Page 1

HOMES UNDER $200,000 – WHY RENT..??

(306)-453-4403 - 119 Main St. Carlyle VIEW ALL LISTINGS ON WWW.REALTOR.CA

622 SOURIS AVE., ARCOLA MLS# SK716774

$85,900

105 MANOR ST., ARCOLA MLS# SK733858

$129,900

113 2ND ST E., CARLYLE MLS# SK744115

318 4TH ST W., CARLYLE MLS# SK746320

$168,400

10 MAIN ST., MANOR MLS# SK744270

$175,000

$199,800

Ray Boutin

(306) 575-8575 BROKER

OBSERVER

PM40011904

VOLUME 82 • NO. 18

THE

Crescent Point cuts workforce PAGE 4

LEANNE SORENSON Broker, Owner RESIDENTIAL & RESORT COMMERCIAL | FARM & ACREAGES

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14TH, 2018

Heart of the Moose Mountains

WWW.CARLYLEOBSERVER.COM

INSIDE THIS WEEK:

|

Views PAGE 8

ARCOLA OPEN HOUSE TOUR! Saturday, September 22nd Address & Times posted Next Week

Homespun specials PAGES 10 & 11

FACEBOOK.COM/CARLYLEOBSERVER

Wildcats volleyball champs PAGE 12

• 108 Coteau St. Arcola, 2 beds, 1 bath, 1020sq.ft, MLS# SK738387, $42,000 • 214 Carlyle St. Arcola, 3 beds, 1 bath, 1157sq.ft, MLS# SK737129, $138,000 • 402 Main St. Arcola, 4 beds, 2 baths, 1180sq.ft, MLS# SK743291, $159,000 • 403 Balmoral Ave. Arcola, 4 beds, 1 bath, 1290sq.ft, MLS# SK729907, $225,000 • 302 Souris Ave. Arcola, 5 beds, 3 baths, 1172sq.ft, MLS# SK727155, $255,000 • 100 Moose Bay, Arcola, 5 beds, 3 baths, 1530sq.ft, MLS# SK728279, $348,000 • 718 Hazel Ave. Arcola, 5 beds, 3 baths, 1440sq.ft, MLS# SK732081, $455,000

Observed At PAGE 13

306.577.1213 REDROOFREALTY@GMAIL.COM OFFICE LOCATION RED ROOF REALTY INC. 18 OKADOCA STREET, KENOSEE LAKE, SK

Crescent Point to cut workforce 17%, appoints new CEO

Archive photo

The Crescent Point office in Carlyle felt the effects of the recent cuts by the company. (see story on page 4)

OPEN HOMESPUN SUNDAY 12-5

Saturday & Sunday Sept. 15th & 16th Carlyle Sports Arena

CARLYLE • WAWOTA

CARLYLE


2018

y this mopartht just most

wellur inmore may ou to e been

cong will ent in a new comp-

d will home consian old urself

eloo say stand might cer-

2

THE OBSERVER • Hydrovac • Steam Trucks • Pressure Trucks • 50/50 Methanol • Water Trucks • Combo Units

Week of September 16 to 22, 2018 You’ll re-evaluate your circle of friends and cut ties with those who constantly drain your energy. Don’t let yourself get taken advantage of by seemingly well-intentioned strangers.

would n diet. t eatveringe are

ARIES

There’s lots of action in store for you this week. Your friends will invite you to partake in a regular sporting acti503 Street,toArcola, vity. This will beMain your ticket stayingSK in shape allDispatch: winter. (306) 455-2667

24 HOUR

If you have young children, you’d do well to discipline them a bit more consistently. You’ll feel like you need to walk on eggshells whenever you’re around a certain family member.

An air of confusion is about to overcome your workplace. A family outing will do you a world of good, even though it’ll prove complicated to organize.

GEMINI

CANCER

You’ll find yourself in an excellent position for a promotion at work. You’re on the right track for financial success. Even your investments are doing particularly well given the current economic climate.

You’ll start to see encouraging results from a recent lifestyle change. This will motivate you to keep eating healthy food and exercising regularly. A loved one will bring you on an adventure. Your need for an adrenaline rush will lead you out of your comfort zone. You’ll feel alive and truly proud of yourself.

and your family will start working on an ambitious project.

VIRGO

Community Events Listing

You’ll let your inner leader shine this week and express your opinion with authority. Slowly but surely, you’ll get to the top of that corporate ladder. Don’t give up.

VIRGO

Septem�er

You’ll receive excellent news about the financial aspect of a project hold dear. Take any opportu15 –you Carlyle - SCRC Races nity you can to learn something 15 &new, 16 –andCarlyle Homespun you’ll find- great success before long. Your eye for detail will 4 Week 16 – Carlyle - OneChurch.ca prove profitable.

You’ll have a hard time resisting the call of the shopping mall this week. Treat yourself — a new wardrobe just might pave the way to new professional opportunities.

23 – Carlyle - OneChurch.ca 4 Week Challenge 24 – Manor - Over 60 Club Potluck 25 – Kenosee Lake - Four Season Bingo 28 – Arcola - United Church Fall Supper 29 – Carlyle - Chase The Ace 30 – Carlyle - OneChurch.ca 4 Week Challenge/Catered Lunch

Octo�er

1-4 – Carlyle - Dickens Thrift Sale 11 – Arcola - Creative Tables 13– Carlyle -Chase The Ace 13 – Arcola - St. Andrew’s United Church Rummage Sale 17 – Carlyle - Community Food Bank

Challenge 18 –LIBRA Kenosee Lake - Four Season Bingo people- Food are counting 19 –Many Carlyle Bankon you to make a decision, but you’ll have 20 –aManor Over 60 Club hard time- choosing a side. Justmeeting sure -you have allThe the infor22 –make Carlyle Chase Ace

If something keeps breaking at home, this week would be the right time to permanently resolve the problem. You might take the opportunity to update your interior decor and add a few touches of colour before the grey days of winter set in.

mation you need before you make the final call.

SCORPIO

You’ll notice your weight has been fluctuating, mainly because you’re overworked. You’ll have lots of success at the office, but you need to take some time to rest. After all, nothing is more important than your health.

SAGITTARIUS

Don’t forget to have your car inspected from time to time, as breakdowns tend to happen at the worst possible time. Keep your phone and your laptop charged at all times; you never know when you might need them.

SAGITTARIUS

You’ll receive warm applause for a brilliant accomplishment. You’ll be given an award of some sort in front of a crowd. This will give you the self-confidence boost you need to take your life to the next level.

CAPRICORN

Having an active social life will inevitably require you to spend some money. You’ll need to make yourself a more detailed budget to be able to afford the leisure activities you enjoy most. Financial matters will be discussed at length at your workplace.

CAPRICORN

You’ll feel the need to retreat and spend some time in the comfort of your own home this week. You might take the opportunity to move some furniture around and get rid of clutter.

AQUARIUS

AQUARIUS

asked for your opinion. senseweek . . . Weather for Your the of humour will help disarm an awk-

PISCES

You might experience a few sleepless nights. Your mind will be particularly active and you’ll need to find an outlet for the extra energy in order to regain balance. A gym membership might be just what you need.

OBSERVER Heart of the Moose Mountains

PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY

Owned and Operated by The Prairie Newspaper group LP, a division of GVIC Communications Corp.

Fax: 306-453-2938

Your first stop to find events happening in our community!

*Do you have a community event you want listed here? SendLEO us the name of the event, date, and what community The idea of embarking on a grand it’s being held by emailing: observer@sasktel.net, calling: adventure will cross your mind. (306)453-2525, or texting: (306)575-3115. If you would You’ll feel an insatiable thirst for like to includeAfter more information knowledge. coming into a con- than that listed below siderable amount of money, youhow we can help. contact our sales people to see

LEO

Phone: 306-453-2525

Calendar

Gradual lifestyle changes might be the answer to your constant fatigue. You may feel the need to get in touch with your spiritual side this week.

CANCER

THE

Community

GEMINI

You’ll start to look at travel deals for the winter. At work, you may have to communicate with clients who speak a different language than you, but you’ll manage to understand and be understood in the end.

You’ll find yourself juggling new responsibilities at home and at work. You’ll need a hefty dose of patience and perseverance in order to get everything done despite stress and fatigue. Luckily, it’ll all be worth it in the end.

Office: (306) 455-0067 Fax: (306) 455-2677

TAURUS

TAURUS

SCORPIO

on a f, but t you carewever, e.

Week of September 23 to 29, 2018

ARIES

rizon. dy to s well ake a peace

some n your You’ll ot this learn day.

CANCER, LEO AND VIRGO

ARIES, TAURUS AND GEMINI

LIBRA

many More dress may esting

THE LUCKIEST SIGNS THIS WEEK:

THE LUCKIEST SIGNS THIS WEEK:

extra talent tight exer-

t time urself masreatly

Friday, September 14, 2018

You won’t mince your words when ward situation at work and allow

Friday, you to restoreSept. the peace.14

HIGH PISCES 20° You might face LOW 8° an unexpected

expense this week; be sure to rearrange your budget accordingly. Monday, Sept. 17 planHowever, your careful financial ning will pay off, as you have more HIGH 11° than enough money to get everything taken care LOW 4° of.

Saturday, Sept.15 HIGH LOW

17° 6 °

HIGH LOW

Tuesday, Sept. 18 HIGH LOW

Publisher ............................................. Rick Major Editor ..................................................... Rick Major Advertising ............................... Alison Dunning Production ................ Karen Mitchell-Steele ........................................................... Dolores Young

Sunday, Sept. 16 14° 8°

Wednesday, Sept. 19

9° 3°

HIGH LOW

11° 3°

Subscription Rates: $40.00/year within Canada (includes GST) Office Hours: Monday to Thursday: 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (Closed 12:00 p.m. to 1 p.m.) Friday: 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

The Carlyle Observer is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalist practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please email running.kelly@gmail.com or call the newsroom at 306-453-2525. If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the website at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163 for additional information.

CMCA AUDITED


3

NEWS

Friday, September 14, 2018

Credit Union gives to Carievale Hall Auxiliary

All Saints Church receives facelift

Photo submitted

Dean Copeland GM of Prairie Pride Credit Union (right) along with Laura Stanley board of director of PPCU (center) presenting a Project Pride cheque for $12,500 to Rhonda Halliday (left) for the Carievale Hall Auxiliary.

Photo submitted

PK Painting recently finished painting the 134-year-old All Saints Church at Cannington Manor Historical Park.

They’re going back to school. Is your Internet fast enough for when they get home?

6999

$

month1 For year 1

up to 10 Mbps2 | 200 GB

7999

$

month1 For year 1

up to 25 Mbps2 | 400 GB

8999

$

month1 For year 1

up to 25 Mbps2 | 500 GB

NO OVERAGE FEES!

3

2 year term required

Call 1-877-739-0684 now and get installed for FREE!

4

Your local Dealer

Glasser’s TV (306) 435-3040

SE Satellite (306) 485-9190

Two year term required. $69.99 pricing reflects a $10 discount off current regular price for the first 12 months. $79.99 pricing reflects a $20 discount off current regular price for the first 12 months. $89.99 pricing reflects a $20 discount off current regular price for the first 12 months. Discounted prices no longer apply in month 13 for remainder of 2 year term. Monthly service fee includes rental cost of equipment, except Xplornet Wi-Fi router. Taxes apply. Offer valid until October 31, 2018 for new customers and is subject to change at any time. 2Actual speed online may vary with your technical configuration, Internet traffic, server and other factors. Traffic Management policy applies, see xplornet.com/legal. 3On Xplornet plans with the limited state option. 4If installation requirements go beyond the scope of a basic installation, additional fees apply. Subject to site check, site check fee may apply. See dealer for details. Packages subject to availability. A router is required for multiple users. Xplornet® is a trademark of Xplornet Communications Inc. © 2018 Xplornet Communications Inc. 1

xplornet.com

For all your printing and paper needs Letterheads Business Cards Posters

Envelopes Statements Invoices

OBSERVER THE

Heart of the Moose Mountains

Place mats Fax sheets Event or Raffle tickets

Brochures Carbonless forms Gift certificates

Labels Purchase orders Bills of lading

306-453-2525 observer@sasktel.net


4

NEWS

Friday, September 14, 2018

Crescent Point to cut workforce 17%, appoints new CEO By Greg Nikkel Crescent Point Energy appointed a new president and CEO on Wednesday, and announced details of a transition plan that includes a reduction of their workforce by 17 per cent. Craig Bryksa has been appointed as president and CEO, and

Robert Heinemann was named the new chairman of the board. “Our board looks forward to working alongside Craig and his team as the company executes its transition plan and strategy,” said Barbara Munroe, chair of the governance and nominating committee. Some of the key

B&A HOLDINGS LTD. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Spring Clean-Up/Yard Work/Roto-tilling Tree Removal, Cutting & Stump Grinding Industrial & Residential Hedge Trimming Farm yard wind row restoration Landscaping Demolition (cabins, garages) Cement take out and hauling Dump Runs Light Carpentry Deck Building 50 4x4 Aerial Lift Aerating, Power raking Lot sweeping Skidsteer work Auger holes (4” to 24”-13” deep) Screw piles Asphalt sealing & crack filling (Commercial & Residential)

• Sierra Stone/Rubberstone, Quartz, Endura Flake, Brick driveways etc. Publication

PHONE BILL Creative

(306)577-1643 L3RP Canada

The Carlyle Observer

Saskatchewan Job Creation Ad

components of the transition plan includes focusing the company’s asset base by making “significant upstream asset divestitures”, a net debt reduction of $1 billion by the end of 2019, and a reduced workforce which will save expenses of over $50 million. The company carried out a comprehensive review of their asset base, business strategy and organizational structure, and have identified their Saskatchewan assets of Viewfield, Shaunavon and Flat Lake as key focus areas. A number of key criteria were considered, including returns, scalability, free cash flow potential and the ability to improve commodity market access. These areas, plus resource plays in the Uinta Basin in the U.S. and East Shale Duvernay, accounted for about 70 per cent of Crescent Point’s second quarter production for 2018. Crescent Point is considering the sale of certain infrastructure assets, which could lead Ad Specs to partnerships and 1/2 Page Ad development of future 9.875”w x 7.86”h infrastructure projects. 4 CP No Bleed

The debt reduction strategy includes maximizing free cash flow through an efficient capital allocation process, cost reductions and asset sales. Part of the organizational restructuring is the immediate reduction of 17 per cent of employees, but no details were provided about where the layoffs will occur, or numbers of employees. Citing the privacy of employees and contractors, Contact the company stated they Jackie Shorman will not divulge any de403-718-3572 tails of the layoffs. Enbridge Inc.

“I want to thank all of our staff for their hard work and contributions over the years. This restructuring is difficult, however we needed to adjust the organization to match our current business needs. We are all focused on executing our transition plan and are excited about Crescent Point’s future,” said Bryksa in a statement. The plan includes an ongoing review of operating and capital costs, which will include implementation of field automation to increase

efficiencies. The company’s guidance for 2018 is unchanged, with the plan for daily average production of 177,000 barrels of oil equivalent and $1.775 billion in capital expenditures. In the second half of 2018, they are planning on capital spending of $750 million, with plans of spending $1.55 billion to $1.6 billion in 2019 on capital expenditures, with a goal of daily average production ranging from 175,000 to 180,000 boe.

How many jobs will the Line 3 program create?

The Line 3 Replacement = 24,494 jobs. The Line 3 Replacement Program is expected to generate almost 25,000 direct, indirect and induced jobs in Canada. The project is creating significant employment opportunities for local and Indigenous individuals and businesses. Here in Saskatchewan, approximately 9,175 jobs will be created over the project lifespan.

> Here are some ways Saskatchewan communities will benefit from the Line 3 Replacement: Stimulating local economies With pipeline construction workers in town, local businesses like hotels, restaurants, campgrounds, stores, movie theaters and recreational businesses will all benefit. Local business boost During construction, Enbridge sources local businesses like hardware stores, supply stores and parts dealers for goods and services to support their operations. Almost $200 million in revenue Over the life of the project, Enbridge will pay an estimated $183.9 million in taxes to the Province of Saskatchewan. These tax revenues are typically used to fund schools, roads, community projects and other services that sustain our quality of life.

Proud to be part of Prairie communities for over 68 years. To learn more about our Line 3 Replacement Program, visit enbridge.com/line3canada, call 1-888-967-3899, or email projects@enbridge.com


Gordon F. Kells High School Volleyball Home Tournament Congratulations to the Sr. Girls volleyball team who placed 2nd in their home tournament last weekend. The girls had an overall record of 12-5 and lost a heartbreaking final to the Englefield Eagles. Excellent start to a team with 7 new players on it. Great things lie ahead in the volleyball season. A big thanks to Laurie James for co-hosting in Arcola as well. The cross country team is out practising every day after school. Athletes are to make 2 practices a week. The grade 7 and 8 District Meet is on Sept. 29 in Rocanville and the grade 9-12 District Meet is on Oct. 3 in Oxbow. Junior boys volleyball (grades 7 – 9) is underway at GFK. The junior boys’ team will be practicing and playing games Tuesday and Thursday after schools until District playoffs On Nov. 8. Fitness club is back at GFK for another year. Fitness club runs every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday mornings from 7:45 – 8:30 and is open to

Back to the usual By Linda Wegner For me, everything changed over the course of the past several weeks: various Fall activities have begun; school has started and volunteer organizations are gearing up for autumn and winter activities; board meetings are chugging back into action; tomatoes and cucumber crops (as incredibly abundant as they’ve been) are showing signs of their impending death; and, days and nights are inching closer to each other by the hour. To make it more dramatic, weeks of blistering heat and the resultant tinder-dry conditions and forest fires are thankfully being moderated by rain and substantially lower temperatures (at least in this part of the country). It’s almost as if we’re getting back to normal. Back to the usual or “normal” isn’t always easy, partly because things aren’t always what they appear to be on the surface. I’ve been thinking a lot about the challenges we face throughout our lives. While it’s easy to see the external pressures brought about by busyness and weather conditions, we humans have been conditioned to try to hide our internal pain. Things such as diminished physical or emotional strength, loneliness, questioning our sense of value or fear over facing new challenges are just some of them. This week a number of Scripture verses have leapt out at me and I’ve been mulling them over them. I’m privileged to share them with you and I trust they will encourage you. “The Lord directs the steps of the godly, He delights in every detail of their lives.” (Psalm 37:23) “He Himself has said, ‘I will never leave you nor forsake you.’” (Hebrews 13:5) “Give your burdens to the Lord and He will take care of you.” (Psalm 55:22) And what more could we ask than this: “Keep me as the apple of your eye; hide me in the shadow of Your wings.” (Psalms 17:8)

Exercise Your Brain. READ THE NEWSPAPER Studies show that reading keeps the mind sharp. Give your brain a boost! Subscribe to the newspaper and expand your mind with a world of information.

OBSERVER THE

5

NEWS

Friday, September 14, 2018

Heart of the Moose Mountains

observer@sasktel.net | (306) 453-2525

Cougar Corner

all GFK students and staff, all fitness levels are welcome. Come out and get a workout in to start your day! Remember, the School Community Council meets every 2nd Wednesday of the month at 7:00 P.M. If you want to know what is going on at the school or have questions, please plan to attend. Your participation is necessary for our school success. GFK is looking for volleyball and basketball coaches. If you are interested, please contact Mr. Trent Johnson or Mr. Colin Wilson at the school (453-2500). Have you forgotten your HomeLogic password? You may now click on the “Forget Password” link to retrieve it. Visit our HomeLogic page for additional information. Parents are reminded to continue to use the Home Logic Parent Portal to keep up with

their children’s grades and attendance. ParenThe basketball season has now started and a busy season is ahead for the Sr. Boys. Practices run almost every Monday and Wednesday and tournaments are slotted in for Norquay, Stoughton, Estevan, Oxbow, Rocanville, Gravelbourg and Davidson. The completion of the season will be the SHSAA playoffs starting with Conferences in March and concluding with Hoopla on March 23rd and 24th!ts can contact the school for information about how to set up access. Remember, if you ever want to set up an interview with one of your child’s particular teachers, please contact the school. All your school news can be found on the GF Kells website on the Southeast Cornerstone School Division website under the “schools” tab. (http://www.cornerstonesd.ca/ school/GFKells) Please check it out.

On September 18th Federated Co-op has decided to partner with Southern Plains Co-op to make a difference in our community. OXBOW

ESTEVAN

CARLYLE

On this day, Federated Co-op will donate $.05 per litre sold at the Oxbow C-store to the Bow Valley Jamboree. This donation will be matched by the Southern Plains Co-op, which means that $.10 per litre will be donated to the cause. These funds will help to continue to improve the festival held in July in the Bow Valley Regional Park. The Bow Valley Jamboree and their Volunteer committee believe that the commitments to the arts are vital to help grow a community. The Jamboree is an opportunity for anyone to come and enjoy a day of fun and music from both local and musicians across Canada. The diverse set of musicians and groups ensures that anyone can take part and enjoy their time at the festival.

On this day, Federated Co-op will donate $.05 per litre sold at the Kensington C-Store and 4th Street C-Store in Estevan to Canadian Pediatric Stroke Support Association. This will then be matched by the Southern Plains Co-op, which means that $.10 per litre will be donated. These funds help Saskatchewan families living with the effects of pediatric stroke. Barb Fornwald who is the Hardware Manager at the Agro Centre on Kensington has a grandson Brenden who has suffered from a stroke. Meghann Lischka his mother shared her story. Brenden suffered his stroke at just 1 year old, exactly 1 week after his first birthday. He suffered a right side hemiparesis. It affected his left arm and leg. Brenden has been such a trooper and gained back use of his arm and hand, but uses and wears an AFO on his left foot to help with his dropped foot. But this has never slowed him down! He is now 11 years old and he can still play and loves hockey, shows cattle in 4H, and loves to swim, play golf, and be with his friends! We will never know the exact cause of his stroke, but are forever grateful on the amazing recovery and determination he has had to overcome obstacles! I love my Pediatric Stroke Survivor with all my heart! We are absolutely honored to partner with Southern Plains Co-op and the Canadian Pediatric Stroke Support Association, a nonprofit organization, to raise funds and bring awareness to Pediatric Stroke, so that other families don’t feel alone and can find the help and support they need!

On this day, Federated Co-op will donate $.05 per litre sold at the Carlyle C-Store in Carlyle to the Carlyle Elementary School. This will then be matched by the Southern Plains Coop, which means that $.10 per litre will be donated. The Carlyle Elementary School is in need of updating their playground equipment. Several structures have been removed due to safety issues, therefore the structures need to be replaced. The entire community of Carlyle utilizes the playground, it is not just used during school hours. New playground structures would give the kids the opportunity to have fun playing and exploring on this new equipment for many years.

We thank you for your SUPPORT!


6

NEWS

Friday, September 14, 2018

Alida News Submitted by Edel Cowan

Oh, oh it was another early deadline (August 30) because of the long weekend on Sept. 3 – Labour Day. I didn’t receive much news so decided to wait and send the news in as usual this Monday, Sept. 10 – when it would be due again. Right now the only thing that happened was that we had some lite showers off and on all day long start-

ing on Aug. 27, and on Tuesday too – so no harvesting being done. Marcelle Peterson accompanied her daughter Michelle and Reg Needham of Oxbow to Weyburn on Aug. 18 where they visited with Bob, Deana Peterson and boys and helped Bob celebrate an early surprise 50th birthday. Happy Birthday Bob from family and friends

18092SS3

AUTHORIZED BY THE CHIEF OFFICIAL AGENT FOR THE NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY, SASKATCHEWAN SECTION

near Alida. Dustin Cowan stopped in at the Cowan farm on Aug. 27 had lunch and a quick visit with his grandparents, Gray and Edel as he was on his way back to Weyburn after completing a service job nearby. Tim, Shelly and Ainsley Cowan travelled to Brandon for the day on Monday where they did some shopping. Bill and Kathy Anthony enjoyed a holiday trip with members of their family. They left Alida on Aug. 17 for Regina where they then accompanied son Riley and grandson Hayden to Swift Current and Drumheller, AB. Riley and Hayden enjoyed a helicopter ride at Horseshoe Canyon. They then travelled to Calgary where they met up with son Mitch and his family. They all sent three days at Mount Kid, near Banff and later toured around Jasper. On their way home they toured Edmonton, arriving back to Alida on Aug. 27. It was a great holiday trip for everyone. The Alida community wishes to extend

18092PS0 18093PS0

sincerest sympathies to the Soroka and Poirier families of the death of Joanne Soroka on Aug. 30 at the age of 56 years while in the Regina Pasqua Hospital. She was predeceased by her parents David and Margaret Poirier. She will be remembered by her husband Robert, children Derek (Katy) and Katrina (Corey Rocha) and grandchildren as well as her siblings, many nieces, nephews, cousins and in-laws. Condolences are extended to all other family members and close friends. Her funeral mass was celebrated Sept. 6 at RC Church, Belegarde. Jeff Cowan stopped in at the Cowan farm for a couple of days (Aug. 31-Sept. 1) where he visited with family and friends before heading back to Regina. Margaret Peet visited in Regina over the long weekend with her family and attended her nephew’s wedding on Sept. 1. Then she joined Lynette and Wendal on Sunday to attend the football game – Riders vs Winnipeg. Lynette Peet and Wendal went to Moose Jaw on Sept. 1 to settled Wendal in to his new residence where he will to begin SIAST following the long weekend. Shelly Cowan and daughter Ainsley visited with her parents Myron and Orlys Nilsen and sister Dicie Sauer (all of Minot) they were camped over at Moose Creek Regional Park for a few days during the

long weekend. They all travelled to Estevan on Sept. 2 to visit granddaughter Kelsey’s store, Soul Hideout, also visited with granddaughter Lacie Nilsen for a while and later came by the Cowan farm to watch Tim do some combining. Murray and Adam Cowan, Estevan spent Sept. 2 at the Cowan farm and enjoyed the day riding their quads, checking out the wildlife in the area, as well as watching the harvesting progress along. Faye Walker attended the retired teacher’s “To Hell with the Bell” meeting and meal on Sept. 4 at the White Bear Casino. Later in the day she left for Saskatoon where she would visit with her family, daughter Deidra, Jeff Nichel and granddaughters Olivia, Abby, Claire and Piper. She also had a dental appointment to attend and returned home Sept. 9. You have probably noticed the ads for nominations for the positions of councillors for the municipalities these past couple of weeks. If you’re interested in serving on your local government, please make sure to get your nomination papers in. It will soon be a very busy time in and around the local rinks with different activities being organized. Not only for sports events, such as skating, hockey, curling and tournaments but other events such as Haunted House tours, Craft sales and other

fundraising events. Just keep your eyes and ears open for dates and events happening near your area in the near future. Then before one realizes it the drama clubs will also be getting started for their next event. These events all help to keep your community surviving and busy – please remember to get involved, if interested someone locally can point you in the right direction for information and where to go. Your help of any kind is always appreciated. Most of the farmers had a couple of days rest as we were blessed with some scattered showers big and small which of course put a stop to combining, but as I sit here Monday morning the guys here are hoping to get back out in the field this afternoon. Now let’s hope that they can get going and keep going until they are finished – that would be great. Do believe that within a couple of weeks of steady harvesting most should be completed. Good luck guys and do remember to take care out there. Once again folks please keep me posted on any happenings going on – it helps to make this news column interesting for the readers. Just contact me either by phone (306-4432496) or text (306485-8561) or e-mail (g.cowan@sasktel.net). Until next time – Keep smiling – Think positive – Drive safely and Take care.

Wawota News Submitted by Myrna Olson

Not much news this week but will send what I have. Ross and Joanne Corkish attended the 47th bi-annual Dominion Royal Canadian League Convention recently. It was held in Winnipeg from Aug. 24 to 29. Happy birthday to Irene Husband who celebrated her 91st birthday at Maryfield Villa. Family members the Husbands, Curries

Observer the

For all your printing and paper needs PHONE

(306) 453-2525

and Duffs attended and enjoyed cake and ice cream. Irene›s birthday was Sept. 4. Vanessa Rohatyn and her daughter, Gracie have moved to Regina as of last week. We wish them well in their new surroundings. On Sept. 1, the Wilson family held their 3rd annual threshing day at their farm. Over 190 people enjoyed the demonstration of the “old tyme style “har-

Letterheads Business Cards Posters Envelopes Statements Invoices

vesting from cutting to the final stage. A collection of old tractors, a wire hay baler, antique vehicles and a model steam engine were on display. Congratulations to Katelyn Matsella and Layne Saville of Carlyle on the birth of their son, Macsen Layne. He was born Aug. 27 and weighed 7 lbs. 11 oz. Remember my news column is only as good as YOU make it.

Announcement cards Carbonless forms Place mats Gift certificates Fax sheets Labels Raffle tickets Purchase orders Dance tickets Bills of lading Brochures Fair books


7

NEWS

Friday, September 14, 2018

QB shuffle dominates NFL off-season

Bruce Penton

It might take a casual fan of the National Football League until U.S. Thanksgiving to get clarity on which quarterbacks went where in the biggest QB shuffle offseason in recent memory. Added to the carousel of veteran quarterbacks getting new addresses is a handful of fuzzy-cheeked QBs right out of college who are all projected stars (at least by the teams that chose them in the draft). History tells us, though, that the success rate of college QBs moving into the NFL is not that great. So let’s forget about the big QB names who stayed put, such as Brady, Rogers, Ryan, Brees, Wilson, Big Ben, etc., and concentrate on those who moved, and who moved in. Kirk Cousins was the biggest ‘name’ player to move, signing as a free agent with Minnesota Vikings after five years with Washington. The Cousins signing allowed the Vikings to go into 2018 with none of the three QBs they had on their 2017 roster: Case Keenum signed with Denver as a free agent; Sam Bradford was a free-agent signee in Arizona; and Teddy Bridgewater was traded to New York Jets, and later dealt to New Orleans, where he’ll back up Drew Brees. To fill the Cousins void in Washington, the Redskins acquired longtime Kansas City quarterback Alex Smith. The Chiefs deemed him

Knocks’ this summer, you wouldn’t trust the Browns staff to organize a lemonade stand, let along run a professional football organization.” • AKA Eddie, on Twitter, referring to his hometown’s NFL team: “Here in Cleveland we refer to them as the Bro ns, since there was no W in the 2017 season.” • Scott Ostler of the San Francisco Chronicle has a great suggestion for the name of the Raiders’ stadium in Las Vegas: “Pair-a-Dice Park.” • Brad Rock of the Deseret News: “LA Gear is trying to block the Chargers from using anything that includes the letters LA in the name. You mean like LAaugh out loud?” • Comedy writer Brad Dickson of Omaha, on the Nike/Colin Kaepernick ad campaign: “Well, I’m glad that Nike finally found a spokesperson who’s non-polarizing. Second and third choices were Julian Assange and Kim Jong Un.” • Comedy writer Jim Barach: “Tom Brady says he is looking to play

THE

sports time-out with

expendable because they believe Pat Mahomes, a second-year player, is ready for stardom. Tyrod Taylor, who had moments of glory for Buffalo, is suiting up with Cleveland Browns thanks to an off-season trade, and he’ll apparently start ahead of No. 1 draft pick Baker Mayfield. Meanwhile, A.J. McCarron, who was acquired by Buffalo from Cincinnati prior to the draft, was shuffled off to Oakland prior to the season. Nathan Peterman will start for Buffalo, and college prospect Josh Allen will back him up. Bills’ fans have their fingers crossed. All eyes will be on the five college quarterbacks who were the stars of April’s draft. Mayfield, as mentioned, will be the backup in Cleveland. Sam Darnold, from USC, is the starter for the Jets. Josh Allen will get a lot of sideline time in Buffalo. Josh Rosen is in Arizona, and will be the backup for Bradford, with Cardinals’ fans hoping the two can replace Carson Palmer, who retired after the 2017 season after 15 years in the league. And versatile Lamar Jackson was picked by Baltimore Ravens, who with Joe Flacco behind centre have no quarterback worries. Every team with a new quarterback has high hopes as the season begins. History tells us those hopes usually don’t take long to get deflated. • Dwight Perry of the Seattle Times: “Odell Beckham Jr. of the New York Giants says his superstar status makes him feel like a ‘zoo animal.’ Especially the part where the Giants ignore the warnings and feed him $95 million.” • Norman Chad of the Washington Post: “If you watched ‘Hard

1

#

five more years in the NFL. Let’s just hope no one let’s the air out of his dreams.” • RJ Currie of sportsdeke.com: “Ex-CFL great Doug Brown once called the WinnipegSaskatchewan Labour Day game a battle of combines and tractors. If memory serves, last year the Riders laid a threshing on the Bombers.” (And this year, too.) • Jimmy Fallon of NBC’s ‘Tonight Show’: “Fantasy Football began tonight. It’s a fun way for people who are bad at real sports to realize that they’re also bad at imaginary sports.” • James Corden of CBS’s Late Late Show, on protests against the Kaepernick Nike ad campaign: “Burning your sneakers does seem like a solid way to get out of going to the gym.” • Headline at TheOnion.com: “Shohei Ohtani regrets not researching which teams were good before signing with Angels.” • Janice Hough of leftcoastsportsbabe. com, on Packers QB Aar-

SCHOOL COMMUNITY COUNCILS

PUBLIC CALL FOR NOMINATIONS AND NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETINGS South East Cornerstone Public School Division schools will be holding their School Community Council Annual General Meetings and Elections. For more information regarding dates and times for the school in your area please visit our website at www.cornerstonesd.ca Success and achievement for every student in every school.

BEST BUYS IN USED EQUIPMENT

MFD

2015 140A Farmall Case IH w/loader, 10 hrs ...........................$122,000 2011 Puma 170 Case IH with duals .........................................$125,000 2011 Puma 140 Case IH w/loader ............................................$115,000 2006 DX45 Case IH, 45 hp, hydro..............................................$25,000

COMBINES

2014 8240 Case IH w/pick up .........................................................CALL 2013 9230 Case IH w/pick up ..................................................$305,000 2013 8230 Case IH & pick up ..................................................$310,000 2009 8120 Case IH w/pick up.....................................................$180,000 2007 7010 Case IH duals, pick up.............................................. $170,000 2007 2588 Case IH 2015 header ...............................................$135,000 2006 2388 Case IH w/pu .............................................................. $90,000 1998 2388 CASE IH with p/u ........................................................ $50,000

COMBINE HEADERS

2014 40 ft. FD 75 MacDon flex header transport & auger ..........$85,000 2013 40 ft FD 75 MacDon flex header, Case IH adapter .............$80,000 2012 35A Case IH flex header, Case IH adapter .........................$67,000 2010 40 ft D60 MacDon, transport Pea Auger, one with JD Adapter & one with CASE IH adapter ..............................................$60,000 2010 2152 40 ft Case IH header/transport AAFX adapter ...............$65,000 2002 36 ft 1042 CASE IH Transport ............................................. $16,000

SEEDING

2011 50 ft. 12” spacing Seed Hawk tool bar w/600 cart, dual wheels, auger, bag lift ............................................................................$225,000 2010 60-12 Seed Hawk tool bar 12” spacing w/400 Seedhawk cart duals, 2 fans, auger, seed & fertilizer kit. Also NH kit ...........................................................................$175,000 2010 6612 Seed Hawk toolbar 12” spacing w/400 plus Seed Hawk seed cart, 2 fans, seeded fertilizer kit. Also NH kit ..........................................................................$175,000

BALERS

2004 RBX 562 CASE IH Baler ....................................................... $8,500

SWATHERS

2010 36 ft. 1203 CASE IH , pickup reel ..................................... $88,000

CULTIVATORS

REASON FOR

READING

37ft 5600 Case IH Cultivator with 4 row Degelmen harrows ........ $23,000

SNOWBLOWER

2009 RDX 110, 110”, Schulte 3-point hitch, used very little ...... $9,500

HAY CONDITIONER

PRINTED COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

IS LOCAL

NEWS

Source: News Media Canada

2010 16 ft. 1476 Heston hay conditioner............................... $22,000

MOWERS

2015 Schulte 15A rotary mower w/XH1500 walking axle ............ CALL 2014 Schulte 15A rotary mower w/XH1500 walking axle ............ CALL

A.E. CHICOINE Farm Equipment Ltd. Storthoaks, SK. 306-449-2255 17 1995 Case Corporation Case IH is a registered trademark of Case Corporation.

THE HOTTEST DEALS NEW PREMIUM MODEL! ®

65” 4K PRO HDR 800 SERIES TC-65FX800

South East Cornerstone Public School Division No. 209

beer and brats can now be paid for with an interest-free loan.” Care to comment? Email brucepenton2003@yahoo.ca

on Rodgers’ $134 million contract extension: “In related news expect Green Bay to announce

• 4K Pro SMART with Quad Core Processor • The Best Picture on any LED to date • Beautiful Design with Glass Frame • Bluetooth Audio Connectivity • Super Bright IPS Panel • 4-HDMI, 3-USB Inputs

LIST PRICE $2699.99 $ 00

SAVE 400

INTRO PRICE $219999

®

FULL SIZE 2.2 CU. FT. INVERTER / GENIUS MICROWAVE OVEN NNST966W

LBS5, BLUETOOTH TABLE TOP MUSIC SYSTEM

• 1200 Watt Inverter • Sensor Cook and Reheat with 12 Categories • Inverter Turbo Defrost 14”h x 19.4”d x 23.9”w

• Walnut Finish • USB Music Player • Line In AUX. • Great Sound Quality • FM Radio

REG. $259.99 $

SAVE 60 SALE $19999 00

Sept 7th to 20th Smaller models starting at $119.99

M.S.R.P. $249.99

INTRODUCTORY PRICE $19999 SAVE $5000

NO NEED TO ORDER AND WAIT! WE STOCK IT HERE IN CARLYLE. LAYAWAY AVAILABLE.

Authorized Dealer

123 Main Street - Carlyle - Phone 453-2233 CELEBRATING 26 YEARS SERVING SE SASKATCHEWAN 1992-2018


8 Views

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2018

Quote of the Week... ““How beautiful the leaves grow old. How full of light and color are their last days.” - John Burroughs

Politicians wrong to pick Trump over Trudeau on trade

By Murray Mandryk There’s very little we can do about the trade problems at the international level that are so critical to us. The best we can hope for is that these problems are not made worse at the national or even at the provincial level by politicians eager to score local political points. The key to this would be for our politicians to not get caught up in games and support the idea that we do need to find a solution. In that regard, a lot of our politicians need to do better. They need to think about how their politicking may cost us in the long run. This is not to say that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau deserves a free pass for his handling of the North America Free Trade Agreement and certainly not for the botched handling of the Trans Mountain pipeline that he purchased from Kinder-Morgan, but can’t now get approval to build. That said, let’s understand there will be a chance for Canadian voters to exercise their frustrations with the Trudeau Liberal government at the polls in a year from now. And there are couple of other things we need to recognize. As suggested by provincial Trade and Export Development Minister Jeremy, there really isn’t an issue as important to Saskatchewan as trade. “We need to get a deal. This is incredibly important for our economy, which is probably the most export-dependent in the entire country, and we’ve been concerned about a pattern we’ve been seeing — moving backward on market access, moving backward on trade access, not moving forward,” Harrison recently told the Leader-Post’s David Fraser. All politicians, including Harrison, who does have a penchant for seeing the world through the political lens first, need to keep this foremost in mind. Second, we need to respect that Canadian of all political stripes, Conservatives like former interim leader Rona Ambrose and Liberals like Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland, are working exceedingly hard at getting a NAFTA deal with the U.S. that works in the interests of all Canadians. This is how it should be, for there are just some issues that are bigger than the mundane partisanship politics. There are just times when politicians, pundits and everyone else have to make a pronounced statement that declares their country comes before their politics. This absolutely must apply to the NAFTA talks. And that should now be blatantly obvious to everyone after the story late last month in which U.S. President Donald Trump made it know to journalists with Bloomberg News in off-the-record comments (first reported by the Toronto Star) that any deal reached would be “totally on our terms” and that Canadians would have “no choice” out of fear of tariffs on automobiles. “Off the record, Canada’s working their ass off. And every time we have a problem with a point, I just put up a picture of a Chevrolet Impala,” Trump is reported to have said, referring to car made at a Canadian GM plant. Yet despite confirmation of Trump’s unfair belligerence that surely must be having an effect on the tactics of the U.S. negotiators handpicked by Trump, we have seen Canadian pundits blame Trudeau for the supposed failure in negotiation. Even worse, we have seen Conservative politicians attempt to use this opportunity to score political points, the worse case of which was likely Saskatchewan Senator David Tkachuk appointed by former Progressive Conservative prime minister Brian Mulroney 28 years ago for the sole purpose of passing a harmonized goods and services tax. Sadly, some Conservatives have eagerly repeated and supported Tkachuk’s position. This is a massive disservice to the nation. There are times when we simply need our politicians to be better.

OBSERVER THE

observer@sasktel.net Fax: 306-453-2938 P.O. Box 160 Carlyle, SK S0C 0R0

Heart of the Moose Mountains

Taking an eraser to the past Our oldest daughter has lived away from home for several years but has a fair amount of belongings in what she insists is still her bedroom. So it happens occasionally she will wonder if an item she is looking for might still be with us. After a recent call I went in search of a book she had read in My Outlook high school and now wanted to Shelley Luedtke read again. In looking for that title I smiled when I came across the “Little House” series of books on her shelf. The stories of the pioneering Ingalls family written by daughter Laura were read again and again when I was a child and I was so excited to share them with my own daughters years later--even though some would suggest I shouldn’t. A trip to South Dakota summers ago took us to the town of De Smet which is the area where several of the books are set. You can wander their homestead, tour the house that Pa built, spend time reading documents and looking through items belonging to family members, and even visit the cemetery where several are buried. The books have not been without controversy over the years. There is discussion over the amount of editing that may have taken place by colleagues and editors; even suggesting the work of a ghost writer. Yet this has been disproven by other researchers. There is also the problem of chronology in some of the books since Laura was actually younger in real life than portrayed. However her own daughter indicated this was a publisher’s decision since they didn’t think the memories of a younger child would ring true. Along the way some places she lived were skipped over so the timeline could catch up. But at their heart, the books tell the stories of a family who, like many others, settled the land, built homes, started families, fought fires, experienced droughts, served on local governments and built communities. They are Laura’s stories, set primarily in the 1870’s, in language and vocabulary in use at

the time. And that’s the problem. The Association for Library Service to Children used to give out an honour called the Laura Ingalls Wilder award. As of June 2018 it, like so many buildings, roadways and statues, has been removed and renamed. The problem with what Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote, and what prompted the stripping of her name, is her portrayal of Native Americans. The vocabulary used is derogatory and demeaning. When you read it the language shocks. As it should, and still should. The author was writing what she knew and heard as a child, describing the perceptions as they were. It was not a sociological treatise. It was storytelling at a time when, regrettably, this was the language used. Was it offensive? Absolutely! Dreadful in its depiction? Without question. But to now try and keep us from seeing these words only serves to whitewash the historical record. An attempt to shield future generations from what was spoken in the past, or a desire to protect those who are offended today, is to do a disservice to an understanding of our history. It is ugly to confront--but it needs to be confronted. Other incidents in her books were written about very differently than they would be in current literature. Her husband’s illness, their inability to earn a living for several years, the death of a newborn son, and the loss of their home following an accidental fire set by their daughter are incredibly harsh setbacks that a writer today would delve into far more deeply. But writing in her time she spoke of them in the way her contemporaries would. Stripping our books, buildings and bridges from the truth of what used to be takes away our ability to recognize the mindset from which we’ve come and where we are now. Trying to sanitize the historical record takes away from its reality and it becomes a hindrance to our understanding of what used to be. We need to acknowledge the past if we are to understand the present. Supporting the keeping of history is not equivalent to agreeing with it. We want to ensure when we reach into the bookshelf we will find portrayals of what truly was, not what we may wish it had been. That’s my outlook.

The Observer welcomes Letters to the Editor and article submissions of local events if a reporter is unavailable to attend. Please feel free to send us your local news updates/opinions via email – observer@sasktel.net, fax – 306-453-2938, or mail – P.O. Box 160 Carlyle, SK S0C 0R0.

Deadlines for the paper are Mondays at 3 p.m., but are subject to change for stat holidays. Call 306-453-2525 to verify deadlines if needed.

*Note: Letters to the Editor have to be signed and cannot be anonymous; all submissions to the paper are subject to editing.


Lifestyles

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2018

Financial Focus

9

Managing Your Money: Taking a vacation is good for your health Americans may have a reputation for being a nation of workaholics but they’re not alone. In 2016, Canadians left an average of three unused vacation days on the table, according to Expedia1. That represents nearly 31 million unused vacation days in 2016 alone. While leaving a few left over vacation days may not seem like a big deal, research shows that not taking holidays can be bad for your health. One study, by the Journal of the American Medical Association, found that men who take frequent annual vacations were 32 percent less likely to die from heart disease as people who didn’t take any vacation2. In another study, it was discovered that women who took vacation once every six years or less were about eight times more likely to get coro-

nary heart disease or have a heart attack than women who took at least two vacations a year3. A lack of vacations can also increase stress, depression and anxiety, too. Unfortunately, many people would rather stay at work, in part because they’re too busy to leave or they think that taking time off could hurt their jobs, though there’s little proof that vacations kill careers. So what can you do to ensure you get away? Plan early Schedule your holidays for the coming six to 12 months and immediately block those days in your calendar – then stick to it. Don’t expect to ever find the perfect time to get away, just plan your days well in advance so that you have enough time to prepare for your time out of office. Don’t be afraid to delegate

Paws & Claws

Many people don’t want to burden their colleagues with extra work while they’re away. They may even fear losing out on a raise or a promotion if they let someone else do their job. However, a research study by the U.S. Travel Association showed that people who took fewer than 10 of their vacation days per year had a 34.6% likelihood of receiving a raise or bonus in a three-year period of time. Comparatively, people who took more than 10 of their vacation days had a 65.4% chance of receiving a raise or bonus. Pay yourself first If you’re self-employed or receive holiday pay on every cheque instead of paid days off, it can be difficult to put that money aside to fund your time off. Consider setting up an automatic transfer from your chequing to your savings account so that when holiday

time comes, you don’t take a financial hit. In the end, the key is to make your vacation time a priority. It will pay off when you return to work refreshed and refocused. 1 https://www.expedia.ca/ travelblog/vacation-deprivation-2016/ 2 http://jamanetwork.com/ journals/jama/article-abstract/377969 3 https://www.wisconsinmedicalsociety.org/_WMS/publications/wmj/pdf/104/6/20. pdf

This column, written and published by Investors Group Financial Services Inc. (in Québec – a Financial Services Firm), and Investors Group Securities Inc. (in Québec, a firm in Financial Planning) presents general information only and is not a solicitation to buy or sell any investments. Contact your own advisor for specific advice about your circumstances. For more information on this topic please contact your Investors Group Consultant. ©Investors Group 2017

animal health column

How to prepare for your pet’s euthanization

Does your aging pet have a hard time walking, eating or doing his business? Does he whine constantly or no longer react to your voice? Has he become become but a shadow of his former self? If so, you may have started to think about having him put down. Here are a few tips to help you prepare for this trying event. Vet’s opinion Always start by having your pet examined by a veterinarian. He or she won’t be able to make the decision for you but will at least be able to provide an accurate assessment of your pet’s health. This

will confirm whether any type of treatment (medication, surgery, special diet) might be viable, or if euthanasia is the only option. Getting the opinion of a trained professional is the best way to be at peace with your decision. A gentle procedure Veterinarians are meticulous in ensuring the euthanasia procedure is fast and painless. It’s required that the responsibility be carried out in conditions that minimize the animal’s anxiety. Respect and compassion are always top-of-mind for the specialists charged with this delicate

task. Should you be present? Whether or not you choose to witness the procedure is entirely up to you. That said, many vets report that pets whose owners are present are typically calmer when receiving the injection. Palliative care If your vet confirms that treatment is no longer an option for your pet but you don’t feel ready to go through with euthanasia, inquire about palliative care services. These can prolong the life of your pet somewhat while minimizing pain and suffering.

Answers on page 17


10

WELCOME TO HOMESPUN

Join us for the nd 32 Annual Homespun Craft Show & Sale

Homespun at The

Saturday, September 15th

Make sure you don’t miss it this year! Open 11am for Lunch: Buffet Upstairs

September 15 & 16 2018 in the Carlyle Sports Arena th

Regular menu served downstairs

Supper: Buffet Downstairs

Shitake Pork Chop Forestiere, Very Chicken Marbella, Yukon Gold Mashed Potatoes... and much more! Plus, Regular Menu is available

DONUTS & COFFEE Carlyle’s own Bakery Coffee Shop! Donuts • Coffee • Pizza • Soups Chili • Sandwich’s & more! Mondays to Saturdays: 6am – 5pm

Located beside the Carlyle Bakery – Downtown Carlyle

th

Kenosee Lake - Allison's Store Estevan - Little J's Food Town - 938 Eva Street Estevan - Pharmasave - 1239 5th Street

Weyburn Pharmasave - 30-3rd Street Oxbow - Southern Plains Co-op 405 Prospect Ave

Southern Plains

Over 60 Jury Selected Booths! There’s something for everyone!

Main Street • Carlyle (306) 453-2044

For More Information, find us on: Facebook, Twitter & Instagram

Also, don’t miss the

SHOW HOURS: SATURDAY 10 A.M. - 7 P.M. & SUNDAY 10 A.M. - 4 P.M. ADMISSION $5 (12 & UNDER FREE)

16th ANNUAL QUILT SHOW at Carlyle Memorial Hall! Saturday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. & Sunday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Saturday & Sunday Sept. 15th & 16th Carlyle Sports Arena

DAYZI’S

Carlyle Bakery can also be found at these Retailers

The “Biggest Little Craft Show in Saskatchewan” is Celebrating 32 Years!!

Last Year’s Buffet!

11

WELCOME TO HOMESPUN

Friday, September 14, 2018

Admission $4 (12 & under FREE)

WELCOME TO HOMESPUN! ENJOY YOUR WEEKEND!

YOU ASKED - AND WE LISTENED!

We are keeping our extended hours for your convenience!

Monday - Wednesday 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Thursdays & Fridays 9 a.m. - 8 p.m. - OPEN LATE! Saturday 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sunday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

LATE NIGHT SHOPPING ON SATURDAY UNTIL 7 P.M. PANCAKE BREAKFAST SATURDAY AT THE LEGION - 8 A.M. - 10 A.M. SUPPER IN THE FIELD (IN THE ARENA) - SATURDAY 5 P.M. - 7 P.M.

***

Don’t forget to join the fun at the Races at The 15th Annual Bowan Rekken Memorial Moto-X Track Races! Saturday, Sept. 15 • 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Located on 8th Street West, Carlyle CARLYLE • WAWOTA

OPEN HOMESPUN SUNDAY 12-5

117 Main Street • Carlyle, SK

Annual Homespun FLEA MARKET Saturday, September 15th - 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, September 16th - 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

FASHION • FOOTWEAR • JEWELLERY Downtown Carlyle

WEEKEND SPECIAL! UP TO

40% OFF

SELECT GIFTWARE!

Open Homespun Saturday 9am-6pm

$4.00/M flannels 50% off select fabric & yarns

TONS OF GREAT DEALS! www.facebook.com/carlylesewandsews

Grocery Phone:

(306) 453-2222

CARLYLE FOODWORLD WELCOME EVERYONE TO

HOMESPUN ENJOY YOUR WEEKEND!

STOP IN TO CHECK OUT THIS WEEK’S SPECIALS! Open Sundays 10am - 6pm

218 Main St., Carlyle, SK

(306) 453-4466 • www.pharmasave.com

Just Around The Corner 1 Block East Of Main • (306) 453-2250


10

WELCOME TO HOMESPUN

Join us for the nd 32 Annual Homespun Craft Show & Sale

Homespun at The

Saturday, September 15th

Make sure you don’t miss it this year! Open 11am for Lunch: Buffet Upstairs

September 15 & 16 2018 in the Carlyle Sports Arena th

Regular menu served downstairs

Supper: Buffet Downstairs

Shitake Pork Chop Forestiere, Very Chicken Marbella, Yukon Gold Mashed Potatoes... and much more! Plus, Regular Menu is available

DONUTS & COFFEE Carlyle’s own Bakery Coffee Shop! Donuts • Coffee • Pizza • Soups Chili • Sandwich’s & more! Mondays to Saturdays: 6am – 5pm

Located beside the Carlyle Bakery – Downtown Carlyle

th

Kenosee Lake - Allison's Store Estevan - Little J's Food Town - 938 Eva Street Estevan - Pharmasave - 1239 5th Street

Weyburn Pharmasave - 30-3rd Street Oxbow - Southern Plains Co-op 405 Prospect Ave

Southern Plains

Over 60 Jury Selected Booths! There’s something for everyone!

Main Street • Carlyle (306) 453-2044

For More Information, find us on: Facebook, Twitter & Instagram

Also, don’t miss the

SHOW HOURS: SATURDAY 10 A.M. - 7 P.M. & SUNDAY 10 A.M. - 4 P.M. ADMISSION $5 (12 & UNDER FREE)

16th ANNUAL QUILT SHOW at Carlyle Memorial Hall! Saturday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. & Sunday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Saturday & Sunday Sept. 15th & 16th Carlyle Sports Arena

DAYZI’S

Carlyle Bakery can also be found at these Retailers

The “Biggest Little Craft Show in Saskatchewan” is Celebrating 32 Years!!

Last Year’s Buffet!

11

WELCOME TO HOMESPUN

Friday, September 14, 2018

Admission $4 (12 & under FREE)

WELCOME TO HOMESPUN! ENJOY YOUR WEEKEND!

YOU ASKED - AND WE LISTENED!

We are keeping our extended hours for your convenience!

Monday - Wednesday 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Thursdays & Fridays 9 a.m. - 8 p.m. - OPEN LATE! Saturday 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sunday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

LATE NIGHT SHOPPING ON SATURDAY UNTIL 7 P.M. PANCAKE BREAKFAST SATURDAY AT THE LEGION - 8 A.M. - 10 A.M. SUPPER IN THE FIELD (IN THE ARENA) - SATURDAY 5 P.M. - 7 P.M.

***

Don’t forget to join the fun at the Races at The 15th Annual Bowan Rekken Memorial Moto-X Track Races! Saturday, Sept. 15 • 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Located on 8th Street West, Carlyle CARLYLE • WAWOTA

OPEN HOMESPUN SUNDAY 12-5

117 Main Street • Carlyle, SK

Annual Homespun FLEA MARKET Saturday, September 15th - 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, September 16th - 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

FASHION • FOOTWEAR • JEWELLERY Downtown Carlyle

WEEKEND SPECIAL! UP TO

40% OFF

SELECT GIFTWARE!

Open Homespun Saturday 9am-6pm

$4.00/M flannels 50% off select fabric & yarns

TONS OF GREAT DEALS! www.facebook.com/carlylesewandsews

Grocery Phone:

(306) 453-2222

CARLYLE FOODWORLD WELCOME EVERYONE TO

HOMESPUN ENJOY YOUR WEEKEND!

STOP IN TO CHECK OUT THIS WEEK’S SPECIALS! Open Sundays 10am - 6pm

218 Main St., Carlyle, SK

(306) 453-4466 • www.pharmasave.com

Just Around The Corner 1 Block East Of Main • (306) 453-2250


12

Friday, September 14, 2018

OBSERVER

Sports

Wildcats win volleyball tournament

By Laura Kish Kipling School’s Senior Boys Magyar Volleyball team hosted a tournament on Friday and Saturday with six teams entered including the host team Kipling Magyars, Montmartre Eagles, Wawota Wildcats, Cowessess Cougars, Bert Fox Bison and Vibank Vipers. Kipling Magyars (coached by Mel Gesell, Darrell Beattie and Ashley Hengen) includes team members: #2 Carter Beattie, #3 Logan

18092SF0 18092SF1

McCarthy, #5 Bryson Andres, #6 Kaiden Lyons, #7 Burke Lyons, #8 Kurtis Doud, #10 Shawn Puffalt, #11 Michael Stanley, #12 Hayden Scott-McCarthy and #13 Dawson DeDecker. Spectators were wowed by the excellent volleyball action throughout the two day tournament. Standings at the end of the round robin: 1st Kipling Magyars, 2nd Bert Fox Bison, 3rd Montmartre Eagles and 4th Wawota Wildcats. The bronze medal match came down to Kipling vs Montmartre with Kipling winning 25-17 and 25-16. Gold medal final was a match between Bert Fox Bison and Wawota Wildcats with very close games. Wawota Wildcats took the gold medal with scores of 2125, 25-17 and 17-15. “I believe our tournament this past weekend was a huge success. It has been a few years since the Senior Boys team has held a home tournament, so it was nice for the boys to kick off the season playing at home - and playing extremely well nonetheless!” comments Mel Gesell, one of the coaches of the Kipling Magyars. “The Kipling Senior Boys team is going to have a very exciting season, if this first tournament is any indication. The boys played and performed like they have been practicing for months already, and we only have three practices under our belt!” adds Gesell. “Kipling placed first

Photo by Laura Kish

Volleyball Champions - Wawota Wildcats: Back row (l to r) Devin Stewart (Coach), Billy Easton, Trevor Stewart, Lucas Porter, Nathan Bye, Mykel Biermann, Riley Riddell (Coach). Front row (l to r) Jesse Schill, Theoren West, Jose Villeta, Thomas Husband, Ross Brimner. in the Round Robin, and our loss in the semi final was the Magyars only loss of the tournament,” says Gesell. “It was really surprising to see volleyball of this calibre from so many teams this early in the season. Not only were the other teams full of skill, but they were also full of respect; for their opponents as well as our officials. We will be coming across many of these teams in our next tournaments to come - next weekend being the University of Regina Cougars Classic!” comments Gesell. “Huge thanks go out to everyone who helped

out to make this tournament a success, and a very important thank you goes out to Susan Hengen who officiated our tournament and did an amazing job of it!” says Gesell. “I thought the quality of volleyball was very

high for the first tournament of the year,” comments Riley Riddell, coach of the Wawota Wildcats. “It was great to get back into the swing of things, as the boys have been really looking forward to this season. It was nice to get

everyone into the games and watch our younger guys improve. We have a lot of work to do as the round robin indicated, but we can take a lot of positives from our semi-final game against Kipling and final game against Bert Fox.”

Enjoying the last of the pool days

Saturday, September 15th, 2018

Arcola Craft & Trade Show

10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Arcola Rink Lunch Available Proceeds go to Prairie Place Hall

Photo submitted

Pool Party - Friday, August 31: everyone enjoying swimming at Alida Swimming Pool during the last day of operation.

• Wood Work • Alpaca products • Clothing • Honey

• Baking • Market Gardening • Jewelry • Wreaths

Over 60 vendors! 17-2

OBSERVER THE

For all your printing and paper needs PHONE

(306) 453-2525

Letterheads Business Cards Posters Envelopes Statements Invoices

Announcement cards Place mats Fax sheets Raffle tickets Dance tickets Brochures

Carbonless forms Gift certificates Labels Purchase orders Bills of lading Fair books


OBSERVED AT

Friday, September 14, 2018 Photos submitted

O bserved At

13

Chamber & PureChem Cougars golf tourney

PureChem Cougar Clayton Geiger and Dean Lequyer auction off players to join teams on the golf course through the day. Amy Geiger (left) and Nicole Currie volunteering their time to register golfers and sell raffle tickets.

The Carlyle Golf Course, The Carlyle Chamber of Commerce & The Carlyle PureChem Cougars put together an awesome day Saturday, September 8th to raise money for many unexpected repairs to the Carlyle Arena this year. All together the tournament raised close to $6,000 to donate to the arena.

Dean Lequyer (left) & Shelley Big Eagle (right) attempt to drive the ball wearing a hockey mask and gloves.

Tim Lequyer in action with Brad Hannem & PureChem Cougar Ben Johnstone.

Dean Lequyer and Amy Geiger organizing prior to heading out on the course.

218 Main St., Carlyle

(306) 453-4466 HALLOWEEN HAS ARRIVED! SHOP NOW FOR BEST SELECTION!

STORE HOURS: MONDAY - SATURDAY 9am - 6pm

www.pharmasave.com


14

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

Friday, September 14, 2018


Friday, September 14, 2018

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

15


16

CLASSIFIEDS

Friday, September 14, 2018

OBSERVER CLASSIFIEDS THE

Heart of the Moose Mountains

PLACING AN AD BY PHONE: 306-453-2525 BY FAX: 306-453-2938 In Person or By Mail: The Carlyle Observer Box 160, 132 Main Street Carlyle, SK S0C 0R0

Obituaries

Office Hours:

Open 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Monday to Thursday Closed through Lunch Friday: 9 a.m to 12 noon

Obituaries

AD DEADLINES 3:00 P.M. MONDAY Ads must be received in our office by AD RATES

$700 per week - up to 20 words

Display Classified - $800 per col. inch

Guaranteed Classified - $2699 up to 52 weeks (some restrictions apply)

Obituaries

Obituaries

With hearts full of sadness and love, Joanne’s family announces that following a brief illness, she passed away at the Pasqua Hospital, Regina, Sask. on Thursday, August 30, 2018 at

the age of 56 years. Joanne was predeceased by her parents, David and Margaret Poirier. She will be sadly missed and fondly remembered by her husband Robert Soroka; children, Derek (Katy) Soroka and Katrina (Corey) Rocha, and grandchildren, Elizabeth and David Soroka. She is also survived by her siblings, Jeannette (Ivan) Roussel, Brian (Debbie) Poirier, Julie (Adrien) Gaudet, Rick (Judy) Poirier, Dianne (Greg) Martin, Janis (Darcy) Barber and Ryan (Jannah) Poirier, as well as many nieces, nephews, cousins and loved ones. Robert and family would like to extend their heartfelt thanks to Karen Rowley, Geraldene Geysen and Axel Larsen for �illing in for Joanne and Robert during her illness. The Prayer Service was held on Wednesday, September 5, 2018 at 8:00 p.m. and the Funeral Mass was celebrated on Thursday, September 6, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. by con-celebrants, Rev. Wilfred Calinawan and Rev. Albert Schmitz. Both services were held at St. Maurice R.C. Church, Bellegarde, Sask. Interment took place at the parish cemetery following the Funeral Mass, after which a time of fellowship and refreshments was held at the Bellegarde Community Hall. In lieu of �lowers, the family would greatly appreciate donations to the St. Maurice Cemetery Memorial Fund, Box 54, Bellegarde, Sask., S0C 0J0. Dustin Hall of Hall Funeral Services, Redvers assisted Joanne’s family. Feed & Seed

HEATED CANOLA WANTED!! - GREEN CANOLA - SPRING THRASHED - DAMAGED CANOLA FEED OATS WANTED!! - BARLEY, OATS, WHT - LIGHT OR TOUGH - SPRING THRASHED HEATED FLAX WANTED!! HEATED PEAS HEATED LENTILS "ON FARM PICKUP" Westcan Feed & Grain 1-877-250-5252

Suites For Rent

For Sale - Misc ANTIQUE TRACTORS: D Case with post pounder. What offers? A little grey Ford tractor, $3,600.00, good shape. Phone 306-577-8333. 16-4

1961 - 2018

FOR SALE: Casio keyboard, $60.00; banjo, $400.00; Treadmill with motor, 2-stepper, $100.00; exercise bike, $60.00; truck boxes & chests, $100.00. Phone 306-5778333. 16-4

CUTLER: In loving memory of Gordon Lionel, Sept. 28, 1948 to Sept. 15, 2015. No one knows how much we miss you No one knows the bitter pain We have suffered since we lost you Life has never been the same. In our hearts your memory lingers Sweetly, tender, fond and true. There is not a day, dear Gord That we do not think of you! Love Barb, Ward, Brent and grandchildren 18-1

Announcements

PROVINCE-WIDE CLASSIFIEDS. Reach over 550,000 readers weekly. Call this newspaper NOW or 306649.1405 for details.

Land For Sale FARMLAND WANTED

NO FEES OR COMMISSIONS! PURCHASING: SINGLE TO LARGE BLOCKS OF LAND. PREMIUM PRICES PAID WITH QUICK PAYMENT. GREAT References Available A TOTAL OF 602 QUARTER SECTIONS SOLD ACROSS SASKATCHEWAN RENT BACK AVAILABLE Call DOUG 306-716-2671 saskfarms@shaw.ca Mobile/Manufactured Homes

Feed & Seed

Buying/Selling FEED GRAINS heated / damaged CANOLA/FLAX Top price paid FOB FARM

Western Commodities 877-695-6461 Visit our website @

www.westerncommodities.ca

Auctions

Need An Auction Sale?

• We offer Complete Auction Services • We Do All Kinds of Sales • Call for Complete Consultation

Key “M”

Steel Buildings / Granaries STEEL BUILDING CLEARANCE ... “SUMMER OVERSTOCK SALE BLAZING HOT DEALS!” 20X21 $5,845. 25X27 $6,588. 30X31 $9,564. 33X35 $9,833. 35X35 $11,955. End Wall Included. Pioneer Steel 1-855-212-7036

Upcoming Events Friday, Sept 14th, Saturday Sept. 15th & Sunday, Sept 16th Fall Garage Sale - 205 7th Street West , Carlyle, SK. Lots! Lots! Lots!- Friday & Saturday : 9am to 7pm; Sunday: 9am to 3pm 18-1

In Memoriam

Joanne Barbara Soroka

FOR RENT: 1 or 2 Bedroom Suite available Sept 1/18 in Manor; includes all amenities. 306.448.2116 16-4

Friday, Sept. 14th & Saturday, Sept. 15th - Garage Sale - #39 Newcombe Street, Manor, SK. Sept 14th: 5pm to 7p: Sept 15th: 9am to 3pm. Household, men’s & ladies clothing EUC, Xmas Decorations, tires, men’s goodies. 18-1

Additional Words - 14c /word per week

*All classified ads must be prepaid by cash, cheque or VISA/MC.*

Johanna Maria Catherina Truman Truman - With tears in our eyes, and love in our hearts we say goodbye to our beloved mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother, Kay as she passed peacefully on to heaven on September 1st, 2018 in Brooks, Alberta. Johanna Maria Catherina Vreys was born and raised in Manor, Sk. area and resided there with her parents and siblings. After his return from WWII, she met and married George Truman in 1948. They settled in Wauchope, Sk. to begin their married farm life. With her strong work ethic, Mom worked tirelessly side by side with Dad and helped with all aspects of life on the farm, particularly, her huge garden, cooking, baking, canning and yes, raising seven children. She entered baking at the local fair for twenty �ive years and received many red ribbons for her cooking excellence. We believe she was the inventor of “multi-tasking”. George and Kay spent more than 30 years farming and being neighbors in numerous community events until they retired to Redvers in 1979. Mom then took on the role of play school teacher and loved her interaction with the “littles” ful�illing a dream of hers as a young girl. When Mom turned 90 she moved to Brooks to be closer to more of her children. Thank you to the Brooks Long Term care Dr.’s and staff and companion Hedwig for the special care over the last few years. Mom’s best accomplishments have been the success and love that �lourished in her family. She was the most generous supporter of all that they did and although she will be dearly missed, her legacy will continue to live within them and cherished in their hearts forever. She was one of a kind, and most importantly, she was ours. Kay was predeceased by her parents Antoon and Anna Vreys, husband George, sisters, Annie and Nellie and brother Jack. She is survived by her seven children – Sharon Sangster of Saskatoon; Loretta (Dennis) Bouchard of Brooks, Wayne (Bonnie) Truman of Redvers, Sk. Nelda (Ed) Didychuk of Winnipeg, Lorraine (Gord) Barr of Atlanta, Tim (Paulette) Truman of Brooks, and Tammy Truman of Calgary; she also leaves behind 15 grandchildren; 15 great grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews, sister Louise Bailey of Rosetown, Sk. and sister-in-law Jean Vreys of Mary�ield, Sk.. Funeral Mass was celebrated at Our Lady of Fatima RC Church in Redvers, SK. on Saturday, September 8th at 2:00 PM. Rev. Wilfred B. Calinawan Celebrant. A family graveside followed at Redvers Cemetery. In memory of Catherine, if friends desire, memorial tributes may be made to a Memory Care Facility of one’s choice. Funeral arrangements entrusted to: SMITH FUNERAL HOME LTD. AND CREMATORIUM BROOKS, ALBERTA Condolences may be forwarded through www.s�h.ca Telephone 403-362-4636 or Toll Free (866) 362-4652 “Our Families Serving Your Family Since 1951”

Pay for 3 weeks - 4th week is FREE

Wednesday, September 19th - BBQ Noon Lunch, Kisbey Rec Centre. 1130am to 1pm. Adults: $12; 5 & under: $3.00. Food Hamper Raffle. Sponsored by Fern by Rebekah Lodge #33 18-1 Monday, Oct. 1st to Thursday, Oct. 4th - DICKENS THRIFT SALE. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. Thursday is 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Museum is selling lunch daily. 17-4

Auction Services vices

A.L. #304543 3 ope SK Box 10 • Wauchope S0C 2P0 Auctioneer ~ Dellan Mohrbutter Phone 306-452-3815 Fax 306-452-3733 Website: keymauction.com

For Sale - Misc Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement, and the Saskatchewan Weekly Newspaper Association and membership do not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements. For greater information on advertising conditions, please consult the Association’s Blanket Advertising Conditions on our website at www.swna.com.

Health Services


17

NEWS

Friday, September 14, 2018

Welcome home

Career Opportunities

Selling Your Land? I Can Help! - Justin Yin

Cell: 306-230-1588 Office: 306-361-8926 Fax: 306-665-1443 justin.yin.ca@gmail.com NOA Realty

• Farmland Marketing Specialist • Powerful marketing networks • Effective English & Chinese websites • Strong Electronic Marketing tools • Featured on CTV / Global TV • Featured in The Globe & Mail / The Western Producer 112 Reindeer Road, Saskatoon SK

n ti i y g Salivin ur! lo o c

The world isn't black and white. So, why is your ad?

Photo submitted

Carlyle and Area Chamber of Commerce President Nicole Currie (left) welcomed Brent (right) and Latonya McLean and their sons back to our community. Wishing them all the success with their business, Dudley and Company Chartered Accountants.

Carlyle & District Food Bank

Notice To Christopher Hayes Final Notice Pursuant to the Tax Enforcement Act Take Notice that the Town of Alameda intends, to request the Registrar of Titles to issue title to the land described below by virtue of an interest based on a tax lien registered against the

Donate to the Food Bank

Every little bit helps.

existing title to that land in the Land Titles Registry on the 25th day of October 2016 as Interest Number 176941345 UNLESS you redeem that land pursuant to the provisions of the Act, and that on issue of Title for that land to the Town of Alameda pursuant to that request, you will thereafter be forever estopped and debarred from setting up any claim to or in respect of that land. Dated at Alameda,in the Province of Saskatchewan, this 10th day of September, 2018.

Glenda Johnston Acting Administrator Christopher Hayes Lot 10 Block 13 Plan #101883168

ATTENTION CAPITAL RECREATION & CULTURE FUNDING PROGRAM Town of Carlyle & R.M. of Moose Mountain No. 63

Carlyle, SK S0C 0R0

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! In-demand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get online training you need from an employertrusted program. Visit: CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855-7683362 to start training for your work-at-home career today!

The program is available to any Town of Carlyle recreation or cultural organization who is interested in obtaining funding for capital projects. The program consists of two components, an annual limited matching grant and a larger long term matching grant. Application deadlines are March 31st and September 30th of every year. Funding is limited and applications will be reviewed by the Recreation and Culture Foundation. Further information and application forms are available from the Town of Carlyle or R.M. of Moose Mountain No. 63 municipal offices.

REDVERS UNITED LUTHERAN SHARED MINISTRY Knox United Church-Redvers Dannevirke Lutheran Church-Redvers ***

SERVICES FOR THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER

at Knox United Church Redvers, SK ***

EVERY SUNDAY EXCEPT SEPT. 2 at 10:00 a.m. Our Lady of Fatima Roman Catholic Church Rev. Father Wilfred B Calinawan Alternate Storthoaks & Bellegarde Saturday.......7:30 pm Sunday.......9:00 a.m. Redvers - Sunday.................10:45 a.m. Manor Anglican/United Churches Contact Rev. Michelle Moore, (306)577-9704 Knox United Church - Manor

11:00 a.m. Worship

2nd & 4th Sundays 4th Sunday Services held at All Saints Cannington Manor (from May through September)

Worship Experience 10:45 a.m.

Every Sunday Campus Pastor Blair & Deb Andrew Sr. Pastor Louis Halbgewachs 306-453-2781 63 Broadway St., Redvers

Roman Catholic Oxbow/Cantal/ Carnduff/Carlyle Rev. Father Melchor Somonte Oxbow St. Joseph’s - 9:00 a.m. Cantal St. Raphael’s Saturday- 7:00 p.m. Carnduff St. Jude - 11:00 a.m.

Rev. Father Yodel Cereno

Carlyle Church of Our Lady 11:00 a.m.


18

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Pemoco Ltd. CARLYLE OFFICE: BOX 1449, CARLYLE, SK S0C 0R0

Now Accepting Contract Operating bids for a Swing Operator to work approximately 10 days per month at the Parkman 4-22-9-33W1 Battery

Interested individuals or businesses must have valid safety certificates and insurances. Bids should be submitted as an hourly rate. Bids can be sent to the above address or emailed to (bfornwald@pemoco.com) For more information, you may contact Terry Hengen at (306) 457-7795 or Rob Niven at (306) 577-739 BIDS WILL BE ACCEPTED UNTIL 4:00 P.M. ON SEPTEMBER 28, 2018.

SRI HOMES’ Estevan Facility SHELTER HOME SYSTEMS is currently accepting applications for

PRODUCTION WORKERS • Required Immediately

Duties include:

• Assembling and installing modular components Send, fax, e-mail or drop off resume to:

H

O

M

E

S

SHELTER

Box 845 #200 Hwy. 18 West, Estevan, SK S4A 2A7 Fax: 306-634-7597 jobs.shelter@gmail.com www.shelterhomes.ca

The Corning Co-Op is looking for a capable person to fill the role of

Operations Support At our store in Corning, SK

MAIN DUTIES: -

Be familiar with all product lines. Provide accurate information and excellent assistance/service to customers. Promote the sale of merchandise and meet the needs, requirements and expectations of the consumer. Operate till and prepare daily cash reconciliations. Prepare and place orders for merchandise; Receive and price merchandise as directed. Perform general housekeeping duties. Operate gas and diesel bars. Other duties as assigned.

REQUIREMENTS: -

Positive attitude and self-motivated. Strong communication and interpersonal skills. Ability to work a variety of shifts (between 7:30am to 6:30pm, Monday to Saturday). Be bondable. Retail work experience is an asset. Forklift ticket would be an asset. be able to lift 60lbs. Valid class 5 driver’s license. Abstract will be requested.

Corning Co-Op offers a competitive salary and a comprehensive Benefits Package, along with excellent training and opportunities for advancement.

HOW TO APPLY:

Please submit your cover letter and resume to: Corning Co-Op Attn: Manager P.O. Box 130 Corning, SK S0G 0T0

Email: corningcoop@gmail.com Applicants must be entitled to work in Canada. Only those selected for interview will be contacted. Closing Date: September 21st, 2018.

Friday, September 14, 2018

Maryfield Villa News Submitted by Janet Mark The Villa Guild is serving for 5 birthdays this month. Irene Husband had 20 members of her family, including: Larry and Marion, Thomas and Lilliam, Gerald, Kristine and Miles, Cathy and Kevin and the Currie’s from Carlyle. Next day Ruth Dennis’ Celebration included: Neil and Barbara; Brad Denis and Lynsey Hnatuk; Josephine Gates, Jean and Audrey McVicar, Myrele Chambers, Ryerson and Gwen Dennis, Estevan. Leanne Jackson brought Aunt Alice Chaput back from Moosomin Hospital. Joe and Shirley Blaise visited her. Maxine Patron visited Grace Toms. Imagine having babies born at home in the middle of harvest! That didn’t crop up in any of our Harvest Memories at Circle of Friends. Ralph remembered sheltering from a storm, age 3, in a big tractor tire. Freda told of the steam

engine, which tooted to hurry up the next load of sheaves. Jessie remembered a white horse which lost its tail, caught in the drive belt of the thresher. One crew boss demanded lunch or a meal in the field every three hours. Fred told of the rust year, when wheat was only worth 26 cents a bushel; but they made their payment on the land. At 9-13-13-W2 there was only one load of wheat sheaves, so the machine came to blow the straw into the loft. Little Allan was given a grease gun to operate. He came into to dinner: Wow! Chicken! This is just about as good as Christmas. My mother and I knew there was part of a wagon load of seed for next year. None for the elevator. Someone asked, “How did you manage?” “We did without.” The Kliever family: Gordon, Ruth and John, led worship from AGC Church.

PUBLIC WORKS FOREMAN The Town of Arcola invites applications for the full-time position of Public Works Foreman. Successful applicant will be responsible for the overall supervision, organization, coordination, and control of our public works and utility systems. Working with the town administrator and council, the town foreman is expected to operate within approved policies, programs, and budgets of the town. A complete job description is available upon request. Requirements include: • Ability to supervise and direct staff. • Possession of a valid Class 5 driver’s license. • Knowledge of vehicle/equipment operation and maintenance. • Level 1 Certification in Water Treatment/Distribution and in Wastewater Treatment/ Collection or willingness to achieve said certification. • The Town of Arcola offers a benefit package and a salary which is negotiable, depending on experience and qualifications. Please submit your letter of application and resume, with references by September 14th to:   Town of Arcola PO Box 359 Arcola, SK   S0C 0G0 Fax: 306-455-2445 Email: arcadmin@sasktel.net   Only those candidates selected for interviews will be contacted. Thank you to all applicants for your interest in this position.

The Carlyle Observer has an immediate opening for a dedicated and enthusiastic full-time Journalist. Our one-person newsroom is responsible for delivering solid news coverage and compelling photos for communities in Southeast Saskatchewan and working to break important stories that matter to our readers. The ideal candidate will be a self-starter, a person who’s not afraid to go the extra mile to capture and tell human-focused stories. We’re looking for someone who can: • generate story ideas • write up to 10 stories a week (sports, news, opinion and features) • take compelling, eye-catching photos • keep our community updated by posting to the website/social media • be a team player who is flexible to changing work needs Qualifications: • a driver’s license and working vehicle • proficiency in English and CP style • adherence to journalistic ethics • ability to write accurate and fair stories to deadline • computer skills in a Mac environment • a post-secondary qualification in journalism or a related field would be an asset • basic knowledge of Photoshop and InDesign would be an asset • possess excellent communication skills Deadline for applications is September 28, 2018 We thank all applicants for their interest. Successful candidates will be contacted to set up an interview. If this job seems right for you, please email your resume, writing and photography samples and references to: Rick Major Publisher, Carlyle Observer Email: rmajor@weyburnreview.com

Brought to you

EVERY WEEK

Over

4000

copies distributed in over 20 communities Phone: 453-2525 Fax: 453-2938 Email: observer@ sasktel.net


19

DRILLING REPORT

Friday, September 14, 2018

OILFIELD DIRECTORY

School zones have changed a lot in the last decade, says CAA Today, nearly three quarters of students are driven to school, which means there has been a significant increase in vehicle traffic to school zones – bringing with it more pollution and more unsafe driving behaviours. The safety of our children, and all road users, in school zones is a top priority for CAA Saskatchewan. There are existing dangerous behaviours in school zones as documented in a 2016 CAA poll: • 30% of drivers reported witnessing a near miss or collision in a school zone, more than half of which involved a child. • Nearly half of Canadians say they witnessed distracted driving in a school zone. • 4 out of 10 Canadians say there are more unsafe driving practices in school zones today than in the past. • 64% of Canadians say they have witnessed speeding in school zones. Tips for improving safety in school zones: • Keep to the posted speed limit, or slower, and note the hours of duration. A slower vehicle speed of just a few kilometres per hour considerably increases the chances of survival for a pedestrian struck by a vehicle. • Be alert. Drivers need to be aware of the busyness of a school zone – children cycling or walking across the street - a school bus that’s about to stop other vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists on the road. It’s important to eliminate distracted driving: Please put away all communications devices. • Help reduce risks for children. It might seem obvious, but some

Are you a photographer? Let a few thousand people know by advertising here

The Carlyle Observer 306-453-2525 observer@sasktel.net

people forget that children need to exit the car on the sidewalk side, not the traffic side. Younger children also need adults or older siblings to help them cross the street as their field of vision is limited. • Set up a CAA School Safety Patrol. Contact the CAA Saskatchewan School Safety Patrol Coordinator for details. The benefits are immense: A patrol improves safety in and around the school and it’s a fantastic way for

The drilling report

older students to learn responsibility. • Leave home earlier to save time; that way you’ll be in less of a rush as you get near the school. • Drop the kids off a little farther from school and have them walk with an older sibling or adult the rest of the way. Some schools have set up drop-off zones in safe locations so check with your school administrator. Visit caask.ca/ schoolzonesafety for further information.

Drilling Licenses

NOTICE The Carlyle Observer apologizes for the error in missing the publication of these three ads submitted by the R.M. of Enniskillen No. 3, to run in our August 31, 2018 issue.

NOTICE OF CALL FOR NOMINATIONS APAS REPRESENTATIVES At the request of the Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan Inc. (APAS), the R.M. of Enniskillen No. 3 hereby gives the Public Notice of a call for nominations of candidates for the position of APAS Representative. Nominations will be received by the undersigned at the Rural Municipal Office during regular office hours until Wednesday, September 19th, at 4:00 P.M. local time. Nomination papers are available from the Rural Municipal Office. Candidates must be agricultural ratepayers in the R.M. APAS is a general farm organization that was formed to provide farmers and ranchers with a democratically elected, grassroots, nonpartisan producer organization based on rural municipal boundaries. For further information, please contact your R.M. Office or APAS at: 140-4th Avenue East Regina, SK S4N 4Z4 E-mail: info@apas.ca

Phone: 306-789-7774 Fax: 306-789-7779 Web: www.apas.ca

Dated this 31 day of August, 2018. Myrna-Jean Babbings Returning Office

108390 107921

2 new licenses issued to Monday, September 10 Triland Energy Hz 2-32-6-4 Whitecape Resources Hz 1-28-5-13

97990 107601 105116 97928 93011 97922 88285 105718 104686 92790 11B104 104117 105860 106847 107340 105839 106997 107338 11B104 14K341 105399 105559 107958

Trinidad Drilling Panther Drilling Precision Drilling Alliance Drilling Alliance Drilling Alliance Drilling Trinidad Drilling Stampede Drilling Trinidad Drilling Vermilion Energy Vermilion Energy Iron Hand Drilling Betts Drilling Stampede Drilling Horizon Drilling Alliance Drilling Horizon Drilling Horizon Drilling Vermilion Energy Vermilion Energy Horizon Drilling Horizon Drilling Horizon Drilling

3-25-5-6 9-26-6-30 4-24-7-10 13-9-1-12 13-9-1-12 13-9-1-12 16-27-1-16 2-10-5-6 1-16-1-14 1-18-2-13 15-22-6-34 07-19-2-1 12-15-6-32 16-15-1-2 13-8-1-12 6-23-4-4 14-30-2-14 15-12-1-13 15-22-6-34 4-26-6-34 5-28-9-6 13-34-10-6 1-29-1-12

Become an advertiser in our oilfield directory!

Hemphill Trenching Ltd.

book your

• Backhoe space in The • Skid Steer pipe • fittings • ValVes • specialties • Dozer Phone: (306) 842-4604 Fax: (306) 842-0535 Drilling Report • Snow removal • Lease mowing TECHNICAL SALES AND MAINTENANCE LTD.

call

E

Phone: (306) 842-7370 • Grading Fax: (306) 842-7372 • Gravel www.pantherdrilling.ca • Spill clean-up Saskatchewan owned and operated •100% Water/Sewage systems • Towing

Providing Oilfield & Farm Service

453-2525

Office - 457-2770 Heward, SK Cell - 457-7322 hemphilltrenchingltd@sasktel.net

PIC NVIRONMENTAL

TECHNOLOGIES INC.

Road Building • Oilfield Trenching • Dugouts

“ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES FOR THE OIL & GAS AND COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIES”

Office - 685-2068 Shop - 685-4601

48 Carlton St. Redvers, SK S0C 2H0 Phone (306) 452-3200 Cell (306) 452-7507 Fax (306) 452-3240

Hank - Cellular - 482-7096 Scott - Cellular - 482-7097 Gainsborough, Sask.

TAX ENFORCEMENT LIST RURAL MUNICIPALITY OF ENNISKILLEN NO. 3 PROVINCE OF SASKATCHEWAN

Rural Municipality of Enniskillen No. 3

Councillor for Division No. 2; Councillor for Division No. 4; Councillor for Division No. 6;

Torc Oil & Gas Vermilion Energy Crescent Point Energy Crescent Point Energy Crescent Point Energy Crescent Point Energy Crescent Point Energy Astra Oil Corp Crescent Point Energy Vermilion Energy Vermilion Energy Vermilion Energy Silver Bay Resources Vermilion Energy Crescent Point Energy Midale Petroleums Vermilion Energy Crescent Point Energy Vermilion Energy Vermilion Energy Ridgeback Resources Ridgeback Resources Crescent Point Energy

For more information call Andrea at Weyburn This Week 306-842-7487 Call Today to

Notice of Call for Nominations

PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that nominations of candidates for the office(s) of:

Rig Report

Notice is hereby given under The Tax Enforcement Act that unless the arrears and costs appearing opposite the land and title number described in the following list are fully paid before the First (1st) day of December, 2018, an interest based on a tax lien will be registered against the land. Note: A sum for costs in an amount required by subsection 4(3) of The Tax Enforcement Act is included in the amount shown against each parcel Part of Section

Sec

Twp

Range

Meridian

Title No.

Total Arrears

Cost Advertising

Total Arrears and Costs

SE PT.

22

03

02

W2

107532491

$323.82

$23.33

$347.15

NE

08

02

01

W2

146329780

$803.97

$23.33

$827.30

NW

09

02

01

W2

146330344

$898.47

$23.33

$921.80

SW

09

02

01

W2

146329825

$907.63

$23.33

$930.96

nicipal Office, 307 Main Street, Oxbow, SK.

NE

27

02

01

W2

146330434

$441.73

$23.33

$465.06

Dated this 31st day of August, 2018.

NW

27

02

01

W2

146330401

$753.60

$23.33

$776.93

will be received by the undersigned during regular business hours of 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday – Friday until the 19th day of September, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. local time at the Rural Municipal Office, 307 Main Street, Oxbow, SK.

Cost of Ad: Fax proof to: Ad to run week(s) of: Proofed by: Nominations Forms may(initials) be obtained at the Rural Mu-

Myrna-Jean Babbings Returning Officer

Dated this 31th day of August, 2018 Myrna-Jean Babbings, Treasurer


20

THE OBSERVER

Friday, September 14, 2018

NOTICE

Saturday & Sunday Sept. 15th & 16th Carlyle Sports Arena

CARLYLE • WAWOTA

OPEN HOMESPUN SUNDAY 12-5

NOTICE

to the Residents of The R.M. of Browning

to the Residents of the Village of Alida

On Behalf of Nal Resources Signal Direct Communications Ltd. With Offices at 1254 7th Street In Estevan, Sk

on Behalf of Nal Resources Signal Direct Communications Ltd. with Offices At 1254 7th Street in Estevan, Sk

Wish to Inform the Residents of the R.M. of Browning of our Intension to Place a Communications Tower on the Land Location Of 5-10–6-5 W2.

Wish to inform the Residents of the Village of Alida of our Intension to Place a Communications Tower on 6th Street West

Its Function Will be to Provide Scada Communications for Nal Resources; if you have any questions or Concerns Please Contact:

Its Function will be to Provide Scada Communications for Nal Resources; if You Have any Questions or Concerns Please Contact:

DEREK YOUNG SIGNAL DIRECT COMMUNICATIONS@ (306) 634-9994

DEREK YOUNG SIGNAL DIRECT COMMUNICATIONS@ (306) 634-9994

Signal Direct Communications 1254 7th Street

Signal Direct Communications 1254 7th Street

PHONE: (306) 634-9994 FAX: (306) 634-6633

PHONE: (306) 634-9994 FAX: (306) 634-6633

(49’ 23’ 17.44” N, 101’ 52’ 53.85.W).

FASHION • FOOTWEAR • JEWELLERY Downtown Carlyle

Line 3 Replacement Program

Keeping You Safe. Enbridge is preparing for the replacement of a segment of the Line 3 pipeline in your area. This upgrade will help us maintain our stringent safety standards. Rest assured that throughout the process, our number one priority is to ensure the safety of communities and our employees and contractors. We thank you for your patience and cooperation.

For Your Safety Use extra caution when driving near any pipeline construction. Watch for: • heavy equipment • caution signs

• flaggers • slow traffic

For your safety and the safety of others, please do not enter our work areas.

For more information, visit enbridge.com/line3construction

Creative

Ad Specs

Contact

Carlyle Observer September 14  
Carlyle Observer September 14  
Advertisement