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A G L O B A L B U S I N E S S M A G A Z I N E F R O M K A L M A R I N D U S T R I E S, N O. 2 / 2 0 0 4

5 ECH units have been delivered to Van Doorn Container Depot at the new Rotterdam Maasvlakte terminal. From left to right: Mr. A. Kornet, Managing Director of Peinemann Kalmar, Mr. J. de Ruiter (standing behind Ad Kornet), Managing Director of Van Doorn Container Depot, Mr. C.J. Schepen (standing next to Ad Kornet), Depot Manager of Van Doorn Container Depot, Mr. J. Jongenotter, Operational Manager van Doorn Containe Depot (he is the one who is sitting on the footstep), Mr. D. Pettersson, Product Manager Heavy Lift Trucks Kalmar Industries, Mr. G. Hoving, Account Manager Peinemann Kalmar, Mr. J. van Beek, Financial Department Van Doorn Container Depot (he is standing on top).

Maher Terminals: ready for new challenges • Largest container terminal in North America – 450 on terminal & 150 near terminal acres (245 hectares). • One combined terminal –

Kalmar’s new empty container truck dedicated to double handling Kalmar has launched an empty container handling truck (ECH) specifically designed to lift two containers simultaneously. The new ECH can stack 8ft 6in containers up to nine high. The market response to the new DCE 100-45E has been extremely positive: Kalmar has already secured orders for 19 units – 12 to the Netherlands and seven to Singapore, five of which are for PSA. The machine has a lifting capacity of ten tonnes and comes equipped with a reinforced mast, a wider and more powerful drive axle and an enhanced lifting attachment.

the space available for stacking not only loaded but also empty containers.” “With our new machine, we are helping our customers to boost their productivity and at the same time cut overall costs during each machine’s lifetime. The DCE 100 is an entirely new machine designed for tough, intensive handling of two containers up to nine-high.” Excellent double handling Among the new features, cus-

This latest addition to its product portfolio is able to lift two containers, including 40ft and 45ft hi-cubes, one on top of the other, using a newly designed attachment with hooks for container connections. The 8+1 designation reflects the fact that when working at its extreme lifting height, the lower of the two containers slots into the 8-high position and the uppermost container is therefore in the nine-high position. The machine can also stack taller, 9ft 6in containers up to eight high, or 7+1. According to Dan Pettersson, ECH Product Manager at Kalmar Industries, the DCE 100 will further consolidate Kal-

mar’s position as the leading supplier of efficient machines for intensive empty container handling in the seven- to tentonnes lifting capacity range: “Our product range now encompasses trucks that stack anything from three up to a maximum of nine containers on top of one another. We therefore have the right tools for every environment, be it a small repair yard, a major container manufacturer, or a terminal operator who is tight for space.” “In today’s shipping market, we are seeing the volume of goods at ports and terminals increasing sharply. This puts port operators under severe pressure to make the best use of

tomers will find a powerful lifting attachment fitted with special hooks for double handling. The mast has been reinforced, while the electrical power and hydraulics supplies have been simultaneously streamlined. The DCE 100 features just one cable for electric supply and two hoses for the hydraulics on the attachment. This makes for considerably improved visibility when, for example, the driver needs to grab or release containers stacked almost 20 metres from the ground. More robust construction The driver benefits from an efficient work space that allows him to devote his full concentration to operating and manoeuvring the machine from his ergonomically styled, elevated cabin.

More information: Dan Pettersson Tel +46 372 26062 Fax +46 372 26390 dan.pettersson@kalmarind.com

one combined system. • High throughput grounded straddle carrier operation. • Storage yard designed for straddle carrier operations and high density stacking. • Nearby depot for storage of non-vessel related empty containers. • Six-lane internal highway. • State-of-the-art automated receiving and delivery system. Continues on page 6

........ Caribbean hubs a centre of attention The Caribbean is home to both well-established terminals and several new developments. In this issue, we take a closer look at three facilities: Freeport in the Bahamas, Kingston Container Terminal (KCT) in Jamaica and the new Pointe des Grives container terminal in Fort-de-France, Martinique. What all three of them have in common is their trust in Kalmar’s straddle carriers. Continues on page 8

We took the most popular straddle carrier family in the world and made it better again. A completely new W-shape cabin with excellent visibility and 180° rotating seat combined with the very rigid Kalmar steel structure makes the new 7th generation straddle a pleasant and efficient working environment for the driver. Simple direct wheel drive combined with the new heavy duty wet disc brakes and the new rope winch hoist option means lower maintenance and operating cost. Remote maintenance interface (RMI) compatibility enables faster real time world-wide support through the web and better availability. The new straddle carrier family is available in proven Smoothlift™ hoist models SHC, CSC, ESC and in the new ESC W winch hoist model. All versions are also available without a cabin and with full automation.

7th generation straddle carrier

Serving the 7 Seas with advanced technology.

Continues on page 4

Kalmar has established its own sales company in Belgium starting on 1 June 2004 through the acquisition of BIA NV’s Materials Handling Equipment Division located in Antwerp. Kalmar Belgium NV’s special focus is on the heavy end of the product range: STS cranes, RTG cranes and straddle carriers, as well as terminal tractors and services. The BIA personnel in Antwerp form the basis for the new structure. Mr Damien Cols, current Sales Manager of BIA Antwerp, has been appointed Managing Director, and Mr Vincent Josse, current Technical Manager of BIA Antwerp, has taken over the position of Technical Director at Kalmar Belgium NV.

Setting up in Antwerp

www.kalmarind.com/newsroom

Vincent Josse and Damien Cols.


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A power boost with 29 EDRIVE® ESC straddle carriers .............................3

Serving the 7 Seas with the best – Kalmar announces its 7th generation straddle carriers ............................4

O Maher Terminals All systems go fo long-term growth ......................6

Europe needs to change up a gear

Freeport reaches new heights…and depths! ........8

There is no doubt that further major investment in transportation is vital if we are to improve the competitiveness of Europe. The direction in which to go – as outlined in many European initiatives – must be to move cargo off the highways and make greater use of other modes of transportation. Europe is a market economy and the success of these planned investments is largely dependent on how they contribute to a competitive transportation channel. Just spending money or even providing subsidies is not enough. One solution may be to implement public-private partnerships, much like the Motorways of the Sea project. This should serve to highlight the true competitiveness of such investments. As equipment and service suppliers, we can contribute by developing new machines for handling containers, trailers and unit loads with different sizes and weights. Our experience, however, shows us that standards are very strong and global standards even stronger, as typified by the ISO container standards. As such, it is to be hoped that the focus falls on improving the productivity of intra-EU transportation in terms of the speed of movements and the transport system itself. These improvements are needed urgently. New standards, such as the European Intermodal Loading Unit (EILU), are not the answer to these challenges. Common initiatives from our industry may be needed in order to support safer and environmentally sustainable solutions. In other words, we believe that the voice of our industry needs to be heard. That's why we are part of the newly created PEMA (Port Equipment Supplier Association).

Kingston banks on flexibility ................................10

On board the Ghan Right across Australia...........................................14

E P&O swings with its RTG quartet .........................16

of the largest orders to date for its EDRIVE® ESC

T

straddle carrier with a request for 29 units from MSC Home Terminal in Antwerp. All 29 machines

Compact new RoRo lift truck provides manoeuvrability and power ..................19

have a three-high stacking ability, while 15 of the EDRIVE® units are equipped with Kalmar’s

Kalmar’s new empty container truck dedicated to double handling ..............................20

extendable twinlift

S

PRINTED BY: Offset Ulonen Oy, Tampere, Finland, 2004

Kalmar has received one

The number one RoRo terminal tractor just got even better!....................................................18

world Layout: imageneering | worldwide partners, Tampere, Finland

N

Truly international industry association in the – almost 50 years old – container handling industry .................................17

Kalmar around the

Editor: Aija Kalander Kalmar Industries P.O.Box 387 FIN-33101 Tampere Tel +358 3 2658 111 aija.kalander@kalmarind.com

T

Martinique ripe for banana trades .......................12

Christer Granskog President and CEO Kalmar Industries

Publisher: Benoît Passard Kalmar Industries PO Box 878, Kungsgatan 70 SE-101 37 Stockholm Tel + 46 8 700 51 40 benoit.passard@kalmarind.com

N

The container handling industry is enjoying strong growth. Our customers are, right now, reporting growth, not only in China, but all over the world. The number of containers moved in 2003 far outstripped the forecasts made by industry consultants. In Europe continual growth is prompting new investment in handling capacity. At Kalmar, as suppliers of container and materials handling equipment, we are pleased to be a part of this positive development. With 10 new EU member states recording GNP growth figures well in excess of the old member states’ and borders opening up across the region, it is not difficult to see the potential for growth in intra-European transportation. Since 1990 we have seen a steady expansion of road and shortsea freight transportation. Movement of goods on inland waterways is also increasing, while rail transportation has been static. The high market share of road transportation reveals that the greatest volume growth lies there, simply because it is still the most competitive way to move goods from door to door. Clearly this cannot continue for much longer without major problems arising, especially if we bear in mind that: • a further increase of 50% of goods traffic on the roads is expected by 2010 if nothing changes; • over 80% of the CO2 emissions generated by transportation is attributable to road vehicles, with a further increase expected until 2010; • the negative impact of congestion on European GDP is now 0.5% and is expected to rise to 1.0% by 2010; • the cost of accidents is the equivalent of 2% of GDP.

spreaders, which have a 50-ton capacity. The 29 machines destined for operation at the major Belgian port are due for delivery late this year and early next.

2

The breakthrough was finally achieved when Kalmar developed an extendable full twinlift spreader, designed especially for straddle carriers and equipped with a 50-ton capacity. Kalmar delivered the world’s first straddle carrier with extendable twinlift to Hesse-Noord Natie at the end of 2002. In October last year Belgium’s Hesse-Noord Natie ordered nine Kalmar EDRIVE® ESC straddle carriers for operation in its River Schelde terminals. Four of these units were specified with extendable twinlift spreaders, equipped with a 50-ton capacity. Impressed by the higher productivity Kalmar’s new technology brought to this Belgian terminal, MSC Home Terminal Antwerp ordered the EDRIVE® units in large numbers, proving that the machines with the electrical

The Kalmar EDRIVE® straddle carriers have proven their success in terms of environmental considerations, with low noise emission, low fuel consumption, low maintenance and repair costs and the use of less hydraulic oil. The significance of the twinlift spreader is its ability to mirror the handling efficiency of terminal ship-to-shore cranes. A ship-toshore crane can lower two full 20ft containers 1.5 m apart from each other on the quayside with its extendable twinlift spreader before swinging back to the ship to collect more cargo. For a number of reasons, this speeds up the operation significantly, for example because seal inspection can be done immediately without extra handling. However, the straddle carrier’s conventional twinlift spreader could only pick up one of these boxes at a time.

3

drive system are clearly gaining market share. Other significant deliveries of the ESC straddle carriers include seven units for Office d’Exploitation des Ports (ODEP), Morocco, which already operates a large fleet of standard Kalmar straddles. Nine ESCs will also be delivered to Terminal de Contenidors de Barcelona (TCB) this year.

More information: Ilkka Annala Tel +358 3 265 8111 Fax +358 3 265 8201 ilkka.annala@kalmarind.com


C

A power boost with 29 EDRIVE® ESC straddle carriers .............................3

Serving the 7 Seas with the best – Kalmar announces its 7th generation straddle carriers ............................4

O Maher Terminals All systems go fo long-term growth ......................6

Europe needs to change up a gear

Freeport reaches new heights…and depths! ........8

There is no doubt that further major investment in transportation is vital if we are to improve the competitiveness of Europe. The direction in which to go – as outlined in many European initiatives – must be to move cargo off the highways and make greater use of other modes of transportation. Europe is a market economy and the success of these planned investments is largely dependent on how they contribute to a competitive transportation channel. Just spending money or even providing subsidies is not enough. One solution may be to implement public-private partnerships, much like the Motorways of the Sea project. This should serve to highlight the true competitiveness of such investments. As equipment and service suppliers, we can contribute by developing new machines for handling containers, trailers and unit loads with different sizes and weights. Our experience, however, shows us that standards are very strong and global standards even stronger, as typified by the ISO container standards. As such, it is to be hoped that the focus falls on improving the productivity of intra-EU transportation in terms of the speed of movements and the transport system itself. These improvements are needed urgently. New standards, such as the European Intermodal Loading Unit (EILU), are not the answer to these challenges. Common initiatives from our industry may be needed in order to support safer and environmentally sustainable solutions. In other words, we believe that the voice of our industry needs to be heard. That's why we are part of the newly created PEMA (Port Equipment Supplier Association).

Kingston banks on flexibility ................................10

On board the Ghan Right across Australia...........................................14

E P&O swings with its RTG quartet .........................16

of the largest orders to date for its EDRIVE® ESC

T

straddle carrier with a request for 29 units from MSC Home Terminal in Antwerp. All 29 machines

Compact new RoRo lift truck provides manoeuvrability and power ..................19

have a three-high stacking ability, while 15 of the EDRIVE® units are equipped with Kalmar’s

Kalmar’s new empty container truck dedicated to double handling ..............................20

extendable twinlift

S

PRINTED BY: Offset Ulonen Oy, Tampere, Finland, 2004

Kalmar has received one

The number one RoRo terminal tractor just got even better!....................................................18

world Layout: imageneering | worldwide partners, Tampere, Finland

N

Truly international industry association in the – almost 50 years old – container handling industry .................................17

Kalmar around the

Editor: Aija Kalander Kalmar Industries P.O.Box 387 FIN-33101 Tampere Tel +358 3 2658 111 aija.kalander@kalmarind.com

T

Martinique ripe for banana trades .......................12

Christer Granskog President and CEO Kalmar Industries

Publisher: Benoît Passard Kalmar Industries PO Box 878, Kungsgatan 70 SE-101 37 Stockholm Tel + 46 8 700 51 40 benoit.passard@kalmarind.com

N

The container handling industry is enjoying strong growth. Our customers are, right now, reporting growth, not only in China, but all over the world. The number of containers moved in 2003 far outstripped the forecasts made by industry consultants. In Europe continual growth is prompting new investment in handling capacity. At Kalmar, as suppliers of container and materials handling equipment, we are pleased to be a part of this positive development. With 10 new EU member states recording GNP growth figures well in excess of the old member states’ and borders opening up across the region, it is not difficult to see the potential for growth in intra-European transportation. Since 1990 we have seen a steady expansion of road and shortsea freight transportation. Movement of goods on inland waterways is also increasing, while rail transportation has been static. The high market share of road transportation reveals that the greatest volume growth lies there, simply because it is still the most competitive way to move goods from door to door. Clearly this cannot continue for much longer without major problems arising, especially if we bear in mind that: • a further increase of 50% of goods traffic on the roads is expected by 2010 if nothing changes; • over 80% of the CO2 emissions generated by transportation is attributable to road vehicles, with a further increase expected until 2010; • the negative impact of congestion on European GDP is now 0.5% and is expected to rise to 1.0% by 2010; • the cost of accidents is the equivalent of 2% of GDP.

spreaders, which have a 50-ton capacity. The 29 machines destined for operation at the major Belgian port are due for delivery late this year and early next.

2

The breakthrough was finally achieved when Kalmar developed an extendable full twinlift spreader, designed especially for straddle carriers and equipped with a 50-ton capacity. Kalmar delivered the world’s first straddle carrier with extendable twinlift to Hesse-Noord Natie at the end of 2002. In October last year Belgium’s Hesse-Noord Natie ordered nine Kalmar EDRIVE® ESC straddle carriers for operation in its River Schelde terminals. Four of these units were specified with extendable twinlift spreaders, equipped with a 50-ton capacity. Impressed by the higher productivity Kalmar’s new technology brought to this Belgian terminal, MSC Home Terminal Antwerp ordered the EDRIVE® units in large numbers, proving that the machines with the electrical

The Kalmar EDRIVE® straddle carriers have proven their success in terms of environmental considerations, with low noise emission, low fuel consumption, low maintenance and repair costs and the use of less hydraulic oil. The significance of the twinlift spreader is its ability to mirror the handling efficiency of terminal ship-to-shore cranes. A ship-toshore crane can lower two full 20ft containers 1.5 m apart from each other on the quayside with its extendable twinlift spreader before swinging back to the ship to collect more cargo. For a number of reasons, this speeds up the operation significantly, for example because seal inspection can be done immediately without extra handling. However, the straddle carrier’s conventional twinlift spreader could only pick up one of these boxes at a time.

3

drive system are clearly gaining market share. Other significant deliveries of the ESC straddle carriers include seven units for Office d’Exploitation des Ports (ODEP), Morocco, which already operates a large fleet of standard Kalmar straddles. Nine ESCs will also be delivered to Terminal de Contenidors de Barcelona (TCB) this year.

More information: Ilkka Annala Tel +358 3 265 8111 Fax +358 3 265 8201 ilkka.annala@kalmarind.com


Serving the 7 Seas with the best – Kalmar announces its 7th generation straddle carriers

Continued from page 1

Based on the global success of the 6th generation, Kalmar is proud to introduce its 7th generation straddle carriers with many new features that make them unsurpassed on the

A shift to the seventh generation “This is not about a revolution; it’s all about an evolution,” says Ilkka Annala, VP, Kalmar straddle carriers. “We have built the world’s most solid and durable straddle carriers for years, but now customers are looking for solutions that help them perform better in the future. Automation, heavier load handling possibilities and minimized operation costs are just a few of the many ways we can help customers work smarter by using the 7th generation straddle carriers.” “We see the 7th generation as an answer to the current trends in the market. Customers are shifting from mechanical to electric machines, from manual to automated operation, from onsite troubleshooting to remote assistance through our latest state-of-the-art RMI system. Also, better driver ergonomics and an excellent cabin are a must today. In our design, we are shifting more towards heavy load 50 ton twinlift or extendable twinlift handling. The strong rigid frame as well as excellent ergonomics and visibility of our new W-type cabin also guarantee high driver confidence and productivity,” Annala continues. Continuing success with availability Kalmar unveiled the latest generation of high-performance machines at the TOC2004 Europe terminal operators conference and exhibition in Barcelona, June 2004. The new straddle carriers hold firm to Kalmar’s philosophy of constantly introducing new technologies to boost the materials handling performance of its customers all over the world. “The new range is complete with lots of new advanced features. Everything evolved for the better,” says Ilkka Annala “Still, the emphasis has been on keeping the availability and reliability of our machines at the highest possible level.”

?

market. A choice of models with the Smoothlift or winch hoist offers the right machine for every purpose, and proven Kalmar modules allows you to build in the options you want.

ed straddle carriers. All 7th generation straddles are now also available fully automated without cabin. Additionally, Kalmar straddle carriers can be also automated at a later date, if this has not already been done in the factory. The carriers come with CAN-bus PLC controls, fly-by-wire controls and other advanced features, in addition to the RMI capability. A range of DRAFs™ (driver assisting features) improve and facilitate operator work. These include Smartpath® container position verification, APP™ (autopick-and-place), automatic spreader sideshift, automatic spreader slowdown when approaching container, and a PLC integrated load-weighing system. Build in the options you want

The list of improvements to achieve this is impressive. The new generation is fully RMI compatible, allowing remote web support for faster troubleshooting and represents the forerunner in automation. Additionally, the Kalmar ESC EDRIVE® straddle carrier structure is now more simple and lighter for better performance and fuel-efficiency; new heavy duty disc brakes have been installed as standard for better manoeuvrability and reduced maintenance, while a new W-type cabin design with an optional 180° rotating seats eases operation and adds to user ergonomics.

Remote support and advanced automation Among the most prominent innovations is that the new carriers have been designed to be fully compatible with the remote maintenance interface (RMI) system. As a result, it is now possible to monitor the condition of the carriers remotely. “This allows Kalmar to support customers in troubleshooting and maintenance actions, providing for more efficient fleet management and higher uptime, with a direct improvement on the bottom line,” says Ilkka Annala. Kalmar’s automation leadership is also evident. The great results achieved at the Patrick Stevedore’s Brisbane terminal attest to what is possible with automat-

5

The new carriers come in two basic types: the CSC Smoothlift™ hoist series and the ESC Smoothlift™ hoist or winch hoist (W) series. The ESC carriers are equipped with electric AC drives to meet the strictest environmental standards. Though the basic variation among both series is between either 3-high or 4-high, and lift 40 tons or twinlift for up to 50 tons, the carriers are highly modular, and therefore offer a great deal of flexibility in choosing optimum features. “The machines have the same proven base structure and components, but it is possible to tailor them to various applications according to customer needs. Our wide range of proven modules offer flexibility as well as reliability,” Ilkka Annala explains. “You can now build exactly the straddle carrier model you need for your own application.”

More information: Ilkka Annala Tel +358 3 265 8111 Fax +358 3 265 8201 ilkka.annala@kalmarind.com


Serving the 7 Seas with the best – Kalmar announces its 7th generation straddle carriers

Continued from page 1

Based on the global success of the 6th generation, Kalmar is proud to introduce its 7th generation straddle carriers with many new features that make them unsurpassed on the

A shift to the seventh generation “This is not about a revolution; it’s all about an evolution,” says Ilkka Annala, VP, Kalmar straddle carriers. “We have built the world’s most solid and durable straddle carriers for years, but now customers are looking for solutions that help them perform better in the future. Automation, heavier load handling possibilities and minimized operation costs are just a few of the many ways we can help customers work smarter by using the 7th generation straddle carriers.” “We see the 7th generation as an answer to the current trends in the market. Customers are shifting from mechanical to electric machines, from manual to automated operation, from onsite troubleshooting to remote assistance through our latest state-of-the-art RMI system. Also, better driver ergonomics and an excellent cabin are a must today. In our design, we are shifting more towards heavy load 50 ton twinlift or extendable twinlift handling. The strong rigid frame as well as excellent ergonomics and visibility of our new W-type cabin also guarantee high driver confidence and productivity,” Annala continues. Continuing success with availability Kalmar unveiled the latest generation of high-performance machines at the TOC2004 Europe terminal operators conference and exhibition in Barcelona, June 2004. The new straddle carriers hold firm to Kalmar’s philosophy of constantly introducing new technologies to boost the materials handling performance of its customers all over the world. “The new range is complete with lots of new advanced features. Everything evolved for the better,” says Ilkka Annala “Still, the emphasis has been on keeping the availability and reliability of our machines at the highest possible level.”

?

market. A choice of models with the Smoothlift or winch hoist offers the right machine for every purpose, and proven Kalmar modules allows you to build in the options you want.

ed straddle carriers. All 7th generation straddles are now also available fully automated without cabin. Additionally, Kalmar straddle carriers can be also automated at a later date, if this has not already been done in the factory. The carriers come with CAN-bus PLC controls, fly-by-wire controls and other advanced features, in addition to the RMI capability. A range of DRAFs™ (driver assisting features) improve and facilitate operator work. These include Smartpath® container position verification, APP™ (autopick-and-place), automatic spreader sideshift, automatic spreader slowdown when approaching container, and a PLC integrated load-weighing system. Build in the options you want

The list of improvements to achieve this is impressive. The new generation is fully RMI compatible, allowing remote web support for faster troubleshooting and represents the forerunner in automation. Additionally, the Kalmar ESC EDRIVE® straddle carrier structure is now more simple and lighter for better performance and fuel-efficiency; new heavy duty disc brakes have been installed as standard for better manoeuvrability and reduced maintenance, while a new W-type cabin design with an optional 180° rotating seats eases operation and adds to user ergonomics.

Remote support and advanced automation Among the most prominent innovations is that the new carriers have been designed to be fully compatible with the remote maintenance interface (RMI) system. As a result, it is now possible to monitor the condition of the carriers remotely. “This allows Kalmar to support customers in troubleshooting and maintenance actions, providing for more efficient fleet management and higher uptime, with a direct improvement on the bottom line,” says Ilkka Annala. Kalmar’s automation leadership is also evident. The great results achieved at the Patrick Stevedore’s Brisbane terminal attest to what is possible with automat-

5

The new carriers come in two basic types: the CSC Smoothlift™ hoist series and the ESC Smoothlift™ hoist or winch hoist (W) series. The ESC carriers are equipped with electric AC drives to meet the strictest environmental standards. Though the basic variation among both series is between either 3-high or 4-high, and lift 40 tons or twinlift for up to 50 tons, the carriers are highly modular, and therefore offer a great deal of flexibility in choosing optimum features. “The machines have the same proven base structure and components, but it is possible to tailor them to various applications according to customer needs. Our wide range of proven modules offer flexibility as well as reliability,” Ilkka Annala explains. “You can now build exactly the straddle carrier model you need for your own application.”

More information: Ilkka Annala Tel +358 3 265 8111 Fax +358 3 265 8201 ilkka.annala@kalmarind.com


Photo by courtesy of Port of NY/NJ

Maher Terminals

All systems go for long-term growth of the port. It targets more than 80 inland points, not only the local NY/NJ area. The amount of cargo carried by rail has grown substantially, from two percent in 1980 to 14 percent in 2002. “We expect that to grow by another 30% when all our infrastructure improvements are in place.” “Serving inland markets by express rail is a big part of what we do. We have been operating a very successful on-dock, double-stack service by express rail, which we intend to expand significantly.” Since its inception, the express rail service has doubled in terms of size and capacity. It now will occupy an area of 72 acres, compared to 32 in its early days, and is capable of handling one million containers annually. Straddle operations provide rail-to-terminal support.

Continued from page 1

With an annual container throughput of 4m TEU, the Port of NY/NJ is the largest port on the US East coast and the third largest in the US. The majority of this volume is handled by Maher Terminals which, because of its impressive throughput and sophisticated handling operations, can be most accurately described as a port within a port. This year, Maher will conclude a US$ 400 million investment programme to improve its capacity. Under a new 30-year lease from the Port of NY/NJ, the operator will introduce a combined maritime and rail terminal based largely on a Kalmar straddle carrier system.

The investment programme includes a series of infrastructure projects and equipment purchases and upgrades. As part of this, Maher has expanded its existing fleet of Kalmar straddle carriers to 148 units and introduce five new ship-to-shore cranes. Total investment in expansion by the Port of NY/NJ as a whole is estimated at 3.7 billion dollars, which includes dredging the channel to achieve a 55ft depth – the equivalent of almost 17 metres. Dr Roger Nortillo, Executive Vice President for Maher Terminals, is confident that when the investment programme is concluded, the terminal will easily become North America’s largest marine terminal. He explains that the development is based on forecasts for the port’s long-term growth. Last year, throughput volumes at the terminal grew by 15 percent. “There are several factors fuelling growth,” he says. “One of these is the ongoing trend for operators to deploy larger vessels on the main East-West trade routes. The size of these vessels is purported to reach as much as 12,000 TEU in the future. Such ships, together with the fact that containers are being stacked higher onboard, call for taller cranes with longer outreaches, as well as deeper drafts.” Things are also changing in Asia, with manufacturing continuing to shift from North East Asia to South East Asia. In real terms, Far East cargo moving through Maher Terminals is already outpacing cargo from North Europe. This is a particularly important development as Far East imports have increased by some 40%. “With that in mind, it is essential that we design a facility capable of handling these significantly larger vessels, as well as being in a position to handle not only local business, but also cargo moving to

More information: Ilkka Annala Tel +358 3 265 8111 Fax +358 3 265 8201 ilkka.annala@kalmarind.com

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and from other markets,” says Dr. Nortillo. A pioneer in technology Maher Terminal is known throughout the port industry as a pioneer in the adoption of the latest technology and its new infrastructure developments reflect a heavy reliance on electrical, optical and digital automation. The Maher daughter company, Maher Terminals Logistic Systems (MTLS), has developed a comprehensive portfolio of terminal management software as well as systems for gate operations. MTLS has supplied these systems to various terminals around the globe, for example in the US, (East and West Coast), Poland, Brazil and Mexico. According to Dr Nortillo, Maher Terminals’ new, state-ofthe-art automated gate systems are designed to handle 13,500 movements per day. “We currently have 6,500 7,000 truck moves daily, but with the new system, we are able to cope with 13,500. We also have the advantage of operating extended gate hours – from 6am to midnight – which is a significant development.” “The gate system is completely paperless and utilises smart dispatching, rather than the “first come, first served” system normally adopted in terminals. We know everything about the container that needs to be known, which allows us to make clever decisions.” Maher’s co-operative chassis pool also increases efficiency for truckers. Chassis are not tied to a particular carrier but can be used by any one of the different ocean carriers that participate in the pool.

High throughput straddle carrier system Commenting on Maher’s decision to adopt a Kalmar straddle carrier system, Dr Nortillo says: “We selected the straddle carrier system after extensive studies based on productivity per acre. Provided their high productivity can be maintained, straddles are the best option for us. Seven years ago we had 38 Kalmar straddle carriers. This year, the total number of Kalmar CSC straddles in the terminal will hit 148 units once the latest order for numerous additional three-high units with twin lift spreaders is completed.” “We have 31 different shipping lines calling at our terminal,which dictates a fast sort and select operation. A high throughput straddle carrier operation working at its best can handle the diversity. MTLS has developed a smart straddle / yard management system which controls and assigns straddle carrier transactions to achieve the shortest travel distances and optimum stacking algorithms for yard and rail transfers. Says Dr Nortillo: “All our straddles take their directions straight from the computer. The shortest travel distance means less wear and tear and a faster production cycle. It optimises operations.” “Our straddles move only with containers. The computer system makes the most efficient matches,

Right on track Maher Terminal serves a high consumption area which houses 40 million people within a small radius

7

rather than allocating moves on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.” While Maher’s own control systems, gate access and data flow all have to work seamlessly to allow the terminal to reach its full potential, the equipment supplier also has to keep up. “Kalmar has proved to be a strategic partner for us,” says Dr Nortillo. Maher renews its fleet on an ongoing basis. Each model needs to be better than the previous model, as that is the only way to achieve a continuous improvement in straddle carrier operations. “In cooperation with Kalmar, we work continuously to obtain feedback statistics on product reliability, availability and maintenance. Together, we make a big effort to improve the equipment and we have achieved some outstanding results.” “For its part, Kalmar has been very receptive and cooperative in their areas. The company has worked hard to evolve from being a traditional manufacturer to one that listens to its customers and works with them to improve productivity, safety and maintenance.” In order to maintain the efficiency of its straddle fleet Maher operates a unique scrapping policy. Explains Dr Nortillo: “The life cycle of our straddles is 10 years, regardless of their physical condition. We have now destroyed 44 units. Moreover, we do not use components from old machines as spare parts for new machines, this would contaminate new equipment with potential obsolete parts and affect the mean time to failure valves.” Reaching new heights Maher Terminals’ commitment to straddle carrier operations as part of its growth strategy is reflected in its decision to introduce ‘sky bridges’ for 120 straddles. These overhead walkways make the drivers’ working environment safer and allows them to be more productive. Maher also has a new centralised straddle carrier maintenance building, which can accommodate 20 straddles at any one time. The US$ 18 million facility has been established to ensure the maximum uptime of the fleet.


Photo by courtesy of Port of NY/NJ

Maher Terminals

All systems go for long-term growth of the port. It targets more than 80 inland points, not only the local NY/NJ area. The amount of cargo carried by rail has grown substantially, from two percent in 1980 to 14 percent in 2002. “We expect that to grow by another 30% when all our infrastructure improvements are in place.” “Serving inland markets by express rail is a big part of what we do. We have been operating a very successful on-dock, double-stack service by express rail, which we intend to expand significantly.” Since its inception, the express rail service has doubled in terms of size and capacity. It now will occupy an area of 72 acres, compared to 32 in its early days, and is capable of handling one million containers annually. Straddle operations provide rail-to-terminal support.

Continued from page 1

With an annual container throughput of 4m TEU, the Port of NY/NJ is the largest port on the US East coast and the third largest in the US. The majority of this volume is handled by Maher Terminals which, because of its impressive throughput and sophisticated handling operations, can be most accurately described as a port within a port. This year, Maher will conclude a US$ 400 million investment programme to improve its capacity. Under a new 30-year lease from the Port of NY/NJ, the operator will introduce a combined maritime and rail terminal based largely on a Kalmar straddle carrier system.

The investment programme includes a series of infrastructure projects and equipment purchases and upgrades. As part of this, Maher has expanded its existing fleet of Kalmar straddle carriers to 148 units and introduce five new ship-to-shore cranes. Total investment in expansion by the Port of NY/NJ as a whole is estimated at 3.7 billion dollars, which includes dredging the channel to achieve a 55ft depth – the equivalent of almost 17 metres. Dr Roger Nortillo, Executive Vice President for Maher Terminals, is confident that when the investment programme is concluded, the terminal will easily become North America’s largest marine terminal. He explains that the development is based on forecasts for the port’s long-term growth. Last year, throughput volumes at the terminal grew by 15 percent. “There are several factors fuelling growth,” he says. “One of these is the ongoing trend for operators to deploy larger vessels on the main East-West trade routes. The size of these vessels is purported to reach as much as 12,000 TEU in the future. Such ships, together with the fact that containers are being stacked higher onboard, call for taller cranes with longer outreaches, as well as deeper drafts.” Things are also changing in Asia, with manufacturing continuing to shift from North East Asia to South East Asia. In real terms, Far East cargo moving through Maher Terminals is already outpacing cargo from North Europe. This is a particularly important development as Far East imports have increased by some 40%. “With that in mind, it is essential that we design a facility capable of handling these significantly larger vessels, as well as being in a position to handle not only local business, but also cargo moving to

More information: Ilkka Annala Tel +358 3 265 8111 Fax +358 3 265 8201 ilkka.annala@kalmarind.com

6

and from other markets,” says Dr. Nortillo. A pioneer in technology Maher Terminal is known throughout the port industry as a pioneer in the adoption of the latest technology and its new infrastructure developments reflect a heavy reliance on electrical, optical and digital automation. The Maher daughter company, Maher Terminals Logistic Systems (MTLS), has developed a comprehensive portfolio of terminal management software as well as systems for gate operations. MTLS has supplied these systems to various terminals around the globe, for example in the US, (East and West Coast), Poland, Brazil and Mexico. According to Dr Nortillo, Maher Terminals’ new, state-ofthe-art automated gate systems are designed to handle 13,500 movements per day. “We currently have 6,500 7,000 truck moves daily, but with the new system, we are able to cope with 13,500. We also have the advantage of operating extended gate hours – from 6am to midnight – which is a significant development.” “The gate system is completely paperless and utilises smart dispatching, rather than the “first come, first served” system normally adopted in terminals. We know everything about the container that needs to be known, which allows us to make clever decisions.” Maher’s co-operative chassis pool also increases efficiency for truckers. Chassis are not tied to a particular carrier but can be used by any one of the different ocean carriers that participate in the pool.

High throughput straddle carrier system Commenting on Maher’s decision to adopt a Kalmar straddle carrier system, Dr Nortillo says: “We selected the straddle carrier system after extensive studies based on productivity per acre. Provided their high productivity can be maintained, straddles are the best option for us. Seven years ago we had 38 Kalmar straddle carriers. This year, the total number of Kalmar CSC straddles in the terminal will hit 148 units once the latest order for numerous additional three-high units with twin lift spreaders is completed.” “We have 31 different shipping lines calling at our terminal,which dictates a fast sort and select operation. A high throughput straddle carrier operation working at its best can handle the diversity. MTLS has developed a smart straddle / yard management system which controls and assigns straddle carrier transactions to achieve the shortest travel distances and optimum stacking algorithms for yard and rail transfers. Says Dr Nortillo: “All our straddles take their directions straight from the computer. The shortest travel distance means less wear and tear and a faster production cycle. It optimises operations.” “Our straddles move only with containers. The computer system makes the most efficient matches,

Right on track Maher Terminal serves a high consumption area which houses 40 million people within a small radius

7

rather than allocating moves on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.” While Maher’s own control systems, gate access and data flow all have to work seamlessly to allow the terminal to reach its full potential, the equipment supplier also has to keep up. “Kalmar has proved to be a strategic partner for us,” says Dr Nortillo. Maher renews its fleet on an ongoing basis. Each model needs to be better than the previous model, as that is the only way to achieve a continuous improvement in straddle carrier operations. “In cooperation with Kalmar, we work continuously to obtain feedback statistics on product reliability, availability and maintenance. Together, we make a big effort to improve the equipment and we have achieved some outstanding results.” “For its part, Kalmar has been very receptive and cooperative in their areas. The company has worked hard to evolve from being a traditional manufacturer to one that listens to its customers and works with them to improve productivity, safety and maintenance.” In order to maintain the efficiency of its straddle fleet Maher operates a unique scrapping policy. Explains Dr Nortillo: “The life cycle of our straddles is 10 years, regardless of their physical condition. We have now destroyed 44 units. Moreover, we do not use components from old machines as spare parts for new machines, this would contaminate new equipment with potential obsolete parts and affect the mean time to failure valves.” Reaching new heights Maher Terminals’ commitment to straddle carrier operations as part of its growth strategy is reflected in its decision to introduce ‘sky bridges’ for 120 straddles. These overhead walkways make the drivers’ working environment safer and allows them to be more productive. Maher also has a new centralised straddle carrier maintenance building, which can accommodate 20 straddles at any one time. The US$ 18 million facility has been established to ensure the maximum uptime of the fleet.


USA Atlantic Ocean Gulf of Mexico

Miami BAHAMAS

JAMAICA MARTINIQUE

Caribbean hubs square up to future challenges With ever increasing transhipment volumes, the Caribbean has established itself as a huge cargo centre. And, as terminals in the region pour significant resources into upgrading their facilities, shipping lines have a veritable beauty parade of Caribbean transhipment hubs from which to choose. The Caribbean is home to both well-established terminals and several new developments. In the next few pages, we take a closer look at three facilities: Freeport in the Bahamas, Kingston Container Terminal (KCT) in Jamaica and the new Pointe des Grives container terminal in Fort-de-France, Martinique.

Freeport reaches new heights …and depths!

Continued from page 1

In recent years, Freeport,

Freeport Container Port first embarked on its ambitious growth track when Chris Gray was appointed Chief Executive in 2002. In 2003 “Our throughput doubled that of 2001,” he says. “This year we expect to reach 1.25 million TEU. In its current state, the port is capable of handling 1.5 TEU but we have the potential to expand our facilities to create additional capacity if required”. According to Mr Gray, Freeport Container Terminal’s current policy is only to expand if customer demand dictates. “At present the terminal is busy handling cargo for our two biggest customers, MSC and Maersk. Some 99.9% of our traffic is transhipment, with 60% of the boxes handled split more or less equally between US and Central and South America destinations.” Freeport has a couple of advantages that have certainly paved the way for growth. Its geographic location is a definite asset, explains Mr Gray. “We are

in the Bahamas, has been the fastest growing hub in the region. Its phenomenal growth started seven years ago, culminating at the end of 2003 when it crossed the one million TEU barrier for the first time. This busy port is currently served by 42 Kalmar straddle carriers, the newest 20 units of which can stack 4-high and, importantly, can be converted for automation.

north of Miami and we’re in the Atlantic, not in the Caribbean. More importantly, we are very strategically located in terms of US East Coast and US Gulf ports, as well as for the Carribbean and Central and South American markets.” Access to land is not an issue for Freeport and, with one of the deepest harbours in the region, neither is draft. According to Mr Gray, in the second half of last year Freeport completed dredging down to 16 meters, allowing it to accommodate the largest container ships in service. “We now have deeper water than any other port on the US East Coast,” he says. “This is a tremendous advantage to us. Vessels are already calling Freeport to lighten their loads before proceeding to the US East Coast. They then call back at Freeport to top up the vessel before heading for the Panama Canal or back across the Atlantic.” Continues on next page

Freeport and Kingston rank amongst the most well-established transhipment hubs in the region. Freeport is the fastest growing terminal in the Caribbean whilst Kingston is busy developing its Phase 4 expansion, which will increase the terminal’s annual capacity to 1.5 million TEU. In comparison, Martinique – a French overseas department and the westernmost outpost of the EU – has only recently started developing container handling facilities at Pointe des Grives, with a view to achieving regional hub status in the future.

What all three of them have in common is their trust in Kalmar’s straddle carriers to assist them in the competitive environment in which they operate. The straddle carrier’s flexibility has, time and again, proven the key to highly efficient container handling in both large, well-established terminals and fledgling, mid-size terminals only just embarking on a growth strategy.

More information: ?? Tel +46 372 26112 Fax +46 372 263 66 ??@kalmarind.com

Kalmar forklifts make light work of heavy handling for Germany's Hamburger Stahlwerke.

8 ?

?


USA Atlantic Ocean Gulf of Mexico

Miami BAHAMAS

JAMAICA MARTINIQUE

Caribbean hubs square up to future challenges With ever increasing transhipment volumes, the Caribbean has established itself as a huge cargo centre. And, as terminals in the region pour significant resources into upgrading their facilities, shipping lines have a veritable beauty parade of Caribbean transhipment hubs from which to choose. The Caribbean is home to both well-established terminals and several new developments. In the next few pages, we take a closer look at three facilities: Freeport in the Bahamas, Kingston Container Terminal (KCT) in Jamaica and the new Pointe des Grives container terminal in Fort-de-France, Martinique.

Freeport reaches new heights …and depths!

Continued from page 1

In recent years, Freeport,

Freeport Container Port first embarked on its ambitious growth track when Chris Gray was appointed Chief Executive in 2002. In 2003 “Our throughput doubled that of 2001,” he says. “This year we expect to reach 1.25 million TEU. In its current state, the port is capable of handling 1.5 TEU but we have the potential to expand our facilities to create additional capacity if required”. According to Mr Gray, Freeport Container Terminal’s current policy is only to expand if customer demand dictates. “At present the terminal is busy handling cargo for our two biggest customers, MSC and Maersk. Some 99.9% of our traffic is transhipment, with 60% of the boxes handled split more or less equally between US and Central and South America destinations.” Freeport has a couple of advantages that have certainly paved the way for growth. Its geographic location is a definite asset, explains Mr Gray. “We are

in the Bahamas, has been the fastest growing hub in the region. Its phenomenal growth started seven years ago, culminating at the end of 2003 when it crossed the one million TEU barrier for the first time. This busy port is currently served by 42 Kalmar straddle carriers, the newest 20 units of which can stack 4-high and, importantly, can be converted for automation.

north of Miami and we’re in the Atlantic, not in the Caribbean. More importantly, we are very strategically located in terms of US East Coast and US Gulf ports, as well as for the Carribbean and Central and South American markets.” Access to land is not an issue for Freeport and, with one of the deepest harbours in the region, neither is draft. According to Mr Gray, in the second half of last year Freeport completed dredging down to 16 meters, allowing it to accommodate the largest container ships in service. “We now have deeper water than any other port on the US East Coast,” he says. “This is a tremendous advantage to us. Vessels are already calling Freeport to lighten their loads before proceeding to the US East Coast. They then call back at Freeport to top up the vessel before heading for the Panama Canal or back across the Atlantic.” Continues on next page

Freeport and Kingston rank amongst the most well-established transhipment hubs in the region. Freeport is the fastest growing terminal in the Caribbean whilst Kingston is busy developing its Phase 4 expansion, which will increase the terminal’s annual capacity to 1.5 million TEU. In comparison, Martinique – a French overseas department and the westernmost outpost of the EU – has only recently started developing container handling facilities at Pointe des Grives, with a view to achieving regional hub status in the future.

What all three of them have in common is their trust in Kalmar’s straddle carriers to assist them in the competitive environment in which they operate. The straddle carrier’s flexibility has, time and again, proven the key to highly efficient container handling in both large, well-established terminals and fledgling, mid-size terminals only just embarking on a growth strategy.

More information: ?? Tel +46 372 26112 Fax +46 372 263 66 ??@kalmarind.com

Kalmar forklifts make light work of heavy handling for Germany's Hamburger Stahlwerke.

8 ?

?


Freeport In Mr Gray’s opinion, pure transhipment is a multi-faceted business, which benefits significantly from the flexibility of a straddle carrier system. “We need a system that is suited to random operations throughout the port and straddle carriers are perfect for this. Sometimes we’ll get a vessel with 2000 containers destined for as many as 70 different ports. When unloaded, they have to be treated as individual containers.” Secondly, Mr Gray explains, straddle carrier operations constitute an independent system which allows the port to keep to a minimum the amount of traffic and machines in the terminal. “The operation uses a lot of land, but as we’re not limited by space, this isn’t a problem for us,” he says. “Straddle carriers are also very fast and offer greater operational flexibility which is beneficial when you consider that loading trailers can be quite time consuming.” Freeport measures productivity by vessel turnaround time rather than by crane lifts. According to Mr Gray, the shipping lines calling at the terminal want their vessels in, worked and then out again in the shortest time possible and are not concerned about individual crane moves so much as overall vessel productivity. In June 2003, Freeport installed the Navis Yard System to help improve efficiency.

More information: Tom Gilchrist Tel +1 609 860 0150 Fax +1 609 860 0224 tom.gilchrist@kalmarind.com

Working as a team In charge of the straddle carrier system at Freeport is Engineering Manager, Steven Wilson. It is his responsibility to ensure that the 50 straddles working in three shifts keep on running. The olders units have so far racked up 20,000 hours of work and Mr Wilson is even more impressed with the newer models: “They’re fantastic machines,” he says. “They’re quieter, the ergonomics are better – in fact they are improving all the time. We also have a good relationship with the people at Kalmar.” According to Mr Wilson, Freeport finds operations run extremely well through the combination of 3- and 4-high stacking machines. “Since the arrival of our very first machines, we have worked together with Kalmar to make improvements.” Mr Wilson also finds the Kalmar straddle carrier user forums helpful. “We sometimes learn about valuable innovations made by other terminals which we can adopt here at Freeport. The forums put us in direct contact with engineering management from around the world, as well as giving us access to a vast database of information,” he says.

Kingston banks on flexibility Based in one of the region’s largest transhipment centres, Dr Ian Blair, Senior Vice President of Operations and Development with the Port Authority of Jamaica (PAJ), is well-placed to put forward his views on port development and cargo patterns in the Caribbean. He points out that despite all the hype about transhipment, only three ports in the area have registered a notable increase in traffic in recent years; namely, Freeport, Kingston and Panama. ”In terms of size and facilities, they are all in the same league and all three of them will continue growing,” he says.According to Dr Blair, the business environment is tough. ”More and more port operators think that this business is attractive – until they are actually in it.” “If you look at most Caribbean ports over a five-year period in terms of throughput and handling capacity, you will see minimal increase. Only Freeport, Kingston and Panama have shown significant growth and have managed to attract traffic normally flowing to other terminals,” he explains. “Today, they all have a volume of 1 million TEU and so they have good economies of scale. And there is another thing in common: Each port is dominated by one or two major shipping lines.” Dr Blair believes that sooner or later these shipping lines will require dedicated terminals. If the ports wish to continue growing, they will have no choice but to provide them. “Even now, whenever there is

More information: Tom Gilchrist Tel +1 609 860 0150 Fax +1 609 860 0224 tom.gilchrist@kalmarind.com

10

any expansion, the respective carriers serving each port absorb the extra capacity so that nobody else can get a foothold. The major shipping lines can easily reroute their traffic from the West Coast through the Caribbean. That is how they maintain their dominance. The lines see these hubs as their marketing tool and they do not want to let the competition in. We often see such phenomenal leaps in growth taking place before the actual expansion occurs. For example, volume growth at Kingston began even before work on the current expansion.” The critical question for these ports, according to Dr Blair, is how to accommodate a dominant carrier that has the critical mass and wants its own terminal, while at the same time providing for other shipping lines. Serving the logistics chain Dr Blair stresses that it is not ports but logistics chains that compete with each other: “Ports are part of a logistics chain and our challenge is to complement that logistics chain as best we can.” Logistics providers decide how their shipments are routed. Major logistics chains that move

large quantities of TEUs – such as Wallmart and Goodyear, for example – decide which shipping line moves what cargo and from where. Because of this, shipping lines select their alliance partners in response to logistics providers. At present there is a great deal of cost cutting: rates are falling and shipping lines are putting pressure on ports to reduce rates. According to Dr Blair, Freeport, Kingston and Panama are fortunate in that they have socalled “first mover” status. “This allows them to charge lower rates and still get a reasonable return for investors. But it takes time to achieve that kind of critical mass. In my opinion you are probably looking at six to seven years before you can fully convince a shipping line that you have the necessary reliability and efficiency levels to justify them rearranging their schedules.” “To strengthen their positions, stevedore companies with global networks have offered a flat rate across their networks, which puts pressure on individual ports such as ourselves.” Long-term vision Kingston Container Terminal (KCT) passed the 1 million TEU throughput mark in 2002, growing by approximately 10% annually – the combined result of a good geographical location and a substantial client base. KCT is owned by PAJ and operated by an AP Moller subsidiary, APM Terminals, under a 2002 management contract. Interestingly, Maersk is not a major user of the terminal, with Zim still accounting for most cargo volume. Explains Dr Blair: “We did not enter into this agreement with a view to attract-

the south. However, our interchange area for truckers will be continue to be located in the north terminal.” Security will also be improved with the installation of security cameras throughout the entire terminal. There will be an x-ray system for all boxes entering and leaving the terminal, although for transhipment boxes, this system will be implemented selectively.

ing Maersk Sealand vessels. The decision was made purely from a management perspective. It has proven to be a good decision, which has manifested itself in significant productivity improvements.” Some 90% of Kingston’s traffic is transhipment, says Dr Blair. “Most of our transhipment cargo is from the Far East to the US East coast. Europe – East Coast – South America cargo is also increasing, as are imports, albeit modestly, by a couple of percentage points annually.” Kingston Port has continually invested in upgrading its facilities and equipment. “We started development of Phase 2 in 1995 and finished in 1997, while work on Phase 3 took place between 1999 and 2001. We are now developing Phase 4 and already planning Phase 5. “If we want to keep on growing we need to have long-term vision and a long-term understanding of the market and trade flows. Our strategy is to be flexible enough to be able to provide both dedicated and multi-user terminal facilities.” Kingston’s Phase 4 development will increase the terminal’s annual capacity to 1.5 million TEU. “Phase 5 will take us to between 2 million and 2.5 million TEU. Land reclamation has started and we will soon begin dredging to reach a depth of 15 meters,” says Dr Blair. “The terminal is presently operating out of two terminals, which will be joined by a new berth in five years’ time. We completed simulation exercises to establish how we can achieve a better balance between the south and north terminals. Our aim is to re-engineer the north terminal to be as productive as

An invaluable partnership Kingston took delivery of its first Kalmar straddle carriers in 1986. The advantages of a straddle carrier system were evaluated against those of other handling methods. Their flexibility in handling finally swung the decision. The latest 12 Kalmar straddle carriers were delivered in December 2003. “The straddle carriers’ flexibility really makes them the ideal handling system,” explains Dr Blair. “We currently have 50 Kalmar straddle carriers in operation.” “But our biggest challenge has been yard management, which we are upgrading at present. Later this year the whole straddle carrier fleet will be operated under the Cosmos yard management system.” To enhance straddle carrier operating efficiency in the stacking area, KCT has used simula-

11

tion. Says Dr Blair: “We found that the deeper you make the stacking area, the more disoriented the drivers became. If we shorten the stacking area, they can drive at a normal speed and achieve better productivity. Our rows are now 10 boxes deep.” Dr Blair has been impressed by Kalmar���s evolution from machine supplier to solutions provider and partner. “Kalmar has worked together with us to overcome the many pressures we face, which has involved continual development of equipment. For example, from a scheduled maintenance point of view, Kalmar’s newer equipment will save us roughly 10,000 man hours per year.” As activity has increased at KCT, straddle carriers now operate roughly 400 hours a month, explains Dr Blair. “Over the past 10 or 11 years we have used our straddle carriers extensively. As our volumes have grown, Kalmar has developed the straddles for much heavier usage. There is no doubt that our newest machines will face much tougher demands than those delivered a decade or so ago.” KCT also operates a multitrailer system with the help of four Kalmar TRX-252 terminal tractors. Containers are transferred between the north and south terminals by train.


Freeport In Mr Gray’s opinion, pure transhipment is a multi-faceted business, which benefits significantly from the flexibility of a straddle carrier system. “We need a system that is suited to random operations throughout the port and straddle carriers are perfect for this. Sometimes we’ll get a vessel with 2000 containers destined for as many as 70 different ports. When unloaded, they have to be treated as individual containers.” Secondly, Mr Gray explains, straddle carrier operations constitute an independent system which allows the port to keep to a minimum the amount of traffic and machines in the terminal. “The operation uses a lot of land, but as we’re not limited by space, this isn’t a problem for us,” he says. “Straddle carriers are also very fast and offer greater operational flexibility which is beneficial when you consider that loading trailers can be quite time consuming.” Freeport measures productivity by vessel turnaround time rather than by crane lifts. According to Mr Gray, the shipping lines calling at the terminal want their vessels in, worked and then out again in the shortest time possible and are not concerned about individual crane moves so much as overall vessel productivity. In June 2003, Freeport installed the Navis Yard System to help improve efficiency.

More information: Tom Gilchrist Tel +1 609 860 0150 Fax +1 609 860 0224 tom.gilchrist@kalmarind.com

Working as a team In charge of the straddle carrier system at Freeport is Engineering Manager, Steven Wilson. It is his responsibility to ensure that the 50 straddles working in three shifts keep on running. The olders units have so far racked up 20,000 hours of work and Mr Wilson is even more impressed with the newer models: “They’re fantastic machines,” he says. “They’re quieter, the ergonomics are better – in fact they are improving all the time. We also have a good relationship with the people at Kalmar.” According to Mr Wilson, Freeport finds operations run extremely well through the combination of 3- and 4-high stacking machines. “Since the arrival of our very first machines, we have worked together with Kalmar to make improvements.” Mr Wilson also finds the Kalmar straddle carrier user forums helpful. “We sometimes learn about valuable innovations made by other terminals which we can adopt here at Freeport. The forums put us in direct contact with engineering management from around the world, as well as giving us access to a vast database of information,” he says.

Kingston banks on flexibility Based in one of the region’s largest transhipment centres, Dr Ian Blair, Senior Vice President of Operations and Development with the Port Authority of Jamaica (PAJ), is well-placed to put forward his views on port development and cargo patterns in the Caribbean. He points out that despite all the hype about transhipment, only three ports in the area have registered a notable increase in traffic in recent years; namely, Freeport, Kingston and Panama. ”In terms of size and facilities, they are all in the same league and all three of them will continue growing,” he says.According to Dr Blair, the business environment is tough. ”More and more port operators think that this business is attractive – until they are actually in it.” “If you look at most Caribbean ports over a five-year period in terms of throughput and handling capacity, you will see minimal increase. Only Freeport, Kingston and Panama have shown significant growth and have managed to attract traffic normally flowing to other terminals,” he explains. “Today, they all have a volume of 1 million TEU and so they have good economies of scale. And there is another thing in common: Each port is dominated by one or two major shipping lines.” Dr Blair believes that sooner or later these shipping lines will require dedicated terminals. If the ports wish to continue growing, they will have no choice but to provide them. “Even now, whenever there is

More information: Tom Gilchrist Tel +1 609 860 0150 Fax +1 609 860 0224 tom.gilchrist@kalmarind.com

10

any expansion, the respective carriers serving each port absorb the extra capacity so that nobody else can get a foothold. The major shipping lines can easily reroute their traffic from the West Coast through the Caribbean. That is how they maintain their dominance. The lines see these hubs as their marketing tool and they do not want to let the competition in. We often see such phenomenal leaps in growth taking place before the actual expansion occurs. For example, volume growth at Kingston began even before work on the current expansion.” The critical question for these ports, according to Dr Blair, is how to accommodate a dominant carrier that has the critical mass and wants its own terminal, while at the same time providing for other shipping lines. Serving the logistics chain Dr Blair stresses that it is not ports but logistics chains that compete with each other: “Ports are part of a logistics chain and our challenge is to complement that logistics chain as best we can.” Logistics providers decide how their shipments are routed. Major logistics chains that move

large quantities of TEUs – such as Wallmart and Goodyear, for example – decide which shipping line moves what cargo and from where. Because of this, shipping lines select their alliance partners in response to logistics providers. At present there is a great deal of cost cutting: rates are falling and shipping lines are putting pressure on ports to reduce rates. According to Dr Blair, Freeport, Kingston and Panama are fortunate in that they have socalled “first mover” status. “This allows them to charge lower rates and still get a reasonable return for investors. But it takes time to achieve that kind of critical mass. In my opinion you are probably looking at six to seven years before you can fully convince a shipping line that you have the necessary reliability and efficiency levels to justify them rearranging their schedules.” “To strengthen their positions, stevedore companies with global networks have offered a flat rate across their networks, which puts pressure on individual ports such as ourselves.” Long-term vision Kingston Container Terminal (KCT) passed the 1 million TEU throughput mark in 2002, growing by approximately 10% annually – the combined result of a good geographical location and a substantial client base. KCT is owned by PAJ and operated by an AP Moller subsidiary, APM Terminals, under a 2002 management contract. Interestingly, Maersk is not a major user of the terminal, with Zim still accounting for most cargo volume. Explains Dr Blair: “We did not enter into this agreement with a view to attract-

the south. However, our interchange area for truckers will be continue to be located in the north terminal.” Security will also be improved with the installation of security cameras throughout the entire terminal. There will be an x-ray system for all boxes entering and leaving the terminal, although for transhipment boxes, this system will be implemented selectively.

ing Maersk Sealand vessels. The decision was made purely from a management perspective. It has proven to be a good decision, which has manifested itself in significant productivity improvements.” Some 90% of Kingston’s traffic is transhipment, says Dr Blair. “Most of our transhipment cargo is from the Far East to the US East coast. Europe – East Coast – South America cargo is also increasing, as are imports, albeit modestly, by a couple of percentage points annually.” Kingston Port has continually invested in upgrading its facilities and equipment. “We started development of Phase 2 in 1995 and finished in 1997, while work on Phase 3 took place between 1999 and 2001. We are now developing Phase 4 and already planning Phase 5. “If we want to keep on growing we need to have long-term vision and a long-term understanding of the market and trade flows. Our strategy is to be flexible enough to be able to provide both dedicated and multi-user terminal facilities.” Kingston’s Phase 4 development will increase the terminal’s annual capacity to 1.5 million TEU. “Phase 5 will take us to between 2 million and 2.5 million TEU. Land reclamation has started and we will soon begin dredging to reach a depth of 15 meters,” says Dr Blair. “The terminal is presently operating out of two terminals, which will be joined by a new berth in five years’ time. We completed simulation exercises to establish how we can achieve a better balance between the south and north terminals. Our aim is to re-engineer the north terminal to be as productive as

An invaluable partnership Kingston took delivery of its first Kalmar straddle carriers in 1986. The advantages of a straddle carrier system were evaluated against those of other handling methods. Their flexibility in handling finally swung the decision. The latest 12 Kalmar straddle carriers were delivered in December 2003. “The straddle carriers’ flexibility really makes them the ideal handling system,” explains Dr Blair. “We currently have 50 Kalmar straddle carriers in operation.” “But our biggest challenge has been yard management, which we are upgrading at present. Later this year the whole straddle carrier fleet will be operated under the Cosmos yard management system.” To enhance straddle carrier operating efficiency in the stacking area, KCT has used simula-

11

tion. Says Dr Blair: “We found that the deeper you make the stacking area, the more disoriented the drivers became. If we shorten the stacking area, they can drive at a normal speed and achieve better productivity. Our rows are now 10 boxes deep.” Dr Blair has been impressed by Kalmar’s evolution from machine supplier to solutions provider and partner. “Kalmar has worked together with us to overcome the many pressures we face, which has involved continual development of equipment. For example, from a scheduled maintenance point of view, Kalmar’s newer equipment will save us roughly 10,000 man hours per year.” As activity has increased at KCT, straddle carriers now operate roughly 400 hours a month, explains Dr Blair. “Over the past 10 or 11 years we have used our straddle carriers extensively. As our volumes have grown, Kalmar has developed the straddles for much heavier usage. There is no doubt that our newest machines will face much tougher demands than those delivered a decade or so ago.” KCT also operates a multitrailer system with the help of four Kalmar TRX-252 terminal tractors. Containers are transferred between the north and south terminals by train.


The opening of the new Pointe des Grives container terminal in Fort-de-France, Martinique, in September 2003 marked one of the largest investments to date in a French port. The terminal is the first major step towards achieving the long-term dream of transforming Fort-de-France into a bridge between the Caribbean and Europe. It is hoped that Pointe des Grives will become a facility fit to join the league of transhipment hubs in the region. Modernisation of the container terminal has been a major landmark in the ambitious plans for the port. Pointe des Grives now boasts a dedicated area for container operations as well as 12 newly delivered Kalmar straddle carriers.

Major French shipping line, CMACGM, is the main operator at Pointe des Grives, accounting for about 70% of the port’s overall volumes. With a total investment of 14 million euros, the carrier has equipped the port with straddle carriers, a new workshop, reefer plugs and a computerised yard management system. The fifth largest shipping line in the world, CMA-CGM believes that the Caribbean market is ripe for development, although the Asia-Europe and Asia-US mainhaul routes, which continue to register the largest increases in volume, will continue to be its key areas of business growth.

the port of Fort-deFrance to transform itself into a regional hub. But things are changing. Now that the terminal has access to state-ofthe-art equipment and adequate facilities, our next aim will be to substantially increase productivity. The goal is to handle 20-25 containers per hour and reduce vessel turnaround time to no more than three days.”

“For us, the Caribbean trade is a small profit centre but a promising area,” says Alain Wils, Chief Executive Vice President, CMA-CGM. “Martinique occupies a prime location with good access to North, Central and South America, as well as to the Caribbean islands. Handling transhipment traffic for the neighbouring islands is a potential growth area but up until now it has been impossible for

According to Mr Wils, one possibility the carrier is looking into is developing Martinique into a key transhipment hub for bananas originating from neighbouring Caribbean islands. Martinique’s banana trade is facing fresh challenges with France’s obligation to begin opening its doors to other banana-producing nations. “Annually we ship 30,000 containers of bananas with four vessels, mostly to Dunkirk. Handling this traffic through Martinique would allow us to more effectively deploy our vessel capacity,” he says. “We focus on the quality of the bananas. Our vessels are built to take more reefers than the average container vessel and they have individually refrigerated containers.” With more than 157 vessels, the carrier offers regular container services from Europe and Asia and within the Carribean basin.

Productivity drive There are at present 12 CSC Kalmar straddle carriers operating in the Pointe des Grives container port. They have replaced some 30 Kalmar reachstackers and lift trucks. The entire responsibility for yard operations now lies with the straddle carrier fleet. Five of the straddle carriers units are capable of stacking four containers high, while the remaining seven stack three high. Only the three-high units can operate under the gantry cranes. The straddles are divided between three operators: eight are owned by CMA-GCM, while local operators Transcaraibes and Plissonneau own three units and one unit respectively. Operations Manager, Valère Pamphile, sponsible for all straddle carrier operations at Pointe des Grives,

Room for expansion

visited various Kalmar straddle carrier terminals in Europe when the terminal first looked into the possibility of buying the equipment. When the decision was made to go ahead, Mr Pamphile also decided to train all straddle carrier drivers and technicians in Europe. He is happy with the results so far. “The flexibility of the straddle carrier system is already allowing us to improve the service we offer our customers,” he said. But there is still room for improvement at the terminal. Currently the facility works in two shifts, but the plan is to achieve a 24-hour operation. Mr Pamphile believes if productivity is improved, the future for Pointe des Grives could be bright indeed. “Our plans for Pointe des Grives represent a great challenge for us and we are determined to succeed. If our productivity and services reach a satisfactory level I believe we will be well-placed to attract feeder vessels from neigbouring islands to tranship their loads onto bigger vessels here in Martinique.”

The current annual throughput of the Pointe des Grives container terminal is about 150,000 TEUs. The majority of this is comprised of imported consumer goods, mainly from France. Exports, which account for 30%, consist mainly of bananas from Martinique and Guadeloupe. The annual rate of growth stands at 2%. In contrast, the capacity of the new terminal is 250,000 TEUs. The upgraded facility has a 460 meter-long quay, which can be extended to 550 meters. Depth alongside is 14 meters and there is a 16-hectare storage area. The opening of the new container terminal freed up a lot of much-needed space in the old port, which is being converted to incorporate a roro terminal, mainly for cars, as well as improved facilities for cruise ships. Martinique is one of two French overseas departments, along with the island of Guadeloupe. The island is 80 km long and 30 km wide and has 400,000 inhabitants.

Jacques R Saade, Chairman of the Executive Board, CMA CGM (right) pictured with Ismo Vaihtamo, Vice President, Kalmar EMEA region.

More information: Michel Geernaert Tel +33 2 35248300 Fax +33 2 35248308 michel.geernaert@kalmarind.com

CMA-CGM‘s container vessel Fort St Louis is christened at Forte-de-France, Martinique.

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13


The opening of the new Pointe des Grives container terminal in Fort-de-France, Martinique, in September 2003 marked one of the largest investments to date in a French port. The terminal is the first major step towards achieving the long-term dream of transforming Fort-de-France into a bridge between the Caribbean and Europe. It is hoped that Pointe des Grives will become a facility fit to join the league of transhipment hubs in the region. Modernisation of the container terminal has been a major landmark in the ambitious plans for the port. Pointe des Grives now boasts a dedicated area for container operations as well as 12 newly delivered Kalmar straddle carriers.

Major French shipping line, CMACGM, is the main operator at Pointe des Grives, accounting for about 70% of the port’s overall volumes. With a total investment of 14 million euros, the carrier has equipped the port with straddle carriers, a new workshop, reefer plugs and a computerised yard management system. The fifth largest shipping line in the world, CMA-CGM believes that the Caribbean market is ripe for development, although the Asia-Europe and Asia-US mainhaul routes, which continue to register the largest increases in volume, will continue to be its key areas of business growth.

the port of Fort-deFrance to transform itself into a regional hub. But things are changing. Now that the terminal has access to state-ofthe-art equipment and adequate facilities, our next aim will be to substantially increase productivity. The goal is to handle 20-25 containers per hour and reduce vessel turnaround time to no more than three days.”

“For us, the Caribbean trade is a small profit centre but a promising area,” says Alain Wils, Chief Executive Vice President, CMA-CGM. “Martinique occupies a prime location with good access to North, Central and South America, as well as to the Caribbean islands. Handling transhipment traffic for the neighbouring islands is a potential growth area but up until now it has been impossible for

According to Mr Wils, one possibility the carrier is looking into is developing Martinique into a key transhipment hub for bananas originating from neighbouring Caribbean islands. Martinique’s banana trade is facing fresh challenges with France’s obligation to begin opening its doors to other banana-producing nations. “Annually we ship 30,000 containers of bananas with four vessels, mostly to Dunkirk. Handling this traffic through Martinique would allow us to more effectively deploy our vessel capacity,” he says. “We focus on the quality of the bananas. Our vessels are built to take more reefers than the average container vessel and they have individually refrigerated containers.” With more than 157 vessels, the carrier offers regular container services from Europe and Asia and within the Carribean basin.

Productivity drive There are at present 12 CSC Kalmar straddle carriers operating in the Pointe des Grives container port. They have replaced some 30 Kalmar reachstackers and lift trucks. The entire responsibility for yard operations now lies with the straddle carrier fleet. Five of the straddle carriers units are capable of stacking four containers high, while the remaining seven stack three high. Only the three-high units can operate under the gantry cranes. The straddles are divided between three operators: eight are owned by CMA-GCM, while local operators Transcaraibes and Plissonneau own three units and one unit respectively. Operations Manager, Valère Pamphile, sponsible for all straddle carrier operations at Pointe des Grives,

Room for expansion

visited various Kalmar straddle carrier terminals in Europe when the terminal first looked into the possibility of buying the equipment. When the decision was made to go ahead, Mr Pamphile also decided to train all straddle carrier drivers and technicians in Europe. He is happy with the results so far. “The flexibility of the straddle carrier system is already allowing us to improve the service we offer our customers,” he said. But there is still room for improvement at the terminal. Currently the facility works in two shifts, but the plan is to achieve a 24-hour operation. Mr Pamphile believes if productivity is improved, the future for Pointe des Grives could be bright indeed. “Our plans for Pointe des Grives represent a great challenge for us and we are determined to succeed. If our productivity and services reach a satisfactory level I believe we will be well-placed to attract feeder vessels from neigbouring islands to tranship their loads onto bigger vessels here in Martinique.”

The current annual throughput of the Pointe des Grives container terminal is about 150,000 TEUs. The majority of this is comprised of imported consumer goods, mainly from France. Exports, which account for 30%, consist mainly of bananas from Martinique and Guadeloupe. The annual rate of growth stands at 2%. In contrast, the capacity of the new terminal is 250,000 TEUs. The upgraded facility has a 460 meter-long quay, which can be extended to 550 meters. Depth alongside is 14 meters and there is a 16-hectare storage area. The opening of the new container terminal freed up a lot of much-needed space in the old port, which is being converted to incorporate a roro terminal, mainly for cars, as well as improved facilities for cruise ships. Martinique is one of two French overseas departments, along with the island of Guadeloupe. The island is 80 km long and 30 km wide and has 400,000 inhabitants.

Jacques R Saade, Chairman of the Executive Board, CMA CGM (right) pictured with Ismo Vaihtamo, Vice President, Kalmar EMEA region.

More information: Michel Geernaert Tel +33 2 35248300 Fax +33 2 35248308 michel.geernaert@kalmarind.com

CMA-CGM‘s container vessel Fort St Louis is christened at Forte-de-France, Martinique.

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Darwin

ON BOARD THE GHAN

Katherine

Tennant Creek

Right across Australia

Alice Springs

On board the historic train – The Ghan – we have 2,979 kilometres in front of us before we step off in two days time in Adelaide, a town full of churches. The new railway station in Darwin has a platform that is 500 meters long, specially built for a train of this considerable length. Lots of Darwin’s residents have come along to give us a proper farewell salute and even if the attendance can’t be compared with yesterday’s grand reception of the very first train from Adelaide – that attracted some 8,000 people – we clearly feel the clatter of history’s rails. 1,400 navvies built the 1,420 kilometre new extension from Alice Springs to Darwin in two and a half years, completed in September 2003. It is Australia’s largest infrastructure construction since the immense Snowy Mountains project in the 1950s. The railway line has cost 1.3 billion dollars, about 6.5 billion Swedish kronor. The government and a private consortium are sharing the cost.

Port Augusta

Adelaide

The railroad from Darwin to Adelaide Length of journey: 2,979 kilometres. A one-way trip takes 2 days and nights. The railroad’s extension from Alice Springs to Darwin required 146 000 tons of track and two million railroad sleepers. The cost was € 800 million. The decision to continue the railroad to Alice Springs was made as early as 1929, but the work didn’t start until 75 years later. A one-way ticket from Darwin to Adelaide costs € 272-1,050 depending on which class you wish to travel.

At the stroke of ten the whistle blows and the station mistress lowers her spade. Slowly, slowly the two big

Boating during high river

engines start the fully one kilometre long train moving

After a couple of hours the train glides into the arms of the long line’s first woman – Katherine. It is a small town that up to now has been the centre for a lot of bus trips into Kakadu National

on its first trip from Darwin in the north to Adelaide in the south.

Park and the Aboriginal Arnhem Land. From now on it is also going to be one of The Ghan’s two exciting long stopovers. Those who are travelling in Gold Kangaroo class can now – at no extra cost – go off on a boat trip up through the world famous Katherine Gorge. Other passengers are welcome, but it costs extra. As we are in the middle of the wet season the river is high and we can only reach the third ravine after which it gets too dangerous. The river is torrential, the air is moist and waterfalls of various sizes spray from the cliff sides. The specially constructed boat parries the gushing river, but we get thoroughly wet. Dressing up in the Australian style A few hours later we are back on board our comfortable train and preparing ourselves for dinner. 146,000 tonnes of rails and 2 million sleepers were used for the new extension. The construction was considerably easier than when the first run was built in the early 1900s. As early as 1929 the decision was taken to push the train line further on to Darwin from Alice Springs, but it was to take 75 years before the decision was implemented. All the capital cit-

ies in the federal states are now connected by train communications. Great Southern Railways controls the long train lines: Indian Pacific (Sydney – Perth), Overlander (Melbourne – Adelaide) and Ghan (Adelaide – Darwin). Just as on the famous European trains, you dress for dinner on The Ghan. However, this is Australia, which means that you change from jeans and T-shirt to skirt and blouse. There are no glittering diamonds buried in deep cleavage here, however the menu and the wine list are a match for those of the Orient Express. The sunset disappears unobserved in the tropical rain and the discussions around the table at the first sitting are about the opportunities that the new railway line are going to open up for trade, exports and tourism in the Northern Territory and South Australia. Freight is the most important aspect of the new train line. Up to now the products have been unloaded in Alice Springs and moved over onto so-called roadtrains – huge lorries with up to five trailers that could carry 4-5 containers. When the freight train is fully booked it can take 250 containers, which means that it can replace some 60 enormous lorries between Alice and Darwin. It

won’t take long before companies realise the possibilities offered by the freight line, however a lot of them are sceptical about its chances of making a profit.

lometres from the famous monolith Uluru - Ayers Rock.

Afghanistan on my mind

Hour after hour through red sand that despite the drought provides nourishment for a large number of different species of grasses, bushes and small trees. We cross the Finke River, considered to be the oldest river in the world. It stretches about 1000 kilometres from the MacDonnell Ranges in the north to Lake Eyre in the south, however it only has water throughout its entire length on a couple of occassions each century. Right now, as the train slowly moves over the 450 meter long bridge, the river bed is completely dry. Dinner is given the name Finke River Dinner and we eat salt water barramundi from the Northern Territory and wash it down with a Riesling from Clare Valley in South Australia. At the same time as the reddening sun goes down in the west, the full moon rises up in the east. 47 hours, almost 3,000 kilometres – the journey with The Ghan is the longest run in the world north/south through a whole continent. A single trip in the very comfortable but not luxurious Gold Kangaroo class costs some 1,700 dollars, about 9,000

From red deserts to meadows

We go to bed with the rain nourishing the green vegetation and wake up to a fabulous sunrise over the red steppe north of Alice Springs. Alice is the second woman on our trip. The author Neville Shute made the town world famous in ”A Town like Alice” – it isn’t even about Alice Springs. The Flying Doctors, the School of the Air and the famous Telegraph Station that connected South Australia with the rest of the world in the late 1800s are located here. This was previously the end station for the train The Ghan. The name Ghan comes from Afghanistan. This was where the skilful camel drivers came from who previously used this same route when they transported goods and people by camel through the red centre of Australia. The Telegraph Station was built beside a waterhole that was named Alice´s Spring after the wife of the builder of the telegraph. Alice has 27,000 inhabitants and is situated about 400 ki-

Kalmar forklifts make light work of heavy handling for Germany's Hamburger Stahlwerke.

?

?

Swedish kronor. Two-bed cabins with bathroom and all meals included. In Red Kangaroo class it costs 1,400 dollars, however food is not included and for the budget traveller there are nonsleeper carriages – comfortable airplane seats – at a price of 440 dollars. Foreign tourists can buy a rail pass for 600 dollars (about 3,250 Swedish kronor) and travel on all the long train lines for six months. The pass only gives access to a sitting place, which means that food and drink is extra. The third woman, Adelaide – the first place in the world to allow women to be elected to the federal state parliament – receives us in 35 degree heat. The red desert is replaced by billowing meadows, wheat fields and large pastures with grazing livestock. Some of the world’s prime wine regions are located around Adelaide – Clare, Coonawarra, Barossa… Agneta Didrikson


Darwin

ON BOARD THE GHAN

Katherine

Tennant Creek

Right across Australia

Alice Springs

On board the historic train – The Ghan – we have 2,979 kilometres in front of us before we step off in two days time in Adelaide, a town full of churches. The new railway station in Darwin has a platform that is 500 meters long, specially built for a train of this considerable length. Lots of Darwin’s residents have come along to give us a proper farewell salute and even if the attendance can’t be compared with yesterday’s grand reception of the very first train from Adelaide – that attracted some 8,000 people – we clearly feel the clatter of history’s rails. 1,400 navvies built the 1,420 kilometre new extension from Alice Springs to Darwin in two and a half years, completed in September 2003. It is Australia’s largest infrastructure construction since the immense Snowy Mountains project in the 1950s. The railway line has cost 1.3 billion dollars, about 6.5 billion Swedish kronor. The government and a private consortium are sharing the cost.

Port Augusta

Adelaide

The railroad from Darwin to Adelaide Length of journey: 2,979 kilometres. A one-way trip takes 2 days and nights. The railroad’s extension from Alice Springs to Darwin required 146 000 tons of track and two million railroad sleepers. The cost was € 800 million. The decision to continue the railroad to Alice Springs was made as early as 1929, but the work didn’t start until 75 years later. A one-way ticket from Darwin to Adelaide costs € 272-1,050 depending on which class you wish to travel.

At the stroke of ten the whistle blows and the station mistress lowers her spade. Slowly, slowly the two big

Boating during high river

engines start the fully one kilometre long train moving

After a couple of hours the train glides into the arms of the long line’s first woman – Katherine. It is a small town that up to now has been the centre for a lot of bus trips into Kakadu National

on its first trip from Darwin in the north to Adelaide in the south.

Park and the Aboriginal Arnhem Land. From now on it is also going to be one of The Ghan’s two exciting long stopovers. Those who are travelling in Gold Kangaroo class can now – at no extra cost – go off on a boat trip up through the world famous Katherine Gorge. Other passengers are welcome, but it costs extra. As we are in the middle of the wet season the river is high and we can only reach the third ravine after which it gets too dangerous. The river is torrential, the air is moist and waterfalls of various sizes spray from the cliff sides. The specially constructed boat parries the gushing river, but we get thoroughly wet. Dressing up in the Australian style A few hours later we are back on board our comfortable train and preparing ourselves for dinner. 146,000 tonnes of rails and 2 million sleepers were used for the new extension. The construction was considerably easier than when the first run was built in the early 1900s. As early as 1929 the decision was taken to push the train line further on to Darwin from Alice Springs, but it was to take 75 years before the decision was implemented. All the capital cit-

ies in the federal states are now connected by train communications. Great Southern Railways controls the long train lines: Indian Pacific (Sydney – Perth), Overlander (Melbourne – Adelaide) and Ghan (Adelaide – Darwin). Just as on the famous European trains, you dress for dinner on The Ghan. However, this is Australia, which means that you change from jeans and T-shirt to skirt and blouse. There are no glittering diamonds buried in deep cleavage here, however the menu and the wine list are a match for those of the Orient Express. The sunset disappears unobserved in the tropical rain and the discussions around the table at the first sitting are about the opportunities that the new railway line are going to open up for trade, exports and tourism in the Northern Territory and South Australia. Freight is the most important aspect of the new train line. Up to now the products have been unloaded in Alice Springs and moved over onto so-called roadtrains – huge lorries with up to five trailers that could carry 4-5 containers. When the freight train is fully booked it can take 250 containers, which means that it can replace some 60 enormous lorries between Alice and Darwin. It

won’t take long before companies realise the possibilities offered by the freight line, however a lot of them are sceptical about its chances of making a profit.

lometres from the famous monolith Uluru - Ayers Rock.

Afghanistan on my mind

Hour after hour through red sand that despite the drought provides nourishment for a large number of different species of grasses, bushes and small trees. We cross the Finke River, considered to be the oldest river in the world. It stretches about 1000 kilometres from the MacDonnell Ranges in the north to Lake Eyre in the south, however it only has water throughout its entire length on a couple of occassions each century. Right now, as the train slowly moves over the 450 meter long bridge, the river bed is completely dry. Dinner is given the name Finke River Dinner and we eat salt water barramundi from the Northern Territory and wash it down with a Riesling from Clare Valley in South Australia. At the same time as the reddening sun goes down in the west, the full moon rises up in the east. 47 hours, almost 3,000 kilometres – the journey with The Ghan is the longest run in the world north/south through a whole continent. A single trip in the very comfortable but not luxurious Gold Kangaroo class costs some 1,700 dollars, about 9,000

From red deserts to meadows

We go to bed with the rain nourishing the green vegetation and wake up to a fabulous sunrise over the red steppe north of Alice Springs. Alice is the second woman on our trip. The author Neville Shute made the town world famous in ”A Town like Alice” – it isn’t even about Alice Springs. The Flying Doctors, the School of the Air and the famous Telegraph Station that connected South Australia with the rest of the world in the late 1800s are located here. This was previously the end station for the train The Ghan. The name Ghan comes from Afghanistan. This was where the skilful camel drivers came from who previously used this same route when they transported goods and people by camel through the red centre of Australia. The Telegraph Station was built beside a waterhole that was named Alice´s Spring after the wife of the builder of the telegraph. Alice has 27,000 inhabitants and is situated about 400 ki-

Kalmar forklifts make light work of heavy handling for Germany's Hamburger Stahlwerke.

?

?

Swedish kronor. Two-bed cabins with bathroom and all meals included. In Red Kangaroo class it costs 1,400 dollars, however food is not included and for the budget traveller there are nonsleeper carriages – comfortable airplane seats – at a price of 440 dollars. Foreign tourists can buy a rail pass for 600 dollars (about 3,250 Swedish kronor) and travel on all the long train lines for six months. The pass only gives access to a sitting place, which means that food and drink is extra. The third woman, Adelaide – the first place in the world to allow women to be elected to the federal state parliament – receives us in 35 degree heat. The red desert is replaced by billowing meadows, wheat fields and large pastures with grazing livestock. Some of the world’s prime wine regions are located around Adelaide – Clare, Coonawarra, Barossa… Agneta Didrikson


On March 3, 2004, P&O dedicated its newest and most technologically sophisticated container terminal in North America at P&O New Orleans. From its strategic gulf coast location, P&O New Orleans offers both direct river access to the American Midwest through a 23,330 km inland waterway system, and direct sea access to Latin America. To maximize operational efficiency at the new terminal, P&O has adopted advanced yard planning software and wireless electronic container identification and tracking technology. Even more importantly, P&O has selected Kalmar RTG cranes, equipped with Smartrail®, to handle its expanding operations at the mouth of the Mississippi.

Smartrail® autosteering & PDS for higher-performance operation The four Kalmar RTGs headed into operation at P&O New Orleans are fitted with Kalmar’s Smartrail® autosteering and container verification system. Smartrail® steers the RTG along “invisible” tracks, relieving the driver of the need to steer, thus allowing him to gantry at full speed between lifts, and to concentrate fully on picking up and setting down containers. For Larry Hannon, Vice-President of Engineering at P&O Ports North America, the benefits for container handling operations are clear: “Smartrail® takes the steering away from the crane driver. This lets the driver concentrate on moving the machine instead of steering the machine. It lets the driver gantry faster while ensuring that they stay on track. Plus, auto-steering helps drivers stay rested.”

With Smartrail® there is very little deviation from the RTG path. Once the RTG operator activates the automated steering function, the RTG follows along a pre-determined path to an accuracy of +/- 5 cm. Plus, Kalmar auto-steering technology is proven: it is in operation today on more than 100 cranes worldwide. Such real-world field experience is not an insignificant factor for engineers such as Larry Hannon for, as he notes, “Auto-steering is not a luxury; it’s a necessity, and not every auto-steering system actually works as promised.”

is diesel emissions – the pollution created by container ships idling at the dock and trucks idling outside the terminal. This is why increasing the speed and efficiency of yard operations is both an environmental issue and a commercial issue. “The biggest problem most terminals have right now is the outside truckers coming through the gate with extensive idling time,” notes Larry Hannon. “Increasing your speed of operation means you can move truckers in and out faster, and that reduces idling time.” P&O New Orleans is addressing this issue of operational speed in two ways. First, Smartrail® auto-steering means faster gantry speed from point to point. Second, P&O’s integration of Kalmar Smartrail® with advanced yard planning software and wireless electronic container identification and tracking technology means that RTG operations are intelligent as well as fast. “By interfacing Smartrail® with the container tracking system, you can eliminate some gantry time,” notes

Protecting the environment at P&O As is true with many industry leaders, P&O is an organization that is keenly interested in doing everything that it can to protect the environment. “Environmental sensitivity has always been a high priority at P&O, and this is still true today,” notes Larry Hannon. By far the greatest “risk factor” when it comes to environmental impact

Larry Hannon. “You ensure that the next logical container to move is the one you actually move onto the truck. The best move may be the move right next to the crane, not the one down the row. If you can reduce gantry time – either by shortening it, or eliminating it – you will speed up your operations.” At P&O New Orleans Smartrail® interfaces directly with P&O’s Terminal Operations System [Navis]. The Kalmar RTG’s integrated Position Detection System [PDS] also works as a container position verification system: each time the spreader twistlocks are activated, the yard management system is automatically updated. Based on a differential global positioning system [DGPS], Smartrail® also ensures accurate performance even under the most difficult weather conditions.

Truly international industry association in the –

almost 50 years old – container handling industry Manufacturers of port equipment, (such as ship to shore cranes, mobile harbour cranes, RTG, RMG, straddle carriers, reachstackers, terminal tractors, heavy fork lift trucks and container spreaders) announced today their intent to form the Port Equipment Manufacturers Association.

Representatives from Bromma Conquip, CVS Ferrari, Fantuzzi Group, Hyster, Kalmar Industries, Konecranes, Liebherr, Linde, Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding, Paceco Corp, RAM, SMV Liftrucks, Stinis, Svetruck, Terberg and ZPMC decided to create one of the only truly global industry association in the particular and dynamic business of port equipment. Many additional companies are expected to join in the near future, as all manufacturers of port and intermodal equipment are welcome. Newly elected interim Chairman Christer Granskog (President & CEO, Kalmar Industries) speaking on behalf of the Board of Directors said: “The containerization industry will soon be 50 years old! We’ve helped lead the way to increasing efficiencies in the delivery of every good of every kind that is shipped anywhere in the world. It’s time for the manufacturers in our industry to dedicate efforts to improve both security

Planning for growth One of the chief advantages of the Smartrail® RTG its ability to help growing terminals minimize yard congestion. Yard congestion can be an issue even at newer terminals. As Larry Hannon notes, many growing terminals in North America face the challenge of managing high container volumes that are unloaded on Friday afternoons. Due to its 5+1 high stacking and ability to straddle six rows of containers plus one vehicle lane, Smartrail® is a good con-

gestion management tool, as it makes possible heightened vertical storage capacity on the yard. In addition, auto-steering enables terminals to lay out very uniform stacks with a reduced amount of space between the containers. Yard planning is simple, as there are no civil works, such as buried wires, transponders, or painted lines, to be maintained. Also, the inherent flexibility created by Smartrail® [to set and reset autosteering based on just two set points] may allow some terminals to eliminate paved runways.

Selecting Kalmar Smartrail® For P&O New Orleans, the decision to purchase four Kalmar Smartrail® RTGs was based on both technical and commercial considerations. “Kalmar offered a lot of technology,” says Larry Hannon. “They provided the best product for the contract price.” Kalmar is pleased to be adding the P&O terminal in New Orleans to the growing list of terminals around the world, including Oslo, Tanjung Pelepas, Malaysia, Dublin, La Spezia, St. Petersburg, Dunkirk, Dubai Ports Authority, Livorno, Laem Chabang, New Jersey, and Kumport, which have chosen Smartrail®. More information: Dan House Tel + 1 609 860 0150 Fax + 1 609 860 0224 dan.house@kalmarind.com

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and safety as well as actively promote environmentally sustainable handling solutions. The results of our combined efforts are to benefit all port equipment’s customers around the globe”. PEMA will be one of the first truly international, universal associations in the world, open to port equipment manufacturing companies from every nation. The companies developing this initiative are a microcosm of that mix, with representatives from Asia, Europe and North America).

More information: Benoît Passard Tel +46 8 700 5140 Fax +46 8 700 5149 benoît.passard@kalmarind.com


On March 3, 2004, P&O dedicated its newest and most technologically sophisticated container terminal in North America at P&O New Orleans. From its strategic gulf coast location, P&O New Orleans offers both direct river access to the American Midwest through a 23,330 km inland waterway system, and direct sea access to Latin America. To maximize operational efficiency at the new terminal, P&O has adopted advanced yard planning software and wireless electronic container identification and tracking technology. Even more importantly, P&O has selected Kalmar RTG cranes, equipped with Smartrail®, to handle its expanding operations at the mouth of the Mississippi.

Smartrail® autosteering & PDS for higher-performance operation The four Kalmar RTGs headed into operation at P&O New Orleans are fitted with Kalmar’s Smartrail® autosteering and container verification system. Smartrail® steers the RTG along “invisible” tracks, relieving the driver of the need to steer, thus allowing him to gantry at full speed between lifts, and to concentrate fully on picking up and setting down containers. For Larry Hannon, Vice-President of Engineering at P&O Ports North America, the benefits for container handling operations are clear: “Smartrail® takes the steering away from the crane driver. This lets the driver concentrate on moving the machine instead of steering the machine. It lets the driver gantry faster while ensuring that they stay on track. Plus, auto-steering helps drivers stay rested.”

With Smartrail® there is very little deviation from the RTG path. Once the RTG operator activates the automated steering function, the RTG follows along a pre-determined path to an accuracy of +/- 5 cm. Plus, Kalmar auto-steering technology is proven: it is in operation today on more than 100 cranes worldwide. Such real-world field experience is not an insignificant factor for engineers such as Larry Hannon for, as he notes, “Auto-steering is not a luxury; it’s a necessity, and not every auto-steering system actually works as promised.”

is diesel emissions – the pollution created by container ships idling at the dock and trucks idling outside the terminal. This is why increasing the speed and efficiency of yard operations is both an environmental issue and a commercial issue. “The biggest problem most terminals have right now is the outside truckers coming through the gate with extensive idling time,” notes Larry Hannon. “Increasing your speed of operation means you can move truckers in and out faster, and that reduces idling time.” P&O New Orleans is addressing this issue of operational speed in two ways. First, Smartrail® auto-steering means faster gantry speed from point to point. Second, P&O’s integration of Kalmar Smartrail® with advanced yard planning software and wireless electronic container identification and tracking technology means that RTG operations are intelligent as well as fast. “By interfacing Smartrail® with the container tracking system, you can eliminate some gantry time,” notes

Protecting the environment at P&O As is true with many industry leaders, P&O is an organization that is keenly interested in doing everything that it can to protect the environment. “Environmental sensitivity has always been a high priority at P&O, and this is still true today,” notes Larry Hannon. By far the greatest “risk factor” when it comes to environmental impact

Larry Hannon. “You ensure that the next logical container to move is the one you actually move onto the truck. The best move may be the move right next to the crane, not the one down the row. If you can reduce gantry time – either by shortening it, or eliminating it – you will speed up your operations.” At P&O New Orleans Smartrail® interfaces directly with P&O’s Terminal Operations System [Navis]. The Kalmar RTG’s integrated Position Detection System [PDS] also works as a container position verification system: each time the spreader twistlocks are activated, the yard management system is automatically updated. Based on a differential global positioning system [DGPS], Smartrail® also ensures accurate performance even under the most difficult weather conditions.

Truly international industry association in the –

almost 50 years old – container handling industry Manufacturers of port equipment, (such as ship to shore cranes, mobile harbour cranes, RTG, RMG, straddle carriers, reachstackers, terminal tractors, heavy fork lift trucks and container spreaders) announced today their intent to form the Port Equipment Manufacturers Association.

Representatives from Bromma Conquip, CVS Ferrari, Fantuzzi Group, Hyster, Kalmar Industries, Konecranes, Liebherr, Linde, Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding, Paceco Corp, RAM, SMV Liftrucks, Stinis, Svetruck, Terberg and ZPMC decided to create one of the only truly global industry association in the particular and dynamic business of port equipment. Many additional companies are expected to join in the near future, as all manufacturers of port and intermodal equipment are welcome. Newly elected interim Chairman Christer Granskog (President & CEO, Kalmar Industries) speaking on behalf of the Board of Directors said: “The containerization industry will soon be 50 years old! We’ve helped lead the way to increasing efficiencies in the delivery of every good of every kind that is shipped anywhere in the world. It’s time for the manufacturers in our industry to dedicate efforts to improve both security

Planning for growth One of the chief advantages of the Smartrail® RTG its ability to help growing terminals minimize yard congestion. Yard congestion can be an issue even at newer terminals. As Larry Hannon notes, many growing terminals in North America face the challenge of managing high container volumes that are unloaded on Friday afternoons. Due to its 5+1 high stacking and ability to straddle six rows of containers plus one vehicle lane, Smartrail® is a good con-

gestion management tool, as it makes possible heightened vertical storage capacity on the yard. In addition, auto-steering enables terminals to lay out very uniform stacks with a reduced amount of space between the containers. Yard planning is simple, as there are no civil works, such as buried wires, transponders, or painted lines, to be maintained. Also, the inherent flexibility created by Smartrail® [to set and reset autosteering based on just two set points] may allow some terminals to eliminate paved runways.

Selecting Kalmar Smartrail® For P&O New Orleans, the decision to purchase four Kalmar Smartrail® RTGs was based on both technical and commercial considerations. “Kalmar offered a lot of technology,” says Larry Hannon. “They provided the best product for the contract price.” Kalmar is pleased to be adding the P&O terminal in New Orleans to the growing list of terminals around the world, including Oslo, Tanjung Pelepas, Malaysia, Dublin, La Spezia, St. Petersburg, Dunkirk, Dubai Ports Authority, Livorno, Laem Chabang, New Jersey, and Kumport, which have chosen Smartrail®. More information: Dan House Tel + 1 609 860 0150 Fax + 1 609 860 0224 dan.house@kalmarind.com

16

17

and safety as well as actively promote environmentally sustainable handling solutions. The results of our combined efforts are to benefit all port equipment’s customers around the globe”. PEMA will be one of the first truly international, universal associations in the world, open to port equipment manufacturing companies from every nation. The companies developing this initiative are a microcosm of that mix, with representatives from Asia, Europe and North America).

More information: Benoît Passard Tel +46 8 700 5140 Fax +46 8 700 5149 benoît.passard@kalmarind.com


K a l m a r :

t h e

n u m b e r

Visitors to this year’s RORO2004 exhibition, held in Gothenburg from 25 to 27 May, had the opportunity to view the world’s latest RoRo handling technology, courtesy of Kalmar Industries. Kalmar’s TRX182 4x4 RoRo tractor design has been overhauled to incorporate a number of new features and enhanced functions. This machine, along with the new generation DCE330 RoRo forklift truck, designed specifically to perform demanding handling duties in confined spaces onboard roll-on, roll-off vessels, were on display at the Kalmar exhibition stand.

o n e

The TRX182 4x4 RoRo tractor now combines a new cab design with Kalmar’s already proven robust structure and cutting-edge components. The cabin has been given a modern look and is laid out to provide easier access to service and maintenance points.

As always, Kalmar has put safety first and the new cabin is fully tested according to international standards such as ROPS (Rollover Protective Structure). It is now also available with a number of new options, including an airsuspended cabin mounting, an electrically operated driver’s side window and a stylish new roof light. The new chassis also features several improvements, aimed primarily at making service and maintenance easier than ever. In addition, there are no longer any direct routes via which noise can escape from the engine compartment, providing better overall control of outside noise levels. Also minimising noise pollution, the TRX182 has a new engine air filter system as well as a new silencer and exhaust pipe. These modifications give the added advantage of improving driver visibility from the cabin. Other design improvements include a new, rounded front bumper, finished with modern square headlights. In terms of the tractor’s handling mechanism, the structure by which the liftboom is mounted to the frame has been totally revised and the liftboom itself

has been fitted with several design improvements, including:

The world’s widest terminal tractor range Kalmar offers the most comprehensive range of terminal tractors available to customers around the world. This includes models for lighter distribution to those machines designed to undertake demanding duties for heavy industires, such as steel mills. By adopting an application-based approach to R&D, Kalmar is able to offer purpose-built machines for different operations. To date, more than 4,100 units have been manufactured at Kalmar’s Tampere factory, the majority of which are for RoRo applications. However, the largest production volumes are seen in North America, where more than 2,000 units are produced annually at Kalmar’s Ottawa plant.

• a more flexible lift boom, which means less stress to the tractor frame structure; and • redesigned cover plate mounting and walking platform mountings to accommodate the new, flexible lift boom. Kalmar is also pleased to announce the addition of a powerful new SisuDiesel 74ETA diesel engine to its range. This latest model has a fully electronic control unit allowing more accurate control thus reducing fuel consumption. It also permits easier maintenance and service thanks to improved diagnostics, which offer better engine protection and easier trouble shooting. It is available in the list of options for Kalmar’s TTX, TRX and TRL182 models.

PORT

INDUSTRIAL

RORO

LOLO

INTERMODAL

FREIGHT

4x2 PT122, TTX182

4x2 PT122, TTX182

4x2 PT122, TTX182

4x2 ST122

4x2 ST122

4x2 ST122

4x2 TTX182

GCW 75 tons * Low slope RoRo in ideal weather.

GCW 75 tons * Container terminal operation, often with bumcar trailers.

GCW 75 tons * Container LoLo and/or road legal trailer spotting in railway yard.

GCW 55 tons * Transportation hubs for spotting road legal trailers.

GCW 55 tons * Distribution centers of various kinds, road legal trailer moving.

GCW 55 tons * Handling of trailer movements within a manufacturing facility.

GCW 75 tons * Heavy loads on special trailers.

4x4 TRX182, TRL182, TRX242, TRX252

4x2 PT172 4x4 TRX242, TRX252

GCW 115 / 150 Trailer trains for tons * up to four Deep slopes or trailers or GCW changing 240 tons * with weather first one conditions at typically hooked ramp side. on the tractor.

WAREHOUSING/ LIGHT HEAVY DISTRIBUTION MANUFACTU- MANUFACTURING RING

4x4 TRX182, TRX242, TRX252

GCW 115/150 tons * Heavy loads on special trailers.

More information: Timo Matikainen Tel +358 3 265 8111 Fax +358 3 265 8530 timo.matikainen@kalmarind.com

18

R o R o

Kalmar has been developing machinery for advanced RoRo handling since the 1960s and incorporates this extensive experience into each new generation of RoRo trucks and terminal tractors. The company currently occupies a leading position in the RoRo market, with thousands of machines in operation around the world. These machines are backed up by a global sales and services network. The first ever RoRo tractor in the world was a Kalmar machine and the company was also the first to introduce a model with a 180° rotating driver’s seat. Kalmar pioneered the variable displacement hydraulic system and offered an active tilting system on the 5th wheel before any of its competitors. More than 4,000 terminal tractors have been built at Kalmar’s Tampere factory in Finland, most of which have been for RoRo applications. The company has also been at the forefront of fork-lift truck development for RoRo applications for the last 40 years. It has several hundred RoRo trucks in operation around the world, many of which have been travelling onboard vessels from port to port for years.

Kalmar is launching a new generation of RoRo lift trucks, designed specifically to perform demanding handling duties in confined spaces onboard roll-on, roll-off vessels.

The number one RoRo terminal tractor just got even better!

i n

The new generation features 33 tonnes of lifting power, a reinforced chassis and an even more powerful engine with exceptional torque. Driver environment has been given a facelift with a new, more spacious cab, reduced emissions, automatic gearbox, and lower noise and vibration levels. RoRo vessels transport a variety of different cargoes, including containers. In order to cope with loading and unloading demands during brief calls in port, reliable and efficient handling practices that make optimal use of space onboard are essential. Says Dan Pettersson, Product Manager, Heavy Lift Trucks: “RoRo handling is an important segment for Kalmar. We undertake ongoing development work in order to constantly improve our products. The demand for fast, strategic handling requires versatile, highperformance machines with enhanced lifting capacity. Our new RoRo model fulfils the demands of our customers.” Heavyweight lifting Despite the fact that the new RoRo truck is robust enough to lift loads of up to 33 tonnes, it is still easy to manoeuvre in tight spaces. Compact design, good visibility and a narrow turning

roomier cab, with enhanced visibility in all directions. Only the mast has been allowed to project upwards from the chassis. Noise and vibration have also been cut to considerably lower levels than in previous models. The new model also contributes to a better working environment on board the RoRo vessel itself. Each machine has been fitted with a Volvo 7-litre, lowemission engine featuring electronic fuel injection, which is not only more powerful but also more environment-friendly. Maximum exploitation of engine output is achieved using an automatic gearbox, further enhancing ‘driveability’ and productivity.

radius make the machine easy to drive, even for less-experienced drivers. The new truck is designed to make light work of all types of RoRo handling, whether it involves sawn timber goods, machine parts, stone or containers. The free lift design of the mast enables deck heights to be exploited to the maximum. The truck is designed for demanding driving, whatever the climate. Its low centre of gravity gives it stability, while its external dimensions are compact. The new RoRo truck can drive into any space with 2.9 metres of headroom, for example. Its powerful performance and manoeuvrability also make it ideal for sophisticated handling tasks within heavy industry. Andreas Nilsson, Product Manager, RoRo lift trucks explains: “The robust construction of Kalmar’s new generation RoRo truck allows it to undertake intensive driving in even the most hostile of environments. By minimising the number of components and selecting tried-andtested mechanical solutions, we have created a machine with good accessibility. The new machines also require less input in terms of servicing and maintenance.”

Service-friendly dependability The new generation of RoRo trucks is ideally suited to life on board where the machine accompanies the vessel from port to port. Service range has been extended to 500 hours and service points are easier to access. The hydraulics are equipped with leak-free couplings and efficient mechanisms for the cooling and filtration of the hydraulic oil. All machine components have been selected and tested to cope with long-term, intensive applications with the minimum of maintenance. Continuous development

Smooth interfacing A computerised control system with CAN-BUS communication and integral electronics makes for higher precision during operation and optimises the interaction between engine, gearbox and lifting gear. The driver has only a small number of instruments and controls through which to address the machine’s main functions, allowing him to concentrate on cargo handling. All communications between the machines’ various functions are inter-networked. This increases reliability considerably as the construction requires less cabling. The system records anomalies and errors and displays these to the driver when necessary. In the process of developing these functions, it has also been possible to condense other instrumentation to a minimum.

Better for the working environment Kalmar has long been developing machines acknowledged for their ergonomics, giving the driver the best tools for working efficiently. The RoRo truck has a brand-new and considerably

Kalmar currently occupies a leading position in the RoRo market, with hundreds of machines in operation around the world. Acknowledged for their high reliability and long service life, a great many of the Kalmar machines from previous generations are still in operation and performing well today. This latest RoRo truck represents the natural progression of an integrated system in which all handling equipment works together seamlessly, irrespective of age.

More information: Dan Pettersson Tel +46 372 26062 Fax +46 372 26390 dan.pettersson@kalmarind.com

Compact new RoRo lift truck provides manoeuvrability and power 17


K a l m a r :

t h e

n u m b e r

Visitors to this year’s RORO2004 exhibition, held in Gothenburg from 25 to 27 May, had the opportunity to view the world’s latest RoRo handling technology, courtesy of Kalmar Industries. Kalmar’s TRX182 4x4 RoRo tractor design has been overhauled to incorporate a number of new features and enhanced functions. This machine, along with the new generation DCE330 RoRo forklift truck, designed specifically to perform demanding handling duties in confined spaces onboard roll-on, roll-off vessels, were on display at the Kalmar exhibition stand.

o n e

The TRX182 4x4 RoRo tractor now combines a new cab design with Kalmar’s already proven robust structure and cutting-edge components. The cabin has been given a modern look and is laid out to provide easier access to service and maintenance points.

As always, Kalmar has put safety first and the new cabin is fully tested according to international standards such as ROPS (Rollover Protective Structure). It is now also available with a number of new options, including an airsuspended cabin mounting, an electrically operated driver’s side window and a stylish new roof light. The new chassis also features several improvements, aimed primarily at making service and maintenance easier than ever. In addition, there are no longer any direct routes via which noise can escape from the engine compartment, providing better overall control of outside noise levels. Also minimising noise pollution, the TRX182 has a new engine air filter system as well as a new silencer and exhaust pipe. These modifications give the added advantage of improving driver visibility from the cabin. Other design improvements include a new, rounded front bumper, finished with modern square headlights. In terms of the tractor’s handling mechanism, the structure by which the liftboom is mounted to the frame has been totally revised and the liftboom itself

has been fitted with several design improvements, including:

The world’s widest terminal tractor range Kalmar offers the most comprehensive range of terminal tractors available to customers around the world. This includes models for lighter distribution to those machines designed to undertake demanding duties for heavy industires, such as steel mills. By adopting an application-based approach to R&D, Kalmar is able to offer purpose-built machines for different operations. To date, more than 4,100 units have been manufactured at Kalmar’s Tampere factory, the majority of which are for RoRo applications. However, the largest production volumes are seen in North America, where more than 2,000 units are produced annually at Kalmar’s Ottawa plant.

• a more flexible lift boom, which means less stress to the tractor frame structure; and • redesigned cover plate mounting and walking platform mountings to accommodate the new, flexible lift boom. Kalmar is also pleased to announce the addition of a powerful new SisuDiesel 74ETA diesel engine to its range. This latest model has a fully electronic control unit allowing more accurate control thus reducing fuel consumption. It also permits easier maintenance and service thanks to improved diagnostics, which offer better engine protection and easier trouble shooting. It is available in the list of options for Kalmar’s TTX, TRX and TRL182 models.

PORT

INDUSTRIAL

RORO

LOLO

INTERMODAL

FREIGHT

4x2 PT122, TTX182

4x2 PT122, TTX182

4x2 PT122, TTX182

4x2 ST122

4x2 ST122

4x2 ST122

4x2 TTX182

GCW 75 tons * Low slope RoRo in ideal weather.

GCW 75 tons * Container terminal operation, often with bumcar trailers.

GCW 75 tons * Container LoLo and/or road legal trailer spotting in railway yard.

GCW 55 tons * Transportation hubs for spotting road legal trailers.

GCW 55 tons * Distribution centers of various kinds, road legal trailer moving.

GCW 55 tons * Handling of trailer movements within a manufacturing facility.

GCW 75 tons * Heavy loads on special trailers.

4x4 TRX182, TRL182, TRX242, TRX252

4x2 PT172 4x4 TRX242, TRX252

GCW 115 / 150 Trailer trains for tons * up to four Deep slopes or trailers or GCW changing 240 tons * with weather first one conditions at typically hooked ramp side. on the tractor.

WAREHOUSING/ LIGHT HEAVY DISTRIBUTION MANUFACTU- MANUFACTURING RING

4x4 TRX182, TRX242, TRX252

GCW 115/150 tons * Heavy loads on special trailers.

More information: Timo Matikainen Tel +358 3 265 8111 Fax +358 3 265 8530 timo.matikainen@kalmarind.com

18

R o R o

Kalmar has been developing machinery for advanced RoRo handling since the 1960s and incorporates this extensive experience into each new generation of RoRo trucks and terminal tractors. The company currently occupies a leading position in the RoRo market, with thousands of machines in operation around the world. These machines are backed up by a global sales and services network. The first ever RoRo tractor in the world was a Kalmar machine and the company was also the first to introduce a model with a 180° rotating driver’s seat. Kalmar pioneered the variable displacement hydraulic system and offered an active tilting system on the 5th wheel before any of its competitors. More than 4,000 terminal tractors have been built at Kalmar’s Tampere factory in Finland, most of which have been for RoRo applications. The company has also been at the forefront of fork-lift truck development for RoRo applications for the last 40 years. It has several hundred RoRo trucks in operation around the world, many of which have been travelling onboard vessels from port to port for years.

Kalmar is launching a new generation of RoRo lift trucks, designed specifically to perform demanding handling duties in confined spaces onboard roll-on, roll-off vessels.

The number one RoRo terminal tractor just got even better!

i n

The new generation features 33 tonnes of lifting power, a reinforced chassis and an even more powerful engine with exceptional torque. Driver environment has been given a facelift with a new, more spacious cab, reduced emissions, automatic gearbox, and lower noise and vibration levels. RoRo vessels transport a variety of different cargoes, including containers. In order to cope with loading and unloading demands during brief calls in port, reliable and efficient handling practices that make optimal use of space onboard are essential. Says Dan Pettersson, Product Manager, Heavy Lift Trucks: “RoRo handling is an important segment for Kalmar. We undertake ongoing development work in order to constantly improve our products. The demand for fast, strategic handling requires versatile, highperformance machines with enhanced lifting capacity. Our new RoRo model fulfils the demands of our customers.” Heavyweight lifting Despite the fact that the new RoRo truck is robust enough to lift loads of up to 33 tonnes, it is still easy to manoeuvre in tight spaces. Compact design, good visibility and a narrow turning

roomier cab, with enhanced visibility in all directions. Only the mast has been allowed to project upwards from the chassis. Noise and vibration have also been cut to considerably lower levels than in previous models. The new model also contributes to a better working environment on board the RoRo vessel itself. Each machine has been fitted with a Volvo 7-litre, lowemission engine featuring electronic fuel injection, which is not only more powerful but also more environment-friendly. Maximum exploitation of engine output is achieved using an automatic gearbox, further enhancing ‘driveability’ and productivity.

radius make the machine easy to drive, even for less-experienced drivers. The new truck is designed to make light work of all types of RoRo handling, whether it involves sawn timber goods, machine parts, stone or containers. The free lift design of the mast enables deck heights to be exploited to the maximum. The truck is designed for demanding driving, whatever the climate. Its low centre of gravity gives it stability, while its external dimensions are compact. The new RoRo truck can drive into any space with 2.9 metres of headroom, for example. Its powerful performance and manoeuvrability also make it ideal for sophisticated handling tasks within heavy industry. Andreas Nilsson, Product Manager, RoRo lift trucks explains: “The robust construction of Kalmar’s new generation RoRo truck allows it to undertake intensive driving in even the most hostile of environments. By minimising the number of components and selecting tried-andtested mechanical solutions, we have created a machine with good accessibility. The new machines also require less input in terms of servicing and maintenance.”

Service-friendly dependability The new generation of RoRo trucks is ideally suited to life on board where the machine accompanies the vessel from port to port. Service range has been extended to 500 hours and service points are easier to access. The hydraulics are equipped with leak-free couplings and efficient mechanisms for the cooling and filtration of the hydraulic oil. All machine components have been selected and tested to cope with long-term, intensive applications with the minimum of maintenance. Continuous development

Smooth interfacing A computerised control system with CAN-BUS communication and integral electronics makes for higher precision during operation and optimises the interaction between engine, gearbox and lifting gear. The driver has only a small number of instruments and controls through which to address the machine’s main functions, allowing him to concentrate on cargo handling. All communications between the machines’ various functions are inter-networked. This increases reliability considerably as the construction requires less cabling. The system records anomalies and errors and displays these to the driver when necessary. In the process of developing these functions, it has also been possible to condense other instrumentation to a minimum.

Better for the working environment Kalmar has long been developing machines acknowledged for their ergonomics, giving the driver the best tools for working efficiently. The RoRo truck has a brand-new and considerably

Kalmar currently occupies a leading position in the RoRo market, with hundreds of machines in operation around the world. Acknowledged for their high reliability and long service life, a great many of the Kalmar machines from previous generations are still in operation and performing well today. This latest RoRo truck represents the natural progression of an integrated system in which all handling equipment works together seamlessly, irrespective of age.

More information: Dan Pettersson Tel +46 372 26062 Fax +46 372 26390 dan.pettersson@kalmarind.com

Compact new RoRo lift truck provides manoeuvrability and power 17


world Kalmar around the

A G L O B A L B U S I N E S S M A G A Z I N E F R O M K A L M A R I N D U S T R I E S, N O. 2 / 2 0 0 4

5 ECH units have been delivered to Van Doorn Container Depot at the new Rotterdam Maasvlakte terminal. From left to right: Mr. A. Kornet, Managing Director of Peinemann Kalmar, Mr. J. de Ruiter (standing behind Ad Kornet), Managing Director of Van Doorn Container Depot, Mr. C.J. Schepen (standing next to Ad Kornet), Depot Manager of Van Doorn Container Depot, Mr. J. Jongenotter, Operational Manager van Doorn Containe Depot (he is the one who is sitting on the footstep), Mr. D. Pettersson, Product Manager Heavy Lift Trucks Kalmar Industries, Mr. G. Hoving, Account Manager Peinemann Kalmar, Mr. J. van Beek, Financial Department Van Doorn Container Depot (he is standing on top).

Maher Terminals: ready for new challenges • Largest container terminal in North America – 450 on terminal & 150 near terminal acres (245 hectares). • One combined terminal –

Kalmar’s new empty container truck dedicated to double handling Kalmar has launched an empty container handling truck (ECH) specifically designed to lift two containers simultaneously. The new ECH can stack 8ft 6in containers up to nine high. The market response to the new DCE 100-45E has been extremely positive: Kalmar has already secured orders for 19 units – 12 to the Netherlands and seven to Singapore, five of which are for PSA. The machine has a lifting capacity of ten tonnes and comes equipped with a reinforced mast, a wider and more powerful drive axle and an enhanced lifting attachment.

the space available for stacking not only loaded but also empty containers.” “With our new machine, we are helping our customers to boost their productivity and at the same time cut overall costs during each machine’s lifetime. The DCE 100 is an entirely new machine designed for tough, intensive handling of two containers up to nine-high.” Excellent double handling Among the new features, cus-

This latest addition to its product portfolio is able to lift two containers, including 40ft and 45ft hi-cubes, one on top of the other, using a newly designed attachment with hooks for container connections. The 8+1 designation reflects the fact that when working at its extreme lifting height, the lower of the two containers slots into the 8-high position and the uppermost container is therefore in the nine-high position. The machine can also stack taller, 9ft 6in containers up to eight high, or 7+1. According to Dan Pettersson, ECH Product Manager at Kalmar Industries, the DCE 100 will further consolidate Kal-

mar’s position as the leading supplier of efficient machines for intensive empty container handling in the seven- to tentonnes lifting capacity range: “Our product range now encompasses trucks that stack anything from three up to a maximum of nine containers on top of one another. We therefore have the right tools for every environment, be it a small repair yard, a major container manufacturer, or a terminal operator who is tight for space.” “In today’s shipping market, we are seeing the volume of goods at ports and terminals increasing sharply. This puts port operators under severe pressure to make the best use of

tomers will find a powerful lifting attachment fitted with special hooks for double handling. The mast has been reinforced, while the electrical power and hydraulics supplies have been simultaneously streamlined. The DCE 100 features just one cable for electric supply and two hoses for the hydraulics on the attachment. This makes for considerably improved visibility when, for example, the driver needs to grab or release containers stacked almost 20 metres from the ground. More robust construction The driver benefits from an efficient work space that allows him to devote his full concentration to operating and manoeuvring the machine from his ergonomically styled, elevated cabin.

More information: Dan Pettersson Tel +46 372 26062 Fax +46 372 26390 dan.pettersson@kalmarind.com

one combined system. • High throughput grounded straddle carrier operation. • Storage yard designed for straddle carrier operations and high density stacking. • Nearby depot for storage of non-vessel related empty containers. • Six-lane internal highway. • State-of-the-art automated receiving and delivery system. Continues on page 6

........ Caribbean hubs a centre of attention The Caribbean is home to both well-established terminals and several new developments. In this issue, we take a closer look at three facilities: Freeport in the Bahamas, Kingston Container Terminal (KCT) in Jamaica and the new Pointe des Grives container terminal in Fort-de-France, Martinique. What all three of them have in common is their trust in Kalmar’s straddle carriers. Continues on page 8

We took the most popular straddle carrier family in the world and made it better again. A completely new W-shape cabin with excellent visibility and 180° rotating seat combined with the very rigid Kalmar steel structure makes the new 7th generation straddle a pleasant and efficient working environment for the driver. Simple direct wheel drive combined with the new heavy duty wet disc brakes and the new rope winch hoist option means lower maintenance and operating cost. Remote maintenance interface (RMI) compatibility enables faster real time world-wide support through the web and better availability. The new straddle carrier family is available in proven Smoothlift™ hoist models SHC, CSC, ESC and in the new ESC W winch hoist model. All versions are also available without a cabin and with full automation.

7th generation straddle carrier

Serving the 7 Seas with advanced technology.

Continues on page 4

Kalmar has established its own sales company in Belgium starting on 1 June 2004 through the acquisition of BIA NV’s Materials Handling Equipment Division located in Antwerp. Kalmar Belgium NV’s special focus is on the heavy end of the product range: STS cranes, RTG cranes and straddle carriers, as well as terminal tractors and services. The BIA personnel in Antwerp form the basis for the new structure. Mr Damien Cols, current Sales Manager of BIA Antwerp, has been appointed Managing Director, and Mr Vincent Josse, current Technical Manager of BIA Antwerp, has taken over the position of Technical Director at Kalmar Belgium NV.

Setting up in Antwerp

www.kalmarind.com/newsroom

Vincent Josse and Damien Cols.


Kalmar Around the World, issue 2/2004