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September 2013

Get out and get fit Don’t let your disability stop you exercising

What is shared lives?

Careers advice

Where to find careers guidance

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Keeping safe

Hints and tips to follow

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Benefits

May 2012 edition

Why you should claim them

The Equality Act

Profiles

How it applies to education

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Paralympics 2012

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Live independently and consideration Job interview out Advice to help you

Positive transition planning

for young adults with

additional needs

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www.achuk.com

Care and support for Adults with Learning Disabilities ACH is a leading provider of residential care homes in the South and East of England offering person-centred support for adults with learning disabilities.

For more than a decade we have provided high quality care and support to enable adults with conditions including: • Autistic spectrum disorders • Epilepsy • Multiple disabilities • Sensory impairments • People who exhibit behaviour that challenges social boundries

Talk to us today! ACH has twenty five homes in the UK that may be of interest to you or a member of your family: • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Newton House, Thatcham, Newbury, Berkshire Alderton House, Littleport, Ely, Cambridgeshire Ivers House, Marnhull, Dorset Bridgewater House, St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex Cloverdale House, Hove, East Sussex Maldon House, Seaford, East Sussex Arundel House, Frinton-on-Sea, Essex Cherrycroft, Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex Ashford Lodge, Chilham, Kent Bradwell House, Hythe, Kent Byfield Court, Sittingbourne, Kent Kingsdown House, Strood, Kent Sheringham House, Gravesend, Kent

• Springfield House, Birchington, Kent • Winchester House, Minster-on-Sea, Kent • Woodbridge House, Gillingham, Kent • Rosebank Lodge, Mitcham, London • Ambleside Lodge, Redhill, Surrey • Beech Trees, Woking, Surrey • Combe House, Woking, Surrey • Whitehatch, Horley, Surrey • Coneyhurst Lodge, Worthing, West Sussex • Fleetwood House, Littlehampton, West Sussex • Harwich House, Littlehampton, West Sussex • Lambourne House, Selsey, West Sussex

For more details or to view any of the homes, please contact:

Theresa Hanson

Head of Referrals & Placements on 0208 502 8879 or Mobile: 07812 072043 email: info@achuk.com


September 2013

43

IN THIS ISSUE

profiles Richard West MBE is inspirational, hardworking and dedicated to helping make a difference to people’s lives.

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A detailed explanation of shared lives, which offers the opportunity to live with carers in the community.

WELCOME TO PROGRESS Contributors and advisers

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Advice and guidance on how disability shouldn’t be a barrier to sport.

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20 A selection of fun and interesting activities to try out.

DOWNLOAD OUR FREE APP TODAY DOWNLOAD OUR FREE APP TODAY 21 Ideas of where to start when looking for careers advice.

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Forthcoming changes around SEN and transition.

transport and out and about.

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The first of our regular columns giving sex and relationships advice.

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News & What’s on?

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A summary of Progress’ successful Transition Event, plus details of how you can get involved next year.

54 Transition pathway

Suggestions as to how preparing for adulthood can be made easier.

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Welcome from the Editor

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As autumn approaches and we all start to prepare for the colder, winter months, we here at Progress have been thinking about the future and what will help you achieve the future you want. To do this we’ve drawn together a great balance of features to help you plan for 2014 and beyond.

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Regular readers of Progress will be aware that the Government is making plans to change SEN, disabilities and transition. On page 14, Ellen Atkinson and Nicola Gitsham summarise what’s being proposed, when it’s likely to happen OUR NEW and what is already happening to change transition, hopefully for the better.

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If you’re thinking about getting a career or starting work, our useful feature on page 21 guides you through careers advice. Schools no longer have to offer you careers education but should you in touch with an adviser – this advice OURput NEW is commonly by phone or on the internet. We’ve put together a number of resources to help you choose your career path and find the right job for you.

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Everyone likes to have fun, have a laugh with friends or family. Our fun activities on page 33 set out some things you can do on days out to try something new and enjoy yourself. Go on, have some fun! Also, this issue sees the first of our regular series of sex and relationships advice. Gill Leno is our sex and relationships specialist and she’s happy to answer any questions you may have. Whether you’re a young person, parent, carer or adviser and have a question about sex, relationships, talking to young people about these subjects or anything in between, take a look at Gill’s introductory column on page 31 and please do send in questions for our next issue.

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Finally, for those of you who couldn’t attend our Transition Event in May, we have included a write-up of the event and details of how you can attend next time. Delegates took away so much useful information, don’t miss out next year.

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Contributors & Advisers • ACH

• Ellen Atkinson, Preparing for Adulthood

• Aspire

• Gill Leno, Sex and Relationship Specialist

• CareTech Community Services

• Greg Tythe, Business Development Manager at Choice Support

• Carlisle Mencap

• Henshaws College

henshaws College

• Mybility All Terrain DOWNLOAD OURWheelchairs FREE APP TODAY • Nicola Gitsham, Preparing for Adulthood

DOWNLOAD OUR FREE APP TODAY • Rachel Mason, Consultant

DOWNLOAD OUR FREE APP TODAY • Richard West MBE DOWNLOAD OUR FREE APP TODAY

Care Choices Limited has taken every care to ensure that the information contained in this publication is accurate. The company cannot accept responsibility for any errors or omissions or if a service varies from the facilities listed either in an advertisement or the indices. Care Choices Limited does not endorse or support any particular institution included in this publication. © 2013 Care Choices Limited. Care Choices Limited reserves all rights in the title Progress and its design. Care Choices™ is a trademark of Care Choices Limited. ISBN 978-1-909048-68-3.

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The information and opinions contained in this magazine and on our website are for general information purposes only. The information and materials do not constitute legal or other professional advice. They are not intended to constitute legal or other professional advice, and should not be relied on or treated as a substitute for specific advice relevant to particular circumstances. Care Choices Limited and its Contributors do not accept any responsibility for any loss which may arise from this information and opinions. Ref. No: 4001/SC20/0913. Reproduction of any part of this publication in any form without the written permission of Care Choices Limited is prohibited. Published by: Care Choices Limited, Valley Court, Lower Road, Croydon, Nr Royston, Hertfordshire SG8 0HF. Tel: 01223 207770. Fax: 01223 207108 E-mail: progress@carechoices.co.uk Web: www.progressmagazine.co.uk­­­­­ publisher: Matthew Tingey Sales: Sue Speaight Business Development Manager: Paul Leahy editor: Emma Morriss Editorial Assistant: Rebecca Northfield Production: Jamie Harvey, NIck Cade & Holly Cornell. Printed in England.

Photograph credits: Progress News – Logo courtesy of Netbuddy, Singing from the same hymn sheet – Diagrams courtesy of Rachel Mason, Progress Profiles – Images courtesy of Richard West MBE

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Inclusion Care provides specialist, tailored support to individuals with a broad range of mental and physical needs, ranging from domiciliary care, supported living and even packages for the support of complex needs such as spinal cord injury, (including ventilator dependent) acquired brain injury and cerebral palsy that requires a 24-hour service including sleeping or waking nights.

The core feature of our care packages is the focus on the individual; planning their entire care/support plan around the client to ensure that they receive a service that suits them rather than requiring them to adjust to a new routine.

Our expertise and professionalism has been recognised through a number of accreditations from leading organisations including Maybo and the Investors in People Gold award which demonstrates our commitment to the continuous training and development of our workforce.

If you’d like to find out more abo ut our various support packages or any of our care homes please don’t hesitate to con tact John Irwin or Sue Strain today on 016 84 857520. Find us on Facebook @InclusionCare 1-3 Welland Court, Brockeridge Park, Twyning, Tewkesbury, Gloucs GL20 6FD


Young disabled students must be able to choose to go to an independent specialist college.

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PROGRESS News

Carers need support

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Calvert Trust Exmoor has been awarded Highly Commended in the ‘Access For All Tourism Award’ category at the VisitEngland Awards for Excellence 2013. Calvert Trust Exmoor runs a fully accessible 60-bed residential outdoor activity centre, catering for people with physical, sensory and learning disabilities of all ages and levels of ability, together with their families, friends and carers. Activities on offer include sailing, horse riding, wheelchair abseiling, accessible cycling and archery. Over 3,500 guests took a break with them last year. This national award is the culmination of a run of awards for Calvert Trust Exmoor in the last few months, starting with winning Bronze in the Visit Devon Awards in November 2012, then Silver in the South West Tourism Awards in February 2013, followed a few days later by being accredited as the only 5-Star activity accommodation in the country. www.calvert-trust.org.uk/exmoor NLOAD

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Calvert Trust Exmoor Excellence Award

As the Government announces proposals for a ‘joined-up’ health and social care service, research by disability charity Vitalise shows that millions of family carers are putting their health at risk because they are unaware that support is available to them. In response to a Royal College of General Practitioners’ report, which found that 40% of carers were thought to be at risk of depression because of their caring role, a recent Vitalise study has revealed that this may be just the tip of the iceberg. The Vitalise study, which collated the findings of research conducted over the past five years, revealed that many carers don’t see themselves as carers because they are unpaid and/or see it as a family duty. As a result they don’t realise they are entitled to statutory support and may be putting their mental and physical wellbeing at risk. There are an estimated six million carers – around one in eight adults – in the UK, with another 6,000 people taking on a caring responsibility each day. It is estimated that the total number of UK carers will have reached nine million by 2037. The research was commissioned by Vitalise and presented as evidence that more needs to be done to reach out to carers and provide them with vital OAstatutory information about L their entitlements. D

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DA DA DA Young disabled students must specialist colleges can continue diffe be able to choose to go to an rence for many young people delivering an inspiring education in with special educational needs. independent specialist college, if they spite of tightened budgets and the Through the Children and Families believe it will best prepare them for need to navigate a complex new Bill…young people and their parents independent living, further studies or funding system. will be able to say where they want employment, Edward Timpson MP, to The main speaker Mr Timpson study - including at special colleges. Parliamentary under Secretary of spoke passionately about We’ve also made sure colleges hav State for Children and Families, said e empowering young disabled people the at this year’s Natspec Conference. funding they need so they can to make their own further education continue to offer highly specialist Natspec’s (The Association of choices and trusting theiOUR TODAY r abilityFREE APP provision. National Specialist Colleges) annual to make the choice that is right ‘We need to be more ambitious conference, ‘Raising Aspirations – for them. He said, ‘Independent for OUR FREE APP Transforming Lives’ examined how the TODAY students as they are very specialist colleges make a huge ambitious for themselves.’

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Getting careers advice is on page 21 If you’re thinking about getting a career or starting work.

Go on, have some fun is on page 33 Some ideas to get you out and about.

also including:

Help to get a job • Personal Independence Payments • What’s On

Over 70% of people who hold a personal budget reported a positive impact on being independent

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National Personal Budgets Su

who use personal A survey of more than 3,300 people r carers has found budgets (PBs) in social care and thei taken up PBs. positive results when people have The survey found that: PB reported a • Over 70% of people who hold a t, getting the positive impact on being independen g supported support they need and want and bein with dignity. act on physical • Over 60% reported a positive imp over their support. trol health, mental wellbeing and con impact on • A further 50% reported a positive e, and in their hom r thei feeling safe in and outside . ters relationships with paid suppor

s of people The survey found only small number reporting any negative impact. k part in the 22 volunteer councils in England too on behalf of Think survey. The work was undertaken ontrol and led by Local, Act Personal by the charity inC tre for Disability Professor Chris Hatton from the Cen John Waters from Research at Lancaster University and inControl. was also run with For the first time, the same survey lth budgets and 195 people who hold personal hea rted similar positive 117 of their carers. This group repo sonal budgets. results as those with social care per

Other key findings included: e aspects of the • Councils continuing to find som a high level of delivery process difficult. There was ple’s lives, but positivity in respect of impact on peo ut the personal people were much less positive abo budget processes. in some areas • Personal budgets had less impact to live with, who including choosing where to live/ with friends, s relationships with family, relationship volunteering. getting and keeping a paid job and e well in these more • However, some councils do quit ld make more difficult areas, suggesting others cou progress. s making the • For all social care groups, council nt better personal budget process easier mea ers. In particular, outcomes for personal budget hold d in planning having a person’s views fully include lts. The same resu itive pos was very strongly linked to findings apply to carers. holders also • Most carers of personal budget ing it made their life reported positive experiences say having the support better in terms of finances (52%), ain well (69%), you need to continue caring and rem rs’ physical and carers’ quality of life (60%), and care mental wellbeing (53%).

Over 60% reported a positive impact on physical health, mental wellbeing and control. @progress_mag


PROGRESS News

@progress_mag

Personal Independence Payments The Personal Independence Payments (PIP), a new disability benefit, has been extended across the country. It replaces Disability Living Allowance (DLA) for working-age claimants. The new benefit is designed to support disabled people to live independent lives and includes a new face-to-face assessment and regular reviews. Esther McVey, Minister for Disabled People said: ‘The Personal Independence Payment has been designed to better reflect today’s understanding of disability, particularly to update our thinking on mental health and fluctuating conditions. We are introducing a new face-to-face assessment and regular reviews – something missing in the current system. This will ensure the billions we spend on the benefit give more targeted support to those who need it most.’ The new assessment looks at an individual’s ability to carry out a broad range of everyday activities such as washing, dressing, cooking and getting around. It also looks at reading, verbal communication and how someone engages with other people. PIP started in April with a phased introduction in the North of England and Claimants can is now being rolled out to the rest of England, Wales and Scotland. Some also use the PIP existing working age claimants will start to be re-assessed from October, checker online but only if there is a change in circumstance, if an existing award ends or if by entering some someone reaches age 16. This means most existing DLA claimants won’t be simple information: re-assessed until 2015 or later, after DWP has considered the findings of the www.gov.uk/pipfirst independent review in 2014. checker DWP wrote to all DLA claimants earlier this year to explain if and when they might be affected.

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Changes to school funding The Council for Disabled Children has developed a briefing for parents on School funding changes and children with SEN in mainstream schools. In April 2013, the Government made changes to the way that funding is provided to schools. The funding changes do not alter the legal responsibilities of schools and local authorities for children with special educational needs (SEN). The Government is also making changes to the SEN system. The changes, currently set out in the Children and Families Bill, will not start to happen until September 2014. Until then, the current SEN framework, the law and the SEN Code of Practice, all stay in place. The briefing provides information about the school funding changes and explains what you should do if a school or local authority proposes to change the special educational provision for your child. It can be downloaded from www.councilfordisabledchildren.org.uk

In April 2013, the Government made changes to the way that funding is provided to schools.

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PROGRESS News

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Help to get a job

Challenging behaviour factsheets

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Last year the programme helped 30,000 disabled people keep or get employment.

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The Challenging Behaviour Foundation has developed a series of three information sheets which look at the causes of challenging behaviour and explain how to make effective plans to reduce challenging behaviour. The information is designed for families or professionals who support a child or adult with severe learning disabilities whose behaviour challenges. Two existing information sheets, which explain how to identify the causes of challenging behaviour, have been updated and a third sheet has been written which shows readers how to make a Positive Behaviour Support plan. The sheets can be downloaded from www.challengingbehaviour.org.uk.

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Disabled people will get more support to gain the skills and experience they need to get a job under changes to the Government’s specialist disability employment scheme. Disabled people on traineeships, supported internships, work trials and work academies will, for the first time, get additional help through the Access to Work scheme - which provides funding towards the extra costs disabled people face in work, such as travel costs, specially adapted equipment or support workers. Recent changes also mean that businesses with up to 49 employees will save up to £2,300 per employee who uses the fund by no longer paying a contribution towards the extra costs faced by disabled people in work. Disabled jobseekers who want to set up their own business through the New Enterprise Allowance are also eligible for Access to Work funding. Access to Work has previously been called ‘the Government’s best kept secret’ so to raise awareness of the changes, the Government will continue its marketing campaign - targeted at young disabled people and people with mental health conditions. Last year the programme helped 30,000 disabled people keep or get employment. Research also shows that around half (45 per cent) of Access to Work customers would be out of work if they did not receive support through the scheme. Anyone interested in applying for this support can search ‘Access to Work’ at www.gov.uk/access-to-work/ to find out details of contact centres.

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PROGRESS News

@progress_mag

Progress Magazine’s Guide to What’s On Regional events in association with Netbuddy have joined up with the Press Association to bring you details of events in your area. Here are just a few examples but take a look at their website for more. www.netbuddy.org.uk/events Drama and Theatre Skills for Adults with Learning Disabilities 19th September to 21st November, 2013, Hounslow www.sparetyre.org Weekly Drama for Learning Disabled Adults 29th October to 17th December 2013, Leicestershire www.speakeasytheatre.co.uk Spinning Yarn Runs to 13th December 2013, London Tel: 020 7354 3524

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To find out what happened at this year’s Transition Event, see page 52.

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The Purple Hub – Words and Wisdom Runs to 16th December 2013, North Yorkshire Tel: 01423 568218

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Kidz up North 21st November 2013, Manchester www.disabledliving.co.uk/Kidz/North

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The Monday Night Club Runs to 16th December 2013, Worcestershire www.mondaynightclub.wordpress.com

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National Events

Monday Night Social Club Runs to 16th December 2013, Oxfordshire Tel: 01865 236119

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PROGRESS/08-2013


Preparing for

Adulthood

Ellen Atkinson and Nicola Gitsham summarise the forthcoming changes around transition.

In March 2011, the Government published a Green Paper, Support and Aspiration: A new approach to special educational needs and disability, which set out proposals to reform the system of support for young people with SEN and disabilities and their families. In the Green Paper, the Government set out its goal for young people with SEN and disabilities to have the best opportunities and support to succeed in education and their careers, live independently and healthily and be active members of their communities. The vision included wide-ranging proposals to improve outcomes for children and young people, to minimise the adversarial nature of the system for families and achieve better use of resources. The Children and Families Bill, which takes forward the Government’s commitments to improve services for vulnerable children and also underpin wider reforms to ensure that all children and young people can succeed, no matter what their background, was introduced into Parliament on the 4th February 2013.

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Why change things? The current system is not working for families and children; too many children with SEN have their needs identified late and young people with SEN do less well than their peers at school and college and are more likely to be out of education, training and employment at 18. Parents report that schools and colleges often focus too much on the SEN label rather than meeting the child’s needs, and the current Statements/ Learning Difficulty Assessments don’t focus on life outcomes. Many families have to battle to find out about available support to get the help they need from education, health and social care services. There is also a very different system when a young person leaves school for further education, which doesn’t carry forward the rights and protections that exist in the school system.

When will it happen? The Children and Families Bill was published by the Department for Education in February 2013; it’s currently going through Parliament and has recently had its second reading in the House of Lords. The Government is thinking about implementing the reforms, and how to manage the changeover to a new legal system from September 2014. In July, Edward Timpson announced that they’ll be providing £9 million in 2013-14 to support local areas to prepare for implementation.


What is being proposed? Single plan

Personal budgets

At the heart of the proposed reforms is a single assessment process and Education, Health and Care Plan, bringing together support from birth to 25, focusing on better life outcomes beyond school or college. The new 0 to 25 Education, Health and Care Plan will replace the current system of statements and Learning Difficulty Assessments to create a much stronger integrated assessment process and will involve parents, young people and a range of professionals. There’ll be a clearer focus on outcomes that reflect the young person’s aspirations, including employment and independent living.

The reforms aim to give parents confidence by giving them more control over the support their family receives. All families with children, and young people, with a statement of SEN or a new Education, Health and Care Plan should have the option of a personal budget by 2014.

Local offer Local authorities will be expected to publish a clear, transparent ‘local offer’ of services, developed with parents and young people, so everyone knows what is available. Schools, further education colleges and health agencies must co-operate with the local authority to make sure that the local offer includes information on their services and how to access them. This will help parents and young people to access the support they need and make choices about the best ways to do so. Local areas will need to set out how they support young people to prepare for adulthood with particular attention to paid employment, independent living and community participation. The local offer is expected to highlight gaps in provision and inform commissioning.

Joint commissioning A key element of the proposed reforms is to increase joint commissioning. The Bill sets out how local authorities in England and their partner clinical commissioning groups must make ‘joint commissioning arrangements’ about the education, health and care provision to be secured for children and young people with SEN for whom the authority is responsible.

Draft Code of Practice An indicative draft Code of Practice has been produced alongside the Children and Families Bill. The Code will provide statutory guidance for a wide range of services. The draft regulations cover a number of areas including Education, Health and Care assessments and plans, personal budgets, the local offer, and SEN information provided by schools. This is the first time that there will be a Code of Practice for everyone working with young people 0 to 25 (including colleges). There is a commitment to incorporate evidence from the pathfinder programme into subsequent drafts of the Code. The Code will be consulted on formally in autumn 2013 and will then be laid before Parliament for approval.


Preparing for Adulthood A programme of work has been running since September 2011 to test and support the implementation of these proposals, working with SEND pathfinders. The Preparing for Adulthood (PfA) programme provides knowledge and support to all local authorities and their partners, including families and young people, so they can ensure young people with SEN and disabilities achieve paid work, independent living, good health and community inclusion as they move into adulthood. PfA works with the Department for Education and its partners to: • Build on the learning from past initiatives. • Support peer to peer learning at a local level to improve outcomes.

Use person-centred planning and reviews to inform support planning and ensure individual budgets lead to life outcomes for young people.

Set an example by employing young disabled people.

Raise aspirations for a fulfilling adult life, by sharing clear information about what has already worked for others.

Invest in family and young people leadership.

Develop information with families and young people themselves.

Stimulate the post-16 market so that young people get a job and get a full life.

Develop a shared vision across all partners,  with families and young people at its heart and focus on improving life chances. Raise aspirations for a fulfilling adult life, by  sharing clear information about what has

Preparing for

Adulthood Develop a shared vision across all partners, with families and young people at its heart and focus on improving life chances.

Building on the learning from past programmes, PfA identified ten key messages that set out what needs to happen to ensure young people achieve better lives.

Develop personalised curriculums so that children learn what they need for adulthood.

Think inclusion and keep focused on life outcomes.

Ensure that the experience of young people and their families inform strategic planning and commissioning by using approaches such as Working Together for Change.

• Share knowledge of what works, the challenges and solutions with Government, local agencies, families and young people. It brings together a wide range of expertise and experience of working with young people and families, locally and nationally, and across government, to support young people into adulthood with paid employment, good health, independent living and community inclusion. The PfA team previously worked on transition programmes including the Transition Support Programme, Valuing People Now, Valuing Employment Now (Getting a Life project, Jobs First, Aspirations for Life and Project Search) and Learning for Living and Work.

already worked for others. Develop information with families and  young people themselves. Invest in family and young people  leadership. inclusion and keep focused on life  Think outcomes that lead to independent living, paid employment, good health, friend relationships and community inclusion. person-centred planning and reviews  Use to inform support planning and ensure individual budgets lead to better life outcomes for young people. Develop personalised curriculums so  that children learn what they need for adulthood. the post-16 market so that  Stimulate young people get a job and get a full life. an example by employing young  Set disabled people. Ensure that the experience of young people  and their families inform strategic planning and commissioning by using approaches such as Working Together for Change.


for people aged 7+ with ASD, learning difficulties and/or disabilities, mental health issues and challenging behaviour

“Four years ago I could never have imagined I would have changed so much!” Josh is now employed following his invaluable placement at Glasshouse College

How can we help you? Because our young people learn to achieve and communicate through practical, real-life activities and accredited courses in social and cultural settings, they are prepared to progress onto greater independence, further education and employment. For Open Days and how our Practical Skills Therapeutic Education curriculum in England and Wales can help you contact our Admissions Teams at: www.rmt.org A member of NATSPEC

Inspected

Ruskin Mill Trust is an educational charity and draws its inspiration from the insights of Rudolf Steiner, John Ruskin and William Morris. Charity No: 1137167

Josh receiving his Adult Learners Award where Skills Minister, Matthew Hancock MP, said the winners demonstrated ‘the life changing benefits education offers.’

Progress half page July 13.indd 1

10/07/2013 10:05

01432 376621 info@rnc.ac.uk | www.rnc.ac.uk

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The Royal National College for the Blind Venns Lane, Hereford HR1 1DT

Company limited by guarantee no. 2367626 Registered charity no. 1000388

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Womaston School is a small, independent special school for students with learning disabilities, complex needs, communication disorders and autism. Set in a fantastic rural location on the borders of Herefordshire and Powys, we deliver a non-classroom based ‘adventurous’ curriculum over a number of locations in and around the school and within the wider community. Learning is promoted through hands-on, motivating activities including pottery, computer studies, climbing, swimming, horse riding, gardening, walking, kayaking, music, and woodland exploration. We provide: • Full time education for students aged 11 to 19 years • Day placements and flexible residential packages from respite to 52 week • Private accommodation for up to 16 students and onsite overnight parent accommodation • A 22 acre campus comprising substantial woodland grounds, sports hall, hydrotherapy pool, sensory room, ICT room, cafe, life-skills kitchen, horticultural area, sensory garden, outdoor classrooms, nature trails • Highly individualised learning programmes tailored to meet the personal and academic needs of each student • Specialists in Occupational Therapy, Speech and Language Therapy, Behaviour Support, Music Therapy, Reflexology and Yoga • Supported transition to adult living through ‘My Way’

“My son is in a home from home, such a welcoming place!” Parent 2012 “The difference in this young man is remarkable, it’s fabu lous to hear about his progress and how much happier he is.” Local Authority 2013 “Behaviour is very good throughout the school” ESTYN April 2013 “Our son has come on leaps & bounds. He’s grown up, calmer, and his concentration has improved a lot” Parent June 2013

For more information or to arrange a visit, call us on 01908 230100, visit our website at www.macintyre-education.org or email us at referrals@macintyrecharity.org

“All pupils become more communication skills” ESTYN April 2013

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What we do The PfA Programme has three strands of work: • Best practice, news and information sharing online, via social media and a bi-monthly e-bulletin. • Wider support for all local areas (non-pathfinder areas) through events and webinars.

What makes a difference for young people? Evidence from the pathfinders tells us that to improve life outcomes for young people, the things that make a difference are:

• Pathfinder support.

> Raising the aspirations of young people,

Pathfinders

> Person-centred transition planning with a

Preparing for Adulthood supports 13 pathfinders to use best practice to develop their approach to single assessment process and 0 to 25 Education, Health and Care plans, personal budgets, local offer and developing post-16 options and support.

families and everyone who supports them. focus on employment being available to all young people.

> Real work experience, so that families see that work is positive and possible.

> Vocational curriculum within schools and

Pathfinders are:

further education colleges to support young people’s aspirations.

• Manchester, • Bromley and Bexley, • SE7, • Wiltshire, • North Yorkshire, • Hertfordshire, • Oldham and Rochdale, • Lewisham, • Greenwich, • Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly, • Darlington and Hartlepool, • Nottingham, • Calderdale. The Government has now set up a Pathfinder Champion in each region to support non-pathfinders through: • regional conferences, • workshops/seminars on thematic areas of interest, • contribute to developing self-evaluation tools, • support days with non-pathfinder local authority areas, • Quarterly case studies.

> Having good supported employment organisations available to work with young people in school and good supported employment from 16+.

> Working with colleges to develop supported internships (building on the trials at 15 colleges) for young people who have complex learning difficulties or disabilities.

> Ensuring study programmes provide structured learning with an employment focus that is tailored to the individual needs of the young person.

> Developing pathways to employment, independent living, good health and community inclusion in local areas with young people, their families and senior decision-makers across education, health, social care, employment, housing and other key agencies that can help young people get fulfilling adult lives.

The Government is proposing many changes to SEN and it is hoped that these changes coupled with the work that is already happening with PfA will pave the way for a better future for children and young people with SEN. With thanks to Ellen Atkinson and Nicola Gitsham from Preparing for Adulthood. www.preparingforadulthood.org.uk

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Natspec www.natspec.org.uk

Members of NATSPEC work in partnership with others to offer the widest choice of innovative, high quality, cost-effective education, training and support to match the inclusive learning needs of young people and adults with learning difficulties and disabilities as they prepare for the next stage of their lives. Prospective learners and their supporters are advised to talk to their specialist careers adviser, Connexions Personal Adviser, disablement resettlement officer or social worker about funding. By law, colleges must open admissions to all students, regardless of disability or impairment. Colleges listed here specialise in educating students with specific disabilities and/or difficulties but welcome applications from all students.

Coleg Elidyr is an independent specialist college that provides a range of services for young people who experience moderate to severe learning disabilities. Our unique rural setting offers an exceptional learning environment in which to challenge our learners. The focus is on assisting the development of confidence and skills needed for greater independence. Our enriched curriculum offers a wide range of courses and activities.

Communication Specialist College Doncaster currently have places available for learners who are deaf, hearing-impaired or those who have specific communication and language needs. We specialise in high-quality, innovative Learning & Training programmes, designed to provide Learners with exactly what they need at the time they need it. Using Total Communication we offer an extended curriculum which is highly supportive and person-centred.

We aim to inspire our learners to be the very best they can be.

To arrange a visit please contact us on: 01302 386 700 Email: marketing@ddt-deaf.org.uk or go to our website: www.deaf-trust.co.uk

Coleg Elidyr,

Communication Specialist College Doncaster

Rhandirmwyn, Nr Llandovery, Carmarthenshire SA20 0NL Tel: 01550 760400 E-mail: admissions@colegelidyr.ac.uk Web: www.colegelidyr.ac.uk

Leger Way, Doncaster DN2 6AY Tel: 01302 386 700 E-mail: marketing@ddt-deaf.org.uk Web: www.deaf-college.co.uk

Derwen College is committed to promoting through personalised learning the vocational, educational, personal and social development of young people with a wide range of learning difficulties and disabilities. We have considerable expertise in working with young people with autistic spectrum conditions, severe learning difficulties, communication difficulties, physical disabilities, epilepsy and other health needs.

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Oswestry, Shropshire, SY11 3JA Tel: 01691 661234 E-mail: : info@derwen.ac.uk Web: www.derwen.ac.uk

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e c i v d a s r e e r a c g n i t t Ge In 2012, the Government made changes to careers advice. It made it the job of schools to help the young people they teach to find careers advice.

If you’re not sure where to start Progress gives you some ideas.

Your school If you’re not sure of what you’d like to do when you leave school or look for work, ask your teachers about the independent advice service that they recommend. Legally, schools should help you to find independent careers advice but your school doesn’t have to deliver careers education. They must recommend someone who can advise you on what you like, what you’d like to do, what you think you’d be good at and what job you may like. This could be when you’re deciding what subjects to study or when you’re thinking about leaving school.

National Careers Service The National Careers Service can give you information, advice and guidance to help you choose the best learning, training and work for you. Its qualified careers advisers offer you confidential and impartial advice online. The website has been designed to help you look at your skills and abilities and set goals for your future. The website is divided into two parts: career tools and career advice. The career tools are designed to help you make the right choices about your future. You can set up a lifelong learning account to save all the results from the website. If you want to do more learning and training you can search thousands of courses. It also has a funding advice section to help you find out if you qualify for financial help for course fees, travel, equipment or day-to-day living costs. If you’re not sure how your skills would translate to the world of work, the Skills Health Check Tool could help. They are a set of online quizzes to help you work out what you're good at, what you like doing and how you like to work. At the end you’ll get a summary report. This also has ideas on industry areas that might suit you – then you can browse through job profiles in that area. The site also has a CV builder to help you put together a good CV and covering letter to give you the best start when applying for jobs. Start by having a look around the website and seeing what will help you find the job you want. https://nationalcareersservice.direct.gov.uk you can also call the National Careers Service on 0800 100 900 but they don’t offer faceto-face advice.

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plotr plotr is the revolutionary new careers platform for 11 to 24 year olds. With the leadership of industry and the support of Government, plotr is a website that gives young people the help they need to build the careers they want. plotr is a not-for-profit organisation and is completely free for young people, parents and teachers to use. plotr brings together insight and guidance from industry with real opportunities to learn and work, to empower young people with access to all the tools they need to build their future. The website has distinct areas: Career Worlds, Resource Centre, Employer Profiles and Opportunity Finder. Career Worlds breaks down sectors into specific job roles that you can then explore in more detail. It tells you more about the roles, how to get started, has videos interviewing people who do that job and useful articles to help you. The Resource Centre draws together a lot of different articles exploring all aspects of career searching including choosing a career, job hunting and university. The site also includes profiles of major employers and there is a searchable database of opportunities. www.plotr.co.uk

Careersbox Careersbox is a free online library of careers-related film, news and information. The case study films show real people doing real jobs, giving an insight into careers across all sectors and helping you to find the right career. The website has videos and information from leading organisations in automotive and transport; creative and media; education, health and care; energy and engineering; legal and financial; medical and science; office, IT and telecoms; process and manufacturing; public sector; retail; and sports, leisure and environment. You can sign up to regular emails giving you information on any sectors that you are interested in. www.careersbox.co.uk

Careers Wales For our Welsh readers, Careers Wales offers web-based and telephone guidance for anyone on their career journey. The website has three main sections: Your Career – advice and information to help you through all the different parts of your career journey; Jobs and Training – a range of information, tools and resources to support you in applying for and gaining access to the job market and Education and Courses – information and advice to make decisions about future qualification choices and study, including a database of all post-16 courses available in Wales. www.careerswales.com


icould

My name is Thomas and I’m 20. I have a visual impairment which means my sight is getting worse as I get older and I also have a learning difficulty.

icould has a lot of useful videos, articles and focuses on particular aspects of job-seeking and careers. It gives Hospitality is my passion and I love it. While I was at school I completed real insight into different jobs and a link course at a local college one day a week to learn about catering. I careers with ideas about what also did a work placement where I learnt to make dishes including quiches, might be a good path for you. salads and puddings. Having this practical experience helped me to make You might even find out about choices about my future. something that you never I was a bit nervous about coming to Henshaws College last year as it was a big knew existed. It gives details step for me. It’s been great meeting new students, talking and making friends. of which subjects work with which careers if you’re Since my very first day, staff have supported me to think about my options for the looking to make decisions future. To make sure hospitality was the right choice for me, I also tried out about your training and different pathways including admin, arts and crafts and horticulture. I then realised education. icould.com that I couldn’t imagine doing anything else! Staff have encouraged me to get relevant experience to prepare for leaving college. I’ve taken part in our Hospitality to Go Enterprise where I make, pack and deliver sandwiches, soup and paninis. I enjoyed this so much that I always went to the sessions early to help prepare the soup of the day. I also worked in the dining room wrapping cutlery and setting up for student break. It’s helped me learn more about the catering industry to build on the skills I already have. When I leave college, I’d love to be involved in catering in some way. My long-term goal is to have my own restaurant for people with disabilities. I feel really positive about my future and I know that I have a lot to look forward to. With thanks to Henshaws College. www.henshaws.ac.uk

Find the job for you Although there are no longer face-to-face careers meetings in every school, there is a wealth of information online and via telephone. The right job for you could be out there, you just need to know what it is.

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L RI A RT O AD VE

Supported Living By Alastair Graham, Director of Golden Lane Housing (GLH), the housing arm of Mencap

In these ever changing times people with a learning disability face a harder situation of finding the right home. Since GLH was set up by Mencap 15 years ago, we’ve helped more than 1,200 people with a learning disability move into supported living housing. But still today only 16% of people with a learning disability live in supported housing in the community. A recent study by Mencap found that eight out of 10 councils in England and Wales said there were severe shortages of appropriate housing. Seven out of 10 said these had worsened in the past year. As a result of this shortage, many people with a learning disability continue to live with parents who may be getting elderly and are struggling to cope, while others live in institutions, often large and remote from their families. We decided that what we really needed was access to capital so that we could buy housing and adapt it as needed to the particular needs of the tenants. With grants very scarce and private loans expensive, we had to look to innovative new sources of finance to help us to provide more housing. In response to this, GLH decided to consider developing a bond issue on a larger scale than in 2003 where we raised £1.8m. After a successful bid to the Big Lottery Fund’s Next Steps Programme for £349,000 it enabled us to develop our proposal.

The response was overwhelming and both parts of the offer had to close early to avoid being oversubscribed as we reached our target of £10 million. In terms of the wider social impact of this project, we are now assessing the impact of the bond on its beneficiaries using a progression tool based on Mencap’s “What Matters to Me” framework. We are also surveying the families of the people who move into all of the bond properties to assess the impact of the move on their lives. And we will also be reporting on the financial impact on the public purse. We have already bought six properties which are home to 24 tenants who are now living in attractive, high quality houses and bungalows in residential areas and are supported by Mencap, and we have a pipeline of schemes that will spend the full £10m this year. In total, there will be nearly 100 new tenancies up and down the country. And the houses and bungalows will be there for future generations of people with a learning disability – the bond has enabled us to create a lasting legacy. We’re now looking at whether we can do a further bond issue in 2014 – so watch this space! For more information and updates on the bond, visit www.glh.org.uk.

Celebrating moving into their new home Lizzie, James, Claire and Sarah celebrated moving into their new home with a house warming party in July, one of the first properties to benefit from the bond capital.

Debbie, Lizzie’s Mum “Everything is just perfect for them; the house, staff, location and they have full lives. We couldn’t ask for any more. It’s a success that has taken planning, preparation and working together as a team. The families have continually worked together, Golden Lane Housing bought the right home that was adapted to meet their needs and after interviewing for a support provider we chose Mencap who are a great support team.”


The Key to your new life Thanks to help from Mencap

With access to new funding, Mencap can provide you with quality housing and flexible support so you can live the life you choose. Freephone 0808 808 1111 Visit mencap.org.uk/thekeytoyournewlife Email mencapdirect@mencap.org.uk

Charity number 222377 (England, Northern Ireland and Wales); SCO41079 (Scotland)


Sharing lives with shared lives Shared lives offers disabled people an opportunity to live with carers within the community. Greg Tythe explains more.

Shared lives is for adults with learning disabilities and mental health issues aged 18 and over who need support, care and accommodation. People live in ordinary homes with shared lives carers who have been trained and approved by the organisation providing the arrangement. The carers are supported and monitored by a shared lives service manager. Living with a carer and their family enables people to learn new skills and become as

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independent as possible while sharing in ordinary family life. Shared lives services are registered and inspected by the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

What does shared lives offer? • A careful match with a carer who can meet the person’s needs. • Being part of a carer’s wider family and circle of friends.

• Living an ordinary lifestyle in the community. • Developing new interests and activities. • The chance to meet new people. • Encouragement to keep in contact with family and friends. • Learning new skills for greater independence. • Having choices and achieving aims and hopes.


What arrangements are available? Everyone’s needs are unique so each arrangement (which used to be called adult placement) is negotiated in advance. • Long-term accommodation with care and support. The person plans to stay for quite a while or wants a permanent home.

• Short-term arrangements. The person agrees a programme with the carer that will help them achieve their plans and wishes and then move on to the next step in their lives.

• Home from hospital and rehabilitative support. Short-term accommodation and care for people who have their own homes but need extra care after illness or a crisis.

• Short breaks and respite. A short stay with a carer away from the person’s usual home to give them a change from routine or give a break to their usual carers, family or friends.

• Emergency and urgent arrangements. Some shared lives carers are trained to take people at short notice for short stays until permanent arrangements can be found.

What needs can be met? • Physical – from prompting washing and getting dressed to full personal care. • Emotional – becoming more confident and maintaining friendships. • Social – getting to know new people and activities, developing new skills for more independence. • Cultural – following a particular diet or customs. • Spiritual – keeping in touch with a faith community.

Who are shared lives carers? Carers are ordinary people from the local community who want to offer family life to a person with a learning disability. Their household and wider family is involved and, as part of the approval process, they will have fully considered what having an extra person in their home will mean for them all. Many shared lives carers have worked or volunteered in social care or have been a family carer. People who have no previous experience are trained and supported by shared lives service managers to become successful carers. Carers are people who want to work in their own homes, providing a service and making a difference to the lives of other people. Carers can be single people, couples, families with children, or have other relatives living with them. They can live in a flat or a house so long as there is enough space for an extra person. They can be younger or older so long as they have good health to take on demanding work. All carers, though, are patient, positive, persevering and person-centred, to meet the person’s needs and help them achieve the outcomes they want for themselves.


How do arrangements work? • The carer and the person are carefully ‘matched’ to ensure that their personalities and lifestyles are compatible, so that the carer can meet the person’s needs. • A careful introductory programme is arranged so that the carer and the person can check if the match is viable.

How are carers trained? • Carers have the same induction training as employed support staff. This includes Common Induction Standards, health and safety and first aid. • They have training for their role as a shared lives carer which includes working at home, working with families, Deprivation of Liberty, Safeguarding of Vulnerable Adults and the Mental Capacity Act. • Carers should also be offered any specialised training they need to meet the specific needs of people they are supporting.

• Most arrangements are planned to last six months or longer.

How are carers approved?

• The shared lives agreement is signed by the carer and the person or their representative. This identifies the outcomes to be achieved.

Social work qualified and experienced shared lives service managers will assess people who want to become carers, and produce an assessment report. The purpose of the assessment, which takes about three months, is to:

• The carers and the person are visited at least once a month by a shared lives service manager. This is to offer support and also to check that the arrangement is safe and working for everyone.

• Help the carer applicant decide whether they can do the job.

• The carer and the person write a monthly report on the progress on the plan.

• Enable the service to check out applicants’ suitability. • If an application is approved, to provide detailed information about the carer and their household for the matching process.

• Regular reviews take place with the service manager, the local authority care manager and any other professionals and individuals involved in the person’s care.

The assessment aims to gain a full picture of the applicant’s personality, character, attitudes and views and gathers information about their household and lifestyle. Other members of their household, if there are any, and wider family are interviewed to ensure that they understand what having a shared lives person will mean for them, and the support they will need to give to the carer. Assessment reports also include:

What if an arrangement does not work? During introductions, the person can decide that they don’t want to go ahead. The service manager will try to find another shared lives carer for them. If the carer doesn’t feel that this arrangement is right for them, this won’t prevent them being offered other arrangements in the future. During the arrangement, if things aren’t working out, the person or the carer can give at least four weeks’ notice to end the arrangement. The service provider should review the reasons so that the service can learn more about the person’s needs and look for another arrangement for them. The experience will also help the carer to know more about their abilities and preferences and this will be useful when they offer shared lives arrangements to other people.

Carers are ordinary people from the local community who want to offer family life to a person with a learning disability.

• Checks on the applicants – criminal records check, health references, employer and personal references. • Checks on the applicant’s home – health and safety, fire safety, general risk assessment, security of tenure with landlord or mortgage provider, home and contents insurance, personal liability insurance. Finally, an independent panel considers the assessment report, and recommends the suitability of the applicant to become a carer and the type of service they can offer.


Homes for adults with a Learning Disability We believe that nothing should be a barrier to people in achieving their ambitions and realising their full potential. Decoy Farm Browston, Norfolk, 01502 730927 The Laurels Lowestoft, Suffolk, 01502 585459 Lynfield Ditchingham, Norfolk, 01986 897196 Wisteria House Ipswich, Suffolk, 01473 726326

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For more information contact your local home or visit www.isiss.co.uk

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The Directors of Quartz Healthcare have a wealth of experience in the world of learning difficulties, mental health, physical disabilities, elderly care, and in the setting up of individual person centred lifelong care packages – from mild to severe conditions.

ur Shared Lives service is for adults aged 18+ with learning disabilities and/or mental health issues. We enable Foster Carers to continue supporting their young person post 18 plus offer parents/guardian and professionals a range of person centred transitional services including shared lives, supported living and respite.

Whether your requirement is specialist housing, just some activity support, or anything in-between.

For more information on becoming a shared lives carer or accessing our services, contact Greg Tythe on 07919 321395. Email: greg.tythe@choicesupport.org.uk

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What is the matching process? The service manager considers the person with a learning disability’s needs assessment and support plan to see if there is a carer with a vacancy who can meet the person’s needs. A ‘matching tool’ enables a systematic assessment of all the factors that go to make successful arrangements and identifies where there are gaps to be filled. The service manager will then send information about the proposed carer to the care manager. Carers have a family book which has accessible information about them and their household which can be shown to the person with a learning disability. The service manager will meet the person to check that a match is possible. An introductory programme is agreed. If no match is available immediately or in the near future, the service manager will inform the care manager as soon as possible.

Supporting and monitoring arrangements • Service managers visit the carer and the person at least monthly and more frequently in the first three months of the arrangement. • An informal review is held two to three weeks after the arrangement has started; and most boroughs hold a new placement review at six weeks. • Informal reviews take place every three months for the first year of the arrangement. • A formal review takes place annually. • Carers themselves have a review of their progress once a year.

For more information on shared lives in your area contact your local authority. With thanks to Greg Tythe, Business Development Manager at Choice Support. www.choicesupport.org.uk, greg.tythe@choicesupport.org.uk

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How much does it cost? The cost varies for each arrangement depending on the level of the person’s needs, which will be assessed to fit within one of four bands. Information about the likely cost of the service for the person will be provided at the meeting of the care manager and the service manager. The final costs are agreed before an arrangement starts. The payment to the carer is made up of: • A carer’s fee – paid by the person or the local authority. • Housing benefit at the local rate for the rent of the person’s room. • A contribution from the person for food and utilities. The local authority or the person is responsible for: • Routine travel costs. • Day services. • Activities, interests and holidays. • Personal needs, clothing etc. There is also a management fee to the provider in addition to the carer’s payment, which includes: • Training, support and appraisal of the carers. • Monitoring the carers and the arrangement. • Regular reviews of the arrangement. • Respite arrangement for the carers and the person. • Emergency cover.


Talking about

Sex AND relationships In the coming issues of Progress, we are going to be answering some of your questions about sex and relationships, so please send them in. There’s no such thing as a silly question as far as sex is concerned, so don’t feel embarrassed.

Talking about sex can be fun, embarrassing, and a bit scary – and sometimes, all three at once. However, it’s very important to get your facts right and it’s never too late to find out. Sometimes it can feel a bit tricky, but remember – nobody starts off knowing all there is to know about sex and relationships, and we all have to find out from somewhere.

Because it’s the first column, I thought I would get us started by answering a couple of general questions that I get asked all the time.

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Thinking about sex is very normal – pretty much everyone does it. But what can you do if you’ve got a question you’re feeling a bit awkward about? Sex and relationships specialist Gill Leno is here to answer any questions you may have.

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Parents Do you have any questions around talkin g about sex with your child? I’m here to help everyone.

Q: Where can I find out about sex? Gillian: It’s very important that you find out about sex from a trustworthy and safe place. You have to know how to stay safe, so getting the wrong information could end up being quite risky. It’s good if you can talk to your parents or whoever you live with, or a teacher/tutor. There are some great books, published by the Family Planning Association, called Talking Together About…, which are very helpful and cover lots of important subjects. They’re available online at the FPA’s website (www.fpa.org.uk) – perhaps you could suggest looking at them together with an adult you trust. I know that can make lots of people feel very shy, though, so you could also look online at the Brook website (www.brook.org.uk). Brook specialises in young people’s sexual health and has lots of up to date information and games.

Q: Am I allowed to have sex? Gillian: This is a really big question that lots of young people have asked me over the years. The short answer is yes, BUT there are quite a few things that have to happen first. You have to have a boyfriend or girlfriend that you know really well and who you trust. Sex is a really grown-up thing to do and you and your partner need to be absolutely sure Please do send in about it before you do it. your questions to editor@ You also both have to progressmagazine.co.uk – be old enough – at least nothing is off limits and there’s no need to be shy. We’ll choose 16 – and you both need one or two each time and to really understand they’ll be anonymous, so everything that sex you can ask whatever involves, especially what you like. could happen, and how to stay safe. Sex should be special, exciting and positive but you have to know all the facts first. That’s where we can help.

If your question is urgent (or private) you can contact me at gleno@qac.ac.uk and I will email you back.

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Go on, have some fun Do you fancy having a good laugh, trying something new, getting out and about? Then look at some of these fun activities to get you started. Calvert Trust The Calvert Trust offers fun-packed holidays for people with disabilities. With three centres in the UK, Exmoor, Kielder and Lake District, you can be guaranteed fun, adventure and wonderful activities.

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Museums are all over the country, you’d be surprised how many towns and cities have them. Do you know if there’s one in your local T can beYhomes area? MuseumsO DA to anything and everything. But, if you think they can be stuffy and boring, think again. Kids in Museums is a charity dedicated to making museums more open and welcoming to families, children and teenagers. Its website has a list of the best family-friendly museums. So if you don’t want to trudge round a museum, keeping quiet and feeling bored, check out some of their award-winning museums and know you’ll be welcomed with open arms. And you could even find some undiscovered gems. www.kidsinmuseums.org.uk

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If you enjoy cycling, check out Pedalabikeaway. Based in the Forest of Dean, Pedalabikeaway offers bike hire T trails inYa beautiful location. If you’re T O notYtoo and cycleO DA DA confident on a bike you can head out on the easy-going family cycle trail. However, the daredevils amongst you can grab a mountain bike and go cross-country. Don’t worry if you don’t have your own bike, they have a huge number of bikes to hire and can kit you out with helmets, accessories and ideas of which trails will best suit your level of experience. They also offer a Mountain Trike experience with a truly all-terrain wheelchair to give you the freedom to go whereFREE APP TODAY DOWNLOAD OUR standard wheelchairs fear to go! Find out more at www. DOWNLOAD OUR FREE APP TODAY pedalabikeaway.co.uk.

Calvert Trust Exmoor is located on the edge of Exmoor National Park, a short distance from the North Devon Coast. Fully accessible, the award-winning centre has highly-experienced instructors who are specially trained to work with disabled individuals. Accommodation, activities and all meals are included in the holiday. Activities include horse riding, rock climbing, sailing, canoeing, archery, zip wire, bush craft and much more. To find out more visit www.calvert-trust.org.uk/exmoor.

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Go Ape is the UK’s number one forest adventure. Days out are about living life a little more adventurously, having fun with family and friends and getting in touch with your inner Tarzan! There are 29 Go Ape locations around the country, set in spectacular forests. You can take part in a variety of activities whilst you’re there. Classic Go Ape is the Tree Top adventure experience. With huge zip wires, Tarzan swings, high rope obstacles, tunnels, bridges and more set high in the tree tops, it’s a great way to get outdoors, try something new and enjoy yourself. For more information on Go Ape, their different locations and adventures visit www.goape.co.uk.

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Theme parks John was diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy when he was one. The condition causes his legs to weaken and so he struggles to keep up with his friends. When diagnosed the news hit us for six – not only was it completely unexpected but he was also such an active, determined and vibrant chap – it didn’t seem to make any sense. Since then, these qualities have been ever present. He enjoys a challenge and has a tremendous zest, instead of feeling sorry for himself he just gets on with it.

Fancy a day out at a theme park? The thrills and spills of rollercoasters, rides, waterparks, sideshows, attractions and much more, can be found up and down the country. Depending on what you want to do and where you want to go, here are just a few to get you thinking.

John wants to help other kids too. Once a week he goes to Great Ormond Street Hospital to take part in clinical trials for a treatment for his condition. The trial can be tiring and uncomfortable, but he seldom complains and is committed to help to find a treatment that could benefit hundreds of children. You might think that with John’s condition he’d be well-advised to take life as easy as possible, while avoiding risk and accepting life has to be different for him. Not a bit of it. It’s just not his mentality. We have struggled to find a wheelchair for John that suited his outlook on life and hunger to get on and live each day to the full. Initially it was rather depressing trying to find a powered wheelchair that is deserving of a young man who doesn’t want to be held back. Presently, NHS chairs don’t meet the basic needs of someone who wants to remain active, involved and spend time with others. As NHS chairs weren’t suitable, John took part in the kids 3K version of the Oxford Town and Gown Charity Run to raise money to buy an all-terrain wheelchair and achieved his fundraising targets. Young people like John enjoy life as much as you or I, they get the same thrill from speed, walking in the woods, playing on the beach, climbing around in the sand dunes or just playing on the school field. That's a right, not a privilege. With thanks to Mybility All Terrain Wheelchairs. www.mybility.co.uk

> Alton Towers, Staffordshire – www.alton-towers.com/theme-park > Blackpool Pleasure Beach – www.blackpoolpleasurebeach.com > Chessington World of Adventures, South West London – www.chessington.com > Drayton Manor, Staffordshire – www.draytonmanor.co.uk > Fantasy Island, Skegness - www.fantasyisland.co.uk > Gullivers Theme Parks, Warrington, Matlock Bath and Milton Keynes – www.gulliversfun.co.uk > Legoland, Windsor – www.legoland.co.uk > Thorpe Park, Surrey – www.thorpepark.com > Oakwood Theme Park, Pembrokeshire – www.oakwoodthemepark.co.uk > Paultons Park, New Forest – www.paultonspark.co.uk > Pleasurewood Hills, Lowestoft – www.pleasurewoodhills.com

Go karting Go karts are small, four-wheeled karts that can be driven indoors or out. Ranging from pedal power up to motorised engine, they offer a driving experience without the need for a driving license. There are go kart tracks across the UK, some throwing karting parties. A simple internet search of go karting will turn up a number of different tracks.




We are Pedalabikeaway, the leading leisure cycling provider in the Forest of Dean. Our aim is to ensure you have a great day out whatever kind of riding you choose. That's why we provide: • Accessible café • and toilets • Wide, safe traffic• free tracks

it's what you CAN do that Counts!

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• Tandems • Trikes • Wheelchair Bikes • Mountain Trikes • Tagalongs

Calvert Trust Exmoor enables people with all types of disabilities to experience exciting, challenging and enjoyable outdoor activity holidays. At our award winning accessible centre all activities are specifically designed and equipped to cater for everyone.

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Zoos If you love animals, take a look at the many zoos around the UK. From large zoos run by the Zoological Society London to smaller, more local zoos, you’re bound to be enthralled by the animals you can see. Here are just a few examples.

> > > > > > > > >

Banham Zoo, Norfolk – www.banhamzoo.co.uk Bristol Zoo – www.bristolzoo.co.uk Chester Zoo – www.chesterzoo.co.uk Colchester Zoo – www.colchesterzoo.co.uk Dudley Zoo – www.dudleyzoo.co.uk Newquay Zoo – www.newquayzoo.org.uk Woburn Safari Park – www.woburnsafari.co.uk ZSL London Zoo – www.zsl.org/zsl-london-zoo ZSL Whipsnade Zoo – www.zsl.ord/zsl-whipsnade-zoo

Whatever you like to do, there’s nothing better than having fun with family and friends.

Go out and enjoy yourself! Opening late July/early August 2013

‘The Old Orchard’ residential care home Newark, Nottinghamshire Witham Valley Care Group provides residential and domiciliary care services to adults who have a learning difficulty and other complex care needs including autism spectrum, severe learning difficulties and epilepsy. The Old Orchard was purchased in December 2012 by the Witham Valley Care Group. It is currently undergoing extensive refurbishment in order to provide six en-suite bedrooms. There are three large reception rooms which will be utilised as a living room for relaxing, a games room and a dining room. The breakfast kitchen is perfect for supporting individuals to develop their cooking and meal preparation skills. The philosophy behind The Old Orchard is to provide a vibrant home within the community to support younger adults with the transition from education and children’s services into adult services. Staff who work at The Old Orchard will provide individualised support and advice to residents and enable them to access work experience and college placements which are suitable to the individual.

The Old Orchard also has the benefit of:

• Large front garden set back from the road with room for several vehicles including the homes own vehicle • Large secure rear garden with patio area and room for outdoor activities and barbeques • Good access to Newark town centre where residents can attend college if appropriate and together with their staff, develop their independent living skills • Within close proximity of public transport links which can be utilised by visitors and for residents when developing/gaining experience of travelling on public transport Please contact: Gemma Collins, Witham Valley Care Group The Old Orchard, 242 Beacon Hill Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 2JP Email: gemma@witham-valley.co.uk Telephone: 01636 700227 Mobile: 07792556136 Web: www.withamvalleycaregroup.co.uk

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Singing from the same hymn sheet – how preparing for adulthood can be easier

Hindsight is a marvellous thing. I’m a parent of two adult sons with autism and learning disabilities. I’ve been through transition twice and I use that experience in my work with adult services seeing how prepared families are when coming through transition. Yet the questions I ask local authorities never seem to change.

• Why, if services have known who they are, where they are likely to live and have had 18 years of access to them via school and many other services, are young people still coming through into adulthood unskilled for their personal life choices?

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• Why do families become so passively involved in their child’s life during school years, that they don’t feel they are the experts LOAon their child and challenge this?

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• Why are young people coming through disconnected from their community so their family feels their options are limited?

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parents, can le as u, yo d an ge an ch to s ed ne is Th

To meet the learning needs of your child successfully, it is important that schools work closely with you and involve you in your child’s education. But what does this mean?

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• Why do parents feel frustrated that services have known about their child for so long and yet they seem unprepared to receive them?

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• Why are young people still reaching 18 feeling illprepared for life ahead?

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As a parent, do you feel underprepared for transition? Are you given enough information about the skills your child is learning and how to translate these to home life? Rachel Mason shares parents’ frustrations and simple ways everyone can sing from the same hymn sheet.

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Parents who wish to work towards a target at home can approach the class teacher. ‘We aim to see every parent at least once a year to talk about their child's progress. This is called an annual review. Parents will also be asked to make a comment on how they feel their child is doing for the Record of Achievement and contribute to the statement review.’

SomeDOWNLOAD teachers have told me howFREE they involve OUR APPparents. TODAY ‘At Open Evenings, parents can go through their child's But is this enough? Why should you have to ‘buy-in’ to Individual Education Plan (IEP) with staff. Parents get child’s education and future life? You should DOWNLOAD OUR FREE APP TODAY your the opportunity to see what we are achieving in school. be involved throughout, it’s your child.

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Where are we going wrong?

be either from the family home and taken into schools or achieved at school and taken home to inspire and motivate families. Also, there isn’t enough investment in local communities in preparation for when our children leave school. This includes housing, transport or work opportunities.

As parents, we are tired, exhausted and can feel out of control of our own destiny, let alone the future of our child. But there are some common core mistakes families, who have been through transition, have seen within services and made themselves which doesn’t help. Unfortunately, school is primarily seen as respite for families, giving them a break from caring. This means that we’re having the wrong conversations with schools. School is about achievements, life skills, growing up and developing, the break is an added extra. There isn’t enough celebration and sharing of our children’s achievements in school and guidance on how to take them forward into adulthood. This could

The way that education is delivered means that there are fewer opportunities for you to work with your child, taking what they’ve learnt at school and carrying it on at home. If the curriculum was more meaningful and practical this would help you to take skills forward in the home. Also, adult services don’t monitor or challenge what is happening, how your child is developing their skills. As a result, adult services inherit unnecessary packages when the young person becomes 18. This doesn’t help anyone.

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Things haven’t changed either, I still see this in my role as a carer co-ordinator in adult services, where 30 years on, a person going to the day centre returns home and are unwittingly prevented from applying the skills DOWNLOAD OUR FREE APP TODAY they’ve gained because their parents don’t know what they’ve learnt there. As far as they know it doesn’t offer DOWNLOAD OUR FREE APP TODAY anything other than respite.

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T Owere Y I felt under constant scrutiny and as if services DA pulling us in different directions to suit their outcomes. I couldn’t relate to the academic and professional language they used to describe my son’s targets. I struggled to understand and believe in the vision and a purpose of numerous services around my son.

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You aren’t expected to work on your child’s goals unlike our mainstream peers, often there is no support L toOAD N transfer any of the skills learned at school into home life. This can leave you unsure of how to support your child’s learning. No one had this conversation with me until the boys were six months away from adulthood.

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PATH and person-centred planning changed our lives. Instead of juggling many services, we were empowered to ask the right questions. What’s important to you? What’s working well?

Traditional review The traditional annual review is fraught with issues. Parents tell me frequently that their child is learning skills but they’re not told how to help them use them at home. Or the reviews aren’t telling them enough about what their child is learning. ‘At my son’s reviews I hear about all the progress he has made. The school refer to reading scales and specialists – percentiles.’ ‘I saw a video of all the new skills he gained over the year, some from over six months ago and yet we, as a family, are still struggling at home and out in the community to get an ordinary life.’ ‘For us a year on…it is yet again - Groundhog day!’

What’s not working? Now tell us what a good future looks like!

So it does beg the question, ‘If the family’s quality of life isn’t changing with all this input from services - can we honestly say it is working?’

A person-centred review – at last singing from the same hymn sheet! Get a person-centred plan Having a person-centred plan (PCP) from the very beginning ensures that you and your child stay in control and maintain ownership of your child’s future. With ownership, you can more easily take responsibility to encourage and support your child to be ‘the best that they can be’. You can work in partnership with education, health, social care and others to review regularly the effectiveness of the plan, how your child is transferring the skills they have learnt in school/college and how effectively any other additional specialist input is being harnessed to support their development. Services are delivered to one common aim with families holding each one accountable.

Home/ With a person-centred review, we Community have a better chance of ensuring a skill gained in one environment PCP is immediately shared and School/ Other implemented in the other areas College Services of your child’s life. Each aspect of service delivery, if delivered in a way that you and your child can identify with, will increase your ownership of it and engagement with services. You will see the benefits and aspire for more.

Some local authorities are introducing interactive platforms into their schools/colleges/adult provision that can provide a co-ordinated way to support your child’s journey into adulthood.You, your child and the team around them can share information and build on each other’s progress as well as use your collective voice to tell services what they need to plan for the future. These platforms provide a secure online hub for the person who will be co-ordinating the single education, health and care plan from 2014 and the account stays with you for life, so information isn’t lost.


Achieving a change A learning platform like this enables your child to transfer the skills they learn in school into daily life at home. It means schools can share visual resources as well by attaching photos and videos.

Doing things differently We used to use residential respite that cost children’s services £1,700 a week. We asked for a direct payment for the cost of a Villa at Butlins and a PA who looked at all my son’s skills to identify areas for more targeted services and curriculum tweaks. This suited my son and cost children’s services less. We also introduced step by step independence aids such as digital gadgets, GPS, iPad and digital key rings. These made such a difference to my son’s self esteem and effectively reduced the pressure on our parental supervision.

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Rachel Mason is a parent and consultant. Email: rachelkmason.consultancy@gmail.com

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For a full version of Rachel’s presentation at the Transition Event 2013 please visit http://www.progressmagazine.co.uk/TTE2013Slides.htm

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By harnessing this knowledge and differentiating the subject topics into work tasks that are meaningful to them, you and your child can see the difference it is making on a daily basis. I’m certain this is a future you can buy into.

just one hour a day reduces their reliance on adult social care by £5,000 a year for the rest of their life. T T AP

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A personalised approach to delivering my sons’ curriculum made the world of difference. Through the person-centred review process, the school learns about the hobbies, TO Y interests and local links your child has with DA their community; the one they will probably live in for the rest of their life.

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Schools need to become more aware of their impact on the life-long outcomes and choices of their pupils.

It does work

By introducing life skills mapping from Year 9, adult services can also track your child’s projected needs and plan ahead for them. You, your child and the education, health and social care services around them can use this mapping every year as their baseline. Working together over the following four years, they can build any areas of life skills weakness back into your child’s curriculum.


Keeley is a young lady with learning disabilities, who moved from Wales to Newton House, Newbury in Oct 2012. The move was carefully planned with Keeley being completely informed and involved throughout the process. Effective communication has been crucial for everyone involved with Keeley. It was important for us to listen to Keeley’s views to establish what is important to her now and for her future. Keeley is encouraged to have positive control over her life and is provided with support that promotes person-centred principles. The main focus of support for Keeley has been to encourage her to lead a life that is as independent as possible in order for Keeley to reach her potential. Those known to Keeley have already noted progress in areas such as speech and budgeting. Keeley takes great enjoyment in being involved in local community activities and has started using local transport to access places like the college and meeting friends in the pub. Every week Keeley plans her activities using a computer and keeps a weekly planner in her room to help her have a focus on each day. Keeley has also learnt to send emails to family and attaches her weekly planner. When family telephone Keeley, they are able to talk about her day with her and also be aware of her plans ahead. Keeley loves to ‘have a chat’ and has progressed steadily over the last nine months by those around her using a ‘total communication’ approach.

Hello. My name is Keeley. I have lived at Newton House for 9 months. Newton House is good. I like going shopping. I work on a farm and go to the college. I see my family and friends. Staff help me. Keeley With thanks to ACH www.achuk.com

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We offer personalised curriculum programmes inclusive of a wide range of therapeutic input, such as Speech and Language Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Sensory Integration, Aromatherapy, Music Therapy and Educational Psychology. Support and care is continued into adulthood with our adult homes further enabling our residents’ independence and integration within their community. For more information please contact: • T: 0208 335 2570 • F: 0208 335 2571 • E: kisimulreferrals@kisimul.co.uk

Freedom Care do a wonderful job, It’s the best placement my son has ever had, Freedom Care have done everything possible to help and support him and our family. It’s a fantastic service which benefits everyone. Mr B Parent of service user.

Our postal address is Woodstock House, Woodstock Lane North, Long Ditton, Surrey KT6 5HN.

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the potential of children and young people with disabilities. We achieve this through providing disability sports, such as football, swimming, athletics, Boccia, table cricket and adapted sports. We provide sporting opportunities for children, young people and adults to enjoy. We also offer expert, specialist support to parents, support workers, teachers, coaches, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, sport providers and other professionals on how to adapt sports for people with cerebral palsy.

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Profiles -

d r a o b n o Richard’s

ference for people with Richard West MBE is making a dif rer, a DJ and involved disabilities whilst also being a ca hard work and in many different organisations. His an MBE for his work. dedication has seen him receive Who are you?

Do you have any other jobs? ning disability I was a founder and trustee of lear . charity My Life My Choice in Oxford

What do you do? ting my partner A lot of my time now is spent suppor y as well and Theresa, she has a learning disabilit needs support.

shire’s first In March 2007 I helped set up Oxford disabilities, Stingnightclub for people with learning Factory in Park ray. The monthly event at The Jam en years. People End Street has been running for sev nce through my have said that I made a real differe facilities for people work to improve the services and shire. with learning disabilities in Oxford

with a learning Richard West, I’m a deaf black man disability.

ired Services When and why did you set up Insp Publishing? rking with Before the Millennium we were wo ke Valuing ma g the Department of Health helpin ple with learning People. That was great to have peo policy. Firstly Ken disabilities making a government organised and n Simons and then Andrew Holma travelled all supported the group doing that. We s and made sure over England getting people’s view ing People. We the important things went into Valu do that. all needed EasyRead information to set up the We needed it even more when we rning Disabilities National Forum of People with Lea going. So I helped to check how Valuing People was ys people with Andrew set up a service that emplo ad. learning disabilities to make EasyRe h learning It is very important that people wit rmation easy info king disabilities are involved in ma can pay people to understand. And great that we t supplier of to do that. We are now the bigges EasyRead in Europe I think! to make sure But there is still so much more to do they can make people have good information so s. choices and take control of their live

programme for I was involved in the disabled arts 2009 chaired the London 2012 Olympics and in al the Department of Health’s Nation Advisory Group on Learning Disability and Ethnicity. And for 10 years I was a member of the Department for Transport’s disabled persons transport advisory committee. drama. You also have a love of music and l’ - a LondonI started as a member of ‘heart ‘n sou ple with learning based arts organisation led by peo a DJ, starting disabilities. We did music and I was for people with and setting up funky night discos learning disabilities. a Bright’ with In 2002, I also worked setting up ‘Osk ation group for Carousel Arts (disability arts organis hton, the first Brig people with learning disability) in de by ever film festival showing films ma ies. bilit people with learning disa

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Expertise in special educational needs

St Piers School and College provide specialist education services for children and young people with learning disabilities. We are experts in working with individuals that have autism, challenging behaviours, epilepsy and severe learning difficulties. The services offered include: • A multi-disciplinary approach from education, medical, therapy and care specialists • Education for children and young people from five to 25 years of age • Expansive rural location that gives students access to various outdoor pursuits • Tailored, individual learning programmes • Residential opportunites for weekly, termly and yearly boarding for students across the UK • A ‘waking day’ curriculum that develops the individual’s social skills and independence • Access to a world-class medical centre and wide variety of therapies. We’ll be at The Transition Event at the National Motorcycle Museum, Birmingham, 22 May 2014.

Come and see us! For more information about St Piers School and College please call us on 01342 831348 or email education@youngepilepsy.org.uk

youngepilepsy.org.uk

school.stpiers.org.uk college.stpiers.org.uk

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Progress Magazine is now digital! Head over to the App Store or Google PlayTM and search for Progress magazine. Download the app for free to your iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch or Android. View the latest issue plus back issues.

Never be without your copy. Be the first to take a look. Show it to your friends, family and others that support you. Never have to worry about lending out your copy and not getting it back.

The app is here; get your digital edition today!

DOWNLOADDownload OUR FREE APPfrom TODAY your copy

the App Store or Google Play TM now!

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What’s a typical day like? d to tell what a As I’m a full-time carer, it’s very har sleep because of day is like. I sometimes lose a lot of knowing when my partner feeling very unwell, not r my partner. I’ll be getting any support to look afte being a and y She has a severe learning disabilit ng to meetings carer with diabetes myself whilst goi same time is and helping the Government at the not easy. at you do? What do you enjoy most about wh support for Being a carer it’s very hard to find the people with my partner, this is why I like to help ple with learning disability and deaf/blind peo port not only sup learning disability to get the right most round the for myself but others who need it world including the UK.

How did you feel about your MBE? thought I had It was very nice to think that people me forward for done a lot for other people and put an award. What was it like getting the MBE? Did you meet the Queen? t should be in I haven’t been to the palace yet, tha s me is whether the next few months. What worrie I have to wear a morning suit, because usually I just wear t-shirts. But Andrew from Inspired said he would help sort it out for me.

h a learning Having equal rights for everyone wit their lives and in disability can make a big difference rried, buy a house, mine, with all the rights to get ma accessible get a job, drive a car and also having information in easy read.

I helped set up a service that employs people with learning disabilities What drives you to do what you do? t support for I like helping people to get the righ y, it’s very everyone who has a learning disabilit ernment’s Gov n important because of the coalitio support got cuts to services, even my home care cut, and I’m finding it very hard. be done and I There is still so much that needs to with learning hope my work to empower people help lead to disabilities will be recognised and d it most all increased support for those who nee over the world. What are your hobbies? ations as I can’t I like cycling, arts and dj-ing with vibr hear sound so well.

What do you want to do in the future?

I like to be in the House of Lords, ements (making making history for making improv h learning things better) for most people wit for the UK, to or sad disability. Also to be an ambas with learning make changes in supporting people at how we can disability around the world, looking a big difference do things together equally to make for everyone. share with our Is there anything else you’d like to readers? ment are hard. The cuts we are all facing at the mo being hit and People with learning disabilities are e about it. I there doesn’t seem to be much don had. It wasn’t have lost the small bit of support I cook meals after great before, they wouldn’t let me als. I didn’t eat I had a fire so I had to eat ready me healthily and got diabetes. help me answer I now have a circle of friends who other things, as all those letters about benefits and having some fun! well as leading a healthier life and son who could Do you know an inspirational per be our next Progress profile? uk Email: editor@progressmagazine.co.

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e s i c r e ex d n a y t i l i b Disa ? u o y g n i p p o t s s ’ – what

It isn’t news to anyone that exercise is good for you. It’s regularly emphasised as an important part of young people’s development and education. So why should it be different for disabled people? As Vanessa Wallace and John Parfitt, who are both qualified disabled fitness instructors, quite rightly say, it shouldn’t.

Getting into fitness Vanessa Wallace has Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and Fixed Dystonia in her lower limbs. Her whole body is affected and she experiences chronic pain and fatigue. She says, ‘I have first-hand experience of how it feels to not know how to even begin approaching fitness, let alone think it is a place where you belong. But we need to change this – schools, clubs, centres and the whole fitness industry need more disabled people to have a strong presence across the country.’

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D A agrees, ‘Despite the fight, struggles, D A tears and having to DA Vanessa constantly explain my disability to people, I feel it has had a positive impact on my confidence and self-awareness, and sport and exercise have been key to this. Accept that it’s ok to feel however you feel – it can be a struggle to get where you want to be but trust yourself that you’ll get there.’

Vanessa and John both qualified as fitness instructors through InstructAbility, a programme created by Aspire and YMCAfit, to DOWNLOAD OUR FREE TODAYdisabled people. offer free fitness industry training APP to unemployed InstructAbility aims to challenge negative perceptions of disabled people DOWNLOAD OUR FREE APP TODAY in society and encourage greater participation of disabled people in sport and leisure activity.

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If London 2012 proved anything; it’s that disability need not be a barrier to exercise and sport. Team GB excelled at the Paralympic Games finishing third in the medals table with 34 Gold medals, 43 Silver and 43 Bronze. Our Paralympians smashed World Records and beat off fantastic competition along the way to achieve a great haul of medals at the event. Now, these athletes are at the top of their game, but how can you get more active and into fitness?

John Parfitt sustained a spinal cord injury aged 25 which has left him a NLOADwheelchair user. He says, ‘Exercise NLOAD NLOAD full-time has been a fundamental part of my recovery. Building strength and fitness has allowed me to have a more independent and active lifestyle. My injury has given me new horizons that might not have been available to me, such as representing GB in wheelchair sports together with the opportunity to travel the world.’

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Building strength and fitness has allowed me to have a more independent and active lifestyle.

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ve To Be A Paralympi a H t ’ n o D an Y ou To Get Out And Enjoy...

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’s Vanessa and John

top 5 tips

for getting fit

pare r you - don’t com Do what works fo else. yourself to anyone at is hard a day of exercise th es ut in m 20 t ou d ab it’s a seated Experts recommen a sweat. Whether e us ca d an te ra t ur hear ter how you do it, enough to raise yo run, it doesn’t mat a r fo g in go or ia at you enjoy. activity like Bocc fortable with and th m co re u’ yo at th just find something

1

club. Find a local sports the s of disabilities and nd ki l al e at od m m l councils acco joyable. Most loca There are sports to en e or m g in cis er make ex who can provide sociable aspect will or inclusion officer er fic of t en pm lo line at have a sports deve find information on so al n ca u Yo . es iti y sports details of local activ ur nearest disabilit yo r fo k) .u rg .o rt araspo Parasport (www.p club or team. gym is nearest accessible ur yo re he w t ou Find . and go to see them ing at the gyms. Start by look od go at ce vi ad d alise k). Ask e (www.efds.co.u You can get person sit eb w t or Sp y lit of Disabi st as much right English Federation sertive, you have ju as Be u. yo r fe of n do rather gyms what they ca them what you can ow sh to k As . se el ne abilities. to be there as anyo ptions about your m su as e ak m em th than letting cise – use use a gym to exer You don’t have to order to keep fit. what you have in ise and use water you can do: improv at th es cis er ex d ound. Even Look online and fin or wheel yourself ar n ru k, al w d an t ou get ur heart rate. bottles as weights; eaning can raise yo cl d an g in en rd ga activities like of fruit and ed diet with plenty nc la ba a – t ea u energy. Watch what yo healthy and full of u yo ep ke to lp vegetables will he snacks on e me, keep healthy lik r, ke ac sn a re u’ ed by yo and don’t get tempt Vanessa shares, ‘If up gy er en ur yo ep you ke enty of fluids.’ you at all times so ated by drinking pl dr hy ay st d An s. unhealthy food

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Benefits of exercise According to the NHS, people who regularly exercise have a 30% lower risk of premature death and a 30% lower risk of depression. Exercise can boost mood and energy levels and improve sleep. It is also believed to help memory and brain function and to reduce stress. As Vanessa explains, ‘Sport and fitness activities have given me, and the people I’ve worked with, a sense of self-worth. It’s something that you’re doing not something that someone else is doing for you. A lot of being disabled can be based on other people helping you but, with sport, I’ve got something to do that’s mine. You can say - I threw that, I caught that, I moved it it’s yours.’ John adds, ‘Take it upon yourself to get out there - it’s your own life. The benefits will far outweigh any difficulties you might have.’

The benefits will far outweigh any difficulties you might have For more information on InstructAbility and to find out if a disabled fitness instructor is working near you, go to www.aspire.org.uk.


Gladys’ walks

Gladys (name changed) has chronic schizophrenia, diabetes, is registered blind (she has periphery vision) and wears two hearing aids. In spite of this she maintains a positive outlook, due in part to her medication, a healthy diet and her daily walks. Daily walks may not seem a lot of exercise to a lot of people but to Gladys it is something to look forward to every day, she is able to do this independently with another resident (after a comprehensive risk assessment) and keeps her mood level. Gladys has had three hospital admissions due to becoming catatonic. Through investigative work with the Manager and staff team where Gladys lives and her care co-ordinator they found that Gladys wasn’t eating the right nutritional meals and not getting enough exercise. We looked at what she was eating and saw that she ate lots of carbohydrates which are slow-releasing energy and because she was having little exercise, this didn’t help her diabetes and schizophrenia so she became seriously ill. She has always refused to do anything she calls ‘strenuous’ but after a considerable amount of time with Gladys explaining the benefits of getting fit, eating healthily and keeping any excess weight off, she asked her close friend who lives at another CareTech home to walk with her round the park. They now do this daily. Gladys hasn’t had a hospital admission or any relapse since she started this healthy lifestyle.

With thanks to CareTech Community Services. www.caretech-uk.com

Helsey House Holiday Cottages Helsey House Helsey Nr Hogsthorpe, Skegness PE24 5PE Telephone: 01754 872 927 E-mail: info@HelseyCottages.co.uk

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of Helsey House in the hamlet of Helsey near Hogsthorpe on the North East Lincolnshire coast. They are single storey and on one level with no steps. Free wi-fi access.

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Helsey House Cottages are situated within the private grounds

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AVAILABLE FACILITIES:

• We can arrange for groceries to be available on arrival • We have a wheelchair and a shower wheelchair available for guests’ use. A toilet seat riser and bed risers are also available. • An Oxford midi 150 mobile hoist is available for guests’ use. • Both cottages have laminated flooring for ease of mobility and are on one level.

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The Cow Shed

• A laundry room with a washer, sink with hot and cold water, tumble dryer and an iron and ironing board are all available. • Pets are welcome. We have our own free range chickens with fresh eggs for you to purchase.

The Dairy

www.helseycottages.co.uk

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Keeping safe in the community Keeping safe on public transport  When waiting for public transport at night, wait in a brightly lit area.

Keeping safe at home To keep you safe in your own home there are some simple but helpful things you can do.  Make sure you have a spy hole in your front door. You can use it to see who is knocking on the door.  Put a chain on your front door too. Keep the chain on when opening the door.  Leave a light on in your home when you go out. This will make it look like someone is in.  Don’t leave any valuables on the windowsills or where people can see them if they look through the window. If you have anything very valuable or important to you, lock it away. You can get small safe boxes.  Lock all your windows and doors when you go out. Keep your doors locked when you are at home.

 Make sure you know the time of the last train or bus home in case of an emergency.  Always take your mobile phone with you.  On a bus, sit in a safe seat near the driver.  If you are bullied on the bus, move to sit near the driver, get off at the nearest stop and keep hold of your ticket to show the route you were travelling on.  If going out and using a taxi to get home, always book it in advance and ask for the driver’s name.  Ask the driver to wait until you are safely inside the house before driving away.

Keeping safe when going out  Before you go out, plan where you are going. Plan how you will get there and get home.  Keep your mobile phone in your pocket or a bag so that it deosn’t get lost or stolen.  Don’t walk in quiet places and try to go out in a group.  Don’t get into a car with a stranger and keep your bag with you at all times.  Tell somebody your plan.

 Close your curtains at night.  If anyone tries to get into your home and you don’t want them to, or they will not go away when you ask them, call the police.

These tips will help you to stay safe when out in the community.


Making sure you are safe is important. Carlisle Mencap found that there is so little accessible information around for people with learning disabilities that they have produced a DVD to help you. Progress summarises the main points.

Keeping safe at the cash machine  Make sure you protect your pin number.  Don’t give any bank details to strangers.

What to do if you are in trouble

 Never give money to people you don’t know.

 Don’t panic.

 Only take out as much money as you need.

 Tell someone what is going on.

 If a stranger gets abusive on the phone, say nothing and hang up.

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 If someone phones to sell you things, hang up.

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 Don’t tell anyone on the phone that you are alone.

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 Don’t give out your name and number when you answer the phone. LOA

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 Let people know you are in trouble by screaming ‘Fire’.  Go to a public place as soon as you can and ask a police officer for help.

Keeping safe over the telephone

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 Don’t stop and fight.

 If anything happens, makes you feel uncomfortable or you see anything happening that you think is wrong, tell someone that you trust. This could be a family member, friend, carer or member of staff.

 If you keep receiving abusive calls, For more information on the DVD these DOWNLOAD OUR FREE APP TODAY call the police. tips are taken from for just £4, contact Carlisle Mencap on 01228 674393 or DOWNLOAD OUR FREE APP TODAY email enquiries@carlislemencap.co.uk.

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The Transition Event 2013 Reviewed Becoming an adult – building the best future for young people with additional needs

In association with In association with

23rd May 2013 National Motorcycle Museum, Birmingham

Progress’ successful Transition Event took place in Birmingham in May. With a fantastic line-up of speakers, a packed conference programme, workshops and exhibitions, the day saw hundreds of people learning more about making transition better for all young people.

Conference topics The main conference featured many subjects crucial to transition and was chaired by Helen Wheatley, Assistant Director of the Council for Disabled Children.

Workshops

Ellen Atkinson, Associate at NDTi set out The Road Ahead – The Future of SEN and Disability. Her presentation summarised the Government’s proposed legislation changes to SEN and disability, it was well-received by all attendees who were curious about the changes and their likely impact.

Running alongside the main stage presentations were a series of practical workshops. These focused on:s

Stuart Lackenby, Former Commissioner at Walsall Borough Council, followed Ellen with his insider’s guide to dealing with social services. Unlocking the Secrets of Social Services was very popular with parents in the audience who found out how to plan for the move to adult services and what they could do to make the transition as smooth as possible.

• Recent benefit changes and the impact it could have on young people.

Person-centred planning and how to translate the skills learnt at school into home or the skills learnt at home into school was covered by Rachel Mason, a freelance personalisation consultant. Her presentation fitted well with that of Elaine Gisby, Director of Personalised Development at National Star College who followed with advice on the skills young people need to move into adult life. Employment and housing were tackled after the break. Robert Elston, Chief Executive of Status Employment explored what can be done by young people and those who support them to help them into the world of work. Mark McGoogan, National Housing Development Manager at Mencap then followed up with how to find housing in a tough housing market. The main stage presentations were rounded up with a valuable piece on safeguarding by Paul Swift, Associate at National Family Carer Network. It gave all delegates a great summary of how to safeguard young people and spot signs that they might be at risk.

• The importance of sex and relationships education and how to approach it sensibly and sensitively.

• The role of circles of support, how to set them up, develop them and their role in a successful transition. • Supporting young people to manage their money and protect them from abuse. • An introduction to the law and how it can help a young person in transition. • Real life case studies of successful transition in practice.


Exhibition

Generous support

The Transition Event ran its successful exhibition throughout the day, with 50 exhibitors there to offer their products, services, advice and guidance to delegates and attending young people with additional needs, the exhibition hall had a fantastic buzz all day.

The event was supported by Solihull Life Opportunities Principal Sponsors were CareTech Community Services. Associate Sponsors were Epilepsy Society, Inclusion Care, Mencap, United Response Standard Sponsors were Amber Support, Glen Care Group, Livability, Thera West and Mackworth House.

This year’s Progress Transition Event has been really valuable for us as it has allowed us to make some great links with schools, teachers, SENCOs and transition specialists, as well as meet our peers and lots of families and young people too who really bring the event to life. The event was hosted in such a friendly and accessible part of the world which meant that we met people from all over the UK and we have specifically made excellent on-going links with schools from around the Midlands and the South West. We have already booked our place for next year’s event. LS HEALTHCARE

The Transition Event 2014 returns to the National Motorcycle Museum on 22nd May 2014. To find out more visit www.progressmagazine.co.uk/events.html or call us on 01223 206965.

We will support you the way you want us to!

Our support is different for each person as we design it around their individual needs and wishes. We will work with you, your family and other people important in your life, to make sure we get this right for you. We can support you to live in your own home, with other people or when you are out and about. We can support you for a few hours a week to 24 hours each day. We will help you build your skills to become more confident and independent so that you can make choices about everything that affects your life and puts you in control.

0800 0884 377 United Response is an award winning charity and has been supporting young people and adults with a wide range of needs and disabilities for 40 years.

get.support@unitedresponse.org.uk www.unitedresponse.org.uk/get-support Registered Charity No. 265249

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Transitions Work Begins

Year 10 (age 14-15) Transitions Reviews to be attended by childcare worker, adult worker, post-16 providers and other appropriate support services. Ensure that: • Transition plan agreed. • Actions for individual workers/ services. • Timescales documented. • Carers’ assessment offered.

Year 12 (age 16-17) Transfer to adult services If the person meets the eligibility criteria for the local authority. Transitions reviews to continue especially if the young person is still in school. • Community Care assessments and care planning to be arranged as appropriate.

Ages 19-25 © Swindon Parents and Carers Advisory Group

Young Person and Parents at heart of the process.

• Statutory SEN statement review. • Person-centred approach introduced. • Help given to set up a circle of support.

Family should be invited to all reviews and young people must be involved in all meetings.

Year 8 (age 12-13)

Key areas covered: Pathway to employment; Housing; Planning for good health; Developing friendships, relationships and community. Meaning of transition and its impact reinforced to young people and parents. Person-centred approach developed and ongoing.

Transition Pathway

Preparation for Transitions • Young people with additional needs identified. • Parents and young people informed of processes. • Child and adult services informed. • Person-centred approach introduced.

Year 9 (age 13-14) Transitions Reviews for all young people with additional needs Consider: • Access to work experience. • Eligibility for Fair Access to Care. • Existing service provision and cost. • Appropriate post-16 provision. • Future provision as an adult. • Referral to appropriate adult services.

Year 11 (age 15-16) Transitions Reviews To continue especially if the young person is still in school. Ensure that: • Community Care assessments and care planning to be arranged as appropriate. • Personal budgets are discussed. • Gaps are identified and appropriate actions are planned.

Year 13 (age 17-18) Year 14 (age 18-19) Planned continuation of adult services • By all services already involved. • Any additional services alerted.

Profile for Care Choices Ltd

Progress Transition Guide September 2013  

A guide for positive transition planning for young adults with additional needs. For a free hard copy of the publication please call Care C...

Progress Transition Guide September 2013  

A guide for positive transition planning for young adults with additional needs. For a free hard copy of the publication please call Care C...