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CARE

the handbook for relatives

YOUR COMPANION THROUGH THE EMOTIONAL AND PRACTICAL ASPECTS of choosing and funding care for an ageing relative.

What are the care options? How will I know which to choose?

What if mum doesn’t agree? Can we afford it? What if I make the wrong choice?


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Swanvale is a group of exclusive North West care homes based in Stockport and Cheshire. Our luxurious care homes are set within pleasant and peaceful residential surroundings. They are within easy reach of all amenities, providing 24-hour excellent long term or respite residential, nursing & dementia care. Our skilled and professional staff provide the highest standards in care. The luxurious accommodation comprises of a choice of single and double en-suite rooms, with comfortable lounges and attractive dining areas providing a relaxing and homely atmosphere. We also provide domiciliary care. We aim to create a happy, fulfiling and stimulating atmosphere for all our service users. The activities programme within the home includes stimulation for the mind, body and soul.

For more information, please do not hesitate to contact us. We will be more than happy to help: Plane Tree Court 11/13 St Lesmo Road, Edgeley, Stockport, SK3 0TX. T: 0161 480 6919 F: 0161 286 3175 Planetree.court@swanvale.com

Cherryfield House Petersburg Road, Stockport, Cheshire, SK3 9QZ. T: 0161 474 1787 F: 0161 474 1787 Cherryfield.house@swanvale.com

www.swanvale.com


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Contributors

Aisling Kearney, Barchester Healthcare Alex Billeter, Elderly Accommodation Council Amanda Waring Anchor Trust

Barbara Vizhanyo, Barchester Healthcare Christopher Manthorp, Barchester Healthcare Deborah Sturdy, Consultant Des Kelly, National Care Forum Dying Matters Ed James, QualitySolicitors Truemans

Foreword

Starting your journey Where do I start? Choosing care Support to live independently at home Care options in one’s own home Choosing a home care agency checklist

George McNamara, Alzheimer’s Society

Care options explained – residential care

Jane Ashcroft, Anchor Trust

Choosing a residential care home checklist

John Galvin, FirstStop Advice and Elderly Accommodation Council

Housing with care

Les Bright, BCD Care Associates Lynsey Roberts, Alzheimer’s Society

Was it the right decision?

Mario Ambrosi, Anchor Trust

Dementia and dementia care

Joe Levenson, National Council for Palliative Care

Residential dementia care checklist

Philip Spiers, FirstStop Advice Sharon Blackburn, National Care Forum Simon Bottery, Independent Age

The Prime Minister’s Challenge on Dementia Reaching the end of life care Advice for funding care Carers Legal issues surrounding needing care Transforming social care for the 21st Century Essential contacts

Publications

www.carechoices.co.uk

careselectmag

Alternative formats

Region-by-region care homes Advertisers’ index

06 07 11 16 23 29 32 34 37 42 48 50 54 56 57 60 67 70 72 78 81 96

This Directory is available electronically at www.carechoices.co.uk. There is also a Browsealoud option for those requiring the information in the spoken word.

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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6 Foreword

Foreword I am delighted to write the foreword for this films on end of life handbook that is an empathetic and supportive care and written guide for people on their journey to find books on inspiring formal care for a loved one. There can be compassionate anxiety, uncertainty and guilt when faced with care. entering into the often bewildering process I speak and train of arranging care, particularly during a time of around the world crisis or increasing frailty. Care Select provides on these topics but always come information and guidance in an understandable, from the personal perspective of a daughter, honest, sensitive and practical way to help even though you may receive good medical relatives and carers make positive informed care, without good emotional and dignified care, choices. healing can be impaired. This book shows you The chapters, written by a wide variety of what you should be looking for, so that your experts, help to reassure one about deciphering relative receives the best care possible. what good and bad care looks like and, I went with both my grandmothers when particularly in times of high media emphasis on they were deciding which care homes to go to the negative aspects of care, this book redresses and it was very much about the atmosphere, the balance by showing that good care is the friendliness and the communication with prevalent throughout the country. staff that swayed them to make their happy In my campaigning work for dignity, I choices. There was little literature around back continually emphasise how important it is then to have offered guidance and I admire the that we highlight the positive aspects of care way that Care Select understands the relative’s and celebrate where the care sector is doing perspective, and provides vital chapters on things well, to move us away from a climate dementia and end of life care as well as taking of fear surrounding health and social services. one through the mire of funding. However, when you feel care of your loved one is Care Select uses personal stories to explore being compromised I know, as a daughter, how the emotional support needed on all sides when valuable this handbook would have been to me entering the process of choosing care and the where it provides advice on what to do about it. advice from the many experts ensures that the I have been a passionate campaigner for best knowledge is shared to help you. I wish all improving care ever since I witnessed the of you well on your journey of arranging care, it undignified treatment that my Mother, the is not always an easy one but this handbook will actress Dame Dorothy Tutin, received whilst help you feel less overwhelmed or alone during being treated for leukemia at the age of this important time. seventy. I was so appalled at the lack of respect given to her Amanda Waring is a campaigner, and other older people that film-maker, speaker and author I sold my flat to make my on dignity in care. awareness raising film E LIN E L P 77 NE I H www.amandawaring.com on dignity What Do You L 0 LP 92 HE 077 ARE 0 3 8 2 See? and have since made C 9 E 0 8

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Starting your journey 7

Starting your journey Reaching the point where you feel a parent or older relative needs some formal assistance, support or care can be difficult. In some cases it’s a slow realisation, in others it might have been an accident or series of smaller incidents that forced the decision. The decision is not easy, there are so many emotions surrounding it. A realisation that your parent is ageing or their health is deteriorating. An uncertainty of being thrust into the world of care and support, not knowing where to start, who to turn to, or what is available. You may be balancing the wishes of parents, siblings and children, each with an opinion or ideas of what’s best. Plus an ever-present resistance to change from many parties involved. You may have been supporting your parent yourself but feel the time has come for some help. Or you may not be living nearby and have the added pressure of trying to arrange care and support from a distance.

You’re not alone in these emotions, on this journey. 1 My mum My two sisters carried it for two decades. I know it worked for them in important ways, but it also gradually set a pattern that became a yolk. Mum was alone after two loving but too short marriages, and as her 70s moved into 80s the pattern became of sisters planning to visit on alternate days, arranging their working lives to accommodate this, and as retirement from paid work came, still continuing to shape their lives around the responsibilities, and the recurring anxieties, of both being there for a mother who couldn’t go out alone any more. They were taking ever more responsibility for trying to anticipate the next crisis and help avoid it. Although, of course, anxieties didn’t dominate every day, still they gradually came to define an underlying sense of responsibility, duties and patterns of living that, in turn and together, have shaped their lives.

‘You may be balancing the wishes of parents, siblings and children, each with an opinion or ideas of what’s best. Plus an ever-present resistance to change from many parties involved.’ 2 What she needs What did and does Mum need most? Thanks to my sisters, the Careline phone replaced her BT one some years ago. Not without tears, but now long since accepted after proving itself on rather too many fraught occasions. Fast forwarding, the stair lift, level access shower and raised toilet seat, which took such grit and emotional risk after a fall and hospitalisation, are now accepted. So is the ganging up to suggest that her driving had to stop. The subsequent and comparatively minor affronts of a weekly cleaner, occasional gardening help and handrails in the back garden have probably been easier to negotiate, but all that’s against the backdrop of seeing a mother, a woman with guts, energy and a will (with a capital ‘W’) to be independent, visibly feeling limited, squeezed and disempowered by what ageing brings.

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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8 Starting your journey

4 Care and support really can help 3 Broaching the subject Broaching the subject can be difficult, your parent or even another member of your family may be highly resistant to change; not wanting to admit the time is coming to look for assistance. Or you may find that they welcome the suggestion, feeling unable to admit that they need some help.

‘We all have this preconceived idea of what care homes are like. But in reality, good care settings can have a positive impact on the people who live there.’ Bulldozing changes through unilaterally can be the worst thing to do for all parties. The different levels of involvement of different family members can be accepted as normal for many years, as in my case separated by 200 miles, but come very much to the fore as the going gets tougher and the time shorter. Mum would rather have been out of it earlier; anticipating what dependency might mean, at odds with the religion she’d married into, and I think confused, to say the least, about the purpose of her adopted God willing her into an extended old age without a purpose she can understand.

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What I think my sisters, and through them I, have learned is that all the services we now know of that are designed to help us as we age are certainly important, and should be easy to find out about and arrange. They are necessary in practical ways, for the older person or for those who care for them. They absolutely must be there, do what they say on the tin, and be affordable and reliable. The coming chapters will give you more of an understanding of what is available to help and support and how to find the things your parent may need. This consideration of services carries through beyond what my Mum has needed to date, and into care services. That is to say, services we call ‘personal’ or ‘nursing’ care. We hope she won’t need them, of course we do. Whether it’s the visiting care worker to help her shower, dress or toilet, or someone to supervise medicines and any other medical treatments that she can’t be relied on to handle methodically. And, of course, we dread the suggestion that she might need to move out of her home into a care setting of some kind to ensure she has the level of attention and supervision to keep her going for a while longer than if on her own at home. Because we all have this preconceived idea of what care homes are like. But in reality, good care settings can have a positive impact on the people who live there. Just reading through the following chapters will give you examples of good care, what good care looks like and the difference it can make. Although the media may give an awful impression of formal care don’t believe all you read. There are care homes that can add months or years of fulfilled life; there are new and old alternatives to care homes; there are superb home care and home help services – they still exist! There are volunteer services, as there always were, to befriend older people, take them out for the day, help them maintain their own links in their community; there are local people – neighbours, friends and acquaintances, that once alerted will share the journey; there is a lot of resilience in many, if not most older people. Although we haven’t discussed it, I suspect we each think that Mum’s probably going to avoid dementia, and feel more than lucky on that front. However, if your mum or dad has dementia, the chapter on page 48 gives you more information on the disease and what good dementia care can provide in maintaining quality of life for those you love. These challenges and dilemmas aren’t any easier to deal with if you work in our field. I’ve seen many of my colleagues grappling and struggling, and it seems to me an absolute truth that there simply aren’t easy answers.

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


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Starting your journey 9

5 Your reality is everyone’s reality If I’ve laboured my Mum’s personality and my sisters’ response to her ageing, my purpose is only to emphasise that I, and my colleagues at Care Select, know that we need to address the realities that many of our readers are facing. Expect to get it wrong; to propose ‘solutions’ and be humiliated to find that you’ve misunderstood the target completely. Even to get it right (proven in retrospect) but to have to take flak here and now for being so bold. Our aim in this handbook is to offer some ideas as well as optimism, based on our collective knowledge and experiences. Of day to day services and support you might not be aware of; of alternative living environments that weren’t available two decades ago; of care homes that are not to be feared; and of new care and support arrangements that people are tentatively exploring. Arrangements not only to look out for and look after our older generation, but structures to provide more support for carers too. We don’t pretend we can magic away the pain and responsibilities of being closely involved with someone living with the challenges, frustrations, disappointments or sadness that ageing can bring. But we do want to share an optimism – that we, and our society, are evolving fast, inventing new solutions (and sometimes dusting off old ones). Whether as older person or carer, there’s no need (we could say no excuse) for trying to go it alone any more. Whether you put it down to the pressure of economic austerity, the resurgence of interest in community or the connecting power of the internet, there are services, help and support, imaginative ideas and proven examples to draw on and connect with. The leading providers of formal care (home care, care homes, assisted living) are now amongst the strongest advocates for a revolution in how it’s done. Voluntary organisations are starved of cash but they, and countless thousands of individual volunteers, are also focused on more impact with fewer resources. Across the richer world the search is on for new ways of organising ourselves to support – but also to value and gain from – our older generations. Out of this are flowing innovations in how we do things and, crucially, networks, inspiration, support and optimism that we may be able to square the circle.

6 It’s not easy We aim to broaden your knowledge of the way services available to older people are evolving, and give you more confidence at least to discuss them with Dad, Mum or whoever you are involved with. Only some of the time will you be thanked for doing this – people struggling with getting older do often have a tendency to ‘shoot the messenger’, though we can all be guilty of that. So many of our citizens are living far longer than they expected; their younger world has disappeared faster than they would have liked; so many of us are farther away from our families than we planned; and of course we, the following generations, inhabit a world that changes faster and demands more every day. It’s not easy to, or even obvious that we can, ‘do it right’ for people of an older generation who we care about and want to care for. However, there are pointers in this new guide that will help you along your way. And I hope that we can build on this in future editions with your input and help. John Galvin is Chief Executive of FirstStop Advice and the Elderly Accommodation Council.

‘We don’t pretend we can magic away the pain and responsibilities of being closely involved with someone living with the challenges, frustrations, disappointments or sadness that ageing can bring.’

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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‘This situation is all too common. The family home is now too big and getting difficult to manage.’

With thanks to FirstStop Advice.

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Where do I start? 11

Where do I start?

Although most older people manage to live independently at home, a time may come when they don’t have the strength and flexibility that they once had and they need a little extra support. It can be difficult to find the right information and advice at the right time, and this can really add to the stress if the need for extra help has arisen at a time of crisis. There are a range of services available which could help. Some people may need help with tasks such as washing and dressing (often referred to as personal care). Others may be helped by getting adaptations in their home. A number may have significantly greater care needs and may need to leave their own home and move into extra care housing or a care home for a greater level of support (see diagram).

‘Whatever your parent’s level of need; whether it has come on suddenly, or has crept up as the result of a more gradual deterioration of health or general frailty, there are practical options available.’

Whatever your parent’s level of need; whether it has come on suddenly, or has crept up as the result of a more gradual deterioration of health or general frailty, there are practical options available, which will help ensure you and your family along with your parent, make the decisions that are best for them when thinking about care. A time may come when you need a little extra support to live independently. Most people’s lives can be improved by getting domestic help or adaptations in their own homes. A smaller number may have significantly greater care needs and may need to leave their own home and move into a care home for a greater level of support.

Recognising need If someone is struggling If your parent is finding it more difficult to get out of a chair, sit comfortably on the loo, or climb the stairs, talk to them. It’s always difficult talking about care and support when it’s clear things aren’t good, so it’s best to start the conversation early, about things that may help, such as a cleaner or other domestic support. Conversations like this need to be a two-way process so start off gently by asking them what they think, pointing out situations that perhaps cause you to be concerned about them or suggesting help that could increase their quality

of life. Try to work out what is important for them and what worries them about some of the possible solutions. If they don’t want to broach the subject immediately, ask them to think about what could make their life easier and what is important to them. As family, you can rightly be very concerned and want your parent to be safe and cared for, but they may have a different view. There is often some mid-ground: they may need to be more realistic about how they will manage, and you as family may have to accept some of your parent’s wishes.

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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12 Where do I start?

Help from the local authority The needs assessment Your parent’s local authority has a duty to provide them with a free care needs assessment if they are in need of some extra support, regardless of their income or savings. These assessments are available to everyone and will establish what your parent’s specific needs are and how they could be best supported. Even if it turns out that they’re not eligible for financial support towards equipment or other help, the council should be able to provide them with sound advice and signpost local services. Councils carry out two types of assessment: the

care needs assessment, to judge your parent’s level of need for care, and then if they do need additional help, a financial assessment to see whether the local authority needs to contribute to the cost. How much state-funded care they get, if any, will depend on the policy of the local council. If your parent needs extra help and is financially secure, it is still worthwhile getting an assessment from the council as it can provide helpful information, advice and support – plus the council has a duty to help arrange care even if your parent is paying for it themselves.

‘Your parent’s local authority has a duty to provide them with a free care needs assessment if they are in need of some extra support’

Care at home

It may be that your parent is already using equipment to help with day-to-day life but finds that they need further help to get up, get to the loo, get washed, dressed, prepare meals or take tablets. In addition to any equipment or telecare that might help, a community care needs assessment (as described above) will also consider whether they might need someone to visit them at home to help with some of these activities. When preparing for the assessment your parent should: • Think about their good days and bad days – and be prepared to describe the bad days. • Note any psychological, religious, social, dietary and cultural needs. • Ask you or another friend or relative to be there. • Ask when they can next expect to hear from social services. After the assessment, their needs will be graded to critical, substantial, moderate or low. Increasingly, councils are only providing services to those people who have substantial or critical care needs. If they don’t qualify, or if they don’t want to receive services from the council, there are a range of other home care services that could help. The

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Care Quality Commission or the council will be able to tell you about locally registered services. Many councils produce directories of care services in their area. Care Choices Limited, the publisher of Care Select, is the largest publisher of care directories in England. Visit the website at www.carechoices.co.uk to search for care in the region in which you are looking. You can also view e-versions of directories or request a hard copy. See the chapter on page 29 for more information on home care services. If your parent does qualify, social services can arrange different types of support to assist them to remain at home. Social services will discuss the options with your parent – make sure everyone is clear on exactly what is being discussed. Throughout this process, you or another family member or close friend can accompany and support your parent, if they would like. Even if your parent is eligible for care provided by the council there are benefits available that may help. Attendance Allowance, for example, is available for people over 65 who require care and/or supervision. Disability Living Allowance is similar but is available to people under 65. It is always advisable to take specialist advice on these and speak to your local Age UK or CAB for a full benefits check.

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


HC-One is a care home provider with a clear vision to provide the kindest care in the UK with the kindest and most professional people. Specialising in Dementia, Nursing, Residential and Specialist care, HC-One is the third largest provider of elderly care, with over 200 care homes situated throughout the UK.

HC-One continuously invests in employee learning and development which in turn ensures that we enrich the lives of Residents through delivering the kindest care.

Each of our Residents and their relatives can trust that the care they will receive at each of our homes will be delivered with kindness, thoughtfulness and respect, in a safe, warm, comfortable and welcoming environment.

For more information about HC-One and our homes visit www.hc-one.co.uk or tel: 0808 1000 212 and quote ‘Care Select’.

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14 Where do I start?

Care after a hospital stay Reablement or Intermediate Care Reablement is designed to help your parent re-learn or regain the skills to live independently. It’s shortterm support that might be appropriate for people who have lost some of their independence after leaving hospital or residential care, have physical disabilities, need support to remain at home or to regain skills to live independently. Reablement services are provided specifically to help someone manage tasks on their own. This might be personal care or food preparation. In traditional home care, someone would visit and do these tasks. With reablement, a reablement assistant will work with your parent to learn (or re-learn) important tasks and skills needed for everyday life. Reablement can help them regain independence or maintain independence for longer and is for those who are at significant risk of losing their safety and independence. If reablement is appropriate for your parent, those involved in their hospital discharge will help to arrange it. It normally lasts up to six weeks and will be free of charge as long as your parent is making progress. This progress will be reviewed every week by the reablement team or care manager.

Continuing care Continuing care is care needed by an adult who requires help over an extended period to manage their daily life because of illness, disability, accidents or the effects of getting older. It is a package of care that involves services and funding from both the NHS and Adult Care and Support. There will be no charge for the NHS part of the continuing care but the local authority may charge for the services it provides. Continuing NHS healthcare is provided solely by the NHS if your parent is eligible and has on-going healthcare needs. This is free of charge, wherever it is delivered and can be provided in any setting. In your parent’s home the NHS funds all care required to meet their assessed needs. In a care home, the NHS makes a contract with the home and pays the full fees for their accommodation as well as all their care. Increasingly local Primary Care Trust or Clinical Commissioning Groups (as they will soon become) limit the amount they will pay for this care and will only pay if they feel the care home or

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care provider can meet your needs in a safe and appropriate way. Regular reviews will be carried out and your parent’s care and/or funding arrangements will be amended to meet any changes in needs.

Make sure To make sure your parent is as independent, mobile, confident and medically fit as possible when they get home from hospital, before they leave, ensure: • The hospital social work team knows that they live alone if that is the case. • They’ve been given a letter for their doctor, so the GP can make out any new prescriptions. • They have been referred to a nurse if it’s likely they’ll need one to call on them at home. • They’ve had a comprehensive needs assessment followed by a financial needs assessment (as described earlier). • The hospital has arranged the care and support they need – known as a care package.

Considering a move If your parent is really struggling to live independently in their home, a move into housing with care or a care home may best support their needs. Moving away from the familiar surroundings of the family home into a new home with care and support available or into a care home is a big step, so it’s important that it is given a lot of thought. There are also financial implications, as moving home or living in a care home can be costly. For further information on housing with care see page 40 or for information on care homes, see page 38. Starting the journey to care and support can be made easier with early planning and full consideration of the different options. A community care assessment is the best starting point to find out what options will best suit your parent’s needs. Simon Bottery, Independent Age Information adapted from Wise Guide: Lifeimproving advice for the over 65s and Wise Guide: Extra help in your home -Essential advice for over-65s who want to stay independent.

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Where do I start? 15

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ready; it frees up hospital beds and reduces re-admissions, and referrals to residential care. To find similar services in your area contact Care Select’s independent advice line on 0800 38 92 077, www.firststopcareadvice.org.uk in association with FirstStop Advice.

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16 Choosing care

Choosing care Choosing care for a parent isn’t easy, we all have different emotions associated with it and your parent could well feel differently to you and you may feel differently to your siblings. It’s not easy to balance everyone. Having to choose care can be in a time of crisis, after hospitalisation or a fall and can be tinged with sadness, guilt or worry.

When the time is near Facing up to failing, because that’s what it may feel like to you or the person you love whose future is up for discussion, is never easy at any point in our lives and so it is unsurprising that fear, resentment and stubbornness may get in the way of making timely decisions. If you are only just beginning the sensitive business of discussing whether the time has arrived to consider care and support, whether in the home, specialist housing schemes or moving into a care home, it is perhaps worth thinking how you would react if you felt that you were being ‘bounced’ into such a far-reaching decision. If it is a time of crisis, for example, during or after a period

of hospitalisation your parent may realise that the time is near. This may not mean though that they are any more inclined to be cooperative than they had been in the lead-up to this situation. The onset of illness or disability, bringing with it reduced mobility; growing difficulties in managing aspects of daily life; or the loss of a lifetime partner, are each likely to have a devastating impact on your parent. You may read these events as signals to start organising changes, but the person most directly affected by these blows to their independence and growing dependency on others may not share this view and will need sensitive handling to participate constructively.

‘The onset of illness or disability, bringing with it reduced mobility; growing difficulties in managing aspects of daily life; or the loss of a lifetime partner, are each likely to have a devastating impact on your parent.’

Handle with care

Drawing attention to what is becoming difficult, for example, problems climbing the stairs and getting to the toilet on time, should not linger on the indignity of being too late, but on what can be done to change the situation. This could be getting a stair lift or moving somewhere that has level access and more toilets. Each of these options could restore confidence, and if a move to housing with care or a care home with such facilities in easy reach, such as their bedroom or public areas, give an important insight into the benefits of communal living. Risks associated with using cookers, kettles and other household equipment – often a serious concern due to physical frailty or memory lapses - could be eliminated because hot drinks and nutritious meals will be provided whether by in-home support or in a care setting. In-home

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adaptations and equipment can also help with these risks. Self-neglect – washing less frequently, or in the case of elderly men putting off shaving and, therefore, looking less well-groomed, or wearing the same clothes for longer than advisable, can be reduced or eliminated altogether by small amounts of help, which can increase in line with their willingness to accept assistance. Unless the situation is an emergency, you should try to move slowly and create the sense that you are setting out together on a journey whose destination will need to suit all parties. Above all, try to avoid focusing on difficulties, deficits or disabling factors – this will not only upset your loved one but is also likely to contribute to the sense of guilt which you – in common with many people – may be feeling.

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Choosing care 17

The choice is wide By the time that you’ve arrived at an understanding that formal care and support is the best option to preserve or restore a good quality of life, it is likely that you will have gained insights into your parent’s care needs and the ways that they can be met. But don’t forget to also give due consideration to the personal issues and preferences that come into play especially if selecting live-in care or a new place to live. An assessment of care needs, undertaken by a professional in hospital or by the local adult social

care team, will provide information that will prove vital in finding an agency or home appropriately equipped and staffed to meet those needs, ensuring that you don’t look for a more expensive service, such as one providing nursing care, when it is not required. However, there are some preliminaries that need personal rather than expert knowledge. In fact, matters of personal choice are just that – very personal. Giving thought to these ahead of a crisis will more than repay the time spent doing so.

Home care If considering home care then there are many local and national agencies that should be able to support your parent. Home care enables them to remain living at home and receive the care and support they need. It enables them to remain somewhere familiar, close to friends and existing networks. For those with relatively low needs, support in the home can maximise their independence and confidence as well as enhancing their quality of life. Many feel this is the ideal option, especially as it enables them to remain in familiar surroundings, possibly the family home that holds so many wonderful memories of a fuller and fulfilled life. However, if their mobility becomes limited and home care visits are only once or twice a day, to get them up and help them back to bed, opportunities

for social interaction can become limited. For some, this may be fine, but for others they may come to miss the social aspects of their previous, more active life. People invest a lot of emotion in the family home and the thought of giving it up can be difficult to entertain for you, your siblings and your parent. However, if the house begins to become a burden, cost of running and maintenance start to become unmanageable with increased care and support needs, the time may come to consider giving it up. This isn’t an easy decision, and one that needs to be considered by all parties that have an emotional connection to it with enough time to come to an agreement. For more information on home care see page 29.

Housing with care Housing with care can feel like an acceptable middle ground to many people. It still involves leaving the family home but provides independence that many feel they could lose in a more formal care home setting. Housing with care offers the security of tenure, rented, part-owned or fully owned, with support available as required – you still have your own front door, Yale lock and all!

If your parent is in need of extra support, would like the more social aspect of living near others of a similar age and wants to retain as much independence as possible, housing with care could be the solution. For more information on housing with care see page 40.

Care homes If your parent’s needs are such that they require a care home, or they would prefer the more social aspect of communal living then you should think carefully about it. Location, for example, can be crucial. Would your parent prefer to stay close to the present neighbourhood to maintain links with friends or a

place of worship; or seize the opportunity to relocate either within the town or to another region to be closer to key family members? It may be that the size of the care home is more important to your parent - a small home may have a more intimate and ‘homely’ feel, while a larger one may have a wider range of daily activities, suiting

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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18 Choosing care

Care homes continued those who wish to remain as active as possible. The building may also be important, for example, your parent may prefer an older house that has been converted because it has more ‘character’, or view a purpose-built home as being better because all rooms will have been designed with the needs of older people to the fore. However, external appearances do not always correlate with the quality of care provided. So although a home may look appealing, it is important to be completely certain that the quality of care provided is acceptable. If your parent loves to garden, grow vegetables or flowers this could be influential in the decision; some homes have large gardens and encourage and support residents to continue their interests. Care homes come in all shapes and sizes, some are on the luxury end of the spectrum offering hotelstyle living with à la carte menus and wine with dinner, whereas others offer a more domestic style. They are as wide and diverse as the people who live in them. Care homes, as well as home care agencies, are

run by corporate businesses, charities, individuals or small businesses; it really is a very diverse sector. It may be that your parent would prefer to live in a home that is run by a charity, a benevolent society, a specific religious group or a small local business – but equally you may feel more confident if they move into a home run by a big national chain because you have visited someone in one of their homes elsewhere and been impressed by their corporate style. Around 90% of care homes are now owned and operated by either private companies or charitable bodies. The range of private companies runs from nationwide chains operating hundreds of homes through to sole traders or partnerships operating just one home. The style and approach they adopt is likely to be a reflection of the range of different providers. Charitable bodies may run homes in a number of locations across the whole country while others will be a one-off, established by local people in response to the needs of their locality. For more information on care homes see page 34.

‘I know what I want’ Many of us will have heard one or both of our parents tell themselves - and anyone else who will listen - that they don’t want to end up in a home, and will do anything to avoid it. Knowing this may make you feel uneasy or guilty that you have to look for a home. Negative views of care homes are usually made up of hazy memories of long-gone days of the old institutions that no longer exist; limited and generally highly partial information gleaned from media reports of inspections failed, court appearances by care staff and ‘undercover’ investigations by television reporters. Most people don’t have direct personal experience of the kind of lives most homes’ residents actually lead; kept safe, well cared for and in a happier state than if they had ‘soldiered on’ without help. There are thousands of care homes across the country and it is unsurprising that, from time to time, things go wrong in a very small number of them. Bad news travels fast and wide, while the realities of a better life – free of so many worries and with scope for companionship, care and skilled help from trained staff - are slower to reach the uninitiated.

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But the alternative, home care, also has its limitations. Some care agencies, under pressure to deliver more care to more people within a day can result in rushed visits of only 15 minutes. If that is what your parent receives every day and it isn’t enough, it can affect their quality of life. Although as with bad care homes this is not the case with all agencies and many ensure quality time and quality visits for every person they support. People may favour home care over care homes because they ‘know’ what they will be giving up by moving into a care home – freedom, control, choice and independence. But if the time comes to consider a care home, a good care home will see changing such opinions as a challenge. They will work hard to assist residents to regain as much control as they wish, and are capable of taking over the detail of their daily routines, and the key choices that matter to them; whether that is about food, trips out, maintaining religious observance, just about anything that your parent specifies as being important. Promoting independence is at the heart of good care home practice and families frequently report their relative starting to do things that they had

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

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Quality care for your loved one At Care UK we ensure that every resident in each of our care homes feels listened to, involved and, above all, cared for in the way that’s right for them. Our expert care teams provide quality residential, nursing, palliative and respite care as well as specialist care for people living with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. We also offer sensitive and supportive end of life care. We help our residents to stay active and independent by encouraging them to get involved in a range of activities, including day-to-day tasks around the home.

Above all our homes offer peace of mind. You know your loved one is receiving the best care from an experienced, compassionate team in a warm, comfortable and safe environment. Care UK has over 100 nursing and residential homes throughout the UK.

For more information or to arrange a visit call

0333 321 0937 careuk.com


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20 Choosing care long since given up, because they are supported to regain skills or find new ways of tackling tasks that matter to them. So, in looking for

the right place, don’t hold your parent back from setting out their wishes, and then looking at how the manager responds.

Shop around Unless it is impossible because of a sudden catastrophic change in health you should always plan to contact a number of different agencies or visit a number of homes that fit with your loved one’s preferences. Compare one against another and above all meet the manager and weigh up the strengths and weaknesses, as far as you are concerned. It is a good idea for you, your parent, and maybe someone else whose judgements you trust, to undertake the visits and you can collectively help to make the decision. When looking at care homes arrange to have a meal during the course of your visit, ideally alongside other permanent residents, so that you all can chat with them to get their views on what’s good about the home. They are likely to be free with their opinions on food, favourite staff and the approachability of the manager – valuable information that written reports cannot always convey as successfully. If you like what you see and hear ask whether it’s possible for your parent to have a short stay, without obligation. When looking at home care agencies, it is just as important to shop around. Visiting an agency or having a visit from the manager will not show the care they offer as it is delivered in the homes of those they support. However, speak with the manager about what their customers think of the service. Look for testimonials or ask to speak with existing clients about their experiences of the service. Whatever the form of care you’re choosing, you should ask the manager about their approach to care planning, considered by many to be the cornerstone of a good personalised service. A care plan should address all aspects of your parent’s life, not just care needs or health status, and should take account of spiritual well-being as well as their physical and mental health; likes and dislikes, and as much information as you are prepared to share with staff about your parent’s personal history.

What standards do they have to meet? Inspectors from the Care Quality Commission, the regulatory body for all health and care services in England, will have visited any agency and home as part of the initial registration requirements and, subsequently, carry out a full annual inspection – and visit on other occasions if there are concerns – to check that they are complying with the relevant regulations. A report on the inspection is posted on the CQC website (www.cqc.org.uk) but the owner or manager should give you a copy. If they don’t, ask for one. The Essential Standards of Quality and Safety (ESQS) – mentioned in the inspection report - cover all aspects of the operations from involving your parent in all aspects of their care, keeping them safe, the number of staff employed, the range of skills staff have and the procedures they must follow. Some local authorities undertake their own inspections of care services but some only inspect

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those that they contract with. You may also find that some of the larger providers have their own internal inspection processes. At the present time there is no comprehensive system of publicly rating care so you cannot make easy comparisons between them, but the combination of inspection reports, conversations with staff, current residents or clients and relatives will give you some strong indications. The views of other professionals, social care staff involved in finding care for people after a hospital stay or without family to assist in the process, are likely to have extensive experience of care providers in a locality and may be happy to offer information and opinions on the strengths and any weaknesses of providers you may be considering. Comprehensive checklists for choosing home care, care homes or dementia care homes can be found on pages 32, 35 and 52.

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Choosing care 21

It’s not easy Regardless of when or how the decision is taken to choose care, if more time is available to make the decision it will help with what can be a difficult stage of life. Good care is prevalent, however it is always the rare bad instances that will reach the media and taint your view. Thorough, considered research, good recommendations from others and personal instincts are the best tools for choosing. However, making sure a home or agency can meet your parent’s specific social, personal, medical and lifestyle needs will help ease the transition. A raft of emotions comes with the decision to choose care and you are not the only ones feeling these.

‘Thorough, considered research, good recommendations from others and personal instincts are the best tools for choosing.’

The Royal Alfred Seafarers’ Society www.royalalfredseafarers.com Providing quality residential, nursing and dementia care primarily for seafarers and their dependants. Short periods of respite care are available and the home is now taking residents from a non-seafaring background. If you know of someone that needs our help please contact us. We offer modern en suite rooms and sheltered flats set in 14 acres of lovely Surrey countryside on the edge of Banstead. Donations and legacies are vital to us and help ensure that our residents continue to receive the best possible care. For further information about the services we provide, or for advice on tax efficient giving, please contact the Chief Executive, Commander Brian Boxall-Hunt OBE, at Head Office, Weston Acres, Woodmansterne Lane, Banstead, Surrey SM7 3HA

Phone: 01737 353763 Fax: 01737 362678

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The Ashmere Lifestyle

Ashmere has been caring in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire for over 25 years. Family owned and managed for three generations, Ashmere has striven to deliver the very best care to our residents, and our experience shows. For those who value their independence our residential care offers all the assistance needed, whilst offering the freedom of choice of which activities and hobbies to pursue from those on offer, along with many trips and outings to allow you to enjoy being a part of the community. Our nursing homes provide all the equipment and expertise required to provide the best care possible. Whilst our extra care units provide specialist care for residents with dementia. In some of our homes all three levels of care are catered for, taking away any stress of having to move again. Codnor Park: 88 Glass House Hill, Codnor, DE5 9QT The Firs: 90 Glass House Hill, Codnor, DE5 9QT Kidsley Grange: 160 Heanor Road, Smalley, DE7 6DX West Hallam: Newdigate St, West Hallam, Ilkeston, DE7 6GZ

Smalley Hall: Main Road, Smalley, DE7 6DS King William: Lowes Hill, Ripley, DE5 3DW Valley Lodge: Bakewell Rd, Matlock, DE4 3BN Sutton Court, Lodge & Manor: Sutton-in-Ashfield, NG17 2AH

Phone: 0845 602 2059 For more info visit: www.ashmere.co.uk Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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22 Toby’s tale

Toby’s tale ‘One minute my mother was the lively, enquiring lady I’d known all my life, and then in the course of a telephone call from my stepfather she became a stroke victim. Dealing with her rapidly deteriorating condition, especially the onset of incontinence and lack of mobility, has been challenging, and made me feel very anxious and unsettled.’ Toby, who is retired, lives around 200 miles from his mother. Over the weeks which followed her admission to hospital and subsequent transfer to a smaller local hospital where she began a period of rehabilitation, he drove back and forth many times – squeezed between his love and concern for his mother, and support for her husband, now also showing worrying signs of increased frailty, and the obligations he had as a parent and grandparent. His former employment meant that he was used to problem-solving and dealing with bureaucracy, but sorting out the options for his mother’s care while also feeling worried by her rapid decline took him out of his comfort zone. He didn’t know where to begin the process of organising the next phase of his parents’ lives. Luckily he has a number of friends who had worked in care services and was able to seek some general advice, but managing to do anything with it while also coping with his stepfather’s anxiety and need for practical assistance at home, made progress difficult. Besides that he didn’t feel qualified to judge the amount and type of help his mother needed, or know what was available. Contact with local authority assessors attached to the hospital was difficult to manage from a distance, and his first face-to-face contact with his mother’s allocated care manager wasn’t good. She was ill-prepared, displaying only a tenuous grasp of the difficulties her client was experiencing, and seemed to lack the skills to communicate effectively, with either Toby or his mother. After a further, more positive meeting with

another member of the local authority’s staff it became clear that his mother wasn’t going to be returning to her former home, regardless of the support available from family, neighbours and various services. Toby began the process of identifying possible homes for his mother and stepfather. Accommodating two people with differing needs, while also wanting to stay in the area, narrowed down the choice so that he, and his London-based sister, didn’t have to visit lots of homes and then select one. They soon arrived at a ‘short list’ of just one home which they visited to satisfy themselves that it was indeed suitable – the location, layout and demeanour of the manager and staff being things they considered essential. As luck would have it Toby’s parents have settled in, and although he and his siblings are happy that their parents are being cared for they continue to feel anxious.

‘He didn’t feel qualified to judge the amount and type of help his mother needed, or know what was available.’

‘What I needed was good, reliable information. It was very difficult to come by and, most importantly, even more difficult to interpret it and then make comparisons. Nothing prepares you for living through a series of “false dawns” and the associated unrealistic expectations that occur during a loved one’s serious disabling illness.’ Somewhat inevitably Toby’s parents are still coming to terms with the big changes in their lives. They know that they are being looked after better than they could manage for themselves and are eating well in a safe environment, but that can’t stop them looking back with some sadness. Les Bright, Consultant, BCD Care Associates

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Advice for older people


Support to live independently at home If your parent is starting to need care and support, your first instinct is likely to be to help support them in their own home. If you’ve been providing that support, or you’re not nearby to be able to help them, there are many different products and services that might help bring peace of mind to everyone involved.

Remaining independent Encouraging your parent to look after themselves, maintain a healthy lifestyle, eat a balanced diet and take regular exercise can help to improve muscle strength, tone and general wellbeing. This may reduce their reliance on services. Regular exercise can reduce risk of developing certain long-term health conditions such as high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, osteoporosis and some cancers. It can also help to improve cognitive abilities, mobility and wellbeing.

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Many people feel that as they get older, aches, pains and stiffness reduce their ability to exercise. However even the lightest activity has more benefits than doing nothing. If your parent has a health condition, contact their GP before starting any exercise. For more information on physical activity guidelines for older people and exercises to try, visit the NHS Choices website http://www. nhs.uk/Livewell/fitness/Pages/physical-activityguidelines-for-older-adults.aspx

‘Encouraging your parent to look w re, o a c n k e re m a n’t start. maintain after a healthy o c r H Dothemselves, to elp. go ? n i e r s e u lifestyle, diet and ho wh caeat n ha balanced metake o E h E LIN e N I ELP PL W exercise L 7 H E 7 t regular can help to improve 7 ec3 8 9 2 0 ec3t8H 9 2 0 7 Esel Esel CAR 0 CAR 0 0 8 0 8 0 strength, tone and0 general muscle wellbeing.’

Broaching the subject of aids, technology or Many people like to remain in their own home for changes to help around the house may be met as long as possible. It holds many memories, can sedas?ifethey with resistance. People don’t likento feel be a haven of safety and security however when a u f o for support n to ? Cneed o e can’t cope and admitting the parent starts to need some extra support, you may om h with d scoaxing e some find yourself looking at the home differently. Are the can be difficult. It may take e N ougor r h t t i encouragement for them to they need stairs now a hazard? Does your mum or dad need E LIN alkappreciate t INE ELP LThis P 7 H L the help. is perfectly normal and you may help getting in or out of the bath? What happens if 7 HE 2 0 E 077 RE 2 persist. 8 9 can L I N you know they’re RE need 9 3 CA to By focusing on how changes they have an accident?H How 8 0 A E L P will 3 C 77 080 800 2 0 empower them to keep independent and make ok? These are RE common 8 9 considerations and there0 3 CAall 00 0 8of their life easier, you might find less resistance to are many levels support to help your relative live change. If time is on your side, starting with a few at home safely and securely. They start with aids smaller changes may help to pave the way for larger and adaptations and progress through community changes in the future. alarms to home care and live-in care.

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24 Support to live independently at home

Just a little help If your mum or dad just needs a little help with everyday tasks such as making a cup of tea or getting in and out of the bath there are many aids and adaptations that could help make life easier. Living Made Easy offers help and advice on daily living as well as details of equipment that is on the market that could help. It is run by the Disabled Living Foundation and works in conjunction with AskSARA. www.livingmadeeasy.org.uk Something as simple as a kettle tipper or bath chair could

Nellie’s stair lift

A few months after her husband passed away Nellie fell down the stairs, injuring her leg quite badly. After a stay in hospital, and then with family, it was time for her to return home. As a very strong, independent woman Nellie didn’t want to admit to her worry about falling again. Her daughter, Mary, broached the subject of a stair lift; without anyone else there to keep an eye on her it would give everyone peace of mind that she wouldn’t have to negotiate the stairs. Nellie initially insisted that she was fine, refusing to entertain the thought or allow anyone to book

Making changes to the home

Adaptations and home improvements could help your parent to live in their house for longer and make life easier. It could be a ramp to the front door, grab rails or a sit-in shower. Home Improvement Agency services may be able to help. They are also known as HIAs, Care & Repair or Staying Put schemes. HIAs are local not-for-profit organisations located throughout the country and they assist older people to improve, repair, maintain or adapt their home. HIAs provide advice and information for homeowners and private tenants and will also check to ensure what benefits and grants the resident may be eligible for to help them live independently. They can visit to discuss requirements and work closely with other agencies, help to identify reputable tradespeople and oversee the work. HIAs help vulnerable people to ensure their home is a comfortable and safe place to live independently. HIAs may recommend a handyperson to help

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make life easier without a huge upheaval. Larger items such as stair lifts, grab rails or external ramps can make getting in, out and around the house much easier. AskSARA also helps you find useful advice and products that make daily living easier. Depending on your parent’s need there are a number of yes/ no questions you can answer, it then generates a report of advice and products that could help make a difference. www.asksara.org.uk

an appointment for a quote. But after a few days at home her daughters noticed her reluctance to get anything from upstairs, or go up herself, preferring to use the cloakroom in the outside passage which she rarely used before. They raised this with her and she explained that she was a little apprehensive. That was all Mary needed to phone local stair lift companies to get some quotes. Six months after having it installed, Nellie couldn’t imagine life without it and is regularly seen with her great-granddaughter on her lap taking the toddler up to the toilet to help her potty training.

with small repairs or adaptations around the home and advise you on what repairs, improvements or adaptations may be best suited to help your parent. To find your local HIA contact Care Select’s independent advice line on 0800 38 92 077, www.firststopcareadvice.org.uk in association with FirstStop Advice. There are grants and financial support available to help with the cost of adaptations. These include the Disabled Facilities Grant. To find out more contact the local authority who will arrange for an occupational therapist to visit your parent at home and assess their needs. They will then recommend which alterations may be necessary. If the council agrees and approves the work there are some forms and a financial assessment to be completed. They will apply for the grant or advise of other financial support that may be available. It can take up to six months to hear about the grant and the financial assessment will determine how much may be expected to be contributed towards the costs.

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


                                                             

                      

  

Technology – the way forward Help in the home is not just about grab rails and stair lifts, it can include new lighting, different cooking equipment, even lower work surfaces. However, there is also a growing range of telecare or assistive technology which uses technology to help keep someone safe in their own home or to make their life easier. The most commonly known piece of telecare is a community alarm; these are usually pendants, pull-cords or buzzers. In the case of an emergency your parent presses or pulls the alarm and either you are contacted directly or it goes through to a central call centre who then make the relevant calls to you, a nominated relative, neighbour or friend who may hold a key to the property and/or the emergency services. Alarms can be installed for a fee and can be bought outright or rented. Some systems have a base unit where the controller can talk directly to your parent whilst help arrives. There have been many developments in telecare and the use of sensors can bring peace of mind should you find yourself worrying about your parent. These include carbon monoxide sensors, flood detectors in case a tap is left running, fall detectors, movement detectors, and alarms if the

front door is opened. If your parent is a little forgetful or has dementia, sensors can help keep them safe if the gas hob is left on, or a tap is left running. Sensors can also indicate if someone gets out of bed in the night and doesn’t return within a set timescale. You can even set voicerecorded alerts in different areas of the home to prompt your parent. For those with dementia, who have a tendency to leave the house, these can be set up at the external doors. You can record a message asking your parent not to leave the house. In many cases they work to distract or divert the individual. To find out more about telecare and aids and adaptations for the home, there are Independent Living Centres throughout the country that demonstrate a wide variety of these items. They usually have occupational therapists on site or who you can book an appointment with for an assessment of what may suit your parent. Telehealth, remote patient monitoring, can help people with specific long-term conditions to monitor their health and transmit it directly back to their GP or consultant without the need for trips into the surgery or hospital. If this is an option for your parent, speak with their GP or consultant to find out more.

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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26 Support to live independently at home

Getting around Community transport Community transport is a scheme to help your parent to get around if they can’t use existing transport. It is arranged by their local council.

Disability Living Allowance currently

£54.05per week

War Pensioners’ Mobility Supplement currently

£60.40per week

Motability The Motability Scheme enables disabled people to use their government-funded mobility allowance to lease a new car, scooter or powered wheelchair. If your parent is in receipt of the Higher Rate Mobility Component of the Disability Living

Allowance (currently £54.05 per week) or the War Pensioners’ Mobility Supplement (currently £60.40 per week), they’re eligible to join the Motability Scheme. To find out more visit www.motability.co.uk.

FREE bus pass Those living in England may be entitled to a bus pass giving free off-peak travel on local buses. Entitlement starts at ‘eligible age’. If your parent was born before 5th April 1950, they are eligible from their 60th birthday. If born after 5th April 1950, they become eligible when they reach the State Pension age for women. This is the same for both men and women. A bus pass can be applied for from the local council. You may even be eligible.

Blue Badge scheme For those with severe mobility problems you may be able to apply for a Blue Badge to enable them to park close to where they need to go. You can apply online via the GOV.UK website www.gov.uk.

Staying socially active Day care services Day care is usually a community-based service offering an opportunity to get out of home, meet other people, try new activities and sometimes receive specialist services such as chiropody or hairdressing. Some centres also offer a hot meal or lunch club and can arrange transport to and from the centre. The local council may have details of day centres, alternatively the local Age UK branch or FirstStop Advice can advise.

Befriending services Befriending services can offer companionship and support if you’re worried your parent feels isolated or lonely. Companions could accompany them on appointments or outings or even just have a cuppa and a chat. Companions may be volunteers or employed by private companies such as home care agencies. They should be fully trained and have Criminal Records Bureau checks.

Wheelchair hire Some organisations offer wheelchairs for short and long-term hire either for a small charge or a donation. The British Red Cross, for example, offer a volunteer-led medical equipment service that provides wheelchair hire and short-term loans of equipment. You can search its website for your nearest service www.redcross.org.uk.

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Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


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Reducing isolation at home 27

Small changes By starting with these smaller changes to home life you may be able to maintain your parent’s independence for longer whilst bringing peace of mind to you and them. There are many creative ideas and developments are happening all the time.

Reducing isolation at home MHA Live at Home scheme, Staffordshire The MHA Live at Home Scheme in Staffordshire aims to reduce social isolation of those living at home. It is a community-based project that offers a voluntary friendship and support service to older people including friendship groups, lunch clubs, computer sessions, dementia day

care, arts and crafts groups, shopping, pub lunches, outings, holiday outings, gardening service, housebound library, dog walking, befriending, telephone befriending and postal befriending. Transport can be arranged to activities as appropriate.

‘The MHA Live at Home Scheme in Staffordshire aims to reduce social isolation of those living at home.’ With thanks to FirstStop and Elderly Accommodation Council.

We offer more than just care and support, whatever your needs we can help, including and not limited to: • Personal Care • Respite Care in your own home • Managing your finances including benefits, savings and expenses

Reach for You – support in any way you need us Reach for You provide flexible and tailored Domiciliary (Homecare) Services, 24 hours a day, 356 days a year. We provide services across Birmingham, Shropshire, Dudley and Wolverhampton. We support anyone requiring support in their own home including people with learning disabilities, mental ill health as well as specialist services for older people and Chinese people.

• Developing life skills including cooking, cleaning and laundry • Engaging with leisure activities and events in the local community • Access to education, training and employment • Maintaining and forging new relationships and friendships • Managing your physical and mental health. Helping you keep track of medical appointments, looking after your medication and reminding you when to take it • Keeping safe and helping you to manage the risks that you may come across in your life.

Call Reach for You for support in your own home.

0121 226 5800

For more information please call us or visit our website www.reachthecharity.org.uk or email domcareenquiries@reachthecharity.org.uk

2nd Floor, Bradfield House, Popes Lane, Oldbury B69 4PA Regulated by the Care Quality Commission Charity number 1129187

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


Nursing and care services in your own home From long-term complex care, through to support with everyday living, Advantage Healthcare Group can provide you with a high quality bespoke care service.

LIVE-IN CARE COMPLEX CARE PALLIATIVE CARE HOSPITAL TO HOME PERSONAL CARE SOCIAL COMPANIONSHIP HOLIDAY CARE

Our service allows you to remain independent in the comfort of your own home, without having to compromise on the quality of your care. For more information on how we can be of assistance to you, please contact our Care at Home team today.

0800 694 4555

www.advantagecareathome.com

THE CARE AGENCY

“The best thing about live in care is that Mum decides what help she needs”

Live-in Care from £675 per week

The alternative to Care Home admission. Live-in Care enables anyone with care needs to continue living in their own home with a round-the-clock care worker. Everyone wants their parents to live in a safe and dignified environment. Where better than in their own home? Throughout the UK, The Care Agency offers a professional and compassionate alternative to a residential home, providing safe and reliable care services at a competitive price. Call now 0845

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604 4152

info@thecareagency.co.uk www.thecareagency.co.uk

08000 121 247 | www.liveincare.info

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


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Care options in one’s own home 29

A

Care options in one’s own home

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If you have found that despite aids, adaptations and other support your parent requires more formal, personal care or support in the home then there are varying degrees of assistance available. From home help to home care or live-in care, they can support your parent to live at home for longer, if this is the best option for them and their quality of life.

For some, receiving care in their own home is what they want and what best suits their needs. It may bring you comfort as well to know that they’re in familiar surroundings. Remaining at home is usually everyone’s first thought when care and support is needed and with unfavourable impressions of care homes, home care is almost an automatic solution. However, this isn’t the case for everybody and some people may become isolated or feel their quality of life is much improved by moving into a care home or care home with nursing.

Assessments and funding

Care in the home is a chargeable service and there are many agencies that can support your parent. It’s also possible to employ someone directly to undertake this role. To understand what assistance may be required, a care needs assessment by the local authority can help to identify specific requirements and the type of support that might be best suited.

Support in the home was traditionally for those only needing slight assistance with daily tasks or personal care a few times a day, this is no longer the case and even those with later stage dementia are being supported to live at home. Care in the home is provided by local and national organisations, large and small. Some companies operate franchised services. Prices vary depending on the individual’s level of need, their location and the number of hours care needed per week.

If your parent is funding their own care they can choose whoever they like to provide their care and support. If they’re eligible for local authority funding then there may be restrictions. Speak to the local authority about this if undertaking a care needs assessment. For more information on assessments and contacting the local authority see page 12.

‘Support in the home was traditionally for those only needing slight assistance with daily tasks or personal care a few times a day’

Home help

Home help is light support at home to help with everyday tasks that don’t include personal care. This might include: • Help with domestic tasks such as housework, cooking, shopping and gardening. • Services such as delivery of meals. • Shopping. • Small maintenance jobs. • Company and social activities. Choosing the right home help can, in itself, provide company

as well as help at home. • Transport to and from shops, doctor, hospital etc. • Walking your dog, and keeping it healthy and clean. • Installing security equipment such as an emergency alarm, entry phone or key box. If your parent doesn’t have any specific care needs, home help can be great to assist with simple household tasks and also keep them company should they wish.

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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30 Care options in one’s own home

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Live-in care 24 hour live-in care can accommodate people with a very high dependency on a permanent basis. It can also provide respite breaks for regular carers and short-term support following hospital discharge. In some cases, it’s preferable and more economical to have a care worker actually living in the home. This can be for a short period such as a week, or on an on-going basis. Costs depend on the amount of care and the particular skills

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required. Live-in care is also available to people with permanent physical or learning disabilities who require long-term on-going care. As with home care, live-in care providers are regulated and inspected by the Care Quality Commission which publishes inspection reports on its website www.cqc.org.uk. When considering a service always check its report.

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


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Care options in one’s own home 31

Careful consideration Choosing support in the home can feel like a natural option and for many it is empowering. Some assistance here and there can help to maintain their independence within comfortable and familiar surroundings. However, if your parent

is remaining at home because of their, or your emotional attachment to the building or a fear of care homes then consider whether home care is actually the best option for their situation.

Tips for arranging home care • When arranging home care, contact a few different agencies. If you or you parent knows of someone else, locally who receives support at home, ask them for recommendations. • All home care and live-in care providers are regulated and inspected by the Care Quality Commission which publishes inspection reports on its website www.cqc.org.uk. When considering a service always check the reports. • You should expect the manager of a prospective agency to come and visit you and your parent to discuss needs and requirements. • It is important that you are all clear about your parent’s specific needs to ensure the care workers can support them fully. This may be difficult if your parent doesn’t feel they need support. It may be that you’ll need to have a couple of meetings to discuss needs. • If your parent has a care needs assessment from the local authority this will give a good starting point for conversations with any care agencies.

Mrs D

‘Mrs D now enjoys her home with the regular support and feels more settled.’

86 year-old Mrs D wants to stay at home despite having problems getting dressed, getting to the toilet and feeding herself. Her family wanted her to go into a local care home so she was safe and well cared for, but Mrs D wasn’t keen. After a few weeks of broaching the subject and trying to get her to discuss what she was thinking, she agreed she was frightened and worried about how to manage. She also admitted that she felt a care home would take over her life, and that she wanted to die, when the time came, where she felt comfortable. It wasn’t until she had a fall resulting in a stay in hospital that Mrs D finally agreed to a twoweek stay at the care home to recover. As this wasn’t what she ultimately wanted in the longer term, when she was home again her family contacted some local care agencies and found one they were happy with, having spoken to the

manager, the families of some other clients and the most recent inspection reports. They then arranged for a care worker to visit Mrs D once a day. Despite initial reservations, Mrs D began to feel comfortable with the support. This was then increased to twice a day as she became more comfortable. She also got several pieces of equipment into the house, such as a wheeled trolley, perching stool, an alarm and, finally, a stair lift, which made life easier and safer for her Mrs D now enjoys her home with the regular support and feels more settled, able to cope and secure. She’s comfortable to live there and knows that with the right support, increasing if needed, she can remain in her home for as long as she desires.

With thanks to Independent Age.

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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Quality Commission. Ask to see a copy of their registration certificate and most recent inspection report.

• Care assistants should be fully trained or be in on-going training. Ask the agency about their policies on this.

• How long has the agency been operating?

Your parent will have a care plan drawn up by the agency which the care assistants will work to. Ask how often this plan will be reviewed by the agency.

Care assistants must be checked with the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) and have a criminal records disclosure – make sure this is the case.

How many care workers would the agency assign to care for your parent and would they see the same one every day? If not, how does the staff rota operate?

What happens if the care assistant goes on holiday or is sick, will your parent be notified in advance that a different person will be attending?

• How can the agency be contacted in an emergency or outside office hours?

Paying

• If you need to, how can you make a complaint? How are things then put right?

If your parent’s care has been arranged privately you should check carefully the fee rates charged and exactly what the payment covers.

For care packages that have been arranged by the local authority, contracts and care plans will have been completed by the care manager and the agencies used will have been accredited to work for the local authority.

Ask for a copy of the agency’s contract terms and Service User Guide. Read these carefully. Ask any questions you may have before signing anything. The Citizens Advice Bureau or Age UK could help with this.

For any advice or guidance on care, call Care Select’s independent advice line on 0800 38 92 077 in association with FirstStop Advice.

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Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


“Worry free” high quality care is our biggest Priority

JUBILEE HEALTHCARE LTD Your well being is our priority

YOUR WELL BEING IS OUR PRIORITY

JUBILEE HEALTHCARE LTD

Trust is our commodity Jubilee Healthcare Ltd delivers a wide range of homecare services across Nottingham & surrounding areas.

Registered with Care Quality Commission

We provide highly skilled staff with professionalism and expertise to work in the following fields: • Residential nursing • Live-in service • Physical & learning disability (both young and elderly) • Mental health & challenging behaviour • Supported living • Respite care • Day care services • Meeting and requirements for a translator/interpreter Our typical services include: • Preparation of meals • Shopping • Laundry • Cleaning & domestic duties • Sitting service • Assistance with bathing, hoisting & dressing • Medication, prepping, fetching prescriptions from GP surgery/pharmacy • Sleepover service

37A Gregory Boulevard, Hyson Green, NG7 6BE Tel: 0115 941 4220 / 07852 976835 Email: jubileehealthcare@qualityservice.com Website: www.jubileehealthcare.co.uk Registered in England and Wales Number 7928938

Caring for you in your own environment… We provide all aspects of personal, domestic and social care, enabling individuals to live with dignity, respect and independence. Our highly trained staff offer unique, person-centred care, 24/7. Our services are available to over 18’s and older persons, including those with learning difficulties, physically disability mental health problems, and sensory disabilities.

• Personal care • Live-in care • Emotional & practical support • Domestic & cleaning • Relief staff • Palliative care • Supported living • Respite care • Rehabilitation care

Tel: 01276 415737

info@sanssouciehomecare.com

www.sanssouciehomecare.com Unit 007 Basepoint Business Centre, 377-399 London Road, Camberley, Surrey GU15 3HL

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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34 Care options explained – residential care

Care options explained – residential care The thought of needing residential care or a care home, as they are more commonly known, can fill you with worry, dread or even guilt. For many the thought of ending up in a ‘home’ is the last thing they want but it shouldn’t be this way. Care homes can provide excellent support and improve someone’s quality of life. Care homes and care homes with nursing can offer round the clock care and support to your loved one. If they are no longer able to support themselves at home, require more care than a home care agency is able to provide or want to be in a more social setting and receive the support they need then care homes fill that role.

We are all aware of the negative image care homes have in the media and that doesn’t make this decision any easier. You, your parent and other family members may all have the thought that a care home is a last resort, or a sign of failure, giving up. However good care homes are the norm, the bad ones are the exception. A good care home can empower your loved one, improve their quality of life, re-able them, give them an opportunity to meet new people, do things they thought they’d never be able to do again, all whilst being cared for, supported and looked after 24 hours a day.

What are care homes? Care homes are forms of communal living. Each individual, or resident, in a care home, more commonly than not, has their own bedroom and may also have en-suite facilities. Some older homes may have shared bedrooms for couples or those who enjoy the company, and shared bathrooms. Dining and living facilities are also shared though there may be a number of different dining and living rooms depending on the size and type of home. Homes are very varied and personal preference plays a large part in choosing a home. There are only two main types of care homes, those offering just personal care and those offering nursing care too. Some may specialise in care for people with different conditions but they will either be able to care for personal, social care needs or personal, social care and medical needs. If your parent is reasonably active, but would like

greater security, to be among other people and also requires personal care, a care home offering only personal care may be the best option. Personal care includes bathing, feeding, dressing and help with moving around. If your parent has medical or nursing needs, a care home with nursing offers a higher degree of care. They are best suited to people who require 24 hour support and have medical care needs that must be supervised by a registered nurse. Nursing homes usually have higher staffing levels due to the higher needs of the residents. In a care home with nursing, if your parent is eligible, the cost of the nursing care part of the fees is paid by the NHS to the home directly: the current amount is £109.79 per week. To find out more about this you can contact the Nurse Care Management Teams at your parent’s local Primary Care Trust.

Is it what my parent needs? A care needs assessment by the local authority will help to determine whether a care home or care home with nursing will best suit your parent’s needs. This will help you all to be clear on what care and support is needed and avoid you choosing the wrong type of care home and possibly paying more than is necessary. If your parent has been in hospital, a care assessment should be conducted before discharge; alternatively you can contact the local authority directly for one. All care providers in England must be registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC). All services are inspected by the CQC, who report on their findings. These inspection reports are available directly from the care service or the CQC’s website www.cqc.org.uk.

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Advice for older people


dedicated to luxury, designed to care.

an exclusive residential care development and club Set in Abingdon Town Centre, Bridge House is an exclusive residential care development. With exceptional living accommodation set over three floors, Bridge House not only offers a high end elderly residential living space but at its heart an aspirational club facility for its residents as well as for the older community of Abingdon. Our experienced and dedicated team understand that each of our residents will have unique care needs. We create highly personalised care experiences, set in luxurious surroundings, and strive to deliver a unique approach to elderly living. • Accommodation for 71 residents (various room types/sizes), some with private gardens • Person-centred care packages including residential, nursing and specialist dementia • Activities, clubs and facilities including Spa, Wellness Centre, Cinema, Café, Bar, Library

info@bridgehouseabingdon.co.uk

0845 409 8030 www.bridgehouseabingdon.co.uk


Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

• Nursing Care • Dementia Care • Residential Care • Respite Care

From the moment my mother and I first visited her Barchester home, we knew we had found somewhere pretty special. The building itself is really elegant, the food is delicious and they have gorgeous gardens too. She’s made loads of new friends and they all have so much fun together. The staff are dedicated and attentive to her needs; knowing she's in such safe hands is a load off my mind. Thanks Barchester.

Why Barchester Care Homes? • Expert care tailored to individuals' needs • Dedicated and passionate staff • Wealth of experience in providing a home from home • We encourage individuals to continue activity, fun and friendship

With two decades of experience and over 200 care homes across the country, you can trust Barchester to help. To speak to our friendly care team, please call

0845 415 4807 www.barchester.com


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Care home checklist 37

Care home checklist First impressions

• • • • • •

Fees

Staff

• • • • •

• • • • •

Were you met by someone when you first arrived? Do staff seem warm, friendly and polite? Do the residents seem happy, active and sociable? Does the home feel homely and welcoming? Is the home fresh, clean and comfortably furnished? How much are the fees? Do the fees cover all the services available? Under what circumstances will the fees alter – eg annually or according to increasing needs? Is the notice to terminate the contract reasonable? Can you see a table of the fees charged?

Transport

• Is the home easy to get to for relatives and friends? • Does the home provide its own transport?

Accommodation

• • • • • • • • • • •

Are bedrooms single or shared? Is there a choice? Can you decorate and re-arrange your room. Can you bring your own furniture and TV? Is there a call system for emergencies? Are there enough electric sockets in your room? Can you control the heating in your room? Can you lock your room and is there a secure place for valuables? Is there a separate dining room? Bar? Are there toilet facilities within easy reach of the communal facilities? Are there both showers and baths? Are bathrooms adapted to help people in and out?

Accessibility • • • •

Does the home have the right adaptations and equipment to meet your needs? Are all areas accessible for wheelchair users? Does the home have extra wheelchairs and walking aids? Is there adequate provision for people with sight or hearing difficulties?

Life within the home

• • • • •

Are there any rules and restrictions (e.g. going out, time of return etc)? Can you see a copy? Can you choose when to get up and retire every day? How are residents involved in decisions about life in the home? Will someone post a letter for you? Or is there a post box nearby? Is there enough privacy given to residents?

• • • •

38

© Care Choices Ltd 2013

Is alcohol served or permitted? Are there smoking and non-smoking areas? What arrangements are there for religious observance? Can you handle your own money? Does a hairdresser/chiropodist visit? Are residents accompanied on visits to the GP? Do the staff appear clean, cheerful and respectful? Observe how the staff talk to residents. Are people treated with dignity? Are the staff formally trained? Is there an adequate number of staff on duty day and night? What evidence is available to back this up?

Visitors • • • •

Are visitors welcome at all times? Is there somewhere to see them in private? May your visitors join you at meals? Can your visitors stay overnight?

Catering • • • • •

How much choice do you get about meals? Is the food varied and interesting? Can the home cater for your dietary needs? Can you have snacks or drinks any time? Can you eat in your room?

Activities • • • • • • •

Can you continue to pursue your hobbies ? What sorts of activities and entertainment are organised? Are outings and holidays arranged? Are escorts available if necessary? Is a library service available? Can you have your own flower bed? Can you stay in your own room if you want to?

Gardens • • • •

Are the grounds/gardens attractive and quiet? Are all areas safe and accessible? Is there somewhere to sit? Are they quiet?

Contract terms • • • •

Can you retain your own room if away? Can you have a short-stay or trial period? Ask to be given a statement of terms and conditions used by the home. Are all procedures, such as complaints, clearly spelt out? Where? Ask to see a copy.

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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38 Care options explained – residential care

What to expect? Care homes and care homes with nursing come in all shapes and sizes. There are big, hotel-style homes or smaller, more intimate ones. The one that suits your parent will be the one that can meet their needs and in which they’ll feel the happiest. Choosing a care home is like choosing any home, it has to be able to meet their personal preferences and reflect what they want from life as much as meeting their care and support needs. You should expect a care home or care home with nursing to be able to meet all your parent’s needs as well as promoting their quality of life. Staff should be friendly and caring and there may be a mix of nationalities amongst care staff. Personal,

cultural and religious wishes should be discussed and promoted. A care home is a home and your parent should be encouraged to join in as much or as little as they want. It is important to make a shortlist of care homes to visit. Think about the types of locations that might be best. When contacting the home ask to speak to the manager and ask for a company brochure and copy of the most recent inspection report. Inspection reports can also be downloaded from www.cqc.org.uk. For more information on what to look for when choosing care, see page 16.

Is going into residential care always permanent? Care homes can be used in a number of shortterm ways to meet your parent’s needs. ‘Short-Term Break’ or ‘Respite’ – this is a shortterm stay at a care home and can be to alleviate any pressure on carers at home, during holidays, or as a taster to see if care home life may suit your parent. It is possible to have a number of short stays in a care home throughout a year. These stays are chargeable and each care home will have its own fees. ‘Intermediate’ residential care – this is when someone coming out of hospital is discharged into residential care. This can be whilst a decision is being made about their future needs while ensuring they don’t remain in hospital unnecessarily. Your parent will not be charged for the first six weeks of intermediate residential care and a placement typically lasts for a maximum of six weeks, after which a decision is usually made.

This could be returning home with home care or a permanent move into residential care. Temporary residential care – this can last up to 52 weeks, with the goal of your parent returning to living independently. It is a chargeable service though it won’t take any property into account when assessing any contribution to the cost of care (as long as the temporary stay does not exceed 52 weeks without good reason and subject to the conditions outlined in the Department of Health’s Charging for Residential Accommodation Guide). An example might be if your parent needs to leave home whilst major repairs are carried out but they want to return once these have been completed. For more information on residential care and paying for care, please contact Care Select’s free and impartial advice line, in association with FirstStop Advice on 0800 389 2077.

The right to choose a care home Your parent has the right to choose a care home that they would like to live in and that meets their needs. If they are funding their own place they are free to visit and decide upon any care home, anywhere in the country. If the local authority is funding the care place, your parent still has the right to choose a home to meet their assessed needs however, if the cost of the accommodation is higher than the local authority would usually expect to pay you may be expected to find a third party top up to cover the difference in cost.

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If supported by the local authority and your parent chooses a care home in another area, the local authority in the area your parent currently lives is responsible for the care fees. The home chosen must meet their assessed needs and comply with the terms and conditions set by the authority. The fees that the local authority will pay may vary. They may offer to cover the fees they would expect to pay for comparable care within their county, or they may offer the fees that the local authority would pay in the chosen region. Seek further advice before making these decisions.

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


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If your parent is funding their own care they will 800 H P 3 8 E Land contract; the procedure for cancelling a contract have to sign a contract with the care provider, it 92 L I N E 077 the administering of medication. is important to speak to solicitors with experience If the place is funded by the local authority it will in this field. Any contract should explain: the cost contract directly with the care provider however of care, what services are included in theCAprice RE 0 800 your parent should receive a written copy of the and how often this is reviewed; what complaints H 38 E L P L I N 9 E and conditions. procedure is in place; what the resident’s rights are 2 0 7terms

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92 speak to solicitors with experience in 8this 0 7field.’ 7 LIN E

The reality of care homes Despite the media perception, care homes are, in the main, homely, welcoming and enjoyable places to live. A good care home can do wonders for someone and many people who move into care homes go on to live full lives and actually have a better quality of life than if they’d stayed at home. Use your instincts when visiting care homes. Consider what sort of life your parent likes to lead. If the home feels homely, welcoming, clean, relaxed and staff seem caring, engaged and supportive, chances are you’ve found a good home. For more

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information on choosing a care home see page 16. It is natural to worry and it may take your parent a while to settle in but if you have any concerns raise them with the manager or your parents’ key worker (who takes the lead on their care and support). They are experienced at telling whether there are any settling in issues, teething problems or real concerns. A good care home manager will listen to your concerns and help to address them to make sure your parent settles well. For more information on evaluating the decision see page 16.

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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40 Care options explained – residential care

Who’s who in a care home? Registered manager The registered manager is in charge of the day to day regulated services in a care home and is responsible for ensuring the home meets the national standards. They must be qualified to NVQ Level 4 in Leadership and Management for Care Services (formerly the Registered Managers Award), registered with the Care Quality Commission, and fully CRB checked. They may be the first person you come into contact with when starting to look for a suitable care home, or they may pass that to an administrator depending on the size of the home. The manager may also be supported by a deputy manager. Activities co-ordinator

3

An activities co-ordinator interacts with residents to provide a wide range of activities to interest and stimulate residents. They will encourage everyone in the home to participate including staff but will also Activities respect the co-ordinator individual’s choice to participate as much or as little as they wish. Activities as a term is all-encompassing and could include traditional activities like bingo or card games, or helping someone to garden, support them to cook, lay the table, fold washing, read or continue with or take up any activities they wish. They may also arrange events such as garden parties, Christmas parties, day trips, coffee mornings etc.

4

Care assistant

Ancillary staff

Ancillary staff

Most care homes will also have ancillary staff depending on the size including administrators, cooks, housekeepers, laundry assistants and gardeners.

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Registered manager

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Care assistant Care assistants offer care and support in care homes; they help the residents to live their day to day lives. A good care assistant should be caring, personable, compassionate and friendly. They should be patient and supportive. They should be CRB checked and although qualifications aren’t essential, they will have had a 12-week induction training which covers national minimum standards of care and they can work towards further qualifications. Senior care assistants will have more qualifications and may take on more of a management function whilst also having a caring role.

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


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92 0 N Care options explained – residential care3 841 77

Big decision Considering a move to a care home is a big decision, shrouded with emotion and preconceived ideas. Careful planning, an accurate care needs assessment and some time to find and visit suitable care homes will help the decision.

Co Need nfused? talk it someone throu t gh wi o th? CARE se

A care home for Ted Lorraine explains how moving into a care home was a positive move for her dad, Ted. We decided in August 2012, due to a situation that had arisen, that Dad could no longer be safely left alone. We looked into other options for him but as he was already living in a wardenassisted flat, we all felt that moving into a care home was the best option for him (providing the home was suitable, of course). We were initially looking for a respite break for Dad, and the warden at his flat mentioned that Anchor, the owners of the warden-assisted flat had just opened West Hall in West Byfleet. It was literally only five minutes away from my brother so it seemed like a good option to try. At first, our thoughts of care homes weren’t the best - we all felt that they weren’t very welcoming; with people sitting around in chairs, sometimes asleep or looking thoroughly bored. This is something we sadly experienced in the past, when visiting other homes. But since Dad has settled into his home, our view has now changed and we’re much more positive about the care that he receives. From the beginning Dad felt the move was good. He found the home to be very clean with good facilities, a bit like a hotel. Everyone was very welcoming. If we experienced any difficulties, we told them how we felt and they were quickly addressed. For example, there was one time when we had trouble getting through on the phone when calling from America - the Wellbeing Manager addressed this straight away. Another time we had some difficulty gaining access to the home through the electronic

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gate system and the Home Manager promptly provided us with an alternative entry system, so What experience the same problem that we wouldn’t s po i s rightWeup rt that for any outside in the future. agreed foalso r m medical p treatment arent?thatyDad may need, the options CARE would be run by us first so that we are H or 0 8of E can decide if we’d like to go aware 0 0them 38 9 L P L I N E 2 07 private. 7

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We evaluated the move by Dad’s general demeanour and mood - it took him a couple of months to adjust but now he seems very settled and happy. He is much more secure than he was in his warden-assisted flat and he’s well looked after. I think he feels well cared for which is really reassuring for us. The activity programme is the real bonus too - it is important for Dad to feel that he has a purpose; is involved in the homes’ activities and has plenty of social interaction. The stand out care that Dad receives has to be the amount of attention he gets and the array of activities he participates in, which I know he enjoys. Also, all the staff seem to know him and all about him too, which is vitally important – we hope it continues. With thanks to Anchor Trust.

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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42 Housing with care

Housing with care Over the last 20 years a range of new models of housing for later life has been developed to help bring care services closer to residents. Some care home owners took advantage of adjacent available land to build bungalows to rent or sell to retired people keen to live in proximity to care services. New models also arose in response to the growing care needs of an ageing and increasingly frail population within sheltered and retirement housing schemes. Whilst care homes and care homes with nursing are well defined by statute, housing with care remains free of such control. There are, therefore, no official definitions of terms such as sheltered housing, very sheltered housing, retirement housing, assisted living, extra care housing, or housing with care.

What is housing with care? Broadly speaking, housing with care is housing designed with the needs of frail older people in mind, and with varying levels of care and support on site. Housing means the privacy of one’s own selfcontained home, one’s own front door, and a contractual security of tenure – none of which are available in care homes. The term housing with care is commonly understood to cover all forms of housing offering one or more services in addition to the availability of an on-site scheme manager or ‘warden’. These additional services are provided or facilitated by the managing organisation or by appointed contractors.

They can include one or more of the following: • Regular meals in a dining room or restaurant. • Assistance to help residents obtain and receive care services. • Visiting care staff. • On-site care staff. • On-site care home (generally called close care). When a retirement housing scheme offers on-site personal care - the kind of services available in a residential care home (care home without nursing), such a scheme is more likely to be called Extra Care housing, a model promoted by the Department of Health.

‘The term housing with care is commonly understood to cover all forms of housing offering one or more services in addition to the availability of an on-site scheme manager or ‘warden’.’

Who is it for?

Housing with care is intended to help older people to continue living independently in their own home. It particularly suits: • People whose home cannot be adapted to meet their physical needs or for carers. • Couples with one partner in need of care support. • People wanting to maintain their independence but in a setting where care services are available. • People who could arrange for care services to be delivered into their own home, but are looking for the social life available in specialist housing.

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Common sense suggests that well-being in later life is likely to depend on some advance planning. Unfortunately too many crucial decisions are made in times of crisis, after a fall or a hospital admission. Housing with care should be an option of choice for those who can anticipate or foresee what services they or their partner will be likely to need in five or 10 years. A free interactive tool is available online at http://hoop.eac.org.uk enabling you to explore your options for moving or staying put.

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


The very best in retirement living Our retirement villages are the perfect place for living in retirement.There’s a choice of facilities, including restaurants, pool and leisure activities, as well as regular social events. Whether you’re looking for independent accommodation, or have a higher level of need for support, we have something for everyone. • A variety of well-appointed properties to buy or rent • 24-hour home care and personal care • Specialist nursing and dementia care • Short term respite care • Physiotherapy and hydrotherapy

Since we were founded over 85 years ago, the St Monica Trust has expanded its services in and around Bristol. Our approach combines the continuous development of responsive, customer-focused services, with a history of stable, sustained growth. Today we are proud to be regarded as a leading provider of retirement living and continuing care for older people in the south west.

Call 0117 949 4004 to find out more. www.stmonicatrust.org.uk | info@stmonicatrust.org.uk

Delivering well-being for older people Registered Charity 202151


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44 Housing with care

Need s adviceome ? Call u s toda y. CARE sel 0 8 0 0 ect H E L P LI 3

How do I find housing with care? EAC’s website www.HousingCare.org lists all forms of accommodation for older people in the UK. Its advanced search facilities enable you to select a location and tick various filters to refine your search for housing types, such as “With care”, “Extra care” and “Close care”. These schemes are fully described, with their contact details. You can also email most of these organisations directly from the website. Care Select’s free advice service in association with FirstStop can also help 0800 389 2077.

How do I choose a scheme? There are many things to consider when choosing housing with care. These may include:

There are only 1,500 housing with care facilities, NE 8 92 a fraction of the 077 26,000 retirement and sheltered housing developments, schemes or villages available in the UK. This means that some prospective residents may not find housing with care in their area of choice.

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• Is the facility near to family and friends? • Is it close to amenities? • Is it easily accessible for future visitors, public transport, parking?

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• Are social events organised?

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Properties can be rented, owned or part-owned/part-rented. The managing organisation will often set eligibility criteria which applicants have to meet – generally to give priority to those in need of care.

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Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people

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Advertorial 45

MHA is a Charity providing care, accommodation and support for older people throughout Britain. We are one of the most well-established care providers in the sector and amongst the largest charities in Britain, providing services to older people for 70 years. We were founded by the Methodist Church and we have strong values based on our Christian heritage. MHA has built a reputation for meeting the highest standards of care and accommodation in a variety of settings, exceeding the expectations of older people and providing excellent value for money. We offer a range of services throughout the UK to meet the differing needs of individuals in later life: CARE HOMES providing a mix of residential care, nursing care and dementia specialist care RETIREMENT LIVING COMMUNITIES with varying levels of support, including 24 hour care - available for rent, part ownership and full purchase, including specialist dementia support to enable couples to live together COMMUNITY SERVICES including Live at Home schemes, which provide guidance, support and friendship to people in their own homes

OUR CARE IN YOUR HANDS

We hope we can help you or a loved one. To find out more about our Retirement Living Communities, Care Homes and support services throughout the UK telephone 01332 296200 or visit www.mha.org.uk

Bringing quality to later life At MHA, we care. Nurturing older people in body, mind and spirit, with professional yet compassionate care and respect for each individual, has been at the heart of our ethos since our inception 70 years ago. We are proud to serve 16,000 older people nationwide with accommodation, care and support, and to be one of Britain’s largest charities and most wellestablished care providers. Our Care Homes are based on the principle of providing person-centred care tailored to each individual, with high quality residential, nursing and dementia specialist care in compassionate surroundings. With Assisted Living, residents receive care and support to care home levels, in their own private apartments. Our Retirement Living with Care developments provide attractive, spacious and private apartments, with a degree of discreet, personal care and assistance available as required. In addition, our Live at Home community service schemes bring friendship and services (transport, escorts to appointments, information,

signposting and more) for people in their own Homes. At MHA, we promote physical, mental and spiritual well-being, understanding that these mean different things to different people. All our residential settings have a dedicated Chaplain to provide spiritual support in all forms to residents of any faith, or none. Our retirement living communities come with choices for sale, rent and part-purchase, ensuring a suitable option for people in all circumstances. Call or email us today to find out how we could help you or a loved one live later life to the full.

‘At MHA, we promote physical, mental and spiritual well-being, understanding that these mean different things to different people.’

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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46 Housing with care

Social rent The resident rents the property at lower-thanmarket rates, subsidised by the state. This form of tenure is generally reserved for ex-local authority and housing association tenants

Care costs Many housing with care providers will only accept residents with some care needs, in order to justify the cost of in-house or contracted care staff. The cost of care will naturally depend on your parent’s individual care needs. As in residential care homes, self-funders will

and for those unable to raise sufficient capital for 16 % sources. the sale of their property or from other In these situations your parent may be eligible for Housing Benefit.

16 %

3%

have to pay for personal care services, whilst social services will pay for those who have been means24% 16 % 3% tested as eligible. If eligible, Attendance Allowance can be used to pay for care. Individual budgets and direct payments for those receiving state support % % 3% 35% can24 also help residents to16buy care services.

Overall costs explained The table below illustrates a fairly typical breakdown of the overall costs in an extra care scheme in London. Costs will, of course, vary widely depending on location, standard of facilities and care needs. Example: London extra care scheme, non-profit sector; One-bedroom flat: Two-bedroom flat: 

35%

16 %

3%

22%

Rent, housing cost

% 24% services 22% charge 3for Service communal

24%  35%

3516% Utilities for flat (water, heating)  3% Housing support (manager, warden)  22% 22% 24% 35% Care support  24% %

£342/week

Total  100%

£368/week

Figures are rounded%up from Housing LIN Case Study 53, Trees % Extra Care housing35– Highgate,22 London (August 2011), Housing LIN publications.

Popular examples The full potential of the housing with care model is best realised in extra care villages, where the number of dwellings ranging from 100 to well over 300 make viable the widest range of communal facilities, activities and care services. The size of these developments often means that they are located at the edge of towns, not close to public amenities. They can draw criticism of ghetto-isation, yet many of these villages are extremely popular with their residents and regularly win top awards. Whiteley Village is a

22% private estate, set in 225 acres of Surrey woodland. It also has a residential and nursing care home, various social, leisure and community buildings including a village shop and post office, church, licensed clubhouse, village hall, bowling green, putting club, hydrotherapy pool and fishing lake. The Trust specifically welcomes applications for cottage accommodation from older people in receipt of housing or other income-related benefits.

The future The best housing with care models will be those which meet the residents’ aspirations most closely. In an ideal world, it would be available everywhere older people wish to live. Contemporary trends show that this is likely to be integrated in established communities. The relatively high cost of land in such urban locations will be offset by

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savings made in providing communal facilities, so much of it being readily available in the immediate neighbourhood. Let us hope that commissioners and developers are ready to respond to this challenge with enthusiasm. Alex Billeter, Elderly Accommodation Council

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


"To be the best quality, most highly regarded care provider in the United Kingdom" Phil Burgan, Chairman & CEO, MMCG Growing old doesn’t mean life has to become less exciting. But as your needs change, you may start thinking about how to make it easier and more enjoyable. Maria Mallaband Care Group is one of the UK’s leading care home providers, renowned for offering luxurious, modern facilities and outstanding, quality services in some truly stunning properties. Maria Mallaband ensures its residents receive a superior level of care, while maintaining a sense of dignity and enjoying a high standard of living. We offer specially designed accommodation offering care, privacy, independence and security. Our staff are our greatest asset and we think it’s important for you to know that. We have a dedicated, qualified team, whose commitment is to ensure that the residents’ wellbeing and comfort is and always remains top priority. We have homes across the UK, Northern Ireland and Channel Islands.

Visit us anytime, or call us today to find your nearest Maria Mallaband care home.

0113 2382690 www.mmcgcarehomes.co.uk

We offer a wide range of services including: • Dementia care • Convalescent / Post• Nursing care operative care • Residential / Personal care • Respite care • Palliative care • Short Breaks • Disability/YPD care • Day care We believe that moving into a care home should be a change of life, not life changing

The best possible care... In Whiteley Village Care Centre, our highly trained, award-winning nurses and care staff meet the individual needs and choices of our residents from residential care, through to nursing, respite and end-of-life care, in a safe and peaceful environment. The UK’s original retirement village. Nestled in 225 acres of beautiful and tranquil Surrey woodland. Reg. Ch. 1103056

In the best possible environment... Residents are able to enjoy the beautiful surroundings and be part of village life in a friendly and caring community. The Village was described by HRH Prince Charles as a “national treasure”. Family and friends are welcome to visit at any time.

01932 857821 www.whiteleyvillage.org.uk

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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48 Was it the right decision?

Was it the right decision Coming to the decision that some extra support is required is a lifechanging event, whether that is formal care in the home or moving into a care home. Deciding that extra help is needed, choosing the care provider and entering into a formal contract takes a lot of emotion, planning and discussion.

Evaluating the decision Having taken the decision, however, how can you tell if it was the right one? Basically, it comes down to relationships and enjoyment of life. A good care agency is one that empowers your relative, offers consistent, quality care, with the same care staff, according to the agreed care plan, helps with agreed daily tasks and makes your parent’s life easier. The relationship between care staff and individual is a very personal one. The quality of this relationship and the care they deliver is essential to determining whether the

relationship is working. A good care home is one in which your parent forms friendships, with other people living in the building and with staff. It is a home in which privacy is respected and where the bedrooms are comfortable and welcoming. People should feel able to use their life skills to care for themselves when they want to, to pursue their interests and to stay in contact with the community - homes that do not welcome visitors should start alarm bells ringing.

‘A good care home is one in which your parent forms friendships, with other people living in the building and with staff.’ Settling in It may take a period of adjustment for your parent to get used to care staff coming into their home and helping them on a daily basis. This is completely normal and you may find that they protest or resist in the early days. Good care agencies are familiar with this response and have experience of helping people settle into the new routine. It can throw up some particular issues; some people have been known to refuse care staff entry or refuse any assistance. A good care agency should alert you to any such issues and work with you to try and resolve them. When moving into a care home, many people quickly feel at home in an environment that offers care and support but some may take several weeks to feel settled. They may mourn a life lost, miss their former home or feel like they have lost touch with familiar surroundings and networks. It

will generally be obvious to concerned visitors if something isn’t right. Most people are able to express dissatisfaction or unhappiness even if dementia means they cannot find words. In both settings, obvious signs of a problem are anxiety, distress or depression, an inability to form relationships, dramatic loss of weight, physical illness or increasing and sustained confusion. A little nervousness or anxiety at the start of living in a new home or adjusting to new arrangements at home may be a natural reaction to a change of circumstances. In a care home, individuals may miss loved ones and friends, particular home comforts or routines – but there is an appreciable difference between mild upset and real unhappiness, which will find expression in words or in behaviour.

‘In a care home, individuals may miss loved ones and friends, particular home comforts or routines.’

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Advice for older people


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Was it the right decision? 49

What if there’s a problem? It is common to worry about your parent but if you feel there is a problem, the first thing to do is to discuss it with staff and the manager. There may be misunderstandings that can be easily resolved or minor changes that can be made to help your parent to feel more comfortable: most people settle relatively easily into a residential environment or new care routine providing it allows them dignity, respect and personal choice. You or your relative may feel worried about your parent being victimised or facing repercussions if you complain about something. This is a common worry but it should never happen. All care and support organisations will have a complaints policy which should be readily available, and any good care provider will respond quickly to problems once they are raised. In the unlikely event that you feel something is seriously wrong, causing distress or putting people

Mary’s story Mary, now a resident at a care home in London, moved in following a series of falls and hospital visits. She lives with a mild degree of confusion and had increasingly proved difficult for her physically frail husband to support. Following a stroke his own health is now a matter of concern and he is in need of help himself. On admission to the home Mary was accompanied by her husband. She found it difficult to understand what was happening and was briefly tearful when she realised that he was going home while she would stay. She cheered up a little when he and staff helped her to arrange her room to her liking and shared a cup of tea and cake together. Mary had some trouble settling in: she found living with some of the other residents unsettling at times and would sometimes ask where she was and why she could not return to her home. She would normally feel happier when the situation was explained to her. Life story work was carried out with Mary, her husband and her key worker, which helped

at risk, for example, you should begin by discussing it with the manager. Alternatively, you can contact the local safeguarding board through the care provider’s management, through the local council (your parent’s care manager if they have one or the local social services office if not) or through the police. Safeguarding boards will move quickly to resolve any serious problem, calling in the industry regulators. They are the Care Quality Commission, who you can also complain to directly. They have the power to direct providers to make changes or even force closure, if necessary. If your parent doesn’t settle, issues can’t be resolved or they remain unhappy at the home after a sufficient settling in period, consider looking for an alternative care home. It is important that your parent is happy and settled in the home and if this is not the case a move, although unsettling, may be in their best interests.

‘Gradually Mary began to establish friendships with some fellow residents and now always sits with two or three friends for meals.’ develop her relationship with her key worker (the person with individual accountability for her care plan) and allowed exploration of approaches to care that would make Mary more comfortable – for example, having a vegetable patch in the garden to take care of herself and helping with drying up after tea, as well as keeping a bottle of sherry in her room so that she can have a glass in the evenings. Gradually Mary began to establish friendships with some fellow residents and now always sits with two or three friends for meals. She has become more used to her surroundings and though occasionally still not sure where she is she finds the companionship of her friends and her relationship with her key worker reassuring. She likes the home’s cat and frequently makes a fuss of it, which will help distract her sometimes if she feels a little upset. She always enjoys the visits from her husband and from church friends, too. Christopher Manthorp, Barchester Healthcare

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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50 Dementia and dementia care

Dementia and dementia care Dementia is a progressive condition that affects the memory of those who have it. Around 800,000 people live with the condition and there are a number of different care and support options available. 2012 was an incredibly important year for people with dementia and their carers. In March, David Cameron made a personal commitment to tackle dementia head on with the Prime Minister’s Challenge on Dementia. It resulted in a wealth of activity across all sectors which has not only helped bring dementia into the spotlight but has also started the ball rolling towards a better future for

the 800,000 people living with the condition today and the millions more who will be in the future. See panel on page 56 for more information on this and how the care sector is supporting it. However, there is still a long way to go and ensuring that people are supported to live well in the place they want to live is a top priority.

What is dementia? Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe the symptoms in the brain caused by a number of different diseases or conditions. These symptoms can include memory loss, behaviour and/or mood changes and communication problems. The most common type of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease but there are over 100 other varieties including vascular dementia and Pick’s disease. How these

symptoms manifest themselves and the speed at which they progress will depend on the disease but will also differ from person to person. While the majority of people with dementia are of pensionable age, 17,000 are under the age of 65. Dementia is indiscriminate of social class, gender or ethnicity and most people will at some point in their lives know someone affected by it.

‘Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe the symptoms in the brain caused by a number of different diseases or conditions. These symptoms can include memory loss, behaviour and/or mood changes and communication problems.’

Living at home

We know from talking to people with dementia that most want to be able to live in their own homes for as long as possible. In the early stages of the condition, this isn’t usually a problem. However, as the condition develops, people often need increasing amounts of support. They may need help getting up in the morning, getting washed, having meals or going to the toilet. They may leave the house in the middle of the night or become frustrated and angry. The levels of support can become too much for, often elderly, husbands and wives or busy sons and daughters. If you live at a distance you may find yourself worrying increasingly about your parent’s safety and wellbeing if home alone but extra support is available

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either privately or from social services. Like with other conditions, if a local authority assessment decides that a person is eligible for certain services or support, they have a responsibility to provide it. Even if they’re not eligible for support from the local authority, an assessment will highlight the type of care and support that would best suit your relative’s needs. This could be, for example, someone coming into the home to help in the morning and at mealtimes or making adaptations to the home. Carers should also be entitled to their own assessment which can enable them to access invaluable respite care to help alleviate the pressure of caring. For more information on carers see page 67.

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


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Dementia and dementia care 51

Assistive technology automatic calendar clocks can be helpful for people Assistive technology, if used in the right way, can who forget what day it is or labelling cupboards or provide an invaluable helping hand to people with rooms can make life significantly easier. dementia and carers, increasing independence and However, it is vitally important the person with choice. What exactly this technology is can dementia is not coerced into using a system vary. At one end of the spectrum that doesn’t work for them. They should there are ‘smart’ homes complete be included in all decisions on the issue with customised electronically and where this is not possible; linked up appliances, which those making the decisions must can include things like sensors have the person’s best interests at and movement monitors to CARE heart. Unfamiliar additions to the help make life easier and safer for HE 0800 38 9 L P L I N E 2 home can cause distress rather than people with dementia. For example, 077 comfort. Equally to use devices that if a person with dementia gets out of the person is unaware are in place raises bed in the middle of the night, the bedroom questions about that person’s rights and unwanted lights could be gradually faded up. At the surveillance. other end of the spectrum simple touches like CA

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Despite all the benefits of living at home, one of the big issues that people with dementia can face is that it can be incredibly difficult to access the support they need. This is increasingly true as CAR council’s tighten their budgets and the criteria for who qualifies for care is raised at the same time E 0 8 0 0 withHdementia E as the numbers of people 3 8 9 L P L I N E needing the services increases. This is on top of the fact 2 0to 7 7local authority financial support, the cost of care can often be that for those who are not entitled debilitating. If people don’t get the support they need they can end up reaching crisis point and going into hospital or care homes unnecessarily. This could all change however, if the Care and Support Bill effectively comes up with answers for how we can ensure CARE people are able to access care at the time H E L to social care, see page 72. they need it and at a fair price. For more information on0 8the 0 0changes PL

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52 Dementia and dementia care

Expectations of dementia care homes To capture the care experiences of people with dementia and their carers, Alzheimer’s Society has produced a report based on surveys of more than 1,000 carers and over 600 care home workers. One of the most interesting findings to come out of the report was the contrast between people’s attitudes towards quality of care and quality of life. Over two thirds of carers said the quality of care was good compared to 8% who said it was poor. Meanwhile only 40% of carers said their loved one had a good quality of life and more than a quarter (28%) said it was poor. As well as this, less than half of people said opportunities for the person with dementia to be involved in activities were good. This suggests that people’s expectations about what a care home should provide are perhaps lower than they should be. Some people might assume that a good quality of life isn’t possible in a care home setting. However, from feedback

we have received and from visits to some of the excellent care homes that exist all over the country, we know that it is. At the heart of good dementia care is an ability to see the person behind the condition. Where possible, the person with dementia and their family must be at the heart of decision-making about the care and activities that are provided. Alzheimer’s Society’s revised This is Me tool aims to help to make this easier. The leaflet gives a snapshot of the person behind the dementia, helping care home staff learn about the likes, dislikes, hobbies and habits. By empowering staff with this information, it can help ensure that the care provided is truly personcentred. By being confident that the care is centred on your loved one can alleviate many concerns you may have about your relative’s life and time in the home.

The person at the centre Keeping the person at the centre of the care also helps to ensure that they are being treated with the dignity and respect they have every right to expect. Often this can be achieved through small but significant actions. Let the care home know if your parent prefers to be addressed by a nickname or a more formal name as this can put them at ease and as a result aid the relationship between them and the care staff. Equally, a person’s beliefs can shape many aspects of their lives. For example, a person who refuses to eat a plate of sausage and mash or shepherd’s pie at dinner time may not be displaying ‘difficult behaviour’ but instead could have been a life-long vegetarian. Establishing these kinds of facts with the care team can make a huge difference to the day-to-day life of your parent. Despite the relatively low number of respondents who were positive about activity levels, research has shown that availability of activities and opportunity for occupation is essential in determining quality of life. It can affect mortality rates, levels of depression, physical function and behavioural symptoms. As good examples show, a home where residents have interesting activities to occupy them throughout the day will have a much more welcoming and positive environment and atmosphere. It is particularly important that care homes address the need for

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activities for people with later stages of dementia, who are especially vulnerable, to becoming isolated and are likely to be reliant on other people to provide opportunities for engagement. Speak with prospective care homes about how they approach this. As to what this entertainment should be, this depends on the needs and preferences of the individual. It need not be a formal, structured activity and could include daily tasks such as laying the table or folding laundry. Organised or therapeutic activity-based interventions that work well can include reminiscence and life review, music therapy, aromatherapy and sensory stimulation. It is difficult to say exactly which techniques will work best for your family member because it depends on them, the skill level of the staff and the setting of the care home. Here again, choice is imperative as this will make it more likely that there will be something to suit everyone. Gardens have been shown to have a number of benefits for people with dementia too. Not only can they allow people in earlier stages of dementia to continue hobbies such as gardening but they can also promote stimulation of the senses in people in later stages. Furthermore, they provide space for enjoying fresh air and for outdoor exercise.

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54 Dementia and dementia care

Staff are crucial Finally, the only way we can ensure the best quality of care and a good quality of life is if staff are empowered with the training they need to provide this. The overall indication is that care home staff feel positively about their training. At the same time,

however, more than half admit to wanting more training, especially on the use of antipsychotic drugs. This backs up what we already know, care home staff want to be able to do a good job. Again, speak to any prospective care homes about staff training and specifically dementia training.

The best place for their needs The most important thing is that people with dementia are supported to live in the place that best suits their needs – whether this is in their own home or in a care home. If people are to live a good quality of life this has to mean much more than just

meeting medical needs. There are great examples of how this is happening all round the country. Speak to prospective care providers about how they care for and support those with dementia, both in early stages and as the condition progresses.

Residential dementia care checklist for example at the weekend and in the week. If possible go with the person you care for. First impressions count. Think about how you are greeted and the way staff relate to people with dementia. Does the home feel homely? Is it warm or too warm? Most importantly, do not be afraid to ask questions. This is the best way to get information.

The following information is a starting point in your search for a care home. But remember, each home is different. You will have your own views on what is important and the questions that matter the most to you. When you visit, spend time looking around, talking to the manager, staff and residents. Look at several care homes and visit at different times,

Residents The best indication of a good home is that the residents appear happy and responsive. • Do staff speak to residents with dementia directly?

Is information readily shared with families and are they supported to become involved in the life of the home? For example, is there a relatives group?

• Are residents involved in activities or chatting?

Access

• Are residents clean comfortably dressed?

If the person with dementia needs or is likely to need equipment or adaptations you may want to check whether:

• Are residents encouraged to do as much for themselves as they can? Can you see any examples of this? • How are residents supported to make their own choices? For example, when and where they can eat. • Are cultural and religious choices respected such as diet and hygiene practices?

Friends and family • Are friends and family encouraged to visit whenever they like? Can they stay for the night? • Can friends and family choose to be involved in mealtimes? • Are there quiet areas where relatives can spend time with residents?

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• The corridors and toilets are wide enough for a walking frame or wheelchair. • There are suitably adapted toilets and baths. • There are ramps or a lift. • There is adequate signage and cues for different parts of the home such as dining room and bathroom.

Bedrooms You may want to find out whether the person with dementia can have a single room and whether: • Residents are encouraged to bring in some of their own furniture and possessions to increase familiarity.

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Residential dementia care checklist 55

Antipsychotic drugs 90% of people with dementia experience behavioural and psychological symptoms, such as restlessness and shouting, at some point. These distressing symptoms can often be prevented or managed without medication. However, people with dementia have frequently been prescribed antipsychotic drugs as a first resort and it has been estimated that around two thirds of these prescriptions are inappropriate. Reducing the use of antipsychotic drugs for people with dementia is a national priority in England. Antipsychotic drugs were developed to treat people with schizophrenia. They eliminate or

• The bedrooms are bright and pleasant. • Residents can go to their rooms when they wish to be alone. • Residents are able to keep pets in their room or in other areas of the home. • Staff respect the right to privacy and knock on bedroom doors.

Toilets Getting to the toilet in time can sometimes be a problem as dementia progresses. • Are there enough toilets within easy reach of the bedrooms and living areas?

reduce the intensity of psychotic experiences such as delusions and hallucinations, and can also have a calming or sedative effect. In some cases antipsychotics can be the right treatment option. However, they are linked to serious side effects, particularly when used for longer than 12 weeks. Speak to any prospective care home about their policy on antipsychotic drugs. George McNamara, Head of Policy, Alzheimer’s Society

• What happens if residents need help in taking medication? • Are changes in medication discussed with the family carers?

Visitors You will want to make sure that there is good communication between relatives and the home and that phone calls and visits are encouraged. • Are visitors welcomed at any time? • Are visitors encouraged to take residents out or join them for a meal? • Are children made to feel at home?

• Are staff trained to spot the signs when someone needs to go to the toilet?

• Are relatives involved in care planning and the general life of the home?

• Are staff cheerful and tactful about helping residents use the toilet and changing them if they are incontinent?

Activities

Living areas Look to see whether chairs are arranged in groups to encourage talking rather than placed in a circle round the outside of the room. • Is there a TV or radio left on needlessly when no one is watching or listening? • Is there more than one room where residents can sit or where they can be quiet or see visitors? • Is there a garden where residents can walk safely?

Health You will want to know what happens if residents are unwell or need medication. • Which doctor or doctors can residents see? • Can a relative stay overnight if a resident is unwell?

Residents should be stimulated without feeling stressed. • Are there opportunities for residents to help staff with small tasks if they wish? •

Does the home provide personalised activities suitable and engaging for residents with dementia? Ask for examples. Explain the interests of those you care for and ask how these can be met.

• Do some activities relate to everyday life, such as cooking, socialising and shopping which can help a person with dementia maintain a sense of normality? •

People in the later stages of dementia are especially vulnerable to becoming isolated. Are there opportunites for stimulating activities for them in particular?

• Are residents encouraged to take exercise and are there enough staff to supervise them? • Are there trips organised away?

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56 The Prime Minister’s Challenge on Dementia

The Prime Minister’s Challenge on Dementia In March 2012, David Cameron launched the Prime Minister’s Challenge on Dementia. This set out an ambitious plan for society to improve the care and experience for people with dementia and their carers in England. There are an estimated 800,000 people with dementia in the UK. Of the total number of people with dementia, one third live in care homes. Across all four countries making up the UK, there have been national dementia plans in place to support a positive approach to the current and future needs of people who have dementia. The Prime Minister has focused on three main areas for further work in his challenge:

Care Compact In a separate piece of work, the Prime Minister has asked care homes to improve their care and services. He has asked them to join the Prime Minister’s Challenge by signing a Care Compact. The Care Compact sets out some specific expectations for people using services, and for their families and friends to use, as a way of assuring themselves that their loved one is having their personal and individual needs met. He has asked that care homes assure themselves that the care they provide to individuals meets the following criteria for each person. • I am respected as an individual.

• Driving improvements in health and care,

• I get care and support which enables me to live well with dementia.

• Creating dementia friendly communities that understand how to help,

• Those around me and looking after me are well supported and understand how to maximise my independence.

• Better research.

‘There are an estimated 800,000 people with dementia in the UK.’ He has asked health and social care services to improve the care experienced by people with dementia and he has supported further investment in the research programme to build on the available evidence base. He has asked communities and business to help improve their response to the needs of people with dementia living in the community including banks and supermarkets.

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• I am treated with dignity and respect. • I know what I can do to help myself and who else can help me. • I can enjoy life. • I feel part of a community and I am inspired to participate in community life. • I am confident that my end of life care wishes will be respected. I can expect a good death. You can play your role, if looking for a care home ask the manager if they are a Care Compact signatory, and encourage them to become one if they aren’t. They can do this by joining the campaign at http://www.ecca.org.uk/article/primeministers-challenge-on-dementia-list-of-signatories. There is a lot of good practice happening and much work to do in creating an excellent care experience for every person with dementia wherever they live. Deborah Sturdy, Consultant

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Reaching the end of life 57

be honest...

Reaching the end of life fact of life...

comfortable... encourage... Although it is difficult to consider your parents dying, it is, unfortunately, a fact of life. You may see their frailties now and appreciate that end of life is drawing near, even if that’s a number of years away. Or it may be something that you’re just not prepared to face. People deal with the prospect of losing a parent in a number of ways and it is unique to you. The way you feel may be different to the way your other parent, siblings, partner or children feel. As your parent reaches the end of life, care and support can help to ensure your parent’s wishes are adhered to and their death is as comfortable and as close to their wishes as possible.

Sooner rather than later Although you or your parent may not want to address their eventual passing, by doing so it can make it a better experience for everyone. By

As much as we don’t want to face it, we know that we will eventually lose our parents. Having the confidence and strength to talk with your parent about their dying wishes before the time comes can help them to have the death they want.

understanding your parent’s wishes when the time comes and the end nears, you can ensure that they receive everything they would want. Starting the conversation, particularly with those close to you, is never easy. We don’t want to sound gloomy or upset anyone. But families commonly report that it comes as a relief to everyone once the subject is brought out into the open. If one person raises it honestly and openly, it gives others the chance to start having their say about their own death too. There is no right way or wrong way to talk about dying: it’s up to you and those close to you. Choose the right place, the right time. No one finds it easy to talk when they’re rushed or in a stressful situation. Look for a prompt that the other person is happy to talk about the future: for example, discussing retirement or care requirements may be a good time to talk about it.

Conversation starters •

Beginning with a question rather than a statement: ‘Have you ever wondered what would happen?’; ‘Do you think we should talk about?’

Sometimes it helps to start with something direct but reassuring, like: ‘I know that talking about these things is never easy’ or ‘We’ve never talked about this before but’

Encourage everyone to be totally honest about how they feel from the start. If you’re all open, there may be either laughter or tears – don’t be afraid of either.

Bear in mind: •

Though others may initially want to change the subject when you talk about dying, talking about it will ultimately make everyone’s lives easier.

If your parent is worried about talking about death with those they love, suggest that they discuss it first with someone else they respect and trust – a nurse or friend perhaps.

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58 Reaching the end of life

Planning dying well

In the checklist below are some of the areas people often leave too late to discuss. You may want to leave this with your parent for their consideration. It is important to think about all the things you want well in advance, talk to your family, write it down and keep it safe.

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1. Consider legal and financial matters:

• Make a will, get legal advice if necessary.

• Think about the costs, consider insurance, a funeral plan.

• If you need financial help to support you and your family with care costs, transport.

2. Save other lives through organ donation:

3. Make a plan for what you want when you die:

• If you want to donate any organs to save other lives or leave your brain or body to medical research, e.g. to help with dementia, write it down and tell your family.

• The type of care you would like towards the end of your life,

• Plan for the care of dependents.

4. Consider how you would like to be remembered:

• What would you like people to know before you die? • Messages, memory boxes, videos for loved ones.

• Where you would like to die,

• Whether you have any particular worries you would like to discuss about being ill and dying, • Whether you want to be resuscitated or not.

5. Plan your funeral arrangements:

6. Prepare for bereavement

• What do you want, burial, cremation, green funeral, other?

• If you need help or advice, find out where to go for support.

• Any service, memorial service, wake, celebration of your life?

• Find out what to do about legal and financial matters after death.

• What songs, messages, themes?

• Who do you want to attend?

When the time comes

Regardless of whether your parent is being cared for in their own home or a care home, you should be confident that the people charged with caring for them will have the necessary training to help make the end of life as comfortable as possible.

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A good understanding of someone’s wishes can help to avoid unnecessary admission to hospital. The majority of people would prefer not to die in a hospital and with good planning the care staff should help to ensure this happens.

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Reaching the end of life 59 Care staff should assess your parent and be familiar with their specific wishes. Each organisation should have its own end of life care policy, ask your parent’s care provider of their policy and training on

the subject. End of life should be a sympathetic time and care staff, whilst being professional, will also be sympathetic and understanding of the situation and the emotions surrounding it.

The Liverpool Care Pathway According to the Information Leaflet for Liverpool Care Pathway, the dying process is unique to each person but in most cases a plan of care can be put in place to support the patient, doctors, nurses and relatives to achieve the best quality of care at the end of life. The Liverpool Care Pathway is a pathway/ document that outlines the best care, irrespective of your parent’s diagnosis or whether they are dying at home, in hospital, in a hospice or a care home. Ask the doctors or nurses caring for your parent for the Information Leaflet for Liverpool Care Pathway to understand more about medical treatment, food and drink, religious and spiritual needs and arrange to speak to one of your parent’s medical professionals about any other aspects of the process that you would like to know more about. The Liverpool Care Pathway has recently

been criticised in the national press, with people questioning whether it is being applied properly. As a result the Department of Health has called for a review of the pathway which will make recommendations about what, if any, changes are needed to improve care, to ensure that patients are always treated with dignity and that, wherever possible, they are involved in decisions about their care, and that carers and families are always involved in the decision-making process. The results of the review are expected in summer 2013.

‘A good understanding of someone’s wishes can help to avoid unnecessary admission to hospital.’

Palliative care Palliative care (from the Latin ‘palliare’: to cloak) focuses on the relief of pain and other symptoms and problems experienced in serious illness. The goal of palliative care is to improve quality of life, by increasing comfort, promoting dignity and providing a support system to the person who is ill and those close to them. Palliative care is appropriate for anyone of any age who is facing serious illness. It can be delivered alongside active treatments designed to try to prolong life at an early point in the disease process. It is also applicable at the end of life and

into bereavement. Palliative care neither hastens nor prolongs death. It celebrates life, even when time is limited. It regards dying as a normal process. Palliative care can be delivered in any care setting, including home, care homes, hospitals and hospices. Hospices provide palliative care services at home, in day care centres or hospice inpatient units. Most people who have inpatient hospice care return home once their problems or needs for care support are addressed.

Team delivery In palliative care, decisions about treatment and care are made with the help of the members of a multidisciplinary team and in line with your parent’s personal goals and preferences. Team members

usually include doctors, nurses and social workers. Occupational or physiotherapists, chaplains, pharmacists, nutritionists and others might also form part of the team.

Practical help There are a range of organisations that can help you and your parent to plan the support and care they need towards the end of life, advise on writing wills and advance care plans, and provide advice on the

emotional issues surrounding dying. Dying Matters www.dyingmatters.org and the NHS Choices websites are a useful starting points http://www. nhs.uk/Planners/end-of-life-care.

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60 Advice for funding care

Advice for funding care Advice for funding care in a care home

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When it comes to funding care it can feel very confusing, finding out whether your parent is eligible for any local authority support can be a starting point. But anything the local authority may contribute towards their care will depend on their financial situation and level of need. The rough rule of thumb is whether they have more than £23,250 in capital and savings.

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38 E The local authority may contribute financially If your parent’s capital is less than £14,250 9 2 0 7 7 and the provider you choose charges fees towards care costs after they have carried out an assessment of care needs.What sup that are within the local authority’s funding ort your parent’s contribution will be is right prate, f o How much? y parentr m assessed only on their income. Normally all ? their income would be taken towards the CApay, To work out how much they may RE your H E 0 8 0 0 3 to L P L fees parent will need a care needs assessment I N E except £23.50 they are allowed to keep 8 92 0 7 7 back as a personal expenses allowance. The define their care needs and how they will be income of their spouse or partner is ignored best met. as is the value of any savings held in their The local authority will also undertake name. a financial assessment of your parent to CARE With capital between determine how much your parent may have H E L Pand 0 8 0 0£14,250 LINE 38 9 £23,250 your parent will also be to 2 expected to pay and how much the local authority 077 may have to pay. Any choice of care provider contribute £1 per week for every £250 they have above £14,250. will be limited to those that accept the local Local authorities now offer cash payments CARE authority’s funding level. More expensive 0800 care homes will expect you to arrange a third in the form of personal budgets to pay for any care and support needs in your own party payment to ‘top-up’ the difference. home. For more information on this see Your parent is not permitted to pay this page 65. themselves if their capital is below £23,250.

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help when considering care providers and whether they are able to meet these needs. Your parent is then able to choose the care that meets their needs from the provider that they wish.

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Advice for funding care 61

Help when self-funding care home fees Moving a close relative into a care home can be a very difficult and emotional time for all involved. As though that’s not enough, if they are funding their care, then there is the added worry of it being affordable over the long-term and their money running out. Around 45% of care home residents are selffunding but despite this, little is on offer in the way of information and advice. In fact, a report commissioned by the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services cited that those who approached their local council for help, because of their financial status, received little information or advice and were often simply given a list of care homes and left to find their own way. For this reason

Care Select has an independent advice line (0800 389 2077) in association with FirstStop Advice offering you help at this difficult time. The decision to move into a care home is often taken at a time of crisis and most people aren’t prepared for what to expect or aware of what help and support is available, particularly if they are self-funding their care. Consequently, some older people can find themselves in very precarious situations as well as missing out on help and financial support that could be available to them. Below are a number of useful pointers that can help you navigate this journey although it is always worth picking up the phone to seek advice about your relative’s own personal circumstances.

‘What is important is that the fees of the home your parent is choosing are going to be affordable over the long-term.’ Care home fees explained The cost of care homes can vary tremendously depending on the type of care needed, the location of the care home or, as with hotels, the degree of luxury chosen. Regardless of the care home you should be given a contract which both the care home and you or your parent signs. This contract and the care home’s ‘terms and conditions’ should clearly set out what is included in the fees, what might cost extra and when the fees are due for payment. It should also explain situations like what happens if your parent’s care needs change, or they needed to go into hospital, what notice periods are required and how long fees remain payable after a resident has passed away. What is important is that the fees of the home your parent is choosing are going to be affordable over the long-term. If there is any chance of their money running out and they had to fall back on

local authority funding, you should discuss this with the care home operator and the local social services department to see what the consequences are likely to be. Most care homes charge more than the local authorities normally pay for care home places. It may be that if your parent were to find themselves in this position, the care home would continue to accommodate them at the lower local authority rate or, more likely, they would require a third party to top-up the fees. Your parent would not be allowed to do this from their remaining capital; it has to be a third party. Failing this, it could end up with your parent having to move to cheaper accommodation which could be detrimental to their health and well-being. This is why it is so important to plan your parent’s finances at the outset.

What you can expect from the local council An assessment of needs Even if your parent is self-funding their care it’s important they have an assessment of their care needs from their local social services department. All people self-funding their care are entitled to an assessment of their care needs which should always precede any financial assessment. Why is this important? Because, without being assessed

as needing a place in a care home they could miss out on some financial support from the council or the opportunity to be considered for fully-funded NHS Continuing Care. Also, if they were to choose a care home that doesn’t match their assessed needs the local authority may insist on them moving care homes if, in the future, their money ran out and they had to rely on state funding.

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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If your parent is assessed as needing to move into a care home permanently and their capital, apart from their property, is less than £23,250 (as stated overleaf) the council may assist with the funding for the first 12 weeks if they don’t have enough Whdirectly income to meet the cost. Speak the at supwith p o i s rt local authority regarding this. right

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What you can expect from the NHS NHS Nursing Care Contribution If the care home provides nursing care your parent should be entitled to a NHS Nursing Care Contribution towards the fees. This is currently £109.79 per week paid by the PCT direct to the care home. Fully-funded NHS Continuing Care When assessed your parent will be screened to ascertain if they are entitled to NHS Continuing Care funding which could meet the full cost of their care. To be eligible, their care needs would have to be primarily health care needs. It is

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Section 117 Aftercare

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If your parent has a mental health condition and was admitted to hospital under Section 3 of the Mental Health Act 1983 for assessment and treatment, their care home fees could be fullyfunded under what is called Section 117 aftercare. This is provided by, or jointly with, the local authority.

Will I need to sell the family home? Not necessarily. If the family home is not disregarded as capital in the means test for care there are options if your parent doesn’t wish to sell it. You could let it for them whilst at the same time taking advantage of the local authority’s deferred payments scheme (see above) if it is available. Depending on how much financial support you will be able to obtain from them and the level of rent you can expect to achieve this may enable you to meet the care costs whilst also deferring the sale of the property. There are, however, some things you should bear in mind. A loan from the local authority will have to be repaid at some stage and, although whilst your parent is alive it is currently interest free, interest

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will begin to be applied 56 days after they die and it could be at quite a high rate set by the local authority. You would need to consider whether the property is suitable for letting and whether you could manage it or if your parent can afford to employ a letting agency. The rental income would be taxable. You must be prepared for gaps in rental periods if the tenant fails to pay up or leaves. Would you be able to meet the shortfall in income needed in this situation? Letting the property could also adversely affect any entitlement to Pension Credit because it would then be treated as capital by the Benefits Agency.

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Advice for funding care 63

Will I still get an inheritance? This brings into play two conflicting emotions, from feeling on the one hand that you want the best possible care money can buy for your parent and on the other you see the inheritance you were expecting diminishing very quickly. How much you might inherit is impossible to answer; it depends entirely on how much capital your parent has, the level of care fees they are paying and for how long. The very least you could expect might be the remaining capital if your parent’s money were to

‘How much you might inherit is impossible to answer.’ deplete to the capital threshold at which the local authority might begin assisting with the funding, this is currently £23,250. If your parent is nearing that figure then you should contact the local authority to seek their assistance.

Seeking financial advice on paying for care Should you choose to sell the property to meet your parent’s care costs you will have the capital available but not knowing how long care might be needed can still be extremely worrying. Despite this many people fail to seek financial advice to understand how best to meet the costs. As interest rates remain low, money held on deposit and used for care fees can be depleted very quickly. It would be sensible, therefore, to consider other forms of investments that could potentially deliver higher returns. There is only one financial product specifically designed to meet long-term care costs, these are called ‘Immediate Need Care Fee Payment Plans’. Offered by some insurance companies they are purchased from capital to deliver the required income. Depending on your parent’s age, life expectancy and circumstances, a mixture of low risk investments may also be worth considering, particularly if they have underlying capital guarantees on death. Care fee payment plans, if appropriate, can deliver the certainty of a regular increasing income over the possible long-term and might only require part of your parent’s capital. The income, if paid direct to the care home, is tax-free. The price of these plans is based on the insurance company’s actuarial interpretation of life expectancy from a medical report, provided by your parent’s GP or the care home, their age and the amount of income required. The more impaired the life, the cheaper the cost. Capital protection can be purchased for extra cost, failing this; you must consider the possible short-term loss of capital against the peace-of-mind factor and longer-term benefits in the event of a lengthy stay in the care home. There is no charge for the medical report so there is usually no cost in considering this route as an option.

What benefits are available? Attendance Allowance - A non-taxable, non-means tested benefit payable to those aged 65 and over who need care whether at home or in a care home. It is paid at a lower rate of £51.85 if care is needed by day or night or at a higher rate of £77.45 per week if needed by day and night. Contact the Benefit Enquiry Line for more information on eligibility and how to claim. Tel: 0800 88 22 00, Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm Pension Credit – Pension Credit is an income-related benefit. It has two parts - Guarantee Credit and Savings Credit. Guarantee Credit tops up weekly income whereas Savings Credit is an extra payment for people who

have saved some money towards their retirement. You don’t pay tax on Pension Credit. If your relative receives Pension Credit and qualifies for Attendance Allowance they will also be entitled to the Severe Disability Addition currently £58.20 per week. Their property, if on the market, is disregarded capital for Pension Credit purpose Winter Fuel Payment – The Winter Fuel Payment is a tax-free, automatic payment for anyone born on or before 5th July 1951 to help pay their heating bills. It is between £100 and £300 and is usually sent out automatically between November and December.

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64 Advice for funding care

Ruby’s Care Funding Ruby, 85 years old, assessed as needing care on a nursing home following a stroke, had £20,000 savings and a property worth £275,000. She had pensions of £625 per month. The nursing home she and her family chose cost £3,250 per month. A care fees adviser helped Ruby claim Attendance Allowance and told her about the NHS Nursing Care Contribution. Together these contributed just over £800 a month but even so, allowing £150 spending money, she needed another £1,975 each month to cover the fees. It was decided to sell her house rather than let it out. This could take a little while but, because she was assessed as needing permanent care and her other capital was below £23,250, the council assisted with funding for the first 12 weeks. After 12 weeks Ruby could continue to receive funding but as an interest free loan through a ‘Deferred Payments Agreement’ with the council. Her adviser showed Ruby and her daughter three options for meeting her care costs from her property proceeds. Option 1: Leaving the money on deposit, but with low interest rates, it showed it would quickly deplete. Option 2: Retaining

some of the capital to meet the care home fees in the short-term and investing the balance of the proceeds into low risk investments which could be drawn upon monthly over the longer-term. Although offering the potential of higher returns than might be achieved on deposit, it carried the risk that the investments can also go down. Option 3: Using some of her capital for a ‘Care Fees Payment Plan’ and investing the remainder. This provided the certainty of a regular increasing income for the rest of her life and potentially left some money for her family. The downside was, without a capital guarantee, once purchased the money used would be lost to her Estate. The house sold and they chose option 3 for peace of mind. Ruby enjoyed her new home for several years and she and her daughter had the reassurance that she would always be financially secure. This is a fictional case study. Ruby chose the Care Plan and benefitted from the income for several years however, although people can live for many years whilst receiving good quality care, longevity is an unknown factor that must be considered.

‘A care fees adviser helped Ruby claim Attendance Allowance and told her about the NHS Nursing Care Contribution.’

Paying for care and support at home The cost of home care will vary depending on where your parent lives and it could be anything from £10 per hour to £18 or £20 per hour. On average across the UK the cost is around £15 per hour. Your parent’s council will set the amount it charges for services it provides to people who are

eligible and this may depend on the amount it has negotiated and contracted to pay home care agencies. The price will also vary on the level of care your parent needs and when they need it. Care at night time and at the weekend is likely to cost more.

Paying for home care privately If your parent doesn’t qualify for local council support it may be necessary to purchase the care they need privately through home care agencies, all of which have to be registered with the relevant social care registration authority who also inspect them to ensure the care they are delivering is up to the prescribed minimum standards.

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The cost of employing a home care agency will depend on where your parent lives and the care they need. Details of local agencies can be obtained from your local social services department, in England from the Care Quality Commission www. cqc.org.uk or the United Kingdom Home Care Association (UKHCA) www.ukhca.co.uk.

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Advice for funding care 65 Many councils produce directories of care services in their area. Care Choices Limited, the publisher of Care Select, is the largest publisher of care directories in England. Visit the website at www.carechoices.co.uk to search for care in the region in which you are looking. You can also view e-versions of directories or request a hard copy.

Care and support at home from the local authority A national framework called ‘Fairer Charging Policies for Home Care and Other Non-Residential Social Services’ provides guidance to local authorities on how to work out charges for home care provided or arranged by them. Applying this, each local authority should publish and make available clear information about charges and how they are assessed. This should be at the time your parent’s needs assessment is carried out and, after the means test, written information should be provided detailing how any charges are worked out and payable. In principle, the fairer charging policy instructs councils to allow people to retain a minimum amount of money for their own personal use, rather than all of it being used up paying for care. This amount should be is set as a 25% buffer above the basic levels of the guaranteed credit of Pension Credit. For example, if Pension Credit was £140 per week, 125% of that would be £175 and be the amount ignored in calculating the income assessible when charging for care. However, in most areas if you have capital or savings in excess of the means

test limit which in the 2012/2013 period is £23,250, you can be charged the full cost of your care. These are the minimum capital limits provided in the fairer charging guidance although a few councils exercise their discretion by increasing the capital limits or might set a maximum level of charges people should be asked to pay. The value of your parent’s home is not taken into account in the means test for home care and, if only one member of a couple requires care, the means test should only take into account the resources of that person. Any joint accounts are treated as divided equally between the partners. Local councils may charge differently depending on the services being used. For example, meals at home or in day care may be charged at a flat rate to all users, without applying a means test because they are regarded as a substitute for ordinary living costs that you might be expected to incur anyway. There is no set national guidance for how services should be charged for, but normally it would be based on the hours of service provided. Whatever method is used it must be deemed to be reasonable.

Self-Directed Support

A Personal Budget can be received in various ways:

If the local authority is contributing towards or arranging your parent’s care then they will most certainly use a system called Self-Directed Support. Self-Directed Support puts people in control of the support they need to live the life they choose.

• A Direct Payment (DP) – the local authority pays your parent an amount of money. The money can then be spent on solutions and services of your parent’s choice to meet their eligible social care needs, and they are in control of this money;

Personal Budgets

• An Indirect Payment (IP) – this is made available if your parent is not able to consent to a Direct Payment, but where a Direct Payment is deemed to be in their best interest. It can be paid to a person who is ‘suitable’ on your parent’s behalf. There are rules and guidance to help the council decide who is a ‘suitable person’;

If your parent is eligible for social care support, Self-Directed Support gives them a Personal Budget based on an assessment of their eligible social care needs. They may need support or help to manage day-to-day activities and everyday tasks such as washing and dressing, help with eating and drinking or getting out into the community. They can then choose what social care and support services this money is spent on. They can be as creative as they want, as long as the money is spent to meet their needs.

• individual Service Funds – your Personal Budget, or some of it, can be lodged with a service provider for your parent to draw from to get support as and when needed; or • The local authority arranges and pays for the support.

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66 Advice for funding care

Direct Payments Direct Payments are financial payments made to people who have been assessed as eligible to receive support from the council. They can make a Direct Payment to most people who need support, including: •

People who have been assessed as needing community care services (including those with Mental Health needs) aged 16 and over, incorporating short as well as longer term needs;

• carers over 16 for carers’ services; and

• parents of disabled children, for children’s services. Instead of the council arranging or providing services directly, your parent can use these payments, either by themselves or with assistance, to purchase support that they consider most appropriate to meet their assessed social care needs. Also, carers may be able to receive Direct Payments to help in their caring role or to have some time for themself.

‘Direct Payments are financial payments made to people who have been assessed as eligible to receive support from the council.’

Why have a Direct Payment

Direct Payments allow more control over the decisions that affect your parent’s life. They provide more flexibility and choice, as your parent can buy appropriate support tailored to their individual needs. Another option is for the council to source a

portion of the care/support needs through services commissioned directly by them and also provide a Direct Payment to arrange those remaining services that your parent wishes to have more control over.

What can Direct Payments be used for? If your parent receives a Direct Payment, the money is used to arrange support to meet eligible needs. They may choose to employ someone directly, to buy services from an independent or voluntary sector provider or purchase equipment to help live more independently. With Direct Payments, people or agencies employed are accountable to your parent and not to the local authority. Therefore, Direct Payments enable more control, choice and flexibility over how your parent plans their support to fit with their life. It is important that their plans meet their assessed needs. Therefore, provided the money is used lawfully, and eligible needs are met, the flexibility

that these payments allow means it is impracticable to outline what the money can be spent on. However, there are certain items on which these payments cannot be spent, for instance: • on services that should be provided by Health; and • on routine living expenditures: utility and household bills for instance. Most Direct Payments are made to meet regular on-going support needs; however they can also be made as a single payment, for example, to purchase equipment or a short respite break.

Care fees advisers Before deciding on what may be the most appropriate solution for meeting care costs it would be sensible to talk to a specialist care fees adviser who has CF8, the relevant qualification financial advisers must have for advising on funding longterm care. The Care Select helpline, in association with FirstStop can refer you to a member of The Society of Later Life Advisers (SOLLA). SOLLA

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accredited advisers specialise in the financial needs of older people. You can contact the Care Select helpline by calling 0800 389 20 77, emailing info@firststopadvice.org.uk with your name, address and contact details or completing the online form at www.firststopadvice.org.uk. Philip Spiers, FirstStop Advice

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Carers 67

Carers Caring for a loved one can have a significant impact on the life of the carer. Whether it is you, your sibling or your other parent, carers need support to enable them to continue caring. Caring is different for every person and is as different as the people being cared for. No two caring roles are the same. This can make it difficult for people, including other family members or employers, to understand what you do and how you cope. Sometimes a caring role can be thrust upon you, other times it may steadily increase without you noticing. You might start off popping in on your way home to check your parent is ok, then it might be morning and evening, or at lunchtime if you live or work close by.

Support for carers The more you care, the more support you need. Caring can have a real impact on your life, it can be tiring, frustrating and can raise a mix of emotions. Some people feel obligated to care for their parents as their parents cared for them. Others find it comes naturally. Being thrust into the role of carer whether willingly or reluctantly can change your relationship with your parent. You may find yourself doing things to support them that you never imagined having to do. This can take some adjustment. Whatever your situation, if you or a relative are caring for someone, receiving support can make a real difference. Asking for help can be difficult but there are a number of organisations who can offer support. Support could be: •

Aids and adaptations to the home, such as grab rail, hoists to help with moving the person if they’re immobile, devices to detect for gas and shut it off, to detect if someone gets out of bed or a chair, fall detectors, alarms if they exit

the property. These electronic devices are called telecare and more information can be found on page 24. •

Someone to come and alleviate your caring role, sit with your parent or take them out a few hours every now and then, or on a regular basis, to give you some time to yourself.

• Or a short or respite stay in a residential care home to enable you to take a longer break. • Support is also available at short notice in cases of emergencies.

‘Whatever your situation, if you or a relative are caring for someone, receiving support can make a real difference.’

Looking after you Looking after your health and well-being is essential to ensuring you are in a better position to care. If you undertake a large amount of care and it is impacting on you tell your GP. They may be able to point you towards local support networks or give you regular health checks to enable you to keep caring. Caring can bring stress, emotional strain and even physical pain from helping your parent get up

or move around. These things should not be taken lightly. By caring for your own well-being you will be in a better position to care for your parents’. There are many different services and support groups for carers. The Carers UK website www. carersuk.org has a wealth of information to help and support you in your caring role. It also has links to carers’ organisations in specific areas under its ‘Help & Advice’ tab, ‘Finding help where you live’.

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68 Carers

Get a carer’s assessment As an informal carer you are entitled to a carer’s assessment from the local authority; whether or not the person you care for receives services. A carer’s assessment will look at your caring role and how this impacts on your health and well-being; it will also consider how much caring you can do whilst still undertaking other activities you need to do, such as work or training, plus any help you may need. A carer’s assessment is just for you in your caring role and will not impact on any benefits either of you receive. To request a carer’s assessment

you need to contact your local social services department. It may be possible to fill out a selfassessment form online or have one sent through or you can have a chat with an assessor over the phone or face to face. Don’t play down the caring you do and the impact it has on your life. There is nothing wrong with asking for help and social services advise you of what help and support you may be able to receive. If you don’t want to contact your local social services, you can still get advice from one of your local carer support groups.

Benefits for carers As a carer you are entitled to claim benefits; the main benefit being the Carer’s Allowance. The current rate is £58.45 a week. It isn’t means-tested but any earnings may affect whether you are entitled to it. It is also taxable. To receive Carer’s Allowance you must: • Be 16 or over, • Not in full-time education, • Earn £100 a week or less, • Be a UK resident, • Look after someone who gets a qualifying disability benefit,

To claim, you can fill out an online form via the GOV.UK website www.gov.uk or by contacting: Carers Allowance Unit Tel: 0845 608 4321 Text phone: 0845 604 5312 Email: cau.customer-services@dwp.gsi.gov.uk Or for all other benefit enquiries: Benefit Enquiry Line Tel: 0800 822 200, Text phone: 0800 243 355 Email: BEL-Customer-Services@dwp.gsi.gov.uk

• Look after that person for at least 35 hours a week.

Working and caring If you also work, the Work and Families Act 2006 gives eligible carers the right to ask their employer for flexible working. Your employer has to consider the request seriously but can refuse if they have a good reason. Although there is a right to appeal. You also have the right to unpaid time off work in an emergency situation relating to the person you care for.

What if I can’t care anymore? If you feel that you can’t carry on caring anymore, don’t feel like you have let down your parent. You have given everything you can to caring for them and that is an incredible thing to do. If you feel that you are struggling, start looking at alternative options before it gets too much. It is better to make these decisions in your own time than in a time of crisis. Other options could include increased formal care in the home or in a care home. These options

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can raise a number of difficult emotions and you will need to broach it with anyone else involved in your situation including your parent, your partner and any siblings you may have. Everyone will have their own emotional response to this news and ideas on the next steps but whatever the outcome you should not feel pressured into carrying on or feel guilty about your decision. Contact social services to ask for an assessment of your parent’s needs. Even if they have been

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Carers 69

assessed before, if their condition has deteriorated or their needs have changed, a new assessment will help you with your decisions going forward. You may need to give your parent a lot of reassurance that your decision is based on what is best for the both of you and discuss alternative options together. If your parent doesn’t want to discuss it, you may need to look for temporary solutions until they come round, or speak to other people about the situation, including other carers or carer support groups. They may be able to give you some ideas for broaching the subject or someone else may be better placed to raise it with your parent.

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70 Legal issues surrounding needing care

Legal issues surrounding needing care Before moving into long-term care you must hold a thorough review of your relative’s legal affairs and make sure they are in order.

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Lasting Power of Attorney

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Legal issues surrounding needing care 71 almost impossible when faced with unhelpful bank staff who will protect them by parroting the data protection provisions if your parent is unable to deal with them directly, causing serious problems and delays. A properly drawn up and registered Property and Affairs LPA will avoid these problems. A Health and Welfare LPA lets your parent make it crystal clear how they wish to live and be looked after if they become ill or unable to look after themselves. An attorney has the legal authority to fight your parent’s corner and make sure that their instructions are followed. When combined with a Property and Affairs LPA you can make sure that the right care package is commissioned for your parent.

This could save money and property as well as giving you certainty about your parent’s future care. If your parent has strong feelings about lifesustaining treatment, a Health and Welfare LPA allows them to give an attorney authority to refuse such treatment on their behalf if they are only being kept alive by medical intervention. If your parent doesn’t make a LPA and they lose capacity you may have to make a lengthy and expensive Court application for a deputyship to obtain permission to look after their financial affairs. The Court is very unlikely to grant a deputyship concerning their welfare and these decisions will be made by social workers and doctors.

‘If someone dies without making a Will this can lead to anxiety and confusion to those left behind.’

Wills

Your parent’s situation and possibly their assets are cha nging when they enter long-term care. You should, therefore , encourage them to review their Will so that it is up to date and reflects their current wi shes and circumstances. Th is should be done every three years in any case and certai nly whenever there is any ma jor change in life. A properly drawn up Will can : • ensure a person’s assets pass to the people they want when they die; • protect assets against car e fees by ring-fencing assets for the next gene ration; • avoid disputes; • minimise Inheritance Tax ;

• appoint Guardians for an • provide for a partner if

y children under 18; and

they are not married. If someone dies without ma king a Will this can lead to anxiety and confusion to tho se left behind. The law en sures that spouses and children are provided for, where po ssi ble, from whatever money, pro perty and possessions a pe rso n leaves when they die, once any debts have been settle d. This can take time to sort out, during which loved on es may not be sure where they sta nd. If someone is not marrie d then the law views a partner as a friend and they may not receive any provision, leaving them in financial difficulties.

Your parent’s home If your parent has been living in their own home before entering long-term care they or you as their attorney will need to decide what is to happen to the property by assessing the options carefully and making sure that all legal protection is in place. Funding of residential care is a source of great anxiety for some people and a major concern is whether or not your relative will have to sell their home to pay for care and whether it is possible to avoid this. For more information on this see the paying for care chapter on page 70. Whatever the situation, Care Select’s helpline in association with FirstStop can put you in touch with a solicitor to deal with the legal matters you or your relative may need to attend to. Call 0800 389 2077 for more information Ed James, QualitySolicitors Truemans

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72 Transforming social care for the 21st Century

vision

Transforming social care for the 21st Century

values

The care sector is experiencing a period of rapid change designed to improve the action quality of care and support services. Demographic pressures created by increased life expectancy, rising consumer demands, on-going concerns about the quality of care provision and a prolonged period of financial austerity are pushing the reform of care and health services.

Government’s policies In the UK, the Government responded to these challenges by publishing a new social care White Paper Caring for our Future: reforming care and support in July 2012. Alongside the White Paper, a series of other important documents were published including a draft Care and Support Bill. This was a progress report on how the Government planned to respond to research on funding care (Dilnot Commission report), initial proposals for regulating the care market, and a response to a critical report from the Health Select Committee. A new legal framework was also set out giving local authorities a duty to promote a diverse, sustainable and high quality service that focuses on outcomes. The White Paper calls for reform of the care and support system arguing that the current system

doesn’t support people to remain independent or enable them to take control of their own lives. Prior to the White Paper there was broad cross-sector and political consensus on the challenges facing the care and support system: • The system too often only reacts as a result of a crisis. • Skills and talents in communities are not sufficiently used. • People don’t have access to good information and advice. • Access to care varies across the country. • Carers have no clear entitlements to support. • The quality of care varies greatly. • Joined-up health, care and support remain patchy.

Vision, values and action Caring for our Future set out (perhaps for the first time in an official government document) some significant steps to bringing together a vision of independence and well-being with principles that underpin practical ways to deliver quality care and support. The document introduced a series of ‘I’ statements to measure the extent to which our aspirations of quality are being implemented: ‘I am supported to maintain my independence as long as possible.’ ‘I understand how care and support works, and what my entitlements and responsibilities are.’ ‘I am happy with the quality of my care and support.’

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‘I know that the person giving me care and support will treat me with dignity and respect.’ ‘I am in control of my care and support.’ Arguably when we can all be confident that people who receive care and support say these things consistently, services will have been transformed. It means that commissioners, providers and regulators of care and support all need to change to adopt this. Quality is at the heart and the report goes on to describe what a high-quality service means. The White Paper contains some 23 actions and an ambitious timetable for implementation. Together they represent the most up-to-date account of current policy in social care.

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Advice for older people


Glebe House CARE HOME WITH NURSING The Glebe House is an excellent, independently run home of character and distinction offering both Residential and 24 hour Nursing Care of the highest quality. The Glebe House is home for up to 41 residents mainly in single rooms, tastefully decorated and comfortably furnished yet retaining much of the character you would expect from a late Georgian and Victorian house. The owners and staff of The Glebe House are committed to providing the highest levels of quality care in a warm, homely environment that respects the individual’s right to privacy, dignity and personal choice.

Tel: 01883 344 434 Church Lane, Chaldon Nr Caterham, Surrey CR3 5AL Email: info@glebe-house.com • www.glebe-house.com


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74 Transforming social care for the 21st Century

Practical proposals In April 2013, the Government plans to launch an information portal that will hold information on care providers and their services. The website will draw information from many sources and aims to be reliable, up-to-date and consistent. This is a major development and has tremendous potential for the future. Demand for information is growing but there is huge variability in what is currently available and questions remain about the quality, validity and authority of the information collected. It is essential that information about quality has a focus on outcomes for the person receiving care and draws on the different interests – people who receive services and their families, commissioners, regulators and providers – in order to capture feedback in the best way. The Care and Support Bill addresses recommendations for a new, simplified statute incorporating, among other things: • national minimum threshold for eligibility to services which will transfer if your parent moves to another council area;

• extend the right to an assessment to more carers and give carers a clear entitlement to support for their own well-being; and • people will have a legal entitlement to a personal budget. • Pilots will be developed to test the benefits of direct payments for people in residential care. •

The charging system for residential care will be changed from April 2013 so that the income people earn in employment is exempt from residential care charges.

• Councils will be given a new duty to promote diversity and quality in services. • Councils will be urged to rule out contracting by the minute in home care services. •

Legislation has been proposed to ensure that all agencies work together at a local level to prevent abuse, which effectively gives local Adult Safeguarding Boards a statutory status.

‘It is essential that information about quality has a focus on outcomes for the person receiving care and draws on the different interests in order to capture feedback in the best way.’ Improving leadership and the quality of care staff The Social Care Leadership Qualities Framework was published in November 2012, and a new Leadership Forum will be established by March 2013 to bring together leaders from all parts of the sector to help to lead the reforms. Dignity and respect will be at the heart of a new code of conduct and minimum training standards for care workers which will be published in 2013. There are plans to double the number of care apprenticeships as well as promote greater use of

the successful Care Ambassador scheme. There will be steps to strengthen the status of registered managers as leaders and champions for quality care and initial work has already begun. Good care providers recognise the responsibilities, reflected in the White Paper, and will have in place effective systems and procedures, training and support, as well as feedback and monitoring to ensure services continue to improve.

Search online for the right care

Publishers of Care Select

Care Choices has a comprehensive website of care, searchable by county, postcode or region. Whether you’re looking for care in the home, housing with care, a care home or nursing home, you can search online to find what’s available in your given location.

 Visit www.carechoices.co.uk and start your search today.

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Chapter heading 75

You’re unique. So are we. We believe that it’s through taking time to understand each individual, their likes and dislikes and their life stories that we can provide personal care with a real difference. We not only offer the highest standards of nursing, residential and dementia care, but a vibrant community where our residents can connect and enjoy their time together. It’s just one of the ways we help your loved one lead a better life. Carebase has a range of care homes across the South of England and East Anglia. To find out more information about any of our homes or to arrange a visit please call 0208 879 6567 or email info@carebase.org.uk

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further

Nursing, Residential & Dementia Care awww.carebase.org.uk ssistance with

Y u’re unique. So are we. y o u r s eYo arch for care


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76 Transforming social care for the 21st Century

The future funding of social care After repeated calls for a clear funding model for social care the Government has announced its plans to be implemented from 2017. Designed to protect people from high and unpredictable social care costs the reforms set out how people will be protected from limitless care bills. The package includes: •

A cap on costs at £75,000. Currently, no cap exists leaving many facing vast bills, with almost 1 in 5 older people facing care costs over £75,000. From 2017, the Government will pay for care costs incurred by individuals over this level.

• A new means-test threshold of £123,000. The Government will step in earlier to pay a proportion of residential care costs, with the

threshold more than quadrupled. In future, people will no longer need to be down to their last £23,250 before they get help – the help will start at £123,000.

Also from April 2015, the Government says no one will have to sell their home in their lifetime to pay for residential care, with those unable to afford the fees given the right to defer paying during their lifetime. Under the reforms, people will have an assessment carried out by their local authority. If they are assessed as having eligible care needs, the local authority will tell them how much it would cost for the local authority to meet those needs with local services. These costs will count towards the cap.

‘After repeated calls for a clear funding model for social care the Government has announced its plans to be implemented from 2017.’ It is a time of real change in the care and support sector. The Government has released a number of proposals and with a new funding model due to be implemented in 2017, it is time to see how the sector will change in the coming years. Des Kelly OBE, National Care Forum (NCF)

Looking

? t r o p p u s r o e r a for c

n ce and informatio vi ad T EN D EN EP port ides an IND A personalised re e advice line prov s. fre ht s k’ rig d oo an db g an in H This ation, fund using with g care, accommod in ss pa m co l care homes or ho al en e of ic ils ta serv de g in sing r customers provid ation about choo fo rm d fo te in ra ry ne ta ge en be m can ith supple eet their criteria w m at th es m he sc care . service to and funding care 7 will enable the 07 92 38 00 08 r taking ephone numbe looking for, while re u’ One call to the fre yo re ca of pe exactly what ty build a profile of rests. al needs and inte on rs pe ur yo t un into acco

7 7 0 2 9 8 3 0 0 8 0 Call

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ple

Advice for older peo

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Advice for older people


Where

Quality Comes

First

• Short breaks and long term stay • Day care and trial visits • Dementia care • Pet friendly • Daily activities and outings • Choice of everyday home cooked meals and snacks • 24/7 friendly and dedicated staff team • Wheelchair and lift access

Our philosophy is to encourage and support our residents in making choices, in being independent. Making the decision to move into one of our homes does not mean giving up independence. In our homes we create a relaxed and happy atmosphere and strive to provide a high quality of care to all of our residents. www.southwestcarehomes.co.uk enquiry@southwestcarehomes.co.uk To find a home near you or to request a brochure visit our website, email or call us FREE on

0800 324 7007

South West Care Homes

Perranporth (Cornwall), Plymouth, Plympton, Crediton, Exmouth, Newton Abbot, Torquay, Witheridge Nr Tiverton (Devon), Langport (Somerset), Portishead (North Somerset)

IA NT TRE E M N DE E CE EN! P R CA OW O N

Lincombe Manor Luxury Residential and Nursing Care Home

A luxurious care home, that offers you or a loved one unrivalled packages of affordable residential and nursing care services. Conveniently set within the beautiful and tranquil grounds of Lincombe Manor Retirement Village; this truly magnificent location enjoys breathtaking panoramic coastal views of Tor Bay, with views from your bedroom or our unique roof and garden terraces. For more information please call 01803 290300 Middle Lincombe Road, Torquay, TQ1 2AF www.manorlife.com

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78 Essential contacts

✆ ✆ ✆✆ ☎ ☎☎ ☎ ☎☎

Essential contacts ✆✆ Action on Elder Abuse (AEA)

Association of Charity Officers

☎☎☎

Helpline: 0808 808 8141

Tel: 0207 255 4480

Web: www.elderabuse.org.uk

Web: www.aco.uk.net

Works to protect, and prevent the abuse of, vulnerable older adults.

A national umbrella body for ‘benevolent charities’.

Age UK Advice line: 0800 169 6565 Web: www.ageuk.org.uk

Information on issues affecting older people and their carers. Alzheimer’s Society - National Dementia Helpline

Association of Independent Care Advisers (AICA) Tel: 01483 203066 Web: www.aica.org.uk

Represents member organisations around the country that help people decide on the best choice of care. Barchester Healthcare

Tel: 0300 222 11 22

Tel: 0208 242 6472

Web: www.alzheimers.org.uk

Web: www.barchester.com

Promotes its unique knowledge and understanding of dementia, develops quality in its care services, to support people with dementia, their families and their carers.

One of the UK’s largest quality healthcare providers, offers a range of care and specialist services tailored to meet each individual’s needs.

Amanda Waring

Web: www.bcdcareassociates.org

Web: www.amandawaring.com

A consultancy offering support to the social care sector – particularly focusing on care homes, their residents, managers and staff.

Actress, campaigner, film-maker and speaker championing dignity and person-centred care. Anchor Trust Tel: 0800 270 7061 Web: www.anchor.org.uk

BCD Care Associates

Care Quality Commission Tel: 03000 616 161 Web: www.cqc.org.uk

Independent and impartial advice on care options. Carers Trust

Tel: 0844 800 4361

Web: www.carers.org

The largest provider of comprehensive carers’ support services in the UK. Carers UK Tel: 0808 808 7777 Web: www.carersuk.org

Provides support to anyone who is a carer. DLF Tel: 0845 130 9177 Web: www.dlf.org.uk

A national charity that provides impartial advice, information and training on daily living aids. Also runs database of daily living equipment - DLF Data. Dying Matters Tel: 08000 21 44 66 Web: www.dyingmatters.org

Aims to change public knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards dying, death and bereavement. ECCA - English Community Care Association Tel: 08450 577 677

Anchor offers housing, care, accommodation and services to older people.

National organisation responsible for inspecting and regulating care services.

Ask SARA

Care Select Helpline

Web: www.asksara.org.uk

Tel: 0800 389 2071

Elderly Accommodation Counsel

Guided advice about daily living.

Web: www.carechoices.co.uk

Tel: 0207 820 1343

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Web: www.ecca.org.uk

The largest representative body for community care in England.

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Essential contacts 79

Web: www.housingcare.org

Helps people make decisions about where to live and any support or care they need. FirstStop Advice Care Advice Line: 0800 389 2077 Web: www.firststopadvice.org.uk

Advice and information on all aspects of care, accommodation, housing, finance and rights for older people. Friends of the Elderly Tel: 0207 730 8263 Web: www.fote.org.uk

Committed to enhancing the quality of life for older people by providing a range of high standard services. Gov.uk Web: www.gov.uk

New information portal for Government services and information. Housing Options for Older People Online Web: hoop.eac.org.uk

Online questionnaire to help consider the most suitable housing for your parent’s needs. Independent Age

NAPA - National Association for Providers of Activities for Older People Tel: 0207 078 9375 Web: www.napa-activities.co.uk

Works to create new opportunities for community involvement and activity in care settings. NCF - National Care Forum Tel: 024 7624 3619 Web: www.nationalcareforum. org.uk

Represents the interests of the not-for-profit care sector. National Care Association, The Tel: 0207 831 7090 Web: www. nationalcareassociation.org.uk

Lobbies the Government to benefit both its members and the people in their care.

Pension Service, The www.thepensionservice.gov.uk

Information on pensions, benefits and retirement. Relatives and Residents’ Association, The Advice Line: 0207 359 8136 Web: www.relres.org

Offers support and information to families, friends and relatives about issues affecting care homes. Society of Later Life Advisers Tel: 0845 303 2909 Web: www. societyoflaterlifeadvisers.co.uk

A not-for-profit organisation aiming to ensure that consumers are better informed about the financial issues of later life and can help you find an Accredited Adviser. Solicitors for the Elderly Tel: 0844 567 6173

National Council for Palliative Care (NCPC) Tel: 020 7697 1520 Web: www.ncpc.org.uk

Umbrella organisation for all those who are involved in providing, commissioning and using hospice and palliative care services in the UK.

Tel: 0845 262 1863

NHS Direct

www.independentage.org.uk

Tel: 0845 46 47

A charity providing life long support to older people on very low incomes.

Web: www.nhsdirect.nhs.uk

For health advice 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

www.solicitorsfortheelderly.com

A national association of solicitors, barristers and legal executives providing and promoting a range of legal services for older people. United Kingdom Homecare Association Tel: 0208 661 8188 Web: www.ukhca.co.uk

Promotes high standards of homecare and takes an active role in liaising with local and central government on all homecare and related issues.

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


Hengist Field Care Centre The Hengist Field Care Centre was opened in late 2011 in the village of Borden, near Sittingbourne, Kent. This is the new flagship home built by Nellsar Ltd, a family owned and managed independent company, with over 23 years of experience in the care sector and 10 existing homes across Kent. Nellsar is committed to achieving the highest standards of professional care and service for those in need of residential and nursing care in the community.

Excellent Facilities... The home boasts 75 single bedrooms of various sizes with en-suites. It has an on-site hair salon, a small cinema, sensory room, activity centre and an internet cafĂŠ and has been purpose built and designed to suit the needs of the residents. Hengist Field will also provide respite care, weekend and day breaks. Information... We accept prospective residents from social services and the private sector. The Hengist Field Centre operates an open door policy, making it flexible for visiting.The home opened in late 2011 and provides Nursing care and specialist Dementia care for the elderly. Please also call for information on respite, holidays and day care services

Please contact the manager on 01795 473880 for more information


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Region-by-region care homes 81

Region-by-region care homes North West

North East

Yorkshire and the Hunmber

East Midlands West Midlands East of England

London

South West South East

82

East Midlands

Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire and Nottinghamshire. 82

North East

County Durham, Northumberland and Tyne and Wear. 84

East of England

Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Norfolk, Peterborough and Suffolk.

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85

North West

Cheshire, Cumbria, Greater Manchester, Lancashire and Merseyside. 86

South East

Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, East Sussex, Hampshire (including the Isle of Wight), Kent, Oxfordshire, Surrey and West Sussex. 93

South West

Bristol, Cornwall, Devon, Dorset, Gloucestershire, Somerset and Wiltshire.

94

West Midlands

Herefordshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire, Warwickshire, West Midlands and Worcestershire. 95

London

All boroughs of London. 95

Yorkshire and The Humber

East Riding of Yorkshire, North Yorkshire, South Yorkshire and West Yorkshire.

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82 Region-by-region care homes

East Midlands Derbyshire

Codnor Park

88 Glass House Hill, Codnor, DE5 9QT

Codnor Park Care Home is a purpose built residential home with 40 fully furnished en-suite rooms. Facilities include a library, a craft room and 3 lounges including a garden lounge with French doors overlooking our well-maintained gardens. Our kitchen is well equipped and serves good home cooked meals with special diets catered for. The home is always busy organising various activities, trips out and fundraising events for everyone to enjoy. Recently there’s been a Swinging 60s day, plenty of art & craft sessions and a trip out to Ashmere’s very own heated swimming pool and spa with full facilities. Whether its day care, respite care or long term care you need, Codnor Park can meet your needs!

Tel: 01773 741111

www.ashmere.co.uk

care homes for loved ones

Smalley Hall

Main Road, Smalley, DE7 6DS

Smalley Hall Care Home is located on the outskirts of the attractive Smalley village. The building is full of character having once been the coach house to Smalley Hall, which stands separate to the home. With only 27 residents when full you can be sure that attention to detail at the home is second to none. There’s plenty to keep you busy in our brand new activity room, which was decorated by our residents, relatives and staff. Our lovely manager also brings her dog to work to keep everyone entertained. Whether its day care, respite care or long term care, Smalley Hall can meet your needs. Why not come and see for yourself? Come and join the family!

Tel: 01332 882848

www.ashmere.co.uk

care homes for loved ones

Valley Lodge

Bakewell Road, Matlock, DE4 3BN

Valley Lodge Nursing Home is set within the stunning countryside, a mile away from Matlock town centre, with panoramic views of the River Derwent and the High Peak Railway with its historic steam engines. Our purpose built home offers residential, nursing and dementia care within an environment that offers quality care for all our residents. We have three lounges, a craft room, an onsite hairdressing salon, as well as an Extra Care Unit known as Valley Views, designed with dementia in mind and offering round the clock care. With all three levels of care catered for, there may be no need to move again, easing any worries for the future. This means you can really settle in and feel at home, safe and cared for.

Tel: 01629 583447

www.ashmere.co.uk

care homes for loved ones

sidents.

Far Fillimore

NigHtiNgale Court

llbeing onforts

Home away from home

Offers a sense of togetherness

Premier nursing home

• Accommodation for 26 residents • For elderly people and people with Dementia • 2 double rooms for couple sharing • Group activities • Long and short term respite care • Palliative care • Large landscaped gardens • Local GP visits

• Accommodation for 43 residents • For elderly people and people with Dementia • Long and short term respite care • Palliative care • Regular group activities • Sensory gardens • Sensory room • Local GP visits

• Accommodation for 40 residents • Specialise in palliative care with unrestricted visits • Regular group activities and entertainment • Within walking distance of shops and post office • Local GP visits • On-site nurse

Wood Lane, Hanbury, Burton-on-Trent DE13 8TG Telephone: 01283 812 180 Email: farfillimorehome@aol.com Web: www.farfillimore.co.uk

11/14 Comberton Road, Kidderminster DY10 1UA Telephone: 01562 824 980

149 Stenson Road, Littleover, Derby DE23 1JJ Telephone: 01332 760 140 Email: littleovernh@aol.com Web: www.littleovernursinghome.co.uk

dents

Care Home

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Care Home

Email: nightingalecourt@btconnect.com

littleover NursiNg Home

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Region-by-region care homes 83

Tynefield Nursing Home

The Troc Care Home

Tel: 01283 732030

Tel: 01636 671342

Tynefield Court & Mews, Eggington Road, Etwall, Derby DE65 6NQ

256 Beacon Hill Road, Newark NG24 2JP

www.thetroc.co.uk

www.tynefieldcare.com

• Registered for 32 residents / 7 ensuite rooms. • Relaxed and happy atmosphere. • Large garden with patio area.

• Registered for 40 residents • Providing nursing care and care for the elderly and young physical disabilities.

Please see our main ad on the inside back cover for more info.

Please see our main ad on the inside back cover for more info.

Nottinghamshire

M

ANSFIELD

• Highest Quality nursing, residential & dementia (EMI) Care

Tel: 01623 631163 Email: info@mansfieldmanor.co.uk Web: www.mansfieldmanor.co.uk

M M

• Achieved high quality care rating by Social Services & CQC

DUAL REGISTERED CARE HOME

ANOR

• Highly trained staff with Registered General Nurse as manager

• Excellent selection of home cooked meals & family atmosphere

We warmly welcome visitors to come and enjoy a cup of tea or coffee with our staff and residents at any time

30-32 Chesterfield Road South, Mansfield NG19 7AD

Sutton Court Care Home

Sherwood Healthcare

Priestsic Road, Sutton in Ashfield NG17 2AH

Sutton Court Care Home is situated only a few minutes walk from Sutton in Ashfield town centre and has well maintained gardens with a beautiful enclosed inner courtyard. Our purpose built home is furnished to a high standard, with several communal lounges. There is a residents’ kitchen where tea or coffee is provided at any time and meals are catered for by qualified cooks. We have a 12 bedded extra-care unit with specially trained staff which is registered to care for residents with various types of dementia. The home also offers a hydro-therapy pool and our manager and deputy manager both hold NVQ level 4 registered Managers Awards.

Tel: 01623 443003

www.ashmere.co.uk

care homes for loved ones

Northamptonshire

2012 Northamptonshire Business Excellence’s Best Customer Service Award Northamptonshire County Council

2006 & 2007 Northamptonshire County Council’s 4 Roses Award

   

Grangefield Care Home 60 Northampton Road Earls Barton, Northampton, NN6 0HE

 Small & stylish Edwardian care home  Renowned across the county  Also offers Homecare Service to help elderly clients continue living at home

Care Home: 01604 812 580 Homecare: 01604 810 137 www.grangefieldcare.co.uk 

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84 Region-by-region care homes

East of England Bedfordshire

Norfolk

The Willows Care Home 73 Shakespeare Road, Bedford, MK40 2DW

Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

• Excellence in person-centred 24-hour residential, nursing & dementia care • Experienced and helpful staff • Engaging in a variety of activities that enhance life’s experiences

• Residential Care • Dementia Care • Respite Care • Day Care

Hethersett Hall Care Home Norwich Road, Hethersett, Norwich, Norfolk, NR9 3AP

For more information please contact the Home Manager on 01234 268270 or e-mail: willows.manager@kingsleyhealthcare.co.uk

Tel: 01603 294 650 | www.barchester.com

Essex

You’re unique. So are we.

Colne House Care Home Station Road, Earls Colne, Colchester, Essex CO6 2LT

At Honey Lane Care Home we believe that it’s through taking time to understand each individual, their likes and dislikes and their life stories that we can provide personal care with a real difference.

Specialist Dementia Care Honey Lane, Waltham Abbey Essex, EN9 3BA

For more information or to arrange a visit please call: 01992 800 138 or email: HoneylaneGM@carebase.org.uk www.honeylanecarehome.co.uk

• Excellence in person-centred 24-hour residential, nursing & dementia care • Experienced and helpful staff • Engaging in a variety of activities that enhance life’s experiences For more information please contact the Home Manager on 01787 222227 or e-mail: colne.manager@kingsleyhealthcare.co.uk

Hertfordshire

Margaret House

Tel:

01763 848272

www.margarethousecare.co.uk

The home is owned and run by the Kelly family for over 40 years and is managed by Ms Margaret James (formerly Mrs Guzman) for the past 15 years. It is situated in 2 acres of landscaped gardens in the picturesque village of Barley. We have always sought the highest standards while providing a caring and homely environment for our client’s. • Respite and holiday stays welcome. • Special diets catered for, with emphasis on traditional English cooking. • 5 Star excellent food hygiene rating awarded by North Herts. District Council. • Prices are inclusive of newspapers, chiropody and hairdresser • Single, single en-suite and unique studio rooms available. • Lift to all floors.

Church End, Barley, Near Royston, Hertfordshire SG8 8JS

Green Trees Care Home

Tel: 020 8449 6381

A small family owned & run home specialising in the care of the very frail elderly and those suffering memory loss.

• Fees include hairdressing, chiropody, toiletries & more • Qualified / experienced staff • Spa bath • All dietary needs catered for

21 Crescent East, Hadley Wood, Barnet EN4 0EY www.greentreescarehome.co.uk

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Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

• Nursing Care • Residential Care • Respite Care • Day Care

Bushey House Beaumont Care Home High Street, Bushey, Hertfordshire, WD23 1QN

Tel: 020 8185 7780 | www.barchester.com

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Region-by-region care homes 85

Suffolk Allonsfield House

Lilac Lodge & Lavender Cottage

Tel: 01728 747095

Tel: 01502 581920

The Depperhaugh

Spring Lodge

Chickering Road, Hoxne, Suffolk IP21 5BX Email: depperhaugh.manager@kingsleyhealthcare.co.uk

Main Road, Woolverstone, Suffolk, IP9 1AX Email: spring.manager@kingsleyhealthcare.co.uk

Tel: 01379 384236

Tel: 01473 780791

Kirkley Manor

Yaxley House

Tel: 01502 573054

Tel: 01379 783230

Campsea Ashe, Woodbridge, Suffolk, IP13 0PX Email: allonsfield.manager@kingsleyhealthcare.co.uk

• Excellence in person-centred 24-hour residential, nursing & dementia care • Experienced and helpful staff • Engaging in a variety of activities that enhance life’s experiences

3 Kirkley Park Road, Lowestoft , Suffolk, NR33 0LQ Email: kirkley.manager@kingsleyhealthcare.co.uk

North West Care select small Lauren.pdf

Cheshire

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07/01/2013

11 Gorleston Road, Oulton Broad, Suffolk, NR32 3AA Email: lilac.manager@kingsleyhealthcare.co.uk

Church Lane, Eye, Suffolk, Suffolk IP23 8BU Email: yaxley.manager@kingsleyhealthcare.co.uk

16:14

50-bed luxury care home with nursing, residential and dementia care.

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The Westbourne Care Home

M

Cricketers Way, Holmes Chapel, Cheshire CW4 7EZ Tel: 01477 535604 Email: westbourne@mmcg.co.uk

Y

CM

Visit us anytime or call today for your free information pack.

MY

CY

CMY

0113 238 2690 www.mmcg.co.uk

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Cherryfield House

Timperley Care Home 53D, Mainwood Road, Timperley, Cheshire WA15 7JU Email: timperley.manager@kingsleyhealthcare.co.uk

Tel: 01619 808001 Petersburg Road, Stockport, Cheshire, SK3 9QZ. T: 0161 474 1787 F: 0161 474 1787 Cherryfield.house@swanvale.com

Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

• Nursing Care • Residential Care • Respite Care

Prestbury Beaumont Care Community Collar House Drive, Prestbury, Cheshire, SK10 4AP

Tel: 01625 242 265 | www.barchester.com

Park Lane Care Home 7-9 Park Lane, Congleton, Cheshire CW12 3DN Email: parklane.manager@kingsleyhealthcare.co.uk

Tel: 01260 290022

Greater Manchester

Plane Tree Court

11/13 St Lesmo Road, Edgeley, Stockport, SK3 0TX. T: 0161 480 6919 F: 0161 286 3175 Planetree.court@swanvale.com

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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86 Region-by-region care homes

South East Berkshire Applegarth Care Home

The best care is on your doorstep

• Short/Long term & respite care • Promoting physical, mental & social well being for the elderly • 19 beds, all en-suite • Nutritious & varied menu • Regular visits from hairdresser, chiropodist & full social activities programme • An experienced manager and dedicated care staff • Care Quality Commission Tel: 01628 663287 Fax: 01628 663987 Compliant & holders of Email: applegarth.care@btconnect.com Investors in People Award. 24 Huntercombe Lane North, Taplow, Maidenhead SL6 0LG

At Larkland House we ensure that every resident feels listened to, involved and, above all, cared for in the way that’s right for them. Visit us or call today

0333 321 0937 Larkland House, London Road, Ascot, Berkshire,SL5 7EG careuk.com/larkland-house

Northcourt Lodge Nursing Care Home

Wild Acres Rest Home

• Short/Long term & respite nursing care for the elderly, physically disabled, dementia sufferers, terminally ill & EMI. • 22 beds, mostly en-suite • Nutritious & varied menu • Regular visits from hairdresser, chiropodist & full social activities programme • An experienced manager and dedicated RGN’s & care staff • Care Quality Commission Compliant & holders of Investors in People Award.

• Short/Long term & respite care • Promoting physical, mental & social well being for the elderly • 26 beds, mostly en-suite • Nutritious & varied menu • Regular visits from hairdresser, chiropodist & full social activities programme • An experienced manager and dedicated care staff • Care Quality Commission Compliant & holders of Investors in People Award.

Tel: 0118 987 5062 Fax: 0118 975 5007 Email: revathy.northcourt@btconnect.com 65 Northcourt Avenue, Reading RG2 7HF

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A home you will love. Care you will appreciate. ✓ Unsurpassed levels of care

B ecketH ouse N ursing H ome

✓ High quality, home-like surroundings ✓ A refreshing, positive approach ✓ Dedicated Alzheimer’s and dementia care available Avondale Care Home Gatehouse Road, Aylesbury HP19 8EH Tel: 01296 438032 www.porthaven.co.uk

Tel: 0118 973 3670 Fax: 0118 973 4581 Email: wildacres@btconnect.com

The home is situated in the prestigious village of Loughton (recently refurbished). • Long and short stay • Respite and convalescence • Local GP service • Varied menus and special diets • Personal laundry service • Regular activities and outings • Visiting clergy • No restrictions on visiting • Visiting hairdresser & chiropodist.

Tel: 01908 231981 Email: info@beckethouse-carehome.co.uk Web: www.beckethouse-carehome.co.uk You’ll like us!

Pitcher Lane, Loughton, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire MK5 8AU

RAYNERS RESidENTiAl HOmE Rayners, the first purpose built Residential Home for the elderly in South Buckinghamshire was opened in June 1990, designed specifically to provide the elderly with a level of care and comfort that is unsurpassed. In addition to the high level of care provided we are able to offer 'extra care', in the event of a resident becoming more dependant. This degree of care is not usually available in residential homes and gives the resident and their relatives alike confidence and peace of mind. Rayners also has the ability to accommodate respite or short stay residents, subject to suite availability. Rayners who is still family owned and managed is also proud to offer luxurious 'Assisted Living Apartments' at Maple Tree House, situated on the same site as Rayners Residential Home.

Tel: 01494 773606 Weedon Hill, Hyde Heath, Amersham HP6 5UH WWW.CAREATRAYNERS.CO.UK

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H E L P L I N E

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


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A home you will love. Care you will appreciate. ✓ Unsurpassed levels of care

Middlesex Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

✓ High quality, home-like surroundings

• Nursing Care • Dementia Care • Respite Care

✓ A refreshing, positive approach ✓ Dedicated Alzheimer’s and dementia care available Chiltern Grange Care Home Ibstone Road, Stokenchurch, Bucks

Wilsmere House Care Centre

Find us 1/4 Mile South of Junction 5 M40

Wilsmere Drive, Harrow Weald, Middlesex, HA3 6BJ

Tel: 01494 412020 www.porthaven.co.uk

You’ll like us!

Tel: 020 3394 0992 | www.barchester.com

East Sussex

Woodside Hall Nursing Home This well equipped, purpose built nursing home is set in the Countryside, half way between Hailsham and Polegate. • 24 Hour Trained Nursing Staff • Nurse Call system • Tastefully decorated en suite rooms with colour TV & telephone • Care Plans on computerised system • Catering for special diets • Visting hairdresser, chiropodist, opticians & other specialists • Wheelchair access throughout

• Unrestricted visiting with ample parking facilities • Respite, convalescence and continuing care welcome • On site activities and entertainment coordinator • Events and outings organised • Extensive gardens and seating areas • Newspapers and flowers delivered on request • Competitive prices

Polegate Road, Hailsham, East Sussex, BN27 3PQ • Telephone: 01323 841670 Web: www.woodsidehall-nh.co.uk • Email: info@woodsidehall-nh.co.uk

Making our home your home

Church Street, Bexhill-on-Sea, East Sussex TN40 2HF Tel: 01424 730809 Email: gm.peterhouse@nabs.org.uk Web: www.peterhousecare.com Web: www.nabs.org.uk Peterhouse is a comprehensive retirement complex, providing a wide range of care needs on one site. Registered Care Home for 36 older people from 55 years old and also for those with a physical disability, providing high quality care and accommodation for 26 Nursing and 10 Residential residents. • Purpose built accommodation, en-suite facilities available. • Set in a tranquil setting of three acres of landscaped grounds. • We can provide sheltered housing flats only for those with links to the advertising industry. • Day care available for older people in the local community. •

Crest House Care Home has been privately owned and managed by mother and daughter team Jo and Lisa since 1987. We offer care, comfort, respect and dignity within an environment that is safe, and we believe in individual choice. • • • • • • •

Single & Double Rooms with en-suite facilities A Preferred Provider To East Sussex Social Services Passenger lift to all floors External wheelchair access Two Victorian conservatories Short term (respite) care Visiting chiropodist, optician and hairdresser

• • • • •

Arranged activities & entertainment Direct dial telephones in all rooms Dedicated and fully trained staff Staff turnover extremely low Fresh, traditional home cooked meals, special diets catered for • 5 star excellent food hygiene award

Contact Jo Crawford or Lisa Willard on Tel: 01424 436229 Email: cresthouse@btconnect.com

Image courtesy of Bohemia Village Voice

Crest House Care Home

St. Matthews Road, St. Leonards On Sea, East Sussex TN38 0TN

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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88 Region-by-region care homes

East Sussex continued

R oseberryH ouse

Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

R esidential H ome

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

The home specilaises in providing care for people suffering from dementia and alzheimers.

• Long and short stay • Respite and convalescence • Local GP service • Varied menus and special diets • Personal laundry service • Regular activities and outings • Next to the park • No restrictions on visiting • Visiting hairdresser & chiropodist

• Nursing Care • Residential Care • Dementia Care • Respite Care

Wadhurst Manor Care Home

Tel: 01323 501026 Email: enquiries@roseberry-carehome.co.uk Web: www.roseberry-carehome.co.uk 2 Rosebery Avenue, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN22 9QA

Station Road, Wadhurst, East Sussex, TN5 6RY

Tel: 01892 628 274 | www.barchester.com

Hampshire

Rotherbank

Tel:

01730 892081

Rotherbank is a small, friendly, family owned and operated residential care home. We are registered for dementia care and the frail elderly. We provide a homely environment affording security, independence with supportive care. Our care assistants are your personal carers, friends and companions. Your needs are constantly met and reviewed following an individual plan of care. All staff are trained to NVQ 2, 3 & 4. All staff are happy and settled which promotes an excellent friendly atmosphere for residents. Staff turnover is extremely low resulting in agency staff never having to be used. If you would like further information, please call us on the telephone number above or feel free to visit us any time.

Rotherbank Farm Lane, Liss Forest, Hampshire, GU33 7BJ

Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

Privately owned and operated, we offer: 

• Specialist dementia and palliative care   • A full time Activities Co-ordinator • A wide range of social and leisure choices • Visiting Chiropodist and Hairdresser • Regular Doctors visits • Access to Dentist and Optician • Beautifully landscaped private grounds

 

London Road, Hillbrow, Liss, Hampshire, GU33 7PD

Ashcombe House Care Home 65 Worting Road, Basingstoke, Hampshire, RG21 8YU

Telephone: 01730 895125/892711 • Email: wenhamadmin@btconnect.com

Tel: 01256 441 457 | www.barchester.com

www.wenhamholtnursinghome.co.uk

Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

• Nursing Care • Dementia Care • Respite Care • Day Care

Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

• Nursing Care • Dementia Care • Respite Care • Day Care

Marnel Lodge Care Home

St Thomas' Care Home

Carter Drive, off Popley Way, Basingstoke, RG24 9UL

St Thomas' Close, Basingstoke, Hampshire, RG21 5NW

Tel: 01256 441 498 | www.barchester.com

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• Nursing Care • Day Care • Respite Care

H E L P L I N E

Tel: 01256 441 458 | www.barchester.com

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


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Region-by-region care homes 89

Kent

The best care is on your doorstep At Kingsfield we ensure that every resident feels listened to, involved and, above all, cared for in the way that’s right for them. Visit us or call today

0333 321 0937 Kingsfield, Jubilee Way Faversham, Kent, ME13 8GD careuk.com/kingsfield

High Hilden

Tel: 01303 254019 www.ashwoodhealthcare.co.uk

Abbotsleigh Care Centre

Independence | Dignity | Quality of Care

01580 891314 | www.nellsar.com

Residential care & respite care If life at home is becoming difficult with more hurdles to overcome every day . . . Visit us at High Hilden and consider the alternatives . . . 01732 353070

84-86 Shorncliffe Road, Folkestone, Kent CT20 2PG

Cumbria House provides quality services and individual care to make our residents feel as much at home as possible. Come and visit us or telephone for a brochure.

www.highhilden.co.uk

High Hilden Close, Tonbridge, Kent, TN10 3DB

Abbotsleigh is a home for 61 adults with dementia in a beautiful countryside setting in Staplehurst, Kent. 18 of the rooms are designed for those that need a residential environment and 43 provide nursing care. George Street, Staplehurst, Kent TN12 0RB

Birchwood House Rest Home

• Set in 6 acres of beautiful Kent countryside • Ideal for long/short stay, convalescence and respite care • 24 hour supervision • En-suite facilities in all rooms • Lift to all floors • Home cooking - special diets catered for • Hairdresser, chiropodist and library available • Shopping trolley providing everyday requisites • In house communion service • Visits to speldhurst and other local churches can be arranged • Links with village activities

Tel: 01892 863559

Stockland Green Road, Speldhurst, Kent TN3 0TU

Birchwood Care Services Helping people to live independently as long as possible in their homes in the local areas of Speldhurst, Penshurst Tunbridge Wells, Pembury Tonbridge, Leigh, Edenbridge

Member of the Kent Care Homes Association

Tel: 01892 863710

Woodstock Residential Home

St Winifred’s Residential Home

01795 420202 | www.nellsar.com

01304 375758 | www.nellsar.com

Woodstock Residential Home, ideally situated in Sittingbourne, is a 55 bedded Dual Registered home providing residential care for both the frail older person and for people suffering with Dementia. It has been renovated to a high standard.

St Winifreds has 55 beds, designed to meet the needs of both residential frail elderly and people over 55 with a diagnosis of dementia. We also offer six separate large lounges with comfortable easy chairs, large screen TVs and separate dining areas. In addition a recently opened 7-day a week Day Care Service providing personalised care packages to meet individual needs.

80 Woodstock Road, Sittingbourne, Kent ME10 4HN

236 London Road, Deal, Kent CT14 9PP

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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90 Region-by-region care homes

Kent continued

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ST PETERS CONVENT

Hengist Field Care Centre

Our philosophy of care at St. Peters is to respect and uphold individuals uniqueness hence the standards of care given is such that each resident is valued as an individual person with varying needs.

01795 473880 | www.nellsar.com Hengist Field Care Centre is a purposebuilt care home situated in Borden, near Sittingbourne. It has 75 en-suite bedrooms as well as an on-site hair salon, cinema, sensory room, activity centre and internet café. Hengist Field can also provide respite care and short breaks.

Tel:

01227 744003

15 St George’s Terrace, Herne Bay, Kent, CT6 8RQ

Pond Farm Lane, Borden, Sittingbourne, Kent ME9 8LS

Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

22 Cornwallis Avenue, Folkestone, Kent CT19 5JB

The Grange provides quality services and individual care to make our residents feel as much at home as possible. Come and visit us or telephone for a brochure.

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

• Nursing Care • Dementia Care • Respite Care • Day Care

Friston House Care Home 414 City Way, Rochester, Kent, ME1 2BQ

Tel: 01303 252394 www.ashwoodhealthcare.co.uk

Tel: 01634 624 167 | www.barchester.com

The heaThers residential home for the elderly

The Heathers was established in 1984 to provide an exceptional level of care and support to its residents, some with EMI, whether permanent or respite. Our superb highly trained and motivated team create a unique homely feel and our in-house chef ensures our residents are catered for creatively and healthily. • Residential & Dementia Care • Full activity programme • Lift to all floors • En-suite rooms • Beautiful victorian house • Mature gardens

Please call for deTails 020 8460 6555 or email helen@TheheaThers.co.uk www.TheheaThers.co.uk 33-35 Farnaby Road, Shortlands, Bromley, Kent BR1 4BL

Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

• Nursing Care • Residential Care • Dementia Care • Respite Care

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

• Nursing Care • Dementia Care • Respite Care • Day Care

Winchester House Care Home

Ashminster House Care Home

180 Wouldham Road, Rochester, Kent, ME1 3TR

Clive Dennis Court, Ashford, Kent, TN24 0LX

Tel: 01634 624 168 | www.barchester.com

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Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

H E L P L I N E

Tel: 01233 428 728 | www.barchester.com

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


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Region-by-region care homes 91

Oxfordshire Winterbrook Nursing Home an exclusive residential care development and club With exceptional living accommodation set over three floors, Bridge House not only offers a high end elderly residential living space but at its heart an aspirational club facility for its residents as well as for the older community of Abingdon. • Nursing care

• Residential care

0845 409 8030

• Specialist dementia care

info@bridgehouseabingdon.co.uk

Bridge House, Thames View, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3UJ

• Short/Long term & respite nursing care for the elderly, physically disabled, dementia sufferers, terminally ill & EMI • 41 beds, mostly en-suite • Nutritious & varied menu • Regular visits from hairdresser, chiropodist & full social activities programme • An experienced manager and dedicated RGN’s & care staff • Care Quality Commission Compliant & holders of Investors in People Award.

Tel: 01491 833922 Fax: 01491 836166 Email: winterbrookhome@btconnect.com 18 Winterbrook, Reading Road, Cholsey OX10 9EF

Surrey

Abbey Chase Nursing Home Bridge Road, Chertsey, Surrey, KT16 8JW Abbey Chase Residential and Nursing Home is Located close to Chertsey town centre and has ground of approximately 10 acres including orchards and moorings on the Abbey River. Abbey Chase offers first class accommodation with every modern convenience. We aim to create a friendly family atmosphere between staff and residents to ensure that our residents are happy, comfortable and content in their retirement. We encourage our residents to pursue their leisure interests whether outdoor or in, the range available is extensive to suit all tastes and examples are fishing; riverside walks and gardening. For more information or advice telephone 01932 568090 or visit www.abbeychase.co.uk Holders of a CQC 3 STAR rating (Excellent) and IIP (Gold) award.

You’re unique. So are we. At Claremont Court Care Home we believe that it’s through taking time to understand each individual, their likes and dislikes and their life stories that we can provide personal care with a real difference.

Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief… Specialist Dementia Care Residential & Nursing Harts Gardens, Guildford Surrey, GU2 9QA

For more information or to arrange a visit please call: 01483 324 088 or email: ClaremontGM@carebase.org.uk www.claremontcourtcarehome.co.uk

Glebe House

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

• Nursing Care • Dementia Care • Respite Care • Day Care

Epsom Beaumont Care Home 20-22 Church Street, Epsom, Surrey, KT17 4QB

Tel: 01372 541 403 | www.barchester.com

CARE HOME WITH NURSING

• 24 hour nursing care • Long term and respite stay • Full programme of activities • Day care Registered with Care Quality Commission - Excellent Report

For further details please contact 01883 344 434 Email: info@glebe-house.com • Website: www.glebe-house.com Church Lane, Chaldon, Nr Caterham, Surrey CR3 5AL

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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92 Region-by-region care homes

Surrey continued

Grace Lodge Residential Care Home • Family run since 1989 • Long term & respite care • Providing care, not hotel rooms 4 Manor Road South, Hinchley Wood, Esher, Surrey KT10 0QL Tel: 020 8398 1437

The Red House

Princess Christian Care Centre 01483 488917 | www.nellsar.com Princess Christian is a 96 bedded Nursing & Residential Home suitable for elderly people with a diagnosis of Dementia and also has a wing specifically for Nursing residents that do not have Dementia. Set off a private road in leafy Bisley, the Home is close to Woking, Surrey. Stafford Lake, Woking, Surrey GU21 2SJ

CARE HOME WITH NURSING

• 24 hour nursing care • Long term and respite stay • Full programme of activities • Day care Registered with Care Quality Commission - Excellent Report

For further details please contact 01372 274 552 Email: redhouse@redhouseashtead.co.uk • Website: www.redhouseashtead.co.uk 43 Skinners Lane, Ashtead, Surrey KT21 2NN

Whiteley Village Care Centre The UK’s original retirement village. Nestled in 225 acres of beautiful and tranquil Surrey woodland. Reg. Ch. 1103056

Whiteley House Meeting the needs of individuals requiring nursing, palliative, respite or end of life care in a safe and peaceful environment.

Ingram House Residential care in well appointed rooms with en-suite facilities. Our friendly and caring community guarantees security and peace of mind.

01932 857821 www.whiteleyvillage.org.uk

Wolf House

RESIDENTIAL REST HOME

Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

• Excellent 24 hour care • Respite care • All good size single rooms • Small caring home registered for 13 residents • Visiting physiotherapist, Chiropodist and Hairdresser Set on the edge of beautiful woodlands and close to Bigging Hill & Bromley, Wolf House offers personal care and attention to its residents. Recently refurbished it provides a “home from home” environment and a relaxing and peaceful atmosphere, and has a high reputation locally.

Telephone: 01883 716627 or 01883 334626 Wolf’s Row, Limpsfield, Oxted, Surrey RH8 0EB

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H E L P L I N E

• Nursing Care • Day Care • Respite Care

Oxford Beaumont Care Community Bayworth Lane, Boars Hill, Oxfordshire, OX1 5DE

Tel: 01865 565 970 | www.barchester.com

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


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Region-by-region care homes 93

Surrey continued The GranGe reTiremenT home

Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

Care Home For Nursing & Dementia

• Privately Owned • Established since 1965 • Committed to Long Term Care • Experienced & Qualified Staff • 62 Full En-Suite Rooms • Landscaped Gardens 01932 562361 Email: info@thegrangechertsey.co.uk Website: www.thegrangechertsey.co.uk Tel:

• Nursing Care • Residential Care • Dementia Care • Respite Care

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

Windmill Manor Care Home

Ruxbury Road, Chertsey, Surrey KT16 9EP

2 Fairviews, Hurst Green, Oxted, Surrey, RH8 9BD

Tel: 01883 868 073 | www.barchester.com

West Sussex

Belvedere House

Privately owned and operated, we offer: 

Weston Acres, Woodmansterne Lane, Banstead SM7 3HB Belvedere House is a modern two-storey building set in the Royal Alfred’s extensive and pleasant landscaped grounds, providing 68 single rooms.

www.royalalfredseafarers.com Tel: 01737 360106

• Specialist dementia and palliative care   • A full time Activities Co-ordinator • A wide range of social and leisure choices • Visiting Chiropodist and Hairdresser • Regular Doctors visits • Access to Dentist and Optician • Beautifully landscaped private grounds

 

London Road, Hillbrow, Liss, Hampshire, GU33 7PD

Telephone: 01730 895125/892711 • Email: wenhamadmin@btconnect.com

South West Bristol

www.wenhamholtnursinghome.co.uk

Devon Where

The Garden House John Wills House

Quality Comes First

Located at the heart of our retirement village communities, our nursing care homes support older people to maintain independence, dignity and personal fulfilment in Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol.

24/7 operated service with a homely and relaxed atmosphere.

Call 0117 949 4735 www.stmonicatrust.org.uk A TI RE EN NT ! M E N D E E C OPE R CA OW N

Beechmount Care Home

Tel: 01803 605607 Rousdown Road, Chelston, Torquay, Devon TQ2 6PB

“The caring attitude of all the staff is exceptional”

South West Care Homes

www.southwestcarehomes.co.uk enquiry@southwestcarehomes.co.uk

Lincombe Manor Luxury Residential and Nursing Care Home

A luxurious care home, that offers you or a loved one unrivalled packages of affordable residential and nursing care services. Conveniently set within the beautiful and tranquil grounds of Lincombe Manor Retirement Village; this truly magnificent location enjoys breathtaking panoramic coastal views of Tor Bay, with views from your bedroom or our unique roof and garden terraces. For more information please call 01803 290300

www.manorlife.com

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


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FA I R F I E L D HOUSE

Personalised care in the heart of the community

Avon Lee Lodge has been designed to provide our residents with maximum independence, encompassing a community feel in a pleasant, safe, and homely environment. Call for a brochure or visit our website for more details.

Preston Lane, Burton, Christchurch. BH23 7JU. t 01202 476 736 e info@avonleelodge.co.uk www.avonleelodge.co.uk

01297 443 513 Charmouth Road, Lyme Regis, Dorset, DT7 3HH www.fairfieldhouse.co.uk enquiries@fairfieldhouse.co.uk

At Fairfield House we offer long term and short term accommodation in a comfortable, caring, relaxed environment with high quality specialist support based on each person’s specific needs.

Somerset Ashley House Care Home

Where

Quality Comes First

The Russets

A positive approach to care of people living with dementia in a supportive and reassuring environment.

Sherwood

24/7 operated service with a homely and relaxed atmosphere.

Tel: 01458 250386 The Avenue, Langport, Somerset TA10 9SA

“I would recommend this home to anyone, you really cannot fault anything”

South West Care Homes

www.southwestcarehomes.co.uk enquiry@southwestcarehomes.co.uk

Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

• Nursing Care • Day Care • Respite Care

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

High quality 24-hour personalised nursing care. Both care homes are part of Sandford Station, the award-winning retirement village in North Somerset. Call 0117 949 4735 to find out more.

www.stmonicatrust.org.uk

Gloucestershire Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

• Nursing Care • Residential Care • Dementia Care • Respite Care

The Manor Care Home Haydon Close, Bishops Hull, Taunton, Somerset, TA1 5HF

Tel: 01823 230 237 | www.barchester.com

Moreton Hill Care Centre Standish, Stonehouse, Gloucestershire, GL10 3BZ

Tel: 01453 557 987 | www.barchester.com

Wiltshire Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

• Nursing Care • Dementia Care • Respite Care

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

• Nursing Care • Residential Care • Dementia Care • Respite Care

White Lodge Care Home

Hunters Care Centre

Braydon, Swindon, Wiltshire, SN5 0AD

Cherry Tree Lane, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, GL7 5DT

Tel: 01666 718 830 | www.barchester.com

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CARE

Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

H E L P L I N E

Tel: 01285 601 335 | www.barchester.com

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


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Region-by-region care homes 95

West Midlands

Alcester

Shropshire Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

• Residential Care • Dementia Care • Day Care • Respite Care

Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

• Nursing Care • Dementia Care • Respite Care • Day Care

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

Wheatlands Care Home

Cherry Trees Care Home

Southfield Road, Much Wenlock, Shropshire, TF13 6AT

Stratford Road, Oversley Green, Alcester, B49 6LN

Tel: 01952 701 338 | www.barchester.com

Tel: 01789 444 296 | www.barchester.com

London

Seeing Mum so settled is such a relief…

…now I can enjoy being her daughter again.

North

• Nursing Care • Dementia Care • Respite Care • Day Care

Hugh Myddelton House Care Centre 25 Old Farm Avenue, Southgate, London, N14 5QR

Tel: 020 8185 7779 | www.barchester.com

Yorkshire & The Humber

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Genuine care, professional staff, a warm and welcoming environment and a place to call ‘home’

CM

• Managed by a qualified team • Single en-suite rooms • Elegant, comfortable surroundings • Close to local amenities • Special diets catered for • Nurse Call systems in all public rooms as well as bedrooms.

Tel: 01756 701220 Email: info@carletoncourtskipton.co.uk Web: www.carletoncourtskipton.co.uk Carleton Road, Skipton, North Yorkshire BD23 2BE

S

MY

CY

CMY

K

ANDROCK

• All large, brand new, single bedrooms with ensuite

Email: info@sandrockhouse.co.uk Web: www.sandrockhouse.co.uk

07/01/2013

C

R esidential H ome

Tel: 01302 535634

1

H

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• 24 hour care provided by highly trained and friendly staff

OUSE

• Excellent 3* Quality of Care rating by CQC Inspectors

• Social services funded and private residents most welcome.

We warmly welcome visitors to come and enjoy a cup of tea or coffee with our staff and residents at any time

53 Bawtry Road, Doncaster DN4 7AA

Sherwood Care Homes

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


|

96 Advertisers’ index

Advertisers’ index Care Choices Helpline

A

Carlton Court

Abbey Chase Residential & Nursing 

91

Abbotsleigh Care Centre

89

Advantage Healthcare 

28

Agincare Group Ltd

28

Allonsfield House

85

Amyn Hotels Ltd (Bridge House) 

35

Applegarth Care Home

86

Cherryfield House

69 & 87

Claremount Court

75 & 91

Codnor Park 

21 & 82

Colne House Care Home

84

Crest House Care Home

87

Cumbria House Care Home

Ashley House Care Home

77 & 94

D

Ashminster House Care Home

36 & 90

Ashwood Healthcare  3, 89 & 90 Avon Lee Lodge

94

Avondale Care Home

69 & 86

B

Draycott Nursing & Care

Beechmount Care Home

36 77 & 93

3 & 89

25

E Epsom Beaumont Care Home

36 & 91

HC-One

13

Hengist Field Care Centre

80 & 90

Hethersett Hall Care Home

36 & 84 89

High Hilden Home

Honey Lane Care Home 75 & 84 Hugh Myddelton House Care Home

36 & 95

Hunters Care Centre

36 & 94

J John Wills House

93

Jubilee Healthcare Ltd 

33

K Kidsley Grange 

21

King William 

21

Kingsfield

19 & 89

Kingsley Healthcare Ltd 84 & 85

F Fairfield House

Barchester

4 & 85

Chiltern Grange Care Home

36 & 88

21

95

Cherry Trees Care Home 36 & 95

Ashcombe House

Ashmere Care Group

74 & 76

Kirkley Manor 94

85

Far Fillimore Care Homes Ltd 82

L

Friston House Care Home

Lavender Cottage

85

36 & 90

Larkland House

19 & 86

Becket House

86

Lauren Court

85

Belvedere House

93

Lilac Lodge

85

Birchwood House Rest Home Bridge House Bushey House Beaumont Care

89 35 & 91 36 & 84

C

G 73 & 91

Glebe House

73 & 91

Grace Lodge

92

M

Grangefield Home Care

83

M H A Care Group

45

Green Trees 

84

Malvirt Ltd

89

Mansfield Manor

83

75, 84 & 91

H

Care UK

19, 86 & 89

H Surdhar

select

H E L P L I N E

77 & 93

Glebe Care Ltd

Carebase

CARE

Lincombe Manor Littleover Nursing Home

Manor Life 86 & 91

Margaret House

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

82

77 & 93 84

Advice for older people


|

Advertisers’ index 97

Maria Mallaband Care Group Ltd 

47 & 85

The Russets

S

43 & 94

Sandrock House

95

The Royal Alfred Seafarers’ Society 21 & 93

Meridian Healthcare Ltd  85, 95 & Inside front cover

Sans Soucie Home Care Limited

33

The Troc Residential Care Home  Inside back cover & 83

Sherwood

94

The Westbourne Care Home 85

Moreton Hill Care Home 36 & 94

Sherwood Care Homes

95

The Whiteley Homes Trust

47

N

Sherwood Healthcare

83

The Willows Care Home

84

Timperley Care Home

85

Marnel Lodge Care Home

36 & 88

NABS Nellsar Ltd

21 & 82

Smalley Hall 87 53, 80, 89 & 90

Nightingale Court Care Home 82 Northcourt Lodge

86

O Oxford Beaumont Care Community

Trident Housing Association 27

South West Care Homes

77, 93 & 94

Spemple Ltd

86, 88 & 95

Spring Lodge

85

St Monica Trust

43

St Peter’s Convent

90

St Thomas’ Care Home 36 & 88 36 & 92

P

St Winfred’s Residential Home

89

Sutton Court Care Home 21 & 83

Park Lane Care Home

85

Peterhouse Care

87

Plane Tree Court

4 & 85

Porthaven Care Homes LLP

69

Premium Care Ltd

87

Swanvale Luxury Care Homes 4

The Care Agency Limited

28

The Chestnuts Residential Care Home  Inside back cover

Prestbury Beaumont Care Home

36 & 85

The Depperhaugh

85

Princess Christian

53 & 92

The Firs

21

R

The Grange Care Home

V Valley Lodge

21 & 82

W Wadhurst Manor Care Home

36 & 88

Wenham Holt Ltd

88 & 93

West Hallam

21

Wheatlands Care Home 36 & 95

T

The Garden House

Tynefield Care Ltd  Inside back cover & 83

Whiteley Village

47 & 92

White Lodge Care Home36 & 94 Wild Acres Res Home

86

Wilsmere House Care Centre  36 & 87 Winchester House Care Home

36 & 90

43 & 93

Windmill Manor Care Home36 & 93

3 & 90

Winterbrook Nursing Home 91

R M H Care LLP

77 & 93

The Grange Retirement Home93

Radian Support

33

The Heathers Residential Care 90

Woodside Hall Nursing Home

The Manor Care Home 36 & 94

Woodstock Residential Home89

Rayners (Extra Care Home) Ltd

86

The Millbrook Inside front cover

Wolf House Ltd

Roseberry House

88

The Oaks

Y

88

The Red House  Outside back cover & 92

Rotherbank Residential Care Home 

95

Yaxley Lodge

87 92

85

Visit www.carechoices.co.uk for further assistance with your search for care


From the publishers of

select CAREselect CAREselect CAREselect CAREselect CAREselect CARE

Regional Care Services Directories

Has there ever been a more important time for care providers to promote their services? • Published in association with more than 30 local authorities.

Buckin

t Services

Care and Suppor Surrey 2012/13

ghamsh

Care an

d Supp

ire

ort Serv

ices Di

rectory

2013/1

4

• Contain valuable editorial for the care seeker regarding financial and legal considerations. • Comprehensive listings of providers in each region. • E-book versions available online.

Pitstone

Hill near

the Ridg

Theadvic e on comp rehens information and choosin ive guide Comprehensive and suppo g anrtd pa to g for your care• Ho ying fo me sup choosing and payin r care port • Car e hom • Care advice line

Housing options Home support •

• Care homes

Advice for older

people

es • Spe

cialist car

Publica

tions

• Spoken word enabled website, using Browsealoud.

Additional publications

eway path

Stoke Lock in Guildford

Publications

e • Use

ful con

tacts

In assoc

iation with

in partnership with

www.b

uckscc.

gov.uk

• CARE MANAGEMENT MATTERS (CMM) is the complete management journal for the UK care sector that aims squarely at the many challenges facing managers and proprietors in the care sector. • PROGRESS is the essential transition guide for 13 to 25 year olds with additional needs.

www.carechoices.co.uk

Call Care Choices ltd on 01223 207770 to find out how your BUSINESS can be included in one of our care services directories Care Choices Limited has taken every care to ensure that the information contained in Care Select is accurate. The company cannot accept responsibility for any errors or omissions or if a home varies from the facilities listed either in an advertisement or the listings. Care Choices Limited does not endorse or support any particular institution included in the publication. © 2013 Care Choices Limited. Care Choices Limited reserves all rights in the titles Care Choices and HOMES Directories and their design. Care Choices™ is a trademark of Care Choices Limited. ISBN 978-1-909048-45-4. Ref. No: 4001/careselect 03/13. Printed in England. Reproduction of any part of this publication in any form without the written permission of Care Choices Limited is prohibited. Published by: Care Choices Limited, Valley Court, Lower Road, Croydon, Nr Royston, Hertfordshire SG8 0HF. Telephone: 01223 207770 • Fax: 01223 208 135 • www.carechoices.co.uk Publisher: Robert Chamberlain Editor: Emma Morriss Business Development Manager: Paul Leahy Production Manager: Lisa Werthmann Production Designers: Nick Cade & ­Holly Cornell

select

CARE

H E L P L I N E

Associate Publisher: Matthew Tingey Group Sales Manager: David Werthmann Senior Sales Executive: Debbie Feetham Assistant Production Manager: Jamie Harvey Junior Creative Artworker: Thomas Holder

Choosing and funding care | 0800 38 92 077

Advice for older people


Quality care within a ‘home from home’ environment Tynefield Nursing Home T: 01283 732 030 E: info@tynefieldcare.com Egginton Road, Etwall, Derby DE65 6NQ www.tynefieldcare.com We are committed to providing a high standard of nursing care at all times and aim to make your stay here as comfortable as possible. Tynefield Nursing Home enjoys a unrivalled location, set in 3 acres of grounds overlooking open countryside, a short walk from the village of Etwall. Our care home is ideal for residents seeking quality care in a peaceful environment, while at the same time being able to enjoy the activities of normal daily life. We are registered for 40 residents providing nursing care and care for the elderly and young physical disabilities and have much experience of providing care to residents with Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s Huntington disease and Stroke. Our philosophy at Tynefield Court is to create and maintain a secure, relaxed and happy environment that is a ‘home from home’. This environment is tailored to meet the nursing, social, physical, emotional & psychological needs of each individual resident, to the very best of our ability. Wii games and daily activities available to all residents.

The Troc Residential Care Home T: 01636 671 342 E: info@thetroc.co.uk 256 Beacon Hill Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 2JP www.thetroc.co.uk With an unsurpassed reputation within the local community, The Troc Care Home is situated on the outskirts of the historic market town of Newark, with easy access to the A1 and excellent transport links. Here at The Troc, we are registered for 32 residents and offer a relaxed and happy atmosphere with individualised care for all. We encourage everyone to remain as independent as possible whilst offering them the support that they need. With a recent refurbishment we now have 7 ensuite rooms, a large garden with patio area , IT equipment and wii games for our residents.

The Chestnuts Residential Home T: 01530 834 187 E: info@thechestnutsresidentialhome.com 111 London Road, Coalville, Leicester, Leicestershire LE67 3JE www.thechestnutsresidentialhome.com

LEARNING DISABILITIES CARE HOME FOR ADULTS UNDER THE AGE OF 65 YEARS • Various activity programmes including holidays, regular excursions, activity clubs, day centre, IT equipment & Wii Games

• Easy walking distance to town centre, home is located on a main road.

• We encourage independent living & further education

• Registered for 13 residents.

• Choice of 3 self contained flats & 10 single bedrooms.

Please contact our homes or visit our websites for further information


The Red House CARE HOME WITH NURSING The Red House is an independently run home of character and distinction offering both Residential and 24 hour Nursing Care of the highest quality. The Red House is home for up to 25 residents in single rooms, some with en-suite facilities, tastefully decorated and comfortably furnished yet retaining much of the character you would expect from a late Victorian house. The owners and staff of The Red House are committed to providing the highest levels of quality care in a warm, homely environment that respects the individual’s right to privacy, dignity and personal choice.

Tel: 01372 274552 43 Skinners Lane, Ashtead, Surrey KT21 2NN Email: redhouse@redhouseashtead.co.uk • www.redhouseashtead.co.uk


Care Select Handbook for Relatives - May 2013