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"EyePhotography ThrougPlanning Documentary h A Lens" Summative Task

Planning Sheet For your photographic essay, potential subjects can be endless. You may be thinking, “Where do I begin?” You should select a topic that interests you, something you know well and something that is readily available to you. Think of your interests to identify potential projects. Step 1: Think about broad areas of interest that intrigue you. This may be broad topics such as people, wealth, poverty, city life, family, friends, music or a locale. Write as many down as possible.

You are a documentary photogr apher and have been hired by E yeLens Magazine to create a photo essa y. They trust your talented visio n and have decided to give you artistic free dom in the subject you choose to document. Their only requirement is that you have a minimum of 9 pho tos for their magazine feature. What will be your story to tell? A photographic essay is a seri es of photographs which attempt to do one or more of the follo wing: reveal, inform, entertain, persuade, or compare and contrast. You r photo essay should have a structure. When telling your story, include the following: •A wide establishing shot •Close ups of activity •A decisive event or moment / candid shots •Portraits (head-shots) •A concluding image

Step 2: Select 3 concepts from above that interest you the most and brainstorm possible projects to investigate for that topic. For example, if you wrote down “people,” think about what types of people interest you: skaters, businessmen, street cleaners etc. If you wrote down “family,” think about what aspect interests you. You may wish to do a compare and contrast between your parents, a day in the life of someone, an activity or process. If you wrote down a locale, write some specifics such as food court/customers, types of businesses/products etc.

Concept 1:

UWC, Dover - Grade 8 unit 3!

Concept 2:

Concept 3:

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Documentary Photography Planning Step 3: Now select three possible projects that you feel passionate about. These might be visually stimulating projects or emotionally engaging etc. Step 4: Now daydream about these three topics and begin to visualise what your images might look like. Write down the visuals that come to mind. If you find that you are unable to visualise images for the subject, it may indicate that you need more time to explore the subject. We already know what things look like. The challenge is to reveal something beyond the obvious. This may include something like a wife tying a husband’s tie as he gets ready for work.

Project 1:

What do you see?

Where are you?

Who is with you?

What actions define the moment?

How does the setting impact you? Are there any specifics, objects, articles, clothing, colours, customs etc. that could be appealing to photograph? Is there anything that could connect to the senses?

Project 2:

What do you see?

Where are you?

Who is with you?

What actions define the moment?

How does the setting impact you? Are there any specifics, objects, articles, clothing, colours, customs etc. that could be appealing to photograph? Is there anything that could connect to the senses?

UWC, Dover - Grade 8 unit 3!

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Name/Tutor:

Documentary Photography Planning

Project 3: What do you see?

Where are you?

Who is with you?

What actions define the moment?

How does the setting impact you? Are there any specifics, objects, articles, clothing, colours, customs etc. that could be appealing to photograph? Is there anything that could connect to the senses?

As you go through this process, it should help you identify the breadth and depth of access you need. How can you also consider the following at this stage?

Project 1: •A wide establishing shot

Project 2:

Project 3:

•A wide establishing shot

•A wide establishing shot

•Close ups of activity

•Close ups of activity

•Close ups of activity

•A decisive event or moment / candid shots

•A decisive event or moment / candid shots

•A decisive event or moment / candid shots

•Portraits (head-shots)

•Portraits (head-shots)

•Portraits (head-shots)

•A concluding image

•A concluding image

•A concluding image

UWC, Dover - Grade 8 unit 3!

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Documentary Photography Planning

Decide on a final project. Remember, you need a minimum of 9 photos. Try to grasp an idea of possible photos you can take again, but also try to consider certain camera work you could include. Of course, depending on when you photograph and the opportunity available, all of this could change. What do you wish to communicate?

FINAL PROJECT IDEA: •A wide establishing shot

•Close ups of activity •A decisive event or moment / candid shots •Portraits (head-shots)

•Close ups of activity •A decisive event or moment / candid shots •Portraits (head-shots)

•Close ups of activity •A decisive event or moment / candid shots •Portraits (head-shots)

•Close ups of activity •A decisive event or moment / candid shots •Portraits (head-shots)

•Close ups of activity •A decisive event or moment / candid shots •Portraits (head-shots)

•Close ups of activity •A decisive event or moment / candid shots •Portraits (head-shots)

•Close ups of activity •A decisive event or moment / candid shots •Portraits (head-shots)

•A concluding image

What story will you tell?

(Don’t forget about composition, balance, focal point,cropping, framing etc.)

UWC, Dover - Grade 8 unit 3!

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Documentary Photography Planning