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the FASHION ISSUE 2017

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PUBLISHER AND FOUNDING EDITOR

JANETTE N. BRIN NYC FASHION & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

R. ANTHONY MORRISON BEAUTY EDITOR (S)

BR ANDY GOMEZ-DUPLESSIS DONELLA K. DIAS FASHION & LIFESTYLE EDITOR

MICHAEL ALIMO CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

SHERINA RUSSELL-GARCIA EDITH WEBBER SEAN ROSE CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

RICKI RICHARDSON SHERWYN “TERR ANCE” WILLIAMS KEVON RICHARDSON ART DESIGN & LAYOUT

CARMEN VIRGINIA GRISOLÍA MARKETING & DISTRIBUTION

J MARKETING GROUP www.jmktgroup.com

f Join the conversation on Facebook. Leave your comments at caribbeanposh.com

l Follow us on twitter @caribbeanposh

YUMI KATSURA AT THE 9TH ANNUAL SUMMER SIZZLE BVI

Share all your POSH moments in real time. ON THE COVER

YVETTE NOEL-SCHURE MUA: AKINOLA SKELTON DRESS: FROM YVETTE'S PERSONAL WARDROBE PHOTOGRAPHER: RICKI RICHARDSON

POSH Fashion Issue VOLUME 7 ISSUE 2


4 Editor’s Page 8 POSHgirl Pick

POSH FASHION 9 Raquel Leid 10 Bay Roc 12 Corinne Basabe 13 Island Bags 14 Akeem Stanley 16 Mamayashi 18 Power of Prints 20 African Inspiration in the Caribbean Fashion Industry 21 SKN Fashion 25 TVISUAL + The Cloth 26 WOW! Highlights from the 9th Annual Summer Sizzle

POSH BEAUTY 38 Beauty Editor’s Favorite Summer Lips: Lookbook 40 Makeup Tips for Photographers 42 New Summer Scents 43 Tropical Foundations 44 Discover a Fresh Glow

POSH FEATURES 46 Tricia Campbell 50 Conversation with Yvette Noel-Schure 54 Khalia 100 55 Lisa Viola

POSH LIFESTYLE 57 Christina Nicola: The Art of Making Melanin 58 Caribbean Rum & Beer Festival 60 Record Score for BVI Tourism 62 Andre “GC” Fennell 63 Estelle + Tarrus Riley “ Love Like Ours” 64 Mista Savona Presents: Havana Meets Kingston 65 Third World 66 VP Record Picks


CARIBBEAN POSH

Janette N. Brin Publisher and Founding Editor Photographed by Kevon Richardson Location: Tortola, BVI

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IRMA & MARIA So, we thought we were used to hurricanes. Just days before, you would think we were simply planning a family get together. We were all at my grandparents’ house, where I grew up, and of course we are cooking, watching movies, and just having a good ‘ole time. My sister, brother-in-law, my two nephews, and their god mother just chilling downstairs as the grandparents relaxed upstairs. You see my grandparents’ house has a generator so when the expected loss of power occurs – we are good. We weren’t the only ones not overly concerned by Irma. Caribbean people know about hurricanes or so we thought. Our understanding of hurricanes changed on that faithful September afternoon when Irma approached the Virgin Islands after leaving mass destruction in her wake on Barbuda, Anguilla, St. Martin and other of the islands. I believe it was just after midday the text message came across my phone, “Road Town to get direct hit 185mph winds very soon. Stay indoors. Secure Now!” We still had phone service during part one of the storm. I was chatting with my son who is away at college, and my mom who was toughing it out in St. Croix. I even took time out to provide an interview with WBAL in Baltimore. As the eye of the hurricane approached and the winds calmed – the sun even shined brightly – we went upstairs to check on our grandparents. It was also an opportunity to access any damage. By this time we just saw a number of broken trees and one house on the hill was starting to lose a bit of its roof. We saw the M/V Mayflower drifting across the harbor. We would later see Irma’s final resting place for her on the rocks adjacent to the Road Town Ferry Terminal. OMG when part 2 of the hurricane approached! It was evident the winds were different. Within minutes we no longer felt safe in the living room as we saw the hurricane grade window start to pull in and out like a balloon. Windows although locked shut were being forced open and closed. Water and leaves starting flying into the house. The howling of the wind was causing a disturbing whistle in our ears. We ran into what turned out to be the safest room given its location in center-back of the house. Three doors had blown out – one of them hitting my brother-in-law smack in the corner of his left eye. As blood flowed down his face he was running around trying to secure as many valuables as he could into our safe room. Water also started gushing through the house and adrenalin must have kicked in as he then proceeded to nail the door back shut. The other two doors he had previously nailed shut on in the earlier part of the storm.

In the end we were fortunate not only to be alive but to just have a few broken windows and the roof gone. As we would soon learn, many were not as fortunate. Irma proved herself historic – a hurricane like no other. Of the things tossed around like toys were cars, catamaran sail boats, and galvanize. There was no one that wasn’t affected. Who didn’t lose their roof, lost their entire house. Some, sadly, even lost their lives. That night following Irma, we stayed up cleaning the house – pushing out the water and brushing the leaves off the wall. The goal was to ensure the house was as comfortable as possible for our grandparents. Our grandfather in particular who is diabetic, blind, and can hardly walk. I could only image his struggle to move to safety when the roof was coming off. Thanks be to God for his protection.

CARIBBEAN POSH • THE FASHION ISSUE 2017

I have never been so afraid in my life, as I heard what sounded like a giant monster just destroying everything -- I really thought I was going to die. I just prayed to God for protection and that is the only reason I am here. My nephews Nicasio, 11 and Mateo, 7 bravely laid on the bed and prayed as well. We all had great concern for our grandparents who at this point we couldn’t get to. I remember Niscasio saying, “I don’t want granny to die …”. All we could do is pray that they were ok as we just listened to the horrible noise. Irma sounded like a giant monster – the sound of fury – I thought the entire house was going to fall.

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With roads blocked by debris we had to walk. We met persons who had walked from one side of the island to the other in search of loved ones. It was my brother-in-law who got the idea to ride his son’s bicycle to town to see if he could get a Wi-Fi signal at his job (FLOW). His plan worked and he was able to get word to loved ones to let them know we were ok. The next day we all walked to town and from there I started my Facebook Live Feed. It was like therapy for me to be able to communicate with the outside world when my world was in complete devastation. I quickly connected with persons around the world and I remember describing what I was seeing as having the resemblance of an atomic bomb having just blown up. As I reflect back on the whole ordeal, I could recall my reaction seeing the first sign of aid. About 5 or 6 mornings later a military helicopter flew over at 7 in the morning. What a sight to see! Who would have ever thought our state of living would become almost third world. There were looters running through the town streets. When word spread that the main grocery store had open there was a line nearly a football field long to get inside. Who would have thought that things could get worse? Days following Irma as people try to make sense of the chaos, hurricane Maria was on her way. You know something though? My people are resilient and this can be seen as signs of normalcy appear each day that passed. While we aren’t at 100% we have life and everyone I meet expresses this sentiment. Telecoms and electricity are coming back on stream faster than anyone imagined. In most instances people are simply determined to push forward. For me personally, in addition to getting my apartment in order – I needed to go to the salon, get my hair and nails done. For me this did more than just help me to feel undefeated but it also meant someone else wasn’t either. I was a consumer creating a demand and bringing business back up and running. These little things made the difference in getting the country off its knees.

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The thought of being able to take care of myself led me to launching “The Caribbean POSHgirl Project”. I felt, I just had to do something to help people. It’s so important for individuals to feel good about themselves. It’s a motivator to do anything. From a brand perspective, Caribbean POSH is committed to empowering women. For the thousands and thousands of women across the Caribbean that were affected by Irma and Maria – join us in giving them some sense of a new beginning. Donate lightly used or new career wear clothing for women.


My Original Editor’s Letter …

As you may know from reading POSH since it began, we remain firmly committed to bringing you the very best that designers, the fashion industry, and the talented people in the Caribbean have to offer. That best also includes seeking out, by whatever means possible, to showcase that talent within the pages of our publication – and we may add to that long list of talented Caribbean fashion designers - artists, musicians, fine goods creators, and all things that reflect our island lifestyle. A sampling of some of the leading edge Caribbean fashion designers whose products we love are: Yardsmanstyle, Bill Edwards, The Cloth, Treffle, Meiling & Cooyah for men, for women who love to wrap themselves up in a Keva J swimsuit, Laura Narayansingh clothing line, Jae Jolly’s sophisticated creation, or Chen Burkett’s Antigua fashion expressions – these so very talented designers can encourage young artists to follow in their footsteps through on-the-job training and the creation of apprenticeships. 2017 is a year of light and space in spreading the word that Caribbean fashion has won, and will win, plenty of design awards. The essence of style is indeed captured in these fashionable islands of ours! Through the focus on a fashion design niche, some other important offshoots have also taken place and may grow: new job creation, fine detailing cottage industries, trade schools, marketing and branding - all things that support this industry. Design entrepreneurs should be steady at the helm and continue to challenge themselves and others to produce the finest output in clothing; they should share with the world the very special rhythm we have in the islands for style, sophistication, and artisanship. “Expect the spectacular” – is a motto we should live by and a motto that the fashion industry is encouraging us to discover. Here’s to a continuation of a splendid landscape of Caribbean style and fashion!

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u BTSKY Multifunctional A4 DOCUMENT BAGS PORTFOLIO ORGANIZER-WATERPROOF Travel Pouch Zippered Case for Pads, Notebooks, Pens, Documents (Purple) $18.99 AMAZON. COM

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WHAT IS YOUR INSPIRATION BEHIND YOUR BRAND?

My love for fashion has been a core part of me ever since I was a little girl. I always knew that one day I’d be deeply involved in the fashion industry in some impactful way. In 2013, I started Always Leid because I was finally ready to let the world see my take on fashion, while inspiring and empowering others to express themselves fearlessly through their sense of style. Perfect for today’s bold and daring Caribbean woman, my Summer 2017 Capsule Collection, Mt. Sealey Garden is inspired by and dedicated to my [late] grandfather’s garden that he took so much pride in tending to. Mt. Sealey Garden is bursting with a myriad of colour, tropical prints and a festive Caribbean vibe.

WHAT DOES FASHION MEAN TO YOU?

Fashion is an outlet I use to show the world my personality and thought patterns without uttering a single word.

CARIBBEAN POSH • THE FASHION ISSUE 2017

Meet Raquel Leid, the brainchild behind Grenadian Fashion and Lifestyle Brand ALWAYS LEID.

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Designer Darryll Bess - The 29-year-old fashion designer from the Cane Garden Bay area of Tortola, British Virgin Islands describes himself as not much of a talker. “I love a good laugh around good people, I have a great sense of humour and I like my music loud, “he further stated. Sporting a tattoo on his arm -- “Amat Victoria Curam” which means “Victory Loves Preparation” Bess, although laid back in demeanour is aware

of his strong presence. He feels this is a result of him being a bit of a strategist. We caught up with the young designer to learn more about him and his line BayRoc.

HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THE CONCEPT FOR YOUR BRAND “BAY ROC”?

HOW WOULD YOU DEFINE YOUR BRAND AND WHAT DO YOU THINK SETS IT APART FROM ANYTHING ELSE?

Before I got into fashion I was always naturally good at drawing and art, so when I came up with the idea to start a fashion line I wanted it to be centred around that; an exclusive quality brand with hand crafted designs, created for the ones that love to stand out, which is why I take pride in keeping all designs as original as possible.

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN DOING DESIGNING?

I started BayRoc in 2007, a year or so after graduating high school, at first all the designs I did were done on paper that never came to life. Spent some years developing my craft through trial and error, it wasn’t until I met Kristin Frazer in 2012 that I started to make designs for runway shows from Jamaica, California etc. I learned a lot.

WHAT INSPIRES YOU?

MODEL: JENNY NOEL MAKEUP: JENNY NOEL HAIR: EZRA FERGUSON PHOTOGRAPHER: KEVON RICHARDSON  MODEL/MAKEUP/HAIR: SACOYA JACKSON  PHOTOGRAPHER: KEVON RICHARDSON

I would always compare BayRoc to cars. Lol. For example, the Bugatti, only about 7 people in the world assemble the engines by hand, or Rolls Royce, completely built by hand. That craft and detail is something that can’t be duplicated by machines, it’s distinction is unmistakable no matter when or where you see it. This is how I define BayRoc.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE FASHION INDUSTRY IN THE BVI AND THE CARIBBEAN?

In my view the fashion industry in the BVI and Caribbean is young and ambitious. I see new designers that are very talented and pushing themselves and their brand, I see Caribbean islands are starting to have Fashion Weeks of their own, I think it’s great, we need it all. Particularly in the BVI over the years I’ve seen it really embrace Fashion with so many shows and events, I hope this sparks interest to cater recourses to a growing industry. It’s only going up.

WHAT WORDS OF ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE LOOKING TO GET INTO THE CARIBBEAN FASHION INDUSTRY? You have to first make a decision to do it all the way, 100%. Finding a mentor can be very helpful with your brand to aid with the direction you want to take it, demographic etc. Your brand should be an extension of who you are as an individual in some way, what are you passionate about? where do you come from? your experiences etc. That individuality will always set you apart.

CARIBBEAN POSH • THE FASHION ISSUE 2017

Inspiration for me can be very broad, it can come from a lot of things. I like Donna Karan, and the incredible detail of Balenciaga. I get largely inspired my different mediums of art; street, pop, abstract, illustrations etc. I recently spent 3 months in Spain where art and Fashion is huge and growing, it was a lot to take in. The architectural works of art by Antoni Gaudí really caught my attention, his style being so distinctive was something I related to because BayRoc in essence is the same way. You will definitely see traces of inspiration from Spain in future pieces to come.

BayRoc is for both men and women, consisting of clothing ranging anywhere from runway pieces to t-shirts. Accessories such as scarves, ties, bows etc. should be available in the near future.

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WHICH VIRGIN ISLAND ARE YOU FROM?

I am from St. John. My mother was St. Johannian and Father was Cruzan. I actually attended the Julius Sprauve School in St. John (Kindergarten), TuTu School (5th Grade), and Antilles School (6-10th grade). Following that I bounced between New York and the Virgin Islands, sometimes living with my mother and sometimes with my father.

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN LIVING IN NYC?

Most recently 10 years. Before that I lived in Berkeley, California for 15 years. Before California I lived in St. John.

HOW DID YOU GET INTO ART?

I was always artistic. I had friends who noticed and enjoyed me to pursue painting. I enjoy abstract painting, folk art, colour field paintings, graffiti, and cartoons. Many of my paintings were created using a Japanese fish printing method called Gyotaku. I strayed from the method by outlining many of them to synthesize printing and drawing.

HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH YOUR BOUTIQUE?

I came up with my boutique to take my art from the arena of art exhibits or an art scene to make it a normal everyday functional thing the way African art was not seen as art originally. It had a function. At this in my Caribbean my art needs to express who I am culturally. The Boutique celebrates art and culture. It’s very disappointing to me that who I am as a Virgin Islands is so hidden. Most people are familiar with Jamaica and other islands like the Bahamas but know little about the Virgin Islands. People should be more familiar with the Virgin Islands because it is part of the United States.  For me globalization shouldn’t just go in one direction with islanders absorbing everything from the mainland. Our culture needs to be respected and celebrated as well in the states. For me, it’s not only our beaches and views, but our language, food, music and folktales that the world needs to associate with the Virgin Islands.  I am waiting for the day that the world Fungi is used interchangeably with the word polenta, or for there to be a demand for people to learn to speak like Virgin Islanders or a demand for Quadrille lessons. Before there was rap we had calypso. Young people can embrace both as a means of selfexpression. Would love to see Calypso workshops in Harlem for young people. We are amazing, absolutely amazing and I intend to let the world know just how interesting we are via images on objects.


INDUSTRY IN BARBADOS?

WHAT PART OF BARBADOS ARE YOU FROM?

I’m from St. Philip, affectionally referred to in Barbados as “St. FARlip” as our parish is a bit out of the way from the hustle and bustle of the South and West coasts. HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THE CONCEPT FOR YOUR BRAND “ISLAND BAGS”?

I wanted to create a simple clutch bag that could be multifunctional (an elegant handbag, a functional makeup bag and an iPad case all in one) and I worked closely with a local factory on the bag design. I wanted the bags to also be super fun and stylish and had the idea of using some of my photographs of Barbados as the prints. HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN DOING ISLAND BAGS?

A handful of years...around four or five. I’ve almost always seen Island Bags as my beloved little side project to my shell art and other work, but it’s definitely one of the central features of some business plans I have coming a bit later in 2017.

Barbados is absolutely filled with truly talented designers, but I see many designers struggling to compete in the global market due to issues such as us not having enough local factories, or access to regional/global ones, we sometimes have issues with shipping products and even the simple task of setting up local bank accounts to accept online payments is challenging. Some designers also struggle to find funding and other resources to tap into to create viable and sustainable companies.  I feel very strongly that more should be done to encourage and foster fashion start-ups in Barbados and the wider Caribbean. WHAT WORDS OF ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE LOOKING TO GET INTO THE CARIBBEAN FASHION INDUSTRY?

Start by perfecting your designs. You must really understand what sets you apart and who your product will sell to.  Once you’ve nailed that first bit, look for a great factory to start working with (and hopefully grow with).  Your designs should be brought to life at the highest quality, for the most competitive price.  Think globally and when you have established yourself to a certain degree, partner up with one of the many new initiatives starting up in the Caribbean that will give a global market, access to your designs.  

WHAT INSPIRES YOU?

What doesn’t? Travel, books, art, all of my super stylish friends and the Caribbean, especially my island home of Barbados.  I absolutely adore where I’m from.

I always ensure that each Island Bag print and design I produce, captures the true essence of “Caribbean Chic”. I love and wear each and every style of bag I produce, so I can also say that each one is a part of me and my definition of style. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE FASHION

Photo 1 (BB1): Cluster Shot Photo 2 (Sobe Leaf Flat Lay): Styled Shot Photo 2 (Facetune 2): Tiyesha Martin - Barbadian Fashion Blogger - wearing Island Bags Photo 3 (Esther Bathsheba Mural): Esther Lussan of Lilian Russell and Island Bags

CARIBBEAN POSH • THE FASHION ISSUE 2017

HOW WOULD YOU DEFINE YOUR BRAND AND WHAT DO YOU THINK SETS IT APART FROM ANYTHING ELSE?

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23-year-old BVI designer, Akeem Stanley has had an eye for fashion from the early age of 14. The idea of having a sketch come to reality; and how fashion can transform a person’s character are some of the elements of fashion that excite him. We caught up with the rising BVI talent as he was preparing for his Couturier Atelier 2017 Collection showing at Summer Sizzle BVI:

BVI’s Got Talent Photographer: Khari Adams Model: Olivia M Fonseca MUA: Akinola Skelton Designer: Akeem Stanley BLUE DRESS: Being from the Caribbean where the beaches are infinite, I like the idea of having an effortless beachy look. FLARED FLORAL SKIRT: this look is multi-functional the cancan underneath can be worn separately and it can also be reversed. Functional indeed! FLARED PANTS: I wanted to create a look that represents young, wild, and still classy! CARIBBEAN POSH

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INSPIRATION BEHIND THE COLLECTION

1: the 2017 spring colour report which consists of Oranges, Greenery, Olives and pink etc. 2: the opportunity to use bold colours that accentuate different silhouettes. Using trending looks was also the inspiration.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR STYLE?

Style is ever evolving you shouldn’t be stagnant when it comes to style because like clothing style gets old! I would describe my style as ever evolving.

FAVOURITE ITEM IN YOUR CLOSET?

My tailored jacket. With a tailored jacket you can wear it in so many ways. Pair it with a pair of ripped jeans or with trousers for a more claimed look. Tailoring is a must!

ON THE RUNWAY

Pink Ruffled Sleeve Dress: This piece was inspired by one of my designer Idols Michael Costello. I found it to be rather chic and high fashion.


SUMMER SIZZLE BVI

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SUMMER SIZZLE BVI

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"..I actually decided years ago to live by love, survive and thrive out of pure love."


WHAT WAS THE INSPIRATION FOR YOUR COLLECTION?  

The clothing line, Mamayashi Collection was inspired out of wanting to create modern and lively options for culturally aware yet fashionable people. To inspire creativity and ancestral reflections through garments. The current collection at mamayashi.com is called Egun, referring to the Yoruba word for ancestor. These pieces are a tribute to African heritage and spirituality.

WHAT DO YOU LOVE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT YOU DO?  

That’s hard because I love so much of what I do! I actually decided years ago to live by love, survive and thrive out of pure love. so everything I do I love it. Everything that’s gets manifested is out of love so it just keeps getting better and better. If I had to choose one thing, it would be the expression. I love bringing new ideas to life from my mind’s eye, and seeing people so happy to be able to wear them.                                                                        

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN IN FASHION DESIGN AND HOW DID YOU GET STARTED?

I have been designing my clothes most of life, growing up around my father who was a tailor. However, I started selling my designs online 13 years ago as a new stay at home mom, involved in the online natural hair community. They were my first customers and are still supporting today.

WHAT IS THE MEANING BEHIND MAMAYASHI?

Yashi is a shortened version of my middle name, and the mama got added to it because of my hands on approach to raising my boys. I usually I have them, or now mostly the only youngest with me while travelling and doing events. Also, I definitely have a mama energy, I like to take care of people, feed them and make sure they are well.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR PERSONAL STYLE DOES IT DIFFER AT ALL FROM THE CLOTHING YOU DESIGN?  

My personal style is definitely the clothing I design. I love every piece and given the opportunity would happily wear it all :) I like to have a varied style, so I have feminine dresses, flexible pants, bright colours, earthy tones, roots pieces, elegance, practicality, versatility, whimsy, militancy, freedom & creativity. I’m bringing all of it.

YOUR ORIGINALLY FROM JAMAICA BUT LIVING IN NYC NOW?

I was born in Jamaica, raised and schooled in New York and now based in Jamaica again with my family.


A review on trendy looking prints on ladies’ shoes, pants, dresses, skirts, bags ahighlighting where to find and examples on how to wear prints

Graphic/Abstract Prints Abstract prints are a combination of bold and predominantly random motifs that are unique in a sense that they depict a sense of creativity and simplicity. Available at LYST.COM, TASTENATIC & MATCHESFASHION

Animal Prints Animal skins are a great inspiration for many fashionistas and there’s no disputing that. You can find them on almost every girly accessories including jackets, skirts, tops, handbags and a lot more. And oh, they come in amazing varieties for you to choose from. Dresses available at PINKCLOVE, ASOS, PROMMAFIA EXPRESSITMOBILE. Shoes available at TOPSHOP, POLYVORE & MICHAEL KORS. CARIBBEAN POSH

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Prints have always been a trendy part of modern fashion and have moved up the ladder to keep up with fashion’s transformation. And ideally, prints can be combined in a variation of colours which look great on almost everything including your shoes and handbags. Here are trendy prints to look out for in 2017 to enhance your beauty.

Swimsuits Swimsuits are available at KAMDORA, CROWN ROSE


Geometric Inspired Prints

Polka Dots

Geometry isn’t only useful and applicable in solving math problems. The triangular, pentagonal and zigzag features are certainly of great value when it comes to selecting the perfect design for prints. Geometric symbols can be creatively combined to produce attractive designs that are perfectly matched.

Polka dots have been in existence for many years but became popular in the late 1920’s and has since been a conspicuous element on our runways. Polka’s are Dazzling and flattering in all shades and dimensions so it’s not hard to see why fashion designers are so much in love with them!

Available at DOROTHY PERKINS, SAMMYDRESS, ICLOTHING, GRUSHIESTYLE & POLYVORE

Available at POLYVORE, DRESSHEAD

Floral Prints Floral prints are an arrangement of unique flowers and ideas associated with any plant form created from a well-balanced composition of floral materials that are aesthetically pleasing. Dresses available at NEWLOOKASSETS, CALVIN KLEIN & POLYVORE

The African-themed print is one of the trendiest pieces of attire you can every wear if you’re lady and especially if you are attracted to bright colours. Whether it’s a swimsuit, straight dress, handbag or hat, the kente fits perfectly. Shoes available at ETSY, TIFFANTASY, OHEMA OHENE, CREATIVE AFRIKA Kente skirt and Blouse available at ETSY

CARIBBEAN POSH • THE FASHION ISSUE 2017

Kente Prints

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by JACKIE EDWARDS

Image Source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ commons/4/42/African_Fashion_in_the_City.JPG

The Caribbean fashion industry had a slow start in terms of global recognition but is fast becoming more popular all over the world. As with all countries and regions, the various influences on Caribbean clothing are distinctive and have significantly aided in shaping the fashion that is most closely associated with the area.  The tropical climate of the region together with a penchant for beautiful, vibrant colours has lent itself to the gorgeous workings of the modern-day Caribbean fashion scene. The influence of beautiful traditional African attire on the local fashion industry is often evident and can be seen in the brightly-coloured garments displayed on both the runways and in public that merges vibrant colours with free-flowing designs that engulf and adapt to the natural curves of the body.  Yet another strong African influence that can be seen in Caribbean fashion is the use of earth and its various elements: precious stones, tree bark, nuts, and seeds are all used to accessorize garments. CARIBBEAN POSH

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Traditional African influences seen in Caribbean fashion One of the best examples of an African infusion in Caribbean clothing can be seen in quadrille dresses. These dresses have different names in each country. In Jamaica it is known as the Bandana Skirt, St Lucia calls it a Kwadril Dress, in Haiti it is known as the Karabela dress and in Suriname it goes by the

name of Kotomisi. These dresses have been worn by women in the Caribbean for countless years and have inspired many garments ranging from peplum blouses to skirts and dresses from renowned fashion houses such as Preen and Yves Saint Laurent.   On the local front, celebrated Caribbean fashion designer Isy Obi’s collection of flowing resort wear is very reminiscent of the quadrille dress which in turn reminds strongly of the Gomesi dress from Uganda, both in design and print.   The Gomesi dress and its influence on Caribbean fashion The Gomesi is a floor-length, brightly coloured cloth dress that has a square neckline and short, puffy sleeves. The dress is tied with a sash below the waist over the hips and is usually made from cotton, linen or silk with silk being the most expensive option.  If you take a closer look at the work of local designer Jessie-Ann Jessamy who hails from Grenada, it is impossible to miss the Afro-Caribbean influences and more particularly, the strong resemblance some of her garments have to the humble Gomesi. The influence of traditional African attire on Caribbean fashion is not limited to the beautiful garments of Uganda but involves a much larger scope of inspiration originating from the dark continent. There are a lot of cultural similarities between the two regions that can often be seen in the most beautiful of garments imaginable.


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Artists Credits MODELS: WINNIELLE PEREIRA AND HER DAUGHTER DESTINEE PHOTOGRAPHER- TINA PAPIES- SCENEKITTSPHOTOGRAPHY.COM MAKEUP ARTIST- JAYCIE LEWIS - HUES AURA DESIGNS - ADORN BOUTIQUE/ PINK AND TURQUOISE DRESSES SANARA BUSSUE/ SWIMWEAR/ BAG AND PINK AFRICAN MERMAIN DRESS 

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The Cloth Caribbean recruits TVISUAL team for it’s new campaign. TVISUAL members Terrance Williams and Lynda De La Mothe Frontline the “This Story Blue” collection’s visual campaign. Both Terrance and Lynda add to their roles, doubling as creative director and make-up artist.

Captured by Kerby Young, Terrance & Lynda wear the collection’s deeply vibrant pieces with diverse silhouettes that are malleable to most body types. Kambe Lovelace worked as stylist for the shoot which spotlights elegant cuts mixed in with bold prints; Contributing to the feel of easiness all while daring to stand out.

Clothing by The Cloth PRODUCTION by TVISUAL TEAM PHOTOGRAPHY by KERBY JB YOUNG MAKE-UP by LYNDA DE LA MOTHE STYLING by KAMBE LOVELACE CREATIVE DIRECTION by TERRANCE WILLIAMS

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PHOTO CREDIT: FROYLAND FLOWERS

Aqua Couture by Roger Gary

Hous of PinkLemonaid

Cesar Galindo


Yumi Katsura

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Akeem Stanley

Aqua Couture by Roger Gary

Akeem Stanley


Cesar Galindo

Cesar Galindo

Anthony Franco

Anthony Franco

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Cesar Galindo

Cesar Galindo

Cesar Galindo

Cesar Galindo

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Cesar Galindo

Cesar Galindo

Yumi Katsura

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Colefacts

CARIBBEAN POSH

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Andrew Nowell

Anthony Franco


Colefacts

Colefacts

Colefacts

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Nikini Swimwear Nikini Swimwear

Nikini Swimwear CARIBBEAN POSH

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Aqua Couture by Roger Gary

Aqua Couture by Roger Gary


The Islander

The Islander

The Islander

Nikini Swimwear

The Islander

The Islander

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The Islander

Aqua Couture by Roger Gary

Nikini Swimwear

The Islander

Nikini Swimwear

Nikini Swimwear


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Yumi Katsura

Yumi Katsura

Yumi Katsura

Yumi Katsura


Yumi Katsura

CARIBBEAN POSH • THE FASHION ISSUE 2017

Yumi Katsura

Yumi Katsura

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CARIBBEAN POSH • THE FASHION ISSUE 2017

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Skin Prep Before applying any sort of make up to your skin the most important thing you must do is Skin prep. For persons who suffer from oily skin, use a primer that is silicone  based. For persons who have dry skin avoid any primers that would dry too matte. Two of the best primers I would recommend  that are safe for all skin types- the Smashbox Photo Finish Foundation Primer and the Benefit POREfessional Face primer. These two products will help your make-up sit faultlessly on your skin. Pro Tip: for oily skin, always try a clay mask before you apply your makeup to draw impurities from the skin’s surface and it also minimizes large pores. 

ProTip: Use a concealer that matches your skin’s complexion rather than going down a shade or two and setting it with a loose translucent powder. Powders Avoid all HD Powders when taking a professional photo because they tend to cause a “flashback” problem. Apply a loose or pressed finishing powder for overall longevity . If you have oily skin, apply the powder only where necessary. Having a blot powder would come in handy, two of the best blot powders that are suitable for all skin types are, MAC Blot Powder or the Black Opal Invisible Oil blocking Powder.

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Contouring/ Bronzing Avoid any heavy contouring for professional photography. If you contour, use sheer products. I recommend contouring with a bronzer for a more subtle look which also adds more warmth to the face and the overall look.  Start with a bronzer then finish off with a blush on the apples of your cheeks. Lashes Even if you’re not comfortable w it h wearing falsies everyday, they look ama zing in photographs! Try them at least once

Foundation Foundation ca n make or break the overall look of your skin, especially if you have either oily or dry skin, those features can appear more prominent in photographs, It is important you stay clear of any foundation that would cause excess oils, anything that has the word “dewy” or if you have extremely dry skin avoid any foundation that will dry down too matte.  Choose a foundation that’s right for your skin type, For oily skin, the trick is to find a foundation that has the right balance of “luminance ” and rely more on your finishing powder.  Some of the best foundations  I’ve used that photographs beautifully are, Elcie Micro Silque foundation, The Lancome Teint Idole Ultra Longwear Foundation and the and the NARS Sheer Glow Foundation. Concealer Apply your foundation first and then conceal the problem areas that still stand out. Usually, the best areas to conceal are around your nostrils, the area above your cupid’s bow, the shallow area underneath your eye and into any laugh lines. Use a minimal amount of concealer and blend well. If you suffer from blemishes or hyperpigmentation, try a colour corrector before you apply your concealer.  I recommend the Estee Lauder Double Wear Stay-in-Place concealer or the NARS creamy Radiant concealer.

the right amount of glow , with a flash you will catch certain areas of your face , Liquid or cream highlighters are easier to blend than powder. I recommend the Becca Shimmering Skin Perfector Liquid Highlighter or the Benefit High Beam Liquid Highlighter .

ProTip: A lway s apply the eye lash glue to the back of your hand, and then run the lashes through the glue before placing on your lid. Do not squeeze the glue directly onto the lashes, because if you have too much glue, you’ll have trouble getting the lashes to lay properly. Lips For professional photography it is important to have a well executed lip thats balanced, moisturized and symmetrical. Going for a nude lip color is the safest bet with a finishing gloss, but for persons who want to wear a vintage lip color like red, use a lip brush and press the color into the mouth, using a lip brush gives you ultimate control and maximum coverage.

Highlighting Highlighting has become one of the biggest trends that you won’t see going away anytime soon.  However, for professional photography the temptation to slather on glow will not work because it is really prominent in photos. Its all about having

Having a good knowledge of makeup for photoshoots will allow you to get the look you envisioned for your images, Always use the best quality makeup that you can. Cheaper makeup products may look “cakey” on the skin or even get crease marks in them, which can make the skin appear cracked or wrinkly in your photographs.


3. PinRose-Secret Genius Eau de perfume  size 1.7 0z $65.00

by BRANDY GOMEZDUPLESSIS

One of my favourite accessories after getting dressed whether it’s for a casual event or a special occasion is a beautiful, seductive bottle of perfume. Each perfume I select has a story of how I am feeling at the very moment. Some days, I feel pretty, sexy, flirty, fancy or just fun and romantic. Not only do I buy for the packaging, but I buy for the lovely notes. Here are my favourite new summer scents I want you to check out and now you can begin your own stories.

5. Kate Spade New YorkLive Colorfully Sunshine Size 3.4 oz $95.00

1. NEST – Black Tulip Eau de Perfume size 1.0 oz $72.00

2. Guerlain-Mon Guerlain Eau de perfume size 1.7 oz $94.00

4. GivenchyL’Atelier de Givenchy Rose Ardente Size 3.3 oz $235.00

6. Tory Burch-Love RelentlesslyEau de perfume Size 1.7 oz $86.00

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8. Giorgio ArmaniSky di Giogia Eau de perfume Size 1.7 oz $72.00

7. Narciso RodriguezNarciso Eau de Toilette Size 1.6 oz $80.00


2. Becca Ever Matte Shine Proof Foundation 3. Lancome Teint Idole Ultra Long Wear Foundation

1. Black Up Matifying Fluid Foundation

Here come s t he su n and if you’re a makeup wearer the one thing we all hate is the feeling of our foundation dripping. If your anything like me, a person who loves full coverage foundation and have very oily skin then finding a really good long wearing foundation is a MUST. Sweat no more because I found us new foundations that can hold up in any Caribbean summer weather. by BRANDY GOMEZ-DUPLESSIS

4. Absolute New York HD Flawless Fluid Foundation

5. L’OREAL Paris Infallible Total Cover Foundation

6. Urban Decay Up All Night Foundation

CARIBBEAN POSH • THE FASHION ISSUE 2017

7. Cover Girl Queen Collection All Day Flawless Foundation

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Let It Glow, Let It Glow… Summer is here and my clients can’t wait for it to get here. I’m sure

you’re ready for that effortless dewy skin; so how do you achieve that brilliant summer glow you ask? A highlighter…Highlighters help to give the skin a luminous finish and can be purchased in different textures: powders, liquids, and creams. When using a highlighter, I like to apply the highlighters with a damp beauty blender on the apple of the cheeks and along the cheekbones to give that radiant fresh face glow. With so many highlighters to choose from it was hard to pick my favorite new ones, because I love them all! So instead of 5 here are 10 of my favorite new highlighters that has hit the shelves and hopefully will make their way to your vanity.

2. Algenist Drop & Glow Luminizing Duo $22.00

1. Absolute New York Liquid Illuminator $7.99

3. Bobbi Brown Nude Finish Illuminating Powder in Golden $52.00

6. Josie Maran Argan Enlightenment Illuminizer $26.00

5. Givenchy Healthy Glow Highlighter $53.00

4. Clinique Chubby Stick Sculpting Highlight $23.00

7. Stila Heaven’s Hue Highlighter inTranscendence $32.00 9. Gerard Cosmetics Star Powder in Grace $36.00 8. M.A.C. Cosmetics Mineralize Skinfinish in Soft and Gentle $33.00 CARIBBEAN POSH

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by BRANDY GOMEZ-DUPLESSIS

10. Jeffree Star Cosmetics & Manny MUA Skin Frost in Eclipse $29.0


At heart, Miss Tricia Campbell will always be a Caribbean girl. From the sunny shores of Montego Bay Jamaica, she has easily propelled her child-hood modelling dreams by flitting on to the magnetic pages of international magazines, and runways over the years. Now based in the United States of America, Campbell is the designated plus-sized stand-In model for media tycoon Ms. Oprah Winfrey for the cover of O Magazine- an honour that she relishes with much grace, pride and humility. However, on the cusp of summer 2017, she took a break from posing behind the powerful camera for endless exciting and lucrative international photo shoots, to share her star power at the prestigious 2017 POSH Girls Brunch.


By: SHERINA RUSSELL-GARCIA


designs by my fellow Caribbean sisters was a blessing. We created magic by the beach.” Walking the runway at the event for Menen 1 Designs was also a treat for her. “I felt empowered walking the runway for designer Menen 1 Designs. Her designs are very flattering for a curvy woman. I really hoped we inspired at least one young lady to walk in her true gift” she said. Busy with designing and marketing her new line of plus-size swimwear called GLAMOUR GLAMOUR Swimwear she got a chance to showcase it at the event.

The invigorating and inspiring event was hosted between May 13 and 15, 2017 by the region’s best magazine Caribbean POSH in the alluring and adventurous British Virgin Islands. The captivating blue skies beckoned when she first touched down in the BVI, and the warm world-famous Caribbean hospitality fully embraced her. “My trip to BVI was routed through the US Virgin Islands, and on entering the US Virgin Islands airport I was greeted with a calypso band playing music. I felt right at home. Then I meet a sweet BVI guy who gave me some quick info about how to catch the Speed boat to BVI. I did not have to worry because Caribbean Posh Magazine had my driver and Speed Boat escort for my final trip to Scrub Island arranged. I also meet Angela Hunte singer and songwriter who was also a panelist at the Posh Girl Power Brunch” she said. Also, “I admire how friendly, hardworking and warm my Caribbean people are. Of course the island vibes, such as our music, pool parties, island fashion shows and beach parties. Swimwear is daywear and flip flops and sandals are my favorite clothing to wear, so I love the freedom of dressing in the Caribbean.” CARIBBEAN POSH

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She got a chance to do photo shoots for local designers Trefle and Menen 1 Designs at the Scrub Island Resort. Reflecting on the experience, Campbell said: “we had fun. I felt like it was creativity at its’ best. Modelling in fashion

“My swimwear line was well-received by new customers from the British Virgin Islands, US Virgin Islands and Virgin Gorda. They really welcomed the bright, vibrant colours and variety of styles we offered from sizes 8 to 22” Campbell said. Happy to receive the 2017 Caribbean Woman of Empowerment Award at the event she said: “my goal was to reach out and inspire even one woman at the brunch. I really wanted thank the visionary and creator of Caribbean Posh Magazine and Posh Girl Power Brunch Ms Janette Brin for bringing such empowering women together. “ Her golden advice to women would be to attend the next event in 2018. “I shared the importance of finding and knowing with women what your true gift is. Find out what God has put you on this earth


to do, and go for it. I also shared my empowering hashtag #You are Royalty meaning no matter what challenges you have been through, you are still Royalty. Everyone is unique, sent by God to create and achieve their mission and make a difference in the world. So never give up on your dreams.” “We live in such a judgmental world, that we need events like these to celebrate all women. Women need to know that all things are possible for us all. Dreams do come true if you work hard, show up and network” she encouraged.

“I felt empowered walking the runway for designer Menen 1 Designs. Her designs are very flattering for a curvy woman. I really hoped we inspired at least one young lady to walk in her true gift”

“I went sailing, speed boating, went on a beautiful date and modelled for the magazine. My advice to all women is to be themselves, and work and support each other” she said.

CARIBBEAN POSH • THE FASHION ISSUE 2017

Apart from networking, Ms. Campbell got a chance to enjoy the natural tropical beauty of the islands.

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Yvette Noel-Schure, the legendary publicist, is President of Schure Media LLC, her publicity firm located in New York. Before venturing out on her own she was Vice President of Media at Columbia Records/ Sony Music. When she began her career as a journalist, she was offered a job at Black Beat magazine where she learned to interview the likes of LL Cool J. Later she moved to Sony as a young publicist, where she met Destiny’s Child comprised of Beyoncé Knowles, Kelly Rowland, and Michelle Williams. Yvette and Beyoncé have become great friends and the rest is history. Equally at home in the islands or New York City, the vivacious and hard working sat down with POSH at Scrub Island. We talked about all sorts of things from continuing the Power Brunch begun by POSH, makeup, perfumes, and even Yvette’s experience with a psychic medium that a friend arranged for her birthday. Relatives came through the medium, particularly her grandmother who strongly suggested that Yvette not eat cheese since it would not be good for her stomach; cheese was the most favorite thing for her to eat… she hasn’t eaten cheese in a year! We discussed Beyoncé’s Formation World Tour, the mesmerizing light show that ranks up there with Prince and Michael Jackson, followed by a series of questions that POSH asked her:


"Here is what I have to say: It is all possible with hard work, smart work, dedication and passion"

Q: WHAT WOULD YOU SAY YOU VALUE THE MOST FROM YOUR CARIBBEAN UPBRINGING?

A: There are so many things that I value about my Caribbean upbringing but I would have to say three are lasting and I learned them all from my family, especially my grandparents. They stressed about working hard but also about working smart; knowing how to ask the right questions and counting on others to help in true team spirit based on our community spirit on the islands. I also learned to be kind to others everyday and all day, and the one that is the most important to me is to be honest at every juncture - stand by the truth and do everything from an honest place. Honesty and integrity are the basis of everything I do, coupled with patience, persistence and more patience.

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Q: HOW OFTEN DO YOU GO HOME TO GRENADA AND WHEN YOU GO WHAT ARE SOME OF THE MUST DOS FOR YOU?

A: I go to Grenada as often as possible, sometime two to three times a year and usually I don’t tell my family. I love just showing up on the island and shouting from the yard, “What you have on the fire for me and where’s the mango?” Now

that JetBlue has direct flights from JFK to Point Salines, it becomes so easy. As soon as I get to Grenada, I have to go to Grand Anse Beach.  There is no other beach in the world like it and the amazing thing is that it is hardly ever crowded. I must go to St. Matthew’s Catholic Church in Birch Grove, where I grew up, and I absolutely cannot get home without a visit to the market in Grenville in St. Andrews.  We call it La-bay and it is where I learned about people, about free enterprise, about the importance of eating natural foods and about the pride and prudent nature of Grenadian women. “Be circumspect with yourself.” I still hear those voices in my ears.  You try so hard not to shame your people, when you hear that warning in your ears.

Q: WHAT DOES COUNTRY PRIDE MEAN TO YOU? A: Country pride means that you are proud of your heritage. That the things your learned not only stay with you but they manage to serve you correctly.  That your heart skips a beat when you see your flag, hear your music play or eat food, you know was cooked with love and devotion.  I am Grenadian first and foremost and everyday I live I want everyone to know it.

Q: I KNOW YOUR MOM IS EXTREMELY DEAR TO YOU. WHAT WOULD YOU SAY IS ONE OF THE GREATEST LESSONS SHE EVER TAUGHT YOU THAT YOU APPLY TO THIS DAY?

A: When I lost my mommy in May of 2016, part of me went with her. I was broken in many pieces.  I remember just rolling up into a ball and inserting myself into a corner of my sofa for 24 hours.  My eyes were puffy and red when I finally uncurled my body, stood up straight and decided to be her daughter again.  My mother taught me strength and resilience and most of all she taught me to love.  I had to get up and start loving my family and loving myself again so I could live and be her legacy.

Q: WHAT LED YOU TO A CAREER IN MEDIA AND PR?

A: As a little girl, I was fascinated by words. I would write on everything I could find and always made lists. I also loved talking to people and asking lots of questions.  The best of it all though, was that I loved reading the scripture out loud in church.  Almost every Sunday it was my job to read during second mass.  That made me curious about words that people


read everyday in the newspapers and so I started delivering the Express Newspaper, which was actually printed in Trinidad. On my paper run I would take a red pen and edit the paper, fixing punctuation and grammar, before delivering the papers to the neighbors.  When I arrived in New York as a 14-year-old, I knew I wanted to be a journalist and I studied journalism in college with a minor in public relations.  But the hard news world of journalism was not for me and I quickly switched to music journalism. It was during this time, I was offered the position of publicist at Columbia Records.  All I requested was a Mariah Carey album and the head of the media department said I had tons of passion and offered me the job.  Thank God I at least took some classes in public relations at City College, but it was a learning curve I was not prepared for.  It took me a minute to get my footing but I ended up spending seventeen years at Columbia Records, working with some of the most amazing and successful artists, including Destiny’s Child and John Legend.  No one could have told me this is what I would end of doing as a career and I love every second of it, even the most challenging times have truly been the best lessons.

Q: WHAT DOES A TYPICAL DAY IN YOUR OFFICE ENTAIL?

A: There are no typical days. Not one resembles another and I am grateful for that.  I have never said I’m bored with my job. I have literally been on two coasts in one day and travelled between three countries in Europe in one day.  This is primarily about music but I get to handle press for events as small as a

listening party for ten people or as huge as a festival or world tour. And now, more than ever I am involved with some incredible philanthropic initiatives that will change people’s lives in Haiti, Brazil and parts of Africa.  These are projects that speak to my heart and encourage love and kindness.  Everything my grandparents and parents taught me on that little Spice Island such a long time ago, has come to fruition.  I am so grateful for this crazy career that keeps me hopping, hopeful and happy.

Q: WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT WHAT YOU DO?

A: The best part of the job is that I get to play a small part in making people happy. What I do brings joy to others.  It gives them correct information on art and culture they love and it engages them in a beautiful escape that speaks to their creativity and sense of adventure.  And what I don’t take for granted is that I get to help artists be the biggest dreamers.  They are the change agents and to sit amongst them is quite the ride.

Q: GIVEN WHERE YOU ARE IN YOUR CAREER - WHAT WOULD YOU SAY TO A YOUNG CARIBBEAN WOMAN NOW TRYING TO MAKE IT IN HER CAREER?

A: Here is what I have to say: It is all possible with hard work, smart work, dedication and passion. You can dream a bigger dream. The possibilities are as wide as your see it, as big as you hope and as real as you make it.

CARIBBEAN POSH • THE FASHION ISSUE 2017

It is no wonder that this intriguing woman can be held up to all of us as a force for good. She is encouraging, brave, and is a real asset to all women trying to achieve their dreams. She has dreamed big and we at POSH applaud her success.

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HOW WOULD YOU DEFINE WHO YOU ARE?

HOT NEWCOMER KHALIA

has a summer-inspired song, Ride Up, by featuring Tifa. Produced by Billboard-charting, Grammywinning producer Tony ‘CD’ Kelly.  Accompanied by a steamy music video shot in Portmore and directed by Jay Parpworth, Ride Up has been getting rave reviews, especially from DJs on the international scene. As for Caribbean POSH, we absolutely love it! We recently caught up with the Jamaican cutie, who is signed to Kelly’s K-Licious label: CARIBBEAN POSH

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I’d like to think I’m a ball of colourful, edgy energy; working on being the best in what I do.

HOW DID YOU GET YOUR START IN MUSIC?

Just a passion that got serious, through the right moves and determination.

WHO OR WHAT ARE YOUR BIGGEST MUSIC INFLUENCES?

Life. Life is my biggest music influence. Music is the most beautiful, universal language. I take influences from everything in life, from the sights to experiences to even feelings. And of course the dancehall greats like Patra, Lady Saw, and Buju Banton

WHERE DID YOU GROW UP AND WHERE DO YOU LIVE NOW? I grew up in Westmoreland till I was 6. Then I moved to London and I’ve been there till last year December. I moved to Kingston.

WHAT’S THE BEST THING ABOUT BEING AN ARTIST? Doing what I love every day and getting to showcase my talents. Being able to relate to so many people through a 3-minute song. 

LET’S TALK FASHION AND BEAUTY: HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR STYLE?

My style is fun, experimental and like my personality, colourful. I love seeing colours!

WHO ARE YOUR TOP 3 FAVOURITE DESIGNERS?

I don’t really have top three favourite designers, I just like out of the box, of the wall thinking when it comes to designers. Pieces that make you say wow!

NAME 3 BEAUTY PRODUCTS YOU CAN’T DO WITHOUT 1. Clean and clear dual action face moisturiser 2. Stud eyebrow pencil from mac 3. Virgin olive oil for my skin.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT KHALIA FOLLOW HER ON SOCIAL MEDIA @KHALIA100


Independent artist LISA VIOLA dropped her new single “Show Me Da Way” earlier this year. The track features Grammy Award Winning Artist SHAGGY, whose singles, including “Boombastic” or “It Wasn’t Me”, have become a revolutionary phenomenon in the international music industry.

02 May 2017 (Sydney, Australia) Singer, Dancer and Songwriter Lisa Viola started 2017 with her explosive style. Mixing reggae, pop and ethnic international music rhythms, this new single fuses her vivid personality and conception of music in one song, offering a brand new insight inside the Angolanborn and Australian raised independent artist. “Show Me Da Way” is out now and follows previous singles such as “Shake Up Your Bum Bum”, where she featured Nigerian artist Timaya or “Bounced Wid It”, featuring Jamaican Dancehall veteran Redfox. Caribbean POSH caught up with the songstress and here is what she had to say:


1. LET’S START WITH WHERE YOU ARE IN YOUR CAREER. BESIDES HAVING A HOT NEW SINGLE FEATURING GRAMMY AWARD WINNING ARTIST, SHAGGY – WHAT KEEPS YOU MAKING MUSIC? That’s an excellent question because as artists we often need to stop and ask ourselves the big question… Why? When I was in my teens I was makingmusic solely because I needed to express myself in a way other than dance. Lyrics, and singing took my self-expression to another level. I now continueto make music because it continues to present new challenges for me and Ithrive off that. The challenge to be better at the art, more authentic, more honest… more ME! You learn a lot about yourself on this journey. There are also challenges outside of the art, the business side of things. I’ve acquired so many skills building my own brand.

asked what Jam was like I told her it was like Africa… but with wifi. Haha. I was born in Angola, also a developing nation.I felt so much of the raw African culture in the Caribbean! From the food, the markets, dance, music, even Patois often sounded like our African dialects. I just felt like I was home. So I’m happy to come back anytime if y’all will have me?

4. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOURSELF?

I’ve recently learnt that my name (Lisa) means ‘Devoted One’ I felt this to be true in so many ways.

3. FOR A CARIBBEAN AUDIENCE THAT MIGHT BE JUST DISCOVERING YOU – WHAT WOULD THEY BE SURPRISED TO LEARN ABOUT YOU AND YOUR MUSICAL INFLUENCES? CARIBBEAN POSH

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That I am in LOVE with the Caribbean!! I’ve been to Jamaica on song writing trips a couple of times and also visited St Thomas. I feel so at home there. When my mother

The movement is very important to me. As a woman it’s tough in music but let’s be real, it’s tough in any industry. Women need to maneuver through life often being under estimated, preyed upon, and victimized. I’ve alwaysrespected and loved my fellow Queens. I believe that often it is our own behavior that can be of a disadvantage to us as women. We must lift each other up, support one another and stop with the gossiping and constant judgment. You’ll see on my social media I don’t say things like with my ‘bitchez’ or with dis ‘hoe’ let alone hating or throwing shade at anybody. I can’t change the world but I can change me. So if I want to see society’s suppression on women lifted then I’ve got to start with myself.

8. WHAT WOULD YOU SAY TO A WOMAN TRYING TO FIND SUCCESS?

2. HOW DID THE SHAGGY COLLABORATION COME ABOUT?

We have a mutual friend in (Dancehall veteran) Red Fox. I cut a track with Fox back in 2013. When I was on tour with Kymani Marley we all happened to be on the same bill for the Reggae Jam Festival in Germany. Shaggy watched me perform and perhaps I impressed him! Hahaha! We’ve kept the link since. When I sent him ‘Show Me Da Way’ I knew it needed something. He sent it back with his finishing touches and I was blown away by how much his energy lifted the track. Shaggy’s a brilliant artist and has always committed his time to helping emerging artists that he believes in. He’s not recognized enough for that!

7. WOMEN EMPOWERMENT. WHAT DOES THIS MOVEMENT MEAN TO YOU AS A FEMALE ARTIST?

1. Know what success means to you. It’s often a balance of a few different things. 2. Don’t ever compare others successes to your own. 3. People will still respect you and want to work with you even if you are assertive, have your own opinion, disagree with the majority, and when you say No. 4. Any time, any point in life you can pick yourself up and start again.

5. WHICH ARTIST LIVING OR DEAD WOULD YOU LOVE TO DO A RECORD WITH?

Tiwa Savage cause her versatility be on 100.

6. IF YOU HAD TO CHOOSE THE BEST SONG EVER WRITTEN – WHAT WOULD YOU CHOOSE?

Just one!!?? That’s too hard!! But I can give you a few that come to mind. Don’t judge me... I’m a hybrid in plenty a ways… Changes – Tupac Orinoco Flow – Enya Black or White – Michael Jackson Bob Marley – One Love In the arms of the Angel – Sarah McLachlan

9. LET’S TALK BEAUTY. WHAT ARE YOUR MUST DO’S TO ENSURE YOUR BEAUTY INSIDE AND OUT?

Exercise, Meditation, Healthy Foods, Faith, Dreams.

10. WHAT’S NEXT FOR YOU?

Only God really knows… but I’d like to continue releasing more music. I want to sing songs that reach millions of people’s hearts and become iconic. Leaving some positivity in the world so I’m remembered for doing something that made an impact. I definitely have it in my bones to do some more touring, theatre, movies, anything performing arts. It’s all I’ve known since I was 5 years old. Love and family also on the cards… God willing.


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1. “Afrogalactic Girl and the Freudian Slip” 2016. Acrylic, chalk, oil pastel and tar on wood. 2. “George Okeny” 2017. Watercolor, acrylic, oil paste, India ink and collage on a clear acrylic frame. 3. “Untitled” 2014. Chalk and charcoal on wood. 4. “I’m Sorry” 2017. Acrylic, oil pastel, watercolor and nail olish on canvas. 5. “Blackbird” 2017. Watercolor, acrylic, oil paste, India ink and collage on canvas.

people?’ I would always hesitantly reply, “not really, no… not necessarily…why do they have to be black?”

Christina Nicola is a mixed media artist from Miami, FL who focuses on highlighting the significance of black men and women through her work. In 2015, Christina Nicola graduated from the University of Central Florida with a Bachelors degree in studio art, specializing in drawing and painting. Christina Nicola uses a variety of mark making techniques in her pieces, employing charcoal, oil pastels, paint, and several other mediums as she believes, “the greatest aspect of art making is creating the form by whatever means necessary”. “All energy, all heart”, is how Christina Nicola describes her own work. Born in Dallas, Texas, Christina Nicola has spent most of her life in Miami. Being a black woman of both Caribbean and African American descent, living in South Floridacontinues to inspire and influence her work.

This sort of representation is incredibly important to Nicola as her work tends to focus on thevisual and political complexities of black men and women. Nicola takes a unique approach to what she calls “making melanin”. “To me, it’s almost absurd that races can be

With her remarkable sense of form and color, Christina Nicola’s workessentially focuses on deconstructing blackness— visually, politically, and conceptually. During her final semester of her undergraduate studies, Nicola focused on work for her series “F21” and “AfroGalactic Girl”. These series touched on celebrating the beauty of black hair and skin, as well as exploring the stereotypes placed on black women by society. Following university, Christina Nicola has gone on to show in over 12 different shows, including the 2016 Art Africa Art Fair as well s the 2017 Superfine Art Fair in Manhattan, NY. Currently, Nicola is gearing up forthe 2017 Art Basel season, as well as preparing for shows in 2018. On Making Black Art Admittedly as a student at university, Nicola never sought out to make “black art”. “To me it was too much—almost limiting in a way, to be defined as a “black artist”that makes “black art”, she recalls. “What I didn’t realize was that regardless of what I would paint, people would never not associate blackness with my work”. This became apparent in the black and white charcoal drawings that Nicola created in college. “I wouldn’t always be drawing a blackperson, but people would come up to me andsay, ‘so you paint black

“My style, my hand, my mark-making will always emphatically be black—the hand of ablack artist. I accept that and I’ve realized that that was never a bad thing. I’m black and the world I experience hinges on my identity. That’s it and that’s wonderful.” The Strength in Suffering Nicola embracing the term “black art” is now more evident than ever, as she launches into work for her new series, “LifeBloodlust”. Lifebloodlust focuses onposing black strength against modern society. In this series, Nicola examines negritude, and the search for strength and pride as a culture and society. “This series is very close to me and is itself changing my life, and the way I react to the past, the present, and my hopes for the future—bothpersonally and for society itself. Following atragedy or in light of injustice or violence, wehave this way of distancing ourselves orminimizing the severity of the situation as away to cope with what is happening. This series, for me, is a way to stop and reflect—on the severity, on the despair, on the grief, on the brutality, and on hope. “I find myself increasingly more emotionally involved now, where as before I hoped to process things quickly and avoid deep emotional discomfort. As I pour through research, writings, and images for my work, I find myself constantly haunted, thankful and full of sadness for the work that has been done and the work that still must be done.”

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“What I really love about my Jamaican culture and being from Miami is that it gives me this insight and opportunity I would never get elsewhere. Miami is this other world when it comes to living in diversity. In South Florida, there’s this focus and support for recognizing of artists of color.”

simplified into such basic classifications as “black,white, brown, tan…the irony is that there is so much more to race than this”.

This ascription of blackness however, occurred quite frequently, even as Christina Nicola would paint non-POC people.

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The Caribbean Rum & Beer Festival has been awarded a RAD Season ‘Best Event’ accolade and has been rated as one of the Top 10 Best Drinking Festivals in the World.

The Festival caught the attention of the awarding company which specialises in global adventure travel. In their citation of the event they stated, “This festival offers over 100 different tastings and a highly competitive Rum Cocktail Wars. Caribbean music, cocktails, and incredible beaches make this the perfect vacation opportunity for rum & beer lovers.” Since 2010 The Caribbean Rum & Beer Festival has been held in Barbados, Grenada and St Maarten. The Festival brings together a host of international rum and beer producers to showcase their products to an eager audience.


Operations Director Dr Glyn Williams is pleased to receive the accolade, “Our team works hard to put together an event to benefit our exhibitors and our patrons, it feels great to know our hard work is being recognised.” The Festival organisers, who are based in Barbados, are in preparation mode for the 2017 Caribbean Rum & Beer Festival which will take place in Barbados in December 2017. Dr Williams added, “This year’s line-up of exhibitors is already shaping up to offer a great mix of products and we are working on introducing some new event features, 2017 is going to be our best Festival yet.”

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PHOTO CREDITS: AZURE MANAGEMENT SERVICES INC.

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Sean Rose, April 2017… The March 20th to April 2nd 2017 staging of the Miami Open at the Tennis Center in Crandon Park, Key Biscayne Miami, Florida, was the stage for another round of riveting tennis action featuring some of the biggest names in the game; Venus Williams, Rafael Nadal, Johanna Konta, among others. For 12 days Crandon Park buzzed with activity even as animated groans, ooohs and ahhhs, laughter and applause emanated from the venue spurred on by some intriguing display of tennis action. There was much fun and excitement to go around as thousands eye-balled the many exhibits, shows, and of course, the rocket fast serves, forehand and backhand shots, volleys, drop shots, lobs and other reciting tennis action out on center court.

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Being an avid tennis spectator, I journeyed to Crandon Park to rub shoulders with Director of Tourism, at the British Virgin Islands Tourist Board, my friend Sharon Flax-Brutus, Board Director Russel Harrigan and other members of the team, and a group of friends, who are also major tourism stakeholders in BVI. That level of collaboration between the business community and the main agency responsible for tourism management and promotion is, in my view a recipe for success for the BVI. It is a recipe other Caribbean tourism destinations ought to emulate. The BVI was the only island destination flying their national flag at

this year’s Miami Open. It was the first of such outings for the Tourist Board as well, and they served up some excellent moves on and off court. From a niche marketing perspective, I am very impressed with the decision to parade brand BVI in full view of the thousands of Miami Open fans at Crandon Park, and the millions who viewed the games on television or followed via Social Media. BVI Welcomes One Million Visitors for the First Time As I reflect on what the BVI has done, within recent times in particular, to boost its own tourism sector, and I take into consideration the fact that many expatriates from across the Caribbean, are active beneficiaries and contributors to that territory’s hospitality sector, I appreciate even more the need for new and creative efforts to promote our respective countries, and ultimately

(UP) BVI TOURISM PRESENT VACATION GIVEAWAY PRIZES AT MIAMI OPEN 2017 (RIGHT PAGE)BVI TOURISM BOOT @ MIAMI OPEN 2017) (DOWN) BVI TOURISM PRESENT VACATION GIVEAWAY PRIZES AT MIAMI OPEN 2017


our region, to the world. It simply isn’t business as usual. While television advertising and other traditional methods may still have a place, the need for unconventional strategies has become even more apparent. The BVI Tourist Board is moving in the right direction, in my humble estimation. How can I validate my endorsement of BVI tourism? While I’m not for one moment suggesting they have achieved perfection, the facts, however, are indisputable. BVI tourism arrival figures for January to July 2016 opened magnificently with an overall increase of 27.3 percent for all visitors, when compared to the same period in 2015, according to data from the BVI’s Central Statistics Office (CSO). The destination went on to deliver some rocket fast serves, to earn record high score of 1,122,671 visitor arrivals to close out 2016. The BVI CSO reports that there were 406,027 overnight visitors documented at the end of 2016. This marks the first

The Caribbean Tourism Organization (CTO) says Marry Caribbean (www. MarryCaribbean.com), the leading online resource for Destination Weddings & Honeymoons in the Caribbean has signed Melanie Reffes as the exclusive journalist for the Caribbean Romance Report. Melanie Reffes is a seasoned travel journalist and television producer, renowned for her coverage of the Caribbean. She is published throughout the USA, Canada and Caribbean and is a contributor to the official websites of the Caribbean Tourism Development

Company and the Caribbean Hotel & Tourism Association (CHTA).  The Caribbean Romance Report offers insider information and reviews for hotels, restaurants and activities across the Caribbean’s 33 countries, the CTO says. The romance market, which includes destination weddings, honeymoons, vow renewals and getaways for those who want to embark on a romantic Caribbean jaunt, can find all the information they need through this exciting new report on www.MarryCaribbean.com.  I found that release from the CTO relevant to the niche marketing strengths of

our Caribbean destinations. It brought to my mind September 13, 2012 when to say “I do” became a whole lot easier for couples who chose destination British Virgin Islands (BVI) for their nuptials. The BVI’s decision to amend its Marriage Act (Cap 272): Residency requirements for ‘Special License’ shortened the process from three (3) days to one (1) day; a new fee schedule was introduced, and the steps to obtain a license were all transferred to the Civil Registry for a ‘One Stop Shop’ process. Couples seeking to travel to BVI for their nuptials can also begin their wedding application online before arriving in the BVI, by submitting their information through the Government’s new Civil Registry Information System (CRIS) at www.crisvi.gov.vg. Collaboration ve approach to help boost tourism marketing In summary, there is much to gain from a collaborative approach to help boost tourism marketing and improve the services offered by any destination across the region. Collaboration among industry partners in any form improves our marketing impact and should not be viewed as a threat. No one agency can do it alone. Rather than playing blame games or dedicating quality time to fault finding missions, many political parties, whether in opposition or in government, public private sector agencies and NonGovernmental Organizations ought to establish mutual relationships to help improve, protect and promote our their respective tourism product. As the saying goes, tourism is you, tourism is me. Observers and experts may differ in opinion in their respective evaluation of the global tourism market, and the strategies necessary to achieve success for the Caribbean, both from the perspective of singular destinations and as a regional bloc. Nonetheless, many of contrary opinions are likely to agree that there is room for more collaborative efforts, to help our small island states and territories remain competitive in today’s international business of travel and leisure. Congrats to Sharon Flax Brutus and her team at the BVI Tourist Board for showing leadership in that regard and the record high results they have achieved. That marriage between tourism and tennis surely offers effective niche marketing opportunities for Nature’s Little Secrets. Bon Voyage!

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time in history that the BVI surpassed the 400,000 overnight visitor mark. In fact, over the five-year period-2012 to 2016, overnight arrivals increased by 15.5 percent for an annual percentage growth rate of 3.1 percent. The British Virgin Islands tourism sector is recording consistent growth, as indicated by an increase in overnight visitor arrivals during 2016. The figures speak for themselves ladies and gentlemen. The tourism sector remains a vital component of our Caribbean economies. To remain competitive, several destinations across the region are challenged to invest heavily in market-

ing and product development. Skeptics often question the value of such investments largely because many deliverables in the industry are intangible by nature. The figures for tourist arrivals are quite often a popular yardstick used to either measure the performance of the tourism stakeholders, or beat them into admission of dismal failure. The BVI officials may very well be in celebratory mood to this day.

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Jamaican born, New York City resident, Andre Fennell, professionally known in the music industry as the artist “GC,” and is also a globally sought after GrammyNominated songwriter and producer. GC has worked with a myriad of internationally known artists and producers including Shaggy, Beyonce, Enrique Iglesias, Jennifer Lopez, Chris Brown, Serayah, Jordin Sparks, Neyo, Magic, Kylie Minogue, Damian Marley, Stephen Marley, Maxi Priest, Eve, Diddy, Elephant Man, Wyclef and KRS One to date. As an artist, GC’s wide range of musical influences are showcased on single “On Purpose” with Portuguese DJ Mastiksoul and Universal Music Denmark released singles “Whine Dat” with Danish DJ Kongsted, which is certified platinum with over 11 million plays on Spotify, and the follow up single “Tik Tok” featuring Danish DJ & Producer, Marwo currently 500k + Spotify plays on Spotify. GC is currently on tour with Showtek, Dutch electronic dance music act, performing their single “Believer” featuring Major Lazor, at the Amsterdam Arena twice to a crowd of 50,000 attendees in the past year, also at Ultra Music Festival in Miami. Showtek and GC are scheduled to release their new singles entitled “Hands Up, Moshpit and Warning” Summer 2017.

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As a songwriter, GC’s creative versatility can be heard on the 2016 summer hit single “Don’t You Need Somebody” with Red One featuring Enrique Iglesias, Shaggy, R City and Serayah. GC’s long established relationship with Grammy-winning international reggae artist, Shaggy, has afforded him writing credits on top 40 Billboard hit entitled “I Need Your Love” featuring “Costi Official, Faydee and Mohombi. He also co-wrote Shaggy’s first, second and third single “Seasons” Ft. Omi, “Only Love” featuring Pitbull and “I Got You” featuring Jovi Rockwell and “That Love” produced by Scott Storch, and is

featured on Cobra Starship’s “Night Shades” Deluxe LP on the single “Anything for Love” with Shaggy (GC was credited under his previous alias “GoldenChyl”). GC’s commitment to musical diversity produced a fruitful collaboration with close friends and mentors, John White and Rich DeCicco, when he became a member of New York City based alternative pop-rock band, 78RPM, where he wrote and co-produced their latest singles “Dynamite” and “Free America”. GC also teamed up with 7 year old Alyssa Cheatham, @alyssacheatham on Instagram, a rising child actress, singer & motivational speaker, who stars in the film “Collateral Beauty” as Will Smith’s daughter on her single “The Weekend”. As an entrepreneur, GC has created his own record label GCMG/G Chyl LLC and released a few singles from his solo EP such as “Fight for You,” “Karma,” and “Crazy” featuring the brilliant songstress Samira, available on iTunes. 

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT ANDRE “GC” FENNELL VISIT WWW.GOLDENCHYL.COM


Complex premiered the new video ‘Love Like Ours’ by Estelle featuring Tarrus Riley. The smooth, mid-tempo track is an exclusive on the Reggae Gold 2017 compilation album. The Reggae Gold compilation series from VP Records has presented the best of dancehall, roots and lovers rock reggae for over two decades. Filmed on location in Agoura Hills, California. and directed by Denzel Williams, the visual portrays a love story narrated by Estelle and Tarrus Riley with stunning outdoor shots of lush greenery. The actors, Gabbi Neal and Guy Peel Jr. play a young couple deeply in love, further emphasizing the songs love filled lyrics that embody the pride and joy of being in a relationship, making it a celebratory anthem for lovers everywhere. The expert styling done by Shani James finds Estelle and Tarrus donning beautiful white ensembles throughout the fourminute video. The actors are dressed in beautiful vintage pieces.

“Estelle and Tarrus Riley are two amazing talents and they perform the song so effortlessly, as seen in this video.” said Christopher Chin, President of VP Records. “We are excited to have the song on the 2017 Reggae Gold compilation and we look forward to releasing Estelle’s upcoming music next year.”


Just a brief span of balmy Caribbean Sea separates the island nations of Cuba and Jamaica. Yet, despite their proximity, each country boasts its own distinctive and uniquely wonderful musical traditions: traditions of incomparable potency and celebratory verve that have evolved, over more than a century, almost completely independent of each other. Until now. In a world-first undertaking, Jake “Mista” Savona journeyed to Havana in 2015 with a handpicked band of Jamaican musicians and established collaborators in tow - including Sly & Robbie (Peter Tosh, NoDoubt, Grace Jones), handdrummer and percussionist Bongo Herman (Bob Marley, Jimmy Cliff, The Abyssinians), and Winston ‘Bopee’ Bowen (Roots Radics, Inna De Yard) - to record the pioneering musical event ‘Havana Meets Kingston’ alongside some of the best and brightest names in Cuban and world music.

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Among the players joining Savona and his Jamaican collective at Havana’s immortal Egrem Studio - the site of global phenomenon Buena Vista Social Club - were celebrated Cuban percussionist Changuito (Los Van Van) and Buena Vista Social Club players Barbarito Torres and Rolando Luna, along with Félix Baloy (Afro-Cuban All Stars), plus dozens more. All told, Havana Meets Kingston deploys the world-beating talents of more than 50 musicians drawn from half-a-dozen nations, recorded over 10 heady days of creative freedom and discovery. At once palpably reverent of Jamaican musical heritage and Cuba’s rich Son, Macusa and Danzón traditions, Havana Meets Kingston is an irresistible celebration of

Afro-Caribbean flavor. Comprising original compositions along with reworked classics, the resulting album weaves an expansive alchemic tapestry, enmeshing Latin beats, dancehall rhythms, rock-steady and deep roots reggae. The enormity of Savona’s achievement with Havana Meets Kingston was foreshadowed by the ample buzz attending lead single ‘Carnival’ - a dose of Jamaican syncopation and rapid-fire reggae vocals featuring Randy Valentine (Major Lazer) and Cuba’s Francisco ‘Solis’ Robert. The EPK video for the album racked up a massive 1.5 million views and 20,000 Facebook shares in just one week, while the single itself stormed the iTunes charts. It’s a clear taste of the ground-breaking musical celebration to come. A richly textured songbook that swings effortlessly from the cigar-and-rum-perfumed atmosphere of Old Havana to the humid abandon of a Kingston Sound System party. Havana Meets Kingston weaves together Spanish-language ardour and entrancing Jamaican patois, spinning a musical web that transcends language - speaking to nothing so clearly as hips and heart, in equal measure. Savona & The Havana Meets Kingston Sound System (featuring Randy Valentine and Solis) are confirmed to appear at Island Vibe Festival on North Stradbroke Island, Australia in October. A full-scale tour featuring the core players from the project is planned for March 2018. One thing is certain: as Aza Lineage and Birdz-I promise on dancehall anthem ‘In the Ghetto’, Havana Meets Kingston is certain to “make ya skank off ya feet.”


Celebrating over 40 years in music, one of the most pivotal reggae bands of all time Third World will drop their new single “Eyes Are Up On You” (out July 28, 2017) off their upcoming full-length album. The song and album are both produced by Damian Marley and will be released on Ghetto Youths International.  Third World’s bassist Richard Daley explains why this musical process comes

full circle. “I had the honor of working with Bob Marley back in the 70s doing some recording in London and how remicinensent it is as I sit in the studio working with Damian Marley. It is the same feeling and vibe, as we record and produce songs like “Eyes Are Up On You” and others. It is a great musical moment.” Damian Marley adds to the excitement and says “I’m proud to be working with my uncles!”

The song, which will be accompanied with a lyric music video to follow. is a reminder that actions speak louder than words. «Eyes are up on you, careful what you do, someone is watching you” states the melodic chorus. The single artwork, inspired by Caribbean-influenced street art, is created by Oakland-based artist Ras Terms, a key figure in Miami’s 80s & 90s graffiti scene who is of Puerto Rican and Colombian desent.

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Hailing from Tanzania, in East Africa, Diamond Platnumz (real name Nasibu Abdul Juma) is here with a strong new Afrobeat / dancehall flavored track, “Hallelujah featuring Morgan Heritage.” Diamond has already made his mark on the African music scene as his social media and YouTube numbers will attest (The video for “Hallelujah” is over 6 million views in three weeks). And now, Diamond alongside Morgan Heritage is making his presence felt on the reggae scene. Download “Hallelujah featuring Morgan Heritage” now and add it to your mix.

The annual release of Strictly The Best compiles the best new reggae songs from Jamaica and abroad. STB vol-ume 56 features lover’s rock and roots reggae from top names and emerging stars in the genre.New and exclusive tracks on STB 56 include “Trouble” from Romain Virgo, “Smile from Jah-Lil, and “No Soul, No Heart, No Love” from Junior Kelly.

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Caribbean POSH Fashion Issues - Yvette Noel-Schure Cover  
Caribbean POSH Fashion Issues - Yvette Noel-Schure Cover