Page 1

FROM FARM, COMMERCIAL TO TOWN OR RESORT - CALL

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$399,000

201 - 1st St., East Carlyle MLS #SK787237

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$229,000

NEW 109 Walter St., Wawota MLS# SK796222

48 Souris Ave., Redvers MLS# SK795603

$125,000

$164,000

PM40011904

OBSERVER

VOLUME 83 • NO. 36 | FRIDAY, JANUARY 17TH, 2020

THE

Heart of the Moose Mountains

WWW.CARLYLEOBSERVER.COM

INSIDE THIS WEEK:

RCMP report Page 6

Arcola Minor Hockey Day PAGE 10

Observed At PAGE 12

carmen

FACEBOOK.COM/CARLYLEOBSERVER

Manor Chase The Ace jackpot growing PAGE 19

megan

conexus mortgage specialist

real estate pr ofessional

306-861-9847

306-452-8198

Functional creations made of clay

70

Photo by Kelly Johnson

Amanda Myers, owner and operator of Lake Front Treasures, readies her pottery creations in her studio. (See story on page 3)

SAVE UP TO

%

STORE WIDE

Carlyle


2

THE OBSERVER

Friday, January 17, 2020

     

Hydrovacs Pressure Trucks Water Trucks Steam Trucks 50/50 Methanol Combo Units

503 Main Street Arcola, SK

24 Hour Dispatch 306-455-2667

Office: 306-455-0067 Fax: 306-455-2677

Community Calendar

Your first stop to find events happening in our community! *Do you have a community event you want listed here? Send us the name of the event, date, and what community it’s being held by emailing: observer@sasktel.net, calling: (306)453-2525. If you would like to include more information than that listed below contact our sales people to see how we can help.

Community Events Listing

January

17 & 18 – Alida - Fun-filled weekend at rink 17 – Pheasant Rump Nakota - IMPACT Early Childhood Fair 18 – Carlyle - Minor Hockey Day

22 – Carlyle - IMPACT Early Childhood Fair 23 – Lampman - IMPACT Early Childhood Fair 27 – Carlyle - Preschool Storywalk

Feb�uary 5 – Manor - IMPACT Early Childhood Fair 10 – Kipling - IMPACT Early Childhood Fair 19 – Carlyle - Food Bank

18 – Carlyle - Food Bank

March

Weather for the week . . . Friday, Jan. 17 ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 The stars pull you deeper into the cocoon of your mind, Aries. This may help you as you work on a project or work through thoughts and emotions. TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 This is a week to take inventory of any goals that you may have put on a shelf, Taurus. Dust them off and create a plan of action because the time to pursue them is now. GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, an ambitious week is on the horizon. Your professional house is booming, and you are ready to perhaps move your career to the next level. CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 This week will get off to a social start, Cancer. Expect friends to bring other friends along if you are hosting a party. This is an exciting opportunity to expand your network. LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, put all of your cards on the table and begin discussions with others who are influencers in your life. Only then can you come up with a strategy to get things done. VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 Make a point of being direct if you are upset, Virgo. Others need to know if they have stepped on your toes, even if it was accidental so they can make things right.

LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Now is a key time to boost your bottom line, Libra. If you don’t already have a job, it’s time to get one. If you’re employed, you may need to seek out new revenue streams. SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 Various ideas are swirling around in your head, Scorpio. You’re not sure which ones you want to see the light of day just yet. Partner up on a trial project first. SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, if stress has been ruling your universe, it might be time to step back and reevaluate your priorities. Find out which tasks you can shed from your daily list. CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Deep soul-searching and a sharing of hidden emotions might be on the docket this week, Capricorn. It is brave to own up to your feelings. You’ll find support in friends. AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 A deep cleaning or decluttering is in order, Aquarius. Start with one room in the house and then work your way onward as time permits. Decluttering can be liberating. PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 You may soon encounter some awkward moments with some people you interact with regularly, Pisces. This will blow over quite quickly.

HIGH LOW

-14° -27°

Saturday, Jan. 18 HIGH LOW

-22° -26°

Sunday, Jan. 19

Monday, Jan. 20

HIGH LOW

HIGH LOW

-20° -25°

Tuesday, Jan. 21 HIGH LOW

-12° -13°

-20° -20°

Wednesday, Jan. 22 HIGH LOW

-9° -12°


3

THE OBSERVER

Friday, January 17, 2020

From Front page - Lake Front Treasures By Kelly Johnson The Observer Lake Front Treasures is a pottery salon, owned and operated by Amanda Meyers. Amanda is from the south of Carlyle where her parents farmed. She attended school in Alameda and completed high school in Oxbow. She and her husband make their home at White Bear Lake. Myers took up making pottery, as a pastime and hobby, a couple years ago. She purchased the necessary equipment, consisting of a potter’s wheel, kiln and other tools; setting up a home studio in the cabin. She creates and markets her finished products at craft and trade shows and by word of mouth. She also has four retail merchants where she wholesales or consigns her wares. Myers produces mugs, pitchers, plates, soap dishes, pretty much anything that can be used in a home and can be fashioned from clay. She also produces decorative vases and bowls and has a very uniquely designed salt and pepper shaker set. Anyone with a passion for pottery can find more information and contact Amanda Myers online at Lake Front Treasures.

Photo by Kelly Johnson

A number of Amanda Myers’ finished products on display in her salon.

Photo by Kelly Johnson

Amanda Myers placing the pottery in the kiln for firing.

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4

Friday, January 17, 2020

Views

Quote of the Week... “No winter lasts forever; no spring skips its turn.” - Joseph Addison

Old political assumptions need re-thinking By Murray Mandryk A killer drone 10,200 kilometres away could have a big impact on the Saskatchewan election still eight months from now. That drone that took out Iranian general, Qassim Suleimani, said to be the second most powerful person in the state that’s long been American’s enemy, could yet have a profound effect on politics in many parts of the world, including here at home. However, whether how much of an effect it will have and whether it will affect us as much it might have had are now two big questions. The pleasing thing is we might not be quite as vulnerable to such events as we once were. Of course, the political turmoil in the Middle East won’t directly effect on Premier Scott Moe’s political fortunes in the Oct. 26 election … or at least, it won’t have the direct impact it might have on U.S. President Donald Trump’s election just eight days later. However, political instability in the Middle East has traditionally had a big effect on something very important to both the Saskatchewan economy and its politics: the price of oil. As of the writing of this column, the West Texas Intermediate price of oil was $62.02 US a barrel _ better than both the initial Saskatchewan 201920 budget projection ($59.27 US a barrel) and the slightly downgraded mid-year projection ($57.03 US a barrel.) An increase in the oil price as generally been good for both the Saskatchewan economy and budget revenues, which, in turn, is really good for the political fortunes of the government of the day. But maybe it’s about here where it would to be best to be careful about old assumptions. Things are changing in this world and it might even be that the rise and fall of oil prices isn’t quite the big deal id used to be. To begin with, the oil market instability expected to follow the assassination and Iran’s retaliatory missile attack hasn’t happened … at least not quite yet. Sure, oil prices increased slightly, but (as of the writing of this) by only a modest 1.5 per cent. Things could change quickly if oil flow is disrupted, something that could happen it Iran continues its retaliate by things like limiting shipping through the Strait of Hormuz in the Persia Gulf. (As suggested earlier, things 10,000 kilometres away have a way of impacting us here.) But, so far, that’s not been the case. And even if were, there are other factors in play. For example, if there is a boom in oil prices it will certainly benefit the economy in certain parts of rural Saskatchewan. However, rural Saskatchewan is already firmly supporting the Saskatchewan Party, whether it’s good economic times or no. Politically speaking, it’s unlikely that there will be much effect here. Of course, the indirect political effect of increasing oil revenue is affording the provincial government the luxury of spending more. That could appease some voters frustrated by 2017 budget cuts. But those frustrated with the Sask. Party administration these past 12 years might not be satisfied by a bit of additional government spending in an election year. Moreover, an oil windfall isn’t quite the big deal in once was. Much to the credit of Finance Minister Donna Harpauer and the Sask. Party government, the financing of the provincial budget as been rejigged in a more manageable way. As of the mid-year update of the 2019-20 budget, about half our revenue comes from taxes and only 12 per cent comes from non-renewable resources. Essentially, this has sheltered Saskatchewan taxpayers from things beyond their control, including what’s now going on in the Middle East. We aren’t completely immune, but we are less vulnerable to things we can’t control than we once were.

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When I squeeze you, you make noise Heads up, gen Xers. Get ready to think back to a pop culture childhood moment that hopefully brings a smile to your face and most assuredly a song to your lips. It was 50 years ago that a certain Muppet named Ernie sat in a tub and sang with obvious affection to his Rubber Ducky, expressing all the fun he had sharing a bath My Outlook with his favorite squeak toy. The Shelley Luedtke song proved so popular on Sesame Street it went on to become a mainstream hit, peaking at #16 on the Billboard 100. For small children, bath time is about more than getting clean. It’s play time and the fun of splashing and discovering how water can be made to move. As children become older and no longer need supervision, baths become boring and inconvenient and children rush through the process all the while trying to convince parents that, yes, they did in fact use soap. Then come the pleas for greater independence and showering instead, causing grown-ups to hold on to the hope that standing under running water for even the briefest of attention spans is accomplishing some sort of cleansing action. For some, the pendulum in adulthood swings again and many enjoy a return to the tub, espousing the benefits of soaking. They have research to back them up. Baths can help regulate blood pressure, contribute to overall heart health, increase blood flow throughout the body, help limbs feel less sore, increase mental alertness, and help us sleep better. Last August, a stress survey conducted by the American Psychological Association found that the top areas of concern for adults were health care, mass shootings, the upcoming presidential election, immigration, environmental issues and sexual harassment concerns. One of the lead researchers remarked, “There is a lot of uncertainty in our world right now -- from mass shootings to climate change.

Publisher ........................... Nancy Johnson Regional Editor ................ David Willberg Advertising ........................ Sean Choo Foo Production .......... Karen Mitchell-Steele ................................................... Dolores Young Reporter .................................Kelly Johnson

This year’s survey shows us that more Americans are saying these issues are causing them stress.” All of these are indeed large, concerning issues; ones people might feel powerless against and not surprisingly cause feelings of stress. So, what does any of this have to do with a rubber ducky? One of my favorite children’s books is “Five Minutes Peace” by Jill Murphy; the story of Mrs. Large, an elephant who searches for five minutes of peace and quiet away from her boisterous children. Leaving them in the kitchen, she retreats to the bathtub. But just as she is about to relax, her children interrupt by playing the flute, reading to her, and even offering her toys to play with. She gives up, heads back to the kitchen, and not surprisingly, her children follow her there, too, but not before she cherishes a full 3 minutes and 45 seconds of peace before their arrival. We need quiet time. We need moments when we can step away from the noise that surrounds us almost unceasingly. It’s not just that we need a break from activity. We need peace and quiet for our brains to recharge and to give our minds time to be renewed. It is in the quiet that we can take time to think, to re-discover what matters most, and to reorder our priorities. When we take time to be quiet we often find that it is good things that come to mind more easily, and some of what causes feelings of stress get pushed to the periphery—just a bit— even for a short period of time. There’s no question the stresses faced by many can feel overwhelming. That’s why it is so important we take time to step back, step out, or maybe even step into a tub and let the water do its job. We can take a cue from that most famous tub toy and allow the soaking time to let us work out the squeaks and reclaim our buoyancy against the stresses we need to face. It won’t wash away the worries, but we just might emerge with a smile that could rival even Ernie’s rubber ducky. That’s my outlook.

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The Carlyle Observer is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalist practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please email observer@sasktel.net or call the newsroom at 306-453-2525. If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the website at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163 for additional information.

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5

Lifestyles

Friday, January 17, 2020

Financial Focus How to survive a layoff If you’ve been laid off, it’s important to re-evaluate your finances. Here are some tips to help you manage the situation until you find another position. Evaluate the situation Review your savings and adjust your budget accordingly. List your recurring expenses, including those for your cable, cell phones, medications, rent and mortgage. Then, tally up what income you have, if any, and determine for how long you can make ends meet. Decide where to cutback You probably won’t be able to maintain the lifestyle you’re used to while you’re unemployed. Start by mak-

ing sure you can cover essential costs, such as those for food, medication and shelter. Then, cut back on unnecessary spending (such as by terminating subscriptions or at least putting them on hold). You should also talk to your financial institution to see whether you can renegotiate bill and credit payments. It’s also important to avoid taking on any new debt. Secure income sources You’ll likely need to supplement your savings while looking for work. Don’t wait until you’re struggling to meet basic living expenses before looking into securing unemployment benefits. You may also want to consider getting

a part-time job until you can find something more permanent. For more advice, don’t hesitate to speak to someone at your financial institution, as they could help you find ways to minimize costs while you find work. Be prepared Experts recommend having an emergency fund with sufficient savings to let you live for three to six months. In addition, maintaining a strong professional network could make finding a new job much easier. Periodically updating your resume and attending networking events is a good idea, even if you aren’t expecting to be laid off.

HEALTH HUB Eczema: 5 tips for managing symptoms Atopic dermatitis, better known as eczema, is a chronic condition that causes the skin to become inflamed. It often manifests on the body as patches of dry, itchy skin that are red or brown. The itching may become more intense at night and, in some cases, raised bumps that leak fluid will develop. Cracked, scaly skin that becomes raw and sensitive from scratching may also be an issue. Here are some tips for mitigating the discomfort associated with eczema. Relax While there’s no concrete evidence of a link between stress and the severity of eczema symptoms, many patients report that their symptoms are worse when they’re worried or under pressure. Regardless of whether stress causes eczema to flare up, it’s likely that relaxation techniques and activities such as yoga can distract people from the itching and reduce the perceived severity of their symptoms. You can also try massage therapy, reading a book or listening to music to de-stress. Stay hydrated Whether they’re mild or severe, a good moisturizing cream is a must for managing eczema flare-ups. For best results, apply a liberal amount of moisturizer after taking a lukewarm bath or shower. Avoid hot water, as it dries the skin and will likely make your symptoms worse. In addition, drink plenty of water and avoid consuming dehydrating foods and drinks such as deli meats, candy and alcohol. Try creams A variety of medicated

creams, some of which can be purchased without a prescription, can help manage flareups. Make sure to choose a product endorsed by dermatologists, and avoid greasy creams as well as those containing perfumes, parabens and dyes. Choose the right clothes When your skin is irritated and inflamed, it’s best to avoid synthetic fabrics and tight-fitting clothes. Privilege loose apparel made of natural textiles such as cotton, bamboo and silk. These are less likely to aggravate your skin. Manage humidity levels Dry air can worsen eczema symptoms. Use a hygrometer to monitor the humidity levels at home and at work. Ideally, you should maintain a humidity level that’s between 40 and 60 per cent. If necessary, you can use a humidifier to remedy dry air. Learn your triggers Eczema flare-ups can be triggered by a wide range of things including soaps, dust, cigarette smoke, cleaning

products and certain foods. Try to identify the things that trigger your eczema and, if possible, eliminate them. This will result in fewer flare-ups. Don’t scratch While it’s easier said than done, refraining from scratching is an important component of managing atopic dermatitis. Despite the temporary relief it provides, scratching damages your skin and makes you even itchier. If you absolutely need to relieve the itching, try to pinch or lightly rub the affected area. It’s also a good idea to wear cotton gloves to bed, as unconscious nighttime scratching is a common cause of skin damage. Finally, you should cut your nails very short to minimize the risk of injuring your skin. Eczema is a common and potentially debilitating skin condition. Following these tips, and seeking the help of a health care professional, will likely make it a little easier to manage.

Answers on page 13


6

THE OBSERVER

Friday, January 17, 2020

Weekly RCMP report Submitted by Staff Sgt. Darren Simons • We are starting out the year with several 911 misdials, false alarms, child welfare and mental health calls. As much as things change they stay the same. One of the alarms was at a school where the teachers forgot to punch in the alarm code when they are preparing for school after their well earned Christmas break. We did not determine if it was due to excitement or dread. • If you have been in our office lately you will note we have a new counter and dividing glass. This installation was started before Christmas and was just completed. Moose Mountain Cabinets, as always, did a great job, however, it was challenging for them having to work with the glass company and their schedule. You might think this would be an easy task, however, add a government contract and a “Secure” lobby adds complications. The amount of safety glass, associated metal support and metal reinforcement which is hidden within the installation is unbelievable. I wish I had taken photos. We would like to thank those in the community that had to attend our Detachment for their patience. • We had a report of sport cars racing on Highway 13. Patrols were made by our traffic unit and we located one vehicle that may have been involved. The driver claimed they were not speeding, however, another sport car had passed him at a high rate of speed and turned in to Carlyle. This story seemed believable being the elderly parent who was a passenger confirmed the story. This Member determined that this parent did not appear to be an individual who had a “need for speed”. Members suspect they know who was operating the other vehicle being they are familiar with it and the driving habits of the owner. Unfortunately, this individual does not believe they need to change their driving habits, however, if they don’t they will continue to be involved with the Police.

• It always amazes me that sorrow and loss can become violence and anger. In a past posting I had to attend a funeral home to deal with grieving family members that were becoming violent and arrests were almost made. When a loved one is passing or has passed please try and get along with others that are grieving as well. These altercations also take place in hospitals and care homes. Not everyone grieves the same way and having the police come is not a memory you want to have. Ironically, another unique place I have attended for a disturbance and fight is a wedding. I never did figure out what the fight was about, but it was a good one. • We are investigating a break and enter to the Redvers Recreation Centre. Our Forensic Identification Section from Yorkton has already linked it to a Break and Enter at the Alida Recreation Centre, which occurred over the same evening. • We had a individual that was suffering from substance abuse wandering around causing concerns. Nothing illegal perse had been done, however, after dealing with the individual a couple times our Members thought maybe this individual has other pressing matters and they were run through our computer database. Our Member was disappointed in themselves for not checking the database on the first occasion being there were warrants from two other Police agencies and we were able to eliminate any further concerns by lodging the individual and dealing with their warrants the following day. We also cleared up other warrants for other Police agencies and continue to look for others wanted by both our Detachment and other Detachments and agencies. • If you have committed offences against the Criminal Code and you are on conditions you need to comply with those conditions. If one of those conditions is to meet with a Probation Officer you have to meet with the Probation Officer. If the meeting does not go well and the Probation Officer chooses to meet you at the Detachment for their safety, well this is where you get to meet Probation. Too bad if you don’t like it. Remember, you are the one that FORM 2 broke the law to start TAX ENFORCEMENT LIST (Section 4) with. PROVINCE OF SASKATCHEWAN • An individual that promised to comply with Notice is hereby given under The Tax Enforcement Act that unless the arrears their conditions and was and costs appearing opposite the land and title number described in the caught and charged was following list are fully paid before the 17 day of March, 2020 an interest based on a tax lien will be registered against the land. Note: A sum for costs in an amount required by subsection 4(3) of The Tax Enforcement Act is included in the amount shown against each parcel

DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY Part of Lot

Lot

Blk

Plan

Part of Section

Sec

Twp

Range

12

31

85R60530

13

31

85R60530

18

15

61R17515

16

09

U47

17

09

U47

21

09

U47

22

09

U47

10

26

75R0445

16

26

75R04445

23

26

79R52071

11

7

E1680

12

7

E1680

13

7

E1680

14

7

E1680

12

8

AF596

8

8

E1680

X

62R02587

23

3

E1680

24

3

E1680

16

12

AF8281

17

12

AF8281

15

11

AF8281

4

11

AF8281

5

11

AF8281

27

23

76R21225

17

23

76R21225

08

23

64R23595

8

32

99SE04764

4

5

102078604

Title No.

Total Arrears

Costs Advertising

Total Arrears and Costs

146454307

1,691.28 1,691.28 2470.24

8.64

1,699.92 1,699.92 2,478.91

Meridian

146454318 144346248 146787227 146787249 144039977 144039988 150659792 146545904 144850596 129232919 129233291 150340407 150340418 142874107 145670890 131843864 134368623 134368702 151848120 141964173 147577461 138577494 138577506 147347095 141310707 127881254 132266246 145901493

657.94 657.94 661.55 661.55 271.53 1,815.22 1,243.27 1,103.82 1,103.82 1,801.64 1,801.64 1,866.15 3,091.97 2,677.09 182.13 182.13 3,720.66 1,571.06 206.74 752.64 752.64 1,383.61 1,383.61 776.20 46.22 2,114.83 1,931.90

8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64 8.64

666.58 666.58 670.19 670.19 280.17 1,823.86 1,251.91 1,112.46 1,112.46 1,810.28 1,810.28 1,874.79 3,100.61 2,685.73 190.77 190.77 3729.30 1,579.70 215.38 761.26 761.26

then given another opportunity to follow their conditions. This did not last and this individual was subsequently arrested and has been in custody for over a week. • Remember what gets put on Social Media can stay there forever. All it takes is someone to take a “Screen Shot” and it can be shared and shared. In addition, if you choose to harass someone on social media you can be charged for harassing communications. To those that are victimized by this communication our first suggestion is to block them and ignore them. • Members were dispatched to a house party where some intoxicated individuals were allegedly causing problems. A patrol was made and one individual was given a ride to another residence, which apparently resolved the issues. • An intoxicated individual chose to ignore the wisdom that was being bestowed upon them by a sober occupant of the residence they both occupied. This resulted in a call to the RCMP who attended and determined that this individual would be best monitored in our cell block until they sobered up. • Another 72-hour suspension and three-day impoundment for alcohol consumption while driving was dealt with. • Members wrote approximately 40 tickets and 60 warnings over the past week. • Tickets were issued for fail to stop at a stop sign - $230, no insurance -$580, open liquor in a public place - $250, window tint -$115, no drivers licence - $150, fail to secure licence plate - $100, fail to wear a seatbelt and most expensive speeding tickets were for $336 and $910. • Warnings were issued for cannabis in a vehicle, fail to display licence plate, drive with undue care and attention, minor consume liquor, uninsured trailer, fail to produce registration, fail to stop at stop sign, fail to produce drivers licence, discard a burning substance from a vehicle, tail light fail to emit red light, excessive damage to windshield, insecure load, operate an over dimensional vehicle, obstructed licence plate, inadequate headlamps, inadequate speedometer, fail to signal and speeding. • Inspection notices were issued for window tint, inadequate mudflaps, inadequate daytime running lights, inadequate licence plate light, inadequate windshield, inadequate brake light, inadequate signal light, inadequate tail lights, and inadequate headlamps.

Buying back the farm By Linda Wegner A quote, posted above my computer, and an article I recently read, prompted these thoughts. Having said that, I can’t describe how painful I find our recent news broadcasts, TV coverage and on-line posts nor how blessed I was to read the following newspaper article, so blessed in fact, that it brought tears to my eyes. I hope it’s not “fake news” but even if it is, it was wonderfully refreshing. According to the post, a young farmer grew up on land that had been in the family for a number of generations. Because a less than scrupulous relative ended up

putting the young man’s ownership of the farm in jeopardy, he found it necessary to put the farming operation up for sale. With much sadness, I’m sure, he found himself engaging the services of an auctioneer. According to the newspaper account, 200 farmers attended and the young man quickly realized he wouldn’t have enough money to retain ownership but he started off the bidding. Long story short: No one else bid on the property, leaving him as its sole owner. It wasn’t just the beautiful outcome that touched my heart so deeply, it was the care and sacrifice of

his neighbours. We’re blessed to live on a street in our part of town where those around us consistently demonstrate their appreciation and care for each other. No matter where we live or what our daily activities, though, let’s be on the constant lookout for ways in which we can minister God’s love. As for that quote, here it is: “Give what you have; to someone it may be better than you dare to think. No man is so poor as to have nothing worth giving.” Henry Wadsworth Longfellow “But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness…” Galatians 5:22

1,392.25 784.84 54.86 2,123.47 1,940.54

Dated this 17day of JANUARY 2020, Bonnie Rutten

Treasurer

T O P S S I H T COULD BE YOURS!

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Friday, January 17, 2020

7

THE OBSERVER

Carievale 4-H Beef hosts District #41 curling Submitted The Carievale 4-H Beef Club hosted the district #41 curling on Friday, January 3, 2020 at the Gainsborough Curling Rink with 62 curlers; 40 fun curlers and 22 competitive curlers. There were three senior competitive teams from Alida & Area Beef, Alameda Beef and Carnduff Beef and two junior

competitive teams from Alameda Beef and Carnduff Beef. The competitive teams started curling at 9 am after the 4-H pledge was recited. The seniors played 8 end games and 6 end games for the juniors. The fun teams joined in at 10 am, where the members from all the clubs were put onto 10 teams. Each fun curling

team played 3 – 4 end games. A raffle was held with prizes donated from each of the families of the Carievale 4-H Beef Club as well as from each of the other 6 clubs. Congratulations to the Alameda Senior and Junior teams who move on to Melville to compete on January 18th at the Regional level.

Photo submitted

The Alameda Junior team.

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Photo submitted

The Alameda Senior team.

Photo submitted

This team sweeps their rock at the District 1 4-H curling held on Jan. 3.

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8

THE OBSERVER

Gordon F. Kells High School Grade 10-12 Semester End Final Exams The end of the semester is only a couple weeks away. The exam schedule for grade 10-12 students has been concluded. On Mon. Jan. 27 Grade 10’s have regular classes all day, but in the PM: Grade 11’s have ELA 20 or Social 20, and Grade 12’s have ELA A30. On Tues. Jan. 28 PM: Grade 10’s have Social 10, Grade 11’s have Physical Sci. 20, and Grade 12’s have Social 30. Wed. Jan. 29 PM: Grade 10’s have ELA A10, Grade 11’s and 12’s have Math 20. Thurs. Jan. 30 AM: Grade 10’s have Math 10 and Grade 11’s have Env. Science 20. Hey students! Looking for a New Year’s resolution? Fitness club in the high school gym is open to all students and all levels of fitness are welcome. Fitness club runs from September to June every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 7:45 – 8:30AM. Get your day started right with some movement! Your school library is open 24/7/365 with thousands of ebooks, audio books, and read-alongs available. Check out access through a free app. See the school website for more details. Remember, the School Community Council meets every 2nd Wednesday of the month at 7:00 P.M. in the school library. If you want to know what is going on at the school or have questions, please plan to attend. Your participation is necessary for our school’s success. Have you forgotten your HomeLogic password? You may now click on the “Forget Password” link to retrieve it. Visit our HomeLogic page for additional information. Parents are reminded to continue to use the Home Logic Parent Portal to keep up with their children’s grades and attendance. Parents can

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Cougar Corner

contact the school for information about how to set up access. All your school news can be found on the GF Kells website on the Southeast Cornerstone

School Division website under the “schools” tab. (http://www.cornerstonesd.ca/school/GFKells) Please check it out.

South Saskatchewan Community Foundation and RBC Foundation announce grant to Youth Group in Stoughton South Saskatchewan Community Foundation and RBC Foundation are providing a grant of $15,000 to support youth-led Community Cooking Classes at the Stoughton Central School. The project at Stoughton Central School is Community Cooking Classes. The grant will help to provide free cooking classes twice a week for students and community members. Ocean Man First Nation students and community members will be a part of the classes, thus bringing the two communities together and sharing ideas throughout. The classes will be youth led and assisted by Professional Chef and Restaurant Owner, Gayla Gilbertson, and Chef Alayna McNab from the Happy Nun Cafe in Forget, Sk. The youth will learn valuable leadership skills and entrepreneurial skills because of this program. Cooking classes run for 15 weeks, 2.5 hours per class, two times a week starting in February. At the end of the 15 weeks the Youth Leaders from this project will host “Diner for a Day” at the Happy Nun Cafe in Forget, SK where they will learn the restaurant business firsthand by preparing and serving meals to 30 guests. Grant recipient and youth leader Jessica Baumgartner says she is very excited that Stoughton gets the opportunity to give out these cooking classes. “I feel it will strongly help the community in encouraging youth to learn to cook,” says Baumgartner. “It is a very important skill that I feel as time goes on people are starting to lack. I hope this project works out well and am very glad to be a part of it.” Youth leader, Erin Campbell says that the cooking classes will be a fun way for youth and for community members to learn some tasty recipes and put teamwork under their belts. “Providing a fun, safe, efficient, and cohesive experience for youth to strengthen their skills in the kitchen,” says Campbell. “This is going to be a great experience and certainly one for the books!” The RBC Future Launch Community Challenge

is hosted by Community Foundations of Canada and participating community foundations. It is made possible thanks to a $5M donation from RBC Foundation, a commitment by RBC and the RBC Foundation to empower Canadian youth for the jobs of tomorrow. Over the next 10 years, RBC Future Launch is dedicating $500 million to help young people access meaningful employment through practical work experience, skills development opportunities, networking solutions and mental well-being supports and services. Grants like this one are being made to youth-led projects in 150 small and medium sized communities across Canada. The goal of the program is to shift the power to young leaders making positive social or environmental change in their communities, while gaining valuable skills and experience. “RBC is committed to the power, vision and potential of youth, and the important role they play in their communities,” says Salman Khan, RBC Community Manager, Southeast Saskatchewan. “We are thrilled to see the results of this important partnership with the CFC helping make a difference right here in Stoughton and in communities across Canada.” The South Saskatchewan Community Foundation serves as a bridge between donors and charities in Regina and in southern Saskatchewan. “We believe in facilitating Saskatchewan philanthropy, supporting local charities, and developing our community so that our home is a more vital, strong, and fair place to live, work, and play,” says Donna Ziegler, Executive Director, SSCF. “Participating in the RBC Future Launch Community Challenge builds on SSCF’s long-time support to local youth and youth leadership.” “Young people are not future leaders - they are leading social and environmental change right now. We are honoured to play a role in the bold change that youth are leading across the country through this national initiative with RBC,” says Andrew Chunilall, CEO of Community Foundations of Canada. 20013BS0 20013BS1

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9

THE OBSERVER

Friday, January 17, 2020

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Reward offered for incidents in which cattle were shot A reward has been offered in connection with a couple of incidents last fall in which cattle were shot. According to a tweet from the Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association (SSGA), the reward of up to $2,000 is being offered by the Saskatchewan Turn in Poachers and Polluters (SaskTIP) line. Chad MacPherson, who is the general manager of the SSGA, said both incidents occurred during hunting season. There was also one in southwest Manitoba that was widely reported. One incident in the southeast was in the Lampman-Alameda area. Two cattle were shot and killed. The other near Wawota led to the cattle surviving injuries that they suffered. “As a result, we reached out to SaskTIPs, which is a non-profit organization that deals with hunting and pollution crimes, and gives opportunity for people to report environmental crimes,” said MacPherson. As for the incident in Manitoba, it occurred in the Reston area. One of the photos in the reward poster is of an animal that was shot in Manitoba. MacPherson said it’s hard to know for sure right now whether

these incidents were related, but the timing and the close proximity of the shootings could mean a connection. “It’s not uncommon for sometimes animals to be injured in hunting season, but these ones seem kind of blatantly criminal in nature versus an accidental shooting. It was alarming that people were just injuring animals for just entertainment,” said MacPherson. He has seen situ-

ation similar to this in North Dakota, but this is the first time he knows of it happening in Saskatchewan in the past few years. The SSGA has been in contact with the RCMP and conservation officers in southeast Saskatchewan regarding the incidents. This is also the first time that the SSGA has gone to SaskTIPS for a reward on a crime. Anyone with information can call SaskTIPs at 1-800-667-7561.

THE

Jess Franklin (left) representing Carlyle Curling Club, makes a presentation to the Open Cash Spiel winners: Mark Walters, Jim Brown, Gary Kreutzer and Dave Wetsch. They defeated the Jeff Faber team in the final. Thanks to Carlyle GM for generously sponsoring our bonspiel, which was held Jan. 3 to 5 at the Carlyle Curling Club.

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10

Friday, January 17, 2020

OBSERVER

Sports

Arcola Minor Hockey Day attracts big crowd Kelly Johnson The Observer Arcola Prairie Place was a busy spot on Saturday, Jan. 11 hosting the community’s Minor Hockey Day. First on the ice was the Initiation game between the Arcola/Kisbey Jr. Comines hosting the Carlyle Clay; MVP

for Carlyle was Keegan Morson and for A/K was Rory Gibson. The following Novice game seen A/K Combines play the Estevan Oilers, with Braydon Henry taking the MVP for the Estevan squad and Caycen Wyatt for the host A/K team. Hitting the ice next

New Faces in the Cougar Line-up Landon Audet

Goal Tender Jersey Number: 39

was the A/K Combines Atoms taking on the Kipling Royals, A/K MVP was Taylen Trobert and Royals Kamryn Kish. The Pee Wee matchup faced off next, also against the Kipling Royals. This game A/K player Hayden McIntosh received MVP for the home A/K Combines and Alex Reid took the MVP for the Royals. Whitebear Cubs were next, squaring off with Arcola-Kisbey/ Lampman Imperial Combines in the Bantam contest. Drayden McArthur was MVP for the Cubs and Ethen Lees was MVP for the host team. The final tilt of the day was the Midget Redvers White bringing it against the A/K Lampman Imperial Combines Mdgets, played in front of a large crowd that had amassed over the day. MVP honours went to Kate Pirlot for the Whites and Jaron Johnston for the A-K/L Imperial Combines. Winning the PS4 raffle was Sadie Grimes and the 50/50 went to Tobie Herion pocketing $965.

Photo by Kelly Johnson

Arcola Prairie Place was a busy spot Saturday, Jan. 11 hosting the town’s Minor Hockey Day. Kate Pirlot was MVP for the visiting Redvers Whites in the Midget game. (See more photos on page 12)

Cougars have weekend break Nicole Currie Sports Contributor The Cougars had

Thank you to all our tournament sponsors from the Initiation

Cougars and Carlyle Minor Hockey!

the weekend off and are looking forward to their last three games of the

Exercise Your Brain. READ THE NEWSPAPER Studies show that reading keeps the mind sharp. Give your brain a boost! Subscribe to the newspaper and expand your mind with a world of information.

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observer@sasktel.net | (306) 453-2525

• Carlyle Auto Parts • Michael’s Coffee Shop & Bakery • Food World • Western Star • Merit Ford • Kings • Rons Work Wear • Pharmasave • Mavi Wealth Management

• The Office Bar and Grill • Affinity Credit Union • Home Hardware • GM Construction • Regal Auto Body • Sew and Sews • Performance Realty • Prairie Dog Drive In • Carlyle Bakery

• • • • • • • • • •

The Observer Ramada Crescent Point Salon 206 Integrity Maintenance Spectrum Resources RBC Dairy Queen Nicolay Plumbing Wayne and Tannis Wilson

COUGARS UPCOMING GAMES FRIDAY, JAN. 17

at

SATURDAY, JAN. 25

FRIDAY, JAN. 31

at JAN. 17TH IS LAST NIGHT TO QUALIFY FOR THE PHARMASAVE CHANCE TO WIN!

at

season. Friday, Jan. 17th, they will be hosting the Yellow Grass Wheat Kings. This will also be the last night to qualify for the Pharmasave $25,000 Chance To Win. Saturday, the 25th, the Cougars head a few miles down the road to play the Combines. The last game of the regular season will be on Jan. 31st, when they host the Wawota Flyers. This should be an action packed night. The Pharmasave $25,000 Chance To Win will happen that night. Salon 206, PureChem and Little Hawk, have all guaranteed a $1,000 50/50. There will also be the regular prize of an Office Bar and Grill Pizza and an oil change from Merit Ford. We will see you at the rink.

JAN. 31ST IS FINAL LEAGUE GAME AND PHARMASAVE CHANCE TO WIN

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Follow the Cougars on


Friday, January 17, 2020

11

THE OBSERVER

Novice Cougars (Chris) dominate in weekend games on the road Nathan Coffey Sports Contributor The Novice Cougars (Chris) took their act on the road the weekend of Jan. 11 and 12 and cruised down the 48 Highway to play the two respective Wawota teams. When the dust settled the boys had two more wins (16-6 Saturday and 28-1 Sunday), and possibly an upset caretaker at the Wawota Forum, because the boys led by the Fab 4 shot out every last light in the building, figuratively speaking of course. GAME 1 (SAT., JAN. 11) 16-6 W This was a tough game to predict with it being the first road trip of the regular season and some minor coaching changes. Coaches Chris and Joey had to step away from the team (Not controversial, just prior engagements), which gave coach Jeff the reins, and an interim assistant coach and one lucky sports contributor Nathan a chance to watch the magic from ice level. Nathan has since retired from coaching on top and undefeated. The boys didn’t skip a beat jumping on the score sheet early and often, with Hayden “Hands and Hair” Puskas leading the surge and I’m sure getting a scoring chance for each and every inch of lettuce hanging out the back of his lid, and potting the majority of them. The Cougars got into a bit of penalty trouble in the second half of the game with Owen “Top Cheese” Light going off for elbowing and “Hands and Hair”

Puskas serving 2 for tripping, But the team stayed steady and killed off both and even managed to score a shorty. The rink was cold at ice level but the boys played with the fire and intensity of 1,000 suns, and finished the game with the warmth of a win in their bellies. GAME 2 (SAT., JAN. 12) 28-1 W Sunday’s game was a bit lopsided with the boys cruising to a 28-1 win. The boys showed some great sportsmanship and Wawota played right to the final buzzer showing some real heart. This was a great team win in all aspects. Quality shots, precision passing, and countless shot blocks to name just a few. The “Brickwall” Brown didn’t see a ton of action, but stopped all but one shot that was sent his way. Early in the second a crisp pass from Reed “The Rifle” Coffey to “Hands and Hair” Puskas leading to a goal finally got “The Rifle” into the points column with his first point of the campaign. I figured in this Sunday matinee game I’d see the boys Stop Drop and Roll, because they were on fire. It was a great weekend of hockey and the boys can go into this week of practice with a 3-0 record. And on behalf of the team I’d like to send a special shout out to all the hockey mom and grandmas for all you do, you are all a very special part of this team and this season wouldn’t be possible without you. Happy Hockey Mom’s Day.

Novice Cougars (Scott) start league play on winning notes Melissa Dixon Sports Contributor Just like a caterpillar emerges from its cocoon as a butterfly, so has this wonderful little team. Since the start of the season in November, this small group of 9, along with their coaches, came together to learn a new format of Novice hockey. We started the season off with half ice hockey and only exhibition games. Definitely not what this veteran hockey mom is used to (haha). But we strapped on the equipment, laced up the skates and away we went, not knowing what exactly to expect of the season. The first exhibition game of the season seemed to take forever to get here for the kids, since we are used to games right off the hop. But game day arrived, smiles beamed and excitement ensued. They won their very first game of the season, and let me tell you, they were pumped! And the wins didn’t stop there, we had quite a few in the first half with the odd loss, but hey, those just build character and create teaching moments. January brought the start of league games, with a major switch from the first half of the season. These kids that worked so hard on their stick handling and skating around more obstacles on that smaller ice surface for the first two months, now get

to play full ice hockey again. Off sides and all! And guess what, all that hard work these little guys and their coaches put in has definitely paid off. Game 1 was played on Jan. 4 against Estevan, with a win of 11-7 and Sunday Jan. 5 brought us back home to play Wawota, to end the weekend with another win of 13-2. This past weekend we took to a tournament in Oxbow leaving with a tie, loss and a win so overall not bad on a bitter cold weekend. I look forward to seeing these wonder kids continue doing what they love and enjoying every minute of it. And I hope to see you all come join us this upcoming weekend, Saturday, Jan. 18, for Carlyle Minor Hockey Days to catch our Novice kids play at 10:30. Bring your bells and horns and pack for a full day of Carlyle hockey. After that we have two away games and then you can catch us back on home ice, Saturday, Feb. 8 at 10:30 vs Wawota.

Donation to Sutherland Cemetery

Photo submitted

Jack Wilson (right), representing the Bear Claw Community Development Corp., presents a cheque to Wayne Wilson on behalf of the Sutherland Cemetery. The donation will go towards upgrades to the Cemetery.

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OBSERVED AT Photos by Kelly Johnson

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13

DRILLING REPORT

Friday, January 17, 2020

Wawota News Submitted by Myrna Olson

At the 2019 Canadian Winter Agribition, Tom Dorrance was presented with an award by the Canadian Hereford Association in recognition of registering Purebred Herefords for 75 years. The Tom Dorrance family celebrated Christmas with all of the family home the week before Christmas. Grandson Tyren Dorrance was home from Toft, California where he is attending College and has qualified to play on their baseball team. Jordan Dorrance won the champion show

person award in the Intermediate Youth Division at the Canadian Western Agribition . Brett Westphal from Wrentham, AB visited with his parents, Clarence and Carol Westphal during the Christmas holidays. Saundra Corkish travelled to Regina on Dec. 22 and the following day she flew to Calgary. She spent Christmas with granddaughter Robynn and Ryan and grandson Chad, her brother Harold and family and Pat and Kellie Corkish who came from Athabasca. On Dec

30th Saundra flew back to Regina then drove to Munster where she visited with the Hinz’s. She arrived home on Jan. 6 after a very enjoyable holiday. Devin and Michelle Klein enjoyed several holidaying in Mayan Riviera, Mexico during the Christmas holidays. Visiting over the holidays with Denis and Norma Lamontagne were Dennis and Lea Kushner, Swift Current, Michele and Mike Taillon, Sam and Jake, Calgary, Rennee and Emett, Canmore and Paul Lamontagne and family.

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Choose LOCAL information as their main reason for reading (editorial,news, sports, entertainment, events)

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Source: News Media Canada

REDVERS UNITED-LUTHERAN SHARED MINISTRY Knox United Church - Redvers Dannevirke Lutheran Church - Redvers Pastor Marja Hordern

LUTHERAN SERVICES FOR THE MONTH OF JANUARY (EVERY SUNDAY)

at Dannevirke United Church Redvers, SK *** Every Sunday at 10:00 a.m.

Our Lady of Fatima Roman Catholic Church Rev. Father Ronald M. Andree Alternate Storthoaks & Bellegarde Saturday.......7:30 pm Sunday.......9:00 a.m. Redvers - Sunday.................10:45 a.m. Anglican Church of Canada Contact Rev. Michelle Moore, (306)577-9704 St. Margaret’s - Manor (Knox United Church)

11:30 a.m. Worship

Worship Experiences Redvers

Every Sunday at 10:45 a.m. Pastor Couple Rev. Matthew and Michelle Redstone 306-453-2781 63 Broadway Street Redvers

Roman Catholic Oxbow/Cantal/ Carnduff/Carlyle Rev. Father Melchor Somonte Oxbow St. Joseph’s - 9:00 a.m. Cantal St. Raphael’s Saturday- 7:00 p.m. Carnduff St. Jude - 11:00 a.m.

Rev. Father Yodel Cereno

Carlyle Church of Our Lady 11:00 a.m.

Crystal Yanyu and family, Zane, Tariah and Gregory have moved back to to Kenosee

Lake. They were renting the David Drumm house. We wish them well in their new sur-

roundings. Thanks to all for their help with the news this past week.

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BUSINESS DIRECTORY

Friday, January 17, 2020

BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY The Observer • (306) 453-2525 • Deadlines are Mondays at 3 p.m. (may change due to holidays)

CONTRACTORS & SUPPLIERS

PIONEER Plumbing & Heating • Residential • Farm • Commercial

* Saskatchewan Gas Contractor

Contact 306-577-8633

“Jean’s Painting” (Nicholson’s)

CARLYLE, SASK.

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING EPOXY FLOORING & TEXTURING

FREE ESTIMATES

306-575-8060 • Cell 306-577-7982 BRIAN | JEANNIE

Residential & Commercial Construction

Plumbing & Heating Ltd.

For your residential, commercial and service needs. 712 Lalonde St. Whitewood, SK After Hours Call 306-853-7227 Shop: 735-HEAT (Fax: 735-4329) ÀDWODQGSOXPELQJ#KRWPDLOFD

Nicolay Plumbing & Heating

Phone: 306-961-4118 • Kenosee Lake

KEEP THEM

Rolling

306-455-2292 Automotive-Diesel-SGI Safeties

Jean Drapeau Colin Pottie (cell) 421-4115 (cell) 485-6344 Owner Owner keepthemrolling.sk@gmail.com #7 Industrial Drive Arcola, Saskatchewan Follow us on @keepthemrolling

Rock Nicolay Owner Journeyman Phone: (306) 453-6060

ELECTRICIANS

MISC. SERVICES

’s n a m p a h C

* Residential Wiring * Industrial Wiring * Commercial Wiring * Oilfield Services

ELECTRIC Residential, Commercial & Oilfield Electrical Contracting • Furnace Repair • Air Conditioning • Trenching • Line Locating • Water Pumps

Jamie Chapman

577-8630

TOWING SERVICES

MARK’S TOWING 306.575.7237

• Big Rig Towing • 24 Hour Service • Unlock Service • Boosting • Deck and Wheel Lift Service • Free Scrap and Vehicle Removal

GOVERNMENT Dan D’Autremont, MLA Cannington Office: Box 130 Alida, Sask. S0C 0B0 Alida Phone 443-2420 • Fax: 443-2269 Office Hours: Monday - Friday 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Five Journeyman Electricians on staff to serve your needs! Fast, Friendly Service with Quality Workmanship

BOOKKEEPING Colpitts Agencies Ltd. Bookkeeping & Accounting Services Payroll Services Specialize in Quickbooks Prepare & e-file Personal & Corporate Tax Returns Please contact Sheila Colpitts Phone: (306)453-4560 Email: colpitts.agencies@sasktel.net 103-202 Main St. Carlyle

Manor SK, Box 7, S0C 1R0

FUNERAL SERVICES Orsted Funeral Home

302 Railway Ave. Carlyle, SK Ph: 453-2400 Fax: 453-2401 For all your granite memorials, bronze memorials and cemetery lettering needs.

*Special Pricing

453-6297 • Carlyle, SK

*All Custom Designs

Ofce Hours: 9 a.m.- 12 p.m. 1 p.m.- 3 p.m. Monday-Friday

Find Your Spot In The Business Directory! Call The Observer at (306) 453-2525 for more info

THIS SPOT COULD BE YOURS!


Friday, January 17, 2020

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

15


16

CLASSIFIEDS

Friday, January 17, 2020

OBSERVER CLASSIFIEDS THE

Heart of the Moose Mountains

PLACING AN AD BY PHONE: 306-453-2525 BY FAX: 306-453-2938 In Person or By Mail: The Carlyle Observer Box 160, 132 Main Street Carlyle, SK S0C 0R0

Announcements POWER ENGINEERS! - Steam Smart has posted new exam preparation courses for people working on their next steam ticket. 2A1, 2A2, 3B2. www.SteamSmart.ca.

$700 per week - up to 20 words Pay for 3 weeks - 4th week is FREE Additional Words - 14c /word per week Office Hours: Open 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Display Classified - $800 per col. inch Guaranteed Classified - $2699 up to 52 weeks (some restrictions apply) Monday to Thursday Closed thru lunch *All classified ads must be prepaid by cash, cheque or VISA/MC.* Friday: 9:00 a.m. to 12 noon

Auctions

Need An Auction Sale?

• We offer Complete Auction Services • We Do All Kinds of Sales • Call for Complete Consultation

Key “M”

Auction Services vices

A.L. #304543 3 ope SK Box 10 • Wauchope S0C 2P0 Auctioneer ~ Dellan Mohrbutter Phone 306-452-3815 Fax 306-452-3733 Website: keymauction.com

Found Is this a credible SOURCE?

AD DEADLINES 3:00 P.M. MONDAY Ads must be received in our office by AD RATES

Livestock

Meeting Place

SALE Diamond M Ranch 9th Annual Bull Sale, Sunday, February 9,At the ranch West of Estevan, SK. Selling 60 coming two year old Simmental & Simm/Angus bulls, as well as 85 purebred bred females & 15 purebred open heifers. All bulls are semen tested and guaranteed. For more information or a catalogue contact Jordan Mantei (306) 421-1915 or T Bar C Cattle Co. (306) 220-5006. View the catalogue online at www.BuyAgro.com. Watch and bid online at www.DLMS.ca (PL#116061)

P O T

Auctions 20014MM2

Notices / Nominations

Notices / Nominations

Land For Sale

For Sale - Misc Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement, and the Saskatchewan Weekly Newspaper Association and membership do not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements. For greater information on advertising conditions, please consult the Association’s Blanket Advertising Conditions on our website at www.swna.com.

S

Auctions

Feed & Seed

PROVINCE-WIDE CLASSIFIEDS. Reach over 550,000 readers weekly. Call this newspaper NOW or 306649.1405 for details.

Don’t believe everything you see. SPOTfakenews.ca

Lost

Wanted COYOTES FOR CASH! Unskinned up to $100; Skinned & Frozen up to $150. #1 Canadian Market. Call Bruce Beasley 403-501-4416

Integrity Post Frame Buildings

SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY

SINCE 2008

WANTED: JOHN DEERE SQUARE BALERS Can be for parts or needing repair. Models 336/337/338/ 346/347/348. 306-946-9669

Built with Concrete Posts Barns, Shops, Riding Arenas, Machine Sheds and More sales@ Integritybuilt.com 1-866-974-7678 www. integritybuilt.com

Upcoming Events

April 20th to 24th - Redvers and District Music Festival 2020. Entry Deadline is February 3rd, 2020. Contact Carroll Dyck for more information: redversmusicfestival@gmail.com 35-3

Health Services

HIP/KNEE Replacement? Other medical conditions causing TROUBLE WALKING or DRESSING? The Disability Tax Credit allows for $2,500 yearly tax credit and $20,000 Lump sum refund.

Take advantage of this offer. Apply NOW; quickest refund Nationwide!

Expert Help:

1-844-453-5372

PRIME Advertising Call: TheObserver 306-453-2525

SHOP LOCAL Notices / Nominations

Notices / Nominations


17

THE OBSERVER

Friday, January 17, 2020

Alida News Submitted by Edel Cowan

I received word that Helen Swayze had passed away on Dec. 29 in Regina. Helen had become a teacher and taught school in a few country schools in the Alida area and later she also taught in Alida School (late 1970s-early 80s). She moved to Maryfield, superannuated in 1984 then moved to Regina to be near her family. Helen was predeceased by her husband Albert (1995), parents, George and Angela Wiszniak (Redvers), brothers, Joe and Fred Wisznick, two sisters, and a great-granddaughter. She is survived by her children – Dennis (Jan), Lori (Laurier) Donais and Norman, nine grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren, brother, Mike (Ann) Wisznick, sisters-in-law Helen and Joanne Wisznick, as well as numerous other extended family and friends. A funeral mass was held Jan. 3 at the R.C. Church in Balgonie. The Alida community extends condolences to all family members. Bob Harrison has returned home after spending some time visiting with his family – daughter BettyJo and Aaron DeJong and family at Lashburn and also with daughter Bobbi-Jo Morrow and her family as well as with son Clayton and Amy Harrison and family at Sylvan Lake, AB. Word was also received that Marlyn Simons of Nipawin, SK passed away Jan. 6. He will missed by his wife Lorraine (Charles), his five children Terry (Rod) Cranch, Tammy, Tracy (Dick Dabek), Michael (Carmen McCleary), Tanis (Leslie Dabek) and 11 grandchildren, as well as his in-laws from Alida Patty Charles and Bob Harrison and their families. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Condolences are extended to all family members from the Alida community. Tim, Shelly and Ainsley Cowan spent the weekend (Jan. 11-13) in Minot visiting with the Nilsen family. They returned home on Monday after Ainsley’s dental appointment.

We didn’t make it into the rink on Friday night to join in with those who gather for some camaraderie-ship, a game or two of cribbage, or a scrimmage game of curling, or just throwing rocks, or one could also go skating for exercise, or maybe even have a scrimmage game of hockey – doing whatever your heart desires. It’s a great way to spend an evening out among friends, as the doors are open every Friday evening. However I understand that only one person made it to the rink, guess the weatherman wouldn’t co-operate so people stayed home and kept warm. Maybe we will see you there some other time. It will be busy at Alida rink over this coming weekend at it Alida’s own Winter Games – a fun-filled weekend with hockey tournaments, curling games, fund-raising auctions and a delicious supper. Hope to see you there sometime. Hubby spent his Saturday (Jan. 11) in the basement on his Ham Radio – another contest (North American QSO Party) to keep him entertained and busy. So I was able to enjoy the Continental Cup Curling on the TV without him coming to do add his usual commentating to bug me – Hooray! However the curling did not end up the way I was hoping for. The European curlers were really on the ball and showed Canada how the game should be played. The event ended up on Sunday with the teams playing skin games. Europe came out on top with over the winning 31.5 points while Canada got around 16.5 points, thus resulting in Europe winning the cup for the second year. The next curling event to be televised is the Canadian Juniors semi-finals and finals games on Jan. 25 and 26 – happy watching. It was Breakfast at the Rink again on Jan. 12 which had Kitchen Group # 3 in charge and they served up a total of 50 breakfasts – Way to go guys and gals, another successful morning and a job well done. It’s just great to see so many familiar faces

Maryfield Villa News

coming back each week and enjoying their breakfast. Next week it’s Kitchen Group # 4 at the helm – will they beat or match the Breakfast Challenge total of 60 – that is the question? Only time will tell – see you at the rink. Please remember folks to keep me posted whenever you have news – simply contact me anytime on the happenings that are going on in and around Alida as well as within your family circle, either call me (306-443-2496) or text (306-485-8561) or e-mail (g.cowan@sasktel.net). I will see that your news gets into a paper. I do appreciate all your input as it does help keep this column interesting. Until next time – keep smiling – think positive – drive safely and take care.

SRI HOMES’ Estevan Facility SHELTER HOME SYSTEMS is currently accepting applications for

PRODUCTION WORKERS • Required Immediately

Duties include:

• Assembling and installing modular components Send, fax, e-mail or drop off resume to:

H

OBSERVER THE

For all your printing and paper needs PHONE

Letterheads Business Cards Posters Envelopes Statements Invoices

(306) 453-2525 ONE CALL FOR ALL YOUR OIL FIELD NEEDS

son, Larry and Marion Husband, visited Irene and Mildred. Joe and Shirley Blaise, Donald Baker, and Beverley and Francis Sheard were our dinner guests New Year’s Day. Francis keeps our bird feeders full. On a serious note, I received a singalong to Christmas Carol tunes from Museum of Science in Philadelphia. Climate change is coming to town. Today’s news: fires in Australia! We shut off the TV. All we can do is pray, not a good start to the decade.

E

S

Box 845 #200 Hwy. 18 West, Estevan, SK S4A 2A7 Fax: 306-634-7597 jobs.shelter@gmail.com www.shelterhomes.ca

Employment Opportunity Rink Janitor/Maintenance Position Permanent Seasonal Part-Time Employment to commence immediately and ending approximately two (2) weeks following rink closure.

For the R.M. of Browning & Town of Lampman Recreation Board ****** Weekend Work Required ****** Duties include: • Cleaning of the rink facilities including, but not limited to: * Lobby * Dressing rooms FOR ALL YOUR * Washrooms * Kitchen * Curling rink area * Hockey rink area • And all other duties as directed by the Recreation Board & Recreation Director

ONE CALL FIELD NEEDS Announcement cards OIL Carbonless forms Place mats Fax sheets Raffle tickets Dance tickets Brochures

Is hiring 6 permanent, full time

Gift certificates Send Resumes to: Lampman Recreation Board, Labels Box 40, Lampman, SK, SOC 1 NO Or email: lampmanrecreation@sasktel.net Purchase orders 306-463-1454 Or drop off at: Lampman Recreation Office at 215 Main St. Bills of lading Lampman, SK For further information contact: Brittany Fox (Recreation Director) Fair books at 306-487-2264. Deadline to Apply: Friday, January 31, 2020

306-463-6337

with 1 year minimum exp.

Good To Go Trucking is a private oilfield service company that has been in business for 29 years and is based out of Kindersley, SK.

At Good To Go Trucking, our focus is our employees!

We endeavor to create a working environment based on safety, respect, common sense and a desire to provide excellent service to our clients.

306-463-6337

Skills & Abilities:

Is hiring 6 permanent, full time

OILFIELD FLUID OPERATORS (Water & KCL)

WINCH TRACTOR and CRADLE OPERATORS

306-463-1454

M

SHELTER

Submitted by Janet Mark Thank you to Judy Moore for the lovely Nativity figurines on the piano. They, and the painting of loons in the dining room are in memory of her mother, Lillian Goldsmith, past chairperson of the Villa residents. There was dancing on New Year’s Eve, when Garry Dixon and Keith Olson played saxophone and accordian. Fred Krukoff and Ray Swanton had no shortage of partners. We were happy to see Ruth Holmstrom looking so well, come to visit old friends. Sherry Wil-

O

Kindersley. Saskatchewan 306-463-5898

with 1 year minimum exp.

Ability to pull Quad Trailers & Super B’s an asset, but not mandatory.

Kindersley, At GPE Saskatchewan Fluids Management, our focus is our employees! WeCELEBRATING endeavor to create a working 28 environment YEARSbased on safety, respect, common sense and a desire to provide excellent service to our clients. IN KINDERSLEY! Skills & Abilities:

• Must be diligent with logs • Must possess a clean abstract and valid Class 1A license • Oilfield tickets an asset, but will train • Must be able to work independently • Must be able to perform basic maintenance on power units and cradles • Must be diligent with logs • Must be in good physical condition

• Must possess clean abstract and valid Class 1A license • Must be able to work without supervision • Good physical condition • Must be able to perform basic maintenance on power units and trailers • Must be diligent with logs Oilfield tickets an asset, but will train

Benefits:

• Health & dental • Short term & long term disability • Company matched savings plan • Competitive wages • Family environment • Lodging Available

306-463-5898

• Health & dental • Short term & long term disability • Company matched savings plan • Competitive wagesSaskatchewan • Family environment • Lodging Available Kindersley,

Wage/Salary to be negotiated. CELEBRATING 28 YEARS Apply to: carthurs@gtgt.ca IN KINDERSLEY! Fax: 306-463-2814

Benefits:

Wage/Salary to be negotiated. Apply to: operations@gpefluids.ca Fax: 306-463-2814


18

THE OBSERVER

Friday, January 17, 2020

SALE ON NOW TRAVEL GIFT CARD

Receive a

2,000 Travel Gift Card

$

with every lease or finance purchase

Offer valid until January 31, 2020

GREAT SELECTION OF 2020’S ARE ARRIVING EACH WEEK & A GREAT ALL MAKE PREOWNED SELECTION 2008 FORD EDGE SEL

2019 RAM 2500 TRADESMAN

2019 GRAND CHEROKEE LTD

CUMMINS DIESEL POWER

FULLY LOADED

MD774547A

WD706364

FULLY LOADED ALL WHEEL DRIVE, SPORT ALUMINUM WHEELS, HITCH RECEIVER, DUAL EXHAUST, POWER SEAT, DUAL ZONE TEMPERATURE CONTROL

NOTHING BEATS A JEEP!

19-122

TOW HOOKS, CHROME APPEARANCE GROUP, VINYL FLOOR, TRAILER BRAKE CONTROL, CHROME WHEEL TO WHEEL STEPS, CLEARANCE LAMPS

ON SALE NOW!!

STARTING FROM $229/WEEKLY OAC

2018 RAM 1500 LIMITED

2015 HONDA CIVIC TOURING

VENTED HEATED AND COOLED LEATHER SEATS, BLIND-SPOT / REAR CROSS-PATH DETECTION, 8.4” TOUCH SCREEN STEREO WITH NAVIGATION

2019 RAM 1500 BIG HORN

2017 GMC YUKON DENALI

GREAT VALUE $139/WEEKLY OAC

SUNSHINE SALE $229/WEEKLY OAC

MOST POPULAR PACKAGE

WD674188A

TINTED WINDOWS, STEERING WHEEL MOUNTED CONTROLS, HEATED LEATHER SEATS, BACKUP CAMERA, SUNROOF, ALUMINUM SPORT WHEELS

GREAT VALUE $115/WEEKLY OAC

2019 RAM 1500 SPORT

2020 CHEROKEE TRAILHAWK ELITE

IC205752A

19-41

EXCELLENT FUEL ECONOMY

MD158754A

GREAT VALUE $187/WEEKLY OAC

19-08

NAVIGATION, HEATED LEATHER SEATS, TRAILER TOW GROUP, V6 ENGINE, MEMORY SEATS, POWER SUNROOF, HEATED REAR SEATS

ALL OPTIONS

20” CHROME WHEELS, SPRAY-IN BOX LINER, COLOR MATCHED RUNNING BOARDS, HEATED VENTILATED & COOLED LEATHER SEATS

2019 RAM 1500 CREW CAB

LED LIGHT PACKAGE, 20” CHROME WHEELS, HEATED SEAT AND STEERING WHEEL, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, POWER SEAT, REMOTE START

SUNSHINE SALE $199/WEEKLY OAC

2018 WRANGLER UNLIMITED

AMAZING CONDITION FRONT AND REAR PARK SENSORS, SUNROOF LEATHER SEATS, 7 PASSENGER, REAR BACK-UP CAMERA, WIRELESS CELL PHONE CHARGING,

STARTING FROM $255/WEEKLY OAC

2020 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO BEST VALUE JEEP

AWESOME COLOUR

BB843808

19-85

20-20

HANDS-FREE POWER LIFTGATE

COMMAND VIEW DUAL-PANE PANORAMIC SUNROOF, HEATED NAPPA LEATHER-FACED SEATS, 8.4” TOUCH SCREEN STEREO WITH NAVIGATION

8.4” TOUCHSCREEN STEREO, PARK-SENSE FRONT AND REAR PARK ASSIST, RAIN-SENSING WINDSHIELD WIPERS, ANTI-SPIN DIFFERENTIAL

SUNSHINE SALE $155/WEEKLY OAC

STARTING FROM $189/WEEKLY OAC

2018 RAM 2500 LARAMIE

2019 RAM 1500 EXPRESS

COLOR MATCHED FREEDOM TOP HARD TOP, SIDE STEPS, FOG LIGHTS, UCONNECT, HEATED SEATS, NAVIGATION TOUCH SCREEN STEREO

SUNSHINE SALE $185/WEEKLY OAC

2019 DODGE DURANGO GT

2019 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN

BEST MIDSIZED SUV

19-160

GREAT CONDITION, FULLY LOADED, RAMBOXES, HEATED LEATHER SEATS, CUMMINS DIESEL ENGINE, WHEEL TO WHEEL STEPS

SUNSHINE SALE $289/WEEKLY OAC

9 ALPINE SPEAKERS, POWER SUNROOF, TRAILER TOW GROUP, PREMIUM LIGHT GROUP, BLACK OUT PACKAGE, LED FOG LAMPS

GREAT VALUE $169/WEEKLY OAC

ONE OWNER

MD571789A

20-15

SAHARA EDITION

19-179

19-112

CLASSIC SPORT APPEARANCE

SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, LED BED LIGHTING, TRAILER BRAKE CONTROL, SPORT PERFORMANCE HOOD, BLACKED OUT ACCENTS

STARTING FROM $169/WEEKLY OAC

TRAILER TOW GROUP, 2ND ROW FOLD & TUMBLE CAPTAIN CHAIRS, POWER SUNROOF, 8.4” TOUCH SCREEN STEREO DISPLAY WITH NAVIGATION

GREAT VALUE $189/WEEKLY OAC

CANADA VALUE PACKAGE

7 PASSENGER, FRONT DUAL-ZONE TEMPERATURE CONTROL, OUTSIDE TEMPERATURE DISPLAY, PARKVIEW REAR BACK-UP CAMERA

STARTING FROM $119/WEEKLY OAC

HIGHWAY #8, MOOSOMIN, SK

306-435-1737 YOUR BUSINESS IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT TO OUR TEAM. ALLOW US TO PROVIDE YOU WITH GREAT CUSTOMER SERVICE!

CODY

CHARLOTTE

CORINNE

KEVIN


Friday, January 17, 2020

19

THE OBSERVER

Manor Fire Department fundraiser blazes record participation Kelly Johnson The Observer Manor Fire Department’s “Chase the Ace’ fundraiser is well supported, setting new records for weekly participation. On Friday, Jan.

10 the jackpot grew to $5,535.00 and paid out $363.00 to Tim Englot who was not in attendance. His proxy, Haley Chapman drew the “King of Hearts”. Had the “Ace of Spades” been pulled it would have netted the

winner $5,898.00. The next draw goes on Friday, Jan. 17 and tickets must be purchased prior to 7 p.m. on that date. All the action takes place at The King George Tavern located in downtown Manor.

Photo by Kelly Johnson

THE

Bill Shiels has the ticket stubs loaded and Korrin Riddell pulls the night’s lucky winner.

1

REASON FOR

# READING

Photo by Kelly Johnson

Proxy Haley Chapman (right) picks a card for Tim Englot for a chance of winning $5,898.00, as Craig Savill and Lucille Dunn look on.

PRINTED COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

IS LOCAL

NEWS

Source: News Media Canada

Photo by Kelly Johnson

Darcy McCrimmon and Craig Savill display the tally for next week’s draw. 20013JJ0


20

THE OBSERVER

Friday, January 17, 2020

Hats off to the Town of Carlyle crew A huge thank you and shout out to the employees and council of the town of Carlyle from all your local retail outlets. You do such an amazing job. Even when it is -46C with the windchill outside. We come to our businesses and Main Street has been totally cleared of all the snow that recently fell. Our customers can walk on the sidewalks, drive and park on the streets in confidence and safety, knowing that the sidewalks, street and the parking have been cleared of snow. You all rock and you help make our town a place where people want to come and shop.

Photo submitted

BIG THE

Tuesdays, Wednesdays & Thursdays

in January

ONE CONTINUES

SAVE UP TO

70

%

THIS SPOT COULD BE YOURS!

Grand Prize Competition: January 30

Runner Up:

500 Cabela’s Gift Card & $500 CASH

$

STOREWIDE

CARLYLE

Qualifying Draws: January 9, 16, 23 & 30 at 8:00PM

3rd Place:

500 Cabela’s Gift Card & $250 CASH

$

Bear Claw Casino (306) 577-4577 Growlers Restaurant (306) 577-4258 Bear Claw Hotel 1-877-909-2327 Highway 9, White Bear First Nation North of Carlyle, SK www.BearClawCasino.ca

CARLYLE / ESTEVAN ¼ PAGE - 4.854” x 8”

GET YOUR BUSINESS NOTICED CALL SEAN AT 453-2525 to find out how to advertise your business here! Some conditions do apply. Call for more information.

ADVERTISING DEADLINE IS MONDAY AT 3 P.M. SHARP

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