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Prosocial Leisure Activities Carey Guides Criminogenic Needs

2nd Edition

y p o C e l p m a S Carey Group Publishing


y p o C e l p m a S CAREY GROUP PUBLISHING Mark Carey, President Madeline M. Carter, Partner 13400 Fairland Park Drive, Silver Spring, MD 20904-5492 PHONE 1.877.892.2739 #80 EMAIL info@thecareygroup.com WEBSITE www.careygrouppublishing.com PROSOCIAL LEISURE ACTIVITIES, 2ND EDITION Copyright Carey Group Publishing 2012

All rights reserved. The publisher grants purchasers the right to copy pages that are marked: “Carey Group Publishing grants the purchaser the right to copy this page.” It is unlawful to reproduce by any means any other portion of this book without the written permission of the publisher. ISBN-13: 978-1-934836-28-6 ISBN-10: 1-934836-28-1 AUTHOR Ingrid Sharos

EDITORIAL REVIEW PANEL William D. Burrell, Community Corrections Consultant Donald G. Evans, President, Board of Directors, Canadian Training Institute Kevin B. Johnson, Director – Whiteside County Court Services (Illinois) Russ Stricker, M.S.W., Supervisor, Intensive Supervision Program, Hennepin County Department of Community Corrections and Rehabilitation (Minnesota) Faye S. Taxman, Ph.D., Professor, George Mason University, Criminology, Law and Society

ACKNOWLEDGMENT Carey Group Publishing would like to acknowledge the integral role that Frank Domurad, former Vice-President of The Carey Group, has played in the development of the Carey Guides. PRODUCED BY First Folio Resource Group Inc. Franz & Company, Inc.

Mark Carey, President Madeline M. Carter, Partner 13400 Fairland Park Drive, Silver Spring, MD 20904-5492 PHONE 1.877.892.2739 #80 EMAIL info@thecareygroup.com WEBSITE www.thecareygroup.com ADDITIONAL SERVICES The Carey Group’s motto is “practitioners helping practitioners.” We offer customized organizational assessments, training, strategic planning, coaching, and consultation services.


What Are the Carey Guides?

R

esearch has shown that the contact model of offender supervision (i.e., offender supervision dictated by the number of contacts with corrections professionals) does not reduce recidivism. Instead, a more effective method is to work with offenders to help them understand and address their identified criminogenic needs and to teach them the skills they require to change their own behavior. The Carey Guides support this method. We know you have a heavy workload and little time, so we have made the Guides short, practical, and easy to use. They are designed to help you do your job more effectively by translating evidence-based practices (EBP) into a series of strategies and Skill-Building Tools. You can use the Tools either when treatment services for specific criminogenic and other needs are not immediately available or when there is a need to reinforce the messages offenders are receiving through other services. The Tools are not meant to substitute for treatment or therapy, and are designed for use with offenders at all motivation levels.

y p o C e l p m a S The Carey Guides can assist you in moving

offenders from resistance to action, from criminal or delinquent behavior to law-abiding behavior.

“Practitioners Helping Practitioners”

A Note About Terminology

The Carey Guides are for professionals working with individuals under correctional supervision. This includes, but is not limited to, institutional and field settings, adults and juveniles, probation and parole, pre-trial and post-sentence, and halfway houses and residential centers. As such, finding a specific set of terms that resonates with all areas of specialty is a bit daunting. The Carey Guides use the terms “offender” and “corrections professional.” “Offender” refers to a youth adjudicated of a delinquent act, an adult convicted of a crime, a pre-trial defendant, or any other individual under correctional supervision. (In recognition of the fact that an individual who commits a crime or delinquent act does not surrender all positive identities, such as father, citizen, friend, daughter, etc., when he or she becomes involved in the justice system, a growing trend is to remove the “offender” label and refer to the person as “involved” or “formerly involved” in the justice system. For readability purposes, this very appropriate approach was not adopted for this series of documents.) “Corrections professional” refers to any individual responsible for managing, supervising, treating, or otherwise providing case management services to the offender.


Prosocial Leisure Activities

y p o C e l p m a S 2nd Edition

Contents

How Can Prosocial Leisure Activities Support a Law-Abiding Lifestyle? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3

Using Evidence-Based Practices to Promote Prosocial Leisure Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4

Skill-Building Tools to Promote Prosocial Leisure Activities. . . . . . . . .

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Tool Instructions

1: Identifying Prosocial Leisure Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2: The Benefits of Prosocial Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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3: Time Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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4: Making a Plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Tool Worksheets

2

1: Identifying Prosocial Leisure Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2: The Benefits of Prosocial Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

15

3: Time Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

16

4: Making a Plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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CAREY BLUE GUIDES: CRIMINOGENIC NEEDS


How Can Prosocial Leisure Activities Support a Law-Abiding Lifestyle?

y p o C e l p m a S Recreation is important for maintaining a balanced lifestyle, relieving everyday stress, and improving physical and mental health. Juvenile and adult offenders who participate in prosocial leisure activities can meet law-abiding people, develop and practice the skills needed to interact and communicate with people in a positive way, gain a sense of accomplishment and belonging, and increase their sense of self-efficacy. Incorporating prosocial leisure activities into their lives provides offenders with structure, which reduces their risk and opportunity for participating in illegal activities and unhealthy behaviors. If offenders lack prosocial leisure activities, they may look for illegal ways to occupy themselves. For example, offenders who like excitement might steal cars to feel a “rush.” Offenders looking for social interaction may turn to gangs. If, on the other hand, offenders engage in prosocial leisure activities, they are more likely to surround themselves with prosocial peers, make meaningful connections within their communities, and develop alternatives to the behaviors and social norms of criminal or delinquent lifestyles, thus reducing their risk to reoffend. Your role is to help offenders define their prosocial interests, identify activities that match those interests, locate opportunities to engage in those activities, and structure their days so that prosocial leisure becomes part of their everyday lives.

Types of Leisure Activities

• At home: cooking, reading, listening to music, watching TV, repairing cars

• In the community: getting involved in a

community services project, going for dinner with friends, going to movies

• At places of worship: services, meetings, social activities, church committees

• At community centers and in parks: playing basketball, running, skateboarding, taking martial arts classes, taking salsa lessons • Adventure: boxing, cycling, rock climbing, going on wilderness expeditions

PROSOCIAL LEISURE ACTIVITIES

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Using Evidence-Based Practices to Promote Prosocial Leisure Activities

y p o C e l p m a S Using evidence-based practices to address offenders’ lack of prosocial leisure activities can reduce their likelihood of reoffence. Follow these five sequential steps:

Assess: Find out about the types of prosocial activities that offenders enjoy and assess the degree to which an absence of these activities might contribute to their criminal or delinquent behavior. • Do offenders usually just hang out or do they plan their days? • What kinds of prosocial activities do they like doing? • What personal needs (e.g., excitement, sense of accomplishment, calm) do these activities meet? • Which activities would they like to do more often? • When during the day do they engage in these activities? • When do they tend to have a lot of “down time”? • When are they most at risk of getting into trouble? It is usually when offenders are not engaged in prosocial leisure activities or other constructive behaviors, such as working, going to school, or attending to family commitments, that they are at a greater risk to reoffend.

While a lack of prosocial leisure activities can

contribute to crime or delinquency, it is considered a lesser influence than factors such as poor decisionmaking skills, a lack of prosocial peers, etc. Refer

to other Carey Guides, such as Moral Reasoning and Antisocial Peers, for ways to address those factors.

Target: Target the specific thoughts and feelings linked to offenders’ delinquent or criminal actions and help them understand how prosocial activities could address those in positive ways. For example, if offenders feel anxious, a pastime such as fishing or repairing a car might help. Discuss additional benefits of prosocial leisure activities, such as the opportunity to meet and engage with positive role models and learn new skills. Target your interventions for those times of the day when offenders are at greatest risk to reoffend.

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CAREY BLUE GUIDES: CRIMINOGENIC NEEDS


Engage: Engage offenders in the process of identifying their interests and talents, then together explore which prosocial leisure activities they might like to pursue. Engaging offenders is critical if they are to take ownership of their overall case plans, maximize their participation in prosocial leisure activities, and experience success.

y p o C e l p m a S Match: Help offenders select prosocial leisure activities that will most likely address their risks to reoffend. These activities should take into consideration their strengths, interests, and motivation. If offenders are risk takers, identify activities that generate excitement but that are lawful in nature. If offenders are bored, choose activities that offer a challenge. Where appropriate, encourage offenders to get involved in activities that are social. They are more likely to stick with leisure activities that they do with people whose relationships they value. Plan: Work with offenders to create case plans that will increase their likelihood of success. Keep the plans simple, concrete, and achievable so that offenders can develop a sense of self-efficacy. Offer support and reinforcement with each small step. Remember that many offenders may not know where to find or how to become involved in clubs, hobbies, or activities of a prosocial nature. Provide them with choices of activities they can do in their neighborhood or nearby. Case plans should include ways to overcome obstacles that would make it difficult for offenders to engage in prosocial leisure activities. For example, if offenders do not have drivers’ licenses or if they do not own or have access to vehicles, work with them to identify public transportation options or family or friends who could provide transportation to prosocial activities. When contacting organizations about their activities, ask if they provide transportation. Ensure that the case plans are dynamic in nature, changing as the needs or circumstances of offenders change, new information is acquired, new strategies are required, or offenders make progress.

Forming partnerships with local community centers, park

districts, and faith-based organizations can help you create

opportunities for offenders to participate in prosocial leisure

activities. When staff from partnering agencies understand and

participate in the case planning process, they may become more invested in offenders’ success. As a result, they might extend special privileges to offenders, such as waiving participation fees, making offenders feel more welcome, and providing additional positive reinforcement.

PROSOCIAL LEISURE ACTIVITIES

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Skill-Building Tools to Promote Prosocial Leisure Activities

y p o C e l p m a S The Skill-Building Tools in this Guide will help you identify the role that prosocial leisure activities can play in reducing offenders’ risk of recidivism. You can use the Tools with offenders during office or home visits, or offenders can complete the exercises at home and bring them to their next meeting with you. Use the Tools in the order listed. Many offenders struggle with literacy and often hide this difficulty very effectively. If you think that the individuals you are working with have reading difficulties, read and complete the questions with them. Alternatively, if offenders give their permission, have their parents, partners, or other supporters help them fill out the Tools in a non-threatening setting.

Teach offenders how to enjoy themselves without putting themselves in high-risk situations.

Realize that many will not know how to do

something more constructive with their leisure

time than just “hanging out.” Help them search for prosocial activities to occupy their time and suggest ways to remove barriers that they might encounter in trying to do so.

How to Use the Skill-Building Tools

There are four Skill-Building Tools in this Guide: “Identifying Prosocial Leisure Activities,” “The Benefits of Prosocial Activities,” “Time Chart,” and “Making a Plan.” In “Identifying Prosocial Leisure Activities,” offenders identify activities they enjoy and people with whom they would like to do these activities. “The Benefits of Prosocial Activities” helps offenders understand that the choices they make around their leisure activities can greatly impact their lives. “Time Chart” encourages offenders to explore how they can incorporate more prosocial leisure activities into their daily routines. “Making a Plan” helps offenders build the skills they need to plan and engage in prosocial leisure activities.

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CAREY BLUE GUIDES: CRIMINOGENIC NEEDS


Tool 1: Identifying Prosocial Leisure Activities Instructions This Tool helps offenders to identify prosocial activities that they enjoy and to determine with whom they would like to do these activities.

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SESSION 1

1. Talk with offenders about why leisure time is important for everyone and introduce the term “prosocial leisure activities.” Explain that these are fun activities that • help us feel good physically and emotionally; • reduce the stress in our lives; • give us the opportunity to socialize with new, positive people; and • help us maintain a balanced lifestyle. Give examples of prosocial leisure activities, such as working out at the gym, going to see a movie with a positive friend, or volunteering for a community services project. 2. Ask offenders to think about what prosocial leisure activities they enjoy. Have them complete Question 1 at home. SESSION 2

1. Review offenders’ answers to Question 1. If they express an interest in activities that may be prosocial for others but that are risky for them, steer them to alternative activities and encourage them to revise their answers. 2. Find out more about the activities that offenders enjoy. For example, you might ask questions such as the following: • What kinds of things do you like to build? • Where do you hike? • What sports do you play? • What’s the last book you really enjoyed? • What kind of music do you like?

3. Then, ask offenders to choose five activities that they enjoy and to think about what they have in common. Are they exciting? Are they interesting? Do they help offenders relax? Do they involve other people? Have offenders record their answers in Question 2.

4. Ask offenders to pick the three activities they enjoy the most and to identify with whom they would like to do these activities. It might be friends, family members, or coworkers. (Be prepared for the possibility that offenders may not be able to designate prosocial companions and that you will have to help them identify possibilities. Alternatively, offenders may be more comfortable participating in the activities alone.) Have offenders record their answers in Question 3.

PROSOCIAL LEISURE ACTIVITIES

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Tool 2: The Benefits of Prosocial Activities Instructions This Tool helps offenders understand how prosocial activities can reduce their risk of committing illegal behaviors.

y p o C e l p m a S SESSION 1

1. Ask offenders to think back to a day when they got or almost got into trouble. Elicit the following information: • What were they doing (e.g., a structured activity, just hanging out)? • Where were they? • Who were they with? • How were they feeling (e.g., bored, lonely, angry)? Have offenders record their answers in Question 1.

2. Help offenders see how each factor in Question 1 may have contributed to their antisocial behavior. Ask questions such as the following: • If you had been working on your car instead of just hanging out, how might your day have been different? (Tailor the alternative activity you suggest to one that is relevant to the offender. Use ideas from Tool 1, “Identifying Prosocial Activities.”) • If you had been at a movie instead of at a bar, how might your day have been different? • If you had been with your daughter instead of with your friends who use, how might your day have been different? • If you had been calm instead of angry, how might your day have been different? Have offenders record their answers in Question 2. 3. Tell offenders that Tool 3, “Time Chart,” will help them see when they are at the greatest risk for illegal behavior and how they can fit more positive leisure activities into their days.

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CAREY BLUE GUIDES: CRIMINOGENIC NEEDS


Tool 3: Time Chart Instructions Using this Tool, offenders will identify their daily activities, discover when they are at the greatest risk for illegal behavior, and learn to organize their leisure time more constructively to reduce the chances of recidivism.

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SESSION 1

1. Explain to offenders that you want to help them think critically about how they use their leisure time and how they could plan their days to include more prosocial activities. Explain that taking part in prosocial activities will help reduce their risk of getting into trouble again. 2. Show offenders the time chart on page 16. Ask them to fill out the chart every day for a minimum of two weeks. Emphasize the importance of being honest in filling out the chart. You might complete a sample time chart with offenders based on the day of their meeting with you so they can see what the chart should look like. 3. Make enough copies of the time chart for offenders to complete a two-week cycle and schedule your next meeting with offenders shortly after the cycle is over. SESSION 2

1. Review the time charts with offenders and help them evaluate how they spent their days. Begin by asking them to color with a highlighter all those times when they were engaged in prosocial leisure activities. (This is Part A, Question 2.) Praise offenders for all the prosocial leisure activities that they were involved in. 2. Then, ask offenders to put a checkmark beside all the times when they were doing something or were with someone who put them at risk for illegal behavior. (This is Part A, Question 3.)

3. Look at the time charts with offenders to see what days of the week and what times of the day they were at risk for illegal behavior. These are the best times for offenders to add prosocial leisure activities to their routines. Have them fill out Part B of the Tool.

PROSOCIAL LEISURE ACTIVITIES

9


Tool 4: Making a Plan Instructions Many offenders are isolated from opportunities that would allow them to pursue prosocial leisure activities. They may not have the skills to find out what activities are available and how to get involved. This Tool helps offenders make a plan and identifies ways in which you can support them.

y p o C e l p m a S SESSION 1

1. Remind offenders of the top three activities they identified in Tool 1. Have them list these activities in Part A, Question 1a. Then, in Question 1b, have offenders record the day(s) and time(s) when they might participate in these activities. These should be the day(s) and time(s) when they are most at risk of getting into trouble. (Refer offenders to their answers for Tool 3, Part B.)

2. In Part A, Question 2a, have offenders record the activity that they would like to pursue first. Together, determine if the activity will help address the factors that led to their criminal or delinquent behavior, as identified in Tool 2. For example, if offenders were looking for a thrill, ensure that the activity they chose can offer excitement. If offenders felt nervous, anxious, depressed, or afraid, ensure that the activity can provide them with a sense of calm. If offenders were bored, make sure that the activity is interesting, different, and gives them the opportunity to do something that is not part of their routine. If offenders did not choose an activity that meets their needs, suggest that they choose an alternative. 3. Work with offenders to create a plan for participating in the activity they chose. Begin by asking them what they know about the activity and what they want to know. Encourage them to think about • where they can do the activity; • when they can do the activity; • how much the activity costs; • what equipment they need; • with whom they can do the activity; and • what things they would need to do the activity (e.g., transportation, childcare). Have offenders record what they know and want to know in Part A, Question 2b. SESSION 2

1. Ask offenders how they might be able to find answers to the questions they recorded in Part A, Question 2b. Encourage them to record their ideas in Part A, Question 3. For example, offenders could find out about activities offered by park districts, community and fitness centers, libraries, and places of worship from print and online schedules or by calling these organizations. In addition, your agency or a community welcome wagon organization may have already developed a list of resources for the community, with addresses, phone numbers, e-mail addresses, and websites. If these lists are available, share them with offenders. 10

CAREY BLUE GUIDES: CRIMINOGENIC NEEDS


2. If offenders are unsure of how to gather information, guide them through the process. For example, if they want to work out at a local gym, look together at the gym’s website to see what facilities and classes there are, when the gym is open, and how much it costs to go. With your help, offenders can practice calling for information. In Part A, Question 4 encourage them to write a script that they can follow. Talk with offenders about things to keep in mind during the conversation: • Say hello. • Tell the person what you want to know. • Repeat what the person told you to make sure you understood. • Ask clarifying questions to follow up on the answers you received. • Jot down notes to remind you of what you learned. • Thank the person for the information.

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3. Once offenders are comfortable and confident in the practice situation, encourage them to actually find the information they want to know, including making any necessary phone calls.

4. Remember that many offenders may not follow through on assignments such as making phone calls or gathering information from websites. Offer them ongoing support and encouragement. For example, you might invite offenders to look up websites, make phone calls, or look through print resources at your office. In some cases, you may need to gather the initial information and use that information to engage offenders. 5. Have offenders record what they learned in Part A, Question 6. SESSION 3

1. Help offenders set a realistic goal for taking part in the activity. The goal should include details about • what activity they want to do; • on what day and at what time they want to do the activity; • with whom they will do the activity; and • when they want to start doing it. Ensure that the goal is realistic. Give an example, such as “I want to work out at the gym on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 6 p.m. with Luke. I’m going to start tomorrow.” Have offenders write their goal in Part B, Question 1. 2. In Part B, Question 2a, ask offenders to rate, on a scale of 1 to 10, how confident they are that they will meet their goal. A rating of 1 means that they’re not very confident; a rating of 10 means that they’re very confident. If offenders rate their confidence as 5 or lower, ask them what they think might make it difficult for them to meet their goal. How could they overcome these barriers? Offenders should record their ideas in Part B, Question 2b.

PROSOCIAL LEISURE ACTIVITIES

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SESSION 4 AND BEYOND 1. Talk with offenders about their progress in meeting their goals. If offenders have been successful, congratulate them. If they are experiencing difficulty, talk with them about ways they could modify their plans or overcome obstacles that they’ve encountered. Have offenders record their ideas in Part C, Question 1.

y p o C e l p m a S 2. Encourage offenders to complete this Tool for each activity that they’d like to try.

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CAREY BLUE GUIDES: CRIMINOGENIC NEEDS


Tool 1

Identifying Prosocial Leisure Activities There are many things to do that are positive and that can lead to enjoyment. This Tool will help you think about the prosocial leisure activities that you enjoy and who you would like to do them with. 1

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Put a checkmark beside those activities that you enjoy. ❑ Visit the library ❑ Get involved in a project

around the house

❑ ❑ Go to an amusement park ❑ Kick, hit, or throw a ball in a park ❑ Call a friend you haven’t

Hike in a local, state, or national park

talked to recently

Go to a free weekend event in your town

❑ Bake cookies, a cake, or a pie ❑ Play with a pet ❑ Go on a scavenger or treasure hunt ❑ Have a surprise party for no reason ❑ Make or fly a kite or paper airplane ❑ Listen to a free outdoor concert

at the park

❑ Put together a puzzle ❑ Learn something new for fun ❑ Watch planes or trains arrive

and depart

❑ Create a budget to save for a vacation ❑ Go bowling or golfing with a friend ❑ Memorize all the U.S. capitals

and states

❑ Take a walk ❑ Feed the animals at the park ❑ Pick up cans and recycle them ❑ Play a game of football or soccer ❑ Set a goal and do one thing to reach it ❑ Go to a play ❑ Surprise someone with

something special

❑ Learn state symbols

Carey Group Publishing grants the

(e.g., bird, flower, tree)

❑ Travel to a new place in your city ❑ Sing a song or play an instrument ❑ Go swimming

copy this page.

illustrative purposes only.

Carey Blue Guides: Criminogenic Needs

at the clouds

❑ ❑ Drive a four-wheeler or wave runner ❑ Smile, tell a joke, or

Work on a model kit or a craft project

enjoy a good laugh

❑ Take a free class

at a building or craft store

❑ Walk the inside of your local mall ❑ Do some landscaping in your yard ❑ Pop popcorn the old-fashioned way ❑ Organize one room or closet in

your house

❑ Volunteer at an animal shelter

or food bank

❑ Help a church or non-profit organization

❑ Take flowers to a hospital or

seniors’ home

❑ ❑ Fly a balloon on a string ❑ Go tubing or rowing ❑ Jump on a trampoline ❑ Invent or play a new game ❑ Start a new exercise routine ❑ Take pictures ❑ Climb a tree ❑ Learn meditation ❑ Take up yoga or pilates ❑ Practice swimming for distance ❑ Go to an arboretum ❑ Reread your favorite book ❑ Paint a picture ❑ Join a running club Go camping

Other:_________________________________________________

❑ Play in the leaves, sand, or dirt ❑ Play checkers, chess, or a

purchaser the right to

Photos are models for

❑ Listen to music or a band ❑ See a movie ❑ Play in the sprinklers or rain ❑ Ride a bike ❑ Try a new food ❑ Watch birds or wildlife at a park ❑ Go inline skating or skateboarding ❑ Play jacks or marbles ❑ Visit the zoo ❑ Have a picnic or barbecue ❑ Help a neighbor ❑ Go sightseeing ❑ Write a story or poem ❑ Read a novel or comic book ❑ Watch a sunrise or sunset ❑ Pick up trash in the neighborhood ❑ Go to a museum ❑ Fold paper into origami ❑ Make a collage ❑ Play computer/video games ❑ Do a crossword or Sudoku puzzle ❑ Write in a journal ❑ Have a water balloon fight ❑ Write a letter ❑ Go fishing ❑ Ride a horse ❑ Start a collection ❑ Go window-shopping ❑ Visit a second-hand bookstore ❑ Lie on the grass and look

new board game

Source: Maricopa Adult Probation Department

Leisure Activities 13


2 Select five of the activities you identified. What do they have in common? Do they make you feel calm? Are they exciting? Are they interesting? Do they involve other people?

3

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What are the three activities that you enjoy the most? Who would you like to do them with? Activity

Who?

with

Activity

Who?

with

Activity

Who?

with

Carey Group Publishing grants the purchaser the right to copy this page. Photos are models for illustrative purposes only.

14 Leisure Activities

Carey Blue Guides: Criminogenic Needs


Tool 2

The Benefits of Prosocial Activities How we spend our time can have a big impact on how our day unfolds. This assignment asks you to think about how a particular day would have ended differently if you had made another choice about your leisure activities.

1

when you got or almost got into trouble. Complete this web to tell about that day. 2

A D B Cpy What were you doing? (e.g., drinking)

Think back to a day

Imagine that your day had been

different. Ask yourself these questions, then answer each one.

What was the event? (e.g., scratched car with a knife)

Where were you? (e.g., at a bar)

What were you feeling? (e.g., mad)

Who were you with? (e.g., my buddy Tom)

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A What if a.

I had been ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ instead?

Name an activity you enjoy, like one you listed in Tool 1. (e.g.,“What if I had been working out instead?”)

I would

B What if b.

(e.g., “I would not have been drinking.”)

I had been at/in _______________________________________________________________________________________________ instead?

Name a place. (e.g., “What if I had been at the gym instead?”)

I would

CWhat if c.

(e.g., “I would not have been at the bar.”)

I had been with _______________________________________________________________________________________________ instead?

Name a prosocial person. (e.g., “What if I had been with my brother instead?”)

I would

D What if d.

(e.g., “I would have stayed sober.”)

I had been________________________________________________________________________________________________________ instead?

Carey Group Publishing grants the

I would

Write a thought or feeling. (e.g., “What if I had been tired from working out instead?”)

(e.g., “I would have gone home and crashed.”)

purchaser the right to copy this page. Photos are models for illustrative purposes only.

Carey Blue Guides: Criminogenic Needs

Leisure Activities 15


Tool 3

Time Chart The purpose of this Tool is to help you evaluate how you are using your time, who you spend your time with, and on what particular days and at what particular times you are most likely to become involved in risky situations. Part A 1

Complete this chart each day for at least two weeks. Record the date

_________________________________________________

,

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what you were doing in each block of time, and who you were with during those times. Time

What I Was Doing

Who I Was With

12 am – 1 am 1 am – 2 am 2 am – 3 am 3 am – 4 am 4 am – 5 am 5 am – 6 am 6 am – 7 am 7 am – 8 am 8 am – 9 am

9 am – 10 am

10 am – 11 am

11 am – 12 pm 12 pm – 1 pm 1 pm – 2 pm 2 pm – 3 pm 3 pm – 4 pm 4 pm – 5 pm 5 pm – 6 pm 6 pm – 7 pm 7 pm – 8 pm 8 pm – 9 pm

9 pm – 10 pm 10 pm – 11 pm Carey Group Publishing grants the

11 pm – 12 am

purchaser the right to copy this page. Photos are models for illustrative purposes only.

16 Leisure Activities

Carey Blue Guides: Criminogenic Needs


2 Color with a highlighter all the times when you were engaged in prosocial leisure activities (e.g., gardening, listening to music, reading, playing basketball or soccer). 3 Put a checkmark next to all the times where you were doing something or were with someone who put you at risk for illegal behavior. Part B

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Look at your time charts. Think about what days of the week and what times of the

day you were at risk for illegal behavior. These are the best times for you to add prosocial leisure activities to your routine. 1 On which days are you most at

y Monda

risk for illegal behavior? Why did you pick those days?

2 During which hours of these days are you most at

risk? Why did you pick those times?

Carey Group Publishing grants the purchaser the right to copy this page. Photos are models for illustrative purposes only.

Carey Blue Guides: Criminogenic Needs

Leisure Activities 17


Tool 4

Making a Plan Now that you have a better idea of the kinds of positive activities that interest you, it’s time to make a plan to do one of them. This Tool will help you to set a goal for taking part in this activity and to determine what steps you need to take to achieve your goal. Part A

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1 a. List the top three activities that interest you. These are the activities you identified in Question 3 of Tool 1. n

n

n

b. Select the day(s) and time(s) when you might participate in these activities. These should be the day(s) and time(s) when you are most at risk for getting into trouble. (Check the answers you recorded in Part B of Tool 3.) Monday n

Day(s):

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Time(s):

2 a. In the chart on page 19, write the name of the activity you want to pursue first. Make sure you choose a prosocial activity that will give you the same feeling you were looking for on the day you got in trouble or almost got in trouble. (Look back to Question 2 of Tool 1 to remind yourself of what that feeling was.) For example, if you were looking for excitement, the activity should be exciting. If you were looking for calm, the activity should make you feel calm. b. Write what Think about

you know about the activity and what you still want to find out.

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where you can do the activity;

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when you can do the activity;

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how much the activity costs;

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what equipment you need;

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who you can do the activity with; and

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what things you’d need to put in place in order to do the activity (e.g., arrange for transportation or childcare).

For example, if you want to start going to the gym to work out, you might already know that there’s a gym down the street from where you live. You may want to find out what facilities the gym has, what classes it offers, and what days and times it’s open. Carey Group Publishing grants the purchaser the right to copy this page. Photos are models for illustrative purposes only.

18 Leisure Activities

Carey Blue Guides: Criminogenic Needs


Activity:

What I Know

What I Want to Know

y p o C e l p m a S 12 3 4 5 6

3

Identify how you can find answers to your questions.

4

Work with your corrections professional to find the information you need. For example, if you want

to work out at a local gym, you might look together at the gym’s website to see what facilities and classes are available, when the gym is open, and how much it costs to go. Or, call the gym, using the questions you listed in Question 2 as a guide. It might help you to write a script for the conversation. Keep in mind these points:

Say hello.

Tell the person what you want to know.

Repeat what the person told you.

Ask clarifying questions.

Jot down notes to remind you of what you learned.

Thank the person for the information.

Carey Group Publishing grants the purchaser the right to copy this page. Photos are models for illustrative purposes only.

Carey Blue Guides: Criminogenic Needs

Leisure Activities 19


5 Ask your corrections professional to practice the conversation with you. The more you practice, the more confident you will be. Once you’re comfortable, contact the person. 6

Record what you learned about the activity in the space below.

Part B 1

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Set a goal for taking part in the activity. Make sure that your goal is realistic and achievable, for example, “I want to work out at the gym on Tuesdays and Thursdays with Luke. I’m going to start tomorrow.” Activity Goal

I want to take part in the following activity:

I’m going to do the activity on this day:

I’m going to do the activity at this time:

I’m going to do this activity with this person:

I’m going to start by this date:

2 a. On a scale of 1 to 10, rate how confident you are that you will meet your goal. Put an X on the number line to show your rating.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Not very confident

Fairly confident

Very confident

Carey Group Publishing grants the purchaser the right to copy this page. Photos are models for illustrative purposes only.

20 Leisure Activities

Carey Blue Guides: Criminogenic Needs


b. If your rating is 5 or less, list the things that you think might get in the way of meeting your goal and the ways you could overcome these things.

Confidence Index

Part C

y p o C e l p m a S Things That Might Get In the Way

Ways I Could Overcome These Things

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1 During your next session with your corrections professional, discuss your progress in meeting your goal. If you’re having trouble, talk with your corrections professional about ways to modify your plan or to overcome unexpected challenges. Record your ideas below.

2 Complete this Tool for each activity that you’d like to try.

Carey Group

"

Publishing grants the purchaser the right to copy this page. Photos are models for illustrative purposes only.

Carey Blue Guides: Criminogenic Needs

Leisure Activities 21


Glossary When applied to Prosocial Leisure Activities, the terms are defined as follows: Case plan A document that outlines the issues offenders will address to promote their success and the steps they will take to address them.

Prosocial leisure activities Recreational and other

activities that provide meaningful, enjoyable, and positive outlets and that help people develop healthy interpersonal skills, physical and mental health, and personal growth.

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Evidence-based practices (EBP) A progressive, organizational use of direct, current scientific evidence to guide and inform efficient and effective correctional services.

Self-efficacy An individual’s belief that he or she has the skills and abilities to achieve a goal and overcome obstacles.

Author

Ingrid Sharos is a Licensed Professional Counselor in the state of Illinois. She worked for 31 years in the field of corrections, serving in both the adult and juvenile probation systems. She was instrumental in implementing evidence-based practices at the Department of Probation and Court Services Division of the 18th Judicial Circuit Court, Wheaton, Illinois. Ingrid worked as a Probation Officer, Program Manager, Supervisor, and retired as the Deputy Director of Adult Casework Services. She continues her work in the corrections field as a trainer, coach, and consultant.

Tell Us What You Think

If you have any thoughts or ideas about how this Guide could be improved, we want to hear from you. You can submit your suggestions through our website at www.careygrouppublishing.com.


Notes


Notes


WHY CAREY GUIDES? We have a unique opportunity to positively influence the direction and practice of professionals who work with offenders. The Carey Guides give corrections professionals EBP Tools to help offenders lead productive lives. Carey Group Publishing has developed 33 practical, easy-to-use handbooks to help corrections professionals deliver EBP to the offenders with whom they are working. Twelve Blue Guides address criminogenic needs and 21 Red Guides address case management issues.

y p o C e l p m a S CAREY GROUP PUBLISHING 13400 Fairland Park Drive, Silver Spring, MD 20904-5492 PHONE 1.877.892.2739 #80 EMAIL info@thecareygroup.com WEBSITE www.careygrouppublishing.com


CAREY BLUE GUIDES CRIMINOGENIC NEEDS The Blue Guides provide short, practical exercises for offenders, designed to address their criminogenic needs and to reduce their future criminal or delinquent behavior.

y p o C e l p m a S Anger

Antisocial Peers

Antisocial Thinking

Emotional Regulation

Empathy

Interpersonal Skills

Moral Reasoning

Overcoming Family Challenges

Problem Solving

Prosocial Leisure Activities

Substance Abuse

Your Guide to Success

CAREY RED GUIDES

EFFECTIVE CASE MANAGEMENT

The Red Guides provide you with strategies for effective case management.

Behavioral Techniques

Case Planning

Co-occurring Disorders

Dosage and Intensity

Drug Dealers

Engaging Prosocial Others

Female Offenders

Impaired Driving

Intimate Partner Violence

Involving Families

Managing Sex Offenders

Maximizing Strengths

Mental Health

Meth Users

Motivating Offenders to Change

Reentry

Responding to Violations

Responsivity

Rewards and Sanctions

Violence and Lethality

What Makes an Effective Corrections Professional?

Carey Group Publishing

Practitioners Helping Practitioners 13400 Fairland Park Drive, Silver Spring, MD 20904-5492 PHONE 1.877.892.2739 #80 EMAIL info@thecareygroup.com WEBSITE www.careygrouppublishing.com ISBN 978-1-934836-28-6

2nd Edition Carey Guides Sample  
2nd Edition Carey Guides Sample  

2nd Edition Carey Guides