSPD has moved from a 2-gym status to a 5-gym status. We will be able to accommodate our programs, our partners, and still have gym time to rent. The gym at Simkus should be rented out specifically for larger (200+) parties with no alcohol and for open gym.

Rooms: FVRC - Specifically, the 3 rooms at FVRC are attractive to medium sized parties. Obtain an R Liquor License for rentals. SIMKUS room improvements allow for not only additional programming space, but birthday parties and rentals in those same rooms during down times.

Equipment: Continue to investigate the potential to rent bicycles, paddle boats, kayaks, canoes, etc.

Picnic Shelters: New shelters at McCaslin open new avenues to market the availability of the shelters. A detailed look at the fee structure of the shelter rentals specifically for non-res.

“Permanent” Renters. This is a successful strategy used by other community centers. Permanent refers simply to long-term or ongoing renters. Some common ones provide examples: Weight Watchers, Massage Therapist, church, Club v-ball, sport therapy and Jazzercise possibly at Simkus Gymnasium on Sunday AM. Do local businesses need space regularly for employee meetings, etc. The renter does not rent space 24/7 but rather rents blocks of time in certain spaces. Similar to what is working for the Home School programs. This option could be applied at SRC or FVRC. Developing a sales strategy for each of

2015 Revenue Generation Plan

Page 3


the above will be a multi-discipline endeavor. It will require a coordinated system of Service Team, Recreation, Maintenance and Marketing. •

Examine the rates of rentals specifically the charge to non-residents.

Sponsorships and Advertising CSPD needs to continue to get local businesses to see the potential value of advertising in park venues. This has been steadily increasing over the past five years, but there is more work that can be done. In the coming few years, this can be a good source of revenues to help with sustainability of our services and facilities. Expanded opportunities: •

Develop a proposed system and guidelines for room, shelter, etc., naming rights.

Maximize Fountain View Recreation Center, McCaslin Park, Armstrong Park, Coyote Crossing and Coral Cove advertising opportunities. Banners/large screen around gym/track.

Sell ads to appear on the FVRC interior electronic bulletin boards. (And, at SRC when the time arrives to update). DONE

Ads in the quarterly program guide have been increasing. The objective with these two examples is to pay for the printing/site management.

All of the planning for sponsorships and advertising will need to be wrapped in a set of parameters and decided upon how to proceed. For example, how many sponsorship banners are acceptable and how many become too much? Are there businesses or products that we don’t allow? Do we accept political candidate advertisements? Dollars from Ancillary Services •

Food and Beverage Concessions: Actively programmed, McCaslin, Coral Cove and FVRC will allow for the District to contract a concessionaire to enhance the recreation experience, while generating additional revenue for the District. Then an analysis will have to be conducted to see which will be more profitable…In-House vs. Vendor.

Food service will be a feature with FVRC rentals. Preferred catering companies that renters hire when renting at FVRC with the Park District collecting a percentage from the catering company.

McCaslin Camp/Group Packages: Market this facility as a destination type facility. Phase 2 has created a more attractive venue for summer camps, day care outings, school outings and the like. Multiple recreation amenities which may sit vacant during the day will provide hours of activity in conjunction with the Coyote Crossing mini-golf course.

2015 Revenue Generation Plan

Page 4


Vending. Specific vending spots have been designed into FVRC. Products will be closely monitored to learn what beverages and snacks sell best. Coupled with visitor input, the vending will continually be brought up to date to maximize sales.

Donations/Foundation Support Now that there is an established Foundation, donations will funnel through that entity allowing potential for larger donations that are more comfortable donating to a 501 (c) 3. The financial benefit to the park district of a Foundation is that the Foundation can supplement programs and amenities. According to the Foundation by-laws they exist and raise money for: •

Program support—Such as programs for lower income families and children; Seed money to start a trial program; financial aid for deserving residents.

Enhancement projects-- such as stocking a lake with fish; funding shade structures at playgrounds; flag poles; public art, etc.

Grants Grants can certainly be a boost to the park district. However, we don’t want to assume that grant money will ever be more than a partial help. Grant money will never underwrite the majority of what CSPD does. Certain types of grants are our “best bets”: •

Grants to reduce energy consumption.

Pursue program support grants that are awarded to low-income and youth at risk, or disabled youth.

Capital project grants: Continue to pursue OSLAD grants funded through the real estate transfer tax of Illinois, grant programs for trails and from the Community Development Block Grant program.

Designate grant point-person: To have our best chance to get and continue to get grants, we will designate a point-person or utilize the services of outside/consultant type grant writers who are familiar with the programs and can guide staff to the dollars available.

Cost Cutting and New Ideas •

Partnerships: We will want to remain aggressive in our pursuit of mutually beneficial partnerships.

Evaluate the cost and value to the community of putting on a special event. Possibly the elimination of Earth Day, Just Play and CS Barks which bring some great community spirit, but also attract a large number of non-residents so the actual value of the event vs. the expenses of putting on such an event need to be evaluated.

2015 Revenue Generation Plan

Page 5


Energy-savings: in addition to grant possibilities, we want to aggressively pursue opportunities to lower gasoline consumption; electricity consumption and natural gas.

Outsourcing: Wherever and whenever we can outsource work we should consider. Considering means that we do a careful cost accounting of the in-house operation and compare to the cost to outsource. (Outsourcing is not new to the Park District. For example, we outsource Attorney Services, Concessions, Mowing and Landscaping, some Janitorial, many recreation classes, Computer System Management, etc.

Identify low-performing or non-core functions and eliminate, or, outsource.

It’s needed and wanted and no business or organization can provide it as well as we do, so continue, including subsidize if necessary.

It’s needed and wanted, but other entities can do it better and/or less expensively, so partner/outsource or get out of the business.

First and foremost, we will tackle the Strategic Plan Actions.

Continue to pursue Voluntary Annexation

Field rentals. The District now has many high quality sport fields. This creates an opportunity for rental revenue. Adult sports and youth travel programs, in particular, is growing in the suburbs, but not through Park Districts. Independent leagues are looking for fields to rent.

Review scholarship program and set parameters, possibly seek scholarship sponsors

Use unrestricted grant money to build Repair and Replacement

Develop detailed schedule for Repair and Replacement including: Vehicle, equipment, IT hardware, Fitness, Playgrounds, and Infrastructure.

Establish allocation schedule of operating money to R&R

Look at Operating Efficiencies including but not limited to: Cell phones, Business cards, Printing/copying, Use of recycled paper, and Office Supplies

Review Insurance Benefits: Which plans should we continue to offer (Dental/life/vision?) Is a pool available to us? Is PDRMA willing to accept us?

Recreation, facility and marketing staff are coordinating promotion of FVRC room and gym rentals.

Regarding sponsorships, senior staff is assessing ways in which we can allocate staff to the job of landing sponsors and advertisers.

2015 Revenue Generation Plan

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In 2015 we will look to heavily promote McCaslin Park to day cares, camps, etc., as a place for a ½ or full day outing.

Apply for more grants for Carolshire, Community Park any possible funding source that can help us with capital or programs.

Partnerships with neighboring towns and districts are already showing some success with recreation programs. Best examples are gymnastics, adult trips and special interest. We hope to see the Winfield and Glendale Heights partnerships produce new revenue streams to the indoor pool programs.

In the coming 12 months, we will complete the evaluation of all of the program areas to determine if it should be cut, continued, or expanded.

Continue to re-work the Birthday Party Packages, and promote accordingly. For example, we will be back in the position of offering swim parties year-round.

Understand Markets: Staff is currently researching ways to expand “Boomers” (born 1946-1964) services as well as ways to re-connect with teens.

No more camp on the go. Shift focus to k-garden camp

Research a “Pole” barn – indoor softball and other indoor sports programming facility and location.

Turf and light cricket are at McCaslin – huge potential for rentals/leagues

Expand swimming lessons at both facilities and use Coyote Crossing Mini Golf for possible skate warming house with rentals, possible Santa house, etc.

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Staff Input: When developing this plan, the Executive Director invited staff to write down their ideas and submit them at the Employee Mini Golf Outing in October. The list below is a condensed version, but a compilation of all of the ideas staff gave. These ideas will not just be put aside, but will be considered in the upcoming year with an effort to implement the ones that make the most sense and produce a decent amount of revenue either through the idea or by cutting expenses. These ideas appear as written. I can only thank the staff for their honesty and straight forward thinking. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Plan to get out of the St. Luke’s Agreement, Mowing each year $8,440, Seal coating every other year (last time $6,000), Two year saving $22,880 Increasing the picnic shelter rental fees. Rather than have a multi-purpose room fee at FVRC, if they want three rooms they should be charged the single room fee x 3. The afterhours fee should be per room (or gym) and not one fee. Charge the affiliates for light usage. The only current light usage fee is for the light usage at GBN, billed to and paid by CSYBA, our football affiliate. Stick to charging for an attendant when an attendant is indicated. Attendants are mandatory at GBN, Evergreen, schools, McCaslin. Reevaluate the Satisfaction Guarantee/Refund Policy – Especially after the program has started, there should be a prorated refund, service fee, etc. Sell it ourselves. Handle concessions ourselves, at least give it a try. What we hear from people is that the prices are way too high. GRILL!!!!! The smell of hot dogs and hamburgers being grilled will be a draw. We need to match Service Team Hours of operation to actual times when customers are calling and coming in. This will reduce wages for hours. We could also cross train between the fitness desk and service desk to have coverage when needed. Possibly combining the cash handling for transaction processing between the front desk and fitness desk. I think that we should be able to cut or close SRC Service Desk on Sunday’s…BBall – Maybe an attendant? Move the SRC vending machines to a more accessible place; the gymnastics entrance is too far removed from most traffic. Maybe the idea of revenue generation can be more of an expenditure reduction in some areas…for example, do we really need to have special ‘Fountain View Fitness’ pens, instead of regular ball point pens? Coffee bar and or juice bar. We would have to take a cut of course. We do get a lot of requests for this. Lowering the budget for the front desk. I think the desk hours at FVRC can be shortened a bit. With the shifts starting at 5am and ending at 11pm, I think it would be cost-effective to open our front desk at, say 7am and close at 9pm. Sell alcohol during league night games at McCaslin. Charge for parking/entry for big tournaments out at McCaslin. Fall-Winter-Spring-Summer – Youth Program Kickoff Youth Programs Kick-Off with onsite sign ups. We bring our contractors to have at FVRC or SRC and allow families to come in, visit with contractors of programs. Offer an onsite registration.

2015 Revenue Generation Plan

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• • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

Juice and/or Coffee bar Selling merchandise, like CSPD tee shirts, mugs, etc. Charging for the electric car chargers outside. Having competitively quoted contracts in place for commodity/service purchases will generate savings - and savings is as good as revenue (and sometime easier to generate). Do we have an office supply contract in place? Do we use joint purchasing contracts. For services do we look for ways to communicate that do not cost us money - email versus printing/mailing. CSPD could do a better job at identifying our current customer base and marketing our programs to them. "Eye catching" promotional items out that will remind customers of the events. Monitoring program levels weeks before - not days before - may provide the time needed to fill vacate slots in the program. Our vending companies are terrible - not sure how these contracts are written - are we getting a % of the sales, but there could be other companies that provide better service and will share profit with us. Certain programs may be "priced" too low...for example open gym - if we increased the single day rate and pushed people to punch passes we may be able to generate additional sales and lower staff time to process these registrations....also....eliminate the open gym EZ pay option...EZ paying $10.00/$15.00 per month is too costly to the agency. Staff time to enter and customer ability to cancel before the year is up creates a potential loss to the agency. We do not allow lap swim members to EZ pay and that membership costs more than the open gym membership. If open gym is making us money lets eliminate one payment option that is actually costing us money... EZ Pay (for open gym). It would be interesting to see if there are any grant awards for park districts in the area of child hood obesity and recreation. Tap into the demand for more competitive sports programs rather than giving the affiliates the sole market share. More unique birthday parties - Include add-ons like inflatables, instruction from youth program instructors/contractors (art, cooking, drama, etc.), face painting, balloon animals, use of the basketball court, etc. Mommy/Daddy & Me fitness classes (for parents with babies/toddlers) Parent/child yoga Stroller fitness (outdoors or on track if permitted) Preschool summer camp (with extended care for working parents. This could even include partial-day programming from current CSPD instructors/contractors (Allstar Sports, gymnastics, dance, Young Rembrandts, cooking, Spanish, Kids Rock/Kindermusik, etc.) More extensive/advertised daytime home school programs (fitness, sports, art, dance, gymnastics, etc.) Outdoor fitness classes Skateboarding or X Games Camp Cheer Camp (featuring dance, cheer, tumbling Open Gym at Simkus? Turn Coral Cove into a larger water park. Lazy River, more slides. In-line hockey leagues Find someone who can develop a Travel Softball program

2015 Revenue Generation Plan

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• • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • •

More family-events/trips. Not just trips for Seniors Family bingo/pizza night Family Night Hikes Family ski/snowboarding trips Turn the gym at SRC into a “Teen Center” for a couple hours after school. This would give kids a place to hang out, work on homework, and play games. Sell snacks and beverages. Cute idea for a special event: Fairy Festival or Frosted Fairy Fest Partner with Bartlett Park District and offer Skiing and Snowboarding lessons at Villa Olivia Aquatics events - Lunch with the lifeguards – gives younger kids a chance to talk to lifeguards, find out about their jobs, etc. Boat Regatta – race your remote-controlled boat in our pool for prizes. Skateboard competitions at our Skate Park Sports Tournaments for Kids – Dodgeball Tourneys, 3-on-3 Basketball, Floor Hockey, etc. Revamp the scholarship program Water trail that starts at FVRC and makes its way to Red Hawk Park. Parallel the trail with a bike trail. Rent kayaks/canoes and bikes. People could paddle to red hawk park and get picked up or bike back. (Work with regional/states to expand this trail to DuPage River and beyond. Just think, eventually you could paddle or bike to the Gulf of Mexico if you wanted!) Extreme Off-Road Park for ATV/Motocross/bmx/mountain bike/JEEP-LandRover. There is nothing like this anywhere near here to my knowledge, and it’s a good fit for our demographic. Would need to be marketed regionally – NE Illinois. Could be big money maker and draw national events, including JEEP jamborees. Maybe more Dog Days Courses to hear lectures by local pet experts and maybe do agility course for the dogs or a hike. A driving range would be a great revenue generator there are so many people interested in golf these days. Teen Dances More sponsors for our Youth and Adult activity guides. Market party rentals. Sale of used sports, ok soccer, equipment. Maybe we could charge like $5.00 for a spot in a section of SRC parking lot and have a used sports equipment sale. Families can stock up on what they need, and we can get make a small fee on offering a central location to get it all done. Run concessions in-house. Driving Range - McCaslin has everything else, why not a driving range. Beer Tent @ McCaslin Batting Cages Basketball concessions - You might not break the bank with all the money, but with all the foot traffic at FVRC and Simkus you could make a couple $100 dollars a weekend. Semi-Private swim lessons. Track peak times at the front desk so we can only have two staff when necessary Floor hockey leagues (youth) Golf range (not mini golf) Pick-up games (softball, soccer, floor hockey, dodgeball, volleyball) with fee to play for those you can’t commit to a team or afford to be on a team

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• • • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

Revamp the scholarship program. Sibling or multiple program discounts. More composting of our own materials rather than pay a dumpster fee. All departments should use recycled paper in their copiers and print double sided whenever possible Consider installing programmable thermostats at the SRC/Elk Trail and possibly FVRC (if not already) to regulate temperature and heat/cool at off peak hours Reduce the number of FVRC Fitness Floor Staff working at the same time, especially during nonpeak hours Consider changing Just Play to advertise only CSPD Park District programs instead of carnival type attractions Save electric by shutting down computers at night. Make fitness memberships more affordable by giving the option of signing up for each individual program separately (like we offered before FVRC was built) - such as fitness membership only, pool pass, fitness classes, etc. This would reduce the cost for memberships, allowing more residents to afford the memberships, and possibly reduce the amount of membership payment problems (credit card rejects, easy pay rejects, nsfs) Reduce hours of employees that don't have enough work to do & spend work time doing personal business Allow large party rentals again (166 or more) in the Simkus Gymnasium. Allow them on Saturday and Sunday evenings as to not conflict with programming. Charge higher rates since it is a party rental and because it would be after hours. Take over our own concession sales at tournaments and games? At McCaslin and the pool? Open a "smoothie bar" at Coral Cove. Mailbox style lockers for Coral Cove Water Park - adding mailbox style lockers strategically placed around coral cove. If you installed 200-400 lockers (depending on size, location, and style) you could have them placed around the pool in inconspicuous locations, so as not to change the esthetics and beauty of the pool grounds. a) Patrons would purchase a "key" rental for a nominal fee. Say $1.00-$2.00 for the day. They would either have to leave an ID, Driver's License, car keys or Pool Pass as collateral. They would need to return the locker key to get their ID, etc. back. b) Or the fee would be $5.00 deposit, with a $4.00 return when the key was returned. c) Perhaps patrons could purchase a locker/key for the season, as part of their pool pass. (I would have these designated separately from all other lockers.) Then they would be guaranteed the same locker for the entire pool season. They would keep the key with them and bring it to the pool every time they attended. The patron would get a deposit back when returning the key at the end of the season. As long as the cost of the deposit covers the cost of replacing a lock and service fee there should be no money loss. Professional wrestling events. We’ve been approached in the past that they’d be willing to put on a show for kids. They would bring in wrestlers to perform, sign autographs etc.

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A FOCUS ON PARTNERSHIPS

Year in Review

2015 through Early 2016


Dear Carol Stream Residents, Each year we set new goals that guide us to achieve accomplishments that positively affect the Carol Stream Park District community. 2015-16 was one of change, development, and success. A common thread from project to project that upheld and continues to preser ve our Mission, Vision and Values is the nurturing of community partnerships. Some of our more significant 2015-16 projects were joint efforts with the Village of Carol Stream, the Carol Stream Public Librar y, local school districts, County of DuPage, VFW Post #10396 and other community partners. Working as a cooperative unit, we were able to pool our resources and save money on parks and maintenance projects. In addition, we are grateful to generous sponsors who help supplement our youth sports and other programs, our larger events such as JustPlay Sports & Recreation Festival and the CSBarks Dog Festival. In 2015-16 we created partnerships that enabled us to offer a variety of recycling initiatives that included electronics, shoes, coats and school supplies. Through the generosity of our community, receptacles filled up daily. They couldn’t be emptied fast enough, which was a wonderful thing! We’re all on the same page when it comes to protecting our environment and reducing the carbon footprint.

Significant park projects took place this year. One of the most visible was the Klein Creek Flood Mitigation Project in Armstrong Park. This two-year project was the result of a partnership between the Park District, the Village of Carol Stream, and the DuPage County Storm Water Commission. The construction of a two-reser voir pumping system diverts flood waters from the nearby neighborhood. Carol Stream is now home to a 9-hole disc golf course at the new Horizon Park, a joint effort with the Carol Stream Public Librar y. Militar y memorial stones were moved in Veterans’ Park to a more visible area on Lies Road in partnership with Home Depot and the Carol Stream VFW. The playground was replaced at Bierman Park to include a spider-webbed climbing apparatus (and swings completed the park in 2016). We are working on grant opportunities for funding to develop land now known as Carolshire Park, which sits between Klein Creek and Carolshire condominiums, and talks continue with the Village regarding future enhancements to Community Park.

In addition to all our partners and sponsors, I must give thanks to our many volunteers that either coach or come out to assist at events. We cannot be successful without them. I am grateful for a strong and robust working staff that put so much time, effort and creativity into their programs and jobs and work hard to accommodate all customers. Lastly, we are lucky to have a great group of Park District Commissioners, whose hearts and souls are truly immersed in this Park District and Community. I appreciate your support and confidence in this Park District and thank you also for your partnership just by caring for this community. Together we grow and become successful. Don’t Forget to Recreate! Sincerely, Jim Reuter, Executive Director

Commissioner Wynn Ullman (2009), Vice President John Jaszka (2011) Commissioner Dan Bird (2003), Commissioner Brenda Gramann (2001) President Jacqueline Jeffery (2011) Commissioners Tim Powers (2007), Brian Sokolowski (2001),


Awards & Honors PowerPlay!

Local Government Works as a Cooperative Unit

Illinois Government Finance Officers Association Certificate of Achievement for Excellence

Armstrong Park

$1,000 PowerPlay! Beyond School Grant for the 2016 Cycle.

in Financial Reporting for the 15th consecutive year.

Starfish Aquatics Institute

Coral Cove Water Park received a prestigious 5-Star Review, which evaluates lifeguards’ performance.

APWA Suburban Branch 2016 – Public Works Project of the Year

Local governments work for the same local taxpayers. So when two or three local governments can join efforts on projects to realize cost savings, that’s a win-win for everyone in the community. Horizon Park In 2014, an intergovernmental agreement was created between Carol Stream Park District, Village of Carol Stream and DuPage County Stormwater Management Commission for the Klein Creek Flood Mitigation Project in Armstrong Park. DuPage County constructed a tworeservoir system that operates when water elevations in Klein Creek increase in order to divert floodwaters from the majority of the nearby Armstrong Park neighborhood.

The Klein Creek Flood Mitigation Project between DuPage County Stormwater Management Committee, the Village of Carol Stream, and the Carol Stream Park District includes a pumped storage capacity of 113 acre feet, pedestrian bridges, a pump station and 60” siphon outlet relief sewer. The Project was recognized by the American Public Works Association (APWA) Suburban Branch and Chicago Metro Chapter as an Environmental Project of the year for its flood control, water quality and recreational benefits.

The project was completed in 2015. DuPage County Stormwater Management Committee Chairman Jim Zay said, “DuPage County formed an important partnership with the Carol Stream Park District as we planned the Armstrong Park reservoir to relieve residents of local flooding problems. The County was able to leverage Federal funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to complete the project, providing effective relief for homeowners and value for taxpayers.”

Carol Stream Parks Foundation

“The partnerships we uphold are the key to the success of the Carol Stream Park District,” says Park District Board President Jackie Jeffery. “By working together with local agencies such as DuPage County and the Village of Carol Stream, we are able to pool our resources to reduce costs and provide great opportunities for our residents.”

The Parks Foundation accepted $3,000 in donations in 2015, which were attributed to the district’s financial assistance program. Hosted 7 special fundraisers. The bike club cycled over 174 miles in 2015. The Parks Foundation builds and strengthens the financial resources of the Carol Stream Park District by receiving gifts, grants, bequests and endowments on the district’s behalf. They work to raise funds for financial assistance, park and facility improvements, recreation program enrichment, and greening initiatives.You can support the Parks Foundation by giving financial gifts, bequests, or by volunteering your time. The Carol Stream Parks Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to developing additional financial support for public parks and recreation programs of the Carol Stream Park District.

Carolshire Park

The Carol Stream Park District is working to provide recreational opportunities to underdeveloped areas. The Village of Carol Stream deeded us a parcel of land located on Gary Avenue between Klein Creek Condominiums and Carolshire Condominiums so we could bring a future park/playground to the nearby residents. An open house was held requesting resident input on new playground equipment and functionality of the park. The Park District is waiting for grant opportunities to develop the land.

The Carol Stream Park District and the Carol Stream Public Library partnered to create Horizon Park at 460 Kuhn Road, now home to Carol Stream’s first disc golf course.

Veterans’ Park

The Carol Stream VFW worked with the Park District and Home Depot to move military memorials to the front of the park. Home Depot donated trees, shrubs, and mulch for the project and their staff worked with the Veterans’ and park district staff to make the area aesthetically pleasing and honorable.

Memorial Park

The idea to raise funds to renovate this park started with members of the Carol Stream VFW Post. A plan was unveiled on Memorial Day 2016, with completion targeted for Memorial Day 2017. Fundraising efforts in 2016 have included brick sales, proceeds from local restaurants, comedy show ticket sales, crowdfunding campaign, event presence and more. Partners in this opportunity are: Carol Stream VFW Post #10396, American Legion,Village Trustees, Chamber of Commerce, Park District Commissioners and Staff, and community volunteers.

Continuing partnerships:

Western DuPage Special Recreation Association

ActivKids Before & After School Care program with Consolidated Community School District 93 Football/soccer turf field at Glenbard North High School with Glenbard District 87 Usage of Indoor Pool at Fountain View Recreation Center with Glenbard District 87. Usage of gymnasium at Evergreen School with Benjamin School District 25 Over 30 youth summer athletic camps at Glenbard North High School Village of Carol Stream - currently planning for Community Park project

Examples of local governments working together to be prudent stewards of taxpayer dollars.


Tax Implication to Residents In 2009-2010, the District gathered feedback from its residents about unmet recreational needs.Their clear message was confirmed when the voters approved a referendum to issue 37 million in bonds to build a new recreation center with an indoor pool; build and improve parks, sports fields, trails, and other recreation facilities. The planning and the math all pointed to being able to issue bonds without increasing the tax rate.The plan was based on a projected modest growth model. “Modest” because, up to that point, Carol Stream Park District tax base was growing steadily at about 6% a year. No one was prepared for the change to the economy – instead of a growing tax base, we saw a steady decline from 2010-2015. Because of the way taxes are calculated, declines in home values (and even larger losses in business properties) resulted in tax rate increases. When the Park Board was faced with a decision of whether to issue the balance of the bonds, or put a halt to the improvements, they chose to listen to the voters and move forward with the improvements. While the Park Board would like to have kept to the original referendum plan of no tax rate increase, they also wanted to deliver the improvements for which residents voted. It was their collective conclusion, as elected representatives of the citizenry, to deliver the improvements and amenities. There has been an incremental increase in the Park District tax rate due to the referendum bonds over the last four years.

Financial Report

Last year we explained that as property values begin to inch upwards, the tax rate would stabilize or go down.This is the case for 2016. The property values within the Carol Stream Park District saw small positive growth in 2016, the tax rate for the coming year will remain relatively the same – there is a very minor drop.

Monthly Taxes Paid To Carol Stream Park District

Home Market Value

$300,000 ••••

$54.75 In 2015 $54.68 in 2016 Home Market Value

$200,000

For Fiscal Year January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2015

REVENUE Charges for Services $4,240,018 Operating Grants & Contributions $39,945 Capital Grants & Contributions $528,170 Taxes $8,128,189 Interest Earned $15,771 Other General Revenue $736,248 Total Revenue $13,688,341 EXPENSES General Recreation Depreciation Interest on Long Term Debt Total Expenses

$100,000

S TAT E M E N T O F N E T P O S I T I O N ASSETS Cash & Investments $7,796,708 Receivables, net $8,100,089 Prepaid Items $44,021

$18.25 In 2015 $18.23 in 2016

Capital Assets not being depreciated

$15,481,877

Capital Assets net of depreciation

$39,566,504

Total Assets:

$70,989,199

••••

$36.50 In 2015 $35.46 in 2016 Home Market Value

••••

The Board believes that the improvements to community’s park and recreation infrastructure are worth it, and will provide better lives and home values for generations to come.

DEFERRED OUTFLOWS Deferred charge on refunding $5,871,805 Deferred pension amounts $619,239 Total Deferred Outflows $6,491,044 LIABILITIES Accounts Payable & Other Current Liabilities Accrued Interest Unearned Revenue Non-current Liabilities Total Liabilities

Recycling Initiatives Electronics (partnered with Flood Brothers) Over 6 tons of electronics were collected. April-May 2015 - Shoes - We collected over 45 large garbage bags of shoes to donate to charitable organizations.

$3,789,021 $5,512,033 $2,750,221 $2,694,352 $14,745,627

June 2015 - School supplies and books - We donated ten full garbage bins to SCARCE, a nonprofit organization focusing on green initiatives and educational support. October-November 2015 - Coats (partnered with School District 93) We collected 146 bags of adult coats and 52 bags of kids coats. Coats were distributed to needy families.

$471,941 $1,997,619 $344,734 $63,294,784 $67,745,964

NET POSITION Net Investment in Capital Assets $2,273,065 Restricted $1,566,769 Unrestricted $5,894,445 Total Net Position $9,734,279


Parks & Facilities

Each year since the residents passed the 2010 referendum, it has been a whirlwind of activity and 2015 was no exception.The following projects were completed or planned: Armstrong Park

LED lights were installed at Armstrong Park from the parking lot to the baseball hub. This included the inline hockey rink lights. The project qualifies for a $7,000 grant. In addition, KidsWorld playground was removed in 2015. A new playground was celebrated in 2016.

Bierman Park

The Playground was replaced in 2015 with modern playsets and a spider-webbed climbing apparatus. Swings were added the spring of 2016.

Simkus Recreation Center

Multipurpose rooms were updated with new cabinets, flooring and refrigerators. Additional security cameras were installed in the building. The roof was completed in 2015. New light fixtures, flooring, and other planned upgrades are taking place in 2016 to spruce up the interior of the Center. In addition, The Village of Carol Stream and the Carol Stream Park District entered into an agreement allowing the Park District to request bids for asphalt paving in conjunction with the Village. This agreement allowed the Park District to reduce the cost for the paving of the Simkus Recreation Center in 2016.

Elk Trail Recreation Center

A new electronic sign to offer information on programs and services to the public.

Coral Cove Water Park

Pool filtering system was upgraded. Two new cabanas were added on the deck to provide shade and space to renters.

Coyote Crossing Mini Golf

Last spring, staff spent a week upgrading the landscaping around the golfing holes at Coyote Crossing. Trees and bushes were added and repairs to the structures were completed.

Facility Rentals

Over $134,994 was generated from Facility Rentals at Fountain View and Simkus Recreation Centers, Coral Cove Water Park, Coyote Crossing Mini Golf, Evergreen Gym, grass and turf ballfields and park shelters.

Facility Supplies

For the first time, Carol Stream Park District went out to bid for all janitorial supplies in 2015. The bidding process helped reduce operating costs and receive best pricing discounts. These supplies are used at Fountain View Recreation Center, Simkus Recreation Center, Coral Cove Pool, Coyote Crossing, Elk Trail Recreation Center, Parks and Facility Maintenance Building, and washroom buildings located in Hampe, Red Hawk and McCaslin Parks.

43 parks & 23 playgrounds

10.32 miles of trails

Did you know...we have

49 ball fields

baseball, softball, soccer, football

452.28 acres of land


Recreation The Recreation Department is continuously working to insure that there is a wide variety of facilities, services and programs offered each season for participants of all ages. These facilities include the Fountain View, Simkus and Elk Trail Recreation Centers, Coral Cove Water Park, Coyote Crossing Mini Golf, as well as programs and services offered in the areas of athletics, fitness, aquatics, dance, gymnastics, special events, early childhood, performing arts, general interest, trips, nature, before and after school care, birthday parties, athletic field and facility rentals. Accomplishments achieved by the Recreation Department in 2015 are listed below:

New Programs Offered Number of Programs Offered

3,159 (In 2015)

3400 2950 (In 2014)

(In 2013)

Program Revenue

$2,538,135 in 2015

Over the last 5 years, the amount of recreation programs offered has increased from 2,490 to 3,159. This is a 9.3% increase since 2013. The Recreation staff works hard to continuously develop new programs based on the needs of our users. The number of new programs developed has increased by 9% since 2013.

186

(In 2015)

240

(In 2014)

160

(In 2013)

Total program Revenue for 2015 was $2,538,135. This was an increase of $125,695 (4.9%) over 2014. Program areas that saw a significant increase in revenue include Awesome Adventure Camp (+$442,575), youth/adult athletic leagues (+$13,827), Forever Young Trips (+$11,119), Aquatic programs (+$4,613) and Special events (+$2,150).

Program Participants

For the 2nd year in a row, total participation in all park district programs and services exceeded 61,000.

22,347

$2,425,000 in 2014

$2,275,000 in 2013

in 2014

21,766 in 2015

Staff will continue to strive towards developing programs and services that meet the needs of our users.We constantly analyze the operation of the department to make sure programs and services are offered as efficiently and cost effective as possible.


Recreation Sports In 2015, 41 tournaments were scheduled. McCaslin Park hosted the SAA 16” softball national championships and the USSSA men’s 12” major national championship Youth Sports Leagues in 2015 had approximately 1,631 kids playing basketball, baseball, soccer or softball, on 156 teams, playing 624 games. Adults playing in basketball, flag football, floor hockey, softball and volleyball leagues averaged 371 teams, 3,710 players and 1,484 games played.

Aquatics Over 2.700 memberships (Coral Cove Water Park) were purchased in 2015. Two cabanas were added to Coral Cove Water Park and were available for rent by patrons.

Forever Young

Staff was able to capitalize on the popularity of Groupon and Living Social to generate an additional $13,800 in revenue for Coral Cove Water Park.

Over 3,180 seniors participated in Forever Young programs in 2015.

Over 16,000 people used the indoor pool at Fountain View Recreation Center.

Over 100 programs were offered to the Forever Young audience.

Dance The Dance program revenue and participation increased by 22% in revenue in 2015.

Before & After School Care Provides service to 279 school children.

Family Events JustPlay! Sports & Recreation Festival entertained 5,000 visitors. CSBarks Dog Festival entertained 4,000 visitors and their dogs. The December holiday train ride called The Polar Express delighted 270 children and families. The annual Boo Fest event hit an all-time record attendance of 385 children, plus their families.

Theatre

National Night Out 2015 entertained 400 people. The park district provided paint supplies for donated children’s items from Home Depot. The event is a community partnership that includes the Village of Carol Stream, Police Department, Library, Outreach Center, Our Savior Lutheran Church and more.

Productions of Hairspray Jr and Annie Jr took place with a total of 10 performances, 4 casts and 216 children.

Community Relations Staff brought in over $72,000 in sponsorship revenue for events and sports programs.

Gymnastics

Over 700 hours were put in by volunteers saving the park district over $5,700 in wages.

Camps

Fountain View Fitness Center Over 4,000 memberships were purchased in 2015 to include the Fitness Center, Walking Track, Lap Swim Pool. Average daily usage of the Fitness Center was 569. An average of 90 group exercise classes (land & aqua) were offered each week. Fit For Life - 29 participants lost almost 400 pounds in body weight. Ten free health and wellness seminars were offered to the community.

Kids participated in 45 different camps in 2015, with total participation of 3,225 and total revenue of $316,841.

The Springers of Carol Stream (SOCS) achieved many State awards in 2015: 1st Place Beginner Tumbling State 1st Place Advanced Beginner Tumbling State 1st Place Bronze Level Optional State 1st Place Silver Level Optional State 2nd Place Gold Level Optional State


The mission of the Carol Stream Park District is to enrich our community by fulfilling our residents needs for healthy, accessible, quality recreation activities, parks and facilities, and to be responsible stewards of our community resources.


ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF 2016 & PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE

Year in Review


A Message from the Executive Director I can’t believe it’s been almost three years since I became your Executive Director. I am excited to have seen so many initiatives prompted by the 2010 Referendum successfully completed. Take a look at the Timeline of Tax Dollars at Work at the bottom of pages 4-5 and see how the referendum dollars addressed our residents’ needs and provided benefits to the Carol Stream community.

Reducing expenses and saving money is a group effort here at the Carol Stream Park District. I commend the staff who work within a tight budget and continually look for ways to provide the best recreation opportunities and ser vices, while controlling costs. It’s through their efforts that we are able to keep rates affordable and ser ve as responsible stewards of this community.

Community partnerships continue with the Village of Carol Stream, the Carol Stream Librar y, Local School Districts and the County of DuPage. These partnerships allow us to pool our resources to save money on ser vices, as well as maintenance projects. Our goals for this town are the same – make Carol Stream a great place to live, learn, work and most importantly play!

This Year in Review is focused on our 2016 successes as well as how we are preparing for the Future. During the referendum campaign residents asked us to provide additional recreation amenities or improve ones that we already had. They also asked us to develop a way to ‘take care of what we have’. Like any public agency, our facilities, parks, playgrounds and trails are subject to general wear and tear, harsh weather and, unfortunately, occasional human mischief. To assure us a stable future, we have been setting money aside in a designated Repair & Replacement Fund. The Fund is built from earned revenues, which allows us to maintain this infrastructure instead of relying solely on the issuance of additional bonds.

Sometimes little touches that don’t cost much make a world of difference! We’ve been sprucing up our parks and facilities with new signage and fresh paint and adding some fun elements. We experimented with fake swans at the Simkus Recreation Center pond to deter geese and the mess that comes with them; it worked! We took a dead ash tree, removed the bark and painted it in our park district colors. Our “recycled art” tree can be seen near the Coral Cove Water Park gates, and in front of Fountain View Recreation Center. Speaking of Coral Cove, our two tall slides, and the drop slide have been repainted in the Park District colors. Working with the Carol Stream Rotar y and built by Glenbard North students, we installed four Little Libraries where people can borrow and donate books for free.

Thank you – our residents, our customers, our loyal members – for a great 2016! I look forward to a bright 2017 and making you, your family, friends and neighbors proud to be a part of the Carol Stream community! Don’t forget to take time to play and enjoy ever ything Carol Stream has to offer!! Jim Reuter, Executive Director


Our Presence Signage

Partnerships

Established and sound working relationships with Carol Stream community partners, such as the Village, Public Library, Chamber of Commerce, Rotary Club and School Districts enable the Park District to combine resources that save taxpayer dollars on many Park District and local projects.These partnerships are key to our success.

Sponsorships

The Park District is always looking for ways to provide programs and services at a reasonable fee. One of the methods we utilize to do this is to acquire sponsorships and donations. In 2016, over $60,000 was generated.

Volunteers

The Park District is always looking for volunteers to help with a variety of tasks. In 2016, 720 volunteer hours saved the District over $5,900.

Scholarships

Through our scholarship program, the District was able to provide financial assistance to 66 families in the amount of $18,450. Funding was available in part due to a $3,000 donation from the Carol Stream Parks Foundation.

As a 501(c)3 organization, all contributions are tax deductible.

Memorial Park Task Force raised $26,000 toward the goal of $200,000. Contributing factors include generous donation from organizations and businesses, $8500, Concerts in the park $939, Brick Sale $4,500, NPRA Crowdfunding $1700 and Zanies Fundraisers $1750.

Supporting the

Signs at a number of our parks and facilities have been updated. Park map signs installed at Armstrong Park.

Technology Improved Online Registration ACTIVE Net, a new internet-based Registration system has improved online registration by making it easier and faster to register. The system has improved program search options; and customers can register with computer, tablet or phone. It also enables staff members to process registrations quickly and securely. Electronic receipts and waivers save paper. From May (when system went live) through November, a cost savings has been realized in the amount of $12,550.

Employee Portal

Our new employee portal is a storehouse of resources for employees that include regularly used forms and documents benefits information; policies, plans and procedures; schedules; safety requirements; available equipment; and photos of staff events.

Web Refresh

A new, mobile-friendly, colorful website with more efficient navigation features, an events calendar, fillable forms, and group class schedules was launched in February of 2017. The site design was complete in summer of 2016, and content was created in-house during the latter months of 2016.

Severe weather signs explaining what to do installed at all ball fields. New safety rule signs that include park’s physical address installed at all playgrounds in case of emergency. Emergency route signs updated in facilities. Historical signage installed at Horizon Park, KidsWorld, and Weeks Park East/Birdville. Kiosk at Jan Smith Park illustrates prairie plant species found in area.

New Guide Design - Featuring You! With the winter guide to start each season, we are refreshing the design to highlight photos of you! We work to keep our photo gallery current with pictures depicting people of our community in atmospheres of fun, teamwork, sports, fitness, talent, action and nature.

Social Media

Social media account usage, specifically Facebook, is used daily to bring our events, programs and stories to you. Paid “boosts” of our events has proven to reach more customers than print ads. We have the ability to target area, age, gender and interests; and we can better quantify the reach of audience views and interactions.


How the Park District Plans to “Take Care of What We Have” T

In the years preceding the 2010 Referendum, the Park District gathered information from residents on their recreational needs. We asked about the types of recreational opportunities you felt were missing or needed to improve.

loca nue Al tion 201 e v 7 Re x a

First, residents asked for new and improved amenities such as an indoor pool, athletic fields that were more resistant to rain outs, more walking trails and pathways, and a larger/full-service fitness center. Secondly, you asked the District to “take care of what we had. ou asked us to fix or replace old playgrounds, improve existing athletic fields, and keep pathways, parking lots, and buildings in good repair.

C

The 2010 Referendum allowed the District to issue bonds and create a capital improvement plan to address resident needs. A condensed timeline of that plan appears along the bottom of the page. We also created a system to set aside funds to ensure that we could “take care of what we had”.

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x Bill 2016 a T ty Grade School D93- 49.3% High School D87- 24.4% College of DuPage- 2.7% DuPage County- 1.4% Health Department- 0.5% Airport Authority- 0.1% Township- 1.0% Township Roads- 1.1% Library- 3.1% Fire District- 8.5% Park District- 6.3% Forest Preserve- 1.6%

Community Needs Assessment Slepicka Park Simkus Recreation Center electronic sign Armstrong Park/ Elk Trail Recreation Center lighting

2008

Cambridge Park & Charger Court playgrounds 280 Kuhn Maintenance building

Corporate Fund- 17.6% Recreation Fund- 15.3%

Financial Report

Paving & Lighting Fund- 0.4% FICA Fund- 3.6%

Year ending 12/31/16 *unaudited information. OPERATING FUNDS

Audit Fund- 0.4% Liability Fund- 2.8% Special Recreation Fund- 6.1% IMRF Fund- 3.8% Bond & Interest Fund- 50.0%

The Park District was fortunate to receive several grants. Keeping in mind the residents’ direction, a portion of those grant dollars have been set aside for future capital repairs. Beginning in 2016, with the completion of a majority of its referendum projects, the Park District has begun to systematically set aside a portion of earned revenue produced by each facility for its future maintenance and repairs.The funds are categorized by facility such as Coral Cove Water Park, Fountain View Fitness, Coyote Crossing Mini Golf, or McCaslin Sports Complex. By setting aside dollars now, the Park District will reduce its reliance on the issuance of bonds as the only alternative to cover costly repairs. That doesn’t mean we won’t ever have to issue bonds, but it does mean that we are committed to saving for the future and reducing the impact on our tax-payers.

Referendum Vote Passes

Over the next several years the Park District will continue to set aside funds for future repairs and to replace broken or outdated equipment. We believe this approach will help us to be better stewards of our residents’ tax dollars, and ensure that we can “take care of what we have”.

Property/Corporate Taxes Interest/Recovery of Cost Rentals Sponsorships/Vending Concessions Programs Awards/Grants/Donation/Other Due from Other Funds Total Revenues

REVENUE 3,625,494 101,161 175,381 59,307 45,088 3,986,278 96,042 96,202 8,184,953

ages/ enefits Utilities Services Supplies Auditing Improvements Insurance Retirement IMRF Total Expenses Total Operating Net

EXPENSES 4,742,086 520,079 1,279,846 614,578 23,250 301,645 166,348 313,115 7,960,947 224,006

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT FUNDS Property Taxes for Bonds Interest/Bond Proceeds Recovery of Cost Donations Total Revenues

REVENUE 4,532,895 8,765 267,112 23,715 4,832,487

Salaries/ enefits Services Capital Improvements Tax Allocation-WDSRA Supplies Debt Service Transfers Total Expenses Total Capital Net

EXPENSES 18,588 47,490 1,189,263 236,435 3,148 4,279,909 17,665 5,792,498 (960,011)

Timeline of Tax

Bark Park Jirsa, Memorial and Tedrahn Park playgrounds

Stonebridge & Sundance Park playgrounds

Kuhn Road trail connects to regional trail

Slepicka Park silo renovation

Steve Ravanesi Trail to the Great Western Trail opens

Simkus Recreation Center office renovation

Design begins for Fountain View Recreation Center

McCaslin Park water/sewer

2009

2010

2011

Armstrong Park Lake George shoreline stabilization Glenbard North High School turf field

Aldrin Community Center farewell and demolition Armstrong Park/DuPage County demolition; flood project begins McCaslin Park artificial turf fields in use Fountain View Recreation Center construction IL-64 Underpass lighting

2012


Parks & Facilities

Each year since the residents passed the 2010 referendum, it has been a whirlwind of activity and 2016 was no exception.The following projects were completed or planned:

? Did you Know

Fountain View Fitness Walking Track

The open design of the walking track provides a wonderful view and lots of natural sunlight. Electronic shades were added to allow shades to be lowered when the sun impacts the safety of the basketball courts below.

There are 54,200 part-time employees at park and recreation agencies in Illinois in seasonal positions. Employed between May and August each year, many of these employees are high school and college-age persons, which makes park and recreation agencies a major employer of young people in the state of Illinois. At the Carol Stream Park District, we employ 300 seasonal employees in a given year. A high percentage of the local dollars earned by the part-time staff is discretionary and is typically spent locally supporting the local economy.

Elk Trail Recreation Center

A new, remote access, electronic marquee was installed at the facility to share news to the preschool families who use the facility, and also advertise other District events.

Coral Cove Water Park

Both tall slides, and the drop slide were resurfaced with bright, fun colors! Resurfacing the slides extended their lifetime and will provide our guests a smooth and fun ride!

Park agencies actively support Special Recreation Associations, which provide access to recreation for those with disabilities. Our local partner is WDSRA - Western DuPage Special Recreation Association.

Armstrong Park

Armstrong Park has gone under a number of renovations over the last few years in conjunction with the DuPage County Stormwater Project.

Park agencies actively support funding for acquisition of land for parks and open space.

Kids World playground got a complete makover. Elements of the original community built playground were preserved.

Park agencies actively support and encourage volunteerism. In 2016, approximately 400 volunteers assisted us with special events, maintenance of buildings and parks, coaching, office tasks and more.

The Ray Nazalian Field has undergone a complete renovation from playing fields, to backstops, to drainage improvement.

Dollars at Work

Simkus Recreation Center roof replaced.

Barbara O’Rahilly Park playground

Coral Cove Cabanas, Shade canopy, Dumping bucket spray feature Administrative offices move to Simkus Recreation Center

Pleasant Hill East playground

Paving at Hampe, Slepicka, Walter Parks

Coral Cove Climbing Wall

Bierman Park playground

Friendship Park swings Veterans Trail bike path (near Elk Trail)

2013

2014

Students from all four Glenbard High Schools served as a catalyst to the Park Board for a tobacco free park system. Reality Illinois is a statewide anti-tobacco movement created by high school students that works to encourage healthy lifestyles reduce second hand smoke and protect the environment by promoting tobacco-free park policies.

Simkus Recreation Center

Carol Stream Park District joined the Village of Carol Stream in the bidding for parking lot work at Simkus Recreation Center. The Simkus parking lot was added as an alternate to the Village’s Flexible Pavement Project bid, saving the Park District almost $113,000. Other improvements include: HVAC system replacement began in 2016 and was completed in 2017. The new system improves comfort and reduces energy use and costs. Signage and lighting was upgraded throughout the building to align with the District’s brand, improve the customer experience and reduce operating costs. The Registration Desk received a facelift. The new counter top includes an ADAaccessible area, a wider customer counter and a durable surface. Vestibules have been added to the north facing entrances to improve energy efficiency by minimizing the loss of hot/cool air. The vestibules are also ADA-accessible.

The entire replacement of the walking path around Armstrong Park is now complete.

Fountain View Recreation Center opens Fitness Center, Indoor Pool, Gymnasium, Track

McCaslin Park playground in the hub

New Tobacco-Free Park Policy

Armstrong Park ball fields 2, 3, 4 back in use Armstrong Park KidsWorld playground renovated Armstrong Park path reconstructed Armstrong Park field 1 renovated for use in 2017 Bierman Park swings All Parks – playground Rules signs standardized Heritage Lake retaining wall at Bierman Park Simkus HVAC and internal renovations

2015

2016


Sports

Recreation The Recreation Department provides a wide variety of programs, services and facilities to meet the leisure needs of the users of the Park District. Staff develops and offers thousands of programs each year for participants of all ages in the areas of aquatics, athletics, dance, fitness, gymnastics, special events, early childhood, performing arts, active adults, trips, special events and general interest programming. In addition to these programs, staff also manages and operates the Fountain View Recreation Center, Simkus Recreation Center, Elk Trail Recreation Center, Coral Cove Water Park and Coyote Crossing Mini Golf.

McCaslin Park hosted the USSSA men’s major 12” softball national championships and the SSA men’s 16” softball national championships for the second year in a row. The District also ran 20 different baseball, softball, basketball and soccer tournaments. Over 190 adult softball teams played in 12 tournaments, and 157 youth baseball teams played in 5 tournaments. Over 1,600 youth participated in baseball, softball, basketball, soccer, volleyball and dodgeball leagues while another 3,800 adults participated in softball, basketball, football, volleyball, dodgeball and floor hockey leagues. Total revenue for all athletic programs and leagues exceeded $590,000.

Before & After School Care We received the Power Play Grant of $1,000 for fitness and health related activities we incorporate into this program. The Grant was used towards the cost of having fitness staff attend each site to offer fitness activities monthly. The Activ ids program serves an average of 269 kids on a daily basis at six different school sites.

180 New Programs Offering 3,111 Programs/Activities Since the Fountain View Recreation Center opened in 2013, the amount of recreation programs offered annually has increased by 621 programs. This is a 20% increase.

Special Events

The District offered 17 events for families and kids, in addition to two community events, JustPlay! Sports & Recreation Festival and CSBarks Dog Festival. Attendance at these events topped 7,000 people, while 3,300 attended our other family events. Hot Wheels & Cool Trucks was introduced in August. The free family event was organized in partnership with the Carol Stream Police Department, with vehicles displayed by Carol Stream Public Works, Fire District and local businesses.

Forever Young Over 3,200 seniors participated in122 Forever Young Programs. Total revenue generated by these programs exceeded $125,000.

Fountain View Fitness Center Over 3,100 memberships were purchased for the fitness center and walking track generating over $1.1 million in revenue. Total revenue for the fitness center exceeded $1.3 million. On average, the daily attendance of the fitness center for 2016 was 552. An average of 90 group exercise classes (land and water) were offered every week for members. Twelve free health and wellness seminars were offered to the community.


Dance

Aquatics

The Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dance program continues to be very popular with almost 900 youth and adults participating in our seasonal and recital classes. The recital classes finish with our annual dance recital performance held at Wheaton Academy. Revenue for all dances classes exceeded $94,000

The Dolphins swim team continues to grow with 126 participants on the summer team and 147 swimmers on the Fall/Winter team. For the first time in over a decade, the Dolphins won the summer conference swim meet. Up until 2013, there wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a fall/ winter team and the summer team averaged 80 members.

Gymnastics The Springers of Carol Stream (SOCS) are consistent performers at Tumbling and Gymnastics meets. SOCS optional gold gymnastics team finished 2nd in the state meet. SOCS optional silver team finished 2nd at their state meet and six individuals finished as state champions on single pieces of equipment at the silver and bronze levels. SOCS tumbling team advanced.

Recreation

Over 15,000 people used the indoor pool at the Fountain View Recreation Center and 35,000 utilized the Coral Cove Water Park

Camps Children of all ages participated in 42 different camps with total participation of 3,110 and total revenue of $290,124.

Theatre Facility Rentals In 2016, $124,000 in revenue was generated from rentals of the multi-purpose rooms, gymnasiums, pools and sports fields.

Productions of Shrek jr. and Willy Wonka jr. took place with a total of 8 performances and 252 performers.

Awards & Honors Illinois Government Finance Officers Association Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting for the 15th consecutive year. Department of Commerce & Economic Opportunity Lighting Grant in the amount of $7,739.20 as part of Public Sector Energy Efficiency Program Rebate. The grant was used for LED lighting in the Simkus Recreation Center parking lot. Commissioner Brenda Gramann was honored for 15 years of service on the Park Board. Commissioner Brian Sokolowski was honored for 15 years of service on the Park Board. Coral Cove Water Park and Fountain View Recreation Center Indoor Pool received an overall annual 4-Star Aquatic Safety score and award from StarGuard Elite.


The mission of the Carol Stream Park District is to enrich our community by fulfilling our residents needs for healthy, accessible, quality recreation activities, parks and facilities, and to be responsible stewards of our community resources.


Simkus Recreation Center 2014 Business Plan

Submitted by: Dannielle Wilson


Contents Executive Summary....................................................................................................................................... 3 Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 3 Customers ................................................................................................................................................. 3 Competition .............................................................................................................................................. 3 Facility Improvements................................................................................................................................... 4 Gymnastics ................................................................................................................................................ 4 Preschool and Elk Trail Recreation Center ................................................................................................ 5 Preschool Market .................................................................................................................................. 5 DCFS ....................................................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. New Dance Room...................................................................................................................................... 7 New Music Room ...................................................................................................................................... 7 New Programming Space â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to be Defined ................................................................................................ 8 Option A: Indoor Playground ................................................................................................................ 8 Option B: Game Room .......................................................................................................................... 8 Upgrades: .................................................................................................................................................. 9 Implementation Schedule ........................................................................................................................... 10 Marketing Strategy ..................................................................................................................................... 10 Feasibility: risk/reward ............................................................................................................................... 10 Summarized Financials................................................................................................................................ 11 Conclusion ................................................................................................................................................... 11 Appendix A: Photo Gallery .......................................................................................................................... 12 Music ....................................................................................................................................................... 12 Indoor Play: ............................................................................................................................................. 12 New Vending: .......................................................................................................................................... 13 Game Room: ........................................................................................................................................... 13

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Executive Summary Simkus Recreation Center is a 25-year old facility that needs some uplifting. What was once the bright, new, exciting hub of recreation in Carol Stream is now playing second-fiddle to the newest gem in town. The opportunity to reassess the role Simkus plays and the programs it hosts has challenged staff to think critically about operations throughout Carol Stream Park District (CSPD). Current programming has been evaluated and new programmatic opportunities at Simkus considered. This business plan outlines the analysis that has been conducted, proposed facility adjustments, and new program opportunities.

Introduction Simkus Recreation Center opened in 1989. The Center currently contains four classrooms for various programming throughout the year. It also houses a large gymnasium that is used for programmed classes, open gym times, rentals and special events, and a dedicated gymnastics room. Behind the scenes, the center is home to administrative areas for Recreation, Marketing Services and Finance and Administration staff. Coral Cove Water Park is the seasonal facility attached to Simkus.

Customers Recreation user groups can generally be identified by age range; a quick process of elimination exercise was used to determine the appropriateness of Simkus’ future target market. Fountain View Recreation Center was designed largely to target the demands of active adults, Elk Trail Recreation Center is exclusive to the early childhood demographic, and Teens and Seniors resist dedicated facilities for their age group. These factors considered, Simkus should identify as the Family Friendly, youth-based programming hub in Carol Stream. A few figures to describe the current market segment:   

2010 census reported 2,574 children ages 0-5 years in the Carol Stream and 2,552 5-9 years CSPD’s registration database has 4,177 customers ages zero to seven years of age (residents and non-residents) In 2013, there were approximately 3,379 registrants in programs that met at Simkus

Because of its location in the community, Simkus is the easy-to-get-to recreation center that residents frequently choose to “stop by” and register out of convenience. Existing customer bases for participants in Dance, Gymnastics, youth sports and at Coral Cove Water Park, are already well-established with Simkus. Emerging customer bases include Summer Camp and Theatre. Seniors prefer Simkus for trip departures and cards/bingo due to the close parking opportunities.

Competition As in most recreation endeavors, private enterprise will always be the primary source of competition. That said, CSPD has had fifty years of proven, quality service that the community is proud of and has supported through several referenda. Recreation programming throughout the district will continue to offer residents affordable community-based programming, regardless of function. In any future plans regarding Simkus, we would want to also ensure that we are not competing with ourselves in any overlap of service between the two major recreation centers in Carol Stream.

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Facility Improvements Gymnastics The CSPD gymnastics program has been in existence since “before anyone can remember” as several staff have recollected. At its inception, the program shared space at Jay Stream Middle School, and then in the Simkus gymnasium, where the gymnastics equipment had to be set up and taken down consistently throughout each week. A more permanent home was established in the western-most wing of Simkus more than 13 years ago. The goal of community-centered, affordable recreation has remained at the backbone of the gymnastics program. CSPD’s gymnastics program is recreation-based, much different than its counterparts in the private industry. Unlike the high-pressure, high-cost atmosphere of local clubs, CSPD’s S.O.C.S. (Springers of Carol Stream) team program encourages achievement in a gymnast-guided, relaxed environment where everyone makes the team. Consideration has been given to the idea of moving gymnastics out of Simkus and into a larger warehouse-type facility. Although participation has remained consistently steady over the past five years, the growth of the team members has increased both revenue and demand on space. (Each team member pays more due to increased time and instruction in the facility.) Growth in the S.O.C.S. team is at an all-time high and has necessitated the current expansion into one of the program rooms for some entry-level tumbling classes and S.O.C.S. mat training. Although a quick-fix, if CSPD’s program continues to be sought out as the more relaxed and affordable gymnastics option, the space will not be able to meet demand. Two key pieces of equipment a warehouse-type facility could accommodate are a “tumble trak” and foam “pit”. These training tools are widely used by gymnasts throughout the nation. In addition to providing safe methods to train new skills, the new features could help attract and retain gymnasts. Continuing to leverage our product as the mid-point will be key to the program’s success: falling in the center of the spectrum between the ‘local park district make-shift tumbling program’ on one end and the ‘intense, expensive, highly-equipped private club’ on the other.

Make-shift tumbling program

CSPD Program

Intense and Expensive Private Club

In the eyes of the “gymnastics world”, the CSPD S.O.C.S. program stands in very high regard. Our coaching staff is top-notch; the size of the team has grown so much that we are no longer able to hold dual meets with other park districts – we often have double the number of competitors on the other teams. Currently there are 57 S.O.C.S. members; inquiries from prospective gymnasts come from as far as Villa Park. Because of the District’s debt margin position, and to continue engaging with partners to serve community needs, the leased warehouse space would be a venture between at least one other park district and possibly the school District 87 gymnastics program. CSPD already maintains cooperative gymnastics programming agreements with Glendale Heights and Villa Park. No partner has been pursued at this time; the Recreation program supervisor feels there could be several interested parties. Page 4 of 13


Preschool and Elk Trail Recreation Center Moving Gymnastics out of Simkus would open the door to moving the Preschool program out of Elk Trail Recreation Center (ETRC) and into the old gymnastics space. The square footage of the current gymnastics space exceeds that of Elk Trial. From a strictly square-footage perspective, it appears feasible to add five classrooms, restrooms, kitchen, and closets into the existing footprint. Further architectural advice and design would be needed. A rough rendering:

Preschool Market Because of its tenure of over 37 years of successful service in Carol Stream, the park district’s preschool program has instilled a strong sense of community pride; former participants are now bringing their children to the CSPD preschool program. Participation in the CSPD’s preschool has been steady, averaging 153 participants per year over course of the last twelve years. Of the years housed at ETRC, participation has been an average of 3% lower than when at the two recreation centers (former Kids Connection and Simkus). There are ten other preschool programs in the area that would be considered competitors: five religious-based, four private, and one school district. In 2013, the CSPD preschool program ‘supplied’ approximately 18% of the kindergarten students enrolled into CCSD93 and D25. Page 5 of 13


CSPD’s niche, especially if housed at Simkus, is the fact that it is the only recreation-based program in Carol Stream. Though not the absolute cheapest in the area, the program is still one of the most affordable. Benefits to moving Preschool to Simkus:        

Reduce the number of independent facilities needing maintenance and upkeep o Current cost to maintain ETRC: $30,000 per year Ample Parking o The drop-off/pick-up procedure would be eliminated, subsequently raising customer satisfaction Market Advantage o Preschool housed inside the staffed recreation center In-house fieldtrips o Gymnasium o Dance Night/Weekend Programming o The expense of a building attendant is no longer needed (SRC Service Desk open) and parking now ample to accommodate more than one course simultaneously. Parent Participation increase o More accessible space equates to greater ability to support parents in the classroom for visitor days, open houses, etc. Ownership o Participant starts their park district ‘career’ with us, in a familiar space Safety o Easy to lock the west wing securely as its own unit, if necessary

If this option is not considered, costs to complete needed repairs and updates to Elk Trail are approximately $70,000. If permissible per Village code, the expense to expand the parking lot would be approximately $30,000. If moving preschool to Simkus is considered, complete costs would need to be professionally estimated; initial thoughts range from $350,000 - $450,000. The addition of an outdoor play space and playground would be essential for a licensed preschool program and advantageous for summer campers. The grass area immediately south of the Simkus west wing, currently adjacent to Coral Cove Water Park, would be ideal. A section of fence could easily be added to the current footprint to create a safe outdoor play space. Licensure A critical factor in the future of the preschool program is the decision to seek state licensure. The state of Illinois requires facilities that care for children ten or more hours per week to be licensed. The CSPD preschool program was adjusted for the 2013-14 school year, so that no child could receive more than ten hours of care per week. However, if CSPD continues to operate as a non-licensed facility, the ability to extend programming outside of the two-hour class time is extremely, if not completely, limited. Staff do not have data regarding how many prospective students are lost due to the lack of license, yet it could be assumed that at the very least, the marketability of the program increases due to the licensure. Staff’s current interpretation of the licensing legislation is such that the summer camp program should be operating under licensure guidelines. Children are in the care of CSPD staff for more than ten hours per week throughout the duration of the program. Page 6 of 13


At the present time, it is staff’s understanding that the state is not actively pursuing unlicensed facilities, but if the state is questioned about a facility it will investigate. If CSPD was to pursue state licensure, licensing a single facility would be most advantageous. Under the proposed new structure, preschool and summer camp would both be housed in Simkus, therefore both programs would be licensed. Key changes that would need to be implemented to secure the license:     

Hand washing sinks in classrooms Staff training requirements Purchase of new equipment, such as cots Addition of snack provision Indoor and outdoor play space

By force of nature, the preschool program being temporarily housed at Simkus in January 2014 turned out to be a fantastic ‘testing grounds’ for both parents and staff. Parents loved the fact that students now had gymnasium play time incorporated into their day, they appreciated additional teacher ‘facetime’, and embraced the socialization opportunity with other parents. Staff saw great value of the additional time spent in the gym developing gross motor skills indoors through the depths of winter.

New Dance Room Simkus Recreation Center has one dedicated dance room with fixed mirrors, barres, hardwood floor, and sound system. Because of the growth in the dance program, many dance classes are currently held in a multipurpose room out of necessity. Youth parents have complained about inequality between dance classes; some students “get to” use the dance room and others “have to” use a multipurpose room. Adult dance bounced around between so many rooms in multiple facilities, the participants have expressed a desire for the program to have a “home”. Conversion of an existing multipurpose room space into a dedicated dance room, complete with mirrors, ballet barres, appropriate flooring, and sound system would provide a more equitable, upgraded space for program expansion. (This project is underway as of August 2014.)

New Music Room Music classes have had to be outsourced off-site or held in a variety of spaces like the Simkus conference room and Coral Cove lobby. The music participants are another group that have felt they do not have a “home” at the park district. Remodel of an existing multipurpose space, the former “Kids Korner”, into a dedicated small music room would offer a quiet location with no other shared program room walls. Small group and private Voice, Piano, Guitar, and other music lessons could now be held onsite in a space appropriate for the lesson, where the participants would feel welcome. The space would also provide the theatre program a small-group breakout room for rehearsals. The growth of the theatre program has had a direct positive growth impact on voice lessons.

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New Programming Space – to be Defined The current men’s and women’s locker rooms, located in the core of Simkus, have now become wasted space without a fitness center on site. Re-allocating the women’s restroom into much-needed storage for tables and moving the men’s restrooms to the approximate location of the current women’s showers offers the opportunity to re-configure the east end of the Simkus core. The program room would be visible through a windowed wall where the four brown-door closets currently exist; closets could move to a less visible location. The effect would be a more welcoming, recreation-focused atmosphere as customers walk through the main doors. What exists in that program room has been under consideration; direction from the Board is sought to determine final action. Option A: Indoor Playground An indoor playground can be described as a soft-play space whereby toddler and elementary aged children can play indoors. In the 2008 community needs survey, 4,120 or 30% of households expressed the need for an indoor playground and 14% households chose indoor playground as a top 4 choice for "most important". Services provided in this space could include:    

Drop-In Play Registration-based Classes Birthday Parties Rentals

In 2013, there were approximately 3,379 registrants in programs that met at Simkus Recreation Center. This established group of program participants could be potential drop-in participants and/or their siblings could be potential drop-in visitors during the programs.

Option B: Game Room As an alternate to the indoor playground concept, a game room could be established. The goal of the traditional “rec-room” space would be to encourage play with interactive games like air hockey, foosball, ping pong… those that would appeal to all ages. A few tables and chairs would provide a space for board games. The new services offered include: a. Drop-In Play b. Coffee Vending c. Birthday Parties d. Multi-Purpose space in summer for Camp and/or Theatre It is anticipated that the game room would be well-received by ‘secondary users’ of Simkus – those waiting for family members to complete their class or compete in their sports competition. The games could be coin operated, and paddles checked out from the service desk, in an effort to recoup equipment costs.

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Note that a hybrid of options A and B could be considered, although the revenue potential of A would be reduced. The concept drawing of the Simkus “core”:

Upgrades: Refreshing the building as a whole, including fixes and updates, would follow the color palette established as the new district standard with the design of Fountain View Recreation Center. The following items are listed without much detail, as they are generally self-explanatory. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

HVAC Fix/Upgrade Vestibules Hallway Benches Paint/flooring Internal Doors Lobby Service Desk ‘Shell’ Motion Sensor light switches Audio/Visual Ceiling Tiles

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Implementation Schedule The gymnastics program could move at any time; whenever the new leased space was secured and converted. Preschool, on the other hand, would best move between semesters, over winter or summer break. Because the women’s restroom in the front of the building would be available, the work on the core of the building could start at any time at the west end, working east. The current women’s locker room could be converted into the storage and men’s/women’s restroom spaces first; the remaining east portions could be completed once the new men’s restroom was available. The restrooms are the largest logistical factor in the core conversion; the rest of the work will have little to no impact on the programmatic space.

Marketing Strategy The park district staff is really spoiled by the talents we already hold in our current Marketing Services team. Once the Simkus plan is approved and scheduled, the marketing team will create a comprehensive plan, using already-established customer and community communication avenues to ensure the right focus, the right touch, and the right message are being used. Targeted communication to current users would be key; an expansion to capture new users would follow.

Feasibility: risk/reward With any new project comes an inevitable amount of risk. The one absolute factor in the future of Simkus is that something must change. What was once the bright, new, exciting hub of recreation in Carol Stream has been described a step-child analogy. With any conversion comes risk, but what about a Simkus Remodel would help make it “less risky”?     

Location. The intersection of Lies and County Farm Roads is a retailer’s dream. Convenience. Just a short walk gets children out of vehicles and into classrooms in no time. Sentimentality. A lot of the community ‘grew up’ going to Simkus, and call it ‘home’. Reputation. Already-proven programs will settle into Simkus easily. Preservation. Carol Stream expects the park district to “take care of what we have”.

The level of risk seems quite low when the five points above are already on the park district’s side.

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Summarized Financials Capital Investment: West wing conversion Core conversion Upgrades

-$400,000 -$500,000 -$150,000 -$1,050,000 $400,000

Possible ETRC Sale Revenue Impact to CIP Operational Impact Elk Trail Facility Budget (shift) New Program Revenue Increase Dance Preschool Music Gymnastics* Special Interest Camp Indoor Play Rentals/Parties

Expenses Gymnastics Upgrades (pit, party room) Gymnastics Lease Indoor Play Equipment

-$650,000 Annual $30,000

Over six years $210,000

$7,200 $42,800 $6,000 $15,000 $5,000 $18,000 $8,400 $6,818

$50,400 $299,600 $42,000 $105,000 $35,000 $126,000 $58,800 $47,726

-$40,000

-$10,000 -$280,000 -$34,000

Conservative gain over six years:

$650,526

*this is in addition to current annual $93k net in gymnastics

The estimated revenue and expense figures above show that the operational gains will provide a return on the initial capital investment in approximately seven years.

Conclusion To summarize, gymnastics moves to a warehouse, preschool to the former gymnastics space. New dance, music, and multipurpose spaces are secured. Storage and restrooms are shifted to secure a new, highly visible program room. With Board approval, staff will pursue professional services to ascertain more accurate architectural advice, construction costs, and will further pursue gymnastics partnering relationships.

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Appendix A: Photo Gallery Music:

Indoor Play:

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New Vending:

Game Room:

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To: From: Date: Re:

Park Board Jim Reuter, Executive Director November 30, 2016 Capital Improvement Notes/Narrative â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Financials as of November 30, 2016

This narrative provides supplemental information to the CIP Spreadsheet for the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Capital Improvement Plans as reconciled against the November 30, 2016 financials. This document is meant to explain what money has been spent, what funds are committed, and what funds remain for future projects. It coordinates with the quarterly Capital Improvements Program spreadsheet, and will be updated on regular intervals.

CIP Narrative - November 2016

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1. Elk Trail Recreation Center: Both RTU’s (roof top units) at Elk Trail Recreation Center and an electronic marquee were installed in 2015 and 2016 respectively with contingency funds. While no money is budgeted for additional work, this facility is likely to require funding in the next few years for tuck-pointing and replacement of the windows.

$38,600 from unassigned contingency was shifted to the Elk Trail Recreation budget to address these improvements. 2. Armstrong Park: This park has seen a major renovation in conjunction with the County’s storm water retention project. Those renovations included a new sled hill, aesthetic and field improvements to hub area, relocating the playground, repainting of the in-line hockey court, new poles and LED lighting at the in-line court, and pathway lighting from the parking lot to the fields. The significant reduction in cost for the District’s stormwater construction freed up $341,900 for funding other projects at Armstrong Park. The LED lighting at the in-line court received a $7,000 energy grant which has been deposited to the District’s Capital Repair & Replacement Fund (42-11). Remaining projects include the renovation of Field #1, addition of a washroom facility, completion of the pathways throughout the park, and restoring a light pole to one of the outfields. • • •

• • • •

Field #1 renovation is almost complete. It will include regraded infields and grass fields, backstops and dugout areas, and lighting. The final portion of pathway to the north of Field #1 is now complete; this pathway goes around all of Armstrong Park. The contract has been awarded for the new prefabricated, handicap accessible washroom structure. Additional funds have been estimated for any subsequent electrical or water utility work, and brick work. A portion of the cost will be charged against the Special Recreation Budget. Three new kiosks have been installed throughout the park; they provide information, directional, and cross marketing items. Resurfacing of the north Armstrong Parking Lot (near Kids World). Plans for the Tot Lot removal and shade structure are on hold. Repainting of the basketball courts is estimated at $8,000 for 2017 completion. CIP Narrative - November 2016

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All planned projects are approaching completion, with an estimated $256,613 in unassigned funds on hold. Staff is recommending shifting $100,000 of those unassigned funds to Coral Cove Water Park to replace the soft surface area under the large water bucket play feature. This will leave $156,613 of unassigned funds for any additional Armstrong Park needs.

3. Simkus Recreation Center: With the roof and parking lot complete, Board has directed staff to focus on aesthetic improvements that would have an immediate impact on revenue production, operating cost reduction, and customer perception. • The registration desk was redesigned and made ADA accessible with the use of Special Recreation Funds. • The redesigned HVAC system upgrade was higher than the earmarked funding level, and the Board approved the shifting of $75,000 from the Energy Improvements line item, as well as assigning $50,000 from undesignated SRC dollars to cover the cost. That project is currently underway with completion scheduled for February 2017. • Vestibule bid for both North facing entrances have been bid; this will make the doors ADA accessible, and improve heating and cooling efficiency. (This will also be funded by Special Recreation Dollars – not Capital) • We will be going to bid to replace flooring throughout the hallways and lobby. Baseboards that match the door trim have already been purchased and will be installed once the flooring is replaced.

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Potential SRC projects include: • Server Room & network infrastructure – initial exploration of needs and cost. • Hallway benches are being considered after the flooring. • Renovation of SRC Kitchen/Staff lounge. • Create a work room in the Administrative Offices, and add a window to the HR Office. • Replace current paver-style island at main entrance.

Based on these suggestions, $571,002 was shifted from unassigned contingency ($75,000 of which was from Energy Improvements), to the Simkus Recreation Center Budget; some values are still estimates.

4. Coral Cove: Plans are underway to accommodate the plans to bring Concession Sales in house. Engineering services have been contracted. Staff has received bids to replace the soft surface area surrounding the large spray feature. This is a necessary repair and funding will be shifted to accommodate these plans.

CIP Narrative - November 2016

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An additional $205,701_will be shifted from Contingency to accommodate the Concession Area and Spray Area improvements.

5. Trails/Paths/Parking Lots/Lighting: Work completed through 2014 totaled $596,768. The unassigned $250,000 for undetermined pathways work has been shifted to Armstrong Park to complete the repair and resurfacing of the pathways throughout the park.

The $250,000 in excess funds have been shifted to Armstrong Park pathway work. 6. Playgrounds: Playground replacements through 2016 totaled $1,055,898. Funds that were assigned to the general playground replacement category have been shifted to the pool of unassigned dollars for now. While this money may still be used for playgrounds, this will allow staff/board to prioritize how it should be spent. A. Kids World - Complete B. Bierman - Complete C. Pleasant Hill: Board direction is not to install a loop in the pathway; instead repair the parts that are bad, but do not add any pathway. Board also suggests that the District approach the school to see if they will split cost of path repairs, but have yet to receive a decision from them. We will also explore rolling this repair/repaving work being done elsewhere, AND explore options for grinding and reusing old asphalt as base. D. Weeks Park / East Weeks Park originally had a budget of $165,000; new budget $30,000. Board agrees with staff recommendation to leave budget of $30,000 for future general improvements to the park. The park will be maintained as a passive park with an open field, pond, and baseball diamonds for neighborhood practices and pick-up games.

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This results in $342,907 of unassigned funds returned to contingency.

7. New Parks A. Community Park: $100,000 is currently budgeted. Staff is working with the Village for the transfer of the property. Through an existing intergovernmental agreement the Park District continues to maintain the park area. Because of its proximity to low income housing, we believe this park is a good candidate for a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG). The Village has agreed to work with the Park District to submit the grant, bringing the potential funding to $200,000. Future improvements may include: demolition/remodeling of existing bathrooms, fabric shade structures, and installation of a new playground. B. Carolshire Park: Original budget $85,000; spent/encumbered $3,382 … $81,618 remaining. Staff held a community planning meeting in October 2015 to gather input on the needs at the future park. Input points to more of a “pocket park” need. Additional funding is needed. The site is also a good candidate for a CDBG Grant. Cash-in-Lieu funds ($85,807 as of November 2016) will also be earmarked for Carolshire Park. Between Capital Funds, Cash-inLieu, and CDBG funds, this could bring funding to $246,455. Staff acquired engineering estimates; shovel ready plans would be needed in order to be prepared for when the State announces CDBG funding becoming available. The Board agrees that park improvements are needed at both Community Park and Carolshire Park to provide recreation to underserved markets.

CIP Narrative - November 2016

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8. General Park Infrastructure/Energy Savings: This category includes general infrastructure, landscaping, and energy improvements. $60,000 was set aside for general landscaping/general infrastructure/tree removal. Prior projects included native plantings along the west side of the Fountain View Recreation Center, relocation of the solar panels for the FVRC sign along Lies Road, Redhawk Park Automatic Flushing System, and improvements for Memorial Park. The remaining funds of $14,529 will now be earmarked for Memorial Park. The District continues to work with the CS Parks Foundation and the VFW to raise funds for the Veteranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Memorial at Memorial Park. *$75,000 which was earmarked for General Energy Improvements will be shifted to the SRC HVAC project.

This results in $233,175 being shifted to unassigned contingency (and $75,000 to SRV HVAC). 9. Land/Shoreline Restoration: $50,000 has been set aside for future shoreline restoration. Repair to the retailing wall at Bierman Park became necessary this year at a cost of $11,600. Mitchell Lake may also require shoreline work in the near future. Staff is considering whether there is a need to outline future shoreline restoration projects, or design a Natural Area Master Plan.

CIP Narrative - November 2016

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This results in $238,400 being shifted to unassigned contingency.

10. FVRC: Glass was removed from around the walking track to relocate the entry of the walking track, and create an additional stretching area. Additional window coverings were purchased for the running/walking track area, as well as the doors in the multi-purpose rooms.

Therefore, an additional $23,609 was shifted to the FVRC budget to cover costs.

11. McCaslin: The turf batter boxes were repaired this year. We also installed air-conditioning in the concession building due to health and safety concerns. This will align with the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plans for bringing concession operations in house. Estimates for concession area improvements include technology, signage as well as additional equipment needed. Staff is also exploring options for adding signage along North Avenue to promote McCaslin Park as well as Coyote Crossing; a design services contract has been signed and estimates for the electronic sign will be presented to the Board for consideration.

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Therefore, an additional $126,992 will be shifted from contingency to the McCaslin Park budget to cover costs. 12. Coyote Crossing Mini Golf: Work to repair the pumps in the pond areas at Coyote Crossing is complete. Minimal changes will be required to bring the concession area in line with the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overall plan. Staff is currently exploring options and costs for resurfacing the putting greens throughout the course. Funding will be shifted from contingency to accommodate this plan.

Approximately $57,944 will be shifted from contingency to cover costs. 13. Equipment/Vehicles: The fleet replacement schedule is reviewed annually, and will now be funded through the Capital Repair & Replacement Fund.

CIP Narrative - November 2016

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14. PMO (Project Management Office) Total costs for PMO services were $949,435.

15. CIP Admin: A portion of staff salaries (of those involved in capital project management) were charged to this line item between 2010 -2015. All future staff salary (even though related to Capital Projects), will be charged to an operating budgets.

This results in $15,583 excess funds that will be placed in unassigned contingency. 16. Legal: The total cost for legal fees paid for the claim was $114,047. The unused balance of transferred funds will be returned to contingency.

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Based on the Year-to-Date expenses, encumbrances and the â&#x20AC;&#x153;proposedâ&#x20AC;? plans outlined above, there is a balance of $344,037 (*) of unassigned CIP funding. *This does not account for the dollars in the Capital Repair & Replacement Fund (November 30, 2016 balance is $1,380,373).

CIP Narrative - November 2016

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Carol Stream Park District Master Plan 2018  

The Carol Stream Park District Board of Commissioners and staff met to identify goals to accomplish in the next 5-10 years, particularly wit...

Carol Stream Park District Master Plan 2018  

The Carol Stream Park District Board of Commissioners and staff met to identify goals to accomplish in the next 5-10 years, particularly wit...