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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

April 2015

CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Kim Spencer-Nairn

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Mike Harris Ian McGuffie Eric Savics Kim Spencer-Nairn CHAIR David Thorpe Todd Towers

PROGRAM DIRECTOR

Meredith Preuss FESTIVAL COORDINATOR

Jaclyn Arndt SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

Jaclyn Bruneau CANADA LINE PUBLIC ART PROJECT MANAGER

Avalon Mott DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS & PRINT ADVERTISING

Assembly Digital PR AND MEDIA RELATIONS

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Assembly Digital and Clou Studio Inc ADDRESS

305 Cambie Street Vancouver BC Canada V6B 2N4 capturephotofest.com info@capturephotofest.com PRINTED IN VANCOUVER BY

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Jessica Eaton, DG Weave (detail), 2015 ALL CONTENT © 2015 THE ARTISTS, AUTHORS, AND CAPTURE. UNAUTHORIZED REPRODUCTION IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED. ALL IMAGES ARE REPRODUCED COURTESY OF THE ARTIST UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED.

CAPTURE IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE SPECIFIC CONTENT OR SUBJECT MATTER OF ANY WORK DISPLAYED OR ADVERTISED. SOME EXHIBITIONS OR INSTALLATIONS MAY BE OFFENSIVE, UPSETTING, OR DISTURBING TO SOME MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC.

FOUNDING DONORS

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CONTENTS

001 CONTACT 004 WELCOME 006 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

009 FEATURE

EXHIBITION

017 PUBLIC

110 MAP 124 EDITIONS

INSTALLATIONS

034 EXHIBITIONS 095 FILMS 102 EVENTS

Contents


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

It is my great pleasure to welcome you to the second Capture Photography Festival. After an overwhelmingly positive response to the inaugural Festival in October 2013, I am delighted to say that Capture is making its return in a new month, April, where it will continue as an annual event from now on. Capture aims to increase knowledge and appreciation of photography and lens-based art by emphasizing the cultural importance of photography in all of its forms. The Festival promotes awareness of Vancouver’s unique history of photo-conceptualism and endeavours to inspire community engagement through its diverse program. Ultimately, the Festival “captures” a specific moment in contemporary photographic discourse. This year Capture presents over one hundred exhibitions, public installations, and events throughout the month, almost all of which are accessible free of charge. The Festival borders have extended beyond Vancouver to include galleries in Burnaby, Richmond, Surrey, North Vancouver, and West Vancouver, truly making this a celebration of photography for all of Metro Vancouver. We are especially proud of our feature exhibition this year, Images That Speak, co-produced with Presentation House Gallery in partnership with Satellite Gallery and curated by Christopher Eamon. This exhibition showcases ten local and international artists, many showing in Vancouver for the first time. Our public art program is expanded this year and includes a massive photograph on the facade of the BC Hydro Dal Gauer Substation, created by Canadian photographer and Emily

Carr University graduate Jessica Eaton. The Canada Line Program returns with eight stations that feature works on the theme “the city before the city.” Four billboards in a parking lot in Mount Pleasant feature Monument to Mysterious Fires, by Other Sights for Artists’ Projects. Metro Vancouver’s cultural organizations are contributing more than fifty exhibitions to Capture’s 2015 progam and for the first time, Capture has partnered with the Knowledge Network to present a series of films on photography, broadcast throughout the month. None of this would be possible without the continued support of our sponsors, donors, partners, board members, dedicated team, volunteers, and, of course, the many participating artists. We are thrilled to welcome the TD Bank as Capture’s presenting sponsor this year. I cannot emphasize enough the importance of their support to ensuring the Festival’s continued success. Special thanks to the TD Community Relations Team: Leah Iverson, Alan Convery, and Scott Mullin. Thank you to our returning sponsors London Drugs, in particular for their extensive printing support and also to PwC and YVR Airport Authority.


WELCOME

On behalf of TD Bank Group, I am very pleased to extend greetings and best wishes to the organizers of the 2015 Capture Photography Festival. Thank you to our media, contributing, and in-kind sponsors the Georgia Straight, Lamar, Pattison Outdoor, Gotham Steakhouse and Bar, St Regis Hotel, MINI Yaletown, Fine Art Framing, Denbigh Fine Art, Vancouver Photo Workshops, Assembly Digital and E. & J. Gallo Premium Wines.

Giving back to our communities in meaningful ways is a source of pride for us at TD. Additionally, we believe it’s important to showcase and present the wealth of artistic talent available locally and to encourage an appreciation of the arts among all Canadians.

We are grateful for the support of the Burrard Arts Foundation, Audain Foundation, the BC Arts Council, the City of Vancouver, the Downtown Business Improvement Association, the University of British Columbia, and the Canada Line Public Art Program— InTransit BC.

Visual art in the form of photography has blossomed in popularity in recent years. The beauty that comes from the camera lens has engaged a collective arts community consisting of art collectors, galleries, and students and has become a point of interest for the general public.

Join Capture in inspiring creative engagement, celebrating the practice and culture of photography, and fostering a vibrant photography community in Vancouver.

We believe our support of Capture will help to further develop this art form and inspire the next generation of emerging artists who will take up this medium. Enjoy this year’s festival.

Mauro Manzi

Kim Spencer-Nairn

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT

TD Bank Group, Pacific Region

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

PRESENTING SPONSOR

MEDIA SPONSORS

WE GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGE THE SUPPORT OF


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

MAJOR SUPPORTING SPONSOR

SUPPORTING SPONSORS

CONTRIBUTING AND IN-KIND SPONSORS

PARTNERS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

THANK YOU

Alan Convery Arni Haraldsson Barabra Cole Birthe Piontek Blackcomb Aviation Brian Mesina Caroline Carter Casey Wei Cate Rimmer Chantal Shah Chelsea Van Leeuwen Christian Chan Christopher Eamon Christy Nyiri Coleen Nemtin Danny Singer Donna McGeachie Edward Burtynsky Erin Siddall Eugene Suyu Gale Penhall Gerry Allin Gisele Fisher Glenna Pollon Greg Girard Helga Pakasaar Holly Marie Armishaw Jane Irwin

Janet Smith Janet Thomas Jasmine Towers Jeremy Rocoroni Jessica Eaton Jim Sinclair John and Lucie Spencer-Nairn John Biehler John Goldsmith Judith Mosley Julie Lee Karen Benbassat Ali Karen Henry Kate Bellringer Ken Stephens Laura Moore Leah Iverson Linda Banecevic Lorna Brown Malania Dela Cruz Marc Koegel Mark Reddekopp Megan Buckley Michael Audain Michael Barrow Michael Batty Michael Preuss Nan Copagna

Nancy Bendtsten Neil Aisenstat Nigel Prince Paul Larocque Peter Marshall Phuong Banh Rachel Lafo Reid Shier Rita Beiks Rob MacDonald Rudy Buttignol Ruth Burr Ryan Beedie Ryan Romero Scott Massey Nelson Mouëllic Scott Mullin Sean Arden Shane O’Brien Stephanie and Michael Wesik Stephen Bellringer Steve McGregor Susan Almrud Susan Rowley Toma Savics Wayne Hoecherl Xenija Koegel


Feature Exhibition 9


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015


FEATURE EXHIBITION

RYAN FOERSTER UNTITleD, 2014 ALUMINUM PRINTING PLATE, PHOTO TONER, CUT-OUTS, 35” x 22.5” COURTESY THE ARTIST AND C L E A R I N G, NEWYORK/BRUSSELS

Each artist in Images That Speak holds in common an expanded notion of picture making that questions the depictive realism of photographs.

APRIL 3 — MAY 16

IMAGES THAT SPEAK Michele Abeles Shannon Ebner Ryan Foerster Susanne Kriemann Steve McQueen Arthur Ou Ryan Peter Eileen Quinlan Matt Saunders Stephen Waddell CURATED BY

Ten renowned local and international contemporary artists reflect on how photographic images speak to us in this exhibition assembled by Canadian curator Christopher Eamon exclusively for Capture Photography Festival. The artists have developed innovative methods to disrupt how we “read” photographic images, often through techniques that retool the very mechanisms of print production. The array of artworks, some made specially for the occasion of this exhibition, showcase artists who tear away and supplant the legibility of photographs, in the process opening up provocative new avenues of meaning.

Christopher Eamon CO-PRODUCED BY

Capture Photography Festival and Presentation House Gallery IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

Satellite Gallery EXHIBITION OPENING & CAPTURE FESTIVAL LAUNCH PARTY

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 7:30 PM Satellite Gallery 560 Seymour St — 2nd Floor Vancouver BC

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Each artist in Images That Speak holds in common an expanded notion of picture making that questions the depictive realism of photographs. In the single-slide installation by celebrated British artist Steve McQueen, entitled 7th November (2001), a close-up view of the top of a black man’s shaved and scarred head is intensified by a first-person account of a violent incident involving the police, a fired gun, and a tragic outcome. The veracity of the narration in relation to the pictured subject is ambiguous, yet it is impossible to split the two, to parse fact from fiction. As the story unfolds over time, our apprehension of the projection becomes increasingly complex.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

Responding in part to the ubiquity of digital images today, some of the artists forfeit cameras altogether and take inspiration from early modernist photographers and printmakers such as Man Ray, Raoul Ubac, and Max Ernst. Ryan Peter’s “autograms” integrate drawing, painting, and darkroom processes, such as dodging, burning, and solarizing, in relation to these historical precedents. Similarly, Eileen Quinlan’s abstractions allude to early photographers’ fascination with display and advertising culture. In a series of recent prints created through the abrasion of the chemical surface of photographic negatives, Quinlan has recorded the loosened chemical layers of negatives that literally float in the darkroom developer bath. At times, Peter’s and Quinlan’s abstractions appear digitally created, yet they are uncompromisingly analog. Michele Abeles’s collaged images, on the other hand, are entirely digital. Manipulated in a virtual darkroom, her brightly coloured photographs imitate the cacophony of today’s image sphere. With white-noise machines attached—the kind used to block out office noise—she adds an aural antidote to the visual intensity of her images.

Stephen Waddell, Susanne Kriemann, and Arthur Ou can be called “straight” photographers, but they too work with a montage aesthetic. Waddell’s overtly cinematic photographs are tableaux of contemporary life that register the invisible aspects of “captured” moments. For Kriemann, the world’s archives serve as an untapped reserve of potentially repurposed images. In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni (a Latin palindrome, also referred to as the devil’s verse, meaning “we wander in the night, and are consumed by fire”) references the use of rare earth elements in early electric light bulbs, an invention that made photography possible. Like a palindrome, Kriemann’s work creates a historical loop, back to the dawn of electricity and forward to our digital age, by exposing images of rare earth elements using only the light from her cell phone. Similarly, Shannon Ebner’s photographs also bring to mind fundamental photographic metaphors of reflection and illumination through a literal mapping in 1:1 scale of large illuminated signs found along North American freeways. Arthur Ou’s display of over seventy-five contact prints, each representing a place or theme and arranged as an overlapping montage, present an almost cinematic archive. Matt Saunders’s photographs also evoke filmic movement. Working with stills from early silent films from Weimar Germany like G. W. Pabst’s Pandora’s Box and Bertolt Brecht’s Kuhle Wumpe (Empty belly), Saunders unites photography and

top STEPHEN WADDELL STaIN, 2012 65.5” x 54” GELATIN SILVER PRINT COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND MONTE CLARKE GALLERY, VANCOUVER bottom MICHELE ABELES SoUND MachINe 01, 2013 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT, WHITE-NOISE MACHINE, 20.6” x 30.5” COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND 47 CANAL, NEW YORK


FEATURE EXHIBITION

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

EILEEN QUINLAN WoMeN’S BUSINeSS, 2010 GELATIN SILVER PRINT MOUNTED ON ALUMINUM, 24” x 20” COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND MIGUEL ABREU GALLERY, NEW YORK


FEATURE EXHIBITION

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

painting by exposing his paintings on linen onto photographic paper. Ryan Foerster’s cameraless photography forfeits authorial control for chance operations. After his work was destroyed by Hurricane Sandy, he began to experiment with exposing photographic paper to the natural elements. He emphasizes the materiality of photographs and, like all of the artists in Images That Speak, offers provocative insights into photography’s limits and its fundamental richness. TEXT BY CHRISTOPHER EAMON

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This exhibition is supported by a Special Project grant from the British Columbia Arts Council. Presentation House Gallery is grateful for the ongoing support from our funders: the Canada Council for the Arts, the British Columbia Arts Council, the Province of British Columbia, the City of North Vancouver, and the District of North Vancouver through the North Vancouver Recreation & Culture Commission. Satellite Gallery is made possible through the generous support of the Michael O’Brian Family Foundation and is partnered with: Charles H. Scott Gallery (ECU), the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery (UBC), the Museum of Anthropology (UBC), and Presentation House Gallery.

RYAN PETER UNTITleD (aUToGRaM), 2014 UNIQUE GELATIN SILVER PRINT, 14” x 11” previous page — top STEVE McQUEEN 7Th NoveMBeR, 2002 COLOUR SLIDE PROJECTION, SOUND COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND THOMAS DANE GALLERY previous page — bottom SHANNON EBNER PoRTaBle chaNGeaBle MeSSaGe SIGN TWo DeToUR, 2014 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT, 113” x 210.8” COURTESY OF THE ARTIST; ALTMAN SIEGEL, SAN FRANCISCO; AND WALLSPACE, NEW YORK


Public Installations 17


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

APRIL 2 — FALL 2015

BC HYDRO DAL GRAUER SUBSTATION: CAPTURE 2015 PUBLIC ART COMMISSION Jessica Eaton PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

Burrard Arts Foundation 944 Burrard St Vancouver BC On the Photographic Work of Jessica Eaton I recall Jessica Eaton as a student at Emily Carr University in 2006 when she was producing a work in the studio that entailed her unleashing some five hundred ping-pong balls from a net twenty feet up in the air. With the ping-pong balls bouncing riotously across the concrete floor, Eaton managed four film exposures in that instant. The resulting work, Quantum Pong, shows a snowstorm of balls levitating in mid-air, made semi-transparent when seen one against the other, the different layers of time gradually becoming apparent. I think that something of the spirit of that afternoon session continues to inform Eaton’s practice to this day. Since photography’s inception, photographers have been experimenting and exploring the medium’s potential in terms of its technology and materiality, from William Henry Fox Talbot to László Moholy-Nagy, right up to the present day. Indeed, recently there has been much activity centered on the most basic and elemental properties of the medium. Whether or not this is a response to the imminent obsolescence of analog photography or a return to origins, a sort of degree-zero moment, especially in light of the dominance of digital technologies, remains to be seen.

The question as to what defines a photograph is being posed anew and with some vigour. Once common exposure times, usually consisting of a fraction of a second as typical of the snapshot, have been radically expanded to the point where one photographer (Michael Wesely) has made photographs from film negatives that he exposed for up to three years inside his camera. Another (Idris Khan), instead of making single-exposure images, has produced single images made up of multiple exposures (scans) layered atop one another, often numbering in the hundreds. Recently, too, photographs have been printed, almost “conjured up,” using outdated photographic paper from the nineteenth century (Alison Rossiter), and which therefore span a time frame of over a hundred years. This often complex dialogue concerning what Samuel Beckett describes as “that double-headed monster of damnation and salvation—Time” is expanded upon by Eaton through her exploration into the agency of light and colour in the formation of the photographic image. What perhaps most interests Eaton is how the camera sees. In particular, how the primary colours of light, when blended using colour separation filters (the tripartite additive colour process), appear vibrant, even hyper, making her photographed objects seem as though illuminated from within. Eaton’s signature motif of the geometric cube that she constructs to be photographed is in essence a miniature, grey monochrome. The layers of highly saturated colours that we see, however, exist only inside the camera as recorded onto a sheet of film. Consequently, the making and building up of each photograph is a labour-invested, happenstance operation. One consolation is that when the procedure fails, it can also often succeed: potential clues are revealed,

alluding to another way of seeing, another way of thinking. As such, Eaton’s photographs may well reveal just how limited our ability to perceive the world still is. TEXT BY ARNI HARALDSSON

completed in 1954, the Bc hydro’s Dal Grauer Substation was designed by the young architect Ned Pratt and artist B. c. Binning. The building was commissioned by the B.c. electric company under the helm of the then president, edward albert “Dal” Grauer, to bridge functional design with public art. The substation would go on to serve as a three-dimensional “canvas” that was said to resemble a Piet Mondrian or De Stijl painting. Unfortunately, in 1977 the substation suffered several explosions that shattered the glass exterior walls; these were later replaced with plexiglass, which, over time, clouded and obscured the vibrant colours of the interior. The modernist philosophy with which the building was designed emphasizes the link between art, architecture, and everyday life. With this in mind, capture Photography Festival has commissioned canadian photographer Jessica Eaton to create a new site-specific work to be adhered to the Substation’s facade. In its conversation with seminal modernist colour theory works, eaton’s photograph points to the history of the Substation and to vancouver’s unique role in West coast modern design. This project highlights this innovative public showcase of future-forward art and technology on Burrard Street. Drawing on the building’s originality, the project will temporarily emphasize the building in the streetscape and reassert it as an architectural icon.


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

JESSICA EATON DG Weave, 2015 INSTALLATION VIEW MOCK UP, BC HYDRO DAL GRAUER SUBSTATION PHOTOGRAPH BY NELSON MOUËLLIC

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

STUDIo FIRe, 2009 PHOTOGRAPH BY BARBARA COLE


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

APRIL 6 — MAY 3

PATTISON OUTDOOR BILLBOARDS: MONUMENT TO MYSTERIOUS FIRES Other Sights for Artists’ Projects Tailgate Party SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 2–5 PM Parking Lot Quebec St at East 5th Ave Vancouver BC In July 2013, members of the public art group Other Sights for Artists’ Projects held an open studio event at Kingsgate Mall at Broadway and Kingsway in East Vancouver. The project, titled I Know What I Want, offered to make small models of residents’ desires for the future of the neighbourhood. Using materials from the mall’s dollar store, the models were combined and recombined on an aerial plan of the adjacent intersection and ranged from the whimsical, such as a pony ranch, to practical concerns, such as affordable housing and food security. The I Know What I Want research proposes an alternative to community consultation practices that includes the generative and resisting principle of friction. One striking desire was for a monument to the mysterious fires that have occurred in the Main Street area over the past several

years. One such fire happened Christmas morning 2009, when a humble two-storey building in the 200 block of Broadway was destroyed. Lost were several local businesses and over seventeen artist studios, including those leased by Other Sights members. On the occasion of the Capture Photography Festival, Other Sights has transformed both sides of two billboards at Quebec Street and 6th Avenue into a temporary monument, commemorating the Christmas 2009 fire alongside the Great Fire of 1886, an event that harkened the development of Mount Pleasant itself. Text panels make reference to the FIRE economy—an acronym for finance, insurance, and real estate—now the world’s principal source of wealth creation. It has transformed our political, economic, and social landscapes with a complex web of global finance, light regulation, debt, risk tolerance, and property bubbles. Instability has accompanied this new orthodoxy, according to authors such as Jane Kelsey, from rising inequality and ballooning household debt to a global financial crisis and fiscal austerity agendas. Addressing the east/west and the north/ south axes of the city and how they factor in the currencies of “views” and the escalation of property values creeping eastward, Monument to Mysterious Fires triggers historical and recent memories of the neighbourhood. The billboards, set perpendicular to one

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another, carve out a sculptural space within a parking lot, in which to gather and reflect on the transformation of the city. Other Sights for Artists’ Projects presents artworks, publications, events, and programs that consider the aesthetic, economic, and regulatory conditions of public places and public life. The creative team for Monument to Mysterious Fires includes Rachel Topham, Tung Yi, and Jack Chiu, along with Barbara Cole, Vanessa Kwan, Jen Weih, Lorna Brown, Marko Simcic, Colin Griffiths, and Joni Low of Other Sights. The capture Photography Festival and other Signs for artists’ Projects gratefully acknowledge the support of the British columbia arts council, an agency of the Province of British columbia, and Pattison outdoor.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

KOWLOON WALLED CITY (SW CORNER), 1987 Greg Girard CURATED BY

Rita Beiks PRESENTED BY

Vancouver Airport Authority IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

35,000 people living within a site measuring approximately 200 by 100 metres. Ungoverned by health and safety regulations, 33,000 families and businesses occupied some 350 interconnected buildings, rising fourteen storeys or more—all constructed without plans, architects, or any regulatory oversight. Although the Walled City was once a hotbed for criminal activity, in later years most residents were not involved in crime and lived quite peacefully within its walls.

Capture Photography Festival Canada Line Station Walkway to YVR International Terminal The Walled City of Kowloon, in Hong Kong, is believed to have been the most densely populated place on the planet, with up to

JANUARY 23 — APRIL 19

THE FLIGHT OF THE MEDICI MAMLUK Shannon Bool PRESENTED BY

The Contemporary Art Gallery IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

the Canada Line Public Art Program — InTransit BC Yaletown-Roundhouse Station Canada Line The Contemporary Art Gallery presents an ambitious new commission at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station by Canadian artist Shannon Bool. Bool typically references a wide variety of historical and monumental objects in her work, commenting on the role of decorative arts within art history, as well as on the change in meaning that occurs through the replication and alteration of significant cultural forms.

Vancouver photographer Greg Girard spent three decades working and living in Asia, examining the social and physical transformations of some of its largest cities. Based in Hong Kong as a photographer for Newsweek and Time magazines, Girard began photographing the Kowloon Walled

For the Yaletown-Roundhouse Station, Bool has worked with a photographer to document the sixteenth-century Egyptian Medici Mamluk carpet, recently rediscovered stored in the Palazzo Pitti in Florence, Italy. Unusual due to its gigantic size and pristine condition, Bool has painstakingly pieced together individual images to reproduce the whole carpet at exact scale across the glass facade of the building. Suspended in the everyday space of the station and tilted as if afloat, the work shows some of the mathematical and geometrical sensibilities that are seldom acknowledged but directly influenced Renaissance thought. Amazing in its detail and intricacy, literally and metaphorically the image records both the patterns and passages of time, in much the same way as the busy station is itself an embodiment of a space of people passing through.

City in 1986 for his own interest. He spent the next five years documenting the “urban dystopia” before it was completely demolished in 1993. Girard co-authored a book with Ian Lambot, recently reissued as city of Darkness Revisited (2014), which documents the compelling history of this social and architectural phenomenon. This presentation is part of a larger exhibition of Girard’s work, Greg Girard: Richmond/Kowloon, on view at the Richmond Art Gallery, April 18–June 29, 2015. The exhibition includes Girard’s photographs documenting Kowloon Walled City in Hong Kong as well as a new body of photographic images of Richmond, BC, and its residents. CITYOFDARKNESS.CO.UK


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

SHANNON BOOL The FlIGhT oF The MeDIcI MaMlUK, 2014 INSTALLATION VIEW, YALETOWN-ROUNDHOUSE STATION, CANADA LINE PHOTOGRAPH BY SCOTT MASSEY

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

opposite page REESE MUNTEAN WATERFRONT STATION

CAPTURE CANADA LINE PUBLIC ART PROJECT: THE CITY BEFORE THE CITY PRESENTED BY

Capture Photography Festival IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

The Canada Line Public Art Program — InTransit BC As part of this year’s Capture Photography Festival, the Canada Line features a series of installations on the theme “the city before the city” at eight stations. The theme for these installations grew out of the topic for the collaborative, multi-sited exhibit c̓ әsnaʔәm, the city before the city, currently showing at the University of British Columbia’s Museum of Anthropology (MOA), the Museum of Vancouver (MOV), and the Musqueam Cultural Education Resource Centre. Artists were asked to contribute a lensbased work drawing on their interpretation of the theme “the city before the city.” The stations were coordinated and curated by a team from MOA and Musqueam, as well as from the City of Vancouver, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), and a group of sixteen students under the guidance of Jennifer Kramer and Diana Marsh as part of a Museum Practice and Curatorship course at the University of British Columbia. Together, works at these stations variously engage themes of absence, belonging, power, identity, memory, place, landscape, and territory.

snәw̓eyәɬ (Teachings) at Waterfront Station, curated by Kate Hennessy, showcases work by photographer Reese Muntean and was created in cooperation with contemporary Musqueam fishers. Documenting the processing of salmon, these images speak to the resilience of and reciprocal relationship between a species of fish and a community’s living culture. For City Centre Station, curated by Rita Beiks and commissioned by the City of Vancouver Public Art Program in partnership with Capture and the Canada Line Public Art Program—InTransit BC, Dana Claxton has created a new work, elk for c̓ әsnaʔәm. Claxton, an artist and educator of mixed Euro-Canadian and Lakota First Nations ancestry, asks us to consider our relationships to elk and other indigenous animals, as well as their absence from our contemporary landscape. Olympic Village Station, curated by Jordan Wilson, features the work of Cree/Métis multimedia artist Gabe Hill. Monument to Piazza Italia engages with the irreparable transformation and history of displacement of the place now referred to as False Creek, as well as narratives of discovery and conquest, raising questions of what is and isn’t memorialized in the public realm. City Hall Station, curated by Susan Rowley, features a collaboration between photographer David Campion and writer Sandra Shields. The Mar Poles of c̓ әsnaʔәm is a satirical exploration of one part of Vancouver that is built on top of an ancient Musqueam village and burial site. Focusing on the architecture presently located at c̓ әsnaʔәm, Campion and Shields offer a biting commentary on the recognition of important Indigenous cultural and historic sites. Curated by students Claire Koga, Tessa McIntosh, Christine Pennington, Kara Campbell, and Brandon Rivas, King Edward Station features the work of Nlaka'pamux/

Dine' photographer Cherry Smiley. Two pieces from Smiley’s ongoing photo series home Story are featured, examining how understandings of home are shaped by continuity and change, intergenerational relationships, and cultural resilience. At the Langara Station, student curators Emma DelliCarpini, Nichole DeMichelis, Shirin Ramchandani, Napatsanan Runmongkonsawad, Kristine Lorenzo, and Lauren Washuk solicited the work of Caroline Monnet, an Algonquin/French multidisciplinary and multimedia artist. The installation features Monnet’s images and film stills, highlighting how space and place are laden with multiple and intertwined narratives. Curated by students Zoya Mirzaghitova, Marisa Swinton, Rebecca Cron, John Zollars, and Nichola Lee, the Marine Drive Station displays two works by Dana Claxton, part of a longer series called Tatanka Wanbli chekpa Wicincala (2006). This installation ultimately asks the viewer to question colloquial place names and their power. Lastly, YVR station is curated by Rita Beiks. The installation, flanking the YVR walkway, consists of works from Christos Dikeakos’s series Sites and Place Names (1992), created in collaboration with Musqueam elders and recently updated by the Musqueam Treaty, Lands and Resources and Language and Culture Departments. Sites and Place Names layers words and their Musqueam, hәn̓q̓ әmin̓әm̓ language, place names over photographs taken by Dikeakos. The photos selected reflect on the dichotomy of place: the new metropolis and the Indigenous cultures that precede and intersect with it. As a whole, these installations speak to the ever-changing nature of what is now known as Vancouver and reflect on the concept of “the city before the city” in multiple ways. While some works reach further back in time to reveal both resilience and drastic transformations, others comment on more recent


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

history, highlighting a landscape constantly in flux; the city of yesterday is the city before our city today. Ultimately, this diverse body of contemporary work, like c̓ әsnaʔәm, the city before the city, asks viewers to reconsider the place they know as Vancouver, whether it is their home or temporary host. Often considered a “new” city, Vancouver has a rich, deep history that existed long before its settler identity. The contributing artists speak to this extensive past and compel us, as Vancouverites and visitors, to reflect on how we recognize and remember this history and how it affects us today. TEXT BY DIANA MARSH AND JORDAN WILSON

WATERFRONT STATION: snəw̓eyəɬ (TEACHINGS)

In addition to representing contemporary Musqueam fishers at work, this series of photographs shows the tools and technologies used in the processing and preserving of salmon, such as axes, hoses, containers, knives, sharpeners, and the smokehouse. Also shown are the animal and natural resources at the heart of this activity: wood for generating smoke and heat, harvested from the land on Musqueam territory; and salmon, lifeblood of Musqueam people, harvested from the Fraser River. snәw̓eyәɬ (teachings) guide how these technologies are used to feed and sustain Musqueam families. Salmon and their life cycles have been intricately connected to Musqueam life ways for millennia, and the ancestral knowledge that has stewarded salmon and the river itself continues to be shared today. These images are an expression of cultural survival and resilience.

Reese Muntean with Jordan Wilson and the Musqueam Fisheries Commission CURATED BY

Kate Hennessy “Fishing is not the act of just putting a net in the water. Why it is so vital to us is because the preparation that goes before fishing is where the transferring of knowledge happens. old stories come out; this is where the history is passed along. You can say, ‘I’ll pay you for the fish,’ but how do you pay me for the time lost with my child, the way I learned from my grandparent and my grandparent learned from his grandparent?” In 2014–15, photographer Reese Muntean worked with curator Jordan Wilson to develop visual and interactive media for the exhibition c̓ әsnaʔәm, the city before the city. In the course of this collaboration, Muntean, Wilson, and members of the Musqueam Fisheries Commission documented the everyday salmon processing practices of community members on their reserve lands at the mouth of the Fraser River in Vancouver, on the unceded traditional territory of the hәn̓q̓ әmin̓әm̓-speaking Musqueam people.

CITY CENTRE STATION: ELK FOR c̓ əsnaʔəm

When asked to conceive an original work for this site relating to the theme of “the city before the city,” Claxton considered precolonial landscapes and animal nations such as elk, deer, bear, beaver, mink, raccoon, skunk, and coyote populations that circulated through these lands according to their own natural logic. In particular, elk form a crucial aspect of First Nations subsistence and spiritual economy. In the Lakota Sioux community, they hold power as sources of sacred mana, integral to ceremonial life. Elk were plentiful in this area for thousands of years, yet have disappeared in less than two hundred. Those living in the early Musqueam villages could simply open their doors to find the elk. Today, Musqueam people are forced to trade up north and into the interior for elk, as their use remains intrinsic to Musqueam society and culture. Claxton questions out loud: What does this mean for society today? How are we respecting the “four-leggeds” still among us? What is our relationship with them? Who is responsible for considering them and making sure they are safe? How do we live with them?

Dana Claxton CURATED BY

Rita Beiks COMMISSIONED BY

She is asking us to ponder the same questions as we look through the grey concrete forest to see the aestheticized elk, alive in a celebration of colour, where it once may have been standing.

City of Vancouver Public Art Program IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

Capture Photography Festival and the Canada Line Public Art Program — InTransit BC Dana Claxton is a Vancouver-based artist and educator working in film, video, photography, and performance art. Born in Saskatchewan, Claxton’s mixed Euro-Canadian and Lakota First Nations ancestry provides her with strong cultural roots that ground her in different cultures and with gifts of openness and curiosity that are evident in the exploration of her uniquely relevant range of topics.

opposite page — top DANA CLAXTON CITY CENTRE STATION opposite page — bottom GABE HILL OLYMPIC VILLAGE STATION

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

OLYMPIC VILLAGE STATION: MONUMENT TO PIAZZA ITALIA Gabe Hill CURATED BY

Jordan Wilson Monument to Piazza Italia (2014) is a work by Vancouver-based, Cree/Métis artist Gabe Hill. The photograph documents an evening of electrical repairs by Hill and her brother, who rewired the lighting in Piazza Italia in East Vancouver to temporarily illuminate the square’s empty pedestal, raising questions around monuments, public space, and absence. Piazza Italia, which housed a statue of Christopher Columbus between 1986 and 2000, has been the site of an ideological struggle between anticolonial and proColumbus proponents since its construction. After years of vandalism, the statue was relocated to the Italian Garden at Hastings Park. Since the statue’s removal, its pedestal has sat vacant, the plaza’s fountain and electricity shut off, despite the space still being well used by many. Posing the question of what is missing, Monument foregrounds the absence of other histories, of what has not been memorialized in the public realm: namely the histories of Indigenous peoples, the original occupants of this land—those “found” by the likes of Columbus. Piazza Italia sits on what was once the shore of an inlet named False Creek by explorers, the shallow mud flats and streams of its eastern end rich in resources valuable to the local Indigenous communities. Though never ceded by Indigenous peoples, settlers transformed the area into the site of heavy industry in the late 1800s. In 1910, the City of Vancouver gifted the land to the Canadian Northern Railway, which ultimately filled in the wetlands to build its terminus. With this history of displacement in mind, Monument memorializes the site as

one of ongoing anticolonial struggle. What Hill illuminates in this photograph is more than an unoccupied pedestal; it is the persistence of Indigenous claims to—and memory of—an irreparably altered landscape. Monument underscores Piazza Italia’s status as a counter-monument, speaking against the narratives of discovery and conquest it once represented and recalling what is seldom publicly remembered.

CITY HALL STATION: THE MAR POLES OF c̓ əsnaʔəm David Campion and Sandra Shields CURATED BY

Susan Rowley This work plays on the name of Marpole, the Vancouver neighbourhood built on top of the ancient city of c̓ әsnaʔәm. Instead of the house posts and carved figures of the Coast Salish longhouse, the work shows the pillars and poles of today, reconceptualizing what we see in the present as an entry point to the past. Sharing a distrust of dominant social mythologies, artists David Campion and Sandra Shields use their work to explore power and its repercussions. Shields comes to the subject of colonialism as the greatgranddaughter of pioneers. Campion approaches from the vantage point of an immigrant from Britain whose youth was spent in apartheid South Africa. Campion and Shields’s words and photographs appear in books, galleries, and museums. Recent work includes their collaboration with stó:lō Nation on Man Turned to Stone: T’xwelátse (The Reach Gallery Museum Abbotsford, 2011).

KING EDWARD STATION Cherry Smiley CURATED BY

Kara Campbell Claire Koga Tessa McIntosh Christine Pennington Brandon Rivas The theme “the city before the city” demonstrates the extensive history of the lands on which Vancouver is situated and highlights the importance of considering the old and new in tandem, not in isolation. King Edward Station displays the poignant work of Cherry Smiley, a Nlaka’pamux and Dine’ artist and feminist activist based in Vancouver. As a proud Indigenous woman, Smiley actively uses her artwork and influence to raise awareness of issues impacting Indigenous women and girls. The two pieces from Smiley’s ongoing photo series home Story showcased at King Edward Station depict the relationship between grandmother and granddaughter. The role of “home” as an active participant in this cross-generational relationship helps to emphasize the significance of place in the formation of spiritual and familial ties. Despite the challenges faced by Indigenous women across Canada, these bonds encourage a continued resilience against the institutionalized threats toward Indigenous women and girls.


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

top DAVID CAMPION AND SANDRA SHIELDS CITY HALL STATION bottom CHERRY SMILEY KING EDWARD STATION

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

LANGARA STATION

MARINE DRIVE STATION

Caroline Monnet

Dana Claxton

CURATED BY

CURATED BY

Emma DelliCarpini Nichole DeMichelis Kristine Lorenzo Shirin Ramchandani Napatsanan Runmongkonsawad Lauren Washuk

Zoya Mirzaghitova Marisa Swinton Rebecca Cron John Zollars Nichola Lee

Caroline Monnet is an Algonquin/French multidisciplinary artist whose work explores Indigenous and bicultural life and identity. She is interested in how people define themselves as people of one or many identities and people living between many cultures. In this installation, stills from Monnet’s film Demi Monde are transposed over the city, making two perspectives visible. The word which literally translates to “half world,” has a personal meaning for Monnet: “A distinct world—that is often an isolated part of a larger world.” Two liquids swirl together, a mirror seems to be a portal, and a single face separates into two—these images all depict boundaries and separations. Vancouver is a city that has had many names since the bustling city c̓ әsnaʔәm was first occupied by the hәn̓q̓ әmin̓әm̓speaking ancestors of the Musqueam people around five thousand years ago. The artist has created these images to take us across the boundaries between one world and another, where two cultures—and two cities—meet.

opposite page — top

The multilingual text is an invitation for viewers to take a moment from their daily commute through Vancouver and join in a multivocal discussion about how these meetings, bindings, and conflicts of identity have shaped the city.

CAROLINE MONNET LANGARA STATION

VIEW THE FULL VIDEO AT CAROLINEMONNET.CA

opposite page — bottom DANA CLAXTON MARINE DRIVE STATION

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The British colonists who arrived at what is now known as the City of Vancouver saw a resemblance between the twin peaks that crown the local landscape and the lion statues in London’s Trafalgar Square. However, these two mountain peaks, now widely known as “the Lions,” have a longer, more established history than their name denotes. They were, in fact, sisters who stopped a long war between the Squamish and Haida nations by marrying brothers from the opposing tribe. They brought peace and solidarity to the coastal people and were immortalized as the twin mountain peaks, watching over the land. The identity of these mountains, their landscape, and their people have undergone great challenges. Dana Claxton’s Tatanka Wanbli chekpa Wicincala (2006, part of a larger series) deals with issues of identity faced by First Nations people in the City of Vancouver and worldwide. Here, the twin sisters hold stuffed toys: a buffalo and an eagle—symbols of power and trust within the Lakota culture. However, their presentation as children’s toys—Western commodities— drains them of their symbolic meaning. Claxton’s work deals with the imposition of the new histories, structures, and perceptions on a culture that existed long before the City of Vancouver and continues to exist today.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

YVR STATION: PASSAGE WAYS Christos Dikeakos CURATED BY

Rita Beiks PRESENTED BY

Vancouver Airport Authority IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

Capture Photography Festival Christos Dikeakos was born in Thessaloniki, Greece in 1946 and moved to Vancouver with his family when he was a child. He was immediately interested in understanding the history of his new home and when he wasn’t in school he was at the Carnegie Building (site of the Vancouver Museum) researching and learning about Vancouver’s pre-colonial history. His art practice began in the 1960’s when he started photographing the False Creek, area of Vancouver. Today, Dikeakos continues to document and comment on the political and social realities of the city’s changing landscape while uncovering its layers of unseen histories. In considering the theme of c̓ әsnaʔәm, the city before the city, Dikeakos selected photos from his extensive project, “Sites and Place

Names Vancouver,” that began in the early 1990’s. The series of photos reflects on the dichotomy of place: the new metropolis and the aboriginal cultures that precede and overlap with it. Dikeakos interviewed late Musqueam elder, Dominic Point, to learn about the sites before the city overtook them, and gleaned key words and histories associated with their ancient uses. By layering words and their Musqueam place names over photographs, Dikeakos provides a glimpse into the site’s accumulated history - the people, activities, stories and traditions that have made these sites important over time. The artist and Vancouver Airport Authority would like to thank the Musqueam for their assistance in providing the updated written form of the words and Musqueam place names used in these photos. The Passage Ways series reflects the change to the written form of hәn̓q̓ әmin̓әm, the language of the Musqueam people whose village is situated across the Fraser River and on whose traditional territory YVR is situated.


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

CHRISTOS DIKEAKOS sɬχil̕әx, "SIWaSh RocK”, 1993 COLOUR PHOTOGRAPH YVR STATION

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

Exhibitions


EXHIBITIONS

ISAAC THOMAS SaRa’S BaT MITzvah, 2015 DURATRAN, 4’ x 6’

JANUARY 30 — MAY 23

SARA’S BAT MITZVAH Isaac Thomas Lightbox Project Space Gallery 295 295 East 2nd Ave — Back Alley Entrance Vancouver BC Sara’s Bat Mitzvah is a large-format photographic work that brings to light the spectacle occasionally immersed within the suburban landscape. By working through the traditions of straight photography, the conceptual elements of the composition are explored in the meticulous depiction of a scene—that of a stilt walker waving to a vehicle, directing passers by towards the #partyoftheyear—Sara’s Bat Mitzvah. Whether it is a coming-of-age ceremony or a fully fledged over-the-top celebration, there is a cultural tradition of thinking up the most impressive and creative ways to eclipse the last (party). The arrow pointing down the road, off camera into the distance, mimics Sara’s future. She has taken her mitzvah vows and been declared a woman in the eyes of her family, peers, and community. In this work, Isaac Thomas extracts the nuances from his own personal encounters of the everyday and depicts them in an aesthetic value in which religious and cultural traditions are practiced in the twenty-first century. Thomas’s interest in debuting this work in the Lightbox Project Space is to frame this tableau in homage to the rich tradition of straight conceptual photography that has come into prominence through the Vancouver School.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

opposite page ALLEN GINSBERG SaNDRo chIa, hIS aPaRTMeNT STUDIo oN WeST 24Th STReeT, 1985 GELATIN SILVER PRINT, 50.8 x 40.6 CM GIFT OF THE ROSSY FAMILY FOUNDATION COPYRIGHT THE ESTATE OF ALLEN GINSBURG

FEBRUARY 20 — APRIL 5

“WE ARE CONTINUALLY EXPOSED TO THE FLASHBULB OF DEATH”: THE PHOTOGRAPHS OF ALLEN GINSBERG (1953–1996) Allen Ginsberg CURATED BY

Barbara Fischer John Shoesmith Presentation House Gallery 333 Chesterfield Ave North Vancouver BC This exhibition celebrates the artistic pursuits—both visual and verbal—of Allen Ginsberg (1926–1997), one of the most prolific poets of the twentieth century. Born in Newark, New Jersey, Allen Ginsberg was exposed to poetry from an early age through his father. He was then educated at Columbia University, where he became acquainted with a circle of poets that would gain notoriety as the “Beat Generation”

of the 1950s and ’60s. Ginsberg’s most famous poem, “Howl” (1956), was temporarily banned due to charges of obscenity, before the ruling was overturned by a court citing “redeeming social importance.” Throughout his life, Ginsberg was an unabashed advocate of free speech—he lived openly as a homosexual with his life partner, Peter Orlovsky—as well as a vocal anti-war activist. During his career as a revolutionary writer, composer, and activist, Ginsberg extensively documented his life in photographs, amassing an archive that now encompasses thousands of images. Last year, the University of Toronto received a donation of 7,600 of Ginsberg’s prints from the Rossy Family Foundation, the largest single collection in the world. Presentation House Gallery is thrilled to bring a selection of these images to British Columbia for the first time. Taken over the course of four decades, the photographs juxtapose Ginsberg’s everchanging surroundings with a steadfast group of friends, lovers, muses, and

fellow poets. Many prominent members of the Beat Generation, including Jack Kerouac, Lucien Carr, Neal Cassady, and William S. Burroughs, are prominently featured. The prints extend beyond mere depiction, however, tracing the poet’s literary influences through music, political freedoms, and even Buddhist philosophy. Ginsberg captioned each of the gelatin silver prints in handwritten script, further integrating his photographic and textual mediums. Indeed, the same shrewd honesty and liberated spontaneity that guide Ginsberg’s poetry are also channelled through his lens. This exhibition was organized by the University of Toronto art centre and Justina M. Barnicke Gallery with the Thomas Fisher Rae Book library at the University of Toronto.


EXHIBITIONS

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EXHIBITIONS

FEBRUARY 27 — APRIL 19

MEDIUM-BASED TIME Jeremy Shaw Contemporary Art Gallery 555 Nelson St Vancouver BC The Contemporary Art Gallery presents Medium-Based Time by Berlin-based Canadian artist Jeremy Shaw, featuring a black-and-white 16 mm film of transgender voguer Leiomy Maldonado, an HD video installation that reworks archival ethnographic film into a dystopian science fiction narrative, and a new series of lightactivated UV prints in the windows of the gallery’s street facade. The exhibition centres on variation FQ (2011–13), in which Shaw worked with legendary voguer Leiomy to produce a film that explores aspects of subculture, dance, gender, power, and special effects. “Vogue” is a primarily black and latino, gay subculture that evolved out of the drag balls of New York in the 1980s and includes a fluid yet raw dance style based around miming the poses of models from high-fashion magazines. The film sets Leiomy starkly lit against a black void performing her

signature freestyle dance, teetering between elegance and violence. As the film progresses, Shaw introduces step-and-repeat-style visual effects, originally created by Canadian animator Norman McLaren in his 1968 ballet film Pas de deux. Shaw’s practice amplifies conceptual strategies within the transcendence-seeking experiences of popular culture, as well as in the speculative nature of scientific mapping of these phenomena. In keeping with this ongoing interest in and around altered states, the CAG premieres Quickeners (2014), a pseudo-documentary that puts the role of truth telling into crisis. Quickeners is set against a cinéma vérité aesthetic, reworking archival documentary footage from a gathering of Pentecostal Christian snake handlers to illustrate the story. Alongside these film/ video works, in our window vitrines hangs Degenerative Imaging (In the Dark) (2015), a new series of light-activated, glow-inthe-dark vinyl cutouts that reference star and planet stickers. The prints are charged by fluorescent light once per hour, causing them to glow strongly and then fade, glow and fade: static time-based mediums on repeat.

opposite page JEREMY SHAW vaRIaTIoN FQ, 2011–13 FILM STILL COURTESY OF JOHANN KÖNIG, BERLIN AND MACAULAY & CO. FINE ART, VANCOUVER IAN LANE PHOTOGRAPH BY IAN LANE

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MARCH 11 — SEPTEMBER 6

SHUTTERBUG: PHOTOGRAPHS BY IAN LANE Ian Lane Beaty Biodiversity Museum University of British Columbia 2212 Main Mall Vancouver BC Take a closer look at local insect life in this exhibition of photographs. Discover how one man’s pastime became his passion, and explore how his images have contributed to science. Over 10,000 of Ian Lane’s photographic slides were donated to the Spencer Entomological Collection at the Beaty Biodiversity Museum, and this exhibition showcases the most spectacular images in the collection. Many of these were documented with the date, location, and species name of the subject, serving as a valuable contribution to scientific research. Join in family friendly activities: be a bug and snap a selfie in our dress-up area, add an origami pollinator to our garden, play ladybird bingo, and more.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

MARCH 19 — APRIL 18

NOTHING HERE APPEARS TO EXIST BUT WHAT CONTRIBUTES TO HARMONY Yedda Morrison EXHIBITION OPENING

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 6–8 PM Republic Gallery 732 Richards St — Third Floor Vancouver BC

MARCH 21 — MAY 2

INVERNOMUTO Invernomuto EXHIBITION OPENING

FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 8 PM Artspeak 233 Carrall St Vancouver BC Emphasizing the collapse and subsequent mixture of languages, Invernomuto blends popular rituals and symbols from folklore and urban culture, working in moving language, sound, and installation. Presented at Artspeak is an instalment of their ambitious Negus project, initiated in 2011. The project is an expanded documentary that mixes various languages, ranging from classic documentary to esoteric fictional mise-en-scène. Negus is based on a historical event dating back to the Italian occupation of Ethiopia and traces an imaginary line linking Invernomuto’s hometown of Vernasca, Italy, to Ethiopia and Jamaica. Taking up Invernomuto’s interest in the reinterpretation of screens and systems for diffusing images, Negus amalgamates historical fact, cultural ghosts, and political scenes from the past with music and

Nothing here appears to exist but What contributes to harmony features new work by Yedda Morrison. Morrison’s work foregrounds that which typically serves as backdrop or supporting scenery in the drama of mass consumerism by rephotographing landscapes and other “natural” elements in mass-produced magazines. Positioned “after nature,” the work attempts to create “nature”—or the experience thereof—through its own highly mediated image. Reframed, the scenery becomes the central, virtual field, inhabiting the privileged and precarious position of both image subject and object of desire. A series of colour photographs as well as an installation make up the show.

performance rites of obscure traditional origins. Negus begins with a wounded soldier’s return to Vernasca from Ethiopia in 1936. To celebrate, the local community organized a festive but sinister ritual, burning an effigy of the Ethiopian King Haile Selassie I in the town square. The project focuses on Selassie, the last Negus of Ethiopia and a messianic figure for the Rastafarian cult that developed in Jamaica during the 1930s. Initially biographical, the narrative widens to incorporate multiple viewpoints, in particular critical moments in Italy’s colonial history and the symbolism of Rastafarian tradition. Related personalities make appearances, including Lee “Scratch” Perry, a seminal musician in the reggae and club tradition. Originating as a film project, Negus has grown to incorporate installation and sculpture. Invernomuto will integrate symbols from the visual landscape of Ethiopian history—symbols that acquire new meaning within the social, political, and religious context of the Rastafarian movement—combined with mementos and materials from personal archives. The project confronts colonial rhetoric, repositioning it within a complex grid of movements that crisscross temporalities and geographies that perhaps are not as distant as they seem.


EXHIBITIONS

top YEDDA MORRISON UNTITleD #2 (STRaW/FUR), 2014 C-PRINT, 48” x 36” COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND REPUBLIC GALLERY

INVERNOMUTO NeGUS—lee “ScRaTch” PeRRY, SET PHOTO 2, 2013 PHOTOGRAPH BY MOIRA RICCI

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015


EXHIBITIONS

opposite page — top DAVID ELLINGSEN laNce TooTh cRoSScUT SaW, 2014

MARCH 24 — APRIL 11

THE LAST STAND

ARCHIVAL PRINT MADE WITH PIGMENT INK ON COTTON RAG PAPER COURTESY OF THE ARTIST opposite page — bottom

David Ellingsen

CHRISTOS DIKEAKOS

EXHIBITION OPENING

FoReGRoUND STUDY, ReD DelIcIoUS, 2007

THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 6–9 PM Initial Gallery 2339 Granville St Vancouver BC

C-PRINT, PRIVATE COLLECTION

“Five generations of my family have been a part of the forest industry in British columbia, from falling old growth trees and clear cutting to contributing to local sustainable harvest initiatives and environmental responsibility. My great-grandfather and great-uncle, in providing for their families and future, fell many of the actual trees whose remnants you now see in these photographs. It was in this familial context, filtered through the contemporary environmental crisis, that the seeds of this series were sown. These iconic remains of the old forest serve as both a meditation on the human-altered landscape and as metaphor for the natural world that supports me, the contemporary globalized culture I am an active part of, and the essential incompatibility of the two.

This incompatibility is evident in our forests through the historical lens of conflicting cultural and social attitudes. British columbia’s aboriginal people harvested trees as needed by their local communities over the millennia— a truly sustainable approach reflected in the majestic forests found by the arriving europeans. colonists added an overriding attitude of “commodification,” extracting timber for sale into the expanding global market and contributing to serious concerns about the long-term sustainability of our forest ecosystems. The cognitive dissonance arising from the dilemma of participation in, and yet responsibility for, the fouling of one’s own nest was a dominant theme guiding this project. although the pattern of progress and disaster has been repeated throughout human history, the urgency I now feel in our globalized world is one of scale . . . a scale said to be so vast, perhaps nearing a point of no return. No doubt evolution is progressing as it should, which brings some measure of comfort, yet I cannot help but feel apprehension for the life my family will lead in the not-too-distant future. ”

EXHIBITION OPENING

Okanagan Valley’s burgeoning wine industry. The photographs both record and act as a contemporary portrait of agriculture, standardization, shifting economies, and environmental change. The photographs also elevate the humble apple: showing beauty in its ripening and subsequent decay.

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 7–9 PM West Vancouver Museum 680 17th St West Vancouver BC

These works were first presented in the exhibition Nature Morte, organized by the Kelowna Art Gallery in 2014.

MARCH 25 — JUNE 13

CHRISTOS DIKEAKOS: TROUBLE IN PARADISE Christos Dikeakos

Christos Dikeakos’s photographs document the supplanting of apple orchards (and the fruit industry) by vineyards to support the

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

MARCH 25 — MAY 2

APRIL 6 — 18

ARTISTS DEPICTION

NPAC NATIONAL PICTURES OF THE YEAR

Victor John Penner EXHIBITION OPENING

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 6–9 PM Gordon Smith Gallery of Canadian Art 2121 Lonsdale Ave North Vancouver BC Artists for Kids, the Gordon and Marion Smith Foundation for Young Artists, and photographer Victor John Penner have partnered to develop an extensive historical documentation of the artists who have been involved in building Artists for Kids and the Gordon Smith Gallery of Canadian Art for the past twenty-four years, including Ed Burtynsky, Rodney Graham, Angela Grossmann, Gu Xiong, Karin Bubaš, Gathie Falk, Irene Whittome, and Attila Richard Lukacs. The portrait at its simplest is a picture of a person, a “life-like description” to celebrate and/or identify. artists Depiction is a series of portraits of Gordon Smith Gallery and Artists for Kids (AfK) patron artists and is a visceral manifest of the artist as “object.” Taken on a large-format camera with sheet film, the sitter is revealed in a microscopic way, as flesh and blood, and not as their body of work that usually hangs on the gallery walls. Stripped of any pretense, this document serves to preserve the essence of the artists that are the heart of Artist for Kids (AfK). This exhibition is displayed on the north wall of the Smith Gallery and acts in conjunction with the main gallery exhibition, Figurative contemplation, an exhibition of works from the AfK Permanent Collection that represent the figure and the creation and discovery of identity.

News Photographers Association of Canada EXHIBITION OPENING

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 5–7 PM Pendulum Gallery HSBC Building 855 West Georgia St Vancouver BC The News Photographers Association of Canada (NPAC) celebrates and champions quality and ethical photography in journalism. Through a variety of efforts, the association challenges its members to better themselves and to continually raise the bar of industry standards. In 2007, the twenty-six-year-old Western Canadian News Photographers Association joined forces with the Eastern Canadian News Photographers Association, whose roots go back to 1975, to form the News Photographers Association of Canada (NPAC). This national organization includes

over two hundred and fifty professional press photographers, freelancers, photo editors, and photojournalism students from across Canada. NPAC hosts the annual National Pictures of the Year awards (NPOY) each spring. This event is the largest annual photo contest in Canada and it showcases the best work of its members. It also recognizes the Photojournalist of the Year, Photograph of the Year, and Student Photographer of the Year. The awards competition also serves to provide members with important peer review of their work as well as helping them to stay current with trends and techniques in photojournalism. This has become the largest photojournalism competition, for both still photography and multimedia, in the country. Almost one thousand images were submitted by over one hundred photographers into the 2014 National Pictures of the Year competition’s twelve categories. The images in this exhibition represent the finalists for the NPOY and the winners will be announced at the NPOY Gala to be held on Saturday, May 9, 2015, at the Bill Reid Gallery in Vancouver.

opposite page — top left VICTOR JOHN PENNER aTTIla RIchaRD lUKacS, 2015 EPSON PRINT ON ARCHIVAL RAG PAPER, 32” x 40” opposite page — top right MATHIEU BELANGER 2014 opposite page — bottom PATRYK STASIECZEK GeSTUReD INTeRFeReNce (011), 2015 UV-LAMINATED DIGITAL C-PRINT ON METALLIC PAPER


EXHIBITIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015


EXHIBITIONS

opposite page MARTEN ELDER PR 20, 2014 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT ON FIBRE-BASED PAPER, 40” x 30” COURTESY OF EQUINOX GALLERY, VANCOUVER

MARCH 26 — APRIL 25

ASKING FOR IT Patryk Stasieczek CURATED BY

Avalon Mott EXHIBITION OPENING

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 7–10 PM FIELD Contemporary 17 West Broadway Vancouver BC Patryk Stasieczek’s solo exhibition asking for It is the result of an ongoing photographic investigation into an embodied material practice toward the occurrence of an event. Within photography’s background, an event is considered an artifactual witness of an operation, as it provides access through the delineation of a trace on some form of lightsensitized material. The photograph itself becomes an extension of the body, being extended through calculated optics and limitations, as presented by the medium of photography. By looking at the photographic event in this way and accepting the limitations of the photographic practice, only a composite view is the phenomenon by which a record of things can be further examined.

Through this, the measurement of the body in images illustrates the evocative shift of photography today. As the movement toward the immaterial digitalism of photographic process progresses, photographs are further situated as an anticipated function of events through their mediated reliability, which in their technological accessibility have further propelled the photographic act towards that of instant image-expression and consumption. Stasieczek takes the idea of an immaterial photographic production back into the darkroom and produces compositional light paintings (photogram collages) within the disembodied space of complete darkness. He composes images using a variety of lighting materials and digital technologies, coupled with sensitized photographic surfaces, allowing for his body to calibrate the exposure and gesture. The resulting photographic traces hold an intentionality that is a direct response to the spatial parameters of their composition and are further informed by the legacy of production knowledge located in the body. This method of production is distilled in the installation and configuration of the photographs as image-objects and light-objects, within a physical environment. This exhibition consists of photographic light paintings, digital C-prints that capture the interference of digital image technologies, and a deconstructed lightbox work.

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MARCH 28 — MAY 2

PERCEPTUAL RENDERINGS Marten Elder EXHIBITION OPENING

SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2–4 PM Equinox Gallery 525 Great Northern Way Vancouver BC Marten Elder’s photographs propose revised terms with which the properties of photography and seeing can be renegotiated in light of digital and technological developments. No longer satisfied to make use of the digital camera to replicate the look of colour film, which was in itself an attempt to approximate human vision, Elder uses the distinct characteristics of the digital camera to capture and process visual information in a new way. The amount of information that is captured by digital cameras is extraordinary. Through careful interpretation of the raw data, Elder produces photographs that disrupt spatial hierarchy and that are intensely vibrant in their tonal range. The colours may seem synthetic at first, but they all exist in the world in the same relative relationship to one another, and it is this representation of the world that is of great interest to Elder. Working in the realm of “straight photography,” the spatial situations depicted in the photographs—sidewalks, curbs, corners, and niches—are selected by the artist for their potential to be both photographs of the physical world and images of photographic technology. It is through this conscious attention to visual perception that Marten Elder is helping reshape the relationship between photography, technology, and perceptual experience.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

MARCH 28 — MAY 2

PICTURED WINDOWS Berenice Abbott Roy Arden Eugène Atget Phil Bergerson Manuel Alvarez Bravo Harry Callahan Walker Evans Lee Friedlander Lorraine Gilbert Fred Herzog Geoffrey James Abelardo Morell Aaron Siskind Bruce Stewart Weegee David Wisdom EXHIBITION OPENING

SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2–4 PM Equinox Gallery 525 Great Northern Way Vancouver BC

MARCH 28 — MAY 9

adrift David Hartt EXHIBITION OPENING

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 8 PM Or Gallery 555 Hamilton St Vancouver BC adrift is set fifty years in the future, when the entire population of the island nation of Tuvalu has been forced to relocate due to rising water levels as a result of global warming and the Tuvalse have commissioned a high-density arcology on the banks

Pictured Windows is a group exhibition that explores the duality of window pictures and the contrast between what is presented and what is reflected. It begins with Eugène Atget’s Paris storefronts of the early twentieth century and brings together photographers who have explored the reflective ambiguity and cultural significance of the storefront as a changing still life. Atget along with Berenice Abbott and Fred Herzog explore ways in which the objects and design of window displays reflect a cultural moment; through these window pictures, they take inventory of their cities. Phil Bergerson humorously presents displayed objects as glass-cased relics of a deserted past, while the works of Lee Friedlander, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, and Abelardo Morell investigate the surrealist possibilities of reflective surfaces. All the works in the exhibition feature the shop window as vitrine, framing its seemingly banal contents, and the photographs, as Susan Sontag writes, “[bring] to our attention the coexistence of sewing machine and umbrella, that chance meeting, which a great Surrealist poet has praised as the essence of beauty.”

of the Mississippi river. The story references both Mark Twain’s huckleberry Finn and Kobo Abé’s early science fiction novel Inter Ice age 4 (Dai-Yon Kampyõki). It was shot both in Tuvalu and at Bertrand Goldberg’s architecturally renowned River City complex in Chicago. Hartt’s work addresses ideology and the built environment, and in adrift, Hartt explores what happens to a people when that environment disappears, specifically through notions of sovereignty in the twentyfirst century, both virtual and physical.


EXHIBITIONS

top EUGÈNE ATGET BoUlevaRD De STRaSBoURG, coRSeTS, PaRIS, 1912 PRINTED 1930s BY BERENICE ABBOTT, SILVER PRINT, 9” x 7” bottom DAVID HARTT STILL FROM adrift, 2015

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 1 — MAY 2

INSIDE OUT Colin Smith EXHIBITION OPENING

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, 6–8 PM Winsor Gallery 258 East 1st Ave Vancouver BC Winsor Gallery presents Inside out, an exhibition of new works by Colin Smith. Historically a model of rational, empiricist thought, the camera obscura persists as a curiosity in the age of advanced photographic technology, closer in practice to how our own eyes receive images than to any manufactured camera today. Using this centuries-old apparatus, Smith transforms modest hotel rooms, abandoned fire lookouts, and airstream trailers into nostalgic showrooms of their environs. The practice is tenuous, highly dependent on the availability of both consistent exterior light and complete interior darkness. With exposing each image over the course of two to six hours comes the risk that they may not materialize at all. In its intimate instability, the medium operates as an allegory for experiential memory. Inside out is a marvel of slowness in image making that runs counter to the instantaneousness of digital photography today.

COLIN SMITH BoW laKe BoleR, 2014 LIGHTJET PRINT, 48” x 60” COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

APRIL 1 — MAY 2

WAYWARD Brody Albert Dana Claxton Alexis Dirks Jason Gowans Maggie Groat Lili Huston-Herterich Laurie Kang Colin Smith Ed Spence CURATED BY

Kimberly Phillips EXHIBITION OPENING

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, 6–8 PM Winsor Gallery 258 East 1st Ave Vancouver BC EXHIBITION TOUR FROM 6:30–7 PM WITH CURATOR KIMBERLY PHILLIPS AND EXHIBITING ARTISTS

In the first decade of its existence, the photographic image was understood not as “captured” or “taken” but rather as something “received from the world.” A certain anxiety was detectable in the writings of the new technology’s practitioners, who confessed their inability to fully control or “fix” the medium, both chemically and psychically. As theorist Kaja Silverman suggests in a new study that radically rethinks the history of photography, it was as though the photograph itself had its own intentionality, through which the world might conspire to assert its presence.

Wayward presents the work of nine contemporary artists—based in Toronto, St. Catharines, Yellowknife, Los Angeles, and Vancouver—who trouble our presumptions about “fixedness" of the photograph. Dana Claxton and Ed Spence unsettle the surface of the image through pixelation, but through analog (rather than digital) processes. Laurie Kang, in a series of repeated exercises, exposes and tears light-sensitive paper to create collaged photograms that respond willfully to their environment. Jason Gowans uses infrared film to manifest a “drift” in both time and collective memory, while Brody Albert, in a three-channel video, offers a fugitive, almost imperceptible meditation on the very basis of photo-graphé or “drawing with light.” Several artists extend the photographic to its farthest reaches: an entire room is transformed into a pinhole camera— and thus a projection of the tourist imaginary—in the case of Colin Smith; patterns mimicking those found the natural world are digitally printed on billboard paper and silk crepe de chine, then run up walls and unfurled across the floor in the work of Alexis Dirks. These works remind us of the photograph’s fundamental unruliness and consider the way the medium’s “unstoppable development,” to borrow Silverman’s term, might well be the world’s primary way of revealing itself to us.


EXHIBITIONS

ED SPENCE caReFUl! YoU’Re FallING INSIDe YoURSelF aGaIN, 2015 UNIQUE ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT WITH GLUE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

APRIL 2 — 29

LIFE OFF GRID: REASSEMBLING DOMESTIC LIFE Jonathan Taggart EXHIBITION OPENING

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 5–8 PM Lobby Gallery at the Liu Institute for Global Issues University of British Columbia 6476 NW Marine Drive Vancouver BC Off-grid isn’t a state of mind. It isn’t about someone being out of touch, about a place that is hard to get to, or about a weekend spent offline. “Off-grid” refers to homes that

opposite page JONAH SAMSON cloWN, CYANOTYPE WITH WILD BLUEBERRIES AND ALL NATURAL HOUSEHOLD CLEANSER, 16” x 20” JONATHAN TAGGART NeT Ball, NUNavUT, 2013 ARCHIVAL INKJET PRINT, 13” x 20”

are disconnected from the electricity and the natural gas grid—homes that are therefore self-sufficient for light, power, and heat. The people living in these homes tend to be independent for procuring other vital resources, such as water and food, and for disposing of their own waste. Life off grid, therefore, is a life that is radically different from the one we know: it’s a life that is reinvented and dramatically innovative, but also quite old. Off-grid homes are experimental labs for our collective future. The lessons they are learning today about living with renewable energy are the lessons we will all need to learn tomorrow in order to make our lives more sustainable, more respectful toward

the environment, and less dependent on non-renewable resources. life off Grid is an intimate look into unusual contemporary domestic lives, but it is also a call to the rest of us leading ordinary lives to examine what we take for granted about our homes, our needs, and our wants. Photographer and filmmaker Jonathan Taggart spent two years travelling Canada with researcher Dr. Phillip Vannini, studying the lives of people living off the grid in every province and territory. life off Grid presents photographs from these travels and encounters. A feature-length documentary film of the same name will be released in 2015.


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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 2 — MAY 2

APRIL 2 — 30

DREAM DISTORTION

CAMERA MACHINA

Jonah Samson

Byron Dauncey Kevin Day

Macaulay & Co. Fine Art 193 East 2nd Ave Vancouver BC In Dream Distortion, Jonah Samson continues to explore the uncanny mysteries, the unsettling tensions, and the darkly humourous moments that blur the line between fiction and reality. Heavily influenced by absurdist theatre, the exhibition wholly embodies the act of hunting and gathering and is born from a vast knowledge of photographic history and an intense love of nature. With a keen eye for the peculiar, the artist diligently mined millions of vintage photographs on eBay for his personal collection and transformed them using historical photographic practices and natural dyes he made from the plants growing on his property on Cape Breton Island. The works embrace that alchemy of nature, understood by the first photographic practitioners like William Henry Fox Talbot. Salt from the Atlantic Ocean combines with sumac, lavender, maple leaves, and photosensitive chemicals to create dreamlike images in the sun. The effect is an exploration of photographic history, interwoven with the conflicting peace and anxiety that comes from living in a remote location. This is a dreamscape that oscillates between an intangible memory and a looming fear, and represents the artist’s belief that the perfect picture is one that combines the magical, the disturbing, and the absurd.

EXHIBITION OPENING

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 6 PM–LATE Robert Lynds Gallery 1639 West 3rd Ave Vancouver BC The Robert Lynds Gallery presents the work of Byron Dauncey and Kevin Day. The exhibition camera Machina explores facets of Dauncey’s diverse creative practice in photography, highlighting his photomanipulative work in his cubist Photography, and showcase Day’s series resuscitated algorithms. In the contemporary age of digital omnipresence, surveillance, and the widespread use of lens-based devices, how does the medium of photography address issues of artistic agency, meaning formation, construction of reality, and representation?

and angles of a singular subject are rebuilt into a kinetic artwork. Dauncey approaches the photo portraits in ways a cubist painter might—playing on time, space, movement, and perspective. Dauncey focuses in on revealing a creative process, exploring alternative perception, and unfolding somebody as they age. Kevin Day’s series resuscitated algorithms comprises photographic readymades that resulted from the resetting and retrieving of files in a digital camera, where the process of resuscitation left a body of noise on the presumed seamlessness of data. While data functions by virtue of being the underlying invisible form, executed through the operations of algorithms, the series seeks to emphasize the presence of the medium, insisting on a refusal of machinic representation and quantification. The photographs break down into noise as one approaches the work, and the resuscitated data reveals itself as the constituent unit of contemporary image making.

Byron Dauncey’s portraits are the latest works from a photo-cubist series, in which shards of photographs from different times

opposite page BYRON DAUNCEY PhoTo-cUBIST WRITeR, 2014 PHOTOGRAPHY, 20” x 20”

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

APRIL 3 — 14

EXHIBITION OPENING

35 YEARS OF REFLECTION: ALUMNI & STUDENT SHOW

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 7 PM Remington Gallery 108 East Hastings St Vancouver BC

Lisa Birke Flick Harrison Kate Henderson Katie Huisman Peter Morin Christian Nicolay Fan-Ling Suen Jason Wright PRESENTED BY

Arts Umbrella

In 1979, which was United Nations’ International Year of the Child, Arts Umbrella opened its doors to forty-five children. Arts Umbrella has flourished and now, more than thirty-five years later, Arts Umbrella commemorates its communities of students, instructors, and artists alike. This lens-based exhibition features the work of artists who’ve instructed at or attended Arts Umbrella,

including Lisa Birke, Fan-Ling Suen, Flick Harrison, Jason Wright, Kate Henderson, Katie Huisman, Peter Morin, Christian Nicolay and more. It’s a celebration of the non-profit organization’s impact and legacy that’s been more than thirty-five years in the making.


EXHIBITIONS

“It was a dream to instill in all children the love of the arts, inspiring them to become healthy, confident, productive, creative citizens. A dream to build a centre that would awaken the artistic potential of young people in a way that hadn’t been done before. It was a dream to make a difference.” CAROL HENRIQUES, O.C. CO-FOUNDER OF ARTS UMBRELLA AND HONORARY CHAIR OF THE ARTS UMBRELLA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

LISA BIRKE RUNNING WITh ScISSoRS (aFTeR MUYBRIDGe), 2012 DIGITAL PRINT ON FINE ART PAPER

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

MICKEY NIELSEN Pooh + chRIST, 2009 35 mm COLOUR FILM, DIGITAL PRINT opposite page PHUNG NOI FONG loTUS 1, 2013 HAHNEMUHL BAMBOO WITH ARCHIVAL PIGMENT INK MOUNTED ON ALUMINUM, 27” x 40”

APRIL 3 — 16

MARK OF MEN/STRUCTURES Justin Langille Mickey Nielsen EXHIBITION OPENING

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 7–11 PM Untitled Art Space 436 Columbia St Vancouver BC Mark of Men/Structures is a collaborative exhibition comprising the works of emerging Canadian documentary photographers Mickey Nielsen and Justin Langille. Both capture notably different subject matter but find common ground in the absence of people in the stories they tell. Nielsen’s series, Mark of Man, is a collection of photographs casually taken over many years with point-and-shoot automatic

cameras and settings. While shot in a documentary manner, these photographs do not depict a storyline. They relate conceptually, captured in the rush of the moment and portraying the playful perspective of the photographer. The lighthearted images poke fun at the complex life humanity has designed for itself. In a rather subtle way, these photographs capture the contrast between man’s creations and nature. Throughout Structures, Langille documents places homeless citizens of London, Ontario, build for themselves along the central banks of the Thames River. A regional city suffering the gradual collapse of its manufacturing sector, London suffers chronic poverty and overwhelmed social services. Chaotic shelters and multiple barriers to housing force many to seek shelter outdoors every summer. Photographs of these venues for rest and recreation are intimate evidence of inequality. However, their innovative designs

and locations are evidence that public river land development is not just a bureaucratic process. Instead, it is a decentralized, often autonomous, practice dictated by deep personal need, not just the authority of government, conservationists, or business. Conventional photographic documentaries depict a clear narrative by telling a story in a linear fashion. Alternatively, Nielsen and Langille approach their subjects with nuanced vision, foregrounding their fascination with spaces impacted by human life. Together, these projects suggest much can be learned in the absence of humanity from the places that function as the stages of our lives.


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 4 — 25

CELEBRATION OF SIMPLICITY Phung Noi Fong

evident and indispensable moment. like a sculptor chisels away to reveal the sculpture hidden within the stone, I remove all elements of a frame until the heart of the subject is exposed, raw, and emotionally honest.

CURATED BY

Launie Fairbairn EXHIBITION OPENING

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8, 6–9 PM Elissa Cristall Gallery 2239 Granville St Vancouver BC CURATOR TALK AT 7 PM

“Simplicity is a form that can only be achieved through the disciplined removal of the nonessential. I try to see past the complexity of motion to capture the subject in their most

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although the realistic vivacity of my images can mislead the eye toward a literal view of the subject, realism is not my only goal; my photography communicates the emotive power of simplicity itself. Whole worlds are suggested through the scarcest of details, suspended in time while belying their timelessness. Remove one element, and the frame collapses. Simplicity, at its most essential, is the true essence of beauty, the place where my soul lies in wait for the one moment to reveal it all. ”


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

STEPHEN FOSTER PoRTRaIT oF a SIoUx ScoUT, 2013 INKJET PRINT FOR BACKLIT LIGHTBOX 22” x 18“


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 11 — JUNE 14

REMEDIATING CURTIS: IMAGINING INDIGENEITY Stephen Foster EXHIBITION OPENING

SATURDAY, APRIL 11, 6:30–9:30 PM Surrey Art Gallery 13750 88th Ave Surrey BC ARTIST TALK AT 6:30 PM FOLLOWED BY RECEPTION AT 7:30 PM

Using interactive video projection and 3D digital images, Stephen Foster explores in his exhibition Remediating curtis:

APRIL 4 — 25

MATTHEW PILLSBURY: TOKYO Matthew Pillsbury EXHIBITION OPENING

SATURDAY, APRIL 11, 2–5 PM Douglas Udell Gallery DUG Vancouver Pop-up 1566 West 6th Ave — Second Floor Vancouver BC “For over a decade now, I have made long exposure photographs using only available light. across several series and in many cities, I have focused on the passage of time and people within spaces both public and private. My work has addressed the growing role that technology is playing in our lives and the sense of modern seclusion that can seem at odds with the constant connectivity being offered by our smartphones and tablets.

Imagining Indigeneity the legacy of the film and photographic work of ethnographer Edward Curtis and his influence on popular images of “Indianness” in contemporary culture. Remediating curtis: Remix is a video installation that remixes Edward Curtis’s 1914 film, “In the land of the head hunters,” along with selections of recent and past Hollywood films. A multichannel soundscape interacts with video footage guided by the audience movement. The central image in the video installation is a stereographic animation reconstruction of the original set for the Curtis film. The audience controls (remixes) the sound and video elements through their chosen movements (tracked by motion sensors) within the confines of

the gallery space. Foster’s photographic series Toy Portraits, documenting toy Indian figurines in the pictorialist style of Curtis’s portraits, are large-scale backlit inkjet prints for light boxes, presented using stereoscopic techniques. The project is specifically meant to connect the portrait photography of Curtis with the current representations of Indigeneity in tourist shops and children’s toys as well as contemporary blockbuster films. Using anaglyph glasses available in the gallery, the stereoscopic effect on the still images and the 3D-modelled video not only references the current film industry obsession with a more immersive experience, as in films like avatar, but also a kind of nostalgia for ’50s cinematic pop culture.

Millions of people file through the streets and subways of Tokyo—the world’s most populous megalopolis—and yet it is often done silently, with each person quietly interacting with their gadgets. That disconnect is at the very heart of so much of our modern existence and part of what I wanted to convey in some of the Tokyo images.

places of worship, pop culture and rebellion among Western-obsessed Japanese youth have crept irreversibly in, forcing sacred and traditional sites to share cultural importance with modern manga robots and Disney castles.

Technology use, as it has in much of the world, has increased exponentially in Tokyo, latching itself onto everything from modern-day cell phone–obsessed geisha women to the ultrahip neighbourhood of Shinjuku, where themed clubs and bars now include high-tech robotics as a featured part of the entertainment. expecting to encounter the kinetic energy depicted in the William Klein and andreas Gursky photographs of the Tokyo Stock exchange, I arrived to discover that the once buzzing trading floor is now run in almost unnerving stillness by computers. While the temples are still revered and deeply respected

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To capture this shifting energy and some of the surreal scenes I encountered, I have started making colour photographs and using much shorter exposures. Photographing for the first time in a completely foreign environment has freed me to look at the world with a renewed sense of wonderment.” Following his Guggenheim Fellowship in 2014, the Douglas Udell Gallery debuts Matthew Pillsbury’s latest series, Tokyo, for the first time in Canada.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

APRIL 9 — MAY 9

deCONSTRUCTION Evann Siebens EXHIBITION OPENING

THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 7–10 PM BAF Studio 108 East Broadway Vancouver BC Vancouver is crumbling. Or perhaps it’s being methodically taken apart brick by brick. Whether for reasons of density, seismic

upgrade, or simply escalating value, old houses, schools, and movie theatres are being demolished to make way for the new. Referencing Jacques Derrida’s semiotic text, deconstruction is an ongoing series of photographs and short films that capture the dismantling of the historic city. What might have been inhabited for half a century can be demolished in a day. The bulldozers are like surgical tools: they hesitate and meander before digging in, creating a dance, a conversation between static structure and the choreography of change.

MATTHEW PILLSBURY aKIhaBaRa, ToKYo, 2014 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT INK PRINT, 20” x 24” opposite page EVANN SIEBENS KeYhole: DecoNSTRUcTIoN, 2014 C-PRINT, 24” x 36”


EXHIBITIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015


EXHIBITIONS

opposite page ELI CRAVEN Beach 2, FROM THE SERIES ScReeN loveRS, 2013 COLLAGE, 7.5” x 6”

APRIL 10 — MAY 23

EIDETIC IMAGE Kristen Abdai Eli Craven Tereza Zelenkova CURATED BY

Christina Hirukawa Meredith Preuss EXHIBITION OPENING

THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 7–10 PM BAF Studio 108 East Broadway Vancouver BC This group exhibition examines the basic aspects of dream-work, exploring the images, symbols, and overarching role of visual culture in Sigmund Freud’s dream-work theory. According to Freud, dreams are processed in three stages: First, the initial episode that is observed while sleeping. Second, as the subject attempts to describe the dream through language. And third, known as the secondary elaboration, through the dreamer’s free associations with the signs, symbols, and metaphors the dream brought forth. Drawing on these themes, this exhibition brings three artists together for the first time: Kristen Abdai, Eli Craven, and Tereza

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Zelenkova. Like the final, secondary elaboration of dream-work itself, the exhibition presents their black-and-white photo-based works in small groupings or maquettes to create extended dream-oriented and symbol-laden narratives. This curatorial method encourages the appropriation of images present in the work while prompting continued investigation into the role of symbols and metaphors in the everyday. Photographic practices of double exposure, montage, and solarization developed and mastered during the surrealist period illustrate the breadth of the medium’s ability to physically present both the signified and signifier, with the two parts making the whole: the sign. In the 1981 October article “The Photographic Condition of Surrealism,” Rosalind Krauss describes how these signs and symbols illustrate how the photographic image “(is) not (an) interpretation of reality. . . . They are presentations of that very reality as configured, or coded, or written.” The exhibition presents a selection of collages and photographs cropped, cut, and framed; these acts of physical change and presentation bring these images together to present the nature of experience, narrative, and space.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

APRIL 9 — MAY 16

ERASER STREET Henri Robideau EXHIBITION OPENING

THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 7–10 PM grunt gallery 116 — 350 East 2nd Ave Vancouver BC eraser Street—hubris, humility and humanity in the Making of a city! is an exhibition that mixes Henri Robideau’s newest and oldest photographs of moments, milestones, and

APRIL 9 — 20

KEITH BIGGINS AND THE RETURN TO SPIRIT RIVER Chris MacArthur EXHIBITION OPENING

THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 6–9 PM truth and beauty gallery 698 West 16th Ave Vancouver BC “I neither could have predicted nor even dreamt about the realization of the hybrid lifestyle of a roughneck and fashion photographer that I now live. But in the fall of 2013, following several years toiling in New York’s and london’s worlds of luxury fashion, glossy magazines, and pop culture, I was at a creative crossroads and in search of a new adventure. It was on a camping trip in southern england that I looked out across the landscape and began to reminisce about my former life

monuments in Vancouver, tracing the character of the city and its residents during the last forty years of non-stop growth. The work reflects upon the quality of life in Vancouver, the value of heritage, the economic engine of development, homelessness, and the voice of the people. Robideau’s holographic satirical text charts history while critiquing the forces of government and commerce that have had a hand in shaping our urban environment. Handmade black-and-white gelatine silver photographs are juxtaposed with computer mediated digital ink jet prints, reinforcing the

working in northern canada: the beauty of the rugged, windswept prairie, the tough as nails blue-collar culture, the personalities, and the spirit and idiosyncratic nature of the small towns that dot this forgotten expanse of northern wilderness. I realized right then that I was called to go back and relive my past life in the oil patch through a photographic lens. In that serendipitous moment, I promptly returned home to clean out my london studio. leaving the doors open, I piled most of my earthly belongings into a corner with a ‘FRee ShIT’ sign placed atop as I left that life behind. I took a one-way flight home and hopped aboard a Greyhound bus destined for Spirit River, alberta, with no plans other than to explore, tell stories, and document contemporary life in the land of pumpjacks and double doubles. ”

flux of change experienced in these images. Robideau’s narrative embraces a lament for what has been lost, a celebration for what has survived, and an admonition for the future of a city still in its infancy. There will be a forthcoming publication with an essay written by Clint Burnham.


EXHIBITIONS

top HENRI ROBIDEAU eRaSeR STReeT bottom CHRIS MacARTHUR KaTIe aND DavID, BoNaNza aB, 2014 ARCHIVAL MATTE C-PRINT, 24” x 36”

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015


EXHIBITIONS

Field Studies investigates radical and inventive ways in which our everyday landscape might be experienced and mapped. Rebecca Bayer and Laura Kozak’s community-based project The hadden Park Map

exchange (developed through the Vancouver Parks Board Field House Residencies) documents the coming together of a myriad of specialized practitioners and community members—visual artists, musicians, historians, gardeners, choreographers, archaeologists, meterologists, lifeguards, local residents, and children—to produce a series of unconventional maps of Hadden Park, at the north end of Vancouver’s Kitsilano Beach. Emiliano Sepulveda probes the very basis of photography with his weather kites made of light-sensitive photo paper, which record light conditions in the sites they are flown. Eden Veaudry’s sensual installation quite literally weaves together still photographs, video, and tapestries to map the intimate surfaces of her domestic realm, à la Xavier de Maistre’s 1794 novel, a Journey Round My Room.

spaces in a Vancouver context, through the sexed and gendered body and, in so doing, voice some of the silences at the core of patriarchal culture. The project addresses how the cultural and ideological inscriptions that construct social subjects are intrinsically informed by the corresponding privilege and neglect in a hierarchical ontology.

photographs and a performance that begins with Moe bound in crime-scene police tape, accompanied by an audio montage of The Texas chainsaw Massacre and the stock exchange. lethe has been shown in New York City, Toronto, and Victoria, but never in Vancouver. Moe will bring lethe “home” through Capture. Sadel is an expert in photographic hand tinting and will inscribe this loving process onto a large-scale tree. She will also show C-prints of the residue of fallen leaves on urban pavement. Each fall season unacknowledged beauty is commemorated in these fleeting impressions.

leThe PERFORMANCE 8 PM

del pieve gobbi’s work-in-progress reinsertion reflects the loss of Vancouver’s missing and murdered women through images of the Downtown Eastside. The images attempt to reframe culpability for the murders to the City of Vancouver for its inaction. del pieve gobbi is also exhibiting her collaged photograms, which reaffirm one’s relationship with one’s body while striving to heal from sexual violence.

Photographer and filmmaker rena del pieve gobbi, photographers Janet Sadel and Bobbi Sue Smith, and photographer and performance artist Karen Moe realize neglected

Moe’s lethe is a “mock metaphysics” where contradictions, absurdities, and horrors surface in a system that is recognizable as our own. lethe consists of large-format

top ALEX GRUNENFELDER AND ALEX MUIR collecTING FIelD NoTeS, The haDDeN PaRK MaP exchaNGe, 2014 COURTESY OF THE ARTISTS bottom KAREN MOE ToRTe, FROM leThe, 2005 ARCHIVAL INKJET, 25” x 35”

APRIL 11 — MAY 23

FIELD STUDIES: EXERCISES IN A LIVING LANDSCAPE Rebecca Bayer and Laura Kozak Emiliano Sepulveda Eden Veaudry EXHIBITION OPENING

FRIDAY, APRIL 10, 7 PM Access Gallery 222 East Georgia St Vancouver BC

APRIL 10 — 19

(NO) MATTER WHAT: FOUR WOMEN PHOTOGRAPHERS REALIZE NEGLECTED SPACES rena del pieve gobbi Janet Sadel Bobbi Sue Smith Karen Moe CURATED BY

rena del pieve gobbi EXHIBITION OPENING

FRIDAY, APRIL 10, 7–10 PM The ARC Gallery 1701 Powell St Vancouver BC

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As an East Vancouver flâneur, Smith moves randomly through her neighbourhood, documenting such objects as shopping carts, temporary shelters, and painted dumpsters. Her silver gelatin prints are mythologized phantoms that haunt Canada’s most neglected neighbourhood.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

APRIL 10 — JUNE 5

APRIL 10 — MAY 23

HIDING IN PLAIN SIGHT

LYING STILL

right ROSS C. KELLY DIPTYch #1, 2014 ALUMINUM-MOUNTED PRINTS, 34” x 9” EACH

Ross C. Kelly

Birthe Piontek

left BIRTHE PIONTEK

EXHIBITION OPENING

CURATED BY

FRIDAY, APRIL 10, 4–6 PM Art Beatus Gallery 108 — 808 Nelson Street Vancouver BC

Michael Love

hiding in Plain Sight is the second solo exhibition of Vancouver-based artist Ross C. Kelly to be presented by Art Beatus Gallery. It surveys a range of new works that speak cumulatively for the artist’s core interests as well as more recent insights stemming from his practice. The general focus of this work is the descriptive limitations of photography; of particular interest is the portrayal of space. Upon entering a space, be it physical or pictorial, we initiate a conversation involving much more than simply what is seen. Spaces have their own histories; their own relationships with other places and other people; resemblances and impressions mistaken or otherwise; and a specific connection (or not) with the viewer. This conversation unfolds within a well of persistent and unnoticed gravities. It is the sum of an equation made up of so many minute and discrete parts, constantly appearing and disappearing and which never quite balance out. Thus, our interpretations are momentary and incomplete—there is and always will be something missing, something unnoticed. Meandering through well-trodden photographic territory, from landscape to cityscape to street photography, the works in hiding in Plain Sight embody various strategies the artist has engaged with to widen the conversation by enlarging the descriptive vocabulary of the photograph. Failing that, these works at least try to confess their inherent limitations, constantly gesturing to what lies outside of their own time and confines and to the tenuous notions of first impressions.

EXHIBITION OPENING

FRIDAY, APRIL 10, 7–10 PM Gallery 295 295 East 2nd Ave — Back Alley Entrance Vancouver BC Birthe Piontek’s practice encompasses an extensive investigation of the self through photography. While focusing primarily on portrait photography, she also creates still lifes and installations and uses found photography as ways to further experiment with expressions of identity. Piontek’s lying Still series began as a visual diary that would accompany the artist through her daily life, capturing peripheral subjects of the ephemeral and abject. The artist’s compositions—that may at first appear as delicate disruptions of the everyday—address themes of intimacy and mortality through her photographic language of rich symbolic iconography, evoking the desires, urges, and fears that exist latently in our subconscious.

SMoKe, 2013 8” x 10”, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST


EXHIBITIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 10 — MAY 8

APRIL 10 — MAY 3

THE SHAPE OF HER BITE

GLISSEMENTS DE TERRAIN (LAND SLIDES)

Michelle O’Byrne CURATED BY

Ryan Mathieson Anne-Marie Proulx

Tarah Hogue Julia K. Kreutz

CURATED BY

Mariane Bourcheix-Laporte Gam Gallery 110 East Hastings St Vancouver BC Examining the way in which photography mediates and shapes experience, Michelle O’Byrne’s practice engages with popular photography as a language with its own syntactical and semantic rules. The works within this exhibition explore the conventions of our photographic language and confront the viewer with the possibilities and limits that it presents. Metonymy within photographic language is investigated through stock photography, a form of photography intentionally produced to be used in a multitude of situations, often as a placeholder to indicate a particular ideology. The works call attention to the pervasiveness of such images and arrest their ideological function by bringing the photograph into relation with material objects and descriptive text, offering alternative avenues for meaning.

EXHIBITION OPENING

FRIDAY, APRIL 10, 7 PM The Toast Collective 648 Kingsway Vancouver BC Glissements de terrain (land Slides) presents recently produced bodies of works by Vancouver artist Ryan Mathieson and Quebec City artist Anne-Marie Proulx. The exhibition looks at how subjective mapping and framing processes modulate the representation of given territories. In their individual practices, Mathieson and Proulx engage the discrepancies between representation-as-index and representation-as-deferral, and the artists’ material and compositional manipulations produce inflexions in the reading of photographic images. The exhibition, in its configuration, furthers this translation process and becomes a space of percolation: more than echoing each other, the works become porous. Slippages and infiltrations create (unstable) grounds for the expansion of the works’ physical and relational frames.

Exhibited works present fragmented renderings of landscapes: Icelandic and Southwestern American deserts, the Gulf Islands of British Columbia, the Magdalen Islands and the Côte-Nord Region of Quebec. Here, an interplay between indexical and non-indexical representation engenders the loss—or translation—of information pertaining to the depicted territories. This gives way to the artists’ reinterpretation of chosen sites through visual, material, and textual means. Mathieson presents a collection of photographic and assemblage-based works, notably exhibiting microscopic imagery and documentation of collected seaweed specimens from the Gulf Islands, as well as a series of landscape compositions that testify to processes of topographical projection. Proulx presents a series of works examining the geographic, human, and idiosyncratic topologies of insularity found along and into the Gulf of the Saint Lawrence River. Playing with the viewer’s perception of space and scale, the artist approaches singularities of Québécois landscapes as conduits to open the very notion of territorial recording.

Approaching image making with an expanded idea of image, the assemblages presented undulate between language, object, and image, exploring what is sayable and unsayable within the mediums and embracing the generative space between them. An artist book that explores the poetic potentialities of image descriptors, such as key words and descriptions from archives and captions, will be produced for this exhibition. This is the first in a series of exhibitions that O’Byrne hopes to mount exploring various language structures within photography. As she moves forward she will be considering aphorisms, superlatives, and similes.

opposite page — top MICHELLE O’BYRNE BeaUTIFUl YoUNG WoMaN IN WhITe BloUSe aT PaRK (DeTaIl), 2014 STOCK IMAGE FRAGMENT, FAUX WOOD FRAME PHOTOGRAPH BY AMANDA ARCURI opposite page — bottom RYAN MATHIESON a ToYoTa’S a ToYoTa, 2014 INKJET PRINT

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

opposite page — top KARIN BUBAŠ ScUlPTeD loG, 2014 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINTS, GLUE, FOAMCORE, MATBOARD, 24” x 24” x 2.75” COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND MONTE CLARK GALLERY opposite page — bottom LESLIE HOSSACK laRGe BaRN, SITe oF TaShMe INTeRNMeNT caMP, SUNShINe valleY, BRITISh colUMBIa, 2013 ARCHIVAL INKJET COLOUR PRINT, 14” x 20.5”

APRIL 11 — MAY 23

APRIL 11 — JUNE 7

PAPER FOREST Karin Bubaš

REGISTERED: THE JAPANESE CANADIAN EXPERIENCE DURING WORLD WAR II

EXHIBITION OPENING

Leslie Hossack

SATURDAY, APRIL 11, 2–5 PM Monte Clark Gallery 105 — 525 Great Northern Way Vancouver BC Karin Bubaš’s exhibition presents a selection of new works from her Paper Forest series. This series of three-dimensional photographic works began when Bubaš travelled around the Pacific Northwest, visiting the sights and experiencing the environment made famous by Emily Carr. In creating her own imagery of the forest, Bubaš felt challenged to capture the rich and encompassing atmosphere. Rather than presenting her photographs as traditional two-dimensional prints, Bubaš began printing multiple images from her negatives to laser cut and reconstruct the scenes into three-dimensional tableaux, building up layers and layers of intricate details. The final result is a selection of threedimensional photographs or paper “toles” housed in Plexiglas cases. The scenes are lush and mesmerizing, but also suggest a tone of isolation; Bubaš’s unique perceptiveness and skill for conveying narrative is readily apparent.

CURATED BY

Beth Carter Sherri Kajiwara EXHIBITION OPENING

SATURDAY, APRIL 11, 3–5 PM Nikkei National Museum and Cultural Centre 6688 Southoaks Cr Burnaby, BC ARTIST IN DISCUSSION WITH STEPHEN WADDELL AT 3:30 PM

ReGISTeReD is an exhibition of colour photographs that examine places of power and persecution and the experiences of Japanese Canadians living in British Columbia during World War II when they were registered, rounded up, and removed. On December 7, 1941, when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, Canada declared war on Imperial Japan. Even before Pearl Harbor, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police had registered all Japanese Canadians over the age of sixteen. Individuals were issued registration cards with a photo and thumbprint, and were required to carry their cards at all times.

Approximately 22,000 persons of the “Japanese race” were forcibly uprooted. Thousands were held in the Livestock Building in Vancouver’s Hastings Park before being moved inland. Most Japanese Canadians spent the war in primitive internment camps in remote areas of the BC interior. ReGISTeReD consists of three installations: Vancouver newspaper clippings from the 1940s; individual registration cards issued by the RCMP; and interpretive photographs of buildings in British Columbia where the story played out. These are the buildings where 22,000 Japanese Canadians originally lived, worked, and studied, and subsequently were registered, detained, and interned during World War II. These existing structures hold the dna of the story as it unfolded in the 1940s. They include the former Japanese community around Powell Street (e.g., the Japanese Language School); places of power in Vancouver where Orders in Council issued under the War Measures Act were enacted (e.g., the old RCMP Barracks); and the site of the former Tashme internment camp, just past the town of Hope, BC. The exhibition’s three sections look at the people, the places, and the press in British Columbia during the war. ReGISTeReD was inspired by Requiem (HarperCollins, 2011) written by award-winning Canadian novelist Frances Itani.


EXHIBITIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

APRIL 11 — 25

MODELS OF RESISTANCE Angela Grossmann CURATED BY

Lynn Ruscheinsky EXHIBITION OPENING

SATURDAY, APRIL 11, 12 PM Marion Scott Gallery/Kardosh Projects 2423 Granville Street Vancouver BC CURATOR AND ARTIST TALK AT 1 PM

In this new body of work, Angela Grossmann creates a series of intimate and erotic portraits of women using found “risqué” photography collaged together with images of vintage puppets and dolls. Though primarily in black and white, the limited use of bright tufts of orange hair, bits of doll’s clothing, or scraps of pink lace creates a provocative set of associations. These portraits “play” with erotica, using voyeurism and exploitation as a starting point but ultimately transforming this into potent images of female empowerment.

ANGELA GROSSMANN UNDeRWeaR, FROM MoDelS oF ReSISTaNce, 2015 COLLAGE, 12” x 12” opposite page CARA BARER DahlIa, 2014 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT, 50” x 50”


EXHIBITIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

top JORGE MAÑES RUBIO BUoNa FoRTUNa (UNDIScloSeD locaTIoN), 2014 C-TYPE PRINT, 150 x 100 cm COURTESY OF THE ARTIST bottom HANS CHRISTIAN KOCH WeST vaN TRacKS, 2014, 5” x 7” CITYSCAPE COMMUNITY ART SPACE: YoU aRe heRe


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 16 — 30

APRIL 16 — MAY 9

APRIL 17 — MAY 16

ORIGINS

BUONA FORTUNA

YOU ARE HERE

Cara Barer

Jorge Mañes Rubio

Group Exhibition

EXHIBITION OPENING

EXHIBITION OPENING

EXHIBITION OPENING

THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 6–8 PM Bau-Xi 3045 Granville St Vancouver BC

THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 6–9 PM Initial Gallery 2339 Granville St Vancouver BC

THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 7–9 PM CityScape Community Art Space North Vancouver Arts Council 335 Lonsdale Ave North Vancouver BC

American photographer Cara Barer is renowned for her unique approach to creating abstract imagery using recycled books. In her latest series, origins, Barer contemplates the nature of books as organic objects in flux.

In his new work Buona Fortuna, Jorge Mañes Rubio transports us to the mountains of the Parco Nazionale del Cilento in the south of Italy, where several isolated villages were abandoned after a series of devastating earthquakes and landslides. Hidden among these ruins, and despite all the decay and destruction, several churches and chapels reveal themselves in all their glory. A closer look into Rubio’s photographs expose empty altars and pedestals; in fact, all the relics are missing. This is a direct consequence of the looters and art merchants who didn’t think twice about breaking in and removing paintings, sculptures, and other sacred relics.

Each book is manipulated beyond recognition using various techniques: the pages are curled into sculptural effect and the flat edges are dyed in vibrant hues. The resulting abstract images reference objects in nature through subtle allusions to imagery of flowers in bloom and butterflies in flight. Barer’s dynamic compositions invite the viewer to consider the evolution of each book in its transformation and the ephemerality of all objects whether organic or man-made. By photographing each object as the last step in her creative intervention, Barer affords a second life to the cast-off books and paper she re-reinterprets in her work. Fanciful and symbolic, Barer’s photographs allude to the status of the book in the contemporary digital ago. “half a century ago, students researched at home with the family set of encyclopaedias, or took a trip to the library to locate information. Now, with computers, tablets and/or smartphones, an Internet connection and cloud storage, a student has the ability to amass knowledge and complete a research paper without ever going near a library. I have fully embraced all this technology, and would not want to be without it, but fear the loss of the beautiful record of books common over the last two centuries.”

Despite all the emptiness and disrepair, Rubio manages to capture these places in all their beauty. A tragic, sublime, almost surreal representation of a fragile yet astounding legacy. With his large-format colour prints, the artist invites us to walk into an ephemeral world where grandeur and decadence clash together—a conflict that draws the viewer into a deeper reflection about the value of these contemporary ruins, and ultimately the meaning of them. Buona Fortuna is not asking for reconstruction nor restoration of the churches, but to preserve them as what they are today: truly works of art. Rubio is currently busy trying to get all the permissions and funding to reopen some of them to the public. His plan is to create a series of new artworks and installations that will replace the stolen figures, transforming these abandoned places into new cultural scenarios. But for now, his photographs have brought to life places that we couldn’t even dream of.

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Nestled between the ocean and the mountains, the North Shore is uniquely spectacular. The forests, water, and mountains are omnipresent—grand and imposing to some, comforting and reassuring to others, but very much a part of being here. You are here features the work of photographic artists who have captured the shared experience and stories of the North Shore. Images connect people to and express a meaningful interaction with place, evoking a sense of belonging. All images were taken outdoors, displaying a spirited interplay of nature and culture and evoking places with scenic or other sensory characteristics that differentiate them from surrounding areas and are identifiably “North Shore.”


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

APRIL 16 — MAY 31

FRED SCHIFFER: LIVES IN PHOTOS Fred Schiffer CURATED BY

Michael Schwartz PRESENTED BY

The Jewish Museum and Archives of British Columbia EXHIBITION OPENING

THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 8 PM MAKE Gallery 257 East 7th Ave Vancouver BC Fred Schiffer was a photographer like none other. From his arrival in Vancouver in 1958 until the time of his death in 1999, Schiffer captured Vancouver’s dramatic years of transition from small town to surging metropolis. He gained renown for his portraiture and was commissioned to photograph Vancouverites of all walks of life, including judges and mayors, artists and architects, business leaders and private citizens, as well as many visiting dignitaries and celebrities including Louis Armstrong and Queen Elizabeth II. Malcolm Perry of the vancouver Sun liked to call Schiffer “The Karsh of Vancouver,” though he was too humble to accept such a label. For twenty-five years, Schiffer’s work has been boxed away, out of public view. Thanks to the support of all levels of government and many local foundations, the Jewish Museum and Archives of BC has spent the past year preparing the exhibit Fred Schiffer: lives in Photos, an exciting opportunity to showcase Schiffer’s life and work as part of the Capture Photography Festival.

FRED SCHIFFER B. c. BINNING, OCTOBER 8, 1966 COPYRIGHT JMABC opposite page GREG GIRARD cUl-De-Sac YaRD, 2014 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT, 21.5” x 30”


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 18 — JUNE 28

GREG GIRARD: RICHMOND/KOWLOON Greg Girard EXHIBITION OPENING

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 7–9 PM Richmond Art Gallery 7700 Minoru Gate Richmond BC Greg Girard: Richmond/Kowloon features Vancouver-based artist Greg Girard’s photographs recording the social and physical transformations in two cities: Hong Kong’s Kowloon Walled City and Richmond, BC. Organized by Richmond Art Gallery curator Nan Capogna, the exhibition includes previously created work documenting Kowloon Walled City as well as a new body of photographic images of Richmond and its residents.

A singular Hong Kong phenomenon, the Walled City housed up to 35,000 people living in over 300 interconnected high-rise buildings covering one square city block in a densely populated neighbourhood forming a city within a city. Though demolished more than twenty years ago in 1993, interest in the Kowloon Walled City continues, fuelled in part by urban legends that persist about this extraordinary community. In the past twenty years the City of Richmond has undergone profound physical and demographic changes, a process of urbanization and immigration, much of it from Hong Kong and China as well as other places. Recording the physical city, homes, shops, and businesses where Richmond residents live and work, Girard’s new body of work reflects a city evolving and in transition, a microcosm of a larger global movement of people, networked, moving, and relocating, seeking greater opportunities in new territories.

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This exhibition links these two communities, Richmond and Kowloon, both of them lesser-known (and formerly rural, workingclass) entities within a better-known whole: Vancouver in regards to Richmond and Hong Kong in the case of Kowloon. The resulting images serve to document the social fabric and physical development of Richmond in the second decade of the twenty-first century.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

top TORRIE GROENING GReeN cITY GlaSS BlUeS (vaNcoUveR), 2014 PHOTOMONTAGE, 52 x 41 cm bottom SCOTT MASSEY SUNS aS RelaTIve PlaNeTaRY Scale 1, 2015 ARCHIVAL INKJET PRINT, 40.5 x 40.5 cm COURTESY OF THE ARTIST


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 17 — JUNE 21

APRIL 20 — MAY 1

SCOTT MASSEY: UNSTABLE GROUND

OUT OF STUDIO: GREEN CITY GLASS BLUE

Scott Massey

Torrie Groening

EXHIBITION OPENING

CURATED BY

SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 8 PM Burnaby Art Gallery 6344 Deer Lake Ave Burnaby BC

Donna Partridge

EVENING PICNIC AND STARGAZING

Scott Massey’s photographic series Unstable Ground records the visual effects of the earth hurtling through space. This accelerated movement causes gravitational pull, allowing us to witness both sunrise and sunset and view the stars turning slowly overhead at night. Using an astronomical tool called an equatorial mount that allows a fixed view of the stars, Massey employed a large-format camera in place of a telescope, producing stunning images. The resulting photographs portray the earth’s rotation over the course of lengthy dawn and dusk exposures. Produced in a location in British Columbia dubbed the “Centre of the Universe,” the works are displayed with their resulting horizons aligned with the gallery floor, countering all illusion of atmospheric stasis.

Art Rental & Sales Vancouver Art Gallery — Main Floor 750 Hornby St Vancouver BC In her ongoing series titled out of Studio, Torrie Groening documents a travelling artist’s makeshift workspace in both real and constructed locations. By staging an impromptu studio as a place of work, we are invited to experience the contemplation and awareness that forces the artist to rise to the occasion. Digital manipulations and enhancements, including the addition of Groening’s personal tools and props, add depth and texture to each image. The results combine watercolour, print, and photography through a montage method that is unique to Groening’s work. For this exhibition, the focus of the outof-studio experience is on Groening’s hometown of Vancouver. Among the locations depicted are a temporary studio alongside moss-clad gargoyles at the Vancouver Hotel and a Strathcona alley garden with layered views to the city’s skyline. Groening’s Green city Glass Blue series intimately speaks of the ongoing changes in Vancouver’s landscape, a transformation that is evident not only in the images she creates, but also in the artist’s own journey.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

APRIL 22 — MAY 23

APRIL 23 — MAY 23

TAKE YOUR TIME Khan Lee

JÜDISCHES KRANKENHAUS BERLIN

EXHIBITION OPENING

Malcolm Levy

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 6–8 PM Republic Gallery 732 Richards St — Third Floor Vancouver BC In Take Your Time, Khan Lee creates and unpacks various abstractions of time through a new series of sculptural and multimedia work. All matter has the potential to be used as a medium. In this exhibition the artist isolates the properties of various materials from their designated functions, proposing new meanings or purposes for these items in the process. The artist’s careful observation of the shapes of various durational events culminates in a body of work that reiterates his visual conception of the essence of time. For Lee, time is a path that each individual builds on through his or her daily existence. Although each existence can have but a single point of view, an observation of the mass creates an ever-changing map of individuals and objects that are constantly morphing, passing, crossing, and colliding into each other. Simultaneously, it also contains parallel events that do not intersect and static moments that can change with imperceptible slowness.

opposite page KHAN LEE MoveMeNT, 2015 WATERCOLOUR, MODIFIED CLOCK MOVEMENT, 12” x 27” x 3.5” COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

EXHIBITION OPENING

THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 7–9 PM Wil Aballe Art Projects | WAAP 105 — 1356 Frances St Vancouver BC Jüdisches Krankenhaus Berlin is a photoand-video-based work focusing on the history of the Jewish Hospital in the area of Wedding in Berlin, which remained throughout all of World War II and the Holocaust. The installation consists of two video feeds and a complementary audio track that mixes sound recordings from the site in 2012 with archival footage of Hilde Kahan, the hospital’s secretary during the war. This is the only surviving document of what life was like at the hospital during this important time in history. The video was recorded on site in Berlin, where Levy broke into the hospital grounds and filmed without detection.

The work is driven by a non-indexical or abstract approach to digital photography and video that offers new perspectives found within the everyday. Aesthetically these interests are rooted in a place where the camera lens and pulse take over that of observers’ own perceptions. The camera is used as a tool more similar to that of a paintbrush than a recording device. Reframing narratives and stories, geographies and locations, the work seeks to find alternate means of understanding the context of our surroundings. Alongside the video installation are a series of still images and collages. The locations within the hospital are all part of Kahan’s story and relate to the events that happened during that time. Purposefully devoid of any jump cuts or edits, the work strives to keep the observations and order of statements intact. Additionally, a manuscript is presented on a plinth in the centre of the space with the transcripts of Kahan’s interview, as well as a map of the hospital and a history of the timeline of the hospital from its inception in the 1800s to the present day.


EXHIBITIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

APRIL 24 — MAY 31

TRIS VONNA-MICHELL Tris Vonna-Michell EXHIBITION OPENING

THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 8 PM Presentation House Gallery 333 Chesterfield Ave North Vancouver BC CONVERSATION WITH THE ARTIST AT 7 PM FOLLOWED BY AN OPENING RECEPTION

This exhibition features installations of film, slide projections, and photographs by Tris Vonna-Michell, a British artist based in Stockholm. Layering camera images with spoken word scripts, he creates entangled stories. Rich with cultural and personal references, his intense monologues are delivered in the artist’s fast-paced voice. Informed by experimental writers such as Allen Ginsberg, the circuitous narratives are fragmented and full of detours, repetition, and dead ends. The full story seems incomplete and forever out of reach, an idea that is extended to the fact that his works are often interconnected and retold through various iterations over years. As the works in this exhibition reveal, VonnaMichell threads together disparate historical information, social observation, and personal anecdotes. In the ongoing piece Finding chopin, a conversation with the artist’s

father is interwoven with a history of postwar experimental poetry personified in the figure of Henri Chopin, the urban development of London, and the cityscape of Paris. Based on research into the realization of Le Corbusier’s utopic architecture for Chandigarh in India, the story in capital complex is propelled by “Traveller,” whose calm nocturnal strolls through the city are derailed, becoming increasingly anxious and confused by distractions. Vonna-Michell creates a space for the viewer to negotiate and make sense of these complex situations. Reflecting on the very nature of coincidence and repetition, Vonna-Michell explores the flexibility of meaning between images and narration. As one critic has aptly described, “the practice of Tris Vonna-Michell is an attempt, on the one hand, to accurately describe the bewildering complexity that lurks behind photographs, and, on the other hand, to give forms to the endless information such pursuit inevitably generates.”


EXHIBITIONS

previous spread MALCOLM LEVY The oFFIce oF The SecReTaRY hIlDe KahaN, 2012 TRIS VONNA-MICHELL PoSTScRIPT Iv (BeRlIN) (DETAIL), 2014 COURTESY OF THE ARTIST; JAN MOT, BRUSSELS; AND T293, NAPLES/ROME

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

APRIL 23 — MAY 23

SPECTRUM STUDIES Scott Massey EXHIBITION OPENING

THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 7–9 PM Wil Aballe Art Projects | WAAP 105 — 1356 Frances St Vancouver BC In October of 2014, Massey attended a project-oriented artist residency at PRIM (Productions Réalisations Indépendantes de Montréal) to complete the editing of a new film/video work entitled light adjustments (centre of the Universe). A durational structuralist landscape work captured over the course of one twenty-four-hour cycle incorporating various filters, films, and imaging technology to manipulate and expand the visible spectrum and passage of time through a slowly widening field of perspective, the film premiered at Dazibao, Montreal, this past winter. In preparation for the project, the artist set out to make studies based on the themes and techniques he employed to create the film. These are the Spectrum Study works. Spectrum Studies is a series of landscape photographs created entirely “in camera,” using a Hasselblad and various image-adjusting

opposite page — top SCOTT MASSEY SPecTRUM STUDY 5 (vISIBle), 2014 LIGHTJET PRINT ON DIBOND, UV LAMINATE, WOOD FRAME, 80 x 89 cm opposite page — bottom DANNY SINGER oxFoRD SKY, 2014 ARCHIVAL INKJET PRINT, 43” x 79”

apparatus. Presented through an infographic pie chart framework, the images contain visual clues about the complexity of their creation. As each piece of the pie-chart represents an element or moment within the image frame, the entire image presents a photographic exploration of one particular spectrum. The pie shapes are created by custom laser-cut stainless steel darkslides the artist had fabricated specifically for this project. These darkslides allow multiple but discrete exposures on a single piece of film, registering the passage of time in a single “frame.” This series continues Massey’s investigation of the malleability of analog photography, rooted in theories of vision, space, and time. The four areas of exploration are visible, greyscale, day-night, and ultra-infra. Visible separates the colour channels of white light (rainbow colours); greyscale separates the sections based on the Ansel Adams Zone System; day-night separates the sections based on the cycle of a passing day; and ultra-infra captures light beyond the visible spectrum.

APRIL 25 — MAY 30

100TH MERIDIAN Danny Singer EXHIBITION OPENING

SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2–4 PM Gallery Jones 1725 West 3rd Ave Vancouver BC Gallery Jones is pleased to announce the opening of 100th Meridian, an exhibition of new work by Danny Singer. For the past decade, Singer has been travelling and photographing habitations across the North American prairies and plains. His work exists as many things: a document of what is there, a subtly revealed history of lives lived, a testament to the ethic of progress that initiated these towns, and the modernization and urbanization that is draining them. All of these characteristics exist because of, and could not exist without, the aesthetic power of the object. Ranging in widths from seven feet to ten feet and heights from a foot-and-a-half to four, the photographs tell stories with themes as broad as the struggle of a human construction on an open plain to the parking habits of residents. Created from up to one hundred and fifty different photographs, there is a temporal element to Singer’s work that heightens the effectiveness of the storytelling. It is almost as if a screen door could swing open and close on the left of the frame before your eyes have a chance to make their way to the right.


EXHIBITIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

SARA LUDY cloUDS PoND 2, 2015 COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

APRIL 25 — SEPTEMBER 7

BEYOND THE TREES: WALLPAPERS IN DIALOGUE WITH EMILY CARR Wallpapers Emily Carr CURATED BY

Diana Freundl Caitlin Jones Vancouver Art Gallery 750 Hornby St Vancouver BC

Beyond the Trees considers the relationship between painted and digital representations of nature, exploring how they can coexist. Taking nature as a starting point, both Wallpapers and Emily Carr invite us to reflect on their varied perceptions of the Canadian West Coast landscape, the former via a digital environment of mapped wall projections and the latter by means of painting scenery as it unfolds through nuanced brushstrokes of line and colour. In both, the viewer undergoes a mediated experience of the natural world. In Wallpapers’ examination, technology produces an environment that both mimics and experiments with the scale and primary forms of nature. These new site-specific works respond to the architecture of two

galleries to create contrast from a monumental outdoor environment simulating clouds and rain to more immersive space established through digitalized textures and patterns. In stark contrast, a selection of Emily Carr’s paintings is presented according to her use of formal elements, particularly those of colour, shape, and pattern. The mounted clusters of oil paintings and charcoal works on paper place an emphasis on the movement captured in her landscape imagery. Wallpaper’s Beyond the Trees is the fifth in a series of In Dialogue with Carr projects organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery. The exhibition is curated by Caitlin Jones, guest curator, and Diana Freundl, assistant curator, Vancouver Art Gallery.


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Films


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 9 PM

DISFARMER: A PORTRAIT OF AMERICA (BC PREMIERE) PRESENTED BY

The Knowledge Network DIRECTED BY

Martin Lavut In the small mountain town of Heber Springs, the eccentric Arkansas portrait photographer known as Mike Disfarmer captured the lives and emotions of the people of rural America during the two World Wars and the Great Depression. Critics have hailed Disfarmer’s remarkable black-and-white portrait practice as “a work of artistic genius” and “a classical episode in the history of American photography.” This documentary discovers an American master, his influence on the modern Manhattan art world, and the legacy he left behind in his hometown of Heber Springs.

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 10 PM

PICTURE START PRESENTED BY

The Knowledge Network DIRECTED BY

Harry Killas The members of the so-called Vancouver School are the biggest art stars to ever come out of Canada, yet they remain little known to many Canadians. Picture Start tells the remarkable, and unlikely, story of the emergence and rise of the original generation of this esteemed group—Jeff Wall, Rodney Graham, and Ian Wallace—offering insight into how and why their ascent occurred in a city until recently known more for its surrounding forests than its artists.


FILMS

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 9 PM

FINDING VIVIAN MAIER (BC PREMIERE) PRESENTED BY

The Knowledge Network DIRECTED BY

John Maloof and Charlie Siskel A mysterious nanny, who secretly took over 100,000 photographs that were hidden in storage lockers and discovered decades later, is now considered among the twentieth century’s greatest photographers. Maier’s strange and riveting life and art are revealed through never before seen photographs, films, and interviews with dozens who thought they knew her. PHOTO COPYRIGHT VIVIAN MAIER MALOOF COLLECTION

TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 9 PM

MUGSHOT (BC PREMIERE) PRESENTED BY

The Knowledge Network DIRECTED BY

Dennis Mohr Originally a law enforcement tool, the mugshot has deviated from its fundamental purpose as a source of criminal identification. It has been sensationalized through celebritydom, been exploited by the leniency of freedom of information, and captivated the attention of the art world. Mugshot explores the personal stories of those whose lives have been transformed by these iconic photographs. ALL FILMS PRESENTED BY THE KNOWLEDGE NETWORK WILL BE BROADCAST ON TELEVISION IN BRITISH COLUMBIA AND WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR STREAMING ONLINE FOR THIRTY DAYS AFTER AIRING AT KNOWLEDGE.CA

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 9 PM

ANNIE LEIBOVITZ: LIFE THROUGH A LENS PRESENTED BY

The Knowledge Network DIRECTED BY

Barbara Leibovitz Through her work for Rolling Stone, vanity Fair, and vogue, Annie Leibovitz has produced some of the most iconic images of the last thirty years. Though masterful at exposing her photographic subjects, Leibovitz’s own life has been private and protected. In this film, she made the decision to bare her artistic process, her personal journey, and her delicate balancing of fame and family to the camera—a camera that was vigilantly pointed by a filmmaker who is her younger sister. life through a lens reveals a woman who has become as iconic as the people she photographs.

THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 9 PM

TIME ZERO: THE LAST YEAR OF POLAROID FILM PRESENTED BY

The Knowledge Network DIRECTED BY

Grant Hamilton In February 2008, Polaroid announced that it was ceasing production of instant film. Time zero tells the story of the last year of Polaroid film and the “magic” of Polaroid through the perspective of Polaroid artists and former employees of the corporation. The discontinuation of instant film created a grassroots movement to keep it alive, with an against-the-odds effort to reinvent instant film.


FILMS

THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 9 PM

CHASING ICE PRESENTED BY

The Knowledge Network DIRECTED BY

Jeff Orlowski In the spring of 2005, acclaimed environmental photographer James Balog headed to the Arctic on a tricky assignment for National Geographic: to capture images to help tell the story of the earth’s changing climate. That first trip north opened his eyes to the biggest story in human history and sparked a challenge within him that would put his career and his very well-being at risk. chasing Ice is the story of one man’s mission to change the tide of history by gathering undeniable evidence of our changing planet. Within months of that first trip to Iceland, the photographer conceived the boldest expedition of his life: the Extreme Ice Survey. With a band of young adventurers in tow, Balog began deploying revolutionary time-lapse cameras across the brutal Arctic to capture a multi-year record of the world’s changing glaciers.

SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 6 PM

FROM DARKROOM TO DAYLIGHT PRESENTED BY

Vancity Theatre DIRECTED BY

Harvey Wang Vancity Theatre 1181 Seymour St Vancouver BC

From Darkroom to Daylight explores the dramatic change from film to digital in photography. Harvey Wang was mid career when the tools of his craft were made nearly obsolete. He interviewed more than twenty photographers and prominent figures in the field, including Jerome Liebling, George Tice, David Goldblatt, Sally Mann, Eugene Richards, Ruud van Empel, John Cohen, and Jeff Jacobson, as well as Steven Sasson, coinventor of the digital camera, and Thomas Knoll, co-creator of Photoshop.

TICKETS

$11/$9 STUDENTS/SENIORS $2 MANDATORY VANCITY MEMBERSHIP FOLLOWED BY

Skype Q&A with the director

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

14A — SOME SEXUALLY SUGGESTIVE SCENES AND NUDITY

The second annual Capture Photography Festival, in conjunction with the Cinematheque, presents a special program of Michael Snow’s Wavelength and Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-Up. These two celebrated films, both dating from the mid 1960s, complicate and confound the routine relationship between stillness and action: the latter contains the former, and from that point, everything can shift. As photographs depict a singular moment, the use of one in a narrative film forces both its characters and the audience to imagine beyond. Whether or not this “beyond” is fulfilled throughout the course of the plot is up for analysis, as the image burns itself into memory, resurfacing with new significance at some later date. Transformed with our own sensibilities and memories, the photograph becomes a placeholder for a greater unknown outside itself.

PERSONS UNDER 14 MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY AN ADULT

TEXT BY CASEY WEI

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 7 PM FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 7 PM

WAVELENGTH & BLOW-UP PRESENTED BY

Capture Photography Festival and the Cinematheque CURATED BY

Casey Wei DIRECTED BY

Michael Snow Michelangelo Antonioni The Cinematheque 200 — 1131 Howe St Vancouver BC DOUBLE-BILL PRICES IN EFFECT FOR THIS PROGRAM

$14 REGULAR/$12 STUDENTS & SENIORS CINEMATHEQUE MEMBERSHIP NOT REQUIRED FOR THIS EVENT.

Wavelength CANADA, 1967, 45 MIN, 16 mm

Canadian master Michael Snow’s 1967 milestone is one of avant-garde cinema’s most celebrated and influential works. The film consists of a single, continuous, forty-fiveminute zoom shot across a room (the artist’s New York loft), set to a steadily increasing sine wave of sound. There are several episodes of human “drama” and various structuralist elements (superimpositions, splicey jumps, variations in light, colour, and film stock) disrupting things along the way. “Wavelength is without precedent in the purity of its confrontation with the essence of cinema: the relationships between illusion and fact, space and time, subject and object. It is the first post-Warhol, post-Minimal movie” (Gene Youngblood).


FILMS

Blow-Up GREAT BRITAIN, 1966, 100 MIN, 35 mm

Michelangelo Antonioni’s first Englishlanguage film was this landmark mid-1960s meditation on the search for meaning, the subjective nature of reality, and the illusory nature of appearances. Set in Swinging London, the film stars David Hemmings as a fashion photographer who thinks he may have inadvertently photographed a murder. With its Carnaby Street–cool portrait of pop art, pot parties, chic fashion models, mod youths, hip clubs, and rambunctious sexual freedom, Blow-Up is the perfect ’60s time capsule. It also remains a quintessential Antonioni piece—“a work totally fascinated with questions of illusion and appearance and shifting surfaces, and the way objects adjust their character according to the nature of the observing eye” (Penelope Houston). Vanessa Redgrave co-stars, while the Yardbirds rock in a (literally) smashing concert cameo.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

Events


EVENTS

PRE-FESTIVAL EVENTS

MAR Thursday

19th

6–8 PM Exhibition Opening

NOTHING HERE APPEARS TO EXIST BUT WHAT CONTRIBUTES TO HARMONY Yedda Morrison Republic Gallery 732 Richards St — Third Floor Vancouver BC

Tuesday

24th 7–9 PM Exhibition Opening

CHRISTOS DIKEAKOS: TROUBLE IN PARADISE Christos Dikeakos West Vancouver Museum 680 17th St West Vancouver BC

APRIL 2ND

THURSDAY, 7:30 PM

Festival and Exhibition Launch

CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL & IMAGES THAT SPEAK Please join us for a celebration to launch of the 2015 Capture Photography Festival. The evening also sees the opening of Capture’s Images That Speak, co-produced with Presentation House Gallery, in partnership with Satellite Gallery. The

9 PM Film

exhibition showcases ten local and international

DISFARMER: A PORTRAIT OF AMERICA

for the first time, whose works call into question

Knowledge Network

employ various techniques to tear away and sup-

contemporary artists, many showing in Vancouver how photographic images speak to us. The artists plant the legibility of images, retooling mechanisms

Friday

20th

10 PM Film Knowledge Network 6–9 PM Exhibition Opening

INVERNOMUTO

THE LAST STAND

Artspeak 233 Carrall St Vancouver BC

David Ellingsen Initial Gallery 2339 Granville Street Vancouver BC

21st

4 PM Artist Talk and Screening

INVERNOMUTO Simone Bertuzzi and Simone Trabucchi Cineworks 1131 Howe St — Back Lane Entrance Vancouver BC

own meanings in the process.

PICTURE START

8 PM Exhibition Opening

Saturday

and pictorial conventions, all the while adding their

Satellite Gallery 560 Seymour St Vancouver BC

APRIL 3RD FRIDAY, 12–1:30 PM

Curator Tour and Artist Discussion

Wednesday

IMAGES THAT SPEAK

25th

Christopher Eamon and Exhibiting Artists

7–9 PM Exhibition Opening

Satellite Gallery 560 Seymour St Vancouver BC

ARTISTS DEPICTION Victor John Penner Gordon Smith Gallery of Canadian Art 2121 Lonsdale Ave North Vancouver BC

EVENT DATES AND TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE. FOR THE MOST UP-TO-DATE EVENT INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM

103


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

Thursday

26th

7–10 PM Exhibition Opening

ASKING FOR IT Patryk Stasieczek FIELD Contemporary 17 West Broadway Vancouver BC

Friday

27th 8 PM Exhibition Opening

FESTIVAL EVENTS

APR

APRIL 7TH

TUESDAY, 5–7 PM Artist Talk

Wednesday

BC HYDRO DAL GRAUER SUBSTATION PROJECT

1st

Jessica Eaton

6–8 PM Exhibition Opening

Jessica Eaton discusses her site-specific com-

INSIDE OUT & WAYWARD

mission from the Capture Photography Festival on

Colin Smith and Group Exhibition

the facade of the BC Hydro Dal Grauer Substation.

EXHIBITION TOUR FROM 6:30–7 PM

This project uses photography to rejuvenate a once

CURATOR Kimberly

prominent public showcase of future-forward art

Phillips AND SEVERAL

EXHIBITING ARTISTS FROM WaYWaRD

and technology on Burrard Street. In its conversa-

Winsor Gallery 258 East 1st Ave Vancouver BC

tion with the building’s history, Eaton’s photograph points to Vancouver’s unique history of West Coast modern design.

adrift David Hartt Or Gallery 555 Hamilton St Vancouver BC

Thursday

2nd

Inform Interiors 50 Water St Vancouver BC FREE ADMISSION RSVP AT INFO@INFORMINTERIORS.COM

Saturday

6 PM–LATE Exhibition Opening

2–4 PM Exhibition Opening

Byron Dauncey and Kevin Day Robert Lynds Gallery 1639 West 3rd Ave Vancouver BC

28th

PERCEPTUAL RENDERINGS & PICTURED WINDOWS Marten Elder and Group Exhibition Equinox Gallery 525 Great Northern Way Vancouver BC

CAMERA MACHINA

9 PM Film

FINDING VIVIAN MAIER Knowledge Network

Friday

7–11 PM Exhibition Opening

MARK OF MEN/STRUCTURES Justin Langille and Mickey Nielsen Untitled Art Space 436 Columbia St Vancouver BC

Saturday

4th

3rd

11 AM–2 PM Community Event

7 PM Exhibition Opening

Angela Fama and Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival Roundhouse Community Centre — Outside 181 Roundhouse Mews Vancouver BC and David Lam Park

35 YEARS OF REFLECTION: ALUMNI AND STUDENT SHOW Arts Umbrella Alumni Remington Gallery 108 East Hastings St Vancouver BC

WHAT IS LOVE?


EVENTS

Tuesday

7th 9 PM Film

MUGSHOT

7–10 PM Exhibition Opening

WEDNESDSAY, 7 PM

Henri Robideau grunt gallery 116 — 350 East 2nd Ave Vancouver BC

ADMISSION $10 THROUGH THE MUSEUM OF VANCOUVER

Knowledge Network

Wednesday

8th

6–8 PM RUNS UNTIL MAY 10 Exhibition Opening

IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT V2.0: PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE PEOPLE PRESENTED BY Beau

Photo Supplies Science World at Telus World of Science 1455 Quebec St Vancouver BC 6–9 PM Exhibition Opening

CELBRATION OF SIMPLICITY

7–10 PM Exhibition Opening

deCONSTRUCTION & EIDETIC IMAGE Evann Siebens and Kristen Abdai, Eli Craven, Tereza Zelenkova BAF Studio 108 East Broadway Vancouver BC

Launie Fairbairn AT 7 PM Ellissa Cristall Gallery 2239 Granville Street Vancouver BC

9th

6–9 PM Exhibition Opening

KEITH BIGGINS AND THE RETURN TO SPIRIT RIVER Chris MacArthur truth and beauty gallery 698 West 16th Ave Vancouver BC

Panel Discussion

WOMEN AND SELF-REPRESENTATION IN CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHIC ART PANELISTS

Holly Marie Armishaw, Susan Bozic, Dina Goldstein, Birthe Piontek Four Vancouver-based artists examine issues in

7–10 PM RUNS UNTIL APRIL 11 Exhibition Opening

ranging from the personal to the political to express

AFTER HOURS

ing. This discussion hopes to provide fresh perspec-

Canadian Association of Photographers & Illustrators In Communications Mainspace Gallery 350 East 2nd Ave Vancouver BC

tives on the local and current situation of women

9 PM Film

ANNIE LEIBOVITZ: LIFE THROUGH A LENS Knowledge Network

Thursday

AND AT MUSEUMOFVANCOUVER.CA/PROGRAMS

contemporary photographic art, exploring topics

Phung Noi Fong CURATOR TALK WITH

APRIL 8TH

ERASER STREET

Friday

10th 3–6PM Exhibition Opening and Artist Talk

a collective anxiety around femininity and art mak-

working in photography. PRESENTED BY the Contemporary Art Society of Vancouver IN PARTNERSHIP WITH Capture Photography Festival and the Museum of Vancouver

Museum of Vancouver 1100 Chestnut St Vancouver BC

7 PM Exhibition Opening

FIELD STUDIES: LESSONS IN LEARNING THE LANDSCAPE

ARTIST TALK AT 3–4PM

Rebecca Bayer and Laura Kozak, Emiliano Sepulveda, Eden Veaudry Access Gallery 222 East Georgia St Vancouver BC

Art Beatus 108 — 808 Nelson St. Vancouver BC

7–10 PM Exhibition Opening

HIDING IN PLAIN SIGHT Ross C. Kelly

LYING STILL Birthe Piontek Gallery 295 295 East 2nd Ave — Back Alley Entrance Vancouver BC

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

7–10 PM Exhibition Opening

2–4 PM Exhibition Opening

(NO) MATTER WHAT: FOUR WOMEN PHOTOGRAPHERS REALIZE NEGLECTED SPACES

PAPER FOREST

PERFORMANCE OF leThe AT 8 PM

rena del pieve gobbi, Janet Sadel, Bobbi Sue Smith, Karen Moe The ARC Gallery 1701 Powell St Vancouver BC 7 PM Exhibition Opening

GLISSEMENTS DE TERRAIN (LAND SLIDES) Ryan Mathieson, Anne-Marie Proulx The Toast Collective 648 Kingsway Vancouver BC

Saturday

Karin Bubaš Monte Clark Gallery 105 — 525 Great Northern Way Vancouver BC 2–5 PM Exhibition Opening

MATTHEW PILLSBURY: TOKYO Matthew Pillsbury Douglas Udell Gallery DUG Vancouver Pop-up 1566 West 6th Ave — Second Floor Vancouver BC 3–5 PM Exhibition Opening

REGISTERED: THE JAPANESE CANADIAN EXPERIENCE DURING WORLD WAR II

Sunday/Monday

12th & 13th 1–3 PM Artist Talk

(NO) MATTER WHAT: FOUR WOMEN PHOTOGRAPHERS REALIZE NEGLECTED SPACES rena del pieve gobbi, Janet Sadel, Bobbi Sue Smith, Karen Moe The ARC Gallery 1701 Powell St Vancouver BC

Tuesday

14th 7 PM RUNS UNTIL MAY 5 Exhibition Opening

Leslie Hossack

DISCONNECTION

CONVERSATION BETWEEN THE ARTIST AND

West Vancouver Secondary School Students

PHOTOGRAPHER STEPHEN WADDELL AT 3:30 PM

Disconnection is a narrative on the concepts of “isolation” and “connection” from the

GALLERY HOP VANCOUVER 2015

Nikkei National Museum and Cultural Centre 6688 Southoaks Crescent Burnaby BC

Canadian Art Foundation Various venues Vancouver BC

4 PM Panel Discussion

11th

TIMES VARY Community Event

12 PM Exhibition Opening and Artist Talk

MODELS OF RESISTANCE Angela Grossmann PRESENTED BY Poïesis Contemporary CURATOR AND ARTIST TALK AT 1 PM

Marion Scott Gallery/Kardosh Projects 2423 Granville St Vancouver BC

(NO) MATTER WHAT: FOUR WOMEN PHOTOGRAPHERS REALIZE NEGLECTED SPACES TRADITIONAL HAND-PRINTING WITH

The ARC Gallery 1701 Powell St Vancouver BC

Janet Sadel

West Vancouver Secondary School 1750 Mathers Ave West Vancouver BC

ASKING FOR IT

Wednesday

“Speaking Off It” FACILITATOR Avalon Mott PANELISTS Karen Zalamea, Manuel Correa, Sean Alward and Patryk Stasieczek FIELD Contemporary 17 West Broadway Vancouver BC

7–9:30 PM Discussion and Q&A

6:30–9:30 PM Exhibition Opening and Artist Talk

1–3 PM Artist Demo

perspective of today’s youth.

REMEDIATING CURTIS: IMAGINING INDIGENEITY Stephen Foster ARTIST TALK AT 6:30 PM, RECEPTION AT 7:30 PM

Surrey Art Gallery 13750 88th Ave Surrey BC

15th

HOW IMAGES AFFECT US CAPIC presents a Pecha Kucha–inspired event featuring six to eight prominent photographers.

Djavad Mowafaghian World Art Centre Goldcorp Centre for the Arts SFU Woodward’s 149 Hastings St Vancouver BC


EVENTS

Thursday

9 PM Film

16th

6–9 PM Exhibition Opening

BUONA FORTUNA Jorge Manes Rubio Initial Gallery 2339 Granville Street Vancouver BC

APRIL 18TH

TIME ZERO: THE LAST YEAR OF POLAROID FILM

SATURDAY, 2–5 PM

Knowledge Network

Community Event

Friday

17th

MONUMENT TO MYSTERIOUS FIRES TAILGATE PARTY Capture hosts a family-friendly Tailgate Party to celebrate the installation of Other Sights’ public

7–11 PM Exhibition Opening

project, Monument to Mysterious Fires. The event

THE PORTRAIT PROJECT

garden from a local brewery. In addition to these fun components, photographer Angela Fama will

and Stage 6 Stage 6 Studio 65 East 6th Ave Vancouver BC

Lindsay Elliott, Katie Huisman, Lynol Lui, Madhava Musterer, Becky Philpott, Alex Waber Remington Gallery 108 East Hastings St Vancouver BC

6–8 PM Exhibition Opening

7–9 PM Exhibition Opening

ORIGINS

GREG GIRARD: RICHMOND/KOWLOON

6–11 PM Exhibition Opening

#THEYKNOWPHOTOGRAPHY PRESENTED BY THEY

Representation

includes entertainment, food trucks, and a beer

be on-site with her project “What Is Love”, inviting guests to collaborate in her travelling pop-up photo studio before taking off on the road across Canada and the US. FREE ADMISSION

Cara Barer Bau-Xi 3045 Granville St Vancouver BC 7–9 PM Exhibition Opening

YOU ARE HERE Group Exhibition CityScape Community Art Space North Vancouver Arts Council 335 Lonsdale Ave North Vancouver BC 8 PM Exhibition Opening

Greg Girard Richmond Art Gallery 7700 Minoru Gate Richmond BC

Parking Lot

Quebec St at East 5th Ave Vancouver BC

Saturday

18th

8 PM Performance

1 PM Artist and Curator Talk

(NO) MATTER WHAT: FOUR WOMEN PHOTOGRAPHERS REALIZE NEGLECTED SPACES

MODELS OF RESISTANCE

Karen Moe, lethe The ARC Gallery 1701 Powell St Vancouver BC

“Hello Dolly” Angela Grossmann CURATED BY Lynn Ruscheinsky PRESENTED BY Poïesis Contemporary Marion Scott Gallery/Kardosh Projects 2423 Granville Street Vancouver BC

FRED SCHIFFER: LIVES IN PHOTOS Fred Schiffer PRESENTED BY the Jewish Museum and Archives of British Columbia MAKE Gallery 257 East 7th Ave Vancouver BC

1–3 PM Artist Demo (NO) MATTER WHAT: FOUR

WOMEN PHOTOGRAPHERS REALIZE NEGLECTED SPACES

TRADITIONAL HAND-PRINTING WITH

Janet Sadel The ARC Gallery 1701 Powell St Vancouver BC

107


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

1 PM Artist Talk

LYING STILL Birthe Piontek Gallery 295 295 East 2nd Ave — Back Alley Entrance Vancouver BC 2 PM Artist Talk

REGISTERED: THE JAPANESE CANADIAN EXPERIENCE DURING WORLD WAR II Nikkei National Museum and Cultural Centre 6688 Southoaks Cr Burnaby BC 7 PM Exhibition Opening

COVET III Group Exhibition Photohaus Gallery 14th West 7 Ave Vancouver BC 8 PM Exhibition Opening

SCOTT MASSEY: UNSTABLE GROUND Scott Massey Burnaby Art Gallery 6344 Deer Lake Ave Burnaby BC

Sunday

19th 6 PM Film Screening

FROM DARKROOM TO DAYLIGHT Vancity Theatre 1181 Seymour St Vancouver BC $11; $9 STUDENTS/SENIORS $2 MANDATORY VANCITY MEMBERSHIP

Wednesday

22nd

6–8 PM Exhibition Opening

TAKE YOUR TIME

9 PM Film

CHASING ICE Knowledge Network

Friday

Khan Lee Republic Gallery 732 Richards St — Third Floor Vancouver BC

24th

7 PM Film Screening

SARA’S BAT MITZVAH

WAVELENGTH & BLOW-UP The Cinematheque 200 — 1131 Howe St Vancouver BC $14; $12 STUDENTS/SENIORS

Thursday

23rd

1 PM Artist Talk Isaac Thomas Gallery 295 295 East 2nd Ave — Back Alley Entrance Vancouver BC 7 PM Film Screening

WAVELENGTH & BLOW-UP The Cinematheque 200 — 1131 Howe St Vancouver BC $14; $12 STUDENTS/SENIORS

6 PM Exhibition Opening

SPOMENIKI

Saturday

Marc Koegel Photohaus Gallery 14 West 7th Ave Vancouver BC

25th

7 PM Exhibition Opening and Conversation with the Artist

100TH MERIDIAN

TRIS VONNA-MICHELL Tris Vonna-Michell

2–4 PM Exhibition Opening Danny Singer Gallery Jones 1725 West 3rd Ave Vancouver BC

CONVERSATION AT 7PM FOLLOWED BY RECEPTION

Presentation House Gallery 333 Chesterfield Ave North Vancouver BC

2–3:30 PM Panel Discussion —

7–9 PM Exhibition Opening

Curse of the Livable City FACILITATOR Leslie Van Duzer PANELISTS Greg Girard, Bing Thom, and Glenn Deer Richmond Art Gallery 7700 Minoru Gate Richmond BC

JÜDISCHES KRANKENHAUS BERLIN & SPECTRUM STUDIES Malcolm Levy and Scott Massey Wil Aballe Art Projects | WAAP 105 — 1356 Frances St Vancouver BC

GREG GIRARD: RICHMOND/KOWLOON


EVENTS

2–3 PM Artist Talk

THE PORTRAIT PROJECT Remington Gallery 108 East Hastings St Vancouver BC

Sunday

26th 1–4 PM Community Event

GREG GIRARD: RICHMOND/KOWLOON Family Sundays Richmond Art Gallery 7700 Minoru Gate Richmond BC

Tuesday

28th 6:30 PM Artist Talk

BEYOND THE TREES: WALLPAPERS IN DIALOGUE WITH EMILY CARR Wallpapers Vancouver Art Gallery 750 Hornby St Vancouver BC 7 PM Artist Talk

OUT OF STUDIO: GREEN CITY GLASS BLUE Torrie Groening Art Rental & Sales Vancouver Art Gallery — Main Floor 750 Hornby St Vancouver BC

POST-FESTIVAL EVENTS

MAY Saturday

16th

APRIL 26TH SUNDAY, 2–4 PM Curator Tour

CAPTURE CANADA LINE PUBLIC ART PROJECT: THE CITY BEFORE THE CITY

10 AM–12 PM Community Event

Susan Rowley

REGISTERED: THE JAPANESE CANADIAN EXPERIENCE DURING WORLD WAR II

UBC Museum of Anthropology curator Susan

Historical Powell Street Walking Tour

the city. Meet at 2 pm sharp in the lobby of

$8/$10 + GST

Waterfront Station, near the top of the stairs

CONTACT NIKKEI NATIONAL MUSEUM & CULTURAL

to the Canada Line.

Rowley takes visitors on a tour of the Capture Canada Line Public Art Project: the city before

CENTRE FOR MEETING LOCATION AT 604 777 7000

Saturday

23rd 10 AM–12 PM Community Event

REGISTERED: THE JAPANESE CANADIAN EXPERIENCE DURING WORLD WAR II Historical Hastings Street Walking Tour $8/$10 + GST CONTACT NIKKEI NATIONAL MUSEUM & CULTURAL CENTRE FOR MEETING LOCATION AT 604 777 7000

10 AM–12 PM Artist Talk

GREG GIRARD: RICHMOND/KOWLOON Greg Girard Richmond Cultural Centre Performance Hall 7700 Minoru Gate Richmond BC

Waterfront Station 601 West Cordova St Vancouver BC

Sunday

24th 1–4 PM Community Event

GREG GIRARD: RICHMOND/KOWLOON Family Sundays Richmond Art Gallery 7700 Minoru Gate Richmond BC

Sunday

27th 1–4 PM Curator Tour

GREG GIRARD: RICHMOND/KOWLOON Art + Tea + Talk WITH Nan Capogna Richmond Art Gallery 7700 Minoru Gate Richmond BC

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

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MAP

CANADA LINE STATIONS 1 WATERFRONT 2 CITY CENTRE 3 OLYMPIC VILLAGE 4 CITY HALL 5 KING EDWARD 6 LANGARA 7 MARINE DRIVE 8 YVR 9 ACCESS GALLERY 222 EAST GEORGIA ST VANCOUVER BC V6A 1Z7 10 THE ARC GALLERY 1701 POWELL ST VANCOUVER BC V5L 11 ART BEATUS 108 — 808 NELSON ST VANCOUVER BC V6Z 2H2

RD MT SEYM

OUR PK

WY

DOLLAR

12 ART RENTAL & SALES VANCOUVER ART GALLERY — MAIN FLOOR 750 HORNBY ST VANCOUVER BC V6Z 2H7

TON HW

Y

13 ARTSPEAK 233 CARRALL ST VANCOUVER BC V6B 2J2 14 BAF STUDIO 108 EAST BROADWAY VANCOUVER BC V5T 1V9 15 BAU-XI 3045 GRANVILLE ST VANCOUVER BC V6H 3J9 16 BC HYDRO DAL GRAUER SUBSTATION 944 BURRARD ST VANCOUVER BC V6Z 1Y3

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17 BEATY BIODIVERSITY MUSEUM UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 2212 MAIN MALL VANCOUVER BC V6T 1Z4

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E

1

18 BURNABY ART GALLERY 6344 DEER LAKE AVE BURNABY BC V5G 2J3

18

DEER LA KE PKW

Y

19 THE CINEMATHEQUE 200 — 1131 HOWE ST VANCOUVER BC V6Z 2L7 IMPERI

20 CINEWORKS 1131 HOWE ST VANCOUVER BC V6Z 2L7

AL ST

44

58

21 CITYSCAPE COMMUNITY ART SPACE NORTH VANCOUVER ARTS COUNCIL 335 LONSDALE AVE NORTH VANCOUVER BC V7M 3M9

111

22 CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY 555 NELSON ST VANCOUVER BC V6B 6R5

37 MACAULAY & CO. FINE ART 193 EAST 2ND AVE VANCOUVER BC V5T 1B4

23 DAVID LAM PARK 1300 PACIFIC BLVD VANCOUVER BC V6Z 2Y1

38 MAINSPACE GALLERY 350 EAST 2ND AVE VANCOUVER BC V5T 4R8

24 DOUGLAS UDELL GALLERY DUG VANCOUVER POP-UP 1566 WEST 6TH AVE — SECOND FLOOR VANCOUVER BC V6J 1R2

39 MAKE GALLERY 257 EAST 7TH AVE VANCOUVER BC V5T 0B4

25 ELISSA CRISTALL GALLERY 2239 GRANVILLE ST VANCOUVER BC V6H 3G1 26 EQUINOX GALLERY 525 GREAT NORTHERN WAY VANCOUVER BC V5T 1E2 27 FIELD CONTEMPORARY 17 WEST BROADWAY VANCOUVER BC V5Y 1P1 28 GALLERY 295 295 EAST 2ND AVE — BACK ALLEY ENTRANCE VANCOUVER BC V5T 1B8 29 GALLERY JONES 1725 WEST 3RD AVE VANCOUVER BC V6J 1K7

40 MARION SCOTT GALLERY/KARDOSH PROJECTS 2423 GRANVILLE ST VANCOUVER BC V6A 3G5 41 MONTE CLARK GALLERY 105 — 525 GREAT NORTHERN WAY VANCOUVER BC V5T 1E1 42 MONUMENT TO MYSTERIOUS FIRES PARKING LOT QUEBEC ST AT EAST 5TH AVE VANCOUVER BC 43 MUSEUM OF VANCOUVER 1100 CHESTNUT ST VANCOUVER BC V6J 5E5

52 RICHMOND CULTURAL CENTRE PERFORMANCE HALL 7700 MINORU GATE RICHMOND BC V6Y 1R9 53 ROBERT LYNDS GALLERY 1639 WEST 3RD AVE VANCOUVER BC V6J 1K1 54 ROUNDHOUSE COMMUNITY CENTRE 181 ROUNDHOUSE MEWS VANCOUVER BC V6Z 2W3 55 SATELLITE GALLERY 560 SEYMOUR ST VANCOUVER BC V6B 3J5 56 SCIENCE WORLD AT TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE 1455 QUEBEC ST VANCOUVER BC V6A 3Z7 57 STAGE 6 STUDIO 65 EAST 6TH AVE VANCOUVER BC V5T 1J3 58 SURREY ART GALLERY 13750 88TH AVE SURREY BC V3W 3L1 59 THE TOAST COLLECTIVE 648 KINGSWAY VANCOUVER BC V5T 3K4

30 GAM GALLERY 110 EAST HASTINGS ST VANCOUVER BC V6A 1N4

44 NIKKEI NATIONAL MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTRE 6688 SOUTHOAKS CR BURNABY BC V5E 4M7

60 TRUTH AND BEAUTY GALLERY 698 WEST 16TH AVE VANCOUVER BC V5Z 1S6

31 GOLDCORP CENTRE FOR THE ARTS SFU WOODWARD’S 149 HASTINGS ST VANCOUVER BC V6B 1H4

45 OR GALLERY 555 HAMILTON ST VANCOUVER BC V6B 2R1

61 UNTITLED ART SPACE 436 COLUMBIA ST VANCOUVER BC V6A 2R8

46 PENDULUM GALLERY HSBC BUILDING 855 WEST GEORGIA ST VANCOUVER BC V6C 3G1

62 VANCITY THEATRE 1181 SEYMOUR ST VANCOUVER BC V6B 3N3

32 GORDON SMITH GALLERY OF CANADIAN ART 2121 LONSDALE AVE NORTH VANCOUVER BC V7M 2K7 33 GRUNT GALLERY 116 — 350 EAST 2ND AVE VANCOUVER BC V5T 4R8 34 INFORM INTERIORS 50 WATER ST VANCOUVER BC V6B 1A4 35 INITIAL GALLERY 2339 GRANVILLE ST VANCOUVER BC V6H 3G4 36 LOBBY GALLERY AT THE LIU INSTITUTE FOR GLOBAL ISSUES UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 6476 NW MARINE DR VANCOUVER BC V6T 1Z2

47 PHOTOHAUS GALLERY 14 WEST 7TH AVE VANCOUVER BC V5Y 1L6

63 VANCOUVER ART GALLERY 750 HORNBY ST VANCOUVER BC V6Z 2H7

48 PRESENTATION HOUSE GALLERY 333 CHESTERFIELD AVE NORTH VANCOUVER BC V7M 2L8

64 WEST VANCOUVER MUSEUM 680 17TH ST WEST VANCOUVER BC V7V 3T2

49 REMINGTON GALLERY 108 EAST HASTINGS ST VANCOUVER BC V6A 4J1

65 WEST VANCOUVER SECONDARY SCHOOL 1750 MATHERS AVE WEST VANCOUVER BC V7V 2G7

50 REPUBLIC GALLERY 732 RICHARDS ST — THIRD FLOOR VANCOUVER BC V6B 3A4 51 RICHMOND ART GALLERY 7700 MINORU GATE RICHMOND BC V6Y 1R9

66 WIL ABALLE ART PROJECTS | WAAP 105 —1356 FRANCES ST VANCOUVER BC V5L 1Y9 67 WINSOR GALLERY 258 EAST 1ST AVE VANCOUVER BC V5T 1A6


Photo by CAPIC Member: Ted Grant, www.tedgrantphoto.com

CAPIC Vancouver Chapter Canadian Association of Professional Image Creators is proud to be a supporter of

Capture Photography Festival 2015 CAPIC is the collective voice and advocate for professional photographers, illustrators and digital artists in Canada. We work hard to maintain industry standards, create a community, fight for copyright protection, and much more. Our work helps all the professionals in our industry. As a professional association, CAPIC’s mission is to promote quality and creativity as well as good business practices.

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CAPIC.ORG


Here at Beau Photo, we’ve seen many changes over the years, but our commitment to all things photographic continues.

We keep up with the latest in digital technology while remaining dedicated to film and darkroom enthusiasts.

Photo Š Jason Kazuta

Beau Photo is an independent shop, providing personalized service that can’t be found online. Come by or give us a call, we can help you out.

        

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Beau Photo Supplies

beauphoto.blogspot.com

1520 W. 6th Ave,Vancouver 604.734.7771

@beauphotostore

beau1520

Beau Photo

Beau Photo Store

www.beauphoto.com


Capture your passion and turn it into a career. PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY DIPLOMA PROGRAM

Learn more. www.langara.bc.ca/photo 604.323.5432

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YTO BARRADA BEAUX GESTES MAY 7 – JULY 25, 2015 OPENING RECEPTION AND RELEASE PARTY FOR PREFIX PHOTO 31: THURSDAY, MAY 7 FROM 7 TO 10 PM. THIS EXHIBITION IS CURATED BY SCOTT MCLEOD AND VICKY MOUFAWAD-PAUL AND PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH A SPACE GALLERY AS A PRIMARY EXHIBITION OF THE SCOTIABANK CONTACT PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL.

YTO BARRADA, MUR DES PARESSEAUX (LAZY WALL), 2010. COURTESY SFEIR-SEMLER GALLERY.

Prefix gratefully acknowledges the assistance of the City of Toronto through the Toronto Arts Council, the Ontario Arts Council and the Canada Council for the Arts.

SUBSCRIBE TO PREFIX PHOTO MAGAZINE

Prefix Institute of Contemporary Art Suite 124, Box 124 401 Richmond Street West Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5V 3A8 T 416.591.0357 F 416.591.0358 info@prefix.ca www.prefix.ca Photo Magazine. Visual, Audio and Surround Art Galleries. Reference Library. Small Press. Travelling Shows.


www.pwc.com/ca

Proudly supporting the arts in BC

Š 2012 PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an Ontario limited liability partnership. All rights reserved. 3640-01 0913


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

PROUD TO SPONSOR THE CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL ...and picture-perfect moments captured by the lens

For Out-of-Home advertising opportunities in B.C., contact 604-235-2700


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STAY CONNECTED AT STRAIGHT.COM


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YOUR LINK TO THE VISUAL ARTS IN WESTERN CANADA Galleries West is available at most fine art galleries in Western Canada and on selected newsstands. www.gallerieswest.ca Subscribe online Or toll-free at 1-866-697-2002

SUPPORTING OUR COMMUNITY Vancouver International Airport is proud to connect British Columbia to the best in international art and photography with our award-winning art collection and support for the Capture Photography Festival.

VANCOUVERINTERNATIONALAIRPORT @YVRAIRPORT YVR.CA


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

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More than you expect, everything you Deserve Every stay includes free: • Full breakfast • Wifi throughout hotel • Worldwide long distance • FIJI bottled water • Steve Nash Club access • 24 Hr Business Services

Forbes Recommended Condé Nast Reader’s Choice Tripadvisor Traveller’s Choice

Downtown Vancouver 1.800.770.7929 stregishotel.com

Assembly Digital is proud to be Capture Photography Festival’s digital, creative, and communications partner.

assemblydigital.com


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

This year, Capture launched the new Mini Artist Edition Series. We've partnered with a select group of artists to contribute limited editions that, thanks to their “petite� scale, are guaranteed to fit on the wall of even the smallest Vancouver condo.

Please visit capturephotofest.com for more information and to purchase.


EDITIONS

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Jessica Eaton DG Weave, 2015 Archival pigment print, 9.8” x 14” Courtesy of the Artist EDITION OF 50 $250 UNFRAMED | $350 FRAMED

Birthe Piontek Trouts, 2013 8” x 10”, archival pigment print Courtesy of the Artist EDITION OF 50 $100 UNFRAMED | $165 FRAMED

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015


EDITIONS

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Scott Massey Spectrum Study 4 (infrared), 2014 11.5” x 12.5”, archival pigment print Courtesy of the artist EDITION OF 50 $100 UNFRAMED | $165 FRAMED

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Danny Singer Trossachs, 2005/2014 6.25” x 23”, archival pigment print Courtesy of the artist and Gallery Jones EDITION OF 100 $200 UNFRAMED | $285 FRAMED

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Proud Supporting Sponsor of the

Canvas Gallery Wraps See what depth and dimension can do to your images! Using specialty pigmented inks with archival qualities, we print your images on premium fine art canvas and hand stretch them onto 1-3/4” deep wooden frames for easy placement or hanging.

Metal Prints

(on Aluminum Panels)

Vibrant dyes are directly infused into specifically coated aluminum sheets. Giving your prints a magical luminescent quality with a high gloss finish.

Ultimate Enlargements Turn your photos into fine works of art up to 44” x 96”. Patented inks produce rich colour and superior definition. Choose from glossy or pearl or upgrade to fine art metallic, bamboo or canvas.

For all of your photo printing needs, visit londondrugs.com/photolab

"I am especially pleased with the colour matching between my high resolution files and the final prints London Drugs has been supplying me. I have never had such a quick, consistent and visually satisfying turn around for my proofing process. I am very grateful and will be sure to return for future printing.” Angela Fama


DO YOU THINK CREATIVIT Y IS LEARNED OR INNATE?

Keep Capture Developing! REAL TALK. KIT AND ACE

If you’re a fan of our (mostly free) programming and this (completely free) publication you hold in your hands

CHECK OUT OUR INDIEGOGO CROWDFUNDING CAMPAIGN TO DONATE MONDAY, MARCH 16 2015 CLOSING WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29 2015 LAUNCH

VISIT

capturephotofest.com OR Indiegogo FOR MORE INFORMATION

Perks range from a Capture Photography Festival Society membership to an ultra chic Capture tote bag to limited-edition artworks from Festival artists. *PLUS, NEW PERKS ADDED THROUGHOUT THE CAMPAIGN KITANDACE.COM ∙ @KITANDACE

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SPINE

CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2015

Proud to support the 2015 Capture Photography Festival. We are working together with Capture to make a difference in ourDPNNVOJUJFT 

VANCOUVER APRIL 2015 ®

The TD logo and other trade-marks are the property of The Toronto-Dominion Bank.

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SPINE

Capture Magazine 2015  

The 2015 Capture Magazine is the official guide to the second annual Capture Photography Festival (April 2–29) in Vancouver, Canada.