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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

VANCOUVER APRIL 2016


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Capture Photography Festival is produced by the Capture Photography Festival Society, a registered not-for-profit society.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

April 2016

CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Kim Spencer-Nairn

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Mike Harris Ian McGuffie Eric Savics Kim Spencer-Nairn CHAIR David Thorpe Todd Towers

PROGRAM DIRECTOR

Meredith Preuss DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS

Raji Sohal PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Jaclyn Arndt CREATIVE DIRECTION AND DIGITAL/PRINT COMMUNICATIONS

Palms CAMPAIGN PHOTOGRAPHER

Birthe Piontek PR AND MEDIA RELATIONS

Dela Cruz PR FESTIVAL INTERN

Pearl Choy ADDRESS

305 Cambie St Vancouver BC Canada V6B 2N4 capturephotofest.com info@capturephotofest.com

FOUNDING DONORS

John and Nina Cassils Stephen Carruthers Chan Family Foundation Mike and Sandra Harris Brian and Andrea Hill Hy’s of Canada Ltd. Michael O’Brian Family Foundation Radcliffe Foundation Ron Regan Eric Savics and Kim Spencer-Nairn Leonard Schein Ian and Nancy Telfer Samantha J. Walker (IN MEMORY OF) Bruce Wright Anonymous Anonymous

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Mitchell Press EDITION 8,000 FRONT AND BACK COVERS

Stephen Waddell, Showroom and The Collector 2016 ALL CONTENT © 2016 THE ARTISTS, AUTHORS, AND CAPTURE.

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UNAUTHORIZED REPRODUCTION IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED. ALL IMAGES ARE REPRODUCED COURTESY OF THE ARTIST UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED.

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CAPTURE IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE SPECIFIC CONTENT OR SUBJECT MATTER OF ANY WORK DISPLAYED OR ADVERTISED. SOME EXHIBITIONS OR INSTALLATIONS MAY BE OFFENSIVE, UPSETTING, OR DISTURBING TO SOME MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC.

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CONTENTS

001 CONTACT 004 WELCOME 006 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

009 PUBLIC

INSTALLATIONS

034 LAUNCH

124 MAP 126 EDITIONS

EXHIBITION

043 EXHIBITIONS 109 EVENTS

Contents


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

Welcome to the third edition of the Capture Photography Festival! This year’s Festival includes over 100 free exhibitions, public installations, and events throughout Metro Vancouver during the month of April.

Our launch party on April 1 moves to a new, larger location this year: the Exhibition Hall at the Roundhouse in Yaletown. The party coincides with an exhibition of the finalists of Presentation House Gallery’s new Phillip B. Lind Emerging Artist Prize, with the winner announced that night. Our public art program continues to grow, and we are delighted to present four major projects this year. The facade of the BC Hydro Dal Grauer Substation features a large-scale diptych created by Vancouverbased artist Stephen Waddell. Works from Jim Breukelman’s series Hot Properties are mounted on ten Pattison Outdoor Billboards throughout the city. The Canada Line Project returns with ten stations that feature diverse works on the theme Lying Stills: Constructing Truth with Photography. Lastly, Viewpoint—an interactive project that incorporates two stacked shipping containers—has been installed at Lonsdale Quay, challenging the way we view North Vancouver’s waterfront. None of this would be possible without the continued support of our sponsors, donors, partners, board members, dedicated team, volunteers, and, of course, the many participating artists.

We are thrilled to welcome back TD Bank as Capture’s presenting sponsor this year. I cannot emphasize enough the importance of their support to ensuring the Festival’s continued success. Thank you also to our returning sponsors: London Drugs, PwC, and YVR Airport Authority. And thank you to our media, contributing, and in-kind sponsors: the Georgia Straight, Pattison Outdoor, Gotham Steakhouse and Bar, St. Regis Hotel, Lonsdale Quay, Big Dog Containers, Proper Design, Lazy Gourmet, Denbigh Fine Art, Fine Art Framing, and Palms. Much of our programming is made possible through the hard work of our partners at the Burrard Arts Foundation, Presentation House Gallery, Roundhouse Community Centre Gallery, Inform Interiors, BC Hydro, Knowledge Network, Contemporary Art Gallery, Western Front, the Vancouver Art Gallery, YVR Airport Authority, SFU School for Contemporary Arts, and the Vancouver Biennale.


WELCOME

On behalf of TD Bank Group, I am very pleased to extend greetings and best wishes to the organizers of the 2016 Capture Photography Festival.

We are also grateful for the support of the Vancouver Foundation, Audain Foundation, the Department of Canadian Heritage, the BC Arts Council, Province of British Columbia, City of North Vancouver, the City of Vancouver, the Downtown Business Improvement Association, and the Canada Line Public Art Program—inTransit BC.

Giving back to our communities in meaningful ways is a source of pride for us at TD. Additionally, we believe it’s important to showcase and present the wealth of artistic talent available locally and to encourage an appreciation of the arts among all Canadians. Visual art in the form of photography has blossomed in popularity in recent years. The beauty that comes from the camera lens has engaged a collective arts community consisting of art collectors, galleries, and students and has become a point of interest for the general public.

Finally, thank YOU for picking up this magazine and for joining Capture to inspire creative engagement, celebrate the practice and culture of photography, and foster a vibrant photography community in Vancouver.

We believe our support of Capture will help to further develop this art form and inspire the next generation of emerging artists who will take up this medium. Enjoy this year’s festival.

Mauro Manzi

Kim Spencer-Nairn

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT

TD Bank Group, Pacific Region

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

PRESENTING SPONSOR

MEDIA SPONSOR

WE GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGE THE SUPPORT OF


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

SUPPORTING SPONSORS

MAJOR SUPPORTING SPONSOR

CONTRIBUTING AND IN-KIND SPONSORS

PARTNERS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

THANK YOU

Adad Hannah Alan Convery Aline Smithson Andrew McCaw Anne Murray Amanda Vincelli Amit Amin Apoorv Dwivedi Barrie Mowatt Birthe Piontek Brian Mesina Cate Rimmer Catherine Cook Chantal Shah Christian Chan Christos Dikeakos Coleen Nemtin Corrina Parent Courtney Senick Dana Claxton Danny Singer David Paterson Denise Oleksijczuk Dennis Dong Diana Freundl Donna McGeachie Ed Chan Erin Siddall Gale Penhall Glenna Pollon Greg Girard Hana Pesut

Helga Pakasaar Ian Wallace James Moes Jan Ballard Janet Smith Jeff Klaver Jennifer Winsor Jennilee Marigomen Jeremy Roncoroni Jim Breukelman John Chimuk John and Lucie Spencer-Nairn John Goldsmith Kate Bellringer Ken Stephens Kevin Day Kevin Mazzone Laura Moore Laura Minta Holland Leah Iverson Linda Banecevic Malania Dela Cruz MaryAnn Camilleri Marie Lopez Megan Buckley Megan Low Michael Audain Michael Barrow Michael Hanos Michael Preuss Nancy Bendtsten Neil Aisenstat

Nelson Mouëllic Nigel Prince Pablo De Ocampo Pantea Haghighi Pascale Georgiev Patryk Stasieczek Paul Larocque Phuong Banh Reid Shier Rita Beiks Rob MacDonald Rudy Buttignol Ryan McKenna Ryan McGrew Ryan Romero Scott Massey Scott Mullin Sean Arden Shane O’Brien Sinziana Velicescu Stephanie and Michael Wesik Stephen Bellringer Stephen Waddell Steve McGregor Susan Almrud Susan Mendelson Tanveer Badal Toma Savics Travis Collier Uwe Boll Vishal Marapon Wil Aballe


Public Installations 9


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016


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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

APRIL 1, 2016 ­— MARCH 31, 2017

BC HYDRO DAL GRAUER SUBSTATION PROJECT: THE COLLECTOR AND SHOWROOM Stephen Waddell PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP BY

Capture Photography Festival and Burrard Arts Foundation 944 Burrard St Vancouver BC Stephen Waddell’s photographs are at once spontaneous and contemplative. His compositions offer a striking initial impression while their seemingly banal subject matter demands closer attention. He depicts recognizable scenes that appear too composed to have been happened upon, yet Waddell is neither a so-called street photographer nor interested in the rhetoric of epic staged photography. He creates pictures that deliberately exist in a place of ambiguity. Photography and industrialization came about in the Western world at roughly the same time—the mid nineteenth century— quickly and vastly changing the way in which everything from labour to the perception of time and space was understood. During this time, photography evolved from a fine art to prosaic and documentary forms. It was only later taken up again by those whose creativity would bind both elements into a conversation between the arts and artists. In many ways, modernist painters such as Édouard Manet and Gustave Caillebotte,

whose works often celebrate the working class and the modern city, set the stage for the rise of street photography during the late 1800s. Images like Eugène Atget’s Chiffonier (Ragpicker) (1899) demonstrate photographers’ growing interest in the lives of labourers, not unlike Caillebotte’s realist painting The Floor Scrapers (1875), which depicts the urban proletariat through an ambivalent, non-moralizing lens. It is this interwoven realist history of early modern painting and street photography that leads directly to Stephen Waddell’s considered studies of anonymous figures working, relaxing, and moving through the urban environment. His work also finds links to a more recent past: mid-century modernism, with its renewed optimism for the possibilities of art, architecture, and technology and their ability to enhance the public realm. Today, this optimism tends to fall flat. Waddell’s photographs of urban subjects moving through cities often illustrate the (il)logical conclusion of this history, this utopianism never come to pass. One reading of the photos on the Dal Grauer Substation could interpret them as laying bare the disconnection between the optimism of the era of the building’s mid-century construction and the cynicism of today. In general, street photography makes the people who would otherwise be invisible to us visible. In The Collector, Waddell makes visible a trophy seller transporting statuary through Berlin’s streets, and, in doing so, directs our attention to the

labour and chain of production involved in constructing and disseminating these peculiar objects. He is an arranger and seller of these twilighted objects. In the second photograph, Showroom, what at first appears as a Renaissance sculpture or arte povera installation awaiting exhibition is revealed to be an item in the showroom of a marble importer in Richmond, British Columbia. When we realize the photo was taken just outside of Vancouver, it brings up questions of aesthetics’ role in both consumer culture and class structure. Both photographs replicate the act of moving through the city alone, observing those you pass by and allowing the mind to wander as the cast of characters around you take on different forms. The mind begins to engage in the description of those anonymous figures, filling in the details of imagined lives with memories from one’s own past. Despite the resulting feeling of familiarity, we are reminded of the unknowability of strangers, as well as of those we are close to. The photographs on the Dal Grauer Substation illustrate the illegibility of images as much as they do that of individuals. Presented as two works on opposing sides of the building, they seem to fight each other to exist. Unsure of whether to identify as a cohesive tableau or as disparate fragments of something larger, the temporary installation invites contemplation of its sense of incompleteness. It also encourages those walking by to consider their own status as anonymous urban subjects as they become aware of their place in the public sphere, now shared with these photographs.


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

Completed in 1954, the BC Hydro’s Dal Grauer Substation was designed by the young architect Ned Pratt and artist B. C. Binning. The building was commissioned by the B.C. Electric Company, under the helm of then-president Edward Albert “Dal” Grauer, to bridge functional design and public art. The substation would go on to serve as a three-dimensional “canvas” that was said to resemble a Piet Mondrian or De Stijl painting. The modernist philosophy with which the building was designed emphasizes the link between art, architecture, and everyday life. With this in mind, Capture Photography Festival and the Burrard Arts Foundation have commissioned Canadian photographer Stephen Waddell to create a new site-specific work to be adhered to the Dal Grauer Substation’s facade. Drawing on the building’s originality, the project will temporarily emphasize the building in the streetscape and reassert it as an architectural icon.

previous spread STEPHEN WADDELL THE COLLECTOR AND SHOWROOM (INSTALLATION VIEW), 2016 PHOTOGRAPH BY NELSON MOUËLLIC

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

opposite page JIM BREUKELMAN HOT PROPERTIES 3, 1986/2016 next spread — left JIM BREUKELMAN HOT PROPERTIES 34 (INSTALLATION VIEW), 1986/2016 PHOTO BY NELSON MOUËLLIC next spread — right JIM BREUKELMAN HOT PROPERTIES 16, 1986/2016

MARCH 28 — APRIL 24

PATTISON OUTDOOR BILLBOARDS PROJECT: HOT PROPERTIES Jim Breukelman PRESENTED BY

Capture Photography Festival CURATED BY

Meredith Preuss

SEE THE MAP ON PAGE 124 FOR BILLBOARD LOCATIONS

In the late 1980s, Jim Breukelman photographed Vancouver’s quirky and well-tended homes built during the 1930s and 1940s. The resulting series, titled Hot Properties, captured these homes as they were slowly vanishing in areas of the city undergoing rapid change. Capture has placed ten of these photographs on billboards throughout Vancouver, in unexpected locations. The homes each reflect the vernacular architectural conventions adopted by builders of the time, from the colourful Frank Stella–like cut-outs adorning a modest bungalow to the baroque flourishes atop a stucco home. The street-facing gardens exhibit the personalities of those who tend them, with their considered mix of springtime blooms and quirky, sometimes misshapen topiaries.

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Initially conceived as portraits of both the houses and their owners, the series feels more urgent some thirty years later, in 2016. In the years following Breukelman’s documentation, the pace of development in Vancouver has only quickened, yet many of the concerns remain the same. Issues around loss of character persist, as do more alarming trends of gentrification and displacement. Furthermore, homes like these—when they haven’t already been replaced by developments—are assessed at the current value of the land, with the house merely bellying the price. Phrases like “developer’s dream” and “investor’s opportunity” proliferate in real estate listings, implying that the act of living in the space is secondary to the so-called investment in the property. Alternatively, Breukelman’s photographs of these lovingly cared-for homes suggest that the lived experience within a home may actually hold more value. These conflicting sentiments speak to our basic need for shelter and the dream of single-family home ownership, while pointing to the pressure to adapt to a new reality.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

APRIL 2 — MAY 31

CONTAINER PROJECT: VIEWPOINT Ryan McKenna Erin Siddall and Sean Arden CURATED BY

Cate Rimmer PRESENTED BY

Capture Photography Festival Open approx. 1:15–5:30 pm every day; check the Capture website for exact times. “Our home is beyond the great Atlantic Ocean, beyond the great inland seas of Canada, beyond the vast wheat-growing prairies of Manitoba, beyond the majestic Rocky Mountains, away on the shores of the Pacific Ocean.” These words, contained in a letter of petition to King Edward VII by a small delegation of First Nations leaders in 1906, underscored the remoteness of their home on the edge of a vast continent, far from the colonial seat of power. At the time of the First Nations peoples’ petition requesting greater control over their own lands, the topography around them had already been carved up and reshaped by homesteads and commercial enterprises. One of those petitioning the king was the Squamish elder Kiyapalanexw, or Joseph Capilano, the namesake of so much on the north shore of Burrard Inlet. From his viewpoint overlooking the inlet, Capilano would have seen the city of Vancouver taking form, its buildings rising and the docks of the port reaching toward him over the water. Where once Indigenous canoes were the sole watercraft, great sailing ships and steamers now plied the water, bringing goods and settlers from the far reaches of the world. Presented 110 years later and situated within the lands of Kiyapalanexw, Viewpoint—a project about looking, seeing,

and perception—surveys the bustling trade of commercial shipping and tourism on and around Burrard Inlet. Viewpoint consists of two lens-based works of art: Vision in 1792 by Ryan McKenna and Burrard Inlet Big Camera by Erin Siddall and Sean Arden. Housed in shipping containers on the edge of the port, the project evokes the history of the inlet as an access point for new forms of governance and for settlers, refugees, goods, and resources from all points of the globe. Though distinct from each other, both projects are focused on observation and the experience of seeing. McKenna’s film Vision in 1792 considers Burrard Inlet and the exploration of its waters by George Vancouver through the unique perspective of a Coast Salish Shaman. The Shaman has a vision about new longhouses that will follow the arrival of the new people as he sings a coming-into-the-house song. Filmed from the vantage point of the Lions Gate Bridge, the movement of the water below is at first barely perceptible. The “impending event” that one expects of traditional narrative film is set aside in favour of a rhythmic reflection of place, circumstance, and the passage of time. The second shipping container of Viewpoint has been turned into a camera obscura, a device that played an important role in the development of photography. The precursor to the modern camera, it allowed a scene to be captured and viewed as an isolated indoor projection. Like historic camera obscuras, Burrard Inlet Big Camera by Erin Siddall and Sean Arden employs a single aperture, multiple angled mirrors, and a camera bellows to create a projection of the slowly evolving view outside. The ephemeral, shifting image of Burrard Inlet speaks to the transient nature of not only the commercial ships that pass by but also to the history and stories of the built environment and landscape around us here on the shores of the Pacific Ocean.

opposite page RYAN MCKENNA VISION IN 1792, 2010 FILM TRANSFERRED TO VIDEO


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

opposite page JEAN-PAUL KELLY FIGURE-GROUND (CRASH OF CANADIAN PACIFIC AIRLINES, DE HAVILLAND COMET IA, CF-CUN, “EMPRESS OF HAWAII”, KARACHI), 2015

WATERFRONT 1 VANCOUVER 2 CITY CENTRE YALETOWN 3 ROUNDHOUSE

OLYMPIC VILLAGE 4

BROADWAY CITY HALL 5

KING EDWARD 6

APRIL — SEPTEMBER

CANADA LINE PUBLIC ART PROJECT — LYING STILLS: CONSTRUCTING TRUTH WITH PHOTOGRAPHY PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP BY

Capture Photography Festival and the Canada line Public Art Program—InTransit BC

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MARINE DRIVE 7

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Considering the role of authenticity and truth in documentary-style photography, Capture has installed photo-based artworks on the exteriors of nine Canada Line stations. The project stretches from downtown’s Waterfront to YVR-Airport and includes curatorial contributions from diverse cultural organizations: Presentation House Gallery, Contemporary Art Gallery, Western Front, School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University, the Vancouver Biennale, and Capture itself. Each organization has presented a unique perspective on this expansive topic. Throughout history photographers have relied on subtle manipulations to convey authenticity, their techniques ranging from staging and tableaux, darkroom processing, and Photoshop manipulations to any number of other subtle “tricks.” Famously, many of Walker Evans’s portraits of dustbowl interiors from the 1930s were skilfully staged to

evoke empathy from their viewers, who would interpret the photographs as unbiased documents. Despite photography’s historically fraught relationship with documentary-style imagery, much of its potential to deceive is taken for granted. As such, many contemporary artists have based their practices around this paradox, to the extent that it is now one of the central concerns for photographic discourse today. The artworks selected for this series of installations offer a detailed look at the meaning of documentary-style photography, from traditional photojournalism to meditations on the construction of identity and photography’s complex role in representation and stereotypes. In several cases, the artists involved have even experimented with optical illusions and degraded images, which—by challenging the very act of seeing and perceiving—function as metaphors for the construction of truth within documentarystyle images. By presenting works that offer a variety of insights into what it means for an image to be made in the documentary style, this project aims to ask questions about the nature of how narrative is conveyed through images, authenticity in photography, and the many choices photographers make to create an image.


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

left ADAD HANNAH AN ARRANGEMENT (POLKA DOTS) 1, 2016 right ISABELLE PAUWELS UNTITLED, 2016 SERIES OF 7 PRINTS 48” x 32” EACH opposite page JÉRÔME HAVRE UNTITLED, 2010


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

1 WATERFRONT STATION: UNTITLED Isabelle Pauwels CURATED BY

Helga Pakasaar, Presentation House Gallery

Isabelle Pauwels’s sequence of images hovers between fantasy, absurdism, and documentary. Sourced from digital photographs, scans of family archives, and frame grabs from the artist’s past video productions, the images depict common cultural artifacts and are capped by mirroring analogue video colour bars that have been superimposed with text clipped from digital HD video colour bars. Removed from their original contexts, further processed, and combined with texts

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that function as visual shapes as well as language, the images form an open-ended narrative. While evoking advertisements through the pairing of image and text, the resulting collages refrain from directing us to feel or react in a certain way. Their meanings shift according to how we combine and prioritize them in relation to the rest of the sequence. Left to right, right to left, these two but not the others—the story can change every time.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

2 VANCOUVER CITY CENTRE STATION: AN ARRANGEMENT (POLKA DOT CASE STUDY) 1, 2, 5

APRIL 15 — AUGUST 31

Adad Hannah

Jérôme Havre

4 OLYMPIC VILLAGE STATION: FIGURE-GROUND (CRASH OF CANADIAN PACIFIC AIRLINES, DE HAVILLAND COMET IA, CF-CUN, “EMPRESS OF HAWAII”, KARACHI)

CURATED BY

CURATED BY

Jean-Paul Kelly

Meredith Preuss, Capture Photography Festival

Shaun Dacey, Contemporary Art Gallery

CURATED BY

Adad Hannah is perhaps best known for his tableau vivant video stills that reimagine historical artworks with live actors. With An Arrangement (Polka Dot Case Study) 1, 2, 5, he explores new themes, exchanging the high-production epics for process-based, in-studio experimentations.

Contemporary Art Gallery presents Toronto-based artist Jérôme Havre’s first presentation in Vancouver. Of Caribbean descent and originally from France, Havre’s work considers representation, circulation, transmission, and translation of black identities, interrogating racialized stereotypes and ideologies projected onto bodies.

For this new body of work, Hannah made a set of ceramic pots, then hired a contortionist to pose with them. By camouflaging the contortionist in a polka-dot bodysuit made of the same material as the plinth and backdrop she appears with, the ceramics at first appear to be floating in space. A human form is revealed slowly as the objects recede, generating tension between the seemingly earnest ergonomic studies and the disorienting illusion caused by the repeating polka-dot pattern. The act of looking becomes deliberate and challenging as the viewer reconciles the fissures between the curves of the contortionist’s figure, the imperfect seams of her suit, and the backdrop. Through these means, Hannah examines how a photograph can function as a document of something both real and imagined. The photo acts as a destabilizing and whimsical pseudo-anthropological document, sharing as much in common with Eadweard Muybridge’s and Étienne-Jules Marey’s studies of movement as with many of the early photograms of László Moholy-Nagy and Man Ray, suggesting a surrealist, topsyturvy world. In this case, the optical illusion acts as a metaphor for how authenticity is constructed and deconstructed.

3 YALETOWN — ROUNDHOUSE STATION: UNTITLED

Havre’s Untitled (2010) is a blunt gesture. The found image depicts a family posed against a vintage car in a tropical landscape, its warm hues of analogue colour giving entry to a past generation. Havre disrupts the scene, scrawling doodles of masklike forms in white-out directly onto each family member’s face, erasing identity and subjectivity, reforming these physical bodies as alien figures. Masks are objects held in high esteem in Western culture. Through centuries of colonial violence and capitalist extraction, these specific objects have come to sit in private and museum collections around the world, detached from the action, ritual, communities, and physical bodies they were made for. Disembodied heads without voice, these masked bodies are “stilled,” recontextualized as stand-ins to represent otherness, here a reflection on Western perceptions of blackness.

Pablo de Ocampo, Western Front Jean-Paul Kelly’s work challenges the notion of documentary images: how they are produced, how they circulate, and how we interpret and understand them. For this project, Kelly repeats a photograph of an original gouache painting across the facade of the station. The original painting, made by Kelly, is itself a reproduction that formally and subjectively translates a JPEG image of the 1953 plane crash in Karachi that killed his maternal grandfather, John Cooke. Cooke was a navigator for Canadian Pacific Air Lines and at the time lived with his family at 2006 West 48th Avenue in Kerrisdale. Kelly found a photograph of the crash on a website about aviation history, and used this low-resolution image as the basis for his project. The gouache painting directly references Bridget Riley, whose op art paintings and drawings from the 1960s use repeating patterns of grids and lines to create an illusory perception of form and space. Kelly’s painting deploys Riley’s technique to offer the viewer a position from which to consider difference, distance, and the disjuncture between subjective interpretations and physical forms inherent in documentary images.

opposite page — top JOHN GOLDSMITH BONDI BEACH, 2011 opposite page — bottom DAVID ELLINGSEN JULY 2015 HOTTEST ON RECORD GLOBAL, 2015


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

5 BROADWAY — CITY HALL STATION: WEATHER PATTERNS I David Ellingsen CURATED BY

Alexandra Best Daniella Donati Solana Rompre, School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University Climate change is directly responsible for influencing David Ellingsen’s ongoing series Weather Patterns. Having grown up on rural

6 KING EDWARD STATION: CAPTURE AND GEORGIA STRAIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION WINNER John Goldsmith Capture Photography Festival and the Georgia Straight invited photographers of all backgrounds to respond to the theme “Authenticity in Documentary-style Photography” by submitting an image or series that creates a story or narrative. A shortlist of five was created by an expert jury consisting of Pablo de Ocampo (Exhibitions Curator, Western Front), Laura Marks (Professor, School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University), and Nigel Prince (Executive Director, Contemporary Art Gallery). The winning photographs, by John Goldsmith, were determined by public vote on the Georgia Straight’s website.

Cortes Island, British Columbia, Ellingsen acknowledges his strong connection with the environment and the immediate effects of global climate change felt around him. Ellingsen began Weather Patterns I in 2011 by documenting the daily flux of the Pacific Ocean, taking a photograph every day possible. Inspired by meteorological records being broken globally and locally, Ellingsen uses such events to structure his works. As humanity moves forward, constantly ushering in new records for extreme temperatures and precipitation activities, the continuous, never-ending nature of this project becomes obvious.

The presence of the artist is important to this work, with Ellingsen shunning any automated process by only documenting the days he is able to be present at the Pacific Ocean. His technique of compressing photos creates images that appear abstracted, challenging our notions of documentary photography by creating lens-based compositions. Through logging and recording images associated with record-breaking elemental extremes, Ellingsen envisages a narrative archive of environmental changes as he experiences them from his home here in the Pacific Northwest.

John Goldsmith’s work follows the long tradition of straight photography, but in a contemporary and often theatrical mode. Drawing from the rich history of documentary photography, this project explores the social aspects of people inhabiting the built environment, documenting unstaged moments punctuated with the visual representations of a postmodern psyche.

The series of photographs mounted on King Edward Station explores community and public space in some of the world’s most livable cities, including Vancouver and Melbourne and Sydney, Australia. The works create caricatures of real people in real moments within the modern urban environment, where citizens negotiate manufactured landscapes under the everwatchful eyes of government, commerce, and an increasingly photography-savvy general public. The line between public and private spaces has become increasingly blurred and, along with it, so has the one between our personal and shared personas.

Using the principles of the photojournalistic style of storytelling, Goldsmith’s photographs examine reality-based perceptions of a medium that manipulates both spatial and temporal dimensions. The photograph is treated as “truth”—produced largely incamera with adjustments made using digital tools analogous to those in a traditional darkroom. In the spirit of the straight movement, nothing is added, nothing removed.

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opposite page — top LUCIEN DUREY HAMSTERLEY FARM WATER TOWER, 2015 opposite page — bottom SEUNG WOO BACK RE-ESTABLISHING SHOT, 2012


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

7 MARINE DRIVE STATION: HAMSTERLEY FARM WATER TOWER

8 TEMPLETON STATION: RE-ESTABLISHING SHOT

9 YVR-AIRPORT STATION Ted Grant

Seung Woo Back Lucien Durey

CURATED BY CURATED BY

CURATED BY

Jorma Kujala Abbey Hopkins Lauren Lavery, School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University

Ken Lum Vancouver Biennale Re-Establishing Shot is a montage of photodocumentation from multiple large-scale photographs composed of urban landscapes, including Seoul, Busan,

For Hamsterley Farm Water Tower, Lucien Durey turned a Hamsterley Farm strawberry jam tin, which he found in Saskatoon, into a crude pinhole camera, using a sewing needle to poke a small hole into the face of the tin. With the homemade camera and 4” x 5” film, the artist travelled to Saanich, British Columbia, to document the jam tin’s referenced site—the farm’s water tower is now preserved as a recognized heritage structure—in an attempt to reveal something of the object to itself. Seemingly “personal” to the camera, can these photographs somehow convey the relational energies that exist between the antique tin and its documented site of origin?

and Tokyo. The artwork holds photo fragments from various places, perspectives, and narratives, assembled together as one. However, upon closer inspection, the images do not contain a fluid visual continuity but rather end abruptly, causing an

Ted Grant began his career when photographers still used film, never knowing what kind of photo he got until the film was developed. Despite advances in technology, waiting is still key to his practice. No matter what the subject—notable people, the Vietnam War, the children of Chernobyl, the Olympic Games, births, deaths, or doctors performing surgery—his process is always to find his vantage point, plant himself, and wait for the right moment.

optical break. This large-scale image draws the viewer in with its unusual perspective of an assembled urban landscape; yet it does not provide clues to a specific location, leaving the viewer curious as to which city they are engaging with. All features suggesting recognition with a place in this documentation have intentionally been removed by the artist. What remains are

The variety of media approaches that constitute Durey’s work often begin with a performative engagement with found objects and ephemera. He is attracted to things that have the potential to be overlooked—quietly emotional things—discarded, forgotten, or revealed through searching. Durey considers his object collecting to be informed by a subjective queer experience—one of simultaneous attraction and repulsion that encompasses the sense that what we find exciting or sensuous can also embarrass us or expose us to harm. Further to this, Durey is interested in the theme of compensation, that is, the emotional motivation for gestures particularly as it relates to human investment in contemporary mythological figures and their representations and to the collection of symbolic and totemic objects.

Rita Beiks, YVR Vancouver Airport Authority

superficial surfaces. Being devoid of the city’s historic and social significances

As a photojournalist and documentary photographer, Grant does not manipulate or stage his photos to achieve any preconceived idea of what the photo should convey. He doesn’t pose his subjects and he doesn’t use flash. He doesn’t need to. And while his intent is to allow the photograph to speak for itself, there is no denying that it is his unique way of seeing and experiencing the world that determines which moment is captured and chosen to convey the true essence of a subject.

removes individual memory, recollection, and personal story. The urban landscape in Re-Establishing Shot cannot be located, and this transient encounter leads to a floating narrative. Without any historic and social context, the urban setting loses its distinction and becomes generalized. During his residency at the Vancouver Biennale, Seung Woo Back documented the industrial landscape of this city, as part of a developing global narrative of the generalizing trend of popular culture, in which differences, distinctions, and tastes are vanishing.

The photos on display at YVR-Airport Station are a small and varied sampling of Grant’s sixty-year career.


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

top TED GRANT PIERRE TRUDEAU, OTTAWA, 1968 bottom ART ZARATSYAN ELIMU–KENYA–1, 2014

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

top SONNY ASSU 1UP, 2016 INSTALLED ON SURREY ART GALLERY’S URBANSCREEN PHOTO BY EDWARD WESTERHUIS bottom LYNOL LUI WILHELMINA, 2015


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

APRIL — MAY

APRIL 1 — 30

OUTSIDE DARKROOM

SEE THROUGH A NEW LENS

Lynol Lui

Megan Wilson Art Zaratsyan

CURATED BY

Roxanne Gagnon

CURATED BY

Tallie Garey Arts Umbrella 1286 Cartwright St Vancouver BC

PRESENTED BY

Photographers Without Borders

&

116–15850 26th Ave Surrey BC Arts Umbrella’s two buildings, at Granville Island in Vancouver and at Morgan Crossing in Surrey, are transformed into site-specific installations by larger-thanlife black and white photographs by artist and Arts Umbrella instructor Lynol Lui. Outside Darkroom aims to create an impact from these two different locations and perspectives, encouraging dialogue around the medium, process, subject matter, and accessibility to art in an open space.

Various Public Spaces Photographers Without Borders showcases images from select photographers who have volunteered their time to capture the work of grassroots charities around the world. Through their collective voice these images are shared worldwide both in print and online, as well as by the organizations for fundraising and awareness campaigns. These inspiring stories of community, collaboration, and positive change reinforce open dialogue, public education, and peaceful relations, encouraging a humanity that would rather help than discriminate. SEE PHOTOGRAPHERS WITHOUT BORDERS WEBSITE FOR LOCATION DETAILS:

photographerswithoutborders.org

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

UP UNTIL MAY 1

THE EXPERIENCE Elizabeth Zvonar CURATED BY

Diana Freundl, Vancouver Art Gallery Vancouver Art Gallery Offsite 1100 West Georgia St Vancouver BC Vancouver artist Elizabeth Zvonar conjures romantic sentiment and melancholic undertones in The Experience, a bleachedout collage and light installation boldly positioned in downtown Vancouver during the dreary winter months.

UP UNTIL MAY 8

1UP Sonny Assu CURATED BY

Alison Rajah RECEPTION

Thursday, April 21, 7–9 pm UrbanScreen at Surrey Art Gallery 13458 107A Ave Surrey BC

Combining materials and strategies used in advertising, the site-specific public artwork draws tangential connections between thoughtful inquiry and advertorial amusement. A pair of sunglasses is placed in the foreground of a celestial landscape from Mars, creating a scene that reads like a postcard from the future. The 105-squaremetre digital collage is accentuated with gel-filtered lighting and framed by a reflective pool of water and colour. In The Experience, Zvonar continues her practice of appropriating imagery from various sources and media, including advertising, contemporary fashion photography, and counterculture. She amplifies the digital design of her hand-cut collage by dramatically increasing

Sonny Assu’s 1UP is a site-specific architectonic installation newly created for the Surrey Art Gallery’s offsite projection venue, UrbanScreen. Located on the west wall of Chuck Bailey Recreation Centre, UrbanScreen is situated on traditional Kwantlen territory. As a Ligwilda’xw/ Kwakwaka’wakw person recently relocated to South Surrey, Assu “tags” the colonial landscape to bring attention to the hidden histories of the Indigenous people in Canada. A colloquial term in gaming culture, “1UP” grants an extra life to a player through an achievement or item. Drawing on this term, Assu’s artwork 1UP becomes a metaphor for how the First People have risen up for rights within a system that was designed to oppress and assimilate them. 1UP merges ’80s and ’90s retro gaming iconography from his childhood with Northwest Coast formline elements.

its scale and using theatrical lighting to produce an environment that shifts from a space of entertainment to one of examination. In its totality, The Experience combines classic summer imagery with references to hippie ideals of the 1970s psychedelic music scene, forming a new hybrid that ultimately prompts viewers to reconsider the passage of time and the limits of temporal reality. The Experience at the Offsite outdoor exhibition space is presented as part of MashUp: The Birth of Modern Culture, a major group exhibition tracing the history of mashup culture across diverse disciplines, presented at the Vancouver Art Gallery from February 20 to June 20, 2016.

Assu’s 1UP relates to his larger body of work, specifically his Longhouse, Chilkat, and Interventions on the Imaginary series, which investigate theories of abstracting abstraction, the recreation of language, and decolonization. Recognizing art from the Northwest Coast is a form of abstraction that inspired artists from the surrealist and cubist movements, Assu witnesses this gaze and influence by making work in response. With 1UP, Assu seeks to comment on the land, honouring and making visible the parallel narratives of Indigenous people and the histories of this place, now known as Surrey city centre. Sonny Assu thanks Mark Mushet for adding the video elements into 1UP.


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

ELIZABETH ZVONAR THE EXPERIENCE, 2015

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

Launch Exhibition


LAUNCH EXHIBITION

APRIL 1—8

THE PRIZE

THE LIND PRIZE OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 7–10 PM Roundhouse Community Arts and Recreation Centre EXHIBITION HOURS

MONDAY–FRIDAY, 9–9 PM; SAT & SUN, 9 AM–5 PM This year’s Capture Photography Festival launches on April 1 in conjunction with the opening reception of the inaugural Philip B. Lind Emerging Artist Prize and exhibition. The prize has been established to support emerging artists working with photography, film, and video. Each year, post-secondary visual arts instructors are invited to nominate a student enrolled in a BFA or MFA program. Shortlisted students have their work exhibited as part of the Lind Prize exhibition. This year’s winner will be selected and announced during the April 1 opening celebration.

The Philip B. Lind Emerging Artist Prize is made possible with generous support from Rogers Communications. Rogers made a significant donation to Presentation House Gallery to honour Phil Lind’s forty-five years of service and contribution to the company and the communications industry, and to celebrate his passion for the Vancouver art scene, at the time of his retirement last year. The 2016 jury includes Stephen Waddell (artist and Emily Carr University of Art + Design faculty member), Helga Pakasaar (Curator, Presentation House Gallery), and Reid Shier (Director/Curator, Presentation House Gallery). The shortlisted emerging artists for the inaugural prize are: KERRI FLANNIGAN University of Victoria EMILY GEEN University of Victoria CURTIS GRAHAUER Simon Fraser University POLINA LASENKO Emily Carr University of Art + Design BRANDON POOLE University of Victoria ANNA SHKURATOFF University of Victoria VILHELM SUNDIN Simon Fraser University LAUREN TSUYUKI Simon Fraser University The winner will be awarded $5,000 toward the production of a new work to be included in an exhibition at the future Polygon Gallery in 2017.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

THE EXHIBITION

opposite—top KERRI FLANNIGAN CATCHING STONES AND THROWING HAMMERS:

Kerri Flannigan’s stop-motion animation maps the exterior of a now defunct institution for the intellectually disabled, using changes wrought to the building’s facade since the mid nineteenth century as a vocabulary of exclusion to explore the ideological borders between healthy and sick, normal and deviant. Emily Geen is engaged in an ongoing investigation into the contemporary condition of mediated looking. She purposely works with images that are amateur and ambiguous, using glass and other materials to fragment, obstruct, or otherwise direct our perception of the pictorial content. Curtis Grahauer’s 16 mm film installation depicts an environment that exemplifies the “super unnatural,” a term coined by the artist to identify the anthropogenic landscape that hides in plain sight, a grey area of obscured human influence between the natural and the naturalized. Polina Lasenko has photographed television newsreaders from video stills, drawing attention to their status as modern storytellers and to the divide between fact, fiction, and propaganda. A second series connects narratives of the familiar and the familial through the actions of sea, wind, and time, in prints drawn from personal and family archives.

Brandon Poole uses recycled materials to create rough sculptural supports for his meticulous HD videos. In these works, virtuality and materiality collide, as small fluttering movements break the flatness of the surface and trouble the stillness of the image. Anna Shkuratoff has made a series of videos dealing with the themes of longing and nostalgia in the production of lens-based work. The technical and formal implications of HD video are revealed through subtle interventions into the video plane that encourage close looking. Vilhelm Sundin’s video installations bring together the sublime and the everyday. In one, a giant moon hovers over the city, familiar but strange. In another, the tiny figure of a man can be seen smoking quietly on an apartment rooftop as smoke blankets the city. Lauren Tsuyuki’s two recent photographic projects consider the transformative nature of a fold. One series uses the process of folding to break apart narrative and memory, the other to accentuate the division between manual and digital processes.

THE WOODLANDS DEMOLITION, 2016 INK, PAINT, MASKING TAPE, PROJECTION STOP-MOTION ANIMATION ON A LOOP, APPROX. 5 MIN

opposite—bottom VILHELM SUNDIN SMOKE, 2016 HD VIDEO, SINGLE-SCREEN PROJECTION, 6 MIN 26 SEC


LAUNCH EXHIBITION

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016


LAUNCH EXHIBITION

opposite page LAUREN TSUYUKI MANUAL PHOTOSHOP, UNTITLED 04, 2014 APPROPRIATED IMAGES FROM LOVE MAGAZINE 6.5” x 10.5” ANNA SHKURATOFF TIRE SWING, 2015 HD VIDEO

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016


LAUNCH EXHIBITION

opposite page EMILY GEEN A VIEW TO CALL ONE’S OWN, 2015 INKJET PRINTS, REFLECTIVE GLASS, CLEAR GLASS, STEEL CURTIS GRAHAUER A DARK SHAPE ON THE HORIZON, 2015 PHOTOGRAPHS, 16 MM FILM LOOP PROJECTION

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

top POLINA LASENKO STORYTELLERS 5, 2015–16 SILVER GELATIN PRINT 11” x 14” (MATTED AND FRAMED) bottom BRANDON POOLE FLATTER MOVEMENT #2, 2015 TWO-CHANNEL HD VIDEO, 1 MIN LOOP


Exhibitions 43


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

opposite page BEATY BIODIVERSITY MUSEUM PASSENGER PIGEON, ECTOPISTES MIGRATORIUS

OCTOBER 2015 — FEBRUARY 2017

100 YEARS, 100 TREASURES Sheila Byers Don Griffiths Kirsten Hodge Darren Irwin Linda Jennings Mairin Kerr Brian Leander Olivia Lee Wayne Maddison Karen Needham Ada Sin Derek Tan Eric Taylor David Turner Christopher Stinson Yukiko Stranger-Galey Ildiko Szabo Jeannette Whitton RECEPTION

SATURDAY, MAY 28, 10 AM–5 PM Beaty Biodiversity Museum University of British Columbia 2212 Main Mall Vancouver BC

100 Years, 100 Treasures is a celebration of the University of British Columbia’s centennial by its natural history museum. The Beaty Biodiversity Museum is opening its cabinets and revealing 100 of its most spectacular treasures through breathtaking photography in an online exhibition at BeatyTreasures.com. Community members have shared their stories about these objects, and the public has been asked to vote on their favourite treasure. These images are currently on display in an interactive installation in the museum. In May 2016, in response to the public’s votes, an exhibition of the top treasures will be unveiled. From the largest creature to have ever lived on earth, the blue whale; to the passenger pigeon, an abundant species brought to extinction by humans 100 years ago; to some of the earliest records of knowledge exchange about uses of native plants between European settlers and local First Nations in British Columbia, these treasures tell important tales. Beaty Biodiversity Museum hopes this project will encourage public dialogue and debate on how these objects are used and understood in different communities in the past and present, and where they might hold a place in the future.


EXHIBITIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016


EXHIBITIONS

JANUARY 21 — APRIL 10

MARCH 5 — APRIL 24

MARCH 14 — MAY 31

A TERRIBLE BEAUTY: EDWARD BURTYNSKY IN DIALOGUE WITH EMILY CARR

NO NAME CREEK Zebulon Zang

BALLET BC 30TH ANNIVERSARY PHOTO EXHIBITION

CURATED BY

Michael Slobodian

Edward Burtynsky

Gregory Elgstrand PRESENTED BY

CURATED BY

Bruce Grenville, Senior Curator, Vancouver Art Gallery The Reach Gallery Museum 32388 Veterans Way Abbotsford BC A Terrible Beauty presents a selection of photographs by Edward Burtynsky in dialogue with paintings and drawings by Emily Carr. Though working in different mediums and over fifty years apart, both artists sought to record the changing, industrialized landscape and our place within it. A Terrible Beauty is organized and circulated by the Vancouver Art Gallery with the generous support of the Killy Foundation.

Art Gallery at Evergreen 1205 Pinetree Way Coquitlam BC In No Name Creek, Zebulon Zang presents a collection of work in photography, film, and sculpture that trains sights on the frequently overlooked and often downright ignored spaces and places in the city. These may, in fact, provide a truer description of the nature and condition of the city than the well-known asphalt and concrete highways and byways that connect strip malls and power centres, parks and leisure centres, formula shops and chain restaurants. In Maillardville, the original centre of Coquitlam, a small creek flows toward the Fraser River, where, just before being diverted under Lougheed Highway, it runs alongside a big-box grocery store. Beyond the expansive parking lot and hidden among a wild tangle of blackberry bushes, the national chain has branded the creek with a sign in its signature “no name” brand font, proclaiming it “No Name Creek.” This no-naming is the kind of non-definition of no-place that stands as a representative anecdote for the city in No Name Creek. In a balance between the distinctive natural landscape and the increasingly homogenous social aspects of specific suburban areas, the exhibition looks to the surfaces of the city to understand how they may be unintentionally understood.

opposite page EDWARD BURTYNSKY

The exhibition is supported by a grant from the BC Arts Council.

SHIPYARD #7, QILI PORT, ZHEJIANG PROVINCE, CHINA, 2005 CHROMOGENIC COLOUR PRINT 48” x 60” © EDWARD BURTYNSKY, COURTESY OF NICHOLAS METIVIER GALLERY / PAUL KUHN GALLERY, CALGARY

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BC Ballet Scotiabank Dance Centre 677 Davie St Vancouver BC Michael Slobodian’s fascination with movement, passion for dance, and ability to catch the perfect lighting, feeling, and line has sculpted his work for almost four decades and has made him one of the most important and internationally recognized dance photographers in Canada. This exhibition is a celebration of Ballet BC’s enduring relationship with this compelling photographer, showcasing Slobodian’s incredible talent for capturing the physicality and beauty of the human body in motion as artistic expression. Celebrating its thirtieth anniversary this year, Ballet BC is a collaborative and creationbased contemporary ballet company, comprising seventeen talented dancers from Canada and around the world who combine classical integrity with a contemporary sensibility. Solidly grounded in the foundation of ballet with an emphasis on innovation and the immediacy of the twenty-first century, the company presents a distinct and diverse repertoire by the most sought-after Canadian and international choreographers today.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

ZEBULON ZANG NO NAME CREEK, 2015 10” x 8” opposite page MICHAEL SLOBODIAN BALLET BC DANCER GILBERT SMALL, 2013


EXHIBITIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016


EXHIBITIONS

opposite page EVAN LEE FROM FUGAZI, 2016 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT 60” x 60” COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND MONTE CLARK GALLERY KAREN ZALAMEA LIGHT & VARIATION NO. 3, 2015 ARCHIVAL GICLÉE PRINT ON PHOTOGRAPH 36” x 48”

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

MARCH 12 ­— APRIL 9

MARCH 12 ­— APRIL 23

MARCH 17 — APRIL 9

FUGAZI

THE MOON AND OTHER MYTHS

SPECTRES OF DESIRE

Evan Lee

Ryan Peter

Karen Zalamea

OPENING RECEPTION

CURATED BY

SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 2–4 PM Monte Clark Gallery 105–525 Great Northern Way Vancouver BC

Pantea Haghighi

Fugazi consists of visually stunning 5 x 5 ft prints created from digital scans of cubic zirconia, relatively inexpensive but highquality imitations of diamonds (“fugazi” is a slang term used in mafia films for counterfeit diamonds). The images are captured at a high level of detail and enlarged 15,000 percent to a scale that renders the gems’ internal appearance mesmerizingly random, distorted, and fractured, while the effects of digital image loss and artifacting emerge to aid in their visual transformation. The patterns and reflected colours appear kaleidoscopic and at times groundless, an aesthetic that Lee manipulates further by constructing geometric backgrounds in response to the resulting visual space.   Lee’s project reflects on his earlier works, such as the Dollar Store Still Life series (2006), which also examines the economic and cultural values of fake and artificial consumer goods. Fugazi also continues Lee’s take on representations of psychedelia, illusion, and optics, as explored in such earlier works as Every Part from a Contaflex Camera . . . (2006) and the Stain (2003) and Phoropter (2012) series. Lee’s practice has always been positioned both alongside and against the grain of photography, and Fugazi continues the artist’s image production in the avant-garde reaches of the post-photographic or camera-less digital realm.

Franc Gallery 1654 Franklin St Vancouver BC

OPENING RECEPTION

SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 2–4 PM Republic Gallery 732 Richards St (Third Floor) Vancouver BC For his fourth solo exhibition with Republic Gallery, Ryan Peter presents a group of new photo-based works. An extension of his Autogram series, The Moon and Other Myths includes a selection of large-scale unique silver gelatin prints. Along with more traditional darkroom processes such as dodging and burning, the works are made by collaging and contact printing “textures” that consist of acrylic paints on translucent polyester and polypropylene films—plastic on plastic. 

Developed through the lens of many disciplines, Karen Zalamea’s process involves image making through handson material engagement. As exhibited in Spectres of Desire, Zalamea creates light forms as photographic subject matter. These images demonstrate the direct relationship between lens, light, and subject and function as evidentiary threads of process. The resultant works combine the unhurried nature of large-format analogue photography and the immediacy of light and its spectral potential.

This uneasy union between synthetic materials produces uncannily natural results: fractal forms that evoke numerous phenomena, from rock formations to wood panelling. In this way, the works present a temporal excavation, resuscitating the organic ancestries of these petroleum products and, in doing so, conjure Georges Bataille’s concept of the ghost as “the perfect heterogeneous space, between life and death.” These allusions to the distant past—and the prehistoric life forms whose deaths have fuelled the future—are complicated by references to more recent imaging technology, such as Photoshopped drop shadows. The exhibition additionally includes new cyanotype prints on canvas, furthering the artist’s investigation into the relationship between painting and photography.

opposite page RYAN PETER UNTITLED (AUTOGRAM), 2015 CYANOTYPE ON UNIQUE GELATIN SILVER PRINT 16” x 20”


EXHIBITIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016


EXHIBITIONS

THE BURIAL OF JOHN SMITH, SPENCES BRIDGE, APRIL 23, 1905 SILVER PRINT (UL #1023) COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY, RARE BOOKS AND SPECIAL COLLECTION, UNO LANGMANN FAMILY COLLECTION OF BC PHOTOGRAPHS

MARCH 30 — JUNE 26

NANITCH: EARLY PHOTOGRAPHS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FROM THE LANGMANN COLLECTION OPENING RECEPTION

SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 7 PM Presentation House Gallery 333 Chesterfield Ave North Vancouver BC NANITCH offers the first look into the Uno Langmann Family Collection of BC Photographs, an important archive of over 18,000, rarely seen photographs recently donated to the University of British Columbia Library by Vancouver’s Uno and Dianne Langmann and Uno Langmann Ltd. Spanning a sixty-year period from the 1860s to the early 1920s, this groundbreaking exhibition reveals dramatic changes in the province, as well as in how and why photographs were made. The dynamic display of photographic material shows how the official activities of nineteenth-century working photographers using large-format cameras evolved with the introduction of amateur cameras and mass distribution of promotional photography.   NANITCH also brings to light new interpretations of the early history of British Columbia. The significant role of the camera in colonization is suggested by the

55

exhibition title, NANITCH, meaning “to look” in Chinook jargon—the trade language of the Pacific Northwest at that time. Questioning colonialist narratives of progress, the exhibition emphasizes the contradictions of settlement. Early photographs of official land surveys, family portraits, industrial ventures, commerce, political events, Indigenous peoples and their displacement are brought into dialogue with dystopian conditions of failure. The exhibition features rare albums of photographs, ranging from the first nineteenth-century government expeditions in the province to the turn-of-the-century, utopic community of Wallachin, which promoted land to entice settlers. Key photographers highlighted include Frederick Dally, Charles Horetzky, Charles McMunn, Hannah and Richard Maynard, Ben Leeson, and Edward Curtis. NANITCH is a co-production of Presentation House Gallery and the University of British Columbia Library. The exhibition and publication are part of UBC Library’s Centennial programme.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

opposite page ADAD HANNAH AFTER MUYBRIDGE: WRESTLERS 2, 2016 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT 27” x 24¼”

MARCH 19­— APRIL 16

CASE STUDIES Adad Hannah

and video is cinematic and focuses on the discursive possibilities of performativity and photography and how, particularly in digital video, stillness can be distilled into an extended moment.

OPENING RECEPTION

SATURDAY, MARCH 19, 2–4 PM Equinox Gallery 525 Great Northern Way Vancouver BC Adad Hannah works within a photographic tradition that combines elements of very early photographic practices, film and video pioneers such as Andy Warhol and Nam June Paik, and the cinematographic approaches of photographers such as Jeff Wall and Cindy Sherman. Largely known for extending and exploring the photographic moment by stretching it out over time using a video camera pointed at tableaux vivants, Hannah’s approach to photography

Time and its complicated relationship to photography have been central to Hannah’s practice for more than a decade. In his new exhibition, Case Studies, Hannah has created three series of performancebased photographs and videos that explore the relationship between the human body, movement, and its photographic representations. Taking Eadweard Muybridge’s studies in human movement and motion as his starting point, this exhibition reverses Hannah’s stance to perform motion rather than stillness, joining together still images toward the illusion of movement.


EXHIBITIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016


EXHIBITIONS

opposite page EADWEARD MUYBRIDGE HUMAN AND ANIMAL LOCOMOTION: PLATE 521. A: WALKING. B: ASCENDING A STEP. C: THROWING THE DISK. D: USING A SHOVEL. E: USING A PICK., 1887 COLLOTYPE 11” x 10”

MARCH 19 — APRIL 16

BUILDING AN ATLAS Eadweard Muybridge OPENING RECEPTION

SATURDAY, MARCH 19, 2–4 PM Equinox Gallery 525 Great Northern Way Vancouver BC

Eadweard Muybridge is one of the most influential photographers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, known for his pioneering work in photographic studies of motion. Born in England, Muybridge immigrated to the United States as a young man but remained obscure until 1868 when his large landscape photographs of Yosemite Valley, California, made him world famous.

by using a galloping horse to trigger the shutters of a bank of cameras. Following his initial success with horses, Muybridge used his tripwire method to capture humans and animals engaged in over 700 different movements and actions. Comprising these hundreds of plates and thousands of individual exposures, Human and Animal Locomotion is a veritable atlas of imagery about movement and time.

Muybridge’s experiments in photographing motion began in the early 1870s, when Leland and Jane Stanford hired him to help prove that during a particular moment in a galloping horse’s gait, all four legs are off the ground simultaneously. Adapting the very latest technology to his ends, Muybridge finally proved his theory

Muybridge’s innovations as a photographer cannot be understated. In the new world that Muybridge envisioned and created, the depiction of moving things was freed from the limitations of memory or perception, and clearly anticipated coming developments in cinematic technologies.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

opposite page — top ALESSANDRO OLIVO SD 45 STUDENT JUMP, 2015 opposite page — bottom MARTA IWANEK SD 45 STUDENT TORONTO STAR, 2015 MISSISSAUGA, ON-MARCH 31 - Mumtaz Ibrahim plays with her father Adan at their host family’s home in Mississauga, March 31, 2015. Mumtaz Ibrahim was born with no right upper eyelid, a cleft skull and frontonasal dysplasia disfiguring her face. Through the Hospital for Sick Children’s Herbie Fund, which provides financial support to families from all over the world in need of treatment for their children, she was able to come to Canada for surgery.

MARCH 28 — APRIL 9

MARCH 29 — APRIL 5

2016 NATIONAL PICTURES OF THE YEAR NOMINEES

SD 45 ONE. FIVE: A SENSE OF PLACE

Group Exhibition

Jody Broomfield Cedric Burgers Craig Cameron Chris Kennedy Ross Penhall SD 45 students

CURATED BY

News Photographers Association of Canada OPENING RECEPTION

THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 6–8 PM Pendulum Gallery HSBC Building 885 West Georgia St Vancouver BC The News Photographers Association of Canada (NPAC) hosts the annual National Pictures of the Year awards each spring. This event is the largest annual photo contest in Canada, showcasing the best work of its members. It also recognizes the Photojournalist of the Year, Photograph of the Year, and Student Photographer of the Year. The awards competition further serves to provide members with important peer review of their work, as well as helping them to stay current with trends and techniques in photojournalism. The National Pictures of the Year awards has become the largest photojournalism competition, for both still photography and multimedia, in the country.

CURATED BY

Jackie Wong OPENING RECEPTION

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 6–8 PM West Vancouver Museum 680 17th St West Vancouver BC In SD 45 One. Five: A Sense of Place, local residents investigate their perceptions of West Vancouver’s social, cultural, economic, and topographical settings. Their personal inquiries of this distinct community are documented in a collaborative mural. Students, educators, politicians, artists, and architects have been directed to document their “community” using a camera. The resulting images have been brought together in the West Vancouver Museum, revealing the common thread that links these neighbours and what defines them as a distinct population.


EXHIBITIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

MARCH 30 — APRIL 26

PROJECT INSTANT V3.0: HOLD A MOMENT IN YOUR HAND Group Exhibition CURATED BY

Kathy Kinakin Nicole Langdon-Davies

In a time when digital cameras and smartphones provide truly instant gratification by displaying a moment in time almost as it passes, the term “instant photograph” is somewhat of a misnomer, being that they can take a period of up to twenty minutes to develop. The instant photograph is, however, an immediately tangible object, whereas the digital image remains ethereal unless printed at a later time.

PRESENTED BY

Beau Photo OPENING RECEPTION

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 6–8 PM Science World at TELUS World of Science 1455 Quebec St Vancouver BC

Project Instant V3.0: Hold a Moment in Your Hand brings together photographers who want to see photographs as immediately physical objects. Being able to hold the image, put it in a pocket, or pass it around is part of what makes it important. Contributors to the exhibition include young people with an eye for detail, emerging photographers, and established artists who use instant film as one of many mediums. The subject matter varies but the materiality of the photograph is the common theme. The film used ranges from Fujifilm Instax Mini, Polaroid, and Impossible SX-70 film up to 8 x 10 instant images. The exhibition also explores the science behind the photograph, providing information about the technology of instant film. The art and science of instant film are inextricably linked, and one can more fully appreciate the one with an understanding of the other.

NICOLE LANGDON-DAVIES DOLL’S HEAD, 2015 IMPOSSIBLE CYAN 600 MONOCHROME FILM opposite page VALERIE DURANT CROSSING, 2008 ARCHIVAL PRINT 40” x 30”


EXHIBITIONS

MARCH 31 — APRIL 30

INTERWEAVE AFRICA Valerie Durant CURATED BY

Janine Vertone OPENING RECEPTION

SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 12–5 PM Ukama Gallery 1802 Maritime Mews Vancouver BC Interweave Africa explores the convergence of African cultures, past and present, within today’s global society. Climate change has emerged as the greatest challenge facing humanity, threatening human and animal existence. Extreme weather events and increased temperatures resulting in flooding and droughts are having unavoidable impact on food and water security and human health, particularly in Africa. Those who contribute the least to climate change are emerging as the most affected. Environmental degradation from intensive agricultural practices and resource exploitation has intensified the issues in many African regions. Rural to urban migration—brought about by economic and geopolitical influences, the impact of colonization, partitioning, and, more recently, extreme climate events and food insecurity—has led to destabilization and displacement. The images selected for Interweave Africa take a humanistic approach, drawing links between the social, economic, and ecological interweave of people and their deep-rooted connection to place. The exhibition reflects upon the impact of human interventions on the culture and livelihoods of people and their interdependence with the natural world.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

opposite page GOGA BAYAT UNTITLED 2, 2011

MARCH 31 — APRIL 8

INTERVALS: PHOTOGRAPHY IN FLUX Goga Bayat David Ellingsen Jim Friesen Diana Nicholette Jeon Edward Peck Phyllis Schwartz Andrew Ward CURATED BY

Edward Peck Phyllis Schwartz OPENING RECEPTION

THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 7–9 PM South Main Gallery 279 East 6th Ave Vancouver BC Intervals: Photography in Flux is an exhibition about the transitory nature of photography. Every image, depending on time, location, viewer, and context, is constantly in transition. Photographers create meaning that fluctuates in the intervals between their images—whether it be the intervals between the shutter opening and closing, the intervals between the images on the wall, the interval between the image and the material on which it is presented, or the interval between the meaning that arises and changes in the viewer as they move between images. Intervals presents the work of seven contemporary photographers based in Vancouver, Victoria, Los Angeles, Honolulu, and Iran who explore the rhythms and tension of their geographical, social, and psychological landscapes. Andrew Ward and David Ellingsen both explore the obsolesce and disposal resulting from a fast-paced economy, reminding us of the rapid fluctuations of our material world.

Diana Nicholette Jeon turns the camera on herself, processing her emotions into an expression of her views on women’s identity and environmental issues. Goga Bayat’s and Jim Friesen’s works explore inner psychological landscapes, resulting in poetic visual imagery. Edward Peck’s abstraction of the Icelandic landscape leads into Phyllis Schwartz’s analogue/digital, cameraless image-making process, which results in abstract landscape forms. Intervals: Photography in Flux is a collection of unique and unusual digital and photographic processes that are rarely seen in one setting. The methods and techniques range from those used long before the invention of the camera to the advanced technology available to artists today.


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EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 1 — 16

APRIL 1 — 21

THE ACT OF CREATION, PRESENTATION AND CONSUMPTION

SANDOKAI: GRASPING AT THINGS IS SURELY DELUSION Josema Zamorano

Group Exhibition CURATED BY CURATED BY

Manuel Piña-Baldoquín

Alex Waber Lynol Lui Roxanne Gagnon

OPENING RECEPTION

PRESENTED BY

Arts Umbrella OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 6–9 PM Remington Gallery 108 East Hastings St Vancouver, BC Arts Umbrella and Remington Gallery come together to curate an evolving exhibition that depends on the participation of visitors. The act of creation, presentation and consumption presents an exploration of the process of creation and sharing through an emphasis on teen photography. Instant production, Snapchat, Instagram, and temporary art will be discussed inside Arts Umbrella’s classrooms and encouraged in the space of the gallery, where images taken throughout the school year by Arts Umbrella students will be displayed alongside Polaroids taken by visitors to the exhibition.

SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 2–4 PM Back Gallery Project 602 East Hastings St Vancouver BC Sandokai is a poem by the Chinese Zen master Sekito Kisen (700–790 CE), chanted daily in temples around Japan and the world. Extravagantly polysemous, this key Zen text expresses, among other things, the merging of the relative and the absolute, of difference and unity, of reality and perspective.

and into the age of social media—that is, that a photograph fixes appearances— Zamorano unfixes reality to release the perspectives contained therein. He achieves this by performing multiple exposures of alternate gazes and creating a single cubist photograph. Zamorano’s work also calls forth a fundamental premise of Japan’s Shinto religion. According to this tradition, the Utsushiyo (visible or material world) and Reikai (invisible world of spirits) are part of one another. Events in both realms have a consequence on reality as a whole. As the wavering appearances of these images suggest, Josema’s work is an investigation of the reunion of the visible, the invisible, and imagined worlds.

Josema Zamorano’s work in the streets of Japan evokes one of Sandokai’s lines: “Grasping at things is surely delusion.” Aiming to subvert a ubiquitous premise of the photographic image that’s been held throughout the history of photography

opposite page — top LYNOL LUI POLAROID, 2016 opposite page — bottom JOSEMA ZAMORANO SANDOKAI TOKYO #10, 2015 INKJET PRINT MOUNTED ON ALUMINUM DIBOND 36” x 24”

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

APRIL 1 — 30

DO YOU DREAM OF SUNSHINE WHEN YOU SLEEP? Campbell + Killough CURATED BY

Avalon Mott OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 7–10 PM FIELD Contemporary 17 West Broadway Vancouver BC Do You Dream of Sunshine When You Sleep? focuses on the relationship between light, atmosphere, and healing. Using both art and design, Campbell + Killough have constructed an experiential environment that explores the healing properties of light and form through photography and sculpture. The placement of objects and their orientation visually guides the viewer into a fully curated experience, and, through the juxtaposition of furniture and sculpture with photographic prints, the viewer will be able to experience two-dimensional impressions of light with three-dimensional experiences of light. Do You Dream of Sunshine When You Sleep? calls for the viewer to sit, reflect, heal, and frame the world around them.

CAMPBELL + KILLOUGH THROUGH A BLUE CLOUD ALL THE LIGHT LOOKS THE SAME, 2016 CYANOTYPE 36” x 48” opposite page ALAN JACQUES LIBRAIRIE PAUL VULIN, 2003 SILVER GELATIN FIBRE PRINT


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 1 — 7

VANCOUVER & PARIS: THE STREET PHOTOGRAPHS OF ALAN JACQUES Alan Jacques CURATED BY

James Emler OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 7–9 PM Visual Space Gallery 3352 Dunbar St Vancouver BC

Vancouver & Paris is a project that has its roots in 1984 Europe, planted during Alan Jacques’s first visit to Paris. Now, thirtytwo years later, this project can be seen as a retrospective of the artist’s street photography work—but it is also much more than that. Not only does the exhibition document Jacques’s impressions of each city, but it also illustrates his creative response to the trials and constrictions placed upon him by Parkinson’s disease. Each exhibited photograph was created using a low or unusual camera position and a prominent wide-angle lens to showcase the unique visual elements present in both cities. Vancouver & Paris features 16” x 20” silver gelatin fibre prints handcrafted by master printer Trevor Martin.

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JON RAFMAN MAINSQUEEZE (STILL), 2014


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 1 — 30

JON RAFMAN + MARK SOO Jon Rafman Mark Soo CURATED BY

Wil Aballe OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 7–9 PM Wil Aballe Art Project 105–1356 Frances St Vancouver BC

Mark Soo’s Koons on Ice features a computer-modelled version of Jeff Koons pornographic Made in Heaven sculpture, with the glass-like bodies acting as an ad hoc lens through which to surveil public scenes. The result is a speculation, at once factual yet hyperreal. The glass interprets the physical laws of optics and explores the phenomena of transparent bodies in space as a visual metaphor for the digital world. Soo’s companion work, You can see the weakness of a man right through his iris, is a further exploration of shapes, bodies, and optics. These protograms bring to mind the instinctive relationship that connects eye to phallus, phallus to lens, and lens as a fundament to the act of vision and photography. Jon Rafman examines the role that technology plays in contemporary life. In Mainsqueeze he surveys and collages clips from the darker corners of the Internet to explore the alienating effects associated with obscure subcultures. Meanwhile, a new, large, resin-poured photograph questions how it is that we, as a society, have premised that technological advances will bring about utopia, only to then discredit any and all utopias as organizing principles for our society via our individualistic impulses.

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opposite page ERIN O’KEEFE THINGS AS THEY ARE #28, 2015 ARCHIVAL INKJET PRINT 20” x 16”

APRIL 2 — 30

THINGS AS THEY ARE Erin O’Keefe OPENING RECEPTION

SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 2–4 PM Gallery Jones Unit 1–258 East 1st Ave Vancouver BC

New York City–based artist Erin O’Keefe, a trained architect, utilizes tools in her art making that are grounded in the formal language of making, as developed through architectural practice. Her photographic work explores the nature of spatial perception and the layer of distortion and misapprehension introduced by the camera.


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EXHIBITIONS

opposite page ROY ARDEN WOUND, VANCOUVER, 1981–85 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT 8” x 8” COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND MONTE CLARK GALLERY

APRIL 2 — 30

FRAGMENTS Roy Arden Monte Clark Gallery 105–525 Great Northern Way Vancouver BC Roy Arden’s Fragments is a suite of intimate colour photographs produced between 1981 and 1985 in Vancouver, Paris, Geneva, and Berlin. Arden was twenty-four years old in 1981 and Fragments was his first body of mature work, started in his last year as a student at what was then Emily Carr College of Art. Arden has said that he was looking for “a mode of photography that could function as a lyrical but realist poetry.” Fragments is largely composed of portraits or figure studies, presented alongside details of urban texture, including natural phenomena.

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Arden chose to work with a vintage twin-lens Rolleiflex, preferring the larger negative and the slower operation of this camera over the speed and ease of a 35 mm camera. The tenor of Fragments is essentially melancholic; as the artist explains, “I was looking for that time and space that meansend rationality had overlooked.” In these photos the liquid texture of the Ektachrome film is wilfully exploited. Objects are drawn out of darkness by the light, which is often harsh or cruel, and a shallow depth-of-field is recurrently employed in the service of a poetics of appearance.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

BRIAN HOWELL ASIAN COUGAR, FROM THE WRESTLER SERIES, 2002 ARCHIVAL INK JET PRINT ON PAPER 31” x 31”

APRIL 2 — 27

BRIAN HOWELL: A SURVEY Brian Howell OPENING RECEPTION

SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 2–4 PM Winsor Gallery 258 East 1st Ave Vancouver BC Brian Howell is a Canadian photographer, notable for large-scale projects that examine vernacular expressions of shifting societal and personal values. His subjects are drawn from fringe or marginalized communities— people and places resonant with allegorical meanings for an age that seems to Howell to be both broken and blinded. Howell’s photographic series build on a truth-telling mantra of an earlier era of documentarians, though they are given structure and further meaning by a more rigorous contemporary, conceptual framework. This survey exhibition features works from a number of Howell’s large-scale projects from the past twenty-five years.


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EXHIBITIONS

opposite page — top JAEDAN CHAYCE LEIMERT LAC-MÉGANTIC, 2016

APRIL 7 — MAY 14

opposite page — bottom

WHAT IS LOVE

ANGELA FAMA DEBBIE INTERIOR (WHAT IS LOVE), 2015

Angela Fama CURATED BY

Kate Bellringer OPENING RECEPTION

THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 7–10 PM Burrard Arts Foundation 108 East Broadway Vancouver BC The concept of love has been the driving force behind the creation of some of our greatest works of art, our best-known philosophies, and our most severe behaviours. While Webster’s Dictionary defines love as “a feeling of strong or constant affection for a person,” this uniform definition precludes our understanding that the human experience of love is varied. APRIL 5 — MAY 7

EIDOLICON Jaedan Chayce Leimert OPENING RECEPTION

TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 7 PM Robert Lynds Gallery THE GALLERY’S NEW LOCATION WILL BE ANNOUNCED THE DAY OF THE OPENING SEE ROBERTLYNDSGALLERY.COM FOR DETAILS

EIDOLICON runs the gamut of tragedy, ranging from atrocity and social injustice to personal bereavement and material impermanence. Jaedan Chayce Leimert’s images are contextually heavy-handed but simultaneously conflicted by the ephemeral nature of their materials (static-held toner, birch bark, exterminated hornet nests). The exhibition brings to light the empathetic power of iconic imagery and the fleetingness of memory while also questioning our mediated understanding of current events through photography.

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Angela Fama began What Is Love in response to this standardized definition. With the aim of unifying communities’ past perceived differences and together redefining the word “love,” in May and June 2015 Fama and her assistant, Joel Tong, visited more than twenty locations across Canada and the United States. Using the same setup for each portrait session within her travelling RV studio, Fama sat with interested adult passersby and discussed the word “love.” She asked the same question of everyone and documented the process by capturing a consistent set of photographs timed with the discussion and recording the stories shared. The project has been created with the intent of comparative viewing. What Is Love is housed under the umbrella project Wabisabi Butterfly, begun by Fama in 2010 with the concept of bringing together adult survivors of trauma and sexual abuse to form safe, respectful, and inclusive communities engaged in the arts and positive change.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

APRIL 7 — MAY 14

APRIL 7 — 21

EARTH TO EARTH, ASHES TO ASHES, DUST TO DUST

LIGHT AND THE SOCIAL ORDER

Randy Grskovic

Louise Francis-Smith CURATED BY

Ewan McNeil CURATED BY

Kate Bellringer OPENING RECEPTION

THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 7–10 PM Burrard Arts Foundation 108 East Broadway Vancouver BC Unlike most photographers, Randy Grskovic uses the darkroom as a starting point for his work. He is affected by the chemistry, geology, and memory of the process. In combination with the science behind the darkroom, Grskovic uses content from history by purchasing glass negatives, smashing them, and printing the result. In each session he shatters the image more, making it impossible to recreate a previously printed image. For him, this Sisyphean process of printing a negative, breaking it, and printing it again until it’s finally dust illustrates his fascination with memory and how each time a memory is accessed it is unavoidably altered. His interest lies in the interruption of photographic tropes to challenge our understanding of historic composition and content.

OPENING RECEPTION

THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 6–9 PM Covan02 Art Gallery 148 Alexander St Vancouver BC In the 1960s, Vancouver’s Chinatown organized against the city’s slum clearance and freeway plans. A freeway would have been a concrete knife cut through the heart of Chinatown, inducing the collapse of its social structure. Once again, Chinatown is undergoing dramatic physical and social change. The colour and fabric of this historic neighbourhood are fading. Traditional businesses are closing at exponential rates to be replaced by cafes, skateboard shops, upscale restaurants, and art galleries. Signage everywhere promotes new condo developments. In Light and the Social Order, Louise FrancisSmith sees an elderly population and a way of life passing.

opposite page RANDY GRSKOVIC MEMORY 1 (ITERATION 3), 2016 GELATIN SILVER PRINTV V


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opposite page LOUISE FRANCIS-SMITH MAILBOX, 2014 ARCHIVAL INKJET PRINT 19” x 19” KEN BURTON NORTHUMBERLAND HOUSE, BEECHY ISLAND, 2015


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 7 — JULY 3

ARCTIC ENCOUNTERS Group Exhibition Vancouver Maritime Museum 1905 Ogden Ave Vancouver BC In August 2015, the Vancouver Maritime Museum sent staff aboard a One Ocean Expeditions cruise ship travelling through the Arctic to present an exhibition that focuses on John Franklin and the European efforts to find the Northwest Passage. This, however, is only one side of a multifaceted story. The Vancouver Maritime Museum staff also took this opportunity to document their experience in the Arctic through photographs as well as to solicit images from local community members, including the archivist of Pond Inlet, Nunavut, who provided photographs of contemporary life in the Arctic. Arctic Encounters presents audiences with unique views of the modern Northwest Passage and the people who call the Arctic home. Photographs from the Pond Inlet archives are presented alongside the photographs of the museum staff’s Arctic trip, revealing the contemporary social and environmental landscapes of Canada’s Far North.

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opposite page BILIANA VELKOVA LAKE LOUISE SCENE, 2012 DIGITAL PRINT ON DIBOND 24” x 36” next spread — left MERLE ADDISON RUBY’S LIGHT, 2015 DIGITALLY MANIPULATED PHOTOGRAPH 9.3” x 14”

APRIL 7 — MAY 7

APRIL 7 — 28

ANÁLEKTA: THE FLOWERINESS, THE BARENESS

FAKE PLASTIC TREES

Merle Addison

Biliana Velkova CURATED BY

Leah Taylor CURATED BY

Glenn Alteen Dana Claxton OPENING RECEPTION

THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 7–10 PM grunt gallery Unit 116–350 East 2nd Ave Vancouver BC This exhibition of new works by Merle Addison documents his switch from analogue to digital. Reworking old works using digital overlays, the final prints in Análekta: the floweriness, the bareness owe as much to printmaking as photography. At once modern and nostalgic, the works transform the media through their highly manipulated surfaces.

impacted the way in which she perceives the “West,” leading her to interrogate issues of capitalism, appropriation, and Western femininity. Although her interdisciplinary practice focuses on social and political issues from a critical perspective, her delivery is optimistic, convivial, and often humorous.

OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 7 PM Tartooful 3183 Edgemont Blvd North Vancouver BC fake plastic trees presents Biliana Velkova’s observations on the branding and commodification of nature. She romanticizes, exaggerates, and complicates the exploitation of nature and nature as artifice, directly referencing tourist tropes found throughout the Saskatchewan prairies and Alberta’s Rocky Mountains.

From iconic fake palm trees found throughout Saskatoon to the majestic views of Lake Louise, Velkova’s cinematic photographs conflate opulence and kitsch. The glossy images of fake plastic trees create a spectacle from everyday encounters. Through her Bulgarian lens, Velkova inserts the narrative of the other by presenting alternative ways of viewing and interpreting the Canadian landscape, ultimately problematizing the ubiquitous images of Canadian identity, creating space for a more polycentric, multicultural history.

Born in Sofia, Bulgaria, Velkova lived under the Communist regime until immigrating to Canada in 1991 at the age of fifteen. Her memories of communism have deeply

“When an outsider comes to a new place, he sees the picturesque and the freakish, whereas the local sees through layers of emotion and memory.”— Walter Benjamin


EXHIBITIONS

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EXHIBITIONS

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EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 7 — 23

APRIL 8 — MAY 14

APRIL 8 — MAY 14

OBJECTSUBJECT

STRAIT GOODS

PLANT LIFE

Peppa Martin

David Crompton

Alex Waber

OPENING RECEPTION

CURATED BY

CURATED BY

THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 6:30–8:30 PM truth and beauty gallery 698 West 16 Ave Vancouver BC

Tarah Hogue Julia Kreutz

Tarah Hogue

ObjectSubject combines visual and descriptive storytelling of personal relationships through object biographies. The photographed objects, often regarded as touchstones of past relationships, act as agents of shared experience found at the improbable intersection of absence and presence. Material histories deposit into memory the small dramas of everyday life, thus acting as tangible placeholders for a time, place, or event that would otherwise exist only in the abstract. Material histories reflect temporal continuity—with the object assuming the role of physical agent for a shared experience— such that a personal narrative of the past is easily reconstructed from them. Often, they propose their own surrogate relationship and serve to explore our understandings of the universal human experience of being attached to people and things. The forty-eight objects of ObjectSubject were collected, photographed, and documented over a period of two years. While the contributors are anonymous, their gender is identified in the companion exhibition catalogue of the object-images and subjectstories.

OPENING RECEPTION OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 8–11 PM The Gam Gallery 110 East Hastings St Vancouver BC Strait Goods is a collection of images made while crossing the Strait of Georgia by ferry from the mainland to Vancouver Island on Canada’s West Coast. If the photographs are portraits, they are oblique portraits. Viewed from above, the subjects do not reveal themselves through their eyes but, instead, through their physical forms, gestures, clothing, and the personal belongings that surround them. In the images passengers sun, smoke, and sleep through the seasons while the set remains essentially the same: an industrial grey ship deck, an ashtray, a garbage bin, and a line of lifejacket trunks turned furniture. The minimal geometric stage provides the perfect common denominator for these strangers to reveal their character and acts a catalyst for imagining the stories each of them might occupy outside the frame. Strait Goods began in 2011 and is an ongoing series.

FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 8–11 PM The Gam Gallery 110 East Hastings St Vancouver BC Alex Waber’s Plant Life series focuses on the boundaries of the two-dimensional medium of photography. The images invite the viewer to experience the physical surface of the object as separate from the image just beyond, thereby shifting the narrative properties of the captured photograph. Narratives created around flowers are equally as rich as they are varied. Nearly every plant has a symbolic meaning, a scientific function, and an aesthetic quality.

previous spread — right ALEX WABER UNTITLED (PLANT LIFE) ARCHIVAL INKJET PRINT 11” x 14” opposite page — top PEPPA MARTIN CIGAR, 2014 DIGITAL CAPTURE opposite page — bottom DAVID CROMPTON STRAIT #13, 2012 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT INK PRINT

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

APRIL 8 — APRIL 18

APRIL 8 — 13

APRIL 9 — 23

COLOUR STORIES

BONSTARDT IS ALWAYS EXCITING ISN’T HE ISN’T HE

CONSTRUCT

Tanya Goehring Nariman J

Chris Shepherd David Lemon CURATED BY

CURATED BY

Lauren D. Zbarsky

Visual Space Gallery 3352 Dunbar St Vancouver BC

OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 8 PM–LATE Untitled Art Space 436 Columbia St Vancouver BC Photographer Tanya Goehring and creative director and stylist Nariman J worked collaboratively to create the photographic series Colour Stories. The series is a trip through the decades, playing on the aesthetic sensibilities of each period. Through their use of a limited colour palette within each photograph, Goehring and Nariman J explore a range of unique feelings that play out in a moving visual poetic. The set, created by Nariman J, and the lighting, designed by Goehring, are designed so that the resulting images appear to be two-dimensional, transporting the viewer into the duo’s collaborative and surreal world.

opposite page DAVID LEMON K 2, 2015

Bonstardt is always exciting isn’t he isn’t he is a body of photographs that will be made in the gallery over the course of the exhibition, which will then be uploaded to the Internet for whatever use the viewer may have for them, free of cost. Their subject will be materials brought into the gallery, which will be available for inspection—in whatever form they are left in—after each session. None of the photographs will be Photoshopped. The outcomes of these photos are unknown. “Bonstardt is always exciting isn’t he isn’t he” is a fragment of dialogue from the 1959 comedy recording The Critics by Ron Goodwin and Max Schreiner, performed by Peter Sellers and Irene Handl. This fragment has enlivened the artist’s experience of looking at and thinking about art, with the rhetorical question continuously popping up like a mind-worm.

Riko Nakasone OPENING RECEPTION

SATURDAY, APRIL 9, 2–4 PM Bau-Xi Gallery 3045 Granville St Vancouver BC Construct is a series of interventions on physical photographic prints. Through shredding, cutting, tearing, folding, crumpling, and other acts, Chris Shepherd rearranges and reconfigures photographic prints into sculptural forms. These new objects are then rephotographed, and the journey—from taking to making and back to taking—allows the viewer to re-evaluate the conventional language of photography. Memory, nostalgia, documentation, and other established tropes of the medium become secondary to the form and object, opening a dialogue about what photography is and means. Shepherd’s artistic practice to date has focused on large-scale photographic prints. Underpinning that work has always been an overriding interest and affection for the painting and sculpture of the geometric abstractionists of the 1960s and the contemporary and conceptual artists of today and the last fifty years. Construct is a conscious effort by the artist to move from “taking” pictures to “making” pictures within this frame of reference. The work in this series uses either existing artist proofs from Shepherd’s studio or newly photographed pieces specifically taken and printed to work with the new processes of manipulation. These processes deliberately avoid technology, opting instead for mundane and repetitive physical actions. This also adds an archaic, durational aspect to the work that is simultaneously uncomfortable and meditative.


EXHIBITIONS

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EXHIBITIONS

opposite page TANYA GOEHRING JADE, 2015 DIGITAL C-PRINT 29” x 36” CHRIS SHEPHERD RED BRICK WALL FOLDED, 2016 CHROMOGENIC PRINT 36” x 36”

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

APRIL 9 — JUNE 12

APRIL 11 — 28

I WAS HERE

AROUND HERE

Paulo Majano

Chris Gallagher

CURATED BY

CURATED BY

Brian Foreman

Chris Keatley

OPENING RECEPTION

OPENING RECEPTION

SATURDAY, APRIL 9, 7:30–9:30 PM Surrey Art Gallery 13750 88 Ave Surrey BC

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 6–8 PM Pendulum Gallery HSBC Building 885 West Georgia St Vancouver BC

Using augmented reality technology, Paulo Majano’s project I Was Here recreates the drama of everyday events in public outdoor spaces and parks across Surrey and its surrounding region. Each location is captured both as a photograph and as a 3D scan (created by scanning individual elements on location in three dimensions). Each resulting photograph contains within it a latent image—a three-dimensional photographic scene that when revealed, like the latent thought in Sigmund Freud’s theory of dreams, offers potentially different narratives and new layers of meaning. When each photo is viewed with a smartphone or tablet using an artist-developed augmentedreality application, the 3D scene becomes visible. The photographic image—at times revealing only partial subjects, or showing elements perhaps a little close to the edges—is an invitation for the viewer to interact with the scene and reframe the composition from different points of view. Through this virtual view, viewers can move in for a closer look, or look behind objects to reveal elements not initially visible in the original photo. Ironically, since the viewer must move around the photograph to fully see it, this virtual medium creates the potential for active, physical interactions.

Around Here combines motion-picture duration with the stasis of the fixed image through a technique the artist calls the radial pan. During exposure, the camera rotates precisely around the lens axis, bending the linear exposure time into a circle, forming a closed loop reminiscent of the film loop. A circle is understood with just a glance; it is narrative free and immune to temporality. Theoretically, at the infinitely small centre of a rotating circle—the dead centre— there is no movement, and this is revealed in the appearance of Chris Gallagher’s photographs. The image smear created by the radial camera’s movement shifts the subject’s representation from the real to the abstract, suggesting temporality as the dominant element of representation, rather than spatial depiction. The images of Around Here are an instant imbued with duration, a continuous moment to which the viewer brings their sense of self and seeks a point of identification. They oscillate between positioning themselves at the dead centre of the image, in the cryogenic stasis (the photograph) but longing for dynamic time and space, and as a satellite, whirling in the circle (the movie) of an unknowable space over an uncontrollable time, wishing for the transcendental stasis of the centre.

opposite page — top PAULO MAJANO THE PICNIC PARTY—REDWOOD PARK [49.034595N, 122.727962W] COLOUR PHOTOGRAPH WITH AUGMENTED REALITY INTERACTIVITY FOR SMARTPHONE opposite page — bottom CHRIS GALLAGHER FIRE IN THE HOLE, 2015 INKJET ON ALUMINUM 76 x 109 cm


EXHIBITIONS

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EXHIBITIONS

opposite page SANAZ MAZINANI EXPLOSION (DETAIL) PHOTOGRAPHS MIRROR MOUNTED ON DIBOND WITH CUSTOM WOODEN STRUCTURE 46” x 23.5” x 6.25”

APRIL 13 — JUNE 4

MIRRORED EXPLOSIONS Sanaz Mazinani CURATED BY

Pantea Haghighi OPENING RECEPTION

TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 7–9 PM West Vancouver Museum 680 17th St West Vancouver BC Mirror reflections have multifarious interpretations: some view the image as objective truth, while others identify its inherent reversal as proof of the mirror’s deception or illusion. Mirrors confine and frame the visible, although they may also exaggerate it infinitely—for example, when two mirrors face each other. We are so used to viewing our reflection on a daily basis that we often fail to see who or what is staring back. The same is true of the photographic image: despite the complexities of photography, even the most atrocious scenes of conflict and war dissolve in the indiscriminate and ubiquitous depictions encountered in the media. Sanaz Mazinani’s recent photographic collages physically jar these images out of this mediascape. By presenting chaotic explosions in mirrored, kaleidoscopic arrangements that refuse to lie flat,

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Mazinani impedes a passive spectatorship; the representation of conflict is both visual and haptic. Each work in Mirrored Explosions is an intervention in space, challenging the privileged vantage through which the politics of war are mediated. Problematizing both the mirrored reflection and the photographic lens, Mazinani ruptures our modes of observation, forcibly asking: How does an image’s mediation affect moral or political judgments? To what extent are these images real to us? How can the implications of war be more visibly, and tangibly, understood through representation?


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

opposite page — top VIKI WU UNTITLED 9, 2015 INKJET PRINT ON EPSON PHOTO MATTE PAPER 11” x 19” opposite page — bottom DINA GOLDSTEIN LIGHT BOX LAST SUPPER 32.5” x 58”

APRIL 14 — 30

APRIL 15 — JUNE 10

GODS OF SUBURBIA

IN A VAULTED ROOM: WORKS BY VIKI WU AND NEO TANG

Dina Goldstein

Meyvis Araniva

Neo Tang Viki Wu

OPENING RECEPTION

CURATED BY

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 7–9 PM South Main Gallery 279 East 6th Ave Vancouver BC

Tamla Mah

CURATED BY

Gods of Suburbia is a ten-part conceptual photography project analyzing religious faith within the modern context of technology, science, and secularism. The project challenges the viewer—religious or secular—to embark on a journey of self-reflection as they contemplate the relevance of ancient ethics and morals in a society characterized by materialism and consumerism.

OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 3–6 PM Art Beatus (Vancouver) 108–808 Nelson St Vancouver BC In a Vaulted Room brings together the work of Neo Tang and Viki Wu, both fourth year students at Simon Fraser University. Using a black and white photodocumentary style, Tang presents ten portraits of different women in his series Ten Sisters. However, the artist subverts the documentary style through the use of ambiguity—he does not define the relationship between the photographic subjects, who do not appear to be biological siblings. In addition to exploring the photographer/ audience relationship, Wu is interested in investigating the way the world is presented beyond the borders of the picture frame. In her work, Wu uses mirrors and live cameras to reveal and invert the invisible presence of the photographer into a performer in the act of picture taking.


EXHIBITIONS

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EXHIBITIONS

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APRIL 15 — MAY 28

APRIL 15 — MAY 28

APRIL 15 — 28

ALLEY 1_(112 E. PENDER ST.)

SPRING FORTH

Gerri York

YOU INHERITED THAT FROM YOUR FATHER! WE DANCE OUR NAME

CURATED BY

Mike Bourscheid

Michael Love Patryk Stasieczek

CURATED BY

OPENING RECEPTION

Michael Love Patryk Stasieczek

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 7–9 PM Lightbox Project Space at Gallery 295 295 East 2nd Ave (Back Alley Entrance) Vancouver BC Gerri York’s Alley 1_(112 E. Pender St.) explores the transformation of material matter through print media. Interested in surface characteristics of pictorial space in photography, York views the process of drawing with ink as concentration toward the materiality of an image, a foundation that bleeds from her background as a printmaker into her photographic practice. In the case of her Alley series, York explores the flowing pool of ink on transparent film, working intuitively and loosely on these forms to examine the ambiguities of chance and circumstance. For York, the spilling of ink on polyester film speaks to the material relationship of light and photography, and the transference of light through the translucent material via the presence of backlighting. York’s work takes up a multifaceted position within the Lightbox Project Space of Gallery 295, where the qualities of her exploration are deepened through installation as a large-scale backlit photographic image. The pooling of ink overlaid onto a banal street photograph transforms the image into a mise en scène. It is this essence in photography that interests York: the reflective and transparent nature of light and its collaboration with the material context of the photograph as it sets the stage for a juxtaposition of form. The resulting work recalls the past tense of photography, of an event that evokes an ineffable sense of absence.

Mayan Vered PRESENTED BY

Publik Secrets

OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 7–9 PM Gallery 295 295 East 2nd Ave (Back Alley Entrance) Vancouver BC Where lies the relationship between photography, performance, and object? In Mike Bourscheid’s solo exhibition, Gallery 295 becomes the site for a largescale sculpture surrounded with three photographs of the artist dressed as a ballet dancer. The sculpture, a large slanted glass object, is intersected by plush phallic objects, and Bourscheid’s selfportraits with these objects act as stand-ins for a performance and performer. Within the gallery setting, the artist sets the stage for a correspondence between cultural history, masculinity, fables, and the performed body. The conversation between these works allows for a candid arrangement of circumstances, all of which are emphasized by Bourscheid’s choreographed poses for the camera. The various flesh tones of the phallic, stuffed objects are mirrored in the photographic mount, where the analogue prints are bordered by brown and pink lace. This arrangement re-emphasizes the blurred distinction between photography’s ability to stand in place of the performance and the reliance of an observer. The photographic space bleeds into the sculptural installation and allows for a permeation of a performed body.

OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 7 PM Hadden Park Field House 1015 Maple St Vancouver BC With spring in the air and buds opening all over the city, Spring forth invites the viewer to take a closer look at the flowers that appear in the lush, urban landscape of Vancouver. Each flower, found around the city, is celebrated in its own imaginative scene. Crisp lines of petals contrasted by draping fabric pay respect to the rich history of still life photography, while bright colours and vases evoke product photography and the glossy pages of magazines. Set in lush Hadden Park, Spring forth allows the viewer to re-enter the park with a new perspective and appreciation for the natural wonders of the botanical world.


EXHIBITIONS

previous spread — left MIKE BOURSCHEID YOU INHERITED THAT FROM YOUR FATHER! A FAMILY PORTRAIT., 2015 ANALOGUE C-PRINT MOUNTED ON PLEXIGLAS, VINYL 30” x 35” previous spread — right GERRI YORK ALLEY 1_(112 E. PENDER ST.), 2016 BACKLIT CHROMOGENIC PRINT IN LIGHTBOX 48” x 70” top MAYAN VERED LAMIUM, POTENTILLA & ASTILBE, 2015 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPH bottom GRADE 9–10, MOUNT SENTINEL SECONDARY SCHOOL, SOUTH SLOCAN, BC HOW THE VALHALLAS INFLUENCE WHO WE ARE, 2015 16 MM PAINT ON FILM

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 16 — SEPTEMBER 18

APRIL 18 — MAY 6

APRIL 21 — 23

VIEW FINDERS

INDUSTRIOGLYPHS

PAPER PORTRAIT PROJECT

Group Exhibition

Stuart McCall

Ross den Otter

CURATED BY

Juliana Bedoya WITH

Laura Aliaga Elfred Matining OPENING RECEPTION

SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2–4 PM ArtStarts Gallery 808 Richards St Vancouver BC View Finders showcases a selection of projects in which young people from schools across British Columbia had opportunities to experiment with different digital and analogue photographic mediums, exploring their potential as tools for communication, documentation, and creative expression. Professional artists and teachers provided space for students to create visual narratives and to find their own artistic voice through digital storytelling and various imagemaking techniques. These experiences also created a context for young people to re-examine ideas of contemporary photography as a medium to express critical perspectives.

Art Rental & Sales Vancouver Art Gallery (Main Floor) 750 Hornby St Vancouver BC Stuart McCall’s practice is characterized by an observational perspective that focuses on industrial areas and construction worksites. McCall began documenting this subject matter with an eye to architectural design and heroic structural elements. Recently, his attention has turned to details within these landscapes. During visits to construction sites, he was drawn to a recurring and curious language of temporary markings inscribed on cement buttresses, walls, posts, and even made directly onto the ground. Reminiscent of cuneiform or prehistoric scripts painted onto cave walls, these inscriptions relay a message to some future observer. In a complex, deadline-driven environment like the modern-day construction site, a simple method of mark making is often the only way to pass on information. These are created using various materials and conventions: spray paint, chalk, pencil, and paint are used to trace symbols, numbers, and abbreviations. The temporary nature of these symbols is compelling: they document the transition between permanence and impermanence, and indicate an action that needs to be taken. They are then covered, sawn through, dug up, or otherwise removed from sight. Capturing these iterations through photography, McCall’s work distinguishes the impermanence of the markings from the fixedness of the resulting structures, and of the photographic prints themselves.

OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, APRIL 21, 6–9 PM Pink Monkey Studios 830 Union St Vancouver BC This exhibition comprises works created using the historical tools of two types of portrait artists: the camera obscura of the Renaissance painter and the Talbotype of the mid-ninteenth-century photographer. The Paper Portrait Project consists of images of visitors to the studio, made earlier in the month during an open studio event (see Event Listings, April 2). The relatively low-cost silver-based portrait that emerged in the mid nineteenth century at the height of the Industrial Revolution had the effect of democratizing the portrait image as well as the idea of self and identity. With this invention, the greater populace had the capacity to commission an image of themselves, whereas historically this was reserved only for those social classes who had the means to contract a portrait painter. The camera and its resulting photographic print gave the subject of the image the opportunity to see their likeness as the world saw it, rather than how the subject viewed oneself, reflected in a mirror.

opposite page — top STUART MCCALL INDUSTRIOGLYPHS 2926, 2010 PIGMENT PRINT 44” x 66” opposite page — bottom ROSS DEN OTTER AYUMU, 2015

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

opposite page — top KATIE HUISMAN CLINT, 2013 20” x 30” opposite page — bottom RYAN MATHIESON UNTITLED, 2015

APRIL 22 — MAY 4

ARCHIVAL INKJET PRINT

MEDIATED VISIONS IN TIME AND SPACE

20” x 26”

Pedro Ferreira David Goldberg Jo Holland Ryan Mathieson Cristina Sabaiduc Jeese Treece Lauren D. Zbarsky APRIL 22 ­— 28 CURATED BY

Shauna Jean Doherty Lauren D. Zbarsky OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, APRIL 22, 8 PM–LATE Untitled Art Space 436 Columbia St Vancouver BC Early on in its history, photography was hailed as a technology capable of translating truth. Subsequent critical reflection by authors such as Susan Sontag, Stuart Hall, and Roland Barthes recognizes that camerabased imagery offers an altered reality, which is itself subjective and unreliable, influenced by both the photographer’s and the viewer’s interpretations. While photography makes claims toward empirical documentation, the mediating impact of the lens produces an imperfect record. Mediated Visions in Time and Space occurs within the unstable space of the photographic reality, exploring the transcendental, interpretive, mutable, and otherworldly dimensions embedded within the filmic image. This group exhibition navigates the perceptual boundaries of lens-based practice, both technically and conceptually, through diverse modes including slide photography, Super 8 film, textile, and collage.

MESS AGE Lincoln Clarkes Katie Huisman Alex Waber Mel Yap OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, APRIL 22, 7–11 PM Remington Gallery 108 East Hastings St Vancouver BC Lincoln Clarkes’s pop conceptual text pieces from 1995 maintain poignant relevance today. Though they appear to be aggressive propaganda at first glance, the messages are anti-political and playful in their duality of meaning. Clarkes’s text works emphasize an individualistic ideology, drawing a comparison between the clichéd “Keep Calm and Carry On” motto of the twenty-first century and the reality of the “MESS AGE” we really live in and think about. For the exhibition MESS AGE, photographers Katie Huisman, Mel Yap, and Alex Waber appropriated and visually responded to Clarkes’s mid-’90s text pieces. The photographic works invite the viewer to step into a less literal reality, leaving behind ingrained political thinking while suggesting that we reconnect to our own ideological mindset.


EXHIBITIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

POST-FESTIVAL EXHIBITION MAY 6 — JULY 17

FIELD GUIDE Jochen Lempert Contemporary Art Gallery 555 Nelson St Vancouver BC The Contemporary Art Gallery presents the first major museum exhibition in Canada devoted to the celebrated German photographer Jochen Lempert. Trained as a biologist, Lempert photographs plants, animals, and other natural phenomena with both scientific acumen and a poetic appreciation of natural beauty. His approach is scientific as well as humorous. Always taken in black and white, his work engages with a diverse range of subjects and genres, ranging from everyday views to abstracted details. Photographic series alternate with single pictures, through which multiple links and subtle associations are woven. Ranging from medium-sized to tiny prints, the exhibition comprises Lempert’s now classic repertoire of flora and fauna and focuses on a range of work produced over the last five years that examines the indexical nature of photography, notions of time and connections to the history of image making, mutability, classification, and materiality. The subject of Lempert’s work—animal life—is complemented by his exploration of the properties and materiality of the photographic image, as revealed in its developing and printing processes. While seemingly serendipitous, Lempert nevertheless pursues a very clear goal and aesthetic. His is a very careful, subtle world. In Vancouver, Field Guide is generously supported by the Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen e.V. Organized by the Contemporary Art Gallery Vancouver in collaboration with the Cincinnati Art Museum.

JOCHEN LEMPERT UNTITLED (ANTILOPE), 2008


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Events


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

STEPHEN WADDELL ROPE UNTANGLER, 2013 COLOR PIGMENT PRINT 20" X 17" © STEPHEN WADDELL AND MONTE CLARK GALLERY, VANCOUVER

CAPTURE SPEAKER SERIES: WRITING WITH LIGHT

TUESDAYS AT 6 PM DOORS AT 5 PM Inform Interiors 50 Water St Vancouver BC EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC. SPACE IS LIMITED, RSVP REQUIRED. RSVP TO INFO@INFORMINTERIORS.COM

Capture Photography Festival and Inform present a Speaker Series entitled Writing with Light that explores the state of photography today. Convening luminary artists, curators, and researchers will discuss how lens-based technology is transforming culture.

April 5 STEPHEN WADDELL Vancouver artist Stephen Waddell talks about his Capture and BAF 2016 commission on the facade of the BC Hydro Dal Grauer Substation on Burrard Street, as well as other highlights from his more than twenty-year photography career, including new and upcoming projects. JOIN BAUHAUS AND TANTALUS VINEYARDS FOR A POSTTALK CELEBRATION OF STEPHEN WADDELL’S NEW PUBLIC ART COMMISSION. SEE PAGE 141 FOR MORE INFO.


EVENTS

April 12

April 19

April 26

FORM AND FUNCTION: THE SINISTER AND PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOGRAPHY IN MOTION: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY TALK BETWEEN A PHOTOGRAPHER AND A PHYSICIST 

LIKING VS. CRITIQUING

Adad Hannah, Dr. Sarah Burke

It has been said that art criticism is dead. Is the

Jason Gowans, Gabrielle Moser “It is perhaps worth stating the obvious: the camera is central to our understanding of photography.” —John Szarkowski, photographer, curator, historian, and critic

Sylvia Grace Borda, Clint Burnham, Maurice Li, Alana Paterson

expanded arena of platforms—from the early days

“We all know what light is, but it is not easy to tell what it is.” —Samuel Johnson

of Flickr to the current dominance of Instagram— altering the boundaries of art criticism? Have accessibility and immediacy led to uniformity in

Photography was once thought to be a medium

Photography is understood to be instantaneous,

the images being created today? How is discourse

of “truth,” but from Yves Klein’s staged photo

capturing a split-second in time by trapping light

shaped by platform design and mandates?

Leap into the Void (1960) to today’s Photoshopped

onto a piece of film. But is this really the case? These and other questions are taken up by art

magazine covers and Instagram posts, this claim has been disproven again and again. Our mistrust

Artist Adad Hannah is well known for pushing the

critic and professor Clint Burnham; artist Sylvia

of photography seems to be greater than ever,

boundaries of what photography “is,” masking

Grace Borda, who often utilizes Google Street View;

with calls for protection from drone imaging,

moving video as still photographs, portraying

popular landscape Instagrammer Maurice Li;

omnipresent CCTV, and even unwanted

motion through stillness, and playing with how we

and photographer Alana Paterson.

Facebook posts.

comprehend optics. Dr. Sarah Burke is a professor of physics who understands photography from

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION

Art critic Gabrielle Moser and artist Jason Gowans

its most basic unit, the photon, and how this is

discuss how contemporary artists are investigating

translated into what it is humans see—or what

and incorporating the properties of digital

we think we see.

7 pm, immediately after the talk Salt Tasting Room 45 Blood Alley Square Vancouver BC All are welcome

photography and videography, its use as a tool of surveillance, and its overwhelming ubiquity

Hannah and Burke discuss the medium of

in today’s world.

photography from their differing viewpoints of artist and scientist and attempt to pin down what, exactly, makes a photograph “a photograph.”

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

KNOWLEDGE NETWORK BROADCASTS MONDAY, APRIL 4, 9 PM

DOROTHEA LANGE: GRAB A HUNK OF LIGHTNING PRESENTED BY

The Knowledge Network DIRECTED BY

Dyanna Taylor Her celebrated photograph The Migrant Mother is one of the most recognized and arresting images in the world, a haunting portrait that came to represent the suffering of America’s Great Depression. Yet few know the story, struggles, and profound body of work of the woman who created the portrait: Dorothea Lange. Directed and narrated by Lange’s granddaughter Dyanna Taylor, Grab a Hunk of Lightning explores the life, passions, and uncompromising vision of the woman behind the camera, whose enduring images document five turbulent decades of American history.

THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 9 PM

MONDAY, APRIL 11, AT 9 PM

FINDING VIVIAN MAIER

CHASING WILD HORSES

PRESENTED BY

PRESENTED BY

The Knowledge Network

The Knowledge Network

DIRECTED BY

DIRECTED BY

John Maloof and Charlie Siskel

Natasha Ryan and Matt Trecartin

A mysterious nanny who secretly took over 100,000 photographs that were hidden in storage lockers and discovered decades later is now considered among the twentiethcentury’s greatest photographers. Maier’s strange and riveting life and art are revealed through photographs, films, and interviews with dozens who thought they knew her.

Chasing Wild Horses tells the story of famous New York fashion photographer Roberto Dutesco, whose search for true beauty takes him to Sable Island. On this remote island, located east of Nova Scotia in the stormiest part of the North Atlantic, he documents the natural beauty of the untouched and unclaimed wild horses.

PHOTO COPYRIGHT VIVIAN MAIER MALOOF COLLECTION


EVENTS

ALL FILMS PRESENTED BY THE KNOWLEDGE NETWORK WILL BE BROADCAST ON TELEVISION IN BRITISH COLUMBIA AND WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR STREAMING ONLINE FOR THIRTY DAYS AFTER AIRING AT KNOWLEDGE.CA

MONDAY, APRIL 11, 10 PM

TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 10 PM

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 9 PM

C.D. HOY: PORTRAITS FROM THE FRONTIER

MUGSHOT

TIME ZERO: THE LAST YEAR OF POLAROID FILM

PRESENTED BY PRESENTED BY

The Knowledge Network

PRESENTED BY

The Knowledge Network

DIRECTED BY

The Knowledge Network

DIRECTED BY

Dennis Mohr

DIRECTED BY

Lynn Booth Photographer Chow Dong Hoy moved from China to rural British Columbia at the turn of the last century. During an era when most photographers depicted Canada’s Aboriginal peoples as “noble savages,” Hoy was advancing the art of ethnographic photography by creating haunting portraits of Aboriginal people and documenting their interactions with encroaching settlers.

Grant Hamilton Originally a law enforcement tool, the mugshot has deviated from its fundamental purpose as a source of criminal identification. It has been sensationalized through celebritydom, exploited by the leniency of freedom of information, and has captivated the attention of the art world. Mugshot explores the personal stories of those whose lives have been transformed by these iconic photographs.

MONDAY, APRIL 18, 9 PM

ANSEL ADAMS: A DOCUMENTARY FILM PRESENTED BY

The Knowledge Network DIRECTED BY

Ric Burns Ansel Adams’s work was part of an extraordinary revolution in photography that sought to capture what he called “the continuous beauty of things that are”: the landscape of North America. More than any other artist of the twentieth century, Adams helped transform the meaning of wilderness in America; his greatest images of the American West changed forever what Americans thought about their own land.

113

In February 2008, Polaroid announced that it was ceasing production of instant film. Time Zero tells the story of the last year of Polaroid film and the “magic” of Polaroid through the perspective of Polaroid artists and former employees of the corporation. The discontinuation of instant film created a grassroots movement to keep it alive, with an against-the-odds effort to reinvent instant film.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

TUESDAY, APRIL 19, 10 PM

NOTHING ON EARTH (BC PREMIERE) PRESENTED BY

The Knowledge Network DIRECTED BY

Michael Angus Murray Fredericks is an award-winning artist renowned for his photographs of the vast, empty space of Lake Eyre, South Australia. For Nothing on Earth, he relocates his work to the Greenland icecap—atop a melting glacier and under the solar storms of the Aurora Borealis. With the use of cutting-edge time-lapse cinematography, the film provides a visual representation of the movement of ice through geological time, alongside Murray’s own personal journey.

THURSDAY, APRIL 21, 9 PM

MONDAY, APRIL 25, 9 PM

BILL CUNNINGHAM NEW YORK

ANNIE LEIBOVITZ: LIFE THROUGH A LENS

PRESENTED BY

The Knowledge Network

PRESENTED BY

DIRECTED BY

The Knowledge Network

Richard Press

DIRECTED BY

Barbara Leibovitz “We all get dressed for Bill,” says Vogue editor Anna Wintour. The Bill in question is octogenarian New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham. For decades, this Schwinn-riding cultural anthropologist has been obsessively and inventively chronicling fashion trends and high-society charity soirées for the Times style section. Bill Cunningham New York is a delicate, funny, and often poignant portrait of a dedicated artist whose only wealth is his own humanity and unassuming grace.

Through her work for Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, and Vogue, Annie Leibovitz has produced some of the most iconic images of the last thirty years. Masterful at exposing her photographic subjects, Leibovitz’s own life has been private and protected. In this film, she made the decision to bare her artistic process, her personal journey, and her delicate balancing of fame and family to the camera—a camera that was pointed by a filmmaker who is her younger sister.


EVENTS

FILM SCREENINGS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 7:30 PM

MONDAY, APRIL 25, 7 PM

MONDAY, APRIL 25, 8:15 PM

EADWEARD MUYBRIDGE, ZOOPRAXOGRAPHER

PAOLO VENTURA: A VANISHING MAN

DIRECTED BY

DIRECTED BY

Thom Andersen

Erik van Empel

PRESENT PERFECT: SHOTS BY CHRIS GALLAGHER—ANY IMAGE IS AN EVENT OF THE PAST THAT HAS CONSEQUENCES IN THE PRESENT

VIFF Vancity Theatre Vancouver International Film Centre 1181 Seymour St Vancouver BC

VIFF Vancity Theatre Vancouver International Film Centre 1181 Seymour St Vancouver BC

TICKETS: $12/$10

TICKETS: $12/$10

VIFF VANCITY THEATRE ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP: $2

VIFF VANCITY THEATRE ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP: $2

A successful fashion photographer for Elle and Vogue, Italian artist Paolo Ventura turned his back on commercial work and moved into a farmhouse in Tuscany, where he began to create narrative photomontages staged against painted backdrops, with props and costumes he found in the village flea market and often featuring himself, his wife, and his son. Pregnant with narrative possibility, the photographs are at once nostalgic, social realist, and surreal, variously evoking artists such as René Magritte and Edward Hopper and filmmakers such as Jean Cocteau and Roy Andersson.

The word “shot” is common to cinema and photography, simultaneously denoting both the still and the moving image. Chris Gallagher’s short films are pictures with a few minutes of duration that dwell upon the shifting and elusive way time and space are autonomous yet codependent. These pictures foreground the tectonic fault that the act of observation acquires within a representation mediated by duration.

PRESENTED BY

DIM Cinema The Cinematheque 200–1131 Howe St Vancouver BC TICKETS: $11/9 CINEMATHEQUE ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP: $3

Thom Andersen’s extraordinary meditation on the nature of vision is a project that began as a UCLA film thesis, for which the aspiring filmmaker rephotographed thousands of Eadweard Muybridge’s images. As described by Ross Lipman of the UCLA Film & Television Archive, Zoopraxographer is “at once a biography of Muybridge, a re-animation of his historic sequential photographs, and an inspired examination of their philosophical implications. . . . The ‘zoopraxography’ of the title speaks to both Muybridge’s practice of motion study—as distinct from photography—and his 1879 device, which enabled the images’ projection. As such, it foregrounds Muybridge’s role in the invention of cinema, and cinema itself as an illusion arising from stillness.” Preceded by a reanimation of Muybridge’s most famous work, the protofilm Horse in Motion from 1886.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

STILL FROM EADWEARD MUYBRIDGE, ZOOPRAXOGRAPHER COURTESY OF THOM ANDERSEN AND LUX, LONDON


EVENTS

PRE-FESTIVAL EVENTS

MAR Saturday

12th

2–4 PM Opening Reception

THE MOON AND OTHER MYTHS Ryan Peter Republic Gallery 732 Richards St (Third Floor) Vancouver BC 2–4 PM Opening Reception

FUGAZI Evan Lee Monte Clark Gallery 105–525 Great Northern Way Vancouver BC

Saturday

19th

FESTIVAL EVENTS

Wednesday

30th

6–8 PM Opening Reception

SD 45 ONE. FIVE: A SENSE OF PLACE Group Exhibition West Vancouver Museum 680 17th St West Vancouver BC

Thursday

31st

6–8 PM Opening Reception

2016 NATIONAL PICTURES OF THE YEAR NOMINEES Group Exhibition Pendulum Gallery HSBC Building 885 West Georgia St Vancouver BC 7–9 PM Opening Reception

BUILDING AN ATLAS

INTERVALS: PHOTOGRAPHY IN FLUX

CASE STUDIES Adad Hannah Equinox Gallery 525 Great Northern Way Vancouver BC

Friday

1st

6–9 PM Opening Reception

THE ACT OF CREATION, PRESENTATION AND CONSUMPTION Group Exhibition Remington Gallery 108 East Hastings St Vancouver, BC 7–10 PM Festival Launch & Opening Reception

CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL & THE PHILIP B. LIND EMERGING ARTIST PRIZE EXHIBITION Join us in celebrating the launch of the third annual Capture Photography Festival. To kick off the occasion, Presentation House Gallery will announce the winning artist of the Philip B. Lind Emerging Artist Prize, whose work will be exhibited

2–4 PM Opening Reception Eadweard Muybridge &

APR

Group Exhibition South Main Gallery 279 East 6th Ave Vancouver BC

at the new Polygon Gallery in 2017, in conjunction with Capture.

Roundhouse Community Arts Centre 181 Roundhouse Mews Vancouver BC 7–10 PM Opening Reception

DO YOU DREAM OF SUNSHINE WHEN YOU SLEEP? Campbell + Killough FIELD Contemporary 17 West Broadway Vancouver BC

EVENT DATES AND TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE. FOR THE MOST UP-TO-DATE EVENT INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

7–9 PM Opening Reception

12–5 PM Opening Reception

JON RAFMAN + MARK SOO

INTERWEAVE AFRICA

Jon Rafman Mark Soo Wil Aballe Art Project 105–1356 Frances St Vancouver BC

Valerie Durant Ukama Gallery 1802 Maritime Mews Vancouver BC

7–9 PM Opening Reception

VANCOUVER & PARIS: THE STREET PHOTOGRAPHS OF ALAN JACQUES Alan Jacques Visual Space Gallery 3352 Dunbar St Vancouver BC 12–10 PM Pop-up Exhibition

Tuesday

5th

5–7 PM, TALK STARTS 6 PM Capture Speaker Series: Writing with Light

STEPHEN WADDELL SEE PAGE 110 FOR MORE DETAILS.

2 PM Artist Talk

INTERVALS: PHOTOGRAPHY IN FLUX Group Exhibition South Main Gallery 279 East 6th Ave Vancouver BC 2–4 PM Opening Reception

Inform Interiors 50 Water St Vancouver BC 7 PM Opening Reception

EIDOLICON Jaedan Chayce Leimert Robert Lynds Gallery The new gallery location will be announced on the day at robertlyndsgallery.com

BRIAN HOWELL: A SURVEY

EXHIBITION ON UNTIL APRIL 7

Brian Howell Winsor Gallery 258 East 1st Ave Vancouver BC

The Playground 434 Columbia St Vancouver BC

6th

2–4 PM Opening Reception

6–8 PM Opening Reception

REPRESSIONS

PROJECT INSTANT V3.0: HOLD A MOMENT IN YOUR HAND

FLIGHT Group Exhibition

Saturday

2nd

12– 4 PM Portrait Sittings

PAPER PORTRAIT SESSIONS Ross den Otter Modern photography was born of a combination of three discoveries: the camera obscura, the lens, and a light-sensitized substrate. Using a camera obscura and a modern variation of a nineteenthcentury positive/negative process, Ross den Otter

Holly Marie Armishaw EXHIBITION ON UNTIL MAY 7

Chernoff Fine Art 265 East 2nd Ave Vancouver BC 2–4 PM Opening Reception

SANDOKAI: GRASPING AT THINGS IS SURELY DELUSION Josema Zamorano Back Gallery Project 602 East Hastings St Vancouver BC

will create large-format negatives of the public at his open studio.

2–4 PM Opening Reception

Open to the public on a first-come,

THINGS AS THEY ARE

first-served basis.

Erin O’Keefe Gallery Jones Unit 1–258 East 1st Ave Vancouver BC

Pink Monkey Studios 830 Union St Vancouver BC

Wednesday

Group Exhibition Science World at TELUS World of Science 1455 Quebec St Vancouver BC


EVENTS

6 PM Artist Talk, Pop Up Exhibition and Reception

6:30 PM Artist Talk

ALINE SMITHSON

EARTH TO EARTH, ASHES TO ASHES, DUST TO DUST

Los Angeles–based photographer Aline Smithson speaks about her award-winning work, her fifty-year-old camera, and her new book, Self & Others: Portrait as Autobiography. Books will be available for sale and signing. Wine reception

Randy Grskovic Burrard Arts Foundation 108 East Broadway Vancouver BC

8th 5–10 PM Opening Reception

SCREAM: A 10-YEAR PHOTO EXPLORATION Wendy D

to follow the talk.

Untitled Art Space 436 Columbia St Vancouver BC

Friday

6.30–8.30 PM Opening Reception

OBJECTSUBJECT Peppa Martin truth and beauty gallery 698 West 16 Ave Vancouver BC

EXHIBITION ON UNTIL APRIL 14

Mainspace Gallery 350 East 2nd Ave Vancouver BC 7 PM Opening Reception

FAKE PLASTIC TREES 7–10 PM Opening Reception

ANÁLEKTA: THE FLOWERINESS, THE BARENESS

ALINE SMITHSON, LEXI TURNED, 2014

7:30 PM Artist Talk

VANCOUVER & PARIS “The Evolution of a Photographer” Alan Jacques Visual Space Gallery 3352 Dunbar St Vancouver BC

Thursday

7th

6–9 PM Opening Reception

LIGHT AND THE SOCIAL ORDER Louise Francis-Smith Covan02 Art Gallery 148 Alexander St Vancouver BC

Merle Addison grunt gallery Unit 116–350 East 2nd Ave Vancouver BC 7–10 PM Opening Reception

EARTH TO EARTH, ASHES TO ASHES, DUST TO DUST Randy Grskovic &

WHAT IS LOVE

Biliana Velkova Tartooful 3183 Edgemont Blvd North Vancouver BC 8 PM–LATE Opening Reception

COLOUR STORIES Tanya Goehring Nariman J Untitled Art Space 436 Columbia St Vancouver BC 8–11 PM Opening Reception

STRAIT GOODS

Angela Fama Burrard Arts Foundation 108 East Broadway Vancouver BC

David Crompton &

7:30 PM Curator Talk

Alex Waber The Gam Gallery 110 East Hastings St Vancouver BC

A TERRIBLE BEAUTY: EDWARD BURTYNSKY IN DIALOGUE WITH EMILY CARR Bruce Grenville The Reach Gallery Museum 32388 Veterans Way Abbotsford BC

119

PLANT LIFE


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

Saturday

9th

CHECK ONLINE FOR TIME Community Event

MAKE YOUR OWN CAMERA WORKSHOPS Sean Arden, Erin Siddall Make Your Own Camera Workshops are free mini-workshops presented in conjunction with Lonsdale Quay Market’s 30th Anniversary and Erin Siddall and Sean Arden’s art installation for Capture, Burrard Inlet Big Camera. Workshop participants will get hands on to make a simple

7:30–9:30 PM Opening Reception

I WAS HERE Paulo Majano Surrey Art Gallery 13750 88 Ave Surrey BC

Sunday

10th 2–4 PM Curator Tour

Wednesday

13th 7:30 PM Film

EADWEARD MUYBRIDGE, ZOOPRAXOGRAPHER The Cinematheque 200–1131 Howe St Vancouver BC TICKETS: $9/$11

Thursday

14th

pinhole camera in order to create images.

DOCUMENTARY AND STORYTELLING IN PHOTOGRAPHY

Part of the Lonsdale Quay Market 30th

Canada Line Public Art Project

Anniversary Celebration. Visit lonsdalequay.com

Join a tour of the Canada Line Public Art Project:

to learn more about how this milestone is

Lying Stills: Constructing Truth with Photography.

6–8 PM Opening Reception

being celebrated.

Meet at 2 pm sharp in the lobby of Waterfront

AROUND HERE

Station, near the top of the stairs of

Chris Gallagher Pendulum Gallery HSBC Building 885 West Georgia St Vancouver BC

AGES 7+

the Canada Line.

5–20 MIN. WORKSHOPS FREE, DROP-IN

RSVP TO RSVP@CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM

SEE PAGE 18 FOR MORE DETAILS ON THE

Waterfront Station 601 West Cordova St Vancouver BC

VIEWPOINT PROJECT.

Lonsdale Quay 123 Carrie Cates Ct North Vancouver BC 2–4 PM Opening Reception

CONSTRUCT Chris Shepherd Bau-Xi Gallery 3045 Granville St Vancouver BC

Tuesday

12th 5–7 PM, TALK STARTS 6 PM Capture Speaker Series: Writing with Light

FORM AND FUNCTION: THE SINISTER AND PHOTOGRAPHY Jason Gowans, Gabrielle Moser

2 PM Artist Talk

WHAT IS LOVE Angela Fama Burrard Arts Foundation 108 East Broadway Vancouver BC

SEE PAGE 111 FOR MORE DETAILS.

Inform Interiors 50 Water St Vancouver BC 7–9 PM Opening Reception

MIRRORED EXPLOSIONS Sanaz Mazinani West Vancouver Museum 680 17th St West Vancouver BC

7 PM Artist talk

MIRRORED EXPLOSIONS Sanaz Mazinani

West Vancouver Museum 680 17th St West Vancouver BC 7–9 PM Opening Reception

GODS OF SUBURBIA Dina Goldstein South Main Gallery 279 East 6th Ave Vancouver BC


EVENTS

Friday

15th 3–6 PM Opening Reception

IN A VAULTED ROOM: WORKS BY VIKI WU AND NEO TANG Neo Tang Viki Wu Art Beatus (Vancouver) 108–808 Nelson St Vancouver BC 7–9 PM Opening Reception

YOU INHERITED THAT FROM YOUR FATHER! WE DANCE OUR NAME Mike Bourscheid &

ALLEY 1_(112 E. PENDER ST.) Gerri York Gallery 295 295 East 2nd Ave (Back Alley Entrance) Vancouver BC 7 PM Opening Reception

Saturday

16th

Sunday

17th

12 PM Artist Talk

2–4 PM Curator Tour

INTERWEAVE AFRICA

DOCUMENTARY AND STORYTELLING IN PHOTOGRAPHY

Valerie Durant Ukama Gallery 1802 Maritime Mews Vancouver BC

Canada Line Public Art Project Join a tour of the Canada Line Public Art Project: Lying Stills: Constructing Truth with Photography. Meet at 2 pm sharp in the lobby of Waterfront

2–4 PM Art workshop

WET PLATE COLLODION (TINTYPE) WORKSHOP AGES 13+ WITH Phillip Chin

ArtStarts Gallery 808 Richards St Vancouver BC & Opening Reception

VIEW FINDERS Group Exhibition ArtStarts Gallery 808 Richards St Vancouver BC

SPRING FORTH Mayan Vered Hadden Park Field House 1015 Maple St Vancouver BC

Station, near the top of the stairs of the Canada Line. RSVP TO RSVP@CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM

Waterfront Station 601 West Cordova St Vancouver BC

Tuesday

19th 5–7 PM, TALK STARTS 6 PM Capture Speaker Series: Writing with Light

PHOTOGRAPHY IN MOTION: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY TALK BETWEEN A PHOTOGRAPHER AND A PHYSICIST  Adad Hannah, Dr. Sarah Burke SEE PAGE 111 FOR MORE DETAILS.

Inform Interiors 50 Water St Vancouver BC

COURTESY OF PHILLIP CHIN

7 PM Reception

NANITCH: EARLY PHOTOGRAPHS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FROM THE LANGMANN COLLECTION Presentation House Gallery 333 Chesterfield Ave North Vancouver BC

121


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

Wednesday

Friday

Sunday

20th

22nd

24th

TIME TBC, SEE SCIENCEWORLD.CA Reception

7–11 PM Opening Reception

2–4 PM Curator Tour

WONDROUS

MESS AGE

GROUP EXHIBITION

Lincoln Clarkes Katie Huisman Alex Waber Mel Yap Remington Gallery 108 East Hastings St Vancouver BC

DOCUMENTARY AND STORYTELLING IN PHOTOGRAPHY

EXHIBITION ON UNTIL APRIL 28

Atrium Gallery Science World at TELUS World of Science 1455 Quebec St Vancouver, BC

Thursday

21st

6–9 PM Opening Reception

PAPER PORTRAIT PROJECT Ross den Otter Pink Monkey Studios 830 Union St Vancouver BC 7–9 PM Artist Talk & Reception

1UP Sonny Assu Surrey Art Gallery 13750 88 Ave Surrey BC 7 PM ALSO APRIL 24 & 28, 7 PM

Exhibition Launches & Performances

VISUAL DIMENSIONS: CROSSING CEREMONY AND SHOW Georgy Korablev EXHIBITION ON UNTIL MAY 5

Beaumont Studios 316 West 5th Ave Vancouver BC TICKETS: $20

Canada Line Public Art Project Join a tour of the Canada Line Public Art Project: Lying Stills: Constructing Truth with Photography. Meet at 2 pm sharp in the lobby of Waterfront Station, near the top of the stairs of the Canada Line. RSVP TO RSVP@CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM

8 PM–LATE Opening Reception

MEDIATED VISIONS IN TIME AND SPACE

Waterfront Station 601 West Cordova St Vancouver BC

Group Exhibition Untitled Art Space 436 Columbia St Vancouver BC

25th

Saturday

7 PM Film

23rd

Monday

PAOLO VENTURA: A VANISHING MAN

3 PM Artist Talk

VIFF Vancity Theatre 1181 Seymour St Vancouver BC

MESS AGE

TICKETS: $12/$10

Lincoln Clarkes Katie Huisman Alex Waber Mel Yap Remington Gallery 108 East Hastings St Vancouver BC 6–10 PM Dinner & Art Slideshows

SLIDELUCK VANCOUVER III Performance Works 1218 Cartwright St. Granville Island Vancouver BC TICKETS: $30 PRESENTED BY SLIDELUCK AND CAPIC

8:15 PM Film

PRESENT PERFECT: SHOTS BY CHRIS GALLAGHER VIFF Vancity Theatre 1181 Seymour St Vancouver BC TICKETS: $12/$10


EVENTS

Tuesday

26th 10 AM–5 PM Special Viewing

HOT PROPERTIES Jim Breukelman

7 PM Artist Talk

INDUSTRIOGLYPHS Stuart McCall Art Rental & Sales Vancouver Art Gallery (Main Floor) 750 Hornby St Vancouver BC

EXHIBITION ON UNTIL APRIL 30

Republic Gallery hosts a special viewing of Jim Breukelman’s Hot Properties series, also on display across Vancouver as Capture’s 2016 Pattison Outdoor Billboards Project. Republic Gallery 732 Richards St (Third Floor) Vancouver BC

Tuesday

3rd

6–8:30 PM Reception

2016 PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY PROGRAM GRAD SHOW Group Exhibition

POST-FESTIVAL EVENTS

RSVP TO ESTEWART@LANGARA.BC.CA

Saturday

Langara College 100 West 49th Ave Vancouver BC

30th

11 AM & 1 PM Art Workshop

DIRECT ANIMATION WORKSHOP KIDS AGE 5+ & FAMILIES WITH Nisha Platzer & Ryder Thomas White ArtStarts Gallery 808 Richards St Vancouver BC JIM BREUKELMAN, HOT PROPERTIES 22, 1986

IMAGE FOR LANGARA 2016 PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY PROGRAM GRAD SHOW

5–7 PM, TALK STARTS 6 PM Capture Speaker Series: Writing with Light

Tuesday

LIKING VS. CRITIQUING

14th

Sylvia Grace Borda Clint Burnham Maurice Li Alana Paterson SEE PAGE 111 FOR MORE DETAILS.

Inform Interiors 50 Water St Vancouver BC CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION

7 pm, immediately after the talk Salt Tasting Room 45 Blood Alley Square Vancouver BC

2:30 PM Artist talk

COURTESY OF NISHA PLATZER & RYDER THOMAS WHITE

I WAS HERE

MAY

Paulo Majano Surrey Art Gallery 13750 88 Ave Surrey BC

Sunday

1st

11 AM & 1 PM Art Workshop

DIRECT ANIMATION WORKSHOP KIDS AGE 5+ & FAMILIES WITH Nisha Platzer & Ryder Thomas White River Market at Westminster Quay 810 Quayside Drive New Westminster BC

123

Saturday

28th 10 AM–5 PM Reception

100 YEARS, 100 TREASURES Beaty Biodiversity Museum University of British Columbia 2212 Main Mall Vancouver BC


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

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CANADA LINE STATIONS 1 WATERFRONT 2 VANCOUVER CITY CENTRE 3 YALETOWN—ROUNDHOUSE 4 OLYMPIC VILLAGE 5 BROADWAY—CITY HALL 6 KING EDWARD 7 MARINE DRIVE 8 TEMPLETON 9 YVR-AIRPORT PATTISON BILLBOARDS BILLBOARD A BROADWAY 75FT EAST OF KINGSWAY SOUTH SIDE FACING SOUTH WEST BILLBOARD B RUPERT STREET 200FT SOUTH OF BROADWAY EAST SIDE FACING NORTH

MT SEYM

OUR PK

DOLLAR

WY

TON HW

Y

BILLBOARD C VICTORIA DRIVE & 33 AVENUE NORTH EAST CORNER FACING NORTH BILLBOARD D VENABLES STREET 150FT EAST OF COTTON DRIVE SOUTH SIDE FACING WEST BILLBOARD E COMMERCIAL DRIVE 50FT SOUTH OF E 2 AVENUE WEST SIDE FACING SIDE BILLBOARD F HASTINGS STREET 400FT WEST OF MAIN STREET NORTH SIDE FACING WEST

LO U

GH

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11

36

Y WA DA NA CA

44

13 ARTSTARTS GALLERY 808 RICHARDS ST VANCOUVER BC P. 105 14 BACK GALLERY PROJECT 602 EAST HASTINGS ST VANCOUVER BC P. 67 15 BAU-XI GALLERY 3045 GRANVILLE ST VANCOUVER BC P. 90 16 BC HYDRO DAL GRAUER SUBSTATION 944 BURRARD ST VANCOUVER BC P. 12 17 BEATY BIODIVERSITY MUSEUM UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 2212 MAIN MALL VANCOUVER BC P. 44 18 BURRARD ARTS FOUNDATION 108 EAST BROADWAY VANCOUVER BC P. 79, 80

BILLBOARD G STATION STREET 100FT SOUTH OF NATIONAL STREET EAST SIDE FACING SOUTH WEST

19 THE CINEMATHEQUE 200 — 1131 HOWE ST VANCOUVER BC P. 115

BILLBOARD H HEATLEY AVENUE 100FT SOUTH OF POWELL STREET WEST SIDE FACING NOTH

20 CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY 555 NELSON ST VANCOUVER BC P. 24, 108

BILLBOARD I W 6TH AVENUE 110FT EAST OF BURRARD STREET NORTH SIDE FACING SOUTH WEST

21 COVAN02 ART GALLERY 148 ALEXANDER ST VANCOUVER BC P. 80

BILLBOARD J EXPO BOULEVARD & CARRALL STREET SOUTH EAST CORNER FACING WEST 49

12 ART RENTAL & SALES VANCOUVER ART GALLERY (MAIN FLOOR) 750 HORNBY ST VANCOUVER BC P. 105

10 ART BEATUS (VANCOUVER) 108­— 808 NELSON ST VANCOUVER BC P. 98 11 ART GALLERY AT EVERGREEN 1205 PINETREE WAY COQUITLAM BC P. 47

22 EQUINOX GALLERY 525 GREAT NORTHERN WAY VANCOUVER BC P. 56, 59 23 FIELD CONTEMPORARY 17 WEST BROADWAY VANCOUVER BC P. 68 24 FRANC GALLERY 1654 FRANKLIN ST VANCOUVER BC P. 52

125

25 GALLERY 295 295 EAST 2ND AVE (BACK ALLEY ENTRANCE) VANCOUVER BC P. 102 26 GALLERY JONES UNIT 1 — 258 EAST 1ST AVE VANCOUVER BC P. 72 27 GAM GALLERY 110 EAST HASTINGS ST VANCOUVER BC P. 89 28 GRUNT GALLERY UNIT 116 — 350 EAST 2ND AVE VANCOUVER BC P. 84 29 HADDEN PARK FIELD HOUSE 1015 MAPLE ST VANCOUVER BC P. 102 30 INFORM INTERIORS 50 WATER ST VANCOUVER BC P. 110, 111 31 LANGARA COLLEGE 100 WEST 49TH AVE VANCOUVER BC P. 123 32 MONTE CLARK GALLERY 105 — 525 GREAT NORTHERN WAY VANCOUVER BC P. 52, 75 33 PENDULUM GALLERY HSBC BUILDING 885 WEST GEORGIA ST VANCOUVER BC P. 60, 94 34 PINK MONKEY STUDIOS 830 UNION ST VANCOUVER BC P. 105

38 REPUBLIC GALLERY 732 RICHARDS ST (THIRD FLOOR) VANCOUVER BC P. 52 39 ROBERT LYNDS GALLERY FOR NEW LOCATION SEE ROBERTLYNDSGALLERY.COM P. 79 40 ROUNDHOUSE COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE 181 ROUNDHOUSE MEWS VANCOUVER BC P. 35 41 SCIENCE WORLD AT TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE 1455 QUEBEC ST VANCOUVER BC P. 62 42 SCOTIA BANK DANCE CENTRE 677 DAVIE ST VANCOUVER BC P. 47 43 SOUTH MAIN GALLERY 279 EAST 6TH AVE VANCOUVER BC P. 64, 98 44 SURREY ART GALLERY 13750 88 AVE SURREY BC P. 94 45 TARTOOFUL 3183 EDGEMONT BLVD NORTH VANCOUVER BC P. 84 46 TRUTH AND BEAUTY GALLERY 698 WEST 16 AVE VANCOUVER BC P. 89 47 UKAMA GALLERY 1802 MARITIME MEWS VANCOUVER BC P. 63

35 PRESENTATION HOUSE GALLERY 333 CHESTERFIELD AVE NORTH VANCOUVER BC P. 23, 55

48 UNTITLED ART SPACE 436 COLUMBIA ST VANCOUVER BC P. 90, 106

36 REACH GALLERY MUSEUM 32388 VETERANS WAY ABBOTSFORD BC P. 47

49 URBANSCREEN AT SURREY ART GALLERY 13458 107A AVE SURREY BC P. 32

37 REMINGTON GALLERY 108 EAST HASTINGS ST VANCOUVER, BC P. 67, 106

50 VANCOUVER ART GALLERY OFFSITE 1100 WEST GEORGIA ST VANCOUVER BC P. 32

51 VANCOUVER MARITIME MUSEUM 1905 OGDEN AVE VANCOUVER BC P. 83

52 VIFF VANCITY THEATRE 1181 SEYMOUR ST VANCOUVER BC P. 115 53 VISUAL SPACE GALLERY 3352 DUNBAR ST VANCOUVER BC P. 69, 90 54 WEST VANCOUVER MUSEUM 680 17TH ST WEST VANCOUVER BC P. 60, 97 55 WIL ABALLE ART PROJECT 105 — 1356 FRANCES ST VANCOUVER BC P. 71 56 WINSOR GALLERY 258 EAST 1ST AVE VANCOUVER BC P. 76


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

opposite page—bottom

this page

Dana Claxton WHY?, 2014 4” x 6”, gelatin print on archival fibre Courtesy of the artist EDITION OF 30

Patryk Stasieczek Tactile Compositional Iteration, 2016 8” x 10”, photogram on matte chromogenic paper Courtesy of the artist

$300

VARIED EDITION OF 30 $123

This image was taking during a trip to France, where Dana Claxton roamed the streets with her old Canon AE1, looking for the American Indian in the Paris cityscape. The more she roamed, the larger her focus became, growing to encompass the wider sociopolitical and spiritual environments of the City of Paris—the grand dame of political thinking, culture, and pleasure. During a stroll down one of many cobbled streets, Claxton saw in big letters on a storefront window the word “WHY,” leading her to think of how this simple three-letter word drives so much research, critical thinking, spiritual inquiry, and human behaviour and histories. The resulting photograph captures a multitude of reflections that are as layered as the word itself, WHY.

By the nature of the photogram process—which involves using light-sensitive photographic paper but no camera to create an image—each number of Patryk Stasieczek’s Tactile Compositional Iteration will be a variance on the image pictured here, which is the first edition. Each subsequent edition will be a variance of a calculated attempt at generating a similar composition. Matters of chance and movement during the exposure and placement of materials onto the photographic paper will render a slightly different image each time, making each photogram a unique edition from a larger series.


EDITIONS

Capture has partnered with a select group of artists to contribute artworks to the Capture Limited Editions series that, thanks to their “petite� scale, are guaranteed to fit on the wall of even the smallest Vancouver apartment. The 2016 and 2015 Capture Limited Editions are available via the Capture website. Framing is available starting from $100 from Fine Art Framing, Vancouver.

127


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016


EDITIONS

opposite page—left & right

previous spread—far right

Stephen Waddell The Collector and Showroom, 2016 17” x 22”, pigment print on fibre paper Courtesy of the artist

Ian Wallace Clayoquot Protest (August 9, 1993), 1993/2015 9” x 6”, inkjet print Courtesy of the artist

EDITION OF 50

EDITION OF 50

$350

$400

Neither a so-called street photographer nor interested in the rhetoric of staged photography, Stephen Waddell creates photographs that deliberately exist in a place of ambiguity.

This work is an inkjet edition version of a detail from the first large panel of Ian Wallace’s nine-panel canvas work Clayoquot Protest (August 9,1993), which is in the collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery. This detail selects a specific moment in the drama of the protest.

In his work, Waddell intertwines the realist history of early modern painting with that of early street photography to create considered studies of anonymous figures working, relaxing, and moving through the urban environment. In addition to his art historical influences, his work finds links to mid-century modernism, with its renewed optimism for the possibilities of art, architecture, and technology and their ability to enhance the public realm. Today, this optimism tends to fall flat. Together, the two works of this edition invite both a quick and a slow reading, replicating the act of moving through the city alone, observing the people you pass by and allowing the mind to wander as the cast of characters around you take on different forms.

129

What attracted Wallace to this detail from the original panoramic photograph of a gathering of several hundred people is the pensive woman in the foreground, who provides a pedestal for a constellation of portraits of individuals engaged in a demonstration of resistance to authority in the name of a politics of ecological responsibility. There is a rich diversity of expression in these portraits: from anxiety to felicity, from serious purpose to wonder and doubt. Wallace hopes this image will provide an emblem for a contemplation of the complexity of this struggle between human ideals and the exploitation of nature.


Proud Supporting Sponsor of the CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

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Vibrant dyes are directly infused into specifically coated aluminum sheets. Giving your prints a magical luminescent quality with a high gloss finish. Now available in larger sizes.

Ultimate Enlargements Turn your photos into fine works of art up to 44” x 96”. Patented inks produce rich colour and superior definition. Choose from glossy or pearl or upgrade to fine art metallic, bamboo or canvas. Check out our premium mounting options!

Check out our new in-store kiosks and website: londondrugs.com/photolab


WHATCOM MUSEUM SUSAN MIDDLETON: SPINELESS

PORTRAITS OF MARINE INVERTEBRATES Susan Middleton; Pacific Giant Octopus (juvenile).

Thomas J. Abercrombie; Kabul, Afghanistan 1967. Courtesy of National Geographic.

Opens September 24

50 GREATEST PHOTOGRAPHS Opens October 1

SHOWING FALL 2016 Lightcatcher Building | 250 Flora Street Bellingham, WA | 60 Miles South of Vancouver 360.778.8930 | www.whatcommuseum.org


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

SLIDELUCK VANCOUVER III building community through food and art

theme

| activism

A p r i l 2 3 r d 2 0 1 6 6 : 0 0 -1 0 : 0 0 p m | P e r f o r m a n c e W o r k s 1 2 1 8 C a r t w r i g h t S t . | G r a n v i l l e I s l a n d dinner and a show | tickets $30 at eventbrite

presented by | slideluck vancouver | capic vancouver | part of CaptureFestival 2016 Vancouver

slideluck.com | capic.org | twitter:@slideluckvan | instagram:slideluck_van | email:vancouver@slideluck.com

photo: Shelley DubĂŠ

capic vancouver | london drugs | district main | sequoia group | beau photo | granville island cultural society | and many others


Discover and book unique spaces for your next shoot and exhibit.

sign up with promo code

CAPTURE for $25 off your ďŹ rst booking

133


Capture your passion and turn it into a career. PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY PROGRAM

This two-year diploma program offers hands-on, comprehensive training. Graduate with industry-ready skills.

Learn more. www.langara.ca/photo

More than you expect, everything you Deserve Every stay includes free: • Full breakfast • Wifi throughout hotel • Worldwide long distance • FIJI bottled water • Steve Nash Club access • 24 Hr Business Services

Forbes Recommended Condé Nast Reader’s Choice Tripadvisor Traveller’s Choice

Downtown Vancouver 1.800.770.7929 stregishotel.com


See extra in ordinary. PHOTOGR APHY, L ANGAR A CONTINUING STUDIES Taught by industry leaders, the CS Photography Certificate Program offers a flexible and diverse curriculum housed in world-class facilities and is designed to meet the needs of photographers of all levels - making it one of the best photography programs in Canada.



Join our free seminars: • • • •

CS Photography Info Session (April 2) DSLR Seminar (April 2) Food and Beverage Photography (April 9) Photography Assistant Seminar (April 9)

Space is limited. Register now! www.langara.ca/photography 604.323.5322

Join us in wrapping up the Writing with Light Capture Speaker Series. 7 PM, TUESDAY APRIL 26 Salt Tasting Room 45 Blood Alley Square Vancouver BC

INCREASE EXPOSURE & GROW YOUR BUSINESS CHOOSE PATTISON OUTDOOR TO CONVERT MORE PROSPECTS INTO CUSTOMERS.

Call our Vancouver office today, 604-235-2700


STAY CONNECTED AT STRAIGHT.COM


P R O U D C R E AT I V E PA R T N E R

S T U D I O PA L M S . C O M

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FESTIVAL SINCE 2013.

SUPPORTING OUR COMMUNITY Vancouver International Airport is proud to connect the best in arts and culture to the world.

YVR.CA


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CAPTURE YOUR WORLD Expand your photography skills through Continuing Studies at the Emily Carr University of Art + Design. We offer: J A part-time certificate in photography J Individual courses in film and digital photography J A summer studio in photography for teens aged 16-18.

ecuad.ca/cs | csinfo@ecuad.ca | 604 844 3810


169 West 7 th Avenue, Vancouver, BC Canada V5Y 1L8 denbighfas.com

604 876 3303

info@denbighfas.com


At Beau Photo, we’ve seen many changes over the years, but our commitment to all things photographic continues.

IINSTANTI PROJECT

V3.0

Hold a Moment in your Hand

An Exhibition of Instant Images Beau Photo is a local independent shop, providing personalized service that can’t be found online. Come by or give us a call, we can help you out.

Beau Photo Supplies 1520 W. 6th Ave, Vancouver, BC 604.734.7771

March 30th to April 26th, 2016 Opening Reception: April 6th, 2016. 6-8pm Location: Science World - Aurizon Atrium

@beauphotostore

Cameras • Film • Digital Rentals • Advice

Beau Photo

beau1520

beauphoto.blogspot.com

Beau Photo Store

www.beauphoto.com

BIG DOG C O N TA I N E R S SALES & RENTALS NEW AND USED CONTAINERS

10’ TO 40’ IN LENGTH

“Run with the Big Dog”

Locations: Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton Phone: 604 341 2798 or 866 376 3818 Email: bdsales@bigdogcontainers.ca


cap-zano5.pdf

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CELEBRATE THE ARTS AT THE MARKET

Join us on April 9th to celebrate 30 years of arts & culture at the Market. Visit our website www.lonsdalequay.com for more details.

Proudly supporting the arts in our community since 1986.


PROTECT EVERyTHINg yOU VALUE.

TIP: #2

Keep all your valuables in a safe place.

A photo record is your best shot at replacing what you’ve lost. They say a picture is worth $1000. In this case it could amount to a lot more. An accurate photographic or video record of your missing or damaged items will make their replacement a lot easier. Be sure to keep photos, digital or print, along with any receipts in a safe, secure location like a safety deposit box. It’s important to keep your list of possessions as up to date as you can. Review it at least once a year or after any major purchase.

Talk to us about protecting everything you value. Call 604.731.6696 or email: home@allwestins.com

We’re all about you.®

RESIDENTIAL • AUTO • BUSINESS • LIFE • MARINE • TRAVEL/MEDICAL • HEALTH/DENTAL allwestins.com


www.pwc.com/ca

Proudly supporting the arts in BC

Š 2012 PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an Ontario limited liability partnership. All rights reserved. 3640-01 0913


IMAGINE. TASTE. ENJOY.

Proud to support the Capture Photography Festival.

Award-winning catering and unparalleled service for corporate gatherings, social events and weddings since 1979.

We are working together with Capture to celebrate photography and lens-based art.

lazygourmet.ca Captured by: Shannyn Higgins On a DSLR: 5DMKII | 50mm Lens Date: 2nd September, 2015 Fall Menu Preferred Caterer to the Capture Photography Festival

ÂŽ

The TD logo and other trade-marks are the property of The Toronto-Dominion Bank.

M05234 (0116)


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2016

VANCOUVER APRIL 2016

Capture Magazine 2016  

The 2016 Capture Magazine is the official guide to the fourth annual Capture Photography Festival (April 1–28) in Vancouver, Canada.

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