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Regular Meeting of the Capitol Region Watershed District (CRWD) Board of Managers, for Wednesday, March 20, 2019 6:00 p.m. at the office of the CRWD, 595 Aldine Street, St. Paul, Minnesota.

I.

REGULAR MEETING AGENDA Call to Order of Regular Meeting (President Joe Collins) A) Attendance B) Review, Amendments, and Approval of the Agenda

Materials Enclosed

II.

Public Comment – For Items not on the Agenda (Please observe a limit of three minutes per person.)

III.

Permit Applications and Program Updates (Permit Process: 1) Staff Review/Recommendation, 2) Applicant Response, 3) Public Comment, and 4) Board Discussion and Action.)

A) B) C)

Permit 15-022 The Good Acre – Closeout (Hosch) Permit 18-018 Payne Development amendment (Hosch) Permit 19-004 Wheelock 4 (Hosch)

IV.

Special Reports – A) Villa Park Analysis, Joe Sellner B) Como Lake Management Plan Update, Britta Belden

V.

Action Items A) AR: Approve Minutes of the March 6, 2019 Board Workshop (Sylvander) B) AR: Approve Minutes of the March 6, 2018 Regular Board Meeting (Sylvander) C) AR: Approve February 2019 Accounts Payable/Receivable (Sylvander)

VI.

Unfinished Business A) Safety Program Update (Eleria) B) 2020 Watershed Management Plan (Eleria)

VII.

General Information A) Board of Manager’s Updates B) Administrator’s Report (Doneux)

VIII. Next Meetings A) Wednesday, April 3, 2019 Board Meeting B) Wednesday, April 10, 2019 CAC Meeting IX.

Adjournment

Our mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District


March 20, 2019 III. Permit Applications A. Permit Close Out (Hosch) DATE: TO: FROM: RE:

March 11, 2019 CRWD Board of Managers Elizabeth Hosch Permit Closeout

Background Construction activity is complete for permit #15-022, The Good Acre. Issues The Good Acre #15-022 This permit was issued for the development of new commercial building and urban farm area near Larpenteur and Fairview in Falcon Heights. Stormwater requirements were met with 4 surface infiltration basins. The site is stable and the stormwater treatment practices have been confirmed functional. One basin on the east side of the project is being replaced with the subsequent development of the adjacent permit #18-011, The Hendrickson. Some additional ongoing maintenance activity at south parking lot basin has been accepted by the owner for continued observation and site corrections as needed. $6,400 surety is available for return. Action Requested Approve $6,400 surety return and Certificate of Completion for permit #15-022 The Good Acre.

W:\07 Programs\Permitting\Board Memos\2019-03-20 Permit Closeout Board Memo.docx

Our Mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District.


Capitol Region Watershed District   Applicant:    

Permit Amendment 18-018 Payne Building Development

Trevor Martinez Schafer Richardson 900 N 3rd Street Minneapolis, MN 55401

Consultant: Keith Matte BKBM 6120 Earle Brown Drive Minneapolis, MN 55430

Description: Three to four story mixed use apartment/retail building, amended to include tree trenches Stormwater Management: One underground infiltration tank and three tree trenches District Rule: —C D F Disturbed Area: 1.29 Acres   Impervious Area: 1.13 Acres  

             

STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Approve Amendment with 6 Conditions: 1. Receipt of $5,700 surety. 2. Receipt of maintenance agreement recorded with Ramsey County. 3. Provide a copy of the NPDES permit. 4. Revise site-specific maintenance plan to address the following: a. Include person(s) responsible for maintenance of stormwater devices (once known). b. Include routine inspection and subsequent maintenance activities to ensure tree trenches are meeting 48-hour drawdown requirement. 5. Revise plans to address items a.- d. in the 3-12-19 permit report. 6. Revise model or plans to correspond for Pond 10P (Tree Trench B): a. Invert of 18” primary outlet is 843.40’ in HydroCAD and 842.75’ in the Sewer Structure Table on sheet C300 and in Detail 5 on sheet C503 in the plans. b. Downstream invert of 18” primary outlet is 843.35’ in HydroCAD and 842.70’ in the Sewer Structure Table on sheet C300 in the plans.

       

 

Payne Ave 

Aerial Photo

Permit Location

Permit Report 18-018

Board Meeting Date: 03-20-2019


Capitol Region Watershed District  Permit Report ‐ Amendment      CRWD Permit #:       Review date:       Project Name:       Applicant:                                    Purpose: 

18‐018 March 12, 2019  Payne Building Development  Keith Matte  BKBM Engineers  6120 Earle Brown Drive, Suite 700  Minneapolis, MN 55430  763‐843‐0420 ext. 446  kmatte@bkbm.com  Three to four‐story mixed‐use apartment/retail building. Stormwater  management includes on underground infiltration tank and three tree  trenches. 

Location:  848 Payne Avenue, St. Paul, MN    Applicable Rules:   C, D, and F    Recommendation:  Approve amendment with 6 Conditions      EXHIBITS:    1. Civil Plans (C100, C200, C300, C301, C400, C401, C402, C500, C501, C502, C503, C600),  by BKBM Engineers, dated 2/15/19, rcvd. 3/4/19.  2. Hydrology Narrative and Calculations (49 pages), by BKBM Engineers, dated 2/26/19,  rcvd. 3/4/19.  3. Geotechnical Exploration and Engineering Review, by NTI, dated 3/8/18, rcvd. 7/27/18.  4. BMP Maintenance Plan, by BKBM Engineers, dated 2/26/19, rcvd. 3/4/19.    HISTORY & CONSIDERATIONS:    Plan amendment was submitted on 1‐22‐19 to include tree trenches for achieving the required  stormwater treatment.     RULE C: STORMWATER MANAGEMENT   Standards   Proposed discharge rates for the 2‐, 10‐, and 100‐year events shall not exceed  existing rates.   Developments and redevelopments must reduce runoff volumes in the amount  equivalent to an inch of runoff from the impervious areas of the site.    W:\07 Programs\Permitting\2018\18-018, Payne (848) Development\18-018 Permit Report_R3b.doc Page 1 of 4


 Stormwater must be pretreated before discharging to infiltration areas to maintain  the long‐term viability of the infiltration area.     Developments and redevelopments must incorporate effective non‐point source  pollution reduction BMPs to achieve 90% total suspended solid removal.       Findings  1. A hydrograph method based on sound hydrologic theory is used to analyze runoff  for the design or analysis of flows and water levels.  2. Runoff rates for the proposed activity do not exceed existing runoff rates for the 2‐,  10‐, and 100‐year critical storm events.  Stormwater leaving the project area is  discharged into a well‐defined receiving channel or pipe and routed to a public  drainage system.    3. Stormwater runoff volume retention is achieved onsite in the amount equivalent to  the runoff generated from 1.1‐inch of rainfall over the impervious surfaces of the  development.    a. The amount of proposed impervious is 49,176 square feet.  b. Volume retention required:  49,176 ft2 x 1.1 inches x 1 ft/12 inches = 4,514 ft3     Table 1. Proposed volume retention through abstraction (i.e. infiltration, reuse).  Volume  Volume Retention  1.1‐inch  2‐inch  Retention  BMP  Provided below  Runoff  Runoff  Required  outlet (cu. ft.)  (cu. ft.)  (cu. ft.)  (cu. ft.)  Underground Infiltration  5,130  3,048  5,541  Tree Trench A  402  1,449  2,635  Tree Trench B  852  1,228  2,233  4,514  Aguirre Tree Trench  69  550*  1,000*  Total  6,453 cf  *CRWD estimate approximately 6,000 sf offsite impervious draining to STRM #14. 

4. 5. 6. 7.

c. Banking of excess volume retention is not proposed.  d. Infiltration volume and facility sizes have been calculated using the  appropriate hydrologic soil group classification and design infiltration rate.    e. The infiltration areas are capable of infiltrating the required volume within  48 hours.  f. Stormwater runoff is pretreated to remove solids before discharging to  infiltration areas.  g. Groundwater mounding is not anticipated to affect adjacent properties and  buildings.   Alternative compliance sequencing has not been requested.  Best management practices achieve 90% total suspended solids removal from the  runoff generated on an annual basis.  A maintenance agreement recorded with Ramsey County has not been submitted.   Adequate maintenance access is provided for the underground system. A site‐ specific plan, schedule, and narrative for maintenance of the proposed stormwater  management practices has been submitted.   

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RULE D: FLOOD CONTROL   Standards   Compensatory storage shall be provided for fill placed within the 100‐year  floodplain.   All habitable buildings, roads, and parking structures on or adjacent to a project site  shall comply with District freeboard requirements.    Findings  1. There is no floodplain on the property according to FEMA.    2. All habitable buildings, roads, and parking structures on or adjacent to the project  site comply with CRWD freeboard requirements.    RULE E: WETLAND MANAGEMENT    Standard   Wetlands shall not be drained, filled (wholly or in part), excavated, or have  sustaining hydrology impacted such that there will be a decrease in the inherent  (existing) functions and values of the wetland.   A minimum buffer of 25 feet of permanent nonimpacted vegetative ground cover  abutting and surrounding a wetland is required.    Findings  1. There are no known wetlands located on the property.    RULE F: EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL    Standards   A plan shall demonstrate that appropriate erosion and sediment control measures  protect downstream water bodies from the effects of a land‐disturbing activity.   Erosion Control Plans must adhere to the MPCA Protecting Water Quality in Urban  Areas Manual.    Findings  1. Erosion and sediment control measures are consistent with best management  practices, as demonstrated in the MPCA manual Protecting Water Quality in Urban  Areas.    2. Adjacent properties are protected from sediment transport/deposition.    3. Wetlands, waterbodies and water conveyance systems are protected from  erosion/sediment transport/deposition.    4. Disturbed area is 1.29 acre; an NPDES permit is required. A SWPPP has been  submitted.    RULE G: ILLICIT DISCHARGE AND CONNECTION   Standard   Stormwater management and utility plans shall indicate all existing and proposed  connections from developed and undeveloped lands for all water that drains to the  District MS4.    Findings  1. New direct connections or replacement of existing connections are not proposed.  W:\07 Programs\Permitting\2018\18-018, Payne (848) Development\18-018 Permit Report_R3b.doc Page 3 of 4


2. Prohibited discharges are not proposed.    Recommendation:  Approve amendment with 6 Conditions    Conditions:  1. Receipt of $5,700 surety.  2. Receipt of maintenance agreement recorded with Ramsey County.   3. Provide a copy of the NPDES permit.  4. Revise site‐specific maintenance plan to address the following:  a. Include person(s) responsible for maintenance of stormwater devices (once  known).  b. Include routine inspection and subsequent maintenance activities to ensure tree  trenches are meeting 48‐hour drawdown requirement.  5. Revise plans to address the following:  a. Revise STRM #14 sump to have the proper drainage ratio to maximize  pretreatment efficiency. The drainage area to the inflow pipe shall be at least  three times greater than the drainage area to the grate above per the University  of Minnesota. The proposed sump currently receives all flow from through the  grate. The desired ratio can be achieved by installing an additional sump MH  between STRM #14 and STRM #13.  b. Revise plan elevations to correspond. Rim elevation for STRM #2A is 849.44’ in  the Sewer Structure Table on sheet C300 and 848.33’ on Detail 7 on sheet C502.  c. Remove filter socks from perforated draintiles in tree trenches.  d. Revise utility plan to show draintile/spreader pipe locations. Include at least 2  observation /cleanouts for each underdrain, one at the upstream end and one  at the downstream end. Cleanouts should be at least 4 inches diameter vertical  non‐perforated schedule 40 PVC pipe, and extend to the surface. Cap cleanouts  with a watertight removable cap.  6. Revise model or plans to correspond for Pond 10P (Tree Trench B):  a. Invert of 18” primary outlet is 843.40’ in HydroCAD and 842.75’ in the Sewer  Structure Table on sheet C300 and in Detail 5 on sheet C503 in the plans.  b. Downstream invert of 18” primary outlet is 843.35’ in HydroCAD and 842.70’ in  the Sewer Structure Table on sheet C300 in the plans.      

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848 PAYNE Keith A. Matte 02/15/2019 Lic. No.

46674

02/15/2019 18385 CD WH KAM

C300

UTILITY PLAN

DATE PROJECT # PHASE DRAWN BY CHECKED BY

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS

REVISIONS

Date

I hereby certify that this plan, specification or report was prepared by me or under my direct supervision and that I am a duly Licensed Professional Engineer under the laws of the state of Minnesota.

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS 02.15.2019

CONSULTANT

848 Payne Ave. St Paul, MN, 55130 © URBANWORKS ARCHITECTURE LLC, 2017 901 NORTH THIRD STREET, SUITE 145, MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55401

PAYNE AVENUE


Capitol Region Watershed District   Applicant:    

Permit 19-004 Wheelock 4, Western to Rice

Cheng Xiong City of Saint Paul 25 W. 4th Street, 900 CHA St. Paul, MN 55102

Consultant:

Description: Street reconstruction Stormwater Management: One infiltration trench (south of Idaho), cost cap reached. District Rule: Cost cap reached—C, F Disturbed Area: 7.8 Acres   Impervious Area: 6.6 Acres  

           

STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Approve with 5 Conditions: 1. Provide plans signed by a professional engineer per the Minnesota Board of AELSLAGID. 2. Provide a copy of the NPDES permit. 3. Submit updated plans to clarify sump depths in structures 123 and 126. Correspondence from Cheng Xiong dated 3/5/19, indicates that sheet 19 will be revised to clearly indicate inverts of structures and pipes. 4. Revise XPSWMM node naming to correspond with structure names in the plans. 5. Revise existing or proposed model so that total drainage areas are equal. Existing HydroCAD area is 22.55 ac. The sum of the proposed HydroCAD (5.79 ac) and XPSWMM (16.5 ac) subcatchments is 22.29 ac. Additionally, revise HydroCAD subcatchments to correspond with drainage areas presented in AutoCAD drainage map (see table in 3-12-19 permit report).

         

Western

Rice

 

Permit Location Permit Report 19-004

Aerial Photo Board Meeting Date: 03-20-2019


Capitol Region Watershed District  Permit Report      CRWD Permit #:       Review date:       Project Name:       Applicant:                                    Purpose: 

19‐004 March 12, 2019  Wheelock Phase 4  Cheng Xiong  City of Saint Paul Public Works  25 West Fourth Street  Saint Paul, MN 55102  651‐266‐6168  cheng.xiong@ci.stpaul.mn.us  Street reconstruction of Wheelock Parkway from Western Avenue to  Rice Street. Stormwater management consists of one underground  infiltration trench. 

Location:  Wheelock Parkway from Western Avenue to Rice Street, St. Paul, MN    Applicable Rules:   C, D, and F    Recommendation:  Approve with 5 Conditions      EXHIBITS:    1. Civil Plans 90% (65 Sheets), by City of St. Paul Public Works, dated 2/22/19, recv.  2/25/19.  2. Project Narrative and SWPPP, by City of St. Paul Public Works, dated 1/16/19, recv.  1/17/19.  3. Drainage Map, by City of St. Paul Public Works, not dated, recv. 1/17/19.  4. Geotechnical Exploration and Review, by AET, dated 3/22/18, recv. 1/17/19.  5. Link 502967 Flow Rate, by City of St. Paul Public Works, not dated, recv. 2/25/19.  6. Existing & Proposed HydroCAD Report, by City of St. Paul Public Works, dated 2/7/19,  recv. 2/25/19.  7. Infiltration Trench Cost Estimate, by City of St. Paul Public Works, dated 2/25/19, recv.  2/25/19.  8. Drainage Area AutoCAD, by City of St. Paul Public Works, not dated, recv. 3/6/19.  9. Time of Concentration Nomograph, by MnDOT, not dated, recv. 3/6/19.    HISTORY & CONSIDERATIONS:     None    W:\07 Programs\Permitting\2019\19-004 Wheelock Parkway4 Western-Rice\19-004 Permit Report_R3b.doc Page 1 of 4


RULE C: STORMWATER MANAGEMENT   Standards   Proposed discharge rates for the 2‐, 10‐, and 100‐year events shall not exceed  existing rates.   Developments and redevelopments must reduce runoff volumes in the amount  equivalent to an inch of runoff from the impervious areas of the site.     Stormwater must be pretreated before discharging to infiltration areas to maintain  the long‐term viability of the infiltration area.     Developments and redevelopments must incorporate effective non‐point source  pollution reduction BMPs to achieve 90% total suspended solid removal.       Findings  1. A hydrograph method based on sound hydrologic theory is used to analyze runoff  for the design or analysis of flows and water levels.  2. Runoff rates for the proposed activity do not exceed existing runoff rates for the 2‐,  10‐, and 100‐year critical storm events.  Stormwater leaving the project area is  discharged into a well‐defined receiving channel or pipe and routed to a public  drainage system.    3. Stormwater runoff volume retention is not achieved onsite in the amount  equivalent to the runoff generated from 1.1‐inch of rainfall over the impervious  surfaces of the development.    a. The amount of proposed impervious is 287,301 square feet.  b. Volume retention required:  287,301 ft2 x 1.1 inches x 1 ft/12 inches = 26,336 ft3     Table 1. Proposed volume retention through abstraction (i.e. infiltration, reuse).  Volume  Volume Retention  1.1‐inch  2‐inch  Retention  BMP  Provided below  Runoff  Runoff  Required  outlet (cu. ft.)  (cu. ft.)  (cu. ft.)  (cu. ft.)  Infiltration Trench  10,538  6,600  12,001  26,336  Total  10,538 cf    c. Banking of excess volume retention is not proposed.  d. Infiltration volume and facility size has been calculated using the  appropriate hydrologic soil group classification and design infiltration rate.   However, additional soil investigation is needed during construction to  support the proposed design infiltration rate.  e. Infiltration area is capable of infiltrating the required volume within 48  hours. However, additional soil investigation is needed during construction  to support the proposed design infiltration rate.  f. Stormwater runoff is pretreated to remove solids before discharging to  infiltration areas.  g. The Hantush groundwater mound spreadsheet predicts a mound depth of  approximately 0.6’ at the house footprint on 335 West Wheelock Parkway.  MnTopo shows surface elevation of 924’ at house. Assuming 8 ft basement  depth (916’), and bottom of trench at approximately 907’, there is sufficient  separation and no anticipated impacts.  W:\07 Programs\Permitting\2019\19-004 Wheelock Parkway4 Western-Rice\19-004 Permit Report_R3b.doc Page 2 of 4


4. Alternative compliance has been requested due to cost cap of a linear project.  a. The applicant did partially comply with the volume retention standard.  b. The applicant did not partially comply with the volume retention standard at  an offsite location or through the use of qualified banking credits.  c. The applicant has not submitted money to be contributed to the  Stormwater Impact Fund.  d. The project is linear, and the cost cap has been reached (6.60 ac *  $30,000/ac = $198,000). The anticipated cost of the proposed infiltration  trench is $221,187.50.  5. Best management practices do not achieve 90% total suspended solids removal  from the runoff generated on an annual basis. However, the project is linear, and  the cost cap has been reached.  6. A memorandum of agreement for maintenance of stormwater facilities exists  between the City of St. Paul and the CRWD. Adequate maintenance access is  provided for the underground system.    RULE D: FLOOD CONTROL   Standards   Compensatory storage shall be provided for fill placed within the 100‐year  floodplain.   All habitable buildings, roads, and parking structures on or adjacent to a project site  shall comply with District freeboard requirements.    Findings  1. There is no floodplain on the property according to FEMA.    2. It is unknown if all habitable buildings, roads, and parking structures on or adjacent  to the project site comply with CRWD freeboard requirements. However, adequate  conveyance has been provided to prevent flooding.     RULE E: WETLAND MANAGEMENT    Standard   Wetlands shall not be drained, filled (wholly or in part), excavated, or have  sustaining hydrology impacted such that there will be a decrease in the inherent  (existing) functions and values of the wetland.   A minimum buffer of 25 feet of permanent nonimpacted vegetative ground cover  abutting and surrounding a wetland is required.    Findings  1. There are no known wetlands located on the property.    RULE F: EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL    Standards   A plan shall demonstrate that appropriate erosion and sediment control measures  protect downstream water bodies from the effects of a land‐disturbing activity.   Erosion Control Plans must adhere to the MPCA Protecting Water Quality in Urban  Areas Manual.    Findings  W:\07 Programs\Permitting\2019\19-004 Wheelock Parkway4 Western-Rice\19-004 Permit Report_R3b.doc Page 3 of 4


1. Erosion and sediment control measures are consistent with best management  practices, as demonstrated in the MPCA manual Protecting Water Quality in Urban  Areas.    2. Adjacent properties are protected from sediment transport/deposition.    3. Wetlands, waterbodies and water conveyance systems are protected from  erosion/sediment transport/deposition.    4. Total disturbed area is 7.8 acres; an NPDES permit is required. A SWPPP has been  submitted.    RULE G: ILLICIT DISCHARGE AND CONNECTION   Standard   Stormwater management and utility plans shall indicate all existing and proposed  connections from developed and undeveloped lands for all water that drains to the  District MS4.    Findings  1. New direct connections or replacement of existing connections are not proposed.  2. Prohibited discharges are not proposed.    Recommendation:  Approve with 5 Conditions    Conditions:  1. Provide plans signed by a professional engineer per the Minnesota Board of AELSLAGID.  2. Provide a copy of the NPDES permit.  3. Submit updated plans to clarify sump depths in structures 123 and 126.  4. Revise XPSWMM node naming to correspond with structure names in the plans.  5. Revise existing or proposed model so that total drainage areas are equal. Existing  HydroCAD area is 22.55 ac. The sum of the proposed HydroCAD (5.79 ac) and XPSWMM  (16.5 ac) subcatchments is 22.29 ac. Additionally, revise HydroCAD subcatchments to  correspond with drainage areas presented in AutoCAD drainage map (see table below).    HydroCAD  AutoCAD  Subcatchment  (ac)  (ac)  E5 (Sta. 22+20 to 26+00)  1.230  1.025  E6 (Sta. 26+00 to 35+50)  7.360   7.037  E7 (Sta. 35+50 to 45+40)  3.840  3.551     

W:\07 Programs\Permitting\2019\19-004 Wheelock Parkway4 Western-Rice\19-004 Permit Report_R3b.doc Page 4 of 4


March 20, 2019 Board Meeting IV. A) Villa Park Analysis (Sellner)

DATE: TO: FROM: RE:

March 14, 2019 CRWD Board of Managers Joe Sellner, Water Resource Specialist Villa Park Performance Analysis

Background The Villa Park Wetland system is intended to treat a significant portion of the runoff from the Lake McCarrons watershed. Monitoring data from as early as 2005 indicated that the system was acting as a source of phosphorus rather than trapping it under certain flow conditions. Based on this data, portions of the wetland system were dredged in 2013 to increase its ability to settle and retain sediment and phosphorus. Issues Since the dredging project in Villa Park, five years of post-dredging data have been collected. CRWD has evaluated whether dredging resulted in significant improvements to the performance of the Villa Park system. A series of statistical analyses were conducted to evaluate changes in performance as a result of dredging and to characterize the system’s current performance. The results confirmed that, prior to dredging, the wetland system was discharging water with a significantly higher phosphorus concentration than the inflow. In general, dredging had a positive impact on the quality of discharge to McCarrons. However, under certain flow conditions, the system has periods where significant treatment is not occurring. Additionally, the system continues to be a source of orthophosphate during low flow periods. Orthophosphate is a type of phosphorus readily available for use by aquatic plants and algae and could contribute to lower water quality in Lake McCarrons. Staff will review the analysis with the Board. Action Requested Review and comment enc: Draft Villa Park Performance Analysis Report (Electronic Only) W:\07 Programs\Monitoring & Data Acquisition\Villa Park\2017 Villa Park Analysis and Report\Board memo Villa Park 2019-03-14.docx

Our Mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District.


Villa Park Wetland System Performance Analysis

Capitol Region Watershed District Saint Paul, MN

February 28, 2019


1. Introduction and Background The Villa Park wetland system in Roseville MN was constructed in 1985 to improve the water quality of Lake McCarrons. It serves an important role in treating and conveying runoff from 740 acres of the Lake McCarrons watershed, or approximately 69% of its total drainage area. The system consists of a series of ponds and wet cells separated by steel and timber weirs (Figure 2). The majority of inflow to the system occurs at the most upstream sedimentation basin. All outflow occurs at the southwestern end and discharges to Lake McCarrons

Figure 1: Villa Park Wetland System Location


Figure 2: Villa Park Wetland System Features


One of the primary functions of the Villa Park system is to treat stormwater runoff by capturing and retaining sediment and phosphorus. Phosphorus is of particular concern in freshwater aquatic systems because it can enhance eutrophication and lead to poor water quality. Because the Villa Park wetland system treats a large area and discharges directly to Lake McCarrons, the quality of this effluent is an important concern in overall lake management and health. Based on preliminary monitoring data from 2005 and 2006, CRWD concluded that the Villa Park wetland system may have been exporting phosphorus and decided that it warranted further investigation (CRWD 2006). The 2010 Villa Park Management Plan (Wenck 2010) concluded that the wetland system was undersized relative to its drainage area, relatively inefficient at retaining total phosphorus (~30% retention rate) and was exporting orthophosphate. The plan recommended a combination of reducing subwatershed loads and a partial dredging of wetland cells to achieve a load target of 109 lbs of phosphorus per year. In 2015 a Villa Park wetland performance analysis was conducted using 2006-2012 monitoring data (Janke 2015). This report also concluded that the wetland system was exporting phosphorus. To date, CRWD has completed two projects based on the management plan recommendations: dredging of 3 segments of the wetland system in 2013, and construction of a stormwater treatment and re-use system upstream of the wetland system in 2016. The goal of the dredging was to increase the system’s capacity for sediment retention and phosphorus removal. The stormwater treatment and re-use system was intended to reduce the external loading to Villa Park. The purpose of this report is to expand upon the previous performance analysis for the Villa Park Wetland system (Wenck 2010 and Janke 2015). Additional data collected since dredging will be used to assess pre- and post-dredging treatment performance and determine the effect of dredging on system performance and the quality of effluent discharging to Lake McCarrons. Performance analysis is primarily focused on total phosphorus (TP) and orthophosphate (ortho-P), the two constituents of greatest concern because of their influence on water quality in Lake McCarrons.

2. Methods 2.1 Data Collection The dataset analyzed consisted of monitoring data collected by CRWD from 2006 to 2018 at the Villa Park Inlet and Villa Park Outlet monitoring stations (Figure 3). Data types included in the analysis consisted of TP and ortho-P concentrations, annual flow-weighted concentrations of TP and ortho-P, and average daily water temperature. Concentration data was a combination of flow proportional composite samples and grab samples. The Villa Park wetland system receives stormwater inputs during precipitation events and continually discharges water during dry periods, therefore, storm event and dry weather baseflow samples were collected and analyzed separately. Separate annual flow-weighted average concentrations for storm and base flow regimes were calculated as follows: 453,592đ?‘šđ?‘šđ?‘šđ?‘š ∑đ?‘–đ?‘–đ?‘–đ?‘–đ?‘–đ?‘–đ?‘–đ?‘–đ?‘–đ?‘–đ?‘–đ?‘–đ?‘–đ?‘–đ?‘–đ?‘– đ?‘™đ?‘™đ?‘™đ?‘™đ?‘™đ?‘™đ?‘™đ?‘™ (đ?‘™đ?‘™đ?‘™đ?‘™đ?‘™đ?‘™) ∗ ďż˝ ďż˝ đ?‘™đ?‘™đ?‘™đ?‘™ đ?‘­đ?‘­đ?‘­đ?‘­đ?‘­đ?‘­ (đ?’Žđ?’Žđ?’Žđ?’Ž/đ?‘łđ?‘ł) = 28.316đ??żđ??ż đ?‘Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Ž đ?‘ đ?‘ đ?‘ đ?‘ đ?‘ đ?‘ đ?‘ đ?‘ đ?‘ đ?‘ đ?‘ đ?‘ đ?‘ đ?‘ đ?‘ đ?‘  đ?‘‘đ?‘‘đ?‘‘đ?‘‘đ?‘‘đ?‘‘đ?‘‘đ?‘‘â„Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Žđ?‘Ž (đ?‘?đ?‘?đ?‘?đ?‘?) ∗ ďż˝ ďż˝ đ?‘?đ?‘?đ?‘?đ?‘?


Water temperature data was collected and analyzed from 2014 to 2018.

Figure 3: Villa Park Monitoring Station Locations


2.2 Outlier Analysis Total Phosphorus and ortho-P samples were screened for outliers. Sample datasets were screened separately for each flow regime: base, snowmelt, and storm. Samples were log transformed to normalize for the skewness of the dataset. Samples were deemed outliers and removed from analysis if the sample concentration was greater than three times the inter-quartile range (IQR) above the upper quartile calculated for the log transformed data. Of the 779 TP sample results, 4 outliers were removed from analysis. Of the 709 Ortho-P sample results, 2 outliers were removed from analysis. Additional method validation was conducted for ortho-P results. Ortho-P sample results are often reported at the lower limit of quantification (LLQ) meaning the data are censored and the true value is at or below the LLQ. For the lab analysis method used, the lower limit of quantification is 0.005 mg/L. The method of using three times the inter-quartile range to identify outliers was considered valid if the 1st quartile (calculated using non-transformed data) was greater than the LLQ. This would indicate that fewer than 25% of the data are censored and the IQR is known (Helsel, D.R. and R. M. Hirsch, 2002). All ortho-P sample sets had a 1st quartile value greater than the LLQ, therefore the 3 times IQR method was deemed valid.

2.3 Percent Reduction To quantify changes in pollutant concentration between the inlet and outlet, the percent reduction was calculated for paired samples for both storm and base flow regimes. Percent reduction was calculated using the following equation: �������������� ������������������ =

[đ??źđ??źđ??źđ??źđ??źđ??źđ??źđ??źđ??źđ??ź đ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??ś − đ?‘‚đ?‘‚đ?‘‚đ?‘‚đ?‘‚đ?‘‚đ?‘‚đ?‘‚đ?‘‚đ?‘‚đ?‘‚đ?‘‚ đ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??ś] Ă— 100 đ??źđ??źđ??źđ??źđ??źđ??źđ??źđ??źđ??źđ??ź đ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??śđ??ś

A negative percent reduction indicates an increase in concentration from the inlet to the outlet.

2.4 Statistical Analysis Mann-Whitney U test To test for significant differences between inlet and outlet samples, the Mann-Whitney U test was employed. The test assumes that samples are unpaired. Although a paired test could be used, such as the Wilcoxon signed rank test, the unpaired test was chosen to eliminate potential analysis issues caused by mixing within the system and sample time inconsistencies (http://www.bmpdatabase.org/stats_guide.html). The Mann-Whitney U test operates on the entire dataset (or a subset) and results reflect overall performance. Both one-sided and two-sided tests were performed to test whether the sample populations were significantly different and whether one population was significantly greater or less than the other. The test was conducted on TP and ortho-P samples separately for storm and base flow regimes. Three analysis periods were used: period of record, pre-dredging and post-dredging. Differences were considered significant at an alpha of 0.05. The Mann-Whitney U test was also used to explore the effects of dredging on the outlet sample concentrations. Pre-dredging samples were tested against post-dredging samples. Both one-sided and


two-sided tests were performed to test whether the sample populations were significantly different and whether one population was significantly greater or less than the other. The test was conducted on TP and ortho-P samples separately for storm and base flow regimes. Differences were considered significant at an alpha of 0.05.

Trend Analysis To determine the presence and significance of trends in outlet pollutant concentrations, the MannKendall test for monotonic trend was used. The test compares a given datapoint to all proceeding datapoints and determines if the difference between the two represents an increase or decrease. This is iterated for all datapoints and an overall trend determined. A trend was considered significant if the absolute value of the normalized test statistic Z was greater than 1.96, the value obtained from the standard normal distribution for an alpha of 0.05 for a two-tailed test. The test was conducted on annual TP and ortho-P flow-weighted average concentrations separately for storm and base flow regimes. Three analysis periods were used: period of record, pre-dredging and post-dredging.

2.5 Water Temperature The average daily temperature was compared between the inlet and outlet. A difference time series was calculated from the outlet and inlet temperature time series. A positive value indicates an increase in temperature from the inlet to the outlet monitoring station. Additionally, the average and median percent change between the inlet and outlet was calculated.

3. Results and Discussion 3.1 TP Reduction Results Of the 124 TP storm flow sample pairs, 52% had a higher outlet concentration. TP storm flow percent reduction results showed an average percent reduction in sample concentration of -14% from the inlet to the outlet with a median percent change of -6%. A negative percent reduction indicates a higher outlet concentration. Of the 163 TP baseflow sample pairs, 60% had a higher outlet concentration.TP baseflow percent reduction results showed an average percent reduction in sample concentration of -46% from the inlet to the outlet with a median percent change of -18%. Figure 4 and Figure 5 show inlet TP concentration plotted vs outlet concentration for storm and base respectively. The 1:1 line helps visually gauge treatment effectiveness. Points that fall below the line indicate a concentration reduction by the system while points above the line indicate a concentration increase. Figure 4 shows that the majority of storm samples have concentrations below 0.4 mg/L and the tight cluster about the 1:1 line indicates that changes between the inlet and outlet are mostly small. It’s noteworthy that all inlet samples above 0.5 mg/L show reduction, however the small number of samples (5) makes it difficult to attribute a pattern. Figure 5 shows more variability during baseflow than the storm plot. Again, there is a large cluster of samples below 0.4 mg/L. Similar to the storm samples,


most inlet samples above 0.5 mg/L show a reduction in concentration, however, there are a number of sample pairs with inlet concentrations below 0.5 mg/L that show an increase at the outlet. Overall, for both storm and base flow regimes, the majority of sample pairs showed an increase in concentration from the inlet to the outlet indicating that the system may be exporting TP. It should be noted however, that the majority of sample concentrations for both the inlet and outlet are relatively low (<0.5 mg/L) and less than the national TP event mean concentration for low density residential areas (https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/Event_mean_concentrations_by_land_use). A preponderance of low concentrations suggests that percent reduction alone should not be used to evaluate system performance. Relatively small absolute changes in concentration can result in large percent changes.

Villa Park Inlet vs Outlet Storm TP

Villa Park Outlet Storm TP Concentration (mg/L)

1.6 1.4 1.2 1

1:1

0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0

0

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

1

Villa Park Inlet Storm TP Concentration (mg/L) Figure 4: Villa Park Storm TP Concentration, Inlet vs Outlet 2006-2018

1.2

1.4

1.6


Villa Park Inlet vs Outlet Baseflow TP

Villa Park Outlet Baseflow TP Concentration (mg/L)

1.6 1.4 1.2 1

1:1

0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0

0

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

1

1.2

1.4

1.6

Villa Park Inlet Baseflow TP Concentration (mg/L) Figure 5: Villa Park Base TP Concentration, Inlet vs Outlet 2006-2018

3.2 Ortho-P Percent Reduction Results Of the 98 ortho-P storm flow sample pairs, 64% had a higher outlet concentration. Ortho-P storm flow percent reduction results showed an average percent reduction in sample concentration of -111% from the inlet to the outlet with a median percent change of -41%. A negative percent reduction indicates a higher outlet concentration. Of the 164 ortho-P baseflow sample pairs, 62% had a higher outlet concentration. Ortho-P baseflow percent reduction results showed an average percent reduction in sample concentration of -117% from the inlet to the outlet with a median percent change of -37%. Figure 6 and Figure 7 show inlet ortho-P concentration plotted vs outlet concentration for storm and base respectively. The 1:1 line helps visually gauge treatment effectiveness. Points that fall below the line indicate a concentration reduction by the system while points above the line indicate a concentration increase. Figure 6 shows that the majority of storm samples have concentrations below 0.05 mg/L and the tight cluster about the 1:1 line indicates that changes between the inlet and outlet are mostly small. Figure 7 shows more variability in base samples than the storm plot. Again, there is a large cluster of samples below 0.05 mg/L. Unlike the storm sample pairs, there are a number of base


sample pairs with inlet concentrations below 0.05 mg/L that show an increase to above 0.1 mg/L at the outlet. Overall, for both storm and base flow regimes, the majority of sample pairs show an increase in concentration from the inlet to the outlet indicating that the system may be exporting ortho-P. As with the TP results, a preponderance of lower concentrations suggests that percent reduction alone, should not be used to evaluate system performance. Relatively small absolute changes in concentration can result in large percent changes.

Villa Park Inlet vs Outlet Storm Ortho-P Villa Park Outlet Storm Ortho-P Concentration (mg/L)

0.4 0.35 0.3 0.25

1:1

0.2 0.15 0.1 0.05 0

0

0.05

0.1

0.15

0.2

0.25

0.3

Villa Park Inlet Storm Ortho-P Concentration (mg/L) Figure 6: Villa Park Storm Ortho-P Concentration, Inlet vs Outlet 2006-2018

0.35

0.4


Villa Park Inlet vs Outlet Baseflow Ortho-P Villa Park Outlet Baseflow Ortho-P Concentration (mg/L)

0.4 0.35 0.3 0.25

1:1

0.2 0.15 0.1 0.05 0

0

0.05

0.1

0.15

0.2

0.25

0.3

0.35

0.4

Villa Park Inlet Baseflow Ortho-P Concentration (mg/L) Figure 7: Villa Park Base Ortho-P Concentration, Inlet vs Outlet 2006-2018

3.3 Statistical Analysis Results Inlet and outlet comparison A Mann-Whitney U test was conducted to determine if there were any significant differences between the monitoring samples at the Villa Park Inlet station and the Villa Park Outlet station. An alpha of 0.05 was used to determine significance. Samples for each parameter and time period were separated by flow regime and three separate Mann-Whitney U tests were conducted: 1. Two-sided – test for differences in either direction (higher OR lower concentrations) between the inlet and outlet 2. One-sided greater – test whether the inlet sample population is greater (higher concentration) than the outlet population 3. One-sided less – test whether the inlet sample population is less (lower concentration) than the outlet population Total Phosphorus There were no statistically significant differences between the inlet TP concentrations and the outlet concentrations using a two-sided test. When one-sided tests were conducted, Inlet TP concentrations for both storm and base for period of record and pre-dredging time period were shown to be


significantly less than the outlet. All tests conducted on the post-dredging time period returned statistically insignificant results. Test results are summarized in Table 1 through Table 3. These results suggest that prior to dredging at Villa Park, the outlet TP concentrations, for both storm and base, were consistently higher than the inlet concentrations. After dredging, the inlet and outlet TP samples were not significantly different. Table 1: Mann Whitney U Test Results, TP Period of Record 2006-2018

Sample Type

Test

Parameters

Storm

Mann Whitney, two sided

Inlet, Outlet, not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are not significantly 0.08 different from outlet concentrations

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided greater not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are not significantly 0.96 greater than outlet concentrations

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided less not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are significantly 0.04 less than outlet concentrations

Mann Whitney, two sided

Inlet, Outlet, not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are not significantly 0.06 different from outlet concentrations

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided greater not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are not significantly 0.97 greater than outlet concentrations

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided less not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are significantly 0.03 less than outlet concentrations

Base

1

p-value

Conclusion1

A result is considered significant when p<0.05

Table 2: Mann Whitney U Test Results, TP Pre-dredging 2006-2013

Sample Type

Test

Parameters

Storm

Mann Whitney, two sided

Inlet, Outlet, not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are not significantly 0.06 different from outlet concentrations

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided greater not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are not significantly 0.97 greater than outlet concentrations

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided less not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are significantly 0.03 less than outlet concentrations

Mann Whitney, two sided

Inlet, Outlet, not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are not significantly 0.05 different from outlet concentrations

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided greater not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are not significantly 0.97 greater than outlet concentrations

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided less not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are significantly 0.03 less than outlet concentrations

Base

1

A result is considered significant when p<0.05

p-value

Conclusion1


Table 3: Mann Whitney U Test Results, TP Post-dredging 2014-2018

Sample Type

Test

Parameters

Storm

Mann Whitney, two sided

Inlet, Outlet, not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are not significantly 0.35 different from outlet concentrations

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided greater not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are not significantly 0.83 greater than outlet concentrations

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided less not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are not significantly 0.17 less than outlet concentrations

Mann Whitney, two sided

Inlet, Outlet, not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are not significantly 0.46 different from outlet concentrations

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided greater not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are not significantly 0.77 greater than outlet concentrations

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided less not censored

Inlet TP concentrations are not significantly 0.23 less than outlet concentrations

Base

1

p-value

Conclusion1

A result is considered significant when p<0.05

Ortho-P Both two-sided and one-sided tests returned significant results for storm and base ortho-p for the period of record and pre-dredging analysis periods. The one sided results indicate inlet concentrations for both flow regimes were significantly less than the outlet for these two periods. During the postdredging period, inlet storm samples were not significantly different from the outlet samples. However, base samples from the inlet were significantly less than the outlet during the same period. Test results are summarized in Table 4 through Table 6. These results suggest that outlet base ortho-P samples were consistently higher than the inlet prior to dredging and continued to be so post-dredging. After dredging, the inlet and outlet storm ortho-P samples were not significantly different, indicating a possible improvement in performance during storm events.


Table 4:Mann Whitney U Test Results, Ortho-P Period of Record 2006-2018

Sample Type

Test

Parameters

Storm

Mann Whitney, two sided

Inlet, Outlet, not censored

<0.0001

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided greater not censored

1.0

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided less not censored

<0.0001

Base

1

Mann Whitney, two sided

p-value

Inlet, Outlet, not censored

0.0043

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided greater not censored

0.998

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided less not censored

0.0021

Conclusion1 Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are significantly different from outlet concentrations Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are not significantly greater than outlet concentrations Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are significantly less than outlet concentrations Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are significantly different from outlet concentrations Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are not significantly greater than outlet concentrations Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are significantly less than outlet concentrations

A result is considered significant when p <0.05

Table 5: Mann Whitney U Test Results, Ortho-P Pre-dredging 2006-2013

Sample Type

Test

Parameters

Storm

Mann Whitney, two sided

Inlet, Outlet, not censored

<0.0001

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided greater not censored

1.0

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided less not censored

<0.0001

Base

1

Mann Whitney, two sided

p-value

Inlet, Outlet, not censored

0.031

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided greater not censored

0.98

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided less not censored

0.015

A result is considered significant when p <0.05

Conclusion1 Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are significantly different from outlet concentrations Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are not significantly greater than outlet concentrations Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are significantly less than outlet concentrations Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are significantly different from outlet concentrations Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are not significantly greater than outlet concentrations Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are significantly less than outlet concentrations


Table 6: Mann Whitney U Test Results, Ortho-P Post-dredging 2014-2018

Sample Type

Test

Parameters

Storm

Mann Whitney, two sided

Inlet, Outlet, not censored

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided not censored

Base

1

p-value

Conclusion1 Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are not significantly different from outlet 0.54 concentrations Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are not significantly greater than outlet 0.73 concentrations

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided not censored

0.27

Mann Whitney, two sided

Inlet, Outlet, not censored

0.04

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided not censored

0.98

Mann Whitney, one Inlet, Outlet, sided not censored

0.02

Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are not significantly less than outlet concentrations Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are significantly different from outlet concentrations Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are not significantly greater than outlet concentrations Inlet Ortho-P concentrations are significantly less than outlet concentrations

A result is considered significant when p <0.05

Outlet pre and post-dredging comparison To further explore the net effect of dredging on water delivered to lake McCarrons, a Mann-Whitney U test was conducted on outlet storm and base samples comparing the pre-dredging time period to the post-dredging time period. Three tests were conducted for each flow regime: 1. Two-sided â&#x20AC;&#x201C; tests for differences in either direction (higher OR lower concentrations) between pre and post dredging 2. One-sided greater â&#x20AC;&#x201C; tests whether the pre-dredging sample population is greater (higher concentration) than the post-dredging population 3. One-sided less â&#x20AC;&#x201C; tests whether the pre-dredging sample population is less (lower concentration) than the post-dredging population

Total Phosphorus The resultant p-values for the two-sided and one-sided greater tests were significant at an alpha of 0.05 (Table 7). The results indicate that outlet TP sample concentrations were significantly higher predredging. Dredging of the Villa Park system had a net positive effect on the quality of water discharged to the lake.


Table 7: Mann Whitney U Test Results, TP Pre vs Post-Dredging

Sample Type

Storm

Test Mann Whitney, two sided

Parameters Pre, Post, not censored

Mann Whitney, one Pre, Post, not sided greater censored Mann Whitney, one Pre, Post, not sided less censored

Base

Mann Whitney, two sided

Pre, Post, not censored

Mann Whitney, one Pre, Post, not sided greater censored Mann Whitney, one Pre, Post, not sided less censored 1

p-value

Conclusion1

Pre-dredging TP concentrations are significantly different from post-dredging <0.0001 concentrations Pre-dredging TP concentrations are significantly greater than post-dredging <0.0001 concentrations Pre-dredging TP concentrations are not significantly less than post-dredging 1.00 concentrations Pre-dredging TP concentrations are significantly different from post-dredging <0.0001 concentrations Pre-dredging TP concentrations are significantly greater than post-dredging <0.0001 concentrations Pre-dredging TP concentrations are not significantly less than post-dredging 1.00 concentrations

A result is considered significant when p <0.05

Ortho-P At an alpha of 0.05, the test resultant p-values for the two-sided tests and one-sided greater tests were significant (Table 8).The results indicate that outlet ortho-p sample concentrations were significantly higher pre-dredging. Dredging of the Villa Park system had a net positive effect on the quality of water discharged to the lake.


Table 8: Mann Whitney U Test Results, Ortho-P Pre vs Post-Dredging

Sample Type

Test

Parameters

Storm

Mann Whitney, two sided

Pre, Post, not censored

0.0003

Mann Whitney, one Pre, Post, not sided greater censored

0.0001

Mann Whitney, one Pre, Post, not sided less censored

1.00

Base

1

Mann Whitney, two sided

p-value

Pre, Post, not censored

0.0074

Mann Whitney, one Pre, Post, not sided greater censored

0.0037

Mann Whitney, one Pre, Post, not sided less censored

1.00

Conclusion1 Pre-dredging Ortho-P concentrations are significantly different from post-dredging concentrations Pre-dredging Ortho-P concentrations are significantly greater than post-dredging concentrations Pre-dredging Ortho-P concentrations are not significantly less than post-dredging concentrations Pre-dredging Ortho-P concentrations are significantly different from post-dredging concentrations Pre-dredging Ortho-P concentrations are significantly greater than post-dredging concentrations Pre-dredging Ortho-P concentrations are not significantly less than post-dredging concentrations

A result is considered significant when p <0.05

3.4 Trend Analysis Results Flow-weighted average concentrations from the outlet monitoring station were evaluated to assess trends over time in the wetland system effluent. The period of record was evaluated to identify any trends attributable to dredging while the separate pre and post-dredging time periods were evaluated to identify any trends independent of dredging. Figure 8 through Figure 11 show flow-weighted average concentrations over time as well as a linear regressions for the period of record. Visually it is difficult to discern any apparent pattern in concentration over time except for perhaps base TP and ortho-P which appear to be lower postdredging. Therefore, a Mann-Kendall test was conducted to detect significant trends over the period of record as well as pre and post-dredging (Table 9 and Table 10). Trends were evaluated using annual FWA concentrations of TP and ortho-P for both storm and base flow regimes. Base FWA concentrations of TP and ortho-P exhibited significant downward trends for the period of record. There were no significant trends identified within pre- and post-dredging periods. Storm FWA concentrations of TP and ortho-P exhibited no significant trends either for the period of record or within the separate pre- and postdredging periods. The period of record trend results suggest that dredging had the greatest effect on base concentrations.


Villa Park Outlet Annual Flow Weighted Average TP Concentration (mg/L) Storm flow 0.35

TP Concentration (mg/L)

0.3 0.25 0.2 0.15 0.1 0.05 0 2004

2005

2006

2008

2009

2010

2012

2013

2014

2016

2017

2019

2017

2019

Linear (Period of Record (2006-2013)) Figure 8: Villa Park Outlet Annual FWA Storm TP Concentration

Villa Park Outlet Annual Flow Weighted Average TP Concentration Baseflow 0.35

TP Concentration (mg/L)

0.3 0.25 0.2 0.15 0.1 0.05 0 2004

2005

2006

2008

2009

2010

2012

2013

Linear (Period of Record (2006-2013)) Figure 9: Villa Park Outlet Annual FWA Base TP Concentration

2014

2016


Villa Park Outlet Annual Flow Weighted Average Ortho-P Concentration (mg/L) Storm flow 0.14

Ortho-P Concentration (mg/L)

0.12 0.1 0.08 0.06 0.04 0.02 0 2004

2005

2006

2008

2009

2010

2012

2013

2014

2016

2017

2019

Linear (Period of Record (2006-2013)) Figure 10: Villa Park Outlet Annual FWA Storm Ortho-P Concentration

Villa Park Outlet Annual Flow Weighted Average Ortho-P Concentration (mg/L) Baseflow 0.045

Ortho-P Concentration (mg/L)

0.04 0.035 0.03 0.025 0.02 0.015 0.01 0.005 0 2004

2005

2006

2008

2009

2010

2012

2013

Linear (Period of Record (2006-2018)) Figure 11: Villa Park Outlet Annual FWA Base Ortho-P Concentration

2014

2016

2017

2019


Table 9: Mann-Kendall Test Results - Total Phosphorus Annual FWA

Analysis Period

Mann-Kendall S (Storm TP)

Period of Record Pre-dredge Post-dredge

Significance (α = 0.05)

-8 Not Significant 11 Not Significant -3 Not Significant

Mann-Kendall S (Base TP)

Significance (α = 0.05)

-38 Significant Decrease -5 Not Significant 7 Not Significant

Table 10: Mann-Kendall Test Results - Orthophosphate Annual FWA

Analysis Period

Period of Record Pre-dredge Post-dredge

Mann-Kendall S (Storm Ortho-P)

Significance (α = 0.05)

-16 Not Significant 14 Not Significant -4 Not Significant

Mann-Kendall S (Base Ortho-P)

Significance (α = 0.05)

-35 Significant decrease -4 Not significant 2 Not Significant

3.5 Water Temperature Results Water temperature was measured at the inlet and outlet from 2014 to 2018. No earlier data exists, therefore no conclusions can be made about the effect of dredging on water temperature. In the monitored period, water temperature was often greater at the outlet than the inlet. This is shown clearly in Figure 12 which shows the difference in the daily average temperature between the inlet and outlet stations. Furthermore, both the average and median monthly temperature differences were greater than zero, indicating greater temperatures recorded at the outlet (Figure 13). These differences, however, may have been due to the inlet and outlet flow control structures and the placement of monitoring equipment. The inlet sensor was located within a submerged outlet pipe in wet cell 5. This location allowed mixing of inflowing water from the sedimentation basin and cool sub-surface water in the wet cell. The primary outlet structure of the wetland system is a weir which skims warmer surface water off the wet pond. The outlet sensor was located downstream of this weir.


Villa Park Difference in Water Temperature (â&#x201E;&#x192;) Outlet - Inlet 6

4

2

0

-2

-4

-6 Figure 12: Villa Park Water Temperature Difference Outlet vs Inlet

Figure 13: Villa Park Daily Temperature Difference Box Plot


3.6 Results Discussion The location of the inlet monitoring station (Figure 3) may have influenced the performance analysis results. The station is located downstream of a sedimentation basin (Figure 2) where water receives significant pre-treatment. The results would likely be different if the concentrations upstream of the sedimentation basin were used. However, this data was not available. If upstream sample concentrations were high enough, and significant pre-treatment did occur in the sedimentation basin, it may have been concluded that the system was performing well. A poor performing aspect of the system would have gone unrecognized. Using those values could have masked the indication that P was (and may still be) exported under some conditions in the treatment train. The results of the Mann-Kendall test on the period of record are not entirely surprising. A major change, the dredging of the wetland system, occurred during the analysis period. The intent of the dredging was to improve the function of the system; therefore, we would expect to see some of the results show a significant downward trend over time. The percent reduction results can be misleading for a number of reasons. Relatively small absolute differences in concentrations can result in large percentage changes that skew both the median and mean reduction percentages. The calculations also assume that samples are paired. Differences in sampling procedures (grab vs composite), sampling time during an event, and additional stormwater inputs downstream of the inlet monitoring station can result in samples that are not truly paired. The Mann Whitney U test is a more appropriate test in this case. Samples are not assumed to be paired, sample populations are compared as a whole, and the results reflect overall system behavior.

4. Conclusions Based on the performance analysis results, it is clear that the Villa Park system was not improving the quality of effluent to Lake McCarrons prior to dredging. The Mann-Whitney U test results strongly reinforce this conclusion. During both storm and baseflow periods, Villa Park was shown to be exporting phosphorus. The picture post-dredging is not as clear. Comparing outlet concentrations pre and postdredging shows that, except for base ortho-P, concentrations were significantly lower after dredging, suggesting a marked improvement. However, post-dredging concentrations were not significantly different between the inlet and outlet. In other words, no significant phosphorus reduction was occurring. This is an improvement from the pre-dredging state in which the outlet concentrations were consistently higher, but the system did not change to a state in which significant improvements were seen between the inlet and outlet monitoring stations. It’s possible that the system is no longer exporting phosphorus and that the influent concentrations are below the level that the system can treat. However, it’s important to note that the post-dredging base ortho-P results suggest continued export of bio-available phosphorus. It’s possible that dredging increased the system’s ability to assimilate sediment and associated phosphorus, but the mechanism by which phosphorus is released in the form of ortho-P is still active. Further monitoring and analysis will have to be done to test these hypotheses.


The only significant temporal trends observed were in base flow-weighted average TP and ortho-P concentrations at the outlet monitoring station, which showed a significant decrease through the period of record. A lack of any significant trend within the separate pre- and post-dredging periods indicates that dredging was very likely responsible for the overall trend observed and that dredging had the greatest impact on baseflow concentrations.


March 20, 2019 Board Meeting IV. B) Como Lake Management Plan Update (Belden) DATE: TO: FROM: RE:

March 14, 2019 CRWD Board of Managers Britta Belden, Water Resource Project Manager Como Lake Management Plan Update â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Review of the Draft Como Lake Management Plan

Background The development of the Como Lake Management Plan has been underway since April 2018. The CRWD Board of Managers and the Citizen Advisory Committee have been involved throughout the development process by providing input and guidance on key deliverables along the way. In addition, two stakeholder groups were established to inform the development of the Como Lake Management Planâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the Agency Advisory Group (AAG) and the Public Advisory Group (PAG). The first meetings for both the AAG and the PAG and were focused on gathering input on Como Lake issues and goals. The second meetings for both groups focused on reviewing potential actions for in-lake management and watershed management to achieve total phosphorus (TP) load reductions in Como Lake. The third and final meetings for both groups will be held the end of March to review the draft Como Lake Management Plan. Issues Using input from the Board, CAC, AAG, and PAG along with the latest lake management science, staff has worked with LimnoTech to assemble a draft Como Lake Management Plan (CLMP). The draft CLMP details an adaptive management approach for improving Como Lake and meeting the goals identified during the input process. The draft CLMP identifies recommended actions for lake management, watershed management, and community engagement. It also provides an implementation plan that includes schedule, lead agency, costs, and financing. A comprehensive review process of the draft CLMP is currently underway with each advisory group (CAC, AAG, and PAG). Staff presented the draft CLMP to the CAC at the 3/13/19 meeting. It will be also presented to the AAG (3/27/19) and the PAG (3/28/19) at their scheduled March meetings. Each group will be asked to review and comment on the draft CLMP after being provided a digital copy of the document. Comments will be received at each meeting and can also be submitted electronically using the following link: https://goo.gl/forms/ddNthbs3X2mvVxO82 Staff will review the major elements of the draft CLMP with the Board. Time for questions and comments will be provided at the meeting to gather feedback from the Board on the draft CLMP. Requested Action Review and comment on the draft Como Lake Management Plan. enc:

Draft Como Lake Management Plan (dated 3/7/2019)

W:\06 Projects\Como Lake Projects\2018 Como Lake Management Plan\Board & CAC\Board Memo_CLMP_March 2019 Update_3-14-19.docx

Our Mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District


Como Lake Management Plan

Capitol Region Watershed District Saint Paul, MN March 7, 2019

DRAFT


Como Lake Management Plan

DRAFT Prepared for: Capitol Region Watershed District

March 7, 2019


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

March 7, 2019

TABLE OF CONTENTS Acronyms and Abbreviations..................................................1 Executive Summary................................................................2 1 Introduction ........................................................................3 1.1 Overview and Purpose .................................................... 3 1.2 Como Lake Management Planning Process .................... 3 1.3 Managing Como Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;A Shared Responsibility ............ 5 1.3.1 Agency Advisory Group ......................................... 6 1.3.2 Public Advisory Group and Engagement Process .. 7 2 Lake & Watershed Characterization .....................................9 2.1 Shallow Lake Ecology....................................................... 9 2.2 Como Lake Characterization ......................................... 10 2.2.1 Historical and Current Morphometry .................. 11 2.2.2 Water Quality in Como Lake ................................ 13 2.2.3 Lake Bottom Sediments ....................................... 16 2.2.4 Aquatic Vegetation .............................................. 17 2.2.5 Fisheries ............................................................... 19 2.2.6 Wildlife ................................................................. 20 2.3 Como Lake Watershed .................................................. 21 2.3.1 Watershed Boundaries ........................................ 21 2.3.2 Watershed Pollutant Sources & Pathways .......... 24 2.3.3 Watershed Characteristics................................... 25 2.3.4 Stormwater Runoff Monitoring & Quality ........... 26 2.3.5 Watershed Modeling & Pollutant Loads.............. 29 2.4 Como Lake Water Quality Standards & Regulations ..... 31 2.4.1 Internal TP Load Reduction Targets..................... 31 2.4.2 External Load Reduction Targets ......................... 31 2.5 Historical Management Actions .................................... 32 2.5.1 Historical Lake Management Actions .................. 32 2.5.2 Historical Watershed Management Actions........ 33 3 Issues and Goals ................................................................35 3.1 Issues of Concern .......................................................... 35 3.2 Stakeholder Input .......................................................... 37 3.3 Goals and Measurable Objectives ................................. 37 3.3.1 Selected Goals and Measurable Objectives ........ 37 4 Recommended Management Actions ................................40 4.1 Lake Management Actions ............................................ 40

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4.1.1 Evaluation of Possible Lake Management Actions ................................................................................ 40 4.1.2 Recommended Lake and Shoreline Management Actions.................................................................... 40 4.2 Watershed Management Actions ................................. 44 4.2.1 Watershed Phosphorus Management Actions .... 44 4.2.2 Other Non-point Source Pollutant Management Actions.................................................................... 50 4.3 Community Actions ....................................................... 51 4.3.1 Recreation............................................................ 51 4.3.2 Education & Outreach ......................................... 52 4.3.3 Partnerships ......................................................... 53 4.4 Recommended Actions Summary ................................. 54 5 Implementation ................................................................62 5.1 Short-term Implementation Plan .................................. 62 5.2 Estimated Implementation Costs .................................. 68 5.3 Financing ....................................................................... 70 6 References ........................................................................71 Appendix A ..........................................................................73 Appendix B ..........................................................................75

LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Adaptive Lake Management Planning Cycle................. 4 Figure 2. Comparison of a clear, macrophyte-dominated shallow lake (left panel) to a turbid, algae-dominated shallow lake (right panel). ...................................................................... 10 Figure 3. Bathmetry map of Como Lake showing depth contours and water quality (WQ) sampling stations (historical station labels shown in parentheses). ........................................... 12 Figure 4. Summer mean total phosphorus (TP), chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), and Secchi depth in Como Lake (1984-2018). ....... 15 Figure 5. Epilimnetic and hypolimnetic total phosphorus (TP) for the years 1984-2018 .......................................................... 16 Figure 6. Biovolume surveys of aquatic macrophytes in Como Lake from May 31, 2018. The red areas represent curly-leaf pondweed. ......................................................................... 18 Figure 7. Total fish abundance among sampling years. Fish surveys were generally conducted in July or August ......... 20

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Figure 8. The Como Lake watershed (1,711 ac) includes areas of St. Paul, Falcon Heights, and Roseville............................... 22 Figure 9. The thirteen major subwatersheds (Como A-M) in the Como Lake watershed. ...................................................... 23 Figure 10. Watershed pollutant sources and pathways. ........... 24 Figure 11. Hydrologic soil groups in the Como Lake watershed. ........................................................................................... 27 Figure 12. Existing land use in the Como Lake watershed. ....... 28 Figure 13. Schematic of generalized flow routing for the Como B subwatershed. ................................................................... 30 Figure 14. Estimated 20-year costs for implementation of the Como Lake Management Plan. .......................................... 69

LIST OF TABLES Table 1. Existing morphometric characteristics of Como Lake.. 11 Table 2. Shallow lake eutrophication standards........................ 14 Table 3. Long-term mean total phosphorus (TP), chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), and Secchi depth in Como Lake (1984-2018). ....... 15 Table 4. Modeled subwatershed TP loads to Como Lake Baseline, current and reductions. ...................................... 30 Table 5. TMDL Load Reduction Targets. .................................... 31 Table 6. Como Lake watershed baseline TP load from year 2000, the TP load reduction target (60%), and allocated watershed load. Note: the baseline TP load and allocated load listed differ from the 2010 TMDL because a model recalibration was completed in 2018. ............................... 32 Table 7. Summary of notable historical lake management actions. ............................................................................... 33 Table 8. The total number of documented structural BMP project types that have been constructed in the Como watershed through year 2018 by CRWD and partners. ..... 33 Table 9. Notable large-scale structural BMP projects constructed in the Como watershed since 2000 by CRWD and partners. ........................................................................................... 34 Table 10. Issues Identified by Agency Advisory Group (AAG) and Public Advisory Group (PAG). ............................................ 36 Table 11. Watershed Total Phosphorus (TP) Load Reduction Plan. ................................................................................... 45

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Table 12. Four categories of watershed TP load reduction methods. ............................................................................ 47 Table 13. Summary of Recommended Management Actions ... 54 Table 14. Short-term Implementation Plan. .............................. 63 Table 15. 2010-2020 Watershed Management Plan (WMP) Expenditures. ..................................................................... 69

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Acronyms and Abbreviations AAG BMP C CACN Chl-a CLMP CLP CLSMP CRWD DO EPA FIN FOC GIS L lbs/yr MNDNR MPCA NCHF P PAG RCPR RCPW SPPR SPPW TCMA TMDL TP µg/L W WQS

Agency Advisory Group Best Management Practices Community Actions Como Active Citizen Network Chlorophyll-a Como Lake Management Plan Curly-leaf pondweed Como Lake Strategic Management Plan (2002) Capitol Region Watershed District Dissolved oxygen Environmental Protection Agency Fishing in the Neighborhood program Frequency of Occurrence Geographic information system Lake Actions Pounds per year Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Minnesota Pollution Control Agency North Central Hardwood Forest Phosphorus Public Advisory Group Ramsey County Parks and Recreation Ramsey County Public Works St. Paul Parks and Recreation Department St. Paul Public Works Twin Cities Metropolitan Area Total Maximum Daily Load Total phosphorus Micrograms per liter Watershed Actions Water Quality Standards

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Executive Summary

This section will be included with final draft.

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1 Introduction 1.1 Overview and Purpose Como Lake, a 70.5 acre shallow urban lake located in St. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 348 acre Como Regional Park, is one of the most popular lakes in the region. Unfortunately, Como Lake has experienced poor water quality for decades due to excessive phosphorus and associated algal blooms. Excessive algal growth has led to odor problems and reduced oxygen conditions in the lake, which has resulted in winter fish kills on numerous occasions. Water quality problems in Como Lake were first observed in 1945 (Noonan 1998). In 2002, Capitol Region Watershed District (CRWD) adopted the Como Lake Strategic Management Plan (CLSMP) to define an implementation plan for improving Como Lake water quality through watershed management strategies (CRWD 2002). Through this plan, the implementation of several structural watershed best management practice (BMP) projects has significantly reduced the external loading of nutrients to the lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; external P loading has been reduced by 20% since 2002. Despite these efforts, water quality in Como Lake remains poor. In 2017, CRWD worked with LimnoTech to conduct the Como Lake Water Quality Drivers Analysis Study (LimnoTech 2017), which sought to better understand the sources and mechanisms of internal phosphorus loading in the lake. Based on the extensive record of monitoring data, the study identified diffusive flux of sediment phosphorus and curly-leaf pondweed (CLP) as the primary drivers of water quality in Como Lake. CRWD recognizes that continued efforts to further reduce external loading in addition to controlling internal loading of phosphorus will be required to improve water quality conditions in Como Lake. CRWD is committed to improving water quality in Como Lake, and has contracted with LimnoTech, to develop a revised Como Lake Management Plan (CLMP) with in-lake and watershed management strategies that are based on the latest science and technology.

1.2 Como Lake Management Planning Process Como Lake is a highly valued community resource that is managed by CRWD and local and state governmental partners. The water quality problems in Como Lake have persisted for decades, and as a result, it will take significant effort over the course of many years to achieve improvement goals. Consequently, the primary purpose of the revised plan is to develop a holistic and adaptive lake management strategy that will be used as a framework for CRWD, local partners, and community stakeholders to improve Como Lake over time. CRWD is taking an adaptive management approach for the management of Como Lake and its watershed, which is illustrated in Figure 1. Adaptive lake management planning is a dynamic process that will allow for evaluation of progress at interim milestones (every three years) to evaluate progress and modify direction if needed to achieve desired management goals and objectives over a twenty-year period (2019-2039). The first steps in an adaptive management planning process are to evaluate conditions and drivers of water quality. In 2017, the Water Quality Drivers Analysis Study (LimnoTech 2017) was completed. The study evaluated the long-term chemical, biological and physical data to determine the primary drivers of water quality in Como Lake under current conditions. In 2018, the P8 watershed model was recalibrated to include the most recent land use conditions and considers the numerous structural BMPS that have been constructed since the year 2000 (Houston 2018). These

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studies represent the Condition Analysis component of the illustration shown in Figure 1, and sought to analyze and document the latest scientific understanding of water quality issues in Como Lake and its watershed.

Condition Analysis Reassess & Adaptively Manage

Set Goals

Monitor & Evaluate

Evaluate Actions

Implement

Figure 1. Adaptive Lake Management Planning Cycle. A successful lake management plan requires a technical understanding of the lake’s issues and drivers of water quality, regulatory requirements and the goals and vision of the community. Once a technical understanding of the current primary drivers of water quality was achieved, additional issues facing Como Lake was identified through stakeholder discussions. Through careful planning and consideration of stakeholder needs, management goals have been developed (discussed in Section 3), which serve as the framework for which management actions can be implemented. The CLMP lays out three major categories of management actions, which include the following: •

Lake Actions: Actions that will be implemented in the lake to target lake-specific processes and pollutants.

Watershed Actions: Actions that will be implemented in the watershed to reduce pollutant loading to the lake.

Community Actions: Actions that will require community support, provide education and outreach, and promote additional recreational opportunities to enjoy the lake and surrounding area.

These management actions, which are described in detail in Section 4, will work towards goal attainment when implemented. The first three years following adoption of the CLMP will require intensive implementation of management actions across all three categories to realize any improvements in water quality. Given that goal attainment will be a long, intensive process, actions have been further characterized in terms of schedule for implementation: •

Short-term: Actions that are recommended to be implemented within the first three years of CLMP adoption. Page | 4


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Ongoing: Actions that are recommended to occur frequently over the life of the plan.

Long-term: Actions that are recommended for consideration pending evolution of shortterm actions to meet goals.

Based on the latest science and other case studies, we are able to estimate how Como Lake will respond to management actions in the near-term. However, it is unrealistic to know how the lake will respond following the first three years of intensive management. Therefore, monitoring and assessment will be required to evaluate the Lake’s response. An adaptive management approach will provide the opportunity to modify the direction of the plan based on the Lake’s response to initial actions, if needed, and incorporate newly emerged lake and watershed management technologies. This management plan provides additional detail on management roles and partnerships, CLMP process and involved groups, characterization of the lake and watershed, water quality standards and reduction goals, historical management activities, management goals and associated actions, and implementation activities and schedule.

1.3 Managing Como Lake—A Shared Responsibility Como Lake has long been a beloved water resource in the region and has garnered prolonged and sustained stewardship. This stewardship is strongly supported by multiple segments of the Como Lake community. This takes many forms from individuals picking up trash around the Lake to a community group concerned with the condition of Como Lake petitioning the State of Minnesota to create the Capitol Region Watershed District in 1998. Historically, there have been many groups/organizations within the community that have worked to improve Como Lake. A subset of those are described below.

Community Groups Community-based groups have played a very critical role in developing and implementing initiatives to improve Como Lake. Community groups have been especially effective in uniting residents in the Como watershed to promote stewardship and communicate the shared responsibility of neighbors in Como Lake’s health. Prominent Como community groups include: District 10 Community Council—The District 10 Community Council (District 10) is a City of St. Paul Planning District that covers a large majority of the Como Lake Watershed. This council and specifically its Environment Committee has been integral in the management and improvement of Como Lake for the last 25 years. In the late 1990s, District 10 having been frustrated with the lack of progress in improving Como Lake, petitioned the State of Minnesota to create the Capitol Region Watershed District to lead lake improvement efforts. District 10 has been instrumental in a number of key initiatives to improve Como Lake over the years, including: rain barrel workshops, rain garden installations, shoreline restoration and many others. Como Active Citizens Network—The Como Active Citizens Network (CACN) is group of concerned Como neighbors who meet and discuss issues related to the health of Como Lake. They further turn these discussions into action by, for instance, organizing community leaf cleanups to reduce phosphorus in the Como Lake watershed. More recently CACN has turned their attention to chloride (salt) and its potential to impact Como Lake. Other Groups—Other less formal community groups beyond those listed above have participated in various aspects of work relative to Como Lake over the past several years.

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Agency Groups A number of agencies have helped with monitoring, planning, programming, funding, and construction of various elements related to Como Lake for the past several decades. Major efforts have previously been undertaken by the following agencies: Ramsey County—Since 1984, Ramsey County has collected and analyzed water quality data for Como Lake. This extended record is integral to understanding the long-term trends and dynamics within Como Lake. It forms the basis for being able to understand what management strategies will work best in the lake. Additionally, Ramsey County has been a key partner in construction, operation and maintenance of watershed BMPs. City of St. Paul Parks & Recreation—The City of St. Paul Parks and Recreation (SPPR) Department manages all of the lands within Como Park. This includes the critical riparian area around the lake as well as several hundred acres of parkland that drain to Como Lake. In addition to land management the SPPR department provides extensive amounts of recreational programming on, around and near Como Lake. City of St. Paul Public Works, Sewers—The City of St. Paul Public Works (SPPW), Sewer Utility manages much of the storm sewer infrastructure that delivers water from the Como watershed to Como Lake. SPPW—Sewers has also been a key partner in implement multiple stormwater management BMPs in the Como Lake watershed. Other Agencies—Other agencies that have provided assistance in monitoring, planning, programming, funding, and construction include: City of Falcon Heights, City of Roseville, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources, and Metropolitan Council. An important component of the plan has involved engagement with the public and local partners to establish goals and expectations for the lake and evaluate lake management strategies that will achieve those goals. These two technical and citizen advisory groups are briefly described below.

1.3.1 Agency Advisory Group While CRWD is the lead agency of the CLMP, several local partners and state agencies have been members of an Agency Advisory Group (AAG), which have provided valuable input during the planning process, and will continue to play vital roles during implementation of the CLMP. The AAG included participants from the following agencies: • • • • • • • • • •

City of St. Paul City of Roseville City of Falcon Heights Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources Minnesota Pollution Control Agency Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Ramsey County Public Works Ramsey County Soil and Water Conservation District Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District Metropolitan Council

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The first AAG meeting occurred on July 12, 2018, which outlined the CLMP purpose, process and schedule. The group also identified the major issues, goals, constraints and expectations for Como Lake from the agency perspective. The second AAG meeting occurred on November 8, 2018, which discussed the major issues identified in the first meeting as well as those described by stakeholders in the first Public Advisory Group (PAG) meeting (discussed below). The AAG also reviewed a draft set of goals and objectives that would work towards the identified issues and provided feedback on the feasibility of a suite of potential in-lake and watershed management actions that would address the major issues in Como Lake. This section will be updated with information from the third and final AAG meeting (March 27, 2019).

1.3.2 Public Advisory Group and Engagement Process All local community members and lake users were invited to join the PAG and participate in an extensive stakeholder engagement process to help guide and inform the CLMP. Community members were invited to participate in the PAG meetings through direct email, social media invitations, press releases, distribution of postcards, and recruitment events where CRWD staff spoke directly to users around Como Lake on July 20th and 26th, 2018. Invitation materials included links to CRWD’s website and an online Como Lake Story Map with additional materials and information related to Como Lake and the planning process. The first PAG meeting was held on the evening of August 9, 2018 at the Como Lakeside Pavilion. The purpose of the first PAG meeting was to provide the following to all interested stakeholders: •

An update on the status of Como Lake and the planning process for the CLMP.

An opportunity to share with CRWD their concerns, hopes, and expectations for a healthy Como Lake.

Participants were asked three questions, and given an opportunity to provide anonymous responses to these questions: 1. What draws you to or excites you most about Como Lake? 2. What do you think are the major issues or concerns for Como Lake today? 3. Looking forward, what hopes do you have for a healthy Como Lake? Following the first PAG meeting, an online survey was created with the same three questions providing an opportunity for those not in attendance to give feedback. The online survey was advertised through email distribution, social media networks, CRWD’s website and the online Como Lake Story Map. The online survey was available through September 7, 2018. Over 800 responses were received from 200+ respondents between the PAG meeting, the online survey, and the recruitment events. All of the input from the July recruitment events, August PAG meeting, and online survey was summarized to identify major themes and inform the development of management goals and objectives for the CLMP (Section 3). The second PAG meeting was held on the evening of December 6, 2018 at the Como Lakeside Pavilion where the following information was provided to all interested stakeholders: •

Summary of issues concerning Como Lake that were expressed at the first PAG meeting and how those issues shaped goals and objectives for lake management.

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Summary of watershed modeling results with estimated phosphorus load reductions from existing and future BMPs.

Lake management actions under consideration that would address excess phosphorus in the sediments, curly-leaf pondweed, and fisheries management.

Participants formed small groups for discussion and were asked to anonymously respond to three questions related to the presented potential lake management actions: 1. What do you like? 2. What do you dislike? 3. What is missing? By using open-ended questions, a wide range of comments could be received that focused less on generating “yes” or “no” responses to the proposed management strategies, and more on identifying the criteria by which the participants were evaluating them. Having the supporting information for why participants felt the way they did provides valuable feedback on participants’ desires and concerns, and respond to them in the development of the implementation plan. Following the PAG meeting, the public was given the opportunity to provide further feedback on the draft goals and measurable objectives through an online form. This section will be updated this section with information from the third and final AAG meeting (March 28, 2018).

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2 Lake & Watershed Characterization 2.1 Shallow Lake Ecology Como Lake is a shallow urban lake with a maximum depth of 15.5 feet and over 97% littoral area. In Minnesota, shallow lakes are characterized as having aquatic plants and water depths generally less than 15 feet (MDNR 2017a). Clear, shallow lakes with low nutrient concentrations are typically dominated by submersed macrophytes. Shallow lakes with excessive nutrient loading often transition to a turbid state dominated by algae that no longer supports a healthy macrophyte community (Wetzel 2001; Scheffer 2004; MSU 2010). Figure 2 shows a clear, healthy lake in the left panel and a turbid, unhealthy lake on the right panel. Currently, Como Lake exists as a turbid, unhealthy lake. Eutrophication describes the condition of a waterbody that has been overly enriched with nutrients (i.e. phosphorus and/or nitrogen) leading to excessive growth of algae. Long-term excessive phosphorus loads to shallow lakes can be particularly problematic when phosphorus accumulates in the bottom sediments, which can then be released back into the water column under low oxygen conditions. This process is referred to as internal phosphorus loading, and diffusive flux of phosphorus from lake sediments is the most common mechanism. Under anoxic conditions, phosphorus that was previously bound to iron is released into the overlying water, which then becomes available for algal growth. CLP can also be a significant source of phosphorus to lakes due to the timing of its decay, or senescence. CLP tends to die-off in late June in the Upper Midwest, which results in release of mobile P as temperature and light conditions are ideal for algal growth and development. This early season pulse of P occurs when light and temperature conditions are optimal for phytoplankton growth, which can lead to algal blooms. Additional discussion on internal phosphorus loading and mechanisms in Como Lake can be found in the Como Lake Water Quality Drivers Analysis Report (LimnoTech 2017). Phosphorus release from sediments in eutrophic shallow lakes can persist for many years even if external loads were able to be completely eliminated. Likewise, release of phosphorus from CLP senescence can also be a significant source of internal phosphorus loading. Therefore, addressing the internal phosphorus load is critically important for management of eutrophic shallow lakes and reduction of nuisance algal blooms.

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Figure 2. Comparison of a clear, macrophyte-dominated shallow lake (left panel) to a turbid, algaedominated shallow lake (right panel). A healthy Como Lake will look more like the example in the left panel of Figure 1. With significantly lower phosphorus, a healthy Como Lake will be free of dense floating algae and possess water that is clear enough to support a diverse native macrophyte community. Reversal of the turbid, algaldominated state to a healthy, clear, macrophyte-dominated shallow lake is challenging and costly. The challenge is even greater in urban areas with high watershed nutrient loading and anthropogenic activities. Typically, when a lake suffers from multiple factors causing degradation, one management technique will not address all of the issues causing impairment. In these cases, an integrated strategy that is tailored to the lake with multiple management actions will be the most successful plan for water quality improvement. Reducing internal and external phosphorus loads and the extent of CLP are the top management priorities for Como Lake. If these issues are not addressed, Como Lake will continue to exhibit poor water quality. Once phosphorus and CLP abundance is significantly reduced in Como Lake, the lake should exhibit clear-water conditions that can support a healthy macrophyte community.

2.2 Como Lake Characterization Como Lake, a 70.5 acre shallow lake located in St. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 348 acre Como Regional Park, is one of the most popular lakes in CRWD. Como Regional Park is one of the most frequently visited parks in the Twin Cities Regional Parks System with more than 4.3 million visitors each year. The lake is frequented by residents and visitors who come for various forms of outdoor recreation, including running/walking, fishing, and boating. Non-motorized, car top carried boats and electric trolling motors are allowed on the lake for fishing and recreation purposes. The lake does not offer swimming opportunities and does not have a public boat launch.

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2.2.1 Historical and Current Morphometry Como Lake was formed in an ice-block depression and rests on glacial till with a mix of soils. Throughout recorded history, Como Lake has been altered from its original shape and depth. Recent sediment borings indicate that Como Lake may have been shallower and could have been a wetland. In 1847, survey records indicate that the Lake was approximately 120 acres, compared to its 70.5 acres today. In 1895, the City of St. Paul dredged Como Lake to increase its depth from five to fifteen feet to reduce swampiness. Como Lake continually diminished in size in the early 1900s, and notably, was drained in 1923 in an effort to preserve the lake. Officials drained the lake to seal the bottom before pumps and a dam were installed to increase water levels. In addition, the surrounding watershed and storm sewer drainage system have developed considerably and is significantly larger than the pre-settlement condition. Currently, Como Lake has a large watershed to lake area ratio of 24.2, which indicates that the watershed strongly influences the lake through runoff from the surrounding area. Currently, Como Lake has a maximum depth of 15.5 feet and mean depth of 6.5 feet and is characterized as a shallow lake (Table 1; Figure 3). The littoral area, where the depth of the lake is shallow enough to allow sunlight to penetrate to the sediment, occupies over 97% of the lake area. The hydraulic residence time in Como Lake is approximately 8 months. Table 1. Existing morphometric characteristics of Como Lake. Surface Area (acres)

Maximum Depth (ft)

Littoral Zone (%)

Volume (acre-ft)

Watershed Area (acres)

Watershed Area : Lake Area Ratio

70.5

15.5

97%

469

1,711

24.2

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Figure 3. Bathymetry map of Como Lake showing depth contours and water quality (WQ) sampling stations (historical station labels shown in parentheses).

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2.2.2 Water Quality in Como Lake Como Lake has experienced water quality problems associated with frequent algal blooms and occasional fish kills for decades. Poor water quality was first recorded in 1945. Excessive nutrient loading, particularly phosphorus, is the primary cause of water quality problems. As discussed above in Section 2.1, excessive phosphorus loading leads to nuisance algal blooms, so reducing and controlling phosphorus in Como Lake is a top management priority. Chloride, or more commonly known as road salt, has emerged as a pollutant of concern to Como Lake as a result of winter deicing practices. Road salt is applied to streets in the Como Lake watershed during the winter months and flushes into the lake through snowmelt runoff. Data has shown chloride concentrations to have increased drastically in Como Lake because, once in dissolved form, chloride cannot be removed from water and accumulates over time. As chloride accumulates in the lake, it can cause the water to become saline which has negative implications to aquatic life (plants, fish, macroinvertebrates) that are not accustomed to a saline environment. In addition, saline water can influence the thermal dynamics of a lake and can interfere with lake mixing. In 2014, Como Lake was listed as impaired for chloride by the MPCA because seasonal average chloride concentrations in the lake were not meeting the state standard of 230 µg/L (MN Statute 7050.0222). However, the impairment listing of Como Lake for chloride is not unique to the Twin Cities metro area. Road salt application has had a significant regional affect with several other metro lakes also listed as impaired. In 2016, the MPCA finalized the Twin Cities Metro Area (TCMA) Chloride Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) to address 39 waterbodies in the 7-county metropolitan area that exceed chloride levels protective of the aquatic community. That same year, the MPCA released the TCMA Chloride Management Plan to provide a framework for implementation of the TMDL. Management actions for chloride reduction in the CLMP (see Section 4) are based on the TCMA Chloride TMDL (MPCA 2016) and TCMA Chloride Management Plan (MPCA 2016). Sediment (silt, sand, clay) entering Como Lake from the watershed is also problematic because it accumulates in the lake, subsequently reducing lake volume, creating sediment deltas, and burying aquatic habitat on the lake bottom. Excess sediment can also damage fish gills and inhibit food foraging on the lake bottom for many fish species. In addition, other pollutants such as phosphorus and heavy metals chemically bind to sediment particles, so they are transported into the lake with the sediment. Lastly, Como Lake was added to the MPCA’s list of impaired waterbodies for mercury in 1998. Atmospheric deposition of mercury from power plant emissions is uniform across the state of Minnesota and has led to mercury impairment of water and fish in many waterbodies across the state (MPCA 2007). Consequently, the state of Minnesota developed the Minnesota Statewide Mercury TMDL in 2007, which was approved by the U.S. EPA. Mercury emission reduction goals are being addressed at state and regional scales and are being addressed through the Implementation Plan for Minnesota’s Statewide Mercury TMDL (MPCA 2009); therefore, it is not considered in this management plan.

Water Quality Monitoring Water quality samples are collected in Como Lake every two weeks throughout the growing season (May through October) since 1984. These water quality samples are collected from the surface and bottom waters at the deepest spot in the Lake, and analyzed by Ramsey County Public Works (RCPW). These data include total phosphorus (TP), soluble reactive phosphorus, chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), nitrate, ammonium, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, turbidity, and chloride. Secchi depth is also measured during each sampling event along with depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature, pH, and conductivity. These parameters are used to assess water quality in Como Lake.

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In 2017, CRWD began measuring continuous DO at three monitoring locations in the Lake (Figure 3) with sensors to measure anoxia near the sediment surface. The sensors were generally deployed from May through October in 2017 and 2018 in order to measure temporal and spatial patterns in anoxia. Quantification of the spatial extent and temporal extent of anoxia in the Lake facilitates estimation of the diffusive flux of phosphorus from the sediments (see Section 2.2.3 and LimnoTech 2017).

Water Quality Standards Como Lake is regulated by the shallow lake eutrophication standards for the North Central Hardwood Forest Ecoregion (MN Statute 7050.0222). As discussed in Section 2.1, eutrophication is the condition where a waterbody has been overly enriched with nutrients leading to excessive algal blooms. In most Minnesota lakes, algae are phosphorus limited. Chl-a is a measurement of algal biomass. The biological response to more phosphorus is higher algal production, and therefore, higher concentration of Chl-a. Secchi depth is a measure of water clarity and can be used as a proxy for estimating the amount of algae in a lake. Consequently, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) developed numeric eutrophication standards for lakes in Minnesota that integrate all three parameters. These standards state that the total phosphorus (TP) concentration must be less than 60 µg/L, Chl-a must be less than 20 µg/L, and Secchi Depth (measure of water clarity) must be greater than 1 meter (Table 2). Table 2. Shallow lake eutrophication standards. Eutrophication Standards for Como Lake TP (µg/L)

Chl-a (µg/L)

Secchi depth (m)

≤ 60

≤ 20

> 1.0

For impairment determination, Minnesota assesses TP, Chl-a, and Secchi data collected during the summer season with summer-average calculations limited to the upper 3 meters of the water column. A lake is considered impaired under MPCA standards if it exceeds the standard for TP concentration and either the Secchi disk depth or Chl-a concentration. Como Lake has annually exceeded shallow lake eutrophication standards for TP and Chl-a, but has met the standards for Secchi depth on occasion. Reduction in TP is critical for reducing Chl-a for regulatory purposes and for improving water quality Como Lake.

Water Quality Trends Table 3 below shows the long-term average TP, Chl-a and Secchi depth for the growing season over the period of 1984-2018. It should be noted that the MPCA defines the growing season for impairment determination as June 1 through September 30 (MN Statute 7050.0150). CRWD defines the summer growing season as May through September, which is representative of the start of the growing season relative to typical ice out and the period of data collection in Como Lake. The long-term mean TP is nearly three times greater than the water quality standard, while the mean Chl-a standard is 1.7 times the water quality standard.

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Table 3. Long-term mean total phosphorus (TP), chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), and Secchi depth in Como Lake (1984-2018). Historical Growing Season (May - Sept) Average 1984-2018 Secchi depth TP (Âľg/L) Chl-a (Âľg/L) (m) 173

34.2

1.4

Figure 4 shows the mean annual TP, Chl-a, and Secchi depth for the same period of record. Mean TP and the biological response variables (Chl-a and Secchi depth) show considerable inter-annual variability in the period of record (1984-2018). As Noonan (1998) noted, these parameters exhibit a cyclical pattern over time in response to variability in annual nutrient loading and management actions. Chl-a and Secchi depth are highly correlated to TP, so annual patterns should be similar among these parameters. Long-term trends in epilimnetic (surface waters) and hypolimnetic (bottom waters) TP are shown in Figure 5. Mean epilimnetic TP far exceeds the shallow lake TP standard, which applies to the epilimnion. Hypolimnetic TP is considerably higher than epilimnetic TP in all years and is likely the result of significant internal phosphorus loading from the bottom sediments (LimnoTech 2017).

Figure 4. Summer mean total phosphorus (TP), chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), and Secchi depth in Como Lake (1984-2018).

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Figure 5. Epilimnetic and hypolimnetic total phosphorus (TP) for the years 1984-2018

Drivers of Water Quality Based on an extensive analysis of the long-term chemical, biological and physical data, a Water Quality Drivers Analysis Study was completed in 2017 (LimnoTech 2017). The results of that study confirmed that external and internal phosphorus loading are the primary drivers of water quality in Como Lake. Diffusive flux of sediment phosphorus and release of phosphorus from senescence of CLP are the major internal loading mechanisms in Como Lake. An imbalanced fishery (i.e. forage fish/planktivorous dominated fishery) is also a contributing factor to poor water quality in Como Lake. Achieving water quality goals (see Section 3) in Como Lake will require a substantial reduction in external phosphorus loading through watershed BMPs. Reduction in internal loading will require either removal or inactivation of phosphorus in the sediments and considerable reduction in curly-leaf pondweed density.

2.2.3 Lake Bottom Sediments As described above, diffusive flux of phosphorus from the lake sediments is a significant source of phosphorus and a primary driver of water quality problems in Como Lake. Under anoxic conditions, phosphorus that was previously bound to iron is released into the overlying water, which then becomes available for algal growth. Unless diffusive flux of phosphorus from the lake sediments is significantly reduced, water quality improvements will not be possible in Como Lake. The Water Quality Drivers Analysis Study (LimnoTech 2017) found hypoxic to anoxic conditions in Como Lake that can persist throughout the summer growing season. Data analysis indicated that dissolved oxygen (DO) is rapidly depleted at the deepest station following a mixing event, which suggests high rates of sediment or hypolimnetic oxygen demand. High oxygen demand is usually indicative of a large amounts of organic matter, which would be expected in a highly productive lake such as Como Lake. In

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addition, these summer anoxic patterns were prevalent in historical data (1991-1993) at the shallow stations. To better understand DO patterns at the deepest and shallow stations, CRWD installed continuous DO sensors and loggers to monitor DO conditions throughout the summer growing season. These data confirmed that Como Lake exhibits hypoxic and anoxic conditions throughout the summer at multiple depths for extended durations. The consequence of this is that anoxic conditions drive phosphorus release from the sediments, which is a management priority for Como Lake. Based on data available at the time, LimnoTech (2017) estimated internal phosphorus loads to be in the range of 293-819 lbs P/year with the variability due to the uncertainty in the temporal and spatial extent of anoxia in Como Lake. The continuous DO data collected in 2017 and 2018 helped to constrain these estimates resulting in approximately 369-371 lbs P/year from diffusive sediment flux. An updated water quality model for Como Lake will be needed to confirm the 2010 TMDL reduction goals (Section 2.4). This model should include the revised subwatershed model results, recent monitoring data, and rates of sediment P flux measured from intact sediment cores (Wenck 2017).

2.2.4 Aquatic Vegetation Macrophyte surveys have been conducted periodically in Como Lake since 2005. Since 2013, multiple surveys per summer were conducted where in prior years, only a single annual survey was conducted. In recent years, CLP was the abundant plant observed especially in late Spring/early Summer. An example is shown in Figure 6, which shows the biovolume of aquatic vegetation on May 31, 2018. The red areas indicate 100% coverage by vegetation, which was dominated by CLP. Canadian waterweed (Eleodea canadensis), filamentous algae (Spirogyra/Cladophora species), Leafy Pondweed (Potamogeton foliusus), Coontail (Ceratophyllum demersum), and Flatstem pondweed (Potamogeton zosteriformis) have also been observed at high density in Como Lake. Density of these species varies through the summer growing season and among years, but in general, the aquatic plant community exhibits low diversity. Canadian waterweed and coontail can grow to nuisance conditions and can outcompete other native vegetation. The potential for this to occur is high will and need to be monitored and evaluated with ongoing adaptive plant management strategies. CLP (Potamogeton crispus) is an invasive aquatic macrophyte that is incredibly problematic for lake managers and nearly impossible to eradicate once it has become established. It is capable of growing under ice and often outcompetes native vegetation to quickly become the dominant aquatic plant species. In this region, it tends to senesce in mid-late June, which releases phosphorus back into the water column during optimal algal growth conditions (i.e. high midsummer temperature and sunlight). As a result, it can fuel algae blooms during this time. Macrophytes, including CLP, have historically been mechanically harvested in Como Lake for recreational purposes to maintain paddling lanes or clear areas near the fishing piers. CLP is a rooted submerged aquatic plant that propagates via rhizomes and buds called turions, which can spread quickly. The rooted portions are not collected during mechanical harvesting so the plant will return each year and the data reflect that pattern. Additional management actions will be required to reduce CLP density in Como Lake. Management strategies that target long-term reductions in CLP should be a top priority for management of the aquatic plant community in Como Lake. Long-term monitoring will be necessary to monitor abundance of CLP and establishment of native plant species following implementation of CLP management activities.

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Figure 6. Biovolume surveys of aquatic macrophytes in Como Lake from May 31, 2018. The red areas represent curly-leaf pondweed.

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2.2.5 Fisheries Fish surveys have been conducted in Como Lake periodically since 1976, mostly by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) with some supplemental sampling sponsored by CRWD. Fisheries management for Como Lake began in the 1980s. Frequent winter fish kills prompted the installation of an aeration device in October 1985. At that time, the fish community was dominated by omnivores and rough fish, which included goldfish, black bullhead, and common carp. Bullhead and carp can significantly impact water quality by resuspending sediments through feeding behavior which releases soluble phosphorus into the water column. Rotenone was applied to the lake in 1985 to kill the existing rough fish community, then restocked with bluegill, walleye and largemouth bass as part of a biomanipulation strategy to improve water quality (Noonan 1998). Biomanipulation intends to create changes in the lake ecosystem through manipulation of the fish community. Often this technique is employed in an effort to shift a lake from a turbid, algal dominated state to a clear, macrophyte dominated state using the fish community. The goal of this strategy is to increase the zooplankton community capacity to significantly graze on algae. As Noonan (1998) reported, Como Lake responded positively to the biomanipulation and shifted to a clearer water state for a brief duration. However, external and internal P loads persisted, so the lake shifted back to a turbid state. Biomanipulation can produce a positive response, but typically requires ongoing maintenance and must be used in conjunction with other nutrient reduction and control strategies for sustained improvements in water quality. Currently, Como Lake is stocked by the MNDNR through their Fishing in the Neighborhood (FIN) Program (MNDNR 2017b), which aims to increase angling opportunities in urban lakes. The species stocked historically by the MNDNR include bluegill, channel catfish, largemouth bass, walleye and yellow perch. On October 1, 2018, MNDNR stocked Como Lake with 293 lbs of walleye in an effort to increase the population of top predators. Total annual fish abundance measured during surveys since 2001 is shown in Figure 7. Total fish abundance was highest in 2001 and 2006 and lowest in 2014. Prior to recent walleye stocking, the fish community has been dominated by black crappie followed by black bullheads or bluegill sunfish since 2006.

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Figure 7. Total fish abundance among sampling years. Fish surveys were generally conducted in July or August The fish community in Como Lake has few top predators, and is dominated by planktivorous forage fish due to combination of low predation pressure, historical stocking practices, and likely recreational fishing pressure (LimnoTech 2017). As a result, cascading effects on the zooplankton community have been observed (LimnoTech 2017). The term trophic cascade refers to the process where changes in the upper trophic levels impacts lower trophic levels, ultimately affecting algal density. The zooplankton community in Como Lake is dominated by small-bodied zooplankton, which is a result of predation pressure by planktivorous fish preferentially consuming large-bodied zooplankton like Daphnia. The consequence of this is that small-bodied zooplankton are less efficient grazers than large-bodied zooplankton so the community is likely having little influence on the algal density.

2.2.6 Wildlife Como Lake supports a variety of wildlife and serves as a habitat sanctuary amidst a densely urbanized area. Throughout the year, several species of mammals, reptiles, birds and pollinators can be observed at Como Lake. The presence, diversity, and abundance of wildlife can be an indicator of Como Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relative health. Future efforts should work toward documenting these species over time to assist in assessing the health of Como Lake. One effort toward assessing wildlife at Como Lake was a turtle study conducted in 2011 by the Como Community Council and District 10. The study evaluated turtle populations in Como Lake by species type. From May 1, 2011 through August 23, 2011, volunteers observed 2052 Painted Turtles and 47 Snapping Turtles basking in and around the lake (District 10 2011). In May, June and July 2011, Como Zoo personnel and volunteers set traps to capture turtles to record characteristics. During that time, 118

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Painted Turtles and 32 Snapping Turtles were caught, measured, sexed and released. Although only two species were identified during the study, Como Lake appeared to have a robust turtle population as of 2011.

2.3 Como Lake Watershed The Como Lake watershed has a total area of 1,711 acres and includes portions of the cities of St. Paul, Roseville, and Falcon Heights (Figure 8). Runoff from 13 major subwatersheds (Figure 9) drains off the land to an extensive network of storm sewer pipes that discharge directly to Como Lake through twentytwo storm sewer outlets.

2.3.1 Watershed Boundaries The Como Lake watershed includes the total area of land draining to the lake (1,711 acres). The watershed boundary was determined using GIS mapping and takes into consideration the local topography and drainage networks surrounding Como Lake. Thirteen major subwatersheds within the Como Lake watershed were also defined (Figure 9). A subwatershed is a localized drainage area within a greater watershed that drains to the lake. The Como Lake subwatershed delineations (Como A-M) were determined using GIS and are based on 1) storm sewer discharge points (outfalls) to Como Lake, and 2) the subsurface storm sewer network extending upstream of the discharge point. The storm sewer networks in the Como watershed are complex, particularly in the Como B subwatershed. Under normal flow conditions, all of Como B subwatershed discharges through one outfall to Como Lake. Under high flow conditions, overflow from the Como B subwatershed main pipe is routed to four separate outfall pipes that discharge directly to Como Lake.

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Figure 8. The Como Lake watershed (1,711 ac) includes areas of St. Paul, Falcon Heights, and Roseville.

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Figure 9. The thirteen major subwatersheds (Como A-M) in the Como Lake watershed.

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2.3.2 Watershed Pollutant Sources & Pathways Stormwater runoff carries excess pollutants like nutrients and sediment from the watershed to the lake, making the watershed a pollutant “source”. The characteristics of the watershed have significant influence on the amount of runoff and what pollutants are being delivered to the lake. Phosphorus is the primary pollutant of concern from the Como Lake watershed. Figure 10 illustrates watershed processes and pollutant pathways typical to the Como Lake watershed, including: A) Pollutant Sources: Includes trash, leaves, grass clippings, soil, animal waste, fertilizers, automobile fluids, road salt, and other chemicals—anything present on the landscape that can be flushed into a storm drain by rain or snowmelt. B) Runoff: Occurs when rain or snowmelt flows off the landscape, picking up pollutants and other material on its path. In urban environments, impervious surfaces like roofs, driveways, parking lots, sidewalks, and roads prevent water from soaking into the ground as it naturally would, causing stormwater runoff to generate and flow into storm drains. C) Stormwater Flows to Lake: Sewers function as underground streams to collect and convey stormwater— they prevent localized flooding by moving runoff from the landscape downstream. Storm sewers flow into Como Lake, and as a result transfer runoff carrying pollutants from the landscape directly to the lake.

Figure 10. Watershed pollutant sources and pathways.

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2.3.3 Watershed Characteristics The landscapes of all 13 major subwatersheds within the Como watershed are directly connected to the lake. Understanding the characteristics of each Como Lake subwatershed is important for managing runoff to Como Lake because each behave differently depending on their topography, soil types, vegetation, land use, hydrology, impervious areas, and anthropogenic activities.

Topography The Como Lake watershed resides in a hilly post-glacial landscape. Over 10,000 years ago, glaciers left behind a rolling landscape typical in this region of Minnesota. Prior to urban development, the landscape consisted of isolated wetlands with small localized watersheds. While the topography in the Como watershed is relatively moderate, it still plays a major role in determining flow pathways and watershed connection to the lake.

Soil Types Soil types influence watershed flow pathways and infiltration rates. Following the retreat of the glaciers, the landscape was dominated by mixed glacial till soils. At present, soils in the Como Lake watershed are largely urban/unknown with some group A, A/D and B soil types due to soil disturbance related to urban development (Figure 11). Many areas in the watershed are not characterized and are likely dominated by fill brought in during urbanization and development of St. Paul. The majority of identified soils demonstrate a moderate potential for infiltration.

Vegetation The Como Lake watershed resides in the North Central Hardwoods Forest (NCHF) ecoregion. The NCHF ecoregion is characterized by temperate broadleaf and mixed forests. Prior to urban development, the Como Lake watershed was predominantly oak openings and barrens. The current vegetation regime is dominated by diverse temperate species typical of residential areas, street boulevards, and parkland areas.

Climate The climate classification for the Como Lake watershed is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dfaâ&#x20AC;?, or Hot Summer Continental Climate. The average annual precipitation is 31.5 inches per year. June is typically the wettest month with an average of 4.8 inches per month. February is typically the driest month with an average of 0.8 inches per month. Snow occurrence is on average 49.2 inches per year (www.weatherbase.com).

Land Use Early development (early 1800s) of the Como Lake watershed primarily consisted of agricultural land use. As development pressure expanded north in St. Paul, land use changed from agricultural to urban as roads, homes, and businesses were built. Currently, the primary land use type in the Como Lake watershed is Single-Family residential. Secondary to residential, the watershed also includes large areas of parkland with Como Regional Park and the Como Golf Course. There are isolated areas of commercial, institutional, railway, and office areas, but they make up a small portion of the overall watershed land use. With dense urban development in the Como Lake watershed, a large portion of the watershed area consists of impervious surfaces (40%), which includes roads, parking lots, driveways, sidewalks, and

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rooftopsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;any type of hard surface that water cannot infiltrate through, which his significant impacts on the watershed hydrology.

Hydrology Prior to development, the Como Lake watershed was dominated by small isolated wetlands and depressions that collected runoff from localized areas. Because of this, the Como Lake watershed was much smaller in area than it is today and the majority of the runoff never reached the lake. With urban development and the loss of localized wetlands, the Como Lake watershed expanded by connecting far reaching areas of the region to the lake with artificial drainage networks, or storm sewers, effectively increasing the total amount of water reaching Como Lake. Currently, the drainage area of Como Lake is dominated by impervious surfaces and artificial drainage networks that collect and convey stormwater runoff as direct inputs to the lake (Figure 12). With 40% impervious surfaces in the watershed, runoff is generated during storm and snowmelt events and piped directly to the lake through 22 storm sewer outfalls. There are no stream or rivers flowing into the lake from the Como Lake watershed.

Anthropogenic Activities Human activities in the Como Lake watershed also have an impact on the lake because of the watershed connectivity. Activities like lawn maintenance, dog walking, sidewalk deicing, automotive maintenance, and trash management can all influence water quality as the remnants from these activities are flushed off the landscape into the lake.

2.3.4 Stormwater Runoff Monitoring & Quality To measure the volume and quality of stormwater entering Como Lake from the surrounding watershed, CRWD annually monitors three major subwatershed outlets (Como B, Como C, and Como D). Areavelocity sensors and automated water quality sampler stations are installed near the outfall locations to the lake. The stations continuously measure discharge and take flow-paced samples during storm events. Samples are analyzed for a suite of water quality parameters, including nutrients, metals, solids, and bacteria. From this data, total annual discharge volumes and pollutant loads can be calculated to better understand watershed phosphorus contributions to Como Lake.

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Figure 11. Hydrologic soil groups in the Como Lake watershed.

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Figure 12. Existing land use in the Como Lake watershed.

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2.3.5 Watershed Modeling & Pollutant Loads To fully calculate the phosphorus load contribution to Como Lake from the surrounding watershed, the P8 Model was utilized in addition to monitoring. The P8 Model is specific to urban watershed and considers all of the factors that drive the hydrology and pollutant sources unique to the Como Lake watershed, such as those described above. The modeling also takes into account structural and nonstructural BMPs in the watershed and their estimated annual load reduction capacity. The original P8 modeling of the Como Lake watershed was completed in 2000 for the TMDL and the 2002 CLSMP. Since then, there have been changes in land use and other model input parameters in the Como watershed. In addition, technology improvements (i.e. improved GIS layers) have resulted in a greater capability to fine-tune the watershed model. To ensure that the best estimates of watershed loads were utilized in the CLMP, a P8 model recalibration was completed fall 2018. The watershed P8 model recalibration includes the most recent land use conditions and considers the numerous structural BMPS that have been constructed since the year 2000. From the P8 model recalibration, updated TP load estimates were determined from the Como Lake watershed for year 2018. Table 4 provides a summary of the Como subwatershed model calibration outputs for TP loads to Como Lake. The table includes subwatershed name (Como A-M), subwatershed area, baseline TP load (year 2000), and current TP load (year 2018). “Baseline TP Load (Year 2000)” refers to modeled Como subwatershed TP loads in the year 2000 and only includes watershed BMPs that were installed before the year 2000. The “Current TP Load (Year 2018)” refers to present-day modeled TP loads and includes load reductions achieved through BMPs installed since the year 2000. Table 4 also lists TP load reductions achieved since 2000 by BMPs (Baseline TP Load - Current TP Load = TP Reduction (lbs)) and the percent TP load reduction achieved (Current) for each subwatershed since baseline. The subwatersheds of Como B (Como B2-B5) are grayed in Table 4 to reflect the complex drainage system that changes outfall location depending on the flow condition. Figure 13 is a schematic of generalized flow routing in the Como B subwatershed to help illustrate how overflow is routed through four separate outfalls during certain flow conditions. Under normal flow conditions, all of Como B subwatershed discharges through one outfall to Como Lake. Under high flow conditions, overflow from the Como B subwatershed main pipe is routed to four separate outfall pipes that discharge directly to Como Lake. It is important to understand the Como B subwatershed flow routing during overflow events because the model outputs for TP loads are directly affected. For the model recalibration effort, the Como B subwatershed flow routing was factored into the watershed loading calculations. The newly modeled TP load reduction estimates show that from 2000 through 2018, a 20% reduction in watershed TP load has been achieved through BMPs, or 143 lbs/year (Table 4).

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Table 4. Modeled subwatershed TP loads to Como Lake - Baseline, current and reductions. % of Total Como Watershed Area

Baseline TP Load (Year 2000) (lbs)

Current TP Load (Year 2018) (lbs)

Overflow Subwatershed

Como A

--

36.6

2%

11.2

11.2

0

0%

Como Ba

--

1173.9

69%

388.8

294.1

94.7

24%

TP Reduction (lbs)

TP Reduction %

--

Como B2

51.3

3%

11.5

11

0.5

4%

--

Como B3

78.8

5%

10.2

10.2

0

0%

--

Como B4

177.4

10%

32.2

32.2

0

0%

--

Como B5

814.8

48%

31.6

16.5

15.1

48%

Como C

--

80.8

5%

20.9

18.1

2.8

13%

Como D

--

195.3

11%

98.3

92.5

5.8

6%

Como E

--

72.2

4%

41.3

41.3

0

0%

Como F

--

44.5

3%

25.6

15.6

10

39%

Como G

--

20.7

1%

16.2

6.2

10

62%

Como H

--

17.8

1%

10.5

9.5

0.9

9%

Como I

--

11.7

1%

6.3

3.2

3.1

49%

Como J

--

19

1%

10

10

0

0%

Como K

--

15.4

1%

8.1

8.1

0

0%

Como L

--

0.5

0.03%

0

0

0

0%

Como M

--

16.9

1%

9.4

9.4

0

0%

732.1

589.1

142.9

20%

Total a

Subwatershed Area (Acres)

Subwatershed

Como B subwatershed has four overflow subwatersheds that discharge to separate outfalls during certain flow conditions. See Como B schematic for flow routing.

Figure 13. Schematic of generalized flow routing for the Como B subwatershed.

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2.4 Como Lake Water Quality Standards & Regulations Como Lake is subject to federal nutrient loading regulations in order to protect water quality. The federal Clean Water Act mandates that a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) needs to be developed for impaired waters in order to determine the amount of maximum amount of nutrient loading that a waterbody can receive from all sources and still maintain water quality standards. A TMDL is implemented by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) on behalf of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In 2010, the 2002 CLSMP was reformatted to comply with TMDL requirements. The 2002 CLSMP and TMDL determined that a 60% reduction in external loads of TP, and a 95% reduction in internal loads of TP are required to meet State water quality standards. External TP loads are from watershed runoff being delivered to Como Lake through storm sewers. Internal TP loads refers to sources or mechanisms within the lake that generate phosphorus. Annual masses of external and internal phosphorus loads were determined in the 2002 CLSMP and TMDL based on modeling from 2001. In 2018, recalibration of the model slightly changed the total masses of TP load reduction required, however the 60% external TP load reduction, and the 95% internal loads TP load reduction remain unchanged in this current plan (Table 5). Following the adoption of the CLMP, CRWD will work with the MPCA and EPA to update the Como TMDL based on the latest and more accurate estimates of internal and external loading in Como Lake. Table 5. TMDL Load Reduction Targets. TP Source

Target Load Reduction (%)

Internal TP Load

95%

External TP Load

60%

2.4.1 Internal TP Load Reduction Targets To meet the 95% reduction in internal TP loads, multiple interrelated drivers of internal loading must be addressed. As described in Section 2.2, the primary drivers of internal loading in Como Lake are diffusive flux from bottom sediments, the presence of CLP, and an imbalanced fishery. Managing each of these sources individually but in consideration of the others will help in working toward a 95% reduction. Diffusive flux is the largest source of the internal TP load, so addressing the bottom sediments first with management will be a key first step to lead the way in being able to manage CLP and the fishery. While the 95% internal TP load reduction target has remained the same, the total annual internal TP load in lbs/year has likely changed since it was modeled for the 2010 TMDL. The Como Lake water quality model should be updated to confirm the current range of annual internal TP loading.

2.4.2 External Load Reduction Targets To address watershed TP loads from the greater Como Lake watershed and meet the 60% TMDL load reduction target, it is best to approach management on a subwatershed-by-subwatershed basis so that

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higher contributing subwatersheds can be identified and prioritized for projects. This strategic approach will result in a cumulative watershed TP load reduction necessary for meeting Como Lake water quality goals. Significant watershed management has already occurred, so future work will build upon progress made to date. Through the watershed model recalibration in 2018, the TP load contribution from each subwatershed within the greater Como watershed were calculated to identify which subwatersheds were the lowest and highest contributors of TP to Como Lake. Implementing management actions in subwatersheds identified as high TP contributors will be most effective toward meeting the 60% watershed load reduction target. Table 6 lists the cumulative baseline TP load (Year 2000) from all contributing subwatersheds to Como Lake, the total required load reduction (60% of the baseline TP load), and the total allocated load that will still meet state standards (40% of baseline TP load). Table 6. Como Lake watershed baseline TP load from year 2000, the TP load reduction target (60%), and allocated watershed load. Note: the baseline TP load and allocated load listed differ from the 2010 TMDL because a model recalibration was completed in 2018. Watershed TP Loads

Annual Load (lbs)

Baseline TP Load (Year 2000)

732

Required Watershed Load Reduction (60% of Baseline)

439

Allocated Load (40% of Baseline)

293

2.5 Historical Management Actions Como Lake has experienced poor water quality conditions for several decades. The first record of algae blooms, fish kills, and odor problems was reported in 1947. Since then, multiple efforts to reduce pollutant loading to the Lake, and actions to manage the Lake directly have been implemented. The following sections provide a summary of historical lake and watershed management actions.

2.5.1 Historical Lake Management Actions Several lake management actions have been implemented over time in an effort to reduce algal and odor problems, reduce erosion, and manage CLP. Table 7 shows a summary of notable lake management actions that have been implemented in Como Lake.

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Table 7. Summary of notable historical lake management actions. Year Initiated

Action

Purpose

1980s

Rotenone (fish pesticide) and copper sulfate (algaecide) addition

Kill and remove rough fish populations (common carp) and control excessive algal growth.

1985

Floating Aerators

Aerate waters with low or no dissolved oxygen to prevent winter fish kills.

2001-2002

Dredging

Reduce accumulated sediment deltas on the southwest side of the lake.

2003 (multiple projects since 2003)

Shoreline Restoration

Stabilize shoreline, reduce erosion, replaced non-native vegetation with native species, increased wildlife habitat, and improved aesthetics for visitors.

2003 - 2018

Mechanical Harvesting

Maintain boating lanes.

2.5.2 Historical Watershed Management Actions Since the adoption of the 2002 CLMSP, many structural BMP projects for reducing phosphorus loads from stormwater runoff have been constructed in the Como Lake watershed by CRWD and other partners. Structural BMPs are engineered systems that are designed to capture and treat stormwater runoff on the landscape such as a rain garden, an underground infiltration system, or a stormwater pond. In the Como Lake watershed, structural BMP projects that have been constructed through 2018 cumulatively treat 20% of the total watershed area and annually capture 143 lbs of TP. Table 8 provides a summary of the documented BMP by project type that have been constructed in the Como watershed through 2018. Table 8. The total number of documented structural BMP project types that have been constructed in the Como watershed through year 2018 by CRWD and partners. # BMP Projects BMP Type (through Year 2018) Raingardens 43 Stormwater Ponds 7 Pervious Pavement 3 Underground Infiltration 20 Native Buffer Plantings 3 Total 76+

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There have been a few notable large-scale structural BMP projects constructed in the Como watershed since 2000 by CRWD and partners. The most significant project was the Arlington-Pascal Stormwater Improvement Project that was constructed in 2006 in the Como B subwatershed with the goal of addressing localized flooding issues and reducing TP from stormwater flowing to Como Lake. This project was completed in partnership with multiple municipalities and included the construction of 8 raingardens, 8 underground infiltration trenches, a large underground infiltration system, and a regional stormwater pond. Table 9 lists all large-scale BMP projects in the Como watershed and associated TP load reductions, including the Arlington-Pascal Project. Table 9. Notable large-scale structural BMP projects constructed in the Como watershed since 2000 by CRWD and partners. Sub Project Name Watershed Year Project Description Agency(s) Location Arlington-Pascal B 2006--2007 Installation of 8 rain gardens,8 CRWD, St. Stormwater infiltration trenches, 1 large Paul, Falcon Improvement underground infiltration Heights, Project system treating runoff from a Roseville 217 acre residential area Como Golf Course Pond Como Regional Park Pool Raingardens Como Park Senior High School

B

2007-2008

D

2011

G

2017

Stewardship Grant Residential Raingardens

All

2005-2018

Pond storage increased and native buffer installation 4 rain gardens treating runoff from pool parking lot Installation of a large underground infiltration system underneath the football field. 21

CRWD, St. Paul St. Paul CRWD, St. Paul Public Schools CRWD. residents

In addition to structural BMPs, significant efforts have occurred over time to reduce Como watershed TP loads through non-structural projects or practices. Non-structural practices focus on source management, such as proper disposal of pet waste, leaf clean-up efforts, storm drain debris clearing, or street sweeping. Phosphorus reductions through non-structural practices have been achieved through participation and promotion from partners, including efforts from community groups such as District 10 and the Como Active Citizen Network (CACN). Notable efforts include annual neighborhood leaf cleanup events by CACN, participation in the Adopt-a-Drain program by District 10, and fall street sweeping by the City of St. Paul.

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3 Issues and Goals Building on the results of the Water Quality Drivers Analysis Study (LimnoTech 2017) and the recalibrated P8 watershed modeling, members of the PAG and AAG were also asked to identify issues facing Como Lake. Once the issues were identified, CRWD worked with the AAG and PAG to develop management goals to provide direction on how and when to address identified issues. The following sections discuss the issues of concern for Como Lake, and the process for issue identification and goal setting through stakeholder engagement.

3.1 Issues of Concern As discussed in Section 1.3, members of the AAG and PAG convened on separate occasions and were asked to identify the major issues facing Como Lake and the surrounding watershed. The issues that were identified represent causes of water quality problems in Como Lake (e.g. phosphorus loading) and associated effects (e.g. algae blooms) (Table 10). Issues that were shared by both groups are presented in Table 10.

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Table 10. Issues Identified by Agency Advisory Group (AAG) and Public Advisory Group (PAG).

Agency Advisory Group Issues

Public Advisory Group Issues

Water quality: • Phosphorus loading • Hypoxia/anoxia • Algal blooms • Odor/aesthetics • Meeting TMDL reduction goals • Shallow urban lake • Other pollutant loading (e.g. chloride) • High summer water temperatures

Water quality: • Pollution from runoff • Algae blooms • Odor/aesthetics • Loss of plant and animal diversity • Invasive species/curly-leaf pondweed • Excessive aquatic plants/weeds

Watershed/Land Use: • Ultra-urban development • Stormwater inputs • Meeting TMDL reduction goals

Watershed/Land Use: • Overgrown vegetation (referring to shoreline plantings) • Overuse • Traffic/noise/light pollution* Other: • • • •

Cost-effective measures needed Bold actions needed Expectations versus Cost Instability in pavilion business* Uncertainty Too few non-summer Funding recreation opportunities Climate change • Under-involved community • Safety* • Population growth* • Lack of political will or willingness by the City to take action* • Impact of water quality on parkland and nearby trails. *Issues that will be addressed outside of the CLMP/by other agencies Other: • • • •

Issues shared by both advisory groups: • • • • • • • •

Phosphorus loading/pollution runoff (internal and external loading) Other pollutants chloride, sediment, trash Algae blooms Odor and aesthetics Invasive species (i.e. curly-leaf pondweed)/excessive aquatic vegetation/loss of plant diversity Imbalanced food web/loss of animal diversity/fisheries management Dense urban environment/population growth Balancing cost-effectiveness

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Identification of the primary issues with Como Lake and the surrounding watershed is key to developing a set of measurable goals and objectives. In addition to goals that will meet TMDL requirements, goals and objectives were developed to address the identified issues (Section 3.3).

3.2 Stakeholder Input As discussed in Section 1.3.2, stakeholders provided input on what draws them to Como Lake, the major issues facing Como Lake today, and their hopes for a healthy Como Lake. Opportunities to provide feedback included the first PAG meeting, conversations at the Lake, and an online survey, which resulted in nearly 800 comments from participants. The responses referenced the full experience of the area, challenges, breadth of social, environmental, and economic issues and opportunities. Stakeholder comments were qualitatively analyzed to identify six major themes, which included: 1. A healthy lake where users are confident in interacting with the water. 2. A safe and accessible park that balances use of the area with a peaceful experience and healthy environment. 3. A diverse, healthy habitat that can support a variety of wildlife, including pollinators, birds, fish, and amphibians. 4. An active, engaged community that protects and cares for Como Lake. 5. Amenities that allow for various kinds of recreation throughout the year. 6. A stable venue that remains affordable and supports community vitality. The six themes that emerged served as the basis for development of goals and measureable objectives, which is further discussed in the following section.

3.3 Goals and Measurable Objectives Management goals set a vision for management of Como Lake, and the associated objectives provide a mechanism to measure progress towards meeting those objectives. Establishment of goals and measurable objectives is critically important to guide and identify management actions to meet those goals. Goals for management are driven by the State water quality standards that apply to Como Lake (see Section 2.2.2), and are also based on stakeholder input (Sections 1.3 and 3.2). The draft goals and objectives statements were reviewed by the AAG and PAG members through an online survey. Both groups provided feedback on the draft goals and objectives. CRWD incorporated the AAG and PAG feedback into the selected goals and measurable objectives, which are presented below.

3.3.1 Selected Goals and Measurable Objectives The following goals and objectives were selected for adaptive management of Como Lake and its watershed. The goals are intended to be broad with specific, measurable objectives to meet the stated goals and measure progress.

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Goal 1: Como Lake will be managed as a healthy, shallow lake. A healthy, shallow lake is one where phosphorus levels are maintained at sufficiently low levels (60 µg/L or lower) to minimize algae nuisances, the rooted plant community is dominated by a diverse assemblage of native plants, and a balanced aquatic food web is maintained. •

Objective 1A: Meet and maintain in-lake total phosphorus concentrations at ≤ 60 µg/L (summertime, surface water average). Meeting this water quality standard will require an approximate 95% reduction in internal loads.

Objective 1B: Meet and maintain in-lake total phosphorus concentrations at ≤ 60 µg/L (summertime, surface water average). Meeting this water quality standard will require an approximate 60% reduction in watershed load.

Objective 1C: Reduce other nonpoint source pollutants from entering Como Lake (e.g. chloride, trash, sediment).

Objective 1D: CLP will be reduced to < 10% Frequency of Occurrence (FOC) during period of peak abundance (typically June).

Objective 1E: Native aquatic vegetation will be established and maintained to exceed these criteria: species richness > 8 with at least 3 species having FOC > 20%.

Objective 1F: Establish and maintain a fishery with balanced populations of piscivorous, planktivorous, and benthivorous fish.

Goal 2: Maintain healthy shoreline areas that can support a variety of wildlife and contribute to the health of Como Lake. •

Objective 2A: Maintain areas of native vegetation along the shoreline to capture surface runoff, minimize shoreline erosion, and promote wildlife habitat.

Goal 3: Maintain a variety of year-round recreational opportunities that are appropriate for a shallow urban lake. •

Objective 3A: Continue to provide fishing opportunities.

Objective 3B: Provide areas suitable for non-motorized boating.

Goal 4: Achieve strong sustained community engagement and stewardship to improve and protect Como Lake. •

Objective 4A: Engage and support existing groups and citizens that have worked to improve and protect Como Lake.

Objective 4B: Engage new groups and citizens in efforts aimed at improving and protecting Como Lake.

Objective 4C: Increase citizen knowledge and understanding of Como Lake.

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Goal 5: Utilize the best science, partnerships, and resources to ensure successful implementation of the CLMP over the life of the plan (20 years). â&#x20AC;˘

Objective 5A: Provide a structured adaptive management approach to most effectively and efficiently adjust management actions through the life of the plan.

â&#x20AC;˘

Objective 5B: Utilize multiple partners and funding sources to provide resources required to implement the CLMP.

Once goals and objectives were finalized, management actions to achieve those goals were critically evaluated and then selected for recommendation. Through this process, three categories of goals and actions were identified, which include lake, watershed and community related actions. These categories serve as the organizational framework for identification and implementation of actions as part of the CLMP, which is discussed in detail in the Section 4.

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4 Recommended Management Actions Shallow urban lakes often have numerous water quality issues and Como Lake is no different. Como Lake has been in poor health for decades, so it will take significant effort and time to achieve current water quality goals. Through holistic, adaptive management, a combination of watershed and in-lake management actions will be required to improve water quality in Como Lake. The following sections describe the recommended lake, watershed, and community-based actions. Letters have been assigned to each category throughout this plan, such that “L” indicates lake management actions, “W” indicates watershed management actions, and “C” indicates community-based management actions.

4.1 Lake Management Actions While some lake management actions have been implemented in Como Lake before, more work in the lake is needed to meet current goals for a healthy shallow lake. Due to the complexity of issues facing Como Lake, there is not one single action that will improve water quality in the lake. Instead, a comprehensive management approach that implements several actions in the short-term, and over time, will be required to meet management goals and ultimately achieve a healthy Como Lake.

4.1.1 Evaluation of Possible Lake Management Actions A matrix of possible lake management actions was developed as part of the evaluation process (Appendix A). The compiled actions have been applied elsewhere with outcomes and expectations welldocumented (Holdren et al. 2001; Cooke et al. 2005; Osgood and Gibbons 2017; Osgood et al. 2017). Possible actions were listed based on their ability to address the primary issues in Como Lake. Selection criteria was based on suitability for a shallow lake, reliability of success, expected duration (i.e. period of action effectiveness), relative cost and return on investment, and pros and cons of each management action. The matrix of possible in-lake management actions was shared with the AAG and PAG. Both groups provided valuable feedback that was incorporated in the selection of recommended management actions.

4.1.2 Recommended Lake and Shoreline Management Actions This section describes lake management actions that are designed to address issues related to four specific categories: In-lake phosphorus management, aquatic vegetation management, fisheries management and shoreline management.

In-lake Phosphorus Management Phosphorus is the primary driver of water quality in Como Lake (LimnoTech 2017). Previous studies have indicated that internal phosphorus loads must be reduced by 95%. Lake management actions that reduce diffusive flux of phosphorus from the sediments must occur in the early implementation of the CLMP in order to improve water quality in Como Lake. This section contains recommended actions specifically related to in-lake phosphorus management. L1. Update lake water quality model. Previous studies have indicated a range of internal phosphorus loading rates depending on method of calculation and assumptions inherent in those calculations. It is highly recommended that the Como Lake water quality model be updated with the revised subwatershed loads developed in 2018, direct sediment core P flux

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measurements collected in 2016, and recent observed monitoring data. The lake water quality model should be applied to validate load reduction targets calculated in the 2010 TMDL and to estimate phosphorus load reduction from alum treatment(s). The revised water quality model should be used to update the 2010 TMDL, which needs to incorporate new data collected and updated watershed model since the TMDL was adopted. L2. Alum application to inactivate sediment phosphorus. Apply alum to inactivate mobile sediment phosphorus and mitigation of internal phosphorus loading. The alum dose can be developed using existing sediment core data collected in 2016 (Wenck 2016). It is highly recommended that an alum application be applied as soon as possible pending available resources. If resources allow, alum should be applied to Como Lake in 2019. Depending on Como Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s response to alum in the first three-year interval of the adaptive management plan, additional supplemental alum application strategies could be needed in the future to meet stated management objectives, which has been included as an action below. Inlake phosphorus reduction in response to the initial alum application will need to be monitored through ongoing water quality sampling throughout the first three years of the adaptive management plan. Depending on Como Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s response, supplemental strategies in the future could include a water column stripping dose, or a maintain dose to keep the original sediment inactivation dose functional, or alum treatment of inflows (i.e. P Interception Strategy). It should be noted that dredging Como Lake sediment was carefully considered as a lake management action. At this time, dredging of Como Lake sediments is not recommended due to the uncertainty in costs, which are estimated to be an order of magnitude more expensive than alum. Adding to the uncertainty in costs for dredging is the potential for special disposal requirements of lake sediments, an issue that would be driven by contaminated sediments. L3. Continue bi-weekly in-lake water quality sampling. Continue bi-weekly in-lake water quality sampling to measure progress. At a minimum, measured parameters should include epilimnetic and hypolimnetic TP soluble reactive phosphorus, Chl-a, and turbidity. While the limiting nutrient in Como Lake is typically phosphorus, total nitrogen, ammonium and nitrate should be frequently monitored in the epilimnion and hypolimnion as well to continue to monitor as this nitrogen also influences algal production. Bi-weekly surface measurements of Secchi depth should be collected with the above parameters along with DO and temperature profiles. Continuous DO monitoring should be maintained to measure indirect influence of implemented actions on anoxia. L4. Monitor and assess subwatershed loads. Subwatershed loads should be monitored to confirm load estimates from watershed model. Monitoring should prioritize subwatersheds with minimal or highly variable observed data, the highest contributing subwatersheds and subwatersheds with BMP implementation to evaluate progress on watershed load reduction from existing and future watershed BMPs. The lake and watershed models will need to be updated in the future if observed watershed loads deviate significantly from predicted. L5. Supplemental alum applications. The expectation is that in-lake phosphorus concentration will decrease following an initial alum application to inactivate sediment phosphorus. However, given the long-term record of external phosphorus loading and burial of phosphorus in the sediments, a maintenance application may be required within a few years of the initial application. This condition will be assessed through ongoing monitoring activities and will be evaluated annually as part of the adaptive management plan.

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Aquatic Vegetation Management The aquatic vegetation community in Como Lake is dominated by CLP with low diversity of other native macrophytes. Mechanical harvesting has historically been implemented in Como Lake to control CLP with a focus on clearing areas for recreation (i.e. near fishing piers and paddling lanes). This management technique only targets the upper portion of CLP with the root system largely unaffected allowing the CLP to propagate each year. There are no documented cases of CLP eradication to-date, so maintenance will be an ongoing challenge with current control strategies. Given how the abundance of CLP in the Lake, an aggressive management strategy in the first three years (or more) of CLMP implementation will be required to get CLP under control. Once the CLP is under control, management efforts can focus on establishment of a diverse, native aquatic plant community. The following management actions pertain to the aquatic plant community. L6. Herbicide treatment to control curly-leaf pondweed. CLP is extremely difficult to control, but herbicide treatment has demonstrated the greatest success to date for reducing CLP density. Even with herbicide treatment, eradication is highly unlikely once it has been established in a lake. Therefore, ongoing management of CLP using herbicides will be required. When appropriately applied, herbicide treatments have shown the greatest success with management of CLP to date. Ongoing research at the University of Minnesotaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center have shown that herbicide treatments are very effective at reducing CLP abundance. Herbicides are widely used as a CLP management tool by MNDNR (including many Twin Cities Metro Area Lakes) and Wisconsin DNR. It is highly recommended that low-dose, large-scale (â&#x2030;Ľ 30 acres) herbicide treatments are applied in early May annually for the first 3-5 years of implementation. A pre-herbicide treatment delineation of CLP will need to be conducted 2-4 weeks before a planned herbicide treatment. The expectation is that a large portion of the lake area can be treated per year with similar large-scale treatments in other areas annually for the first 3-5 years of implementation. However, depending on pre-treatment delineation, repeated treatments in the same area may be required. It is expected that abundance of CLP will be reduced considerably if large-scale herbicide treatments occurs annually for the first few years of implementation. L7. Develop lake vegetation management plan. Collaborate with MNDNR to develop a longterm lake vegetation management plan (LVMP) to establish and maintain a healthy and diverse, native aquatic plant community. The plan should also consider strategies to keep CLP under control following initial herbicide treatments, which may also require periodic, small-scale herbicide treatments. L8. Conduct annual aquatic vegetation surveys. Conduct point-intercept surveys to measure aquatic vegetation species abundance and density 2-3 weeks following herbicide treatment (June) and late-season (late-July or early-August).

Fisheries Management Recent studies have found that Como Lake has an imbalanced fishery. That is, the Lake is dominated by planktivorous fish with few top predators. Planktivorous fish tend to preferentially feed on large-bodied zooplankton, which reduces their overall capacity to graze on phytoplankton. A better balanced fishery can lead to more efficient zooplankton grazing on algae and can also provide a fishery that is more resilient to recreational fishing pressures. The following actions are recommended to address the imbalanced fishery in Como Lake.

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L9. Develop long-term targets for balanced fishery. Collaborate with MNDNR to develop longterm targets for a diverse, ecologically balanced fishery that can also support and sustain recreational fishing for the community. The Como Lake Fisheries Management Plan should be regularly updated and assessed as part of the ongoing adaptive management of Como Lake. L10. Conduct fish surveys. Complete regular fish surveys every 2-3 years to determine species abundance and diversity, and to measure progress of efforts to meet and sustain long-term targets for a balanced fishery. The MNDNR typically conducts fish surveys in Como Lake every five years. Depending on the MNDNR survey rotation, supplemental fish surveys may be needed in the early years of the adaptive management plan.

Shoreline Management Since the 2002 CLSMP, several shoreline stabilization projects have been implemented. However, there are areas along the shore that need additional stabilization and/or may provide opportunities to meet additional management goals and objectives (e.g. reduce trash loading or provide additional fishing locations). The actions below are recommended to assess and document current shoreline conditions and develop plans for management based on those conditions. L11. Conduct shoreline assessment. A shoreline assessment is the first step in development of a Shoreline Management Plan (discussed below), which should be completed early in the implementation of the CLMP. In collaboration with the City of St. Paul, a shoreline assessment should be conducted to identify the following: •

Erosional areas (current and susceptible).

Existing shoreline vegetation composition (density, diversity of native and non-native species).

Quality of wildlife habitat (species types, availability, and needs).

Areas where the shoreline vegetation buffers widths could be expanded to maximize capture of surface runoff.

L12. Develop shoreline management plan. In collaboration with the City of St. Paul, develop and implement a “Como Lake Shoreline Management Plan” that emphasizes native plant diversity, wildlife habitat, shoreline stabilization, and capture of surface runoff. Using information obtained in the shoreline assessment, the shoreline management plan should incorporate steps to implement priority actions, which include: •

Implement shoreline vegetation improvement and/or reinforcement to stabilize erosional areas and promote wildlife habitat.

Maintain areas of shoreline vegetation that allow for visual and physical access to Como Lake from the shoreline through vegetation.

Where needed and feasible, replace nuisance non-native vegetation with native vegetation.

L13. Engage volunteers and local partners. Identify opportunities to engage volunteers and local partners to assist with shoreline vegetation management projects based on specifications in the Shoreline Management Plan (e.g. Adopt a Shoreline Volunteer Program).

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4.2 Watershed Management Actions To achieve Como Lake water quality goals, TP loads being transported to the Lake from the watershed through stormwater runoff must be addressed in addition to the internal phosphorus load. To address watershed TP loads from the greater Como Lake watershed, it is best to approach management on a subwatershed-by-subwatershed basis so that higher contributing subwatersheds can be identified and prioritized for projects. This strategic approach will result in a cumulative watershed TP load reduction necessary for meeting Como Lake water quality goals. This section identifies future watershed management actions for achieving Como Lake water quality goals.

4.2.1 Watershed Phosphorus Management Actions To meet the long-term 60% phosphorus watershed load reduction goals over the life of the plan, a Como Watershed TP Load Reduction Plan (Table 11) was developed based on subwatershed modeling load estimates.

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Table 11. Watershed Total Phosphorus (TP) Load Reduction Plan. Subwatershed Como A Baseline TP Load (Year 2000) (lbs) Existing Practices (Year 2018) Potential Structural - Identifieda TP Load Potential Structural - Unidentifiedb Reductions (lbs) Future Permit BMPsc Potential Non-Structural d Reduction Subtotal Total Target TP Load (lbs) Total Target Reduction (%) a

11.2 0.0 0.0 ? 0.0 0.8 0.8 10.4 7%

Como B 474.3 110.3 130.8 ? 45.4 28.4 314.9 159.4 66%

Como C

Como D

20.9 2.8 8.9 ? 0.0 2.0 13.8 7.1 66%

98.3 5.8 47.1 ? 33.3 3.8 90.0 8.3 92%

Como E 41.3 0.0 31.8 ? 0.0 1.9 33.8 7.5 82%

Como F 25.6 10.0 1.2 ? 0.6 1.6 13.4 12.2 52%

Como G 16.2 10.0 0.0 ? 1.7 0.6 12.3 3.9 76%

Como H 10.5 1.0 2.6 ? 0.0 0.9 4.5 6.0 43%

Como I 6.3 3.1 0.0 ? 0.0 0.7 3.8 2.5 61%

Como J 10.0 0.0 2.5 ? 0.0 1.4 3.9 6.1 39%

Como K 8.1 0.0 2.0 ? 0.0 1.1 3.1 5.0 39%

Como L 0.0 0.0 0.0 ? 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0%

Como M 9.4 0.0 2.4 ? 0.0 1.6 3.9 5.5 42%

All 732.1 143.0 229.3 0.0 81.0 44.9 498.3 233.8 68%

Projects evaluated in existing feasibility studies

b

Unforseen or unplanned future opportunities. E.g. curb cut rain gardens, innovative practices

c

Estimated future redevelopment projects subject to CRWD rules

d

Reduction estimates based on enhanced street sweeping studies. Actual practices may vary.

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From the loading estimates, subwatersheds needing TP management to meet the load reduction goals were identified and prioritized. Four categories of TP load reduction methods were defined, including both potential structural and non-structural BMPs to be implemented in the future: 1) Potential Structural â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Identified, 2) Potential Structural â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Unidentified, 3) Future Permit BMPs, and 4) Potential Non-Structural. Definitions of each of these four categories are listed in Table 12. It is important to note that in a highly developed urban watershed, finding opportunities to implement watershed management actions are limited and are dependent on opportunities presenting themselves through the initiation of other projects (e.g. street reconstruction or building redevelopment, land use changes, landscape redesign, partnerships, funding sources, and the planning of non-structural activities).

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Table 12. Four categories of watershed TP load reduction methods. TP Load Reduction Method 1. Potential Structural – Identified

2. Potential Structural – Unidentified

3. Future Permit BMPs

4. Potential Non-Structural

Description Potential projects identified in existing feasibility studies

Unforeseen or unplanned future structural BMP opportunities in the Como watershed Future potential redevelopment projects in the Como subwatershed that could be subject to CRWD’s permitting rules (i.e. parcels ≥ 1 acre)

TP load reduction estimate for nonstructural BMP practices

Project Examples

Assumptions for Determining TP Load Reduction

See Appendix B for a list of identified projects from feasibility studies by subwatershed

Estimated using TP load reduction targets (lbs/year) for each project as identified in feasibility studies

Curb cut raingardens or the development of innovative BMP practices; future feasibility studies

Could not be estimated, currently unknown. Listed as question marks (?) and will be filled in as it becomes available

BMPs installed in the Como watershed as redevelopment occurs

All parcels ≥1 acre identified (parkland and existing structural BMPs exempted). Of those parcels, 50% (or 35 parcels) assumed to be developed over the next 20 years. Of those 35 parcels, each were assumed to have 70% impervious area and a structural BMP installed with a removal rate of 1.6 lbs/acre

Street sweeping, storm drain maintenance, community leaf cleanups

An average TP load reduction estimate from enhanced street sweeping studies were used as a representative value for load reduction by nonstructural practices. Rates calculated using representative value and total directly connected impervious fraction

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Under each category of TP load reduction methods from the Watershed TP Load Reduction Plan (Table 11), the following watershed management actions were identified to address watershed TP loading and to meet the 60% watershed load reduction goal by subwatershed. Achieving each of the watershed management actions presented here will rely heavily on partnerships with municipalities, residents, and businesses in the Como watershed. Partnerships will allow for collaboration when opportunities arise so multiple interests can be fulfilled on a project.

Potential Structural – Identified Several feasibility studies have been completed by CRWD and other partners in effort to identify locations or opportunities for potential structural BMP projects in the Como watershed. Appendix B lists all potential BMP projects identified in existing feasibility studies in each Como subwatershed (B-M). The BMP type and the estimated TP load reduction target (lbs/year) of each project are also listed Appendix B. The total estimated TP load reduction target (lbs/year) for each subwatershed was summed and the total was placed in the Watershed TP Load Reduction Plan (Table 11) to subtract from the baseline load. The majority of the potential structural projects listed in Appendix cc were identified as part of the Como Park Stormwater Inventory and Watershed Analysis (HEI 2016) and the Como Regional Park Stormwater Master Plan (HEI 2017). The following action is recommended to achieve implementation of all potential structural projects that have been identified in feasibility studies: W1. Implement potential structural projects identified in feasibility studies. Collaborate with partners to implement identified projects (Appendix B) in existing feasibility studies as opportunities arise. Based on the calculated estimations, TP Load reductions from ‘Potential Structural-Identified’ have the potential to be significant with 229 lbs/year, or 31% of the total watershed TP load (Table 11).

Potential Structural – Unidentified The ‘Potential Structural-Unidentified’ method accounts for load reductions achieved through unforeseen or unplanned future structural BMP opportunities. This category also accounts for TP load reductions gained by future innovative structural BMPs discovered through research. In addition, feasibility studies that identify potential structural BMP opportunities in the Como watershed will continue to be developed in the future. The TP load reductions to be achieved by potential unidentified structural practices in the Watershed TP Load Reduction Plan (Table 11) could not be estimated because they are currently unknown. Therefore, the load reduction estimates are accounted for in the Watershed TP Load Reduction Plan as question marks (?) and will be filled in as opportunities come available. The following actions are recommended to achieve load reductions from unidentified structural BMPs: W2. Seek out potential structural BMP project opportunities in the Como watershed not currently identified. Collaborate with partners to identify new opportunities as they become available and strategically implement in key locations, such as the placement of curb cut boulevard raingardens during a street reconstruction project. W3. Support research to seek out innovative stormwater management practices. Research and development on innovative stormwater practices is ongoing and continues to evolve. Encourage and provide support to research seeking to develop new and innovative stormwater practices. W4. Complete a feasibility study for an alum treatment facility to treat watershed runoff. This potential future action depends upon progress to reduce external/watershed loads and response of lake to in-lake management actions. Page | 48


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Future Permit BMPs CRWD implements a set of Board adopted rules through the Permitting Program that regulate development and redevelopment projects to ensure that stormwater runoff from construction sites does not adversely affect District water resources. According to CRWD’s Water Quality and Stormwater Management Rules (CRWD 2015), a permit is required for any land development project that disturbs one acre of land or greater, or 10,000 square feet in area and adjacent to a water body (Rule C). For development projects that meet the criteria for Rule C, permittees are required to fulfill three standards pertaining to stormwater management on their site as part of the project: 1) Rate Control—runoff rates cannot exceed existing runoff rates; 2) Volume Reduction—stormwater runoff volume reduction must be achieved onsite in the amount of 1.1 inches of runoff from the total impervious surfaces; and 3) Water Quality—effective non-point source pollution reduction BMPs to achieve 90% pollutant removal from the runoff generated by 2.5 inch rainfall or annually. Any future development or redevelopment project within the Como watershed will present an opportunity to enact CRWD’s Rule C which will assist in working toward TP load reduction goals. The following actions are recommended to achieve load reductions from future permit BMPs: W5. Implement CRWD permitting rules as they apply. Enact Rule C as opportunities arise through future development or redevelopment projects in the Como watershed. TP load reductions from ‘Future Permit BMPs’ have the potential to be significant with 81 lbs/year, or 11% of the total watershed TP load.

Potential Non-Structural Non-structural practices in the Como watershed are an effective method for reducing TP loading in stormwater flowing to the lake. Non-structural practices focus on source management, such as proper disposal of pet waste, leaf clean-up efforts, storm drain debris clearing, or street sweeping. The success of non-structural practices for reducing watershed TP are reliant on participation from both municipal and community partners. It is also important to invest in research that aims to understand the effectiveness of non-structural practices so efforts can be better coordinated. Potential non-structural practices were included in the Watershed TP Load Reduction Plan (Table 11) and target TP load reductions by subwatershed were estimated. Based on the calculations, TP load reductions from potential non-structural practices are estimated to be 45 lbs/year, or 6% of the total watershed TP load. The following actions are recommended to assist in achieving load reductions from non-structural practices: W6. Support research on the effectiveness of non-structural practices. Support research that aims to better understand the benefits of leaf removal and street sweeping as TP load reduction strategy. W7. Enhance spring and fall street sweeping efforts in the Como watershed. Coordinate efforts with municipal partners to evaluate a “Como Watershed Street Sweeping Plan” that prioritizes streets for sweeping based on subwatershed load reduction potential, tree species type (P content, typical leaf drop timing), source potential, logistics. W8. Support the community in implementing non-structural practices in the Como watershed. Support and promote community efforts for leaf removal, storm drain cleanup, and other TP reduction strategies, e.g. Adopt-a-Drain, leaf disposal assistance, supplies, education/outreach, or event coordination.

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W9. Provide educational opportunities to Como area residents on non-structural practices. Promote best practices to residents through education and outreach in partnership with CACN, District 10, and other groups.

4.2.2 Other Non-point Source Pollutant Management Actions While phosphorus is the primary pollutant of concern to Como Lake, there are additional non-point source pollutants that affect water quality and overall lake health. The most significant non-point source pollutants in addition to phosphorus are chloride, trash, sediment, and other pollutants contained in stormwater runoff. The implications of each of these pollutants to Como Lake and strategies for reducing them from the watershed are listed below.

Chloride Addressing chloride issues are complex due to the need to balance public safety on icy roads with the negative water quality implications. The following actions are recommended to assist in managing chloride in the Como Lake watershed: W10. Promote best winter deicing practices to the community. Promote best winter salt use and deicing practices to residents and business owners through education and outreach in the Como Lake watershed. W11. Collaborate with agency partners to promote best deicing practices. Continue to work with local partners to promote best practices for snow removal and deicing to reduce road salt application on streets and roads in the Como Lake watershed. W12. Require deicing training classes for private applicators. Require private road salt applicators to take the MPCAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Smart Salting training classes W13. Routinely monitor and analyze chloride concentrations in Como Lake and storm sewer outlets. Continue to perform routine sampling (April-October) of chloride in the lake and at key storm sewer outlets discharging to the lake and report upon results.

Trash Trash entering Como Lake from watershed runoff is problematic because it can have negative impacts the aquatic ecosystem and the overall lake aesthetics. The reduction of trash in Como Lake can be achieved through a combination of prevention in the watershed and direct removal from the lake. The following actions are recommended to assist in preventing and removing trash in the watershed and Como Lake: W14. Improve trash management within the immediate vicinity of Como Lake. Coordinate with the City of St Paul to develop an improved Trash Management Plan to reduce litter within the immediate vicinity of Como Lake. W15. Coordinate with community groups to develop a plan for reducing trash from the watershed through educational opportunities and organized neighborhood trash clean ups. W16. Implement an annual trash removal event in the lake. Coordinate volunteers and community groups to assist in removing trash in the lake and along the shoreline. W17. Maintain stormwater BMPs in the watershed to ensure performance for removing trash from stormwater.

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Sediment Strategies for managing sediment from the watershed are the same as those proposed for watershed TP reduction through structural and permit BMPs (see Actions W1, W5, W17). Since structural BMPs are receiving stormwater runoff from the watershed, they are able to capture the majority of the other entrained pollutants in addition to TP. In addition to actions W1, W5, and W17, the following action is recommended to assist in reducing sediment from the Como watershed: W18. Continue to monitor sediment and other pollutants in Como lake and at key storm sewer outlets discharging to the lake and report upon results.

4.3 Community Actions While the previous two sections of the CLMP discuss actions in the Lake and Watershed, Communitybased actions are equally as important to the success of the CLMP. These actions work to help build stewardship of and pride in Como Lake from both individuals and groups within the community. Upon successful implementation of the CLMP, visitors to Como Lake will be able to more confidently interact with Como Lake. That interaction can take the form of fishing, boating, sitting near the lake, etc. This category of actions is grouped into 3 sub-categories: Recreation Actions, Education & Outreach Actions, and Partnership Actions.

4.3.1 Recreation Recreation is the most significant way people interact with Como Lake. Being the centerpiece of Como Regional Park brings many visitors to Como Lake in all seasons. These visitors recreate in many ways such as: walking/running, bird watching, photography, kayaking, stand-up paddle boarding, fishing and others. One of the most significant values individuals have about Como Lake is related to recreation in and around the Lake, which was identified through the PAG engagement process As such, it is important that management actions in the CLMP facilitate, improve and celebrate recreational activities at Como Lake. The following actions are recommended to assist in promoting and maintaining recreational activities on Como Lake: C1. Enhance and maintain existing fishing areas. Enhance and maintain existing fishing areas around the Lake, i.e. Pavilion dock, fishing pier, east parking lot area, and Duck Point. C2. Identify additional designated fishing areas. In conjunction with the shoreline assessment (Action L11), identify potential locations for additional designated fishing areas and establish stable, designated, shore-fishing sites for individuals or small groups. C3. Host annual community fishing event. This event should be coordinated with MNDNRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fishing in the Neighborhood Program. Teach youth how to fish. Educate residents on fish types and ecology. C4. Provide access for non-motorized boating. Continue to provide and maintain designated points for non-motorized boat access. C5. Maintain clear channels for non-motorized boating. Maintain clear channels for nonmotorized boating, particularly in areas near the Pavilion. Efforts to maintain clear channels for non-motorized boating will need to be carefully evaluated on an annual basis to ensure that management actions do not interfere with progress towards Goal 1, Objective 1D.

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C6. Create a “Como Lake Water Trail”. Create on-the-water education opportunities for people recreating on Como Lake, such as a “Como Lake Water Trail” that includes interpretive installations in the lake. C7. Work with the City of St. Paul to provide year-round water-related recreational activities to bring people to Como Lake.

4.3.2 Education & Outreach Public support through sustained community engagement and stewardship is critical for the improvement and projection of Como Lake. Having committed community groups and members that can help further the initiatives of the CLMP and support the work the CRWD and its partners is essential for success. Information, education and understanding of Como Lake, its issues and the work to improve it, form the foundation that supports stewardship. Outreach to the many different communities and user groups around Como Lake provides an opportunity to increase the number and diversity of the people working to improve Como Lake. The following actions are recommended to achieve education and outreach objectives: C8. Conduct annual educational workshops or events on watershed and lake protection. Coordinate and host at least 1 annual workshop or event for existing groups and new audiences that supports current initiatives. C9. Develop and install a Como Lake Water Quality Kiosk. A kiosk will be developed, installed and maintained at an outdoor location near the Pavilion, and will serve as the primary information hub on Como Lake. The kiosk will communicate information relevant to Como Lake’s water quality and on-going improvement efforts, e.g. science, information, updates, realtime data, available activities, maps. C10. Develop and install new educational signage around Como Lake. Signage will be installed at key locations to enhance user experience and understanding of Como Lake. Identify at least two additional languages to display or print educational information in C11. Develop educational resources about Como Lake for school groups and others. Educational resources should be developed that can be offered to school groups or others for use in learning more about Como Lake’s water quality, and watershed and lake protection practices. C12. Incorporate art and other media as an alternative communication method of Como Lake’s water quality. Art and other media can help engage citizens who might not otherwise be engaged in the work to improve Como Lake’s water quality. This work will need to be coordinated with the City of St. Paul to ensure that it is complimentary to other park programming and art installations. C13. Provide regular updates on Como Lake. Coordinate and submit regular updates (e.g. blogposts, social media content, press releases, and/or reports) on Como Lake water quality, current projects, or other relevant information for Como Active Citizen Network (CACN), District 10, and others to distribute to their networks. C14. Regularly participate in meetings of existing community groups. Regular participation or presentations to existing groups represents a simple what to continue to support and educate groups that have provided sustain support for Como Lake and efforts to improve it.

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C15. Support at least one community organized event each year. Existing community events offer an excellent opportunity bring information about Como Lake to citizens of the District. These events although not necessarily water focused can be a point to engage citizens who might not otherwise have exposure to information about Como Lake. C16. Provide resources (informational and/or supplies) to volunteer groups in the Como Lake Watershed to support their initiatives (e.g. Master Water Stewards, CACN, neighborhood teams). C17. Identify and partner with new community institutions in Como Lake improvement efforts. New institutions in the community may include schools, faith groups, cultural groups, or businesses, and provide opportunities to engage with Como Lake and participate in water quality improvement efforts. C18. Target outreach to recreational users of Como Lake and Como Park. Engage with various individuals or user groups utilizing Como Lake and Como Park, e.g. walkers, runners, bikers, dog owners, boaters, anglers, skiers, birders, etc. C19. Provide a Como Lake comprehensive online resource to allow the public to access information and updates about Como Lake. A wealth of information is available about Como Lake. A comprehensive online location for this information will help educate and inform the community about Como Lake. C20. Document history, personal stories, and values linked to Como Lake. Coordinate and develop programming to research, document, and share the history, stories, and value of Como Lake. C21. Develop and launch a citizen science campaign with Como area residents, schools, and community groups. Citizen science offers an excellent opportunity to engage groups and individuals in helping collect critical data to help guide management decisions for Como Lake. Additionally, it provides a meaningful way for individuals to learn more about Como Lake.

4.3.3 Partnerships No one agency can implement the CLMP and improve Como Lake alone. Partnerships are a key component to working to improve a highly impaired, shallow urban lake in a fully built out watershed. Several agencies and community groups have done significant work relative to lake and/or watershed improvement projects and programs. Continued partnering and coordination between these agencies and groups will remain a key component to most efficiently and effectively implement the CLMP. New partners also will be important to ensure efforts can be linked to all segments of the Como Lake community. Partnerships can also include funding arrangements that can most cost-effectively implement the CLMP. The following actions are recommended to support partnerships: C22. Partner with agencies and community groups to complete the actions in the Como Lake Management Plan. Partnerships and cooperative efforts are integral to successful implementation of the CLMP since improvement of the lake is dependent on multiple partners. C23. Conduct annual meeting with agency partners. Coordinate and host an annual meeting with agency partners (e.g. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Como Lake Agency Management Teamâ&#x20AC;?) to report upon progress, projects, results, and next steps. This group will be able to regularly document progress towards meeting goals and serve as the mechanism for implementing the Adaptive Management Approach.

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C24. Regularly evaluate potential opportunities for outside funding/financing sources to implement the CLMP including grants, cost-sharing, in-kind, and loans.

4.4 Recommended Actions Summary A summary table of the recommended actions can be found below (Table 13). In addition to listing all of the actions, this table indicates which goals and objectives each action is aimed at achieving. Additionally, the timing of each action has been identified. Because of the uncertainty in how the Lake will respond and the need for management flexibility beyond the first three years of plan adoption, the recommended actions have been temporally structured in the following way: •

Short-term (0-3 years): Actions that are recommended to be implemented within the first three years of CLMP adoption.

Ongoing: Actions that are recommended to occur frequently (in some cases annually) over the life of the plan.

Long-term (3-20 years): Actions that are recommended for consideration pending evolution of short-term actions to meet goals.

Category

Table 13. Summary of Recommended Management Actions (L = Lake; W = Watershed; C = Community; Obj = Objective). Short-term Long-term Action # Ongoing (0-3 years) (3-20 years)

Associated Goal/Obj

Lake (L) L1

L2 Phosphorus Management

Update lake water quality model Alum application to inactivate sediment phosphorus

L3

1A, 1B

1A, 1B, 1C Supplemental alum applications

L5 L6

1A Continue bi-weekly in-lake water quality sampling Monitor & assess subwatershed loads

L4

Aquatic Vegetation

1A

Herbicide treatment to

1A 1D

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Category

Action #

L7

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Short-term (0-3 years)

Fisheries

Shoreline

L12

L13

Associated Goal/Obj

1D, 1E Conduct annual aquatic vegetation surveys

1D, 1E

Develop longterm targets for balanced fishery

1F Conduct fish surveys

L10 L11

Long-term (3-20 years)

control curlyleaf pondweed Develop lake vegetation management plan

L8

L9

Ongoing

1F

Conduct shoreline assessment Develop shoreline management plan

2A

2A Engage volunteers and partners

2A

Watershed (W)

W1

Phosphorus Management

W2

Implement potential structural projects identified in feasibility studies Seek out potential structural BMP project opportunities in the Como watershed not

1A, 1B, 5B

1B, 5B

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Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

Category

Action #

March 7, 2019

Short-term (0-3 years)

Ongoing

Support research to seek out innovative stormwater management practices

W3

Implement CRWD permitting rules as they apply Support research on the effectiveness of non-structural practices

W5

W6

W8

W9

Enhance spring and fall street sweeping efforts in the Como watershed

Associated Goal/Obj

1B, 5B

Complete a feasibility study for an alum treatment facility to treat watershed runoff

W4

W7

Long-term (3-20 years) currently identified

1B, 5A

1B, 1C

1B

1B, 5b

Support the community in implementing nonstructural practices in the Como watershed Provide educational opportunities to Como area

1B, 4A, 4B

1B, 4A, 4B, 4C

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Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

Category

Action #

March 7, 2019

Short-term (0-3 years)

Ongoing

Long-term (3-20 years)

Associated Goal/Obj

residents on nonstructural practices

Chloride Management

W10

Promote best winter deicing practices to the community

1C, 4A, 4B, 4C

1C, 4C, 5B

W11

Collaborate with agency partners to promote best deicing Require deicing training classes for private applicators

W12

Routinely monitor and analyze chloride concentrations in Como Lake and storm sewer outlets.

W13

W14

1C, 5A

Improve trash management within the immediate vicinity of Como Lake

1C, 5B

Coordinate with community groups to develop a plan for reducing trash from the watershed

Trash Management W15

W16

1C, 4A, 4B, 4C, 5B

Implement an annual trash

1C, 4A, 4B, 4C

1C, 4A, 4B, 4C

Page | 57


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

Category

Action #

W17

Sediment Management

W18

March 7, 2019

Short-term (0-3 years)

Ongoing

Long-term (3-20 years)

removal event in the lake Maintain stormwater BMPs in the watershed (trash reduction)

Associated Goal/Obj

1C

Continue to monitor sediment and other pollutants

1C, 5A

Community (C) Enhance and maintain existing fishing areas Identify additional designated fishing areas

C1

C2

C3

C4 Recreation C5

C6

C7

Host annual community fishing event Provide access for non-motorized boating Maintain clear channels for nonmotorized boating

3A

2A, 3A

3A

3B

3B

Create a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Como Lake Water Trailâ&#x20AC;? Work with the City of St. Paul to provide year-round water-related recreational activities

3B, 4C

5B

Page | 58


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

Category

Action #

March 7, 2019

Short-term (0-3 years)

C10

Education & Outreach

C13

C14

C15

Associated Goal/Obj 4A, 4B, 4C

Develop and install a Como Lake Water Quality Kiosk Develop and install new educational signage around Como Lake

4C

4C

Develop educational resources about Como Lake for school groups and others

C11

C12

Long-term (3-20 years)

Conduct annual educational workshops or events on watershed and lake protection

C8

C9

Ongoing

Incorporate art and other media as an alternative communication method of Como Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water quality Provide regular updates on Como Lake Regularly participate in meetings of existing community groups Support at least one community

4C

4C

4A

4A

4A

Page | 59


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

Category

Action #

C16

C17

C18

C19

C20

C21

March 7, 2019

Short-term (0-3 years)

Ongoing organized event each year Provide informational resources (informational and/or supplies) to volunteer groups Identify and partner with new community institutions in Como Lake improvement efforts Target outreach to recreational users of Como Lake and Como Park Provide a Como Lake comprehensive online resource to allow the public to access information and updates about Como Lake Document history, personal stories, and values linked to Como Lake Develop and launch a citizen science campaign with Como area residents, schools, and community groups

Long-term (3-20 years)

Associated Goal/Obj

4A, 4B

4B, 4C

4B, 4C

4C

4C

4C

Page | 60


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

Category

Action #

C22

Partnerships

C23

C24

March 7, 2019

Short-term (0-3 years)

Ongoing Partner with agencies and community groups to complete the actions in the CLMP Conduct annual meeting with agency partners Regularly evaluate potential opportunities for outside funding/financing sources

Long-term (3-20 years)

Associated Goal/Obj 5A, 5B

5A, 5B

5B

Page | 61


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

March 7, 2019

5 Implementation As described in Section 1.2, CRWD is taking an adaptive management approach for the management of Como Lake and its watershed. Attainment of management goals to improve water quality in Como Lake will be challenging, costly, and will occur through long-term implementation of actions recommended in this plan. Measurable objectives associated with each management goal provide a way for CRWD and partners to evaluate progress towards goal attainment. Through ongoing monitoring and assessment, CRWD will conduct a thorough evaluation every three years to determine progress towards meeting stated goals. It is anticipated that this three-year evaluation interval will occur throughout the life of the 20-year plan. It is anticipated that the Implementation Plan will be updated every three years as new information is gained in the process. The implementation schedule allows for some flexibility to determine how the Lake will respond to management actions in the short-term, while also ensuring some accountability for monitoring progress over time.

5.1 Short-term Implementation Plan The Short-Term Implementation Plan is a regularly developed plan (every 3 years) that defines the specific projects, programs and actions for the short-term (Table 14). These items are much better defined due to the time-frame for implementation and details of cost, timing, and lead and supporting agencies are known. This short-term implementation plan is the tool to implement the adaptive management plan. The first Short-Term Implementation Plan (Table 14) was developed as part of the planning process and adoption of the CLMP. It covers the years 2019 through 2021 and is found below. Future short-term implementation plans will be developed via the adaptive management process described below. In the third and final year of each short-term implementation plan the following process will be completed: 1. An assessment of progress towards each of the 5 goals and 14 measurable objectives. 2. An assessment of the success (or not) of implementation of the actions in the short-term implementation sections will be completed. 3. Based upon these assessments, CRWD and partners (by way of the Como Lake Agency Management Team) will develop, review and finalize the next 3-year Short-term Implementation Plan. 4. The updated (new) Short-term Implementation Plan will be reviewed and coordinated with the public before it is finalized. The process detailed above will be implemented with agency partners through Recommended Action C23.

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Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

Category

Action #

March 7, 2019

Table 14. Short-term Implementation Plan. Short-term & Estimated Ongoing Schedule Cost (0-3 years)

Lead Agency

Partners

Lake (L) L1

L2 Phosphorus Management L3

L4

L6 Aquatic Vegetation

L7

L8

L9 Fisheries L10 L11 Shoreline

L12 L13

Update lake water quality model Alum application to inactivate sediment phosphorus Continue biweekly in-lake water quality sampling Monitor & assess subwatershed loads Herbicide treatment to control Curly-leaf pondweed Develop lake vegetation management plan Conduct annual aquatic vegetation surveys Develop long-term targets for balanced fishery Conduct fish surveys Conduct shoreline assessment Develop shoreline management plan Engage volunteers and local partners

2019

$20,000

CRWD

2020

$250,000

CRWD

Ongoing

Included in Baseline

RCPW

Ongoing

Included in Baseline

CRWD

2019 2020 2021

$25,000 $25,000 $20,000

CRWD

DNR

2019

$10,000

CRWD

DNR

Ongoing

Included in Baseline

CRWD

RCPR

2019

$7,500

CRWD

DNR

Ongoing

Included in Baseline

CRWD

DNR

2020

$10,000

CRWD

2021

$15,000

CRWD

Ongoing

Included under C16

CRWD

CRWD

RCPR SPPR RCPR SPPR Community Groups

Page | 63


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

Category

Action #

W1

W3

W5

Phosphorus Management

W6

W7

W8

W9

March 7, 2019

Short-term & Ongoing Schedule (0-3 years) Watershed (W) Implement potential 2019â&#x20AC;&#x201D; structural projects Como Zoo identified in feasibility studies Support research to seek out innovative Ongoing stormwater management practices Implement CRWD permitting rules as they apply Ongoing

Support research on the effectiveness of non-structural practices Enhance spring and fall street sweeping efforts in the Como watershed Support the community in implementing non-structural practices in the Como watershed Provide educational opportunities to Como area residents on non-

Ongoing

Estimated Cost

Lead Agency

Partners

$1,100,000

CRWD

SPPR, SPPW, RCPW, others

Included in Baseline

CRWD

MPCA, Met Council

None or Funding provided via other CRWD efforts

CRWD

Included in Baseline

CRWD

MPCA, U of MN

2021

$50,000

CRWD

SPPW, Community Groups

Ongoing

$5,000

CRWD

Community Groups

Ongoing

$5,000

CRWD

Community Groups

Page | 64


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

Category

Action #

W10

W11 Chloride Management

W13

W14

W16 Trash Management W17

W18

C3

Short-term & Ongoing Schedule (0-3 years) structural practices Promote best winter deicing Ongoing practices to the community Collaborate with agency partners to Ongoing promote best deicing Routinely monitor and analyze chloride concentrations in Ongoing Como Lake and storm sewer outlets Improve trash management within the Ongoing immediate vicinity of Como Lake Implement an annual trash Ongoing removal event in the lake Maintain stormwater BMPs Ongoing in the watershed (trash reduction) Continue to monitor sediment Ongoing and other pollutants Community (C) Host annual community fishing Ongoing event

March 7, 2019

Estimated Cost

Lead Agency

Partners

$5,000

CRWD

Community Groups

Included in Baseline

CRWD

Multiple

Included in Baseline

CRWD

RCPW

In-Kind Costs

SPPR

CRWD

$2,500

CRWD

SPPR, Community Groups

Required under other District/City programs

CRWD

Multiple

Included in Baseline

CRWD

$2,500

CRWD

SPPR, DNR

Page | 65


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

Category

Action #

C4

C5

C8

C9

C10

Education & Outreach C12

C13

C14

C15

Short-term & Ongoing (0-3 years) Provide access for non-motorized boating Maintain clear channels for nonmotorized boating Conduct annual educational workshops or events on watershed and lake protection Develop and install a Como Lake Water Quality Kiosk Develop and install new educational signage around Como Lake Incorporate art and other media as an alternative communication method of Como Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water quality Provide regular updates on Como Lake Regularly participate in meetings of existing community groups Support at least one community

March 7, 2019

Schedule

Estimated Cost

Lead Agency

Partners

Ongoing

Included in existing park programing

SPPR

CRWD

Ongoing

$20,000

SPPR

CRWD, DNR

Ongoing

$2,500

CRWD

Community Groups

2020

$20,000

CRWD

SPPR

2020

$20,000

CRWD

SPPR

Ongoing

$5,000

CRWD

Multiple

Ongoing

Included in Baseline

CRWD

Ongoing

Included in Baseline

CRWD

Community Groups

Ongoing

$3,000

CRWD

Community Groups

Page | 66


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

Category

Action #

C16

C17

C18

C19

C20

C21

Short-term & Ongoing (0-3 years) organized event each year Provide informational resources (informational and/or supplies) to volunteer groups Identify and partner with new community institutions in Como Lake improvement efforts Target outreach to recreational users of Como Lake and Como Park Provide a Como Lake comprehensive online resource to allow the public to access information and updates about Como Lake Document history, personal stories, and values linked to Como Lake Develop and launch a citizen science campaign with Como area residents, schools,

March 7, 2019

Schedule

Estimated Cost

Lead Agency

Partners

Ongoing

$2,000

CRWD

Community Groups

Ongoing

Included in Baseline

CRWD

Community Groups

Ongoing

Included in Baseline

CRWD

SPPR

Ongoing

Included in Baseline

CRWD

Ongoing

Included in Baseline

CRWD

Community Groups

2021

$1,500

CRWD

Community Groups

Page | 67


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

Category

Action #

C22

Partnerships

C23

C24

Short-term & Ongoing (0-3 years) and community groups Partner with agencies and community groups to complete actions in the CLMP. Conduct annual meeting with agency partners Regularly evaluate potential opportunities for outside funding/financing sources

March 7, 2019

Schedule

Estimated Cost

Lead Agency

Partners

Ongoing

Included in Baseline

CRWD

Multiple

Ongoing

Included in Baseline

CRWD

Multiple

Ongoing

Included in Baseline

CRWD

Multiple

5.2 Estimated Implementation Costs Costs for the short-term implementation actions are detailed in Table 14. During every 3-year adaptive management cycle the plan for the actions to be implemented over the following three years will be determined (see Section 1.2). Cost estimates will be included for these items at that time. To be able to effectively implement the CLMP, it is important to have an estimated level of expenditure over the life of the plan. Due to the adaptive management approach being used for the CLMP it is not possible to define a long-term (~20 year) project list with associated costs like would be done in a more typical management plan. To estimate the total plan implementation cost, previous expenditures completed under the 2002 CLSMP were analyzed. Additionally, the planned costs for Como Lake initiatives in the 2010 Watershed Management Plan were analyzed (Table 15). During the previous planning period, average annual costs of $540,700 were incurred on Como Lake management actions.

Page | 68


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

March 7, 2019

Table 15. 2010-2020 Watershed Management Plan (WMP) Expenditures. 2010 WMP Expenditures (2010-2020) 305 Como Lake Planning

$

1,426,000

405 Como Lake Implementation

$

3,481,000

Monitoring ($35,000/yr)

$

350,000

Education/Outreach ($15,000/yr)

$

150,000

$

5,407,000

Total

Based on previous work and its associated costs and what major projects and programs are anticipated in this CLMP, it is estimated the average annual cost of implementation is $700,000. This would extrapolate out costs over the life of the plan (20 years) of $14,000,000. This estimated 20-year implementation cost is depicted in the Figure 14.

Figure 14. Estimated 20-year costs for implementation of the Como Lake Management Plan.

Page | 69


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

March 7, 2019

5.3 Financing This section of the CLMP describes financing options, including tax levy and other sources of revenue that will be utilized to implement the CLMP. The District will seek funding for actions implement through the Como Lake Management Plan through grants and outside cost-share funding. Where known costshare opportunities are lacking, partnerships may be developed for cost and workload sharing. Costs and responsibility will be shared with partners whenever possible. In the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, watershed districts have the authority to levy an ad valorem tax (a tax on all taxable parcels in the District that is based on property value) to pay for the costs of implementing their watershed management plan. These authorities are granted in MN Statutes 103B and 103D. These costs include the District’s administration, programs, projects, and capital improvement projects. The District also has the authority to finance large capital projects by selling bonds or securing loans. The District will fund implementation of the CLMP using four primary sources of revenue: 1. Property tax levy 2. Grant funds 1. Local partner cost-sharing funding 3. Bonds and loans The District’s financing approach for operational actions (administration, programs, and projects) will be used to fund the costs primarily through the annual levy, however, typically 5% is raised through grants, fees, interest income, and local cost-share funding. The financing approach for capital improvement projects is planned to be 25% through the annual levy and 75% through grants, loans, and bond proceeds. Small capital improvement projects (less than $250,000) will be financed through the annual levy. Larger projects will have the costs spread to the long-term benefitting parties through financing via bonds and loans. CRWD will seek local partner cost-share funding for capital improvement projects of all sizes to off-set the District’s contributions. Current and past bond issues, loans and grants and their original amounts are listed below. Grants and loans will likely remain a small (15%) percentage of CRWD’s funding sources. The District will continue to apply for grants and loans to offset project costs whenever possible and cost effective. However, grant and loan programs change frequently as existing grant/loan amounts and priorities change, new grant and loans become available, and existing programs are terminated. The District will also seek partnerships, or cost-sharing, to distribute a portion of project costs to all the benefitting organizations.

Page | 70


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

March 7, 2019

6 References Capitol Region Watershed District (CRWD), 2002. The Como Lake Strategic Management Plan. St. Paul, MN. Capitol Region Watershed District (CRWD), 2015. Capitol Region Watershed District Rules. St. Paul, MN. Revised April 4, 2015. Como Community Council (District 10), 2011. Como Lake Turtle Study. St. Paul, MN. Cooke, G.D., E.B. Welch, S.A. Peterson, and S.A. Nicholes. 2005. Restoration and Management of Lakes and Reservoirs, 3rd Edition. CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, Boca Raton, Florida. Emmons & Oliver Resources Inc (EOR), 2010. Como Lake TMDL. Prepared by Emmons & Oliver Resources Inc for Capitol Region Watershed District. October 2010. Holdren, C., W.Jones, and J. Taggart. 2001. Managing Lakes and Reservoirs. North American Lake Management Society and Terrene lnstitute, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Madison, WI. Houston Engineering Inc (HEI), 2016. Como Park Stormwater Inventory and Watershed Analysis. Prepared by Houston Engineering for Capitol Region Watershed District. March 2016. Houston Engineering Inc (HEI), 2017. Como Regional Park Stormwater Master Plan. Prepared by Houston Engineering for Capitol Region Watershed District. June 2017. Houston Engineering Inc (HEI), 2018. Como Park stormwater reclassification, calibration, and load reduction analysis. Prepared for Capitol Region Watershed District, St. Paul, MN. October 2018. LimnoTech, 2017. Como Lake Water Quality Drivers Analysis Study. Prepared by LimnoTech for Capitol Region Watershed District, St. Paul, MN. October 2017. Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR). 2017a. Shallow Lakes Program. http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/wildlife/shallowlakes/index.html Accessed 04 March 2019. Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR). 2017b. Fishing in the Neighborhood. http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/fishing/fin/index.html. Accessed 04 March 2019. Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA), 2016a. Twin Cities Metropolitan Area Chloride Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Study. Prepared by LimnoTech for MPCA. February 2016. Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA), 2016b. Twin Cities Metropolitan Area Chloride Management Plan. Prepared by LimnoTech for MPCA. February 2016. Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA), 2007. Minnesota Statewide Mercury Total Maximum Daily Load. March 2007.

Page | 71


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

March 7, 2019

Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA), 2009. Implementation Plan for Minnesotaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Statewide Mercury Total Maximum Daily Load. October 2009. Minnesota State University, Water Resources Center. 2010. Shallow Lakes: Minnesotaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Natural Heritage. http://files.dnr.state.mn.us/fish_wildlife/wildlife/shallowlakes/shallowlakes.pdf. Accessed 04 March 2019. Noonan, T. A. (1998) Como Lake, Minnesota: The Long-Term Response of a Shallow Urban Lake to Biomanipulation, Lake and Reservoir Management, 14:1, 92-109, DOI: 10.1080/07438149809354113 Osgood D. and H. Gibbons. Lake Management Best Practices: Managing Algae Problems. Duluth, MN: Lake Advocates Publishers, 2017a. Osgood D., H. Gibbons and S. Brattebo. Lake Management Best Practices: Alum for Phosphorus Control in Lakes and Ponds. Duluth, MN: Lake Advocates Publishers, 2017b. Scheffer, Marten. Ecology of Shallow Lakes. The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2004. Weatherbase 2019. Climate information. www.Weatherbase.com. Accessed on 04 March 2019. Wenck, 2016. Sediment Characterization for Lake McCarrons and Como Lake. Prepared for Capitol Region Watershed District, St. Paul, MN. September 2016. Wetzel R.G. Limnology: Lake and River Ecosystems. 3rd Edition. San Diego (California): Academic Press, 2001.

Page | 72


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

March 7, 2019

Appendix A

Page | 73


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

March 7, 2019

Matrix of Possible In-lake Management Actions Management Action

Algaecides Hypolimnetic aeration/oxygenation Inflow/end-of-pipe chemical treatment (e.g. alum based compounds)

Biomanipulation through Fisheries Mgmt (Long-term)

Biomanipulation through Fisheries Mgmt (Short-term) Drawdown

Shoreline restoration/riparian management

P coagulants (Alum & alumbased compounds)

P coagulants (Ca & Fe)

P coagulants (Other)

Dilution and flushing

Mechanical harvesting Native plant community restoration

Herbicides

Dredging

Microbes and enzymes

Shading Dye

Artificial Circulation Hypolimnetic withdrawal

Brief Description of Action

Chemical application to kill standing stock of algae Typically a mechanical system that circulates or oxygenates water to prevent anoxia. Treatment of stormwater with a chemical agent that binds with phosphorus before it enters the lake. Altering of the biological community (typically fish) to increase abundance of predators or herbivores. Altering of the biological community (typically fish) to increase abundance of predators or herbivores. Drains large volumes of water for extended periods of time. May include bank stablization, erosion control, native plant, and/or habitat restoration actions. Chemical application to the lake with a compound that binds with phosphorus in water column and phosphorus diffusing from sediments. Addition of metals salts binds with phosphorus making it unavailable to algae. Addition of proprietary compounds (e.g. Phoslock) that bind with phosphorus making it unavailable to algae. Reducing the nutrient concentration by adding more water (dilution) and increases the water exchange (flushing).

Target

Would this action work towards goals Reliability Duration for Como Lake?

Application

General Magnitude Pros of Cost

Cons

Immediate response; cost-effective

short duration, can promote Cyanobacteria growth, not a sustainable management action

MediumHigh

Effective at improving DO when designed correctly & maintained

Can be costly to maintain

HighMedium

Very effective at reducing P load to receiving waters

Need storage capacity / settling basin for flocculated water

Medium Occasional

Low-HIgh

Improves ecological function; can reduce Requires long-term maintenance; Ineffective w/o algal density through zooplankton feeding additional management actions in eutrophic lakes

Low

Medium Seasonal

LowMedium

Can improve fishery in short-term.

Short-term responses not expected

yes

Medium

Medium Occasional

Low-High

Can be effective for macrophyte control

Can be costly and labor intensive.

yes

High

Medium-LVariable

Low-High

Helps to reduce sediment inputs, improves ecological function.

Limited cons are action specific.

Algae

yes

High

Short

Frequent-SeasoMedium

Anoxia

yes

High

Short

Continuous

External P load

yes

Medium

Long

Continuous

Food web

yes

High

Food web

yes

Food web

Habitat, erosion control.

Needs a buffer in alkaline lakes, which can add to cost. May need multiple applications depending on extent of eutrophication and sediment P. Often under-dosed; requires special handling

Internal P load

yes

High

Variable Variable

Mediumlow

Internal P load

yes

High

Variable Variable

Mediumlow

Very effective and safe when dosed properly; well-tested, broadly applied and understood; cost-effective Long-record of application/effectiveness; based on well understood geochemical reactions

Internal P load

yes

High

Variable Variable

Mediumlow

Long-record of application/effectiveness; based on well understood geochemical reactions

Internal P load

yes

High

Short

Continuous

Low-High

Indirect control of internal P loading observed

yes

Medium

Short

Seasonal

MediumHigh

Removes dense macrophyte growth in short-term

yes

Medium

Medium Variable

Low

low-effort restoration, community egnagement opportunities

yes

High

Short

Seasonal

LowMedium

Some products can be selective

yes

Medium

Long

Rare

High

Removes P in sediment thereby reducting internal loading Expensive, labor intensive

no

Untested

N/A

N/A

N/A

Mechanical raking/removal of nuisance, rooted-vegetation. Macrophyte control Removal of nuisance vegetation and establishment of native vegetation. Macrophytes Chemical application to kill nuisance / invasive macrophytes. Macrophytes Reduced internal loading through Dredging and removal of removal of nutrientsediments. rich sediments. Typically proprietary compounds that claim to control algae or manipulate nutrients. Algae Addition of dye to lake to limit light penetration to control algal growth. Algae Typically a mechanical system that extends the depth of circulated water/prevents anoxia/stratification. Anoxia Removal of nutrient-rich Nutrient reduction hypolimnetic water.

no

Untested

Medium Seasonal

Low

no

High

Short

Continuous

Medium

no

High

Long

Continuous

Medium

Implications for pH and dissolved oxgen - requires special considerations; requires special handling

Implications for pH and dissolved oxgen - requires special considerations; requires special handling

Increased vertical mixing; decreased algal excretory products operationally difficult; expensive machinery for single lake use; usually requires mulitple applications; not effective from some macrophytes; not species selective may require biotic and abiotic controls to be successful; more challenging when invasive species are problematic toxicity; public perception; predicting reemergent community; potential for oxygen depletion with decaying plant material

Unknown efficacy reduces photosynthecally available light; non-toxic

May not control surface or shallow water blooms

Effective at improving DO when designed correctly & maintained; chemical oxydation of reduced substances Reduced anoxic duration, removes nutrients from the system

Some adverse affects could include cyanobacteria promotion, resuspension of particulate P, reduced clarity Thermal imbalance, need storage capacity or treatment option for withdrawn water

Page | 74


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

March 7, 2019

Appendix B

Page | 75


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

March 7, 2019

Identified Potential Structural BMP Projects and TP Load Reductions from Existing Feasibility Studies

Potential Structural BMP Projects

BMP Type

Como TP Load Reduction Target (lbs/year)

Como B Golf Course Parking Lot Reconstruction

svandenberg@hensonefron.com

Lexington & Como Blvd Intersection

1.8 2.6

Infiltration Filtration/Infiltration

40.7

Stormwater Pond Retrofit

21.7

NW Golf Course Pond - IESF Bench

Stormwater Pond Retrofit

Golf Course Parking Lot Pond - IESF Bench Zoo Combo - Filtration Basin & Infiltration Basin

Stormwater Pond Retrofit Filtration/Infiltration

24.2 18.7

Como Pavilion North - Rain Gardens

Bioretention Subwatershed Total

1.6

Infiltration

8.9

Como Blvd Reconstruction - Regional Treatment East Golf Course Ponds IESF

1

19.5 130.8

Como C Como Pavilion south Regional 2 - Infiltration Stream and Underground Infiltration

Subwatershed Total

8.9

Como D McMurray Field Capture and Reuse - Regional Treatment Lexington, Como & Horton Ave Median Rain Garden at Horton and Van Slyke

Reuse/Infiltration Filtration/Infiltration Bioretention Subwatershed Total

40.3 5.8 1.0 47.1

Page | 76


Como Lake Management Plan DRAFT

March 7, 2019

Como E Chatsworth St - Regional Treatment Median Rain Gardens at Argyle and Van Slyke

Filtration/Infiltration

28.9

Rain gardens

Bioretention Bioretention Subwatershed Total

2.6 0.3 31.8

Como F Nagasaki Road

Bioretention Subwatershed Total

1.2

Filtration/Infiltration Subwatershed Total

2.6

Filtration/Infiltration Subwatershed Total

2.5

Filtration/Infiltration Subwatershed Total

2.0

Filtration/Infiltration Subwatershed Total

2.4

1.2

Como H Como Blvd Reconstruction - Regional Treatment1 Como J Como Blvd Reconstruction - Regional Treatment1 Como K Como Blvd Reconstruction - Regional Treatment1 Como M Como Blvd Reconstruction - Regional Treatment1

2.6

2.5

2.0

2.4

The Como Blvd reconstruction load reduction estimate is based on regional treatment encompassing multiple subwatersheds. The total estimated reduction was apportioned to each subwatershed based on its contributing area. 1

Page | 77


March 20, 2019 Board Workshop

V. Action Item A) Approve Minutes of March 6, 2019 Board Workshop Meeting (Sylvander) Special Board Meeting of the Capitol Region Watershed District (CRWD) Board of Managers, for March 6, 2019, 5:00 p.m. at the office of the CRWD, 1410 Energy Park Drive, Suite 4, St. Paul, MN 55108. Board Workshop Minutes I.

Call to Order at 5:00 p.m. (President Joe Collins)

A) Attendance Joe Collins Mary Texer Shirley Reider Rick Sanders Seitu Jones II.

Others Present Mark Doneux, CRWD Britta Belden, CRWD Mark Houle, CRWD Bob Fossum, CRWD

Open Forum A) Lake McCarrons Sediment Core Analysis Report

To further explore the results of the 2016 coring, 23 additional cores were taken in a grid formation on Lake McCarrons in February 2017 by the National Lacustrine Core Repository (LacCore). Cores were analyzed to determine alum thickness and distribution across the lake as well as the characteristics of the sediment overlying the alum. The 2017 cores were further analyzed using GIS to display the results. Methods and results were compiled into the Lake McCarrons Sediment Core Analysis Report. Staff presented results from this study show that alum is present at 10 of the 23 coring locations and the alum layer is not distributed equally across the targeted area of the lake. In addition, sediment deposition since the time of the treatment has likely reduced the efficacy of the alum layer by preventing it from interacting with dissolved phosphorus in the hypolimnion. Much of the sediment deposited above the alum layer is inorganic, which is likely from external sources. This report presents the results of the 2017 coring and aims to understand the effectiveness of the alum treatment and identify potential sources of the sediment deposited on the lake bottom since 2004 to guide future management efforts. B) Strategic Planning Update Mr. Fossum provided a brief update on the outcomes of the CRWD Strategic Planning Meeting. III.

Adjournment

Motion 18-045: Adjournment of the March 6, 2019, Board Workshop at 6:00 p.m. Reider/Texer Unanimously Approved Respectfully submitted,

1


Michelle Sylvander, Office Manager W:\04 Board of Managers\Minutes\2017\April 4, 2018 DRAFT Special Meeting.docx

2


March 20, 2019 Board Meeting V. Action Item A) Approve Minutes of March 6, 2019 Regular Board Meeting (Sylvander)

Regular Meeting of the Capitol Region Watershed District (CRWD) Board of Managers, for Wednesday, March 6, 2019, 6:00 p.m. at the office of CRWD, 595 Aldine Street, St. Paul, Minnesota. REGULAR MEETING MINUTES I.

A)

Managers Joe Collins Seitu Jones Shirley Reider Rick Sanders Mary Texer

B)

Call to Order of Regular Meeting (President Joe Collins) Staff Present Public Attendees Mark Doneux, CRWD Della Young, Young Environmental Jessica Bromelkamp, CRWD Todd Shoemaker, Wenck Forrest Kelley, CRWD Mary Lilly, CAC Elizabeth Hosch, CRWD Michelle Sylvander, CRWD Jim Mogen, Ramsey County Attorney Review, Amendments and Approval of the Agenda.

Motion 19-027: Approve the Agenda of March 6, 2018. Texer/Jones Unanimously Approved II.

Public Comment – For Items not on the Agenda

Ms. Mary Lilly from the CAC shared that she attended an event hosted by Ramsey Washington Metro Watershed District on Tuesday March 5th. The speaker was Dr. Mike Osterholm talking about trout stream restoration. The event was held at HB Fuller and about 100 people were in attendance. III.

Permit Applications and Program Updates A) Permit 16-020 Dorothy Day Place amendment – application extension (Hosch)

Ms. Hosch reviewed permit #16-020 Dorothy Day Place amendment. The applicant, Catholic Charities is building a new building in Higher Ground campus and adding an additional parking area. The applicable rules are Stormwater Management (Rule C), Flood Control (Rule D), and Erosion and Sediment Control (Rule F). The disturbed area of this project is 2.58 acres with 2.58 acres’ impervious surface. Motion 19-028: Approve permit #16-020 Dorothy Day Place – Amendment with two conditions.


1. Receipt of $12,900 surety. $9,600 surety has already been received. An additional $3,300 surety is required from the Triangular Parking Lot Amendment. 2. Provide documentation of maintenance agreement recorded with Ramsey County, amended to include Underground System C. Reider/Jones Unanimously approved B) Permit 19-002 TH94 Mill and Overlay (Hosch) Ms. Hosch reviewed permit #19-002 TH94. The applicant, MnDOT is planning on mill and overlay, drainage repair, guardrail, ADA improvements, and signals. The applicable rules are Stormwater Management (Rule C), Flood Control (Rule D), and Erosion and Sediment Control (Rule F). The disturbed area of this project is 3.2 acres with .16 acresâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; impervious surface. Motion 19-030: Approve permit #19-002 TH94 Mill and Overlay with three conditions. 1. Provide a copy of the NPDES permit. 2. Revise plans to address the following: a. Specify inlet protection for the 14 inlets indicated in a detailed grading plan that indicates that these inlets are upgradient from earth disturbing activities and trucking routes. b. Specify perimeter control between earth disturbing activities and I-94 where surrounding grades direct stormwater to the interstate. Additional drainage arrows should be added to the plan where earth disturbing activities occur to confirm perimeter control is specified on all down-gradient edges of disturbed soils 3. Provide gross pollutant removal for each drainage area with new/reconstructed impervious. Reider/Jones Unanimously approved Motion 19-029: Approve withdrawal of 64cf of Volume Reduction Credits from the MnDOT Bank, with revision based on exact area reconstructed. Reider/Jones Unanimously approved C) Permit 19-004 Wheelock 4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; application extension (Hosch) Ms. Hosch reviewed permit #19-004 Wheelock 4 will expire on 3/19/19. The applicant requested an extension to the 60-day review period prior to the expiration. Additional time is still needed to resolve how the applicant will meet CRWD Rule requirements. Motion 19-031: May 18, 2019. Reider/Jones

Approve 60-day review period extension for permit 19-004 Wheelock 4 to expire


Unanimously approved IV.

Special Reports

Illicit Discharge, Detection and Elimination program, Della Schall-Young, Young Environmental Consulting Group, LLC Mr. Kelley introduced Ms. Della Shall-Young from Young Environmental Consulting Group. CRWD was first issued a Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System permit in 2006. Within the permit requirements CRWD is required to develop, implement and enforce a program to identify and eliminate illicit discharge into Trout Brook. Ms. Young summarized the plan and highlighted the following recommendations: 1. Update the IDDE database module to include the Field Observation Sheet and tracking documentation form with the next 3 months 2. Assess the need for complaint hotline over the next 6-12 months following the steps outlined by CWP. 3. Proactively identify potential generating sites within the 12 months. 4. Develop materials/brochures for outreach. Manager Jones asked about how calls regarding illicit discharge are routed. Mr. Kelley replied that there is a link on the website. Incoming calls are routed to Ms. Anna Eleria, or Ms. Elizabeth Hosch. President Collins asked about a recent spill and Manager Jones asked if CRWD has emergency policy procedures. Mr. Kelley replied that there is an emergency policy procedure in place. Motion 19-032: Approve the CRWD Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination Program Plan Reider/Jones Unanimously approved V.

Action Items A)

AR:

Approve Minutes of the February 27, 2019 Regular Board Meeting (Sylvander).

Correction â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Moorhead not Fargo Motion 19-033: Approve the Meeting Minutes of the February 27, 2019 Regular Board Meeting. Jones/Reider Unanimously approved B)

AR:

Authorize 45-day Comment Period for Rule Amendments (Kelley)

Motion 19-033: Authorize distribution of proposed draft rule revisions for formal 45-day review and comment period ending April 22, 2019. Texer/Jones Unanimously approved


Motion 19-034: at 6:00pm.

Schedule a public hearing on the proposed draft rules for Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Texer/Reider Unanimously approved A) Approve Communication and Engagement Request for Qualifications (Bromelkamp) Motion 19-035: Authorize staff to distribute a Request for Qualifications to develop a Communications and Engagement Plan for CRWD. Reider/Sanders Unanimously approved VI.

Unfinished Business A) Snelling Midway Update (Eleria)

Mr. Kelley gave an update on the St. Paul soccer stadium now to be called Allianz Field. CRWD will be responsible for the hiring of a contractor to operate and maintain the reuse system. Ms. Eleria is working on signage for outside of the great lawn. President Collins thanked Mr. Kelley for the update. No action was taken. VII. A)

General Information

Board of Managers Updates

Manager Texer shared that Metro MAWD will be held on Tuesday, April 9th. Tuesday, April 16th the Freshwater Society will be hosting a public lecture called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Lifeâ&#x20AC;?. CRWD will be hosting meetings for MAWD in their strategic planning. VIII. Next Meetings A) B)

Wednesday, March 13, 2019 CAC Meeting, 7:00 PM, Manager Reider will attend Wednesday, March 20, 2019 Board Meeting

IX.

Adjournment

Motion 19-036: Adjournment of the March 6, 2019 Regular Board Meeting at 7:04. Unanimously Approved Respectfully submitted, Michelle Sylvander


March 20, 2019 Board Meeting V. Action Items – B) Accounts Payable & Budget Update (Sylvander)

DATE: March 14, 2019 TO: CRWD Board of Managers FROM: Michelle Sylvander, Office Manager RE: February 2019 Accounts Payable/Receivable and Administrative/Program Budget Report _________________________________________________________________________________

Enclosed are the Accounts Payable/Receivable and the Administrative/Program Budget Reports for the Month of February 2019.

Summary of Budget Report: (February Only Expenses) Administrative Budget (100’s) Program Budget (200’s) Project Budget (300’s) Capital Improvement Budget (400’s) Debt Service (500’s)

$ $ $ $ $

80,280.17 108,211.55 27,246.07 80,802.24 0

TOTAL

$

296,540.03

Summary of Accounts Payable/Receivable Report through February 28, 2019: (Past, present and future months) (February 2019 Only)

Accounts Payable Accounts Receivable

$ $

478,081.53 28,700.78


2019 Operations and CIP Monthly YTD Expenditures to Budget $6,000,000 $5,000,000 $4,000,000 $3,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 $Jan

Feb

March

April

May

Jun

July

August

Sept

Oct

2019 Operations Budget

Operations Cumulative Expenditures

2019 CIP Budget

CIP Cumulative Expenditures

Nov

Dec

Request Action Approve February 2019 Accounts Payable/Receivable and Budget Report and direct Board Treasurer and President to endorse and disperse checks for these payments. enc:

February 2019 Accounts Payable February 2019 Budget Report

W:\02 Budget and Finance\Board Memos\Board Memos 2019\BD Memo AP Budget Report 03142019.docx


Capitol Region Watershed District

Check Register For the Period From Mar 1, 2019 - Mar 31, 2019

Date 02/28/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19

Payee MN Association of Watershed Districts Applied Ecological Services, Inc. Barr Engineering Barr Engineering Barr Engineering Barr Engineering Barr Engineering Because Collective, LLC Benefit Extras, LLC C Lanphear Design Carl & Elsie Pohland Family Foundation Christine Baeumier VOID Colonial Life Comcast - Business Comcast - Business Computer Revolution Digi Graphics, LLC Dwaynes Lawn & Snow Care Equity Literacy Institute, LLC ESRI Forrest J. Kelley HealthPartners Holiday Fleet Intereum J E Dunn Construction Kisters League of MN Cities Ins. Trust McCaren Designs, Inc. Menards MetLife Monitor Nelson Cheese & Deli Park Press Pioneer Press Pitney Bowes - Financial Services Pitney Bowes - Supplies Ramsey County - Attorney Redpath & Company, Ltd. SRF Consulting, Inc. SRF Consulting, Inc. St. Paul Regional Water Services Staples Business Advantage Story Teller Media & Communications Syscon, Inc. TCB Marketing, Inc.

Total

Check #

$7,500.00 632.50 915.00 6,032.10 1,607.48 6,728.00 4,456.50 405.00 76.75 212.50 6,400.00 1,937.50 755.38 661.21 944.89 24,854.17 1,240.53 2,100.00 2,000.00 291.00 1,440.00 21,365.30 82.35 126,272.71 30.00 18,812.50 5,557.00 539.11 1,001.68 469.36 496.30 296.66 130.00 104.40 273.75 117.78 1,955.00 4,546.39 1,034.55 7,585.74 38.34 56.70 7,466.25 260.00 360.70

19625 19626 19627 19628 19629 19630 19631 19632 19633 19634 19635 19636 19637V 19638 19639 19640 19641 19642 19643 19644 19645 19646 19647 19648 19649 19650 19651 19652 19653 19654 19655 19656 19657 19658 19659 19660 19661 19662 19663 19664 19665 19666 19667 19668 19669 19670

Page 1 of 2

Description 2019 Membership Dues Restoration Management Groundwater Monitoring Watershed Management Plan TBI Engineering Services Seminary Pond Improvements Lake McCarron's Management Plan Press Releases Employee Benefits Design Work Surety Return Project Administration VOID Employee Benefits Business Internet Phone Service Managed Services/New Computers Equipment Snow Removal/Moving Snow Workshop - Racial Equity ARC GIS Online Service Calls Office Cleaning Employee Benefits Fuel for Vehicles Office Furniture Underpayment/July Web Portal Workers Comp. Insurance Monthly Horticulture Services Supplies Employee Benefits Job Postings Lunch for Workshop/Strategic Planning Employment Ads Legal Notices Scale Lease Postage Meter Ink January Attorney Fees February Accounting Easement Acquisition Parkview Center School BMP Final Water Service Office Supplies Video Production Archive 2017 Job Postings/Inspector Job Posting

2018 2018

2018


Capitol Region Watershed District

Check Register For the Period From Mar 1, 2019 - Mar 31, 2019

Date 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19 03/20/19

Payee Verizon Wireless Viking Industrial Center Walters Wenck Associates, Inc. Xcel Energy Xcel Energy Zenman Productions US Bank

SUB-TOTAL: FEBRUARY A/P

Total 316.06 317.59 247.69 15,116.69 939.73 853.53 8,500.00 6,777.89

Check # 19671 19672 19673 19674 19675 19676 19677 19678

Description Monthly Wireless Replacement Sensors Trash/Recycling Premit Inspections/Program Electrical Service Electric/Gas Website Monthly Credit Card Expense

$303,112.26

WIRE TRANSFERS: 03/20/19 J. E. Dunn Construction Company 03/20/19 J. E. Dunn Construction Company

$38,463.00 16,447.00

SUB-TOTAL: WIRE TRANSFERS:

$54,910.00

FEBRUARY PAYROLL/BENEFITS:

$120,059.27

FEBRUARY TOTAL:

$478,081.53

Certificate of Payment - #11 - Thru 02/28/19 Certificate of Payment - #11 - Thru 02/28/19

APPROVED FOR PAYMENT:

3/20/2019

FEBRUARY, 2019 RECEIPTS Aldi McCarron Hill Application Fee - 19-007 MAWD Lunch 4M Fund-Bonds 4M Fund-General

$10,000.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 220.00 9,155.61 5,325.17

FEBRUARY RECEIPTS:

$28,700.78

Page 2 of 2

Surety Permit Fee Permit Fee Miscellaneous Income February Interest February Interest-Bonds


Capitol Region Watershed District February 28, 2019 Comparison

February Check Register Totals February A/P

February Financial Statements

Difference

$303,112.26

February J.E. Dunn Construction February Payroll/Benefits

54,910.00 120,059.27

FEBRUARY SUB-TOTAL:

$478,081.53

Less 2018 Expenditures Paid 3/20/19: Less Surety Release:

$296,540.03

($181,541.50)

($152,551.46) ($6,400.00)

Less Pre-Paid Benefits:

($22,590.04)

JANUARY TOTAL:

$296,540.03

2018 Expenditures Paid 3/20/19: Intereum Kisters Story Teller Media & Communications Total 2018 Expenditures:

126,272.71 18,812.50 7,466.25 $152,551.46

Surety release: Carl & Elsie Pohland Family Foundation:

$6,400.00

Pre-Paid Expenses: HealthPartners MetLife Colonial Life

21,365.30 469.36 755.38 $22,590.04

Page 1 of 1

$296,540.03

$0.00


CAPITOL REGION WATERSHE DISTRICT JOB COST RECAP FOR THE PERIOD FEBRUARY 1, 2019 ‐ FEBRUARY 28, 2019

TOTAL GENERAL ADMINISTRATION: 200 ‐ Administration 201 ‐ Groundwater 207 ‐ Rulemaking/Rule Revisions 208 ‐ Permitting 210 ‐ Stewardship Grants 211 ‐ Monitoring & Data Collection 220 ‐ Education & Outreach 225 ‐ Technical Resources & Information Sharing 228 ‐ Future Trends:  Research and Positioning 230 ‐ Geographic Informatin Systems (GIS) 240 ‐ Safety Program TOTAL PROGRAMS: 300 ‐ Administration 301 ‐ Shoreline & Streambank Maintenance 305 ‐ Como Lake Subwatershed 310 ‐ Lake McCarron's Subwatershed 313 ‐ Loeb Lake Subwatershed 315 ‐ Trout Brook Subwatershed 317 ‐ Crosby Lake Subwatershed 325 ‐ Wetland, Stream & Ecosystem Restoration 330 ‐ Mississippi River Subwatershed 370 ‐ Watershed Management Plan 390 ‐ Special Projects & Grants TOTAL PROJECTS: TOTAL OPERATING FUND: 405 ‐ Como Lake BMP's 410 ‐ Lake McCarron's BMP's 413 ‐ Loeb Lake BMP's 415 ‐ Trout Brook BMP's 417 ‐ Crosby Lake BMP's 425 ‐ Wetland, Stream & Ecosystem Restoration 430 ‐ Mississippi River Subwatersheds BMP's 440 ‐ Special Projects & Grants 450 ‐ Future Trends:  Implementation TOTAL CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT: 14960 ‐ Debt & Loan Service 15 TOTAL DEBT SERVICES:

2019 ANNUAL BUDGET 0.00 660,840.00 0.00 61,200.00 5,000.00 (289,200.00) $437,840.00 190,872.00 6,480.00                            22,300.00 398,590.00 819,880.00 637,770.00 611,620.00 32,680.00 145,080.00 50,390.00 38,460.00 $2,954,122.00 98,328.00 8,000.00 102,410.00 201,700.00                                        ‐ 344,410.00 28,710.00                                        ‐ 256,120.00 242,180.00                            87,320.00 $1,369,178.00 $4,761,140.00 1,172,200.00 742,320.00 82,980.00 110,000.00                                        ‐ 30,000.00 834,090.00 719,780.00 175,000.00 $3,866,370.00 1,059,503.00 $1,059,503.00

CURRENT MONTH EXPENDITURES 0.00 74,521.19 5,508.39                                 ‐                          250.59                                 ‐                     80,280.17                                 ‐                             16.72                       3,682.99 33,550.41 11,325.73 28,558.79 22,793.00 549.93 6,167.08 1,200.10                           366.80 $108,211.55                                 ‐                                 ‐ 6,066.86 4,600.07                                 ‐ 4,505.04 599.97                                 ‐ 2,017.28 9,456.85                                 ‐ $27,246.07 $215,737.79                       1,043.37 8,194.78                           709.16                                 ‐                                 ‐                                 ‐ 7,844.72 4,565.52                     58,444.69 $80,802.24                                 ‐                                 ‐

TOTAL ALL FUNDS:

$9,687,013.00

$296,540.03

$1,659,345.74

Unaudited Fund Balance FUND BALANCES @ 12/31/18 Operations 2,211,785.43 Capital Improvement 2,050,966.04 Debt Service 156,132.97                       2,901,177.80 Building/Bond Proceeds TOTAL FUND BALANCE: $7,320,062.24

2019 Fund Transfers                                 ‐                                 ‐                                 ‐                                 ‐ $0.00

Year‐to‐Date Revenue                  21,478.98                   19,075.43                               ‐                               ‐ $40,554.41

18970 ‐ General Administration 18 19970 ‐ General Administration 19 19795 ‐ Aldine Operating Expense 19976 ‐ Thomas Operations 19978 ‐ MAWD 00000 ‐ Administration Allocation

 

JOB COST #/NAME

YEAR‐TO‐DATE BALANCE OF BUDGET EXPENDITURES REMAINING 13,490.72 (13,490.72) 123,704.79 537,135.21 14,054.57 (14,054.57)                     1,005.47 60,194.53                     1,621.05 3,378.95                               ‐ (289,200.00) $153,876.60 $283,963.40                               ‐                   190,872.00                           16.72 6,463.28                     6,451.02                     15,848.98 60,511.92 338,078.08 20,454.77 799,425.23 48,757.79 589,012.21 43,657.86 567,962.14 1,822.40 30,857.60 7,638.57 137,441.43 3,271.52 47,118.48                        446.79 38,013.21 $193,029.36 $2,761,092.64                               ‐ 98,328.00                               ‐ 8,000.00 18,194.20 84,215.80 5,050.95 196,649.05                               ‐                                 ‐ 12,940.43 331,469.57 1,454.79 27,255.21                               ‐                                 ‐ 10,400.61 245,719.39 18,924.27 223,255.73                               ‐                     87,320.00 $66,965.25 $1,302,212.75 $413,871.21 $4,347,268.79                   23,398.02 1,148,801.98 103,685.00 638,635.00                        709.16 82,270.84                           60.80 109,939.20                               ‐                                 ‐                               ‐ 30,000.00 11,661.34 822,428.66 10,014.47 709,765.53                 315,248.86 (140,248.86) $464,777.65 $3,401,592.35                 780,696.88 278,806.12 $780,696.88 $278,806.12 $8,027,667.26

% OF BUDGET EXPENDED ‐‐‐ 18.72% ‐‐‐ 1.64% 32.42% 0.00% 35.14% 0.00% 0.26% ‐‐‐ 15.18% 2.49% 7.65% 7.14% 5.58% 5.27% 6.49% 1.16% 6.53% 0.00% 0.00% 17.77% 2.50% ‐‐‐ 3.76% 5.07% ‐‐‐ 4.06% 7.81% ‐‐‐ 4.89% 8.69% 2.00% 13.97% 0.85% 0.06% ‐‐‐ 0.00% 1.40% 1.39% 180.14% 12.02% 73.69% 73.69% 17.13%

Year‐to‐Date Unaudited Fund Balance Expenditures @ 02/28/19 $413,871.21 1,819,393.20 178,814.65 1,891,226.82 780,696.88 (624,563.91)                    285,963.00 2,615,214.80 $1,659,345.74 $5,701,270.91

Page 1 of 6


CAPITOL REGION WATERSHE DISTRICT JOB COST DETAIL FOR THE PERIOD FEBRUARY 1, 2019 ‐ FEBRUARY 28, 2019   2018 ANNUAL BUDGET 0.00 660,840.00                             ‐                 61,200.00                   5,000.00 (289,200.00) TOTAL GENERAL ADMINISTRATION: $437,840.00 20000 ‐ Administration Allocation 190,872.00 18000 ‐ District Permit Program                             ‐ 19000 ‐ District Permit Program 202,640.00 19101 ‐ Permit Tracking & Database Management                 14,150.00 18102 ‐ Construction Inspection                             ‐ 19102 ‐ Construction Inspection 147,250.00 18103 ‐ Permit Closure & Post Construction Inspection/Maintenance                             ‐ 19103 ‐ Permit Closure & Post Construction Inspection/Maintenance 34,550.00 ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ ‐ Permits 18120 ‐ Evaluate Rules/TAC Meetings                             ‐ 19120 ‐ Evaluate Rules/TAC Meetings                 22,300.00 19130 ‐ Groundwater Protection ‐ Well Sealing 6,480.00 17143 ‐ Stewardship Grants                             ‐ 18143 ‐ Stewardship Grants                             ‐ 19143 ‐ Stewardship Grants              427,650.00 18144 ‐ Partner Grants                             ‐ 19144 ‐ Partner Grants 126,340.00 18145 ‐ Inspiring Communities Program                 20,490.00 18146 ‐ Rain Garden Projects 24,090.00 16147 ‐ TWP Blvd. Rain Gardens              213,310.00 18148 ‐ MN Greencorps Member                             ‐ 19148 ‐ MN Greencorps Member                   8,000.00 18200 ‐ Baseline Monitoring & Data Collection                             ‐ 19200 ‐ Baseline Monitoring & Data Collection              331,880.00 19205 ‐ Lake Monitoring & Data Collection 102,610.00 18210 ‐ Villa Park Monitoring & Data Collection                             ‐ 19210 ‐ Villa Park Monitoring & Data Collection 28,470.00 19215 ‐ Wetland Bio‐Monitoring 17,670.00 19220 ‐ WISKI Database Website 46,720.00 19225 ‐ Remote Data Access & Set Up                 12,510.00 18230 ‐ BMP Monitoring                             ‐ 19230 ‐ BMP Monitoring                 49,540.00   18970 ‐ General Administration 19970 ‐ General Administration 19975 ‐ Aldine Operations 19976 ‐ Thomas Operations 19978 ‐ MAWD 10000 ‐ Administration Allocation

JOB COST #/NAME

CURRENT MONTH YEAR‐TO‐DATE BALANCE OF  EXPENDITURES EXPENDITURES BUDGET REMAINING 0.00 13,490.72 (13,490.72) 74,521.19 123,704.79 537,135.21 5,508.39 14,054.57 (14,054.57)                              ‐ 1,005.47 60,194.53                        250.59 1,621.05 3,378.95                               ‐                                ‐ (289,200.00) $80,280.17 $153,876.60 $283,963.40                               ‐                                ‐                190,872.00 0.00 6,102.03 (6,102.03) 19,495.98 23,313.86 179,326.14                               ‐                                ‐ 14,150.00                               ‐ 74.26 (74.26)                           74.25 295.63 146,954.37                               ‐ 296.99 (296.99)                               ‐ 239.77 34,310.23                   13,980.18                     30,189.38 (30,189.38)                               ‐ 44.83 (44.83)                     3,682.99 6,406.19 15,893.81                           16.72                            16.72 6,463.28                               ‐ 74.67 (74.67)                               ‐ 2,434.37 (2,434.37)                     7,427.36 9,600.89 418,049.11                        196.92 1,267.11 (1,267.11)                        992.82 1,463.35 124,876.65                               ‐                                ‐ 20,490.00                               ‐                                ‐ 24,090.00                     2,090.91 4,450.21 208,859.79                               ‐ 221.79 (221.79)                        617.72 942.38 7,057.62                               ‐ 10,474.93 (10,474.93)                   26,782.11 35,710.36 296,169.64                           73.96                            73.96 102,536.04                               ‐ 139.76 (139.76)                        242.65 402.74 28,067.26                               ‐                                ‐ 17,670.00                               ‐                                ‐ 46,720.00                     1,240.53                      1,240.53 11,269.47                               ‐ 333.06 (333.06)                        219.54 271.52 49,268.48

% OF BUDGET EXPENDED ‐‐‐ 18.72% ‐‐‐ 1.64% 32.42% 0.00% 35.14% 0.00% ‐‐‐ 11.51% 0.00% ‐‐‐ 0.20% ‐‐‐ 0.69% ‐‐‐ ‐‐‐ 28.73% 0.26% ‐‐‐ ‐‐‐ 2.25% ‐‐‐ 1.16% 0.00% 0.00% 2.09% ‐‐‐ 11.78% ‐‐‐ 10.76% 0.07% ‐‐‐ 1.41% 0.00% 0.00% 9.92% ‐‐‐ 0.55%

Page 2 of 6


CAPITOL REGION WATERSHE DISTRICT JOB COST DETAIL FOR THE PERIOD FEBRUARY 1, 2019 ‐ FEBRUARY 28, 2019       JOB COST #/NAME 15231 ‐ AHUG Exfiltration Monitoring 17232 ‐ Midway Office WH Monitoring 18250 ‐ General Ed & Outreach 19250 ‐ General Outreach & Communications 18251 ‐ General Communications 19255 ‐ Leaf & Litter Clean Ups 19260 ‐ Municipal Training 18262 ‐ Youth Outreach 19262 ‐ Youth Outreach 19263 ‐ Communications Training 18265 ‐ Sponsorships & Partnerships 19265 ‐ Sponsorships & Partnerships 18268 ‐ Adopt A Drain 19268 ‐ Adopt A Drain 17270 ‐ Website & Social Media 19270 ‐ Website & Social Media 18271 ‐ Master Water Stewards 19271 ‐ Master Water Stewards 17274 ‐ TWP Communications 19275 ‐ Events 16277 ‐ TWP ‐ Adopt a Drain 16278 ‐ TWP Leaf & Litter Clean Ups 18279 ‐ Social Media 19279 ‐ Social Media 19280 ‐ 595 Aldine Education & Outreach 18285 ‐ Awards & Recognition Programs 19285 ‐ Awards & Recognition Programs 17300 ‐ Local & Agency Plan Review & Tech Committee 18300 ‐ Plan Review & Tech Committee 19300 ‐ Plan Review & Tech Committee 18303 ‐ BMP Database Maintenance/Updates 19303 ‐ BMP Database Maintenance/Updates 18330 ‐ District Research Program 19330 ‐ District Research Program 19333 ‐ Public Art Program 18334 ‐ Public Art Program ‐ Aldine 19334 ‐ Public Art Program ‐ Aldine 19335 ‐ Diversity & Inclusion 19336 ‐ Climate Change Impacts 18370 ‐ GIS Program Development 19370 ‐ GIS Program Development 19390 ‐ Safety Training 19395 ‐ Safety Program Updates/Audits 19396 ‐ Safety Equipment TOTAL PROGRAMS:

2018 ANNUAL BUDGET                 18,560.00                 29,810.00                             ‐              270,690.00                             ‐ 10,370.00 14,740.00                             ‐ 10,640.00 10,990.00                             ‐ 28,040.00                             ‐ 21,360.00                             ‐                 37,730.00                             ‐                 30,410.00                   6,980.00 35,720.00                   5,370.00                   6,370.00                             ‐ 7,260.00 100,000.00                             ‐ 14,950.00                             ‐                             ‐                 17,000.00                             ‐                 15,680.00                             ‐ 50,200.00 29,120.00                             ‐ 25,960.00 20,000.00 19,800.00                             ‐                 50,390.00                 13,540.00                 12,400.00 12,520.00 $2,954,122.00

CURRENT MONTH EXPENDITURES                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                     8,929.53                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                        635.92                               ‐                               ‐                        184.11                               ‐                        158.51                     8,672.10                        267.84                               ‐                        558.29                           43.03 774.18                               ‐                        122.77                           44.64 229.65                     2,172.43                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                        511.61                               ‐                           38.32                           53.28                        293.06                     2,067.98                     1,497.76                               ‐                     2,255.00                               ‐                               ‐                     1,200.10                               ‐                           49.21                        317.59 $108,211.55

YEAR‐TO‐DATE BALANCE OF  EXPENDITURES BUDGET REMAINING                                ‐ 18,560.00 110.93 29,699.07 2,997.17 (2,997.17) 12,603.32 258,086.68 798.54 (798.54)                                ‐ 10,370.00                                ‐ 14,740.00 66.42 (66.42) 792.76 9,847.24                                ‐ 10,990.00 684.36 (684.36) 3,762.53 24,277.47 456.40 (456.40) 307.83 21,052.17 9,546.42 (9,546.42)                         267.84 37,462.16 780.78 (780.78) 964.01 29,445.99 87.39 6,892.61 1,065.65 34,654.35                                ‐ 5,370.00                         122.77 6,247.23 44.36 (44.36)                            44.64 7,215.36 277.01 99,722.99 7,987.66 (7,987.66)                                ‐ 14,950.00 562.83 (562.83) 179.29 (179.29) 838.35 16,161.65 203.61 (203.61)                            38.32 15,641.68 53.28 (53.28)                         293.06 49,906.94                      2,067.98 27,052.02 2,922.87 (2,922.87)                                ‐ 25,960.00 2,301.38 17,698.62                                ‐ 19,800.00 121.13 (121.13) 3,150.39 47,239.61                                ‐ 13,540.00                            49.21 12,350.79 397.58 12,122.42                  193,029.36 $2,761,092.64

% OF BUDGET EXPENDED 0.00% 0.37% ‐‐‐ 4.66% ‐‐‐ ‐‐‐ 0.00% ‐‐‐ 7.45% 0.00% ‐‐‐ 13.42% ‐‐‐ 1.44% ‐‐‐ 0.71% ‐‐‐ 3.17% 1.25% 2.98% 0.00% 1.93% ‐‐‐ 0.61% 0.28% ‐‐‐ 0.00% ‐‐‐ ‐‐‐ 4.93% ‐‐‐ 0.24% ‐‐‐ 0.58% 7.10% ‐‐‐ 0.00% 11.51% 0.00% ‐‐‐ 6.25% 0.00% 0.40% 3.18% 6.53%

Page 3 of 6


CAPITOL REGION WATERSHE DISTRICT JOB COST DETAIL FOR THE PERIOD FEBRUARY 1, 2019 ‐ FEBRUARY 28, 2019       JOB COST #/NAME 30000 ‐ Administration Allocation 19405 ‐ St. Paul Natural Resources Intern Program 18421 ‐ Como BMP Maintenance & Inspection 19421 ‐ Como BMP Maintenance & Inspection 19425 ‐ Curtis Pond Opti RTC O & M 18427 ‐ Como Lake Management Plan 16430 ‐ TWP Como Lake Project Development 19470 ‐ AIS Management 18476 ‐ Upper Villa Maintenance 16477 ‐ TWP ‐ Lake McCarron's Project Development 19477 ‐ TWP ‐ Lake McCarron's Management Plan 18550 ‐ Inspection & Annual Maintenance 19550 ‐ Inspection & Annual Maintenance 14552 ‐ TBI Easement Verification & Documentation 17554 ‐ TBI Hydraulic/Hydrolic Model Calibration & Update 19570 ‐ NPDES MS4 Stormwater Program 18575 ‐ Illicit Discharge Detection & Elimination Program 19620 ‐ Green Infrastructure for Innovation Districts 17621 ‐ Snelling Midway Redevelopment 19621 ‐ Snelling Midway Redevelopment 18622 ‐ Ford Site Planning 18623 ‐ Ford Site Area C 18624 ‐ CCLRT BMP Maintenance 19624 ‐ Green Line BMP Maintenance 18531 ‐ Highland Ravine BMP Maintenance 19631 ‐ Highland Ravine Maintenance 18650 ‐ 2020 Watershed Management Plan 18655 ‐ Strategic Plan 19660 ‐ Special Grants ‐ Project Development

19703 ‐ Como Lake In‐Lake Management 16705 ‐ TWP Como BMP McMurray 16720 ‐ Willow Reserve Restoration Project 16752 ‐ TWP ‐ McCarrons BMP ‐ Parkview 19790 ‐ Loeb Lake Shoreline Restoration 16815 ‐ TBI Repairs ‐ St. 0+00 ‐ 28+49 19820 ‐ TBI Repair ‐ Station 28+65 ‐ 50+72 19850 ‐ Land Conservation Funding

2018 ANNUAL BUDGET 98,328.00 8,000.00                             ‐                 26,070.00                   9,500.00                 42,920.00 23,920.00                 39,300.00 30,000.00                             ‐              132,400.00                             ‐              100,500.00 216,000.00                             ‐ 7,910.00 20,000.00 60,800.00                             ‐ 29,750.00              119,200.00                 10,000.00                             ‐ 36,370.00                             ‐                 28,710.00              242,180.00                             ‐                 87,320.00 TOTAL PROJECTS: $1,369,178.00 TOTAL OPERATING FUND: $4,761,140.00 224,600.00 947,600.00 70,360.00              742,320.00                 12,620.00                             ‐ 110,000.00 30,000.00

CURRENT MONTH YEAR‐TO‐DATE BALANCE OF  EXPENDITURES EXPENDITURES BUDGET REMAINING                               ‐                                ‐ 98,328.00                               ‐                                ‐ 8,000.00                               ‐ 34.25 (34.25)                           98.42 174.45 25,895.55                               ‐                                ‐ 9,500.00                     5,407.17 17,334.59 25,585.41                        561.27 650.91 23,269.09                        102.85                         102.85 39,197.15                               ‐                                ‐ 30,000.00                           40.72 40.72 (40.72)                     4,456.50 4,907.38 127,492.62                     1,607.48 7,480.40 (7,480.40)                     1,029.33 2,879.42 97,620.58                     1,417.05 1,738.67 214,261.33                               ‐ 160.81 (160.81)                               ‐                                ‐ 7,910.00                        451.18 681.13 19,318.87                           48.92                            48.92 60,751.08                               ‐ 643.24 (643.24)                               ‐                                ‐ 29,750.00                     1,625.06 8,480.53 110,719.47                               ‐                                ‐ 10,000.00                               ‐ 757.90 (757.90)                        343.30 470.02 35,899.98                               ‐ 100.97 (100.97)                        599.97 1,353.82 27,356.18                     9,456.85 18,504.27 223,675.73                               ‐ 420.00 (420.00)                               ‐                                ‐ 87,320.00 $27,246.07                    66,965.25 $1,302,212.75 $215,737.79 $413,871.21 $4,347,268.79                               ‐                                ‐ 224,600.00                     1,043.37 23,398.02 924,201.98                        709.16                         709.16 69,650.84                     8,194.78 103,685.00 638,635.00                               ‐                                ‐ 12,620.00                               ‐ 60.80 (60.80)                               ‐                                ‐ 110,000.00                               ‐                                ‐ 30,000.00

% OF BUDGET EXPENDED 0.00% 0.00% ‐‐‐ 0.67% 0.00% 40.39% 2.72% 0.26% 0.00% ‐‐‐ 3.71% ‐‐‐ 2.87% 0.80% ‐‐‐ 0.00% 3.41% 0.08% ‐‐‐ 0.00% 7.11% 0.00% ‐‐‐ 1.29% ‐‐‐ 4.72% 7.64% ‐‐‐ 0.00% 4.89% 8.69% 0.00% 2.47% 1.01% 13.97% 0.00% ‐‐‐ 0.00% 0.00%

Page 4 of 6


CAPITOL REGION WATERSHE DISTRICT JOB COST DETAIL FOR THE PERIOD FEBRUARY 1, 2019 ‐ FEBRUARY 28, 2019       JOB COST #/NAME 16881 ‐ Green Line Redevelopment BMP's 16886 ‐ Lauderdale Subwatershed Stormwater Improvement Project 19890 ‐ Midway Peace Park 18910 ‐ Special Grants 19910 ‐ Special Grants 19913 ‐ CRWD Opportunity Fund 16917 ‐ Swede Hollow Construction 15918 ‐ Midway Stadium Redevelopment 16918 ‐ North Lake Como Restore 16920 ‐ TWP Grant Administration 17926 ‐ Adams Spanish Immersion 16950 ‐ New Office Facility TOTAL CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT: 14960 ‐ Debt & Loan Service  TOTAL DEBT SERVICES:

2018 ANNUAL BUDGET 603,090.00                 51,000.00              180,000.00                             ‐              366,900.00              350,000.00                             ‐                             ‐                             ‐                   2,880.00                             ‐              175,000.00 $3,866,370.00 1,059,503.00 $1,059,503.00

CURRENT MONTH EXPENDITURES                        465.60                     6,777.21                        601.91                               ‐                     3,844.54                               ‐                        232.34                               ‐                               ‐                        488.64                               ‐                   58,444.69 $80,802.24                               ‐                              ‐

TOTAL ALL FUNDS:

$9,687,013.00

$296,540.03

YEAR‐TO‐DATE BALANCE OF  EXPENDITURES BUDGET REMAINING 643.05 602,446.95 9,913.52 41,086.48 1,104.77 178,895.23 2,524.98 (2,524.98) 6,483.46 360,416.54                                ‐ 350,000.00 273.06 (273.06) 122.17 (122.17) 40.72 (40.72)                         488.64 2,391.36 81.44 (81.44) 315,248.86 (140,248.86) $464,777.65 $3,401,592.35 780,696.88 278,806.12 $780,696.88 $278,806.12 $1,659,345.74

$8,027,667.26

% OF BUDGET EXPENDED 0.11% 19.44% 0.61% ‐‐‐ 1.77% 0.00% ‐‐‐ ‐‐‐ ‐‐‐ 16.97% ‐‐‐ 180.14% 12.02% 73.69% 73.69% 17.13%

Page 5 of 6


CAPITOL REGION WATERSHED DISTRICT PERMITS FOR THE PERIOD FEBRUARY 1, 2019 ‐ FEBRUARY 28, 2019 PERMIT   NUMBER

PERMIT NAME

PERMITTING BUDGET

9009 12003 12023 13015 14017 14018 14027 15007 15013 15030 15040 16004 16007 16019 16020 16021 16025 16028 16032 17009 17010 17013 17015 17018 17020 17022 17023 17025 18002 18004 18008 18009 18012 18013 18014 18015 18016 18017 18018 18019 18020 18022 18023 19001 19002 19003 19004 19005 19006

Victoria Street Cretin‐Derham Hall Ford Site Demo Maryland Arkwright St. Paul Academy Frogtown Farms HealthPartners MOB Ramsey County Building Demo Jamestown Homes Farrington Estates Luther Seminary Xcel Pipeline 2016 Community School of Excellence Roselawn Cemetary Dorothy Day Place 2300 Territorial Apartments Snelling Midway Adams School SPJCC Addition Jackson Street Reconstruction Swede Hollow Great River Schools Wheelock Dale Victoria Exchange Street Apartments Transfer Road Storage Regions Birth Center Weyerhaeuser Apts. Rice Park Revitalization Menards Trnasload Terminal Como Paving 2018 Vomela Beacon Bluff Seal Island at Como Zoo Scheffer Community Center Beacon Bluff Opus Morning Star Met Council Villa Park Sanitary O'Gara's Mixed Use Cathedral Hill Payne Building Development Ford TCAP Railyard Excavation Albion Senior Community Rivoli Phase III Roseville Aldi Fairview Avenue TH94 Mill & Overlay Victoria Park Play Area Wheelock 4, Western to Rice Midway Peace Park McCarrons Hill

                       ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐                         ‐

18000

Sub‐Total: Permits General Permitting

                       ‐                         ‐ TOTAL PERMITS: $202,640.00

CURRENT MONTH EXPENDITURES

YEAR‐TO‐DATE EXPENDITURES

BALANCE OF PERMIT BUDGET REMAINING

% OF PERMIT BUDGET EXPENDED

                               ‐                                 ‐                                 ‐                                 ‐                             92.81                                 ‐                                 ‐                                 ‐                                 ‐                             74.25                          283.06                                 ‐                                 ‐                                 ‐                       2,277.95                          310.03                          712.61                                 ‐                                 ‐                                 ‐                                 ‐                                 ‐                          324.00                          298.00                          322.03                          309.30                          393.87                                 ‐                       1,079.59                          555.60                          298.00                          309.30                          324.35                                 ‐                          363.33                                 ‐                          185.61                                 ‐                          841.50                                 ‐                          569.59                                 ‐                                 ‐                             36.00                          304.10                       1,452.30                             36.00                       1,368.85                          858.15

                        31.50                        294.00                        678.62                            5.69                        983.81                        376.20                          31.50                          31.50                          31.50                        185.31                        825.39                          31.50                          31.50                          18.57                    2,763.22                        876.36                        712.61                          73.79                        154.89                        341.00                          37.14                          36.89                        324.00                    1,063.65                        864.36                        605.69                        879.14                          25.75                    1,079.59                        579.60                    1,117.14                        919.66                        809.62                        339.72                        973.69                          18.45                        191.02                          45.97                        845.30                        677.57                        572.12                    1,338.99                    1,412.71                        674.35                    1,095.20                    2,057.15                        899.45                    1,368.85                        858.15

                                ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐

                             ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐

                                ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐                                  ‐

                             ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐                               ‐

13,980.18                    19,495.98                    33,476.16

30,189.38                 29,415.89                 59,605.27

                                ‐                               ‐                                  ‐                               ‐ $143,034.73 29.41%

Page 6 of 6


DATE: TO: FROM: RE:

March 13, 2019 CRWD Board of Managers and Staff Mark Doneux, Administrator February 2019 Administratorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report

1) Administrator Approved or Executed Agreements a) State of Minnesota Income Contract Amendment for an amount not to exceed $20,860. b) Partner Grant Agreement with Water Heroes for Lawn Chair Gardener Creative Services for an amount not to exceed $20,000. c) Partner Grant Agreement with Como Community Council for Como Lake Cleanup for an amount not to exceed $18,473. d) Partner Grant Agreement with District 6 Planning Council for Meet Willow Reserve for an amount not to exceed $5,000. e) Partner Grant Agreement with Friends of the Mississippi River for Youth Environmental Stewards Program and Trout Brook Initiative for an amount not to exceed $9,070. f) Partner Grant Agreement Frogtown Green for Splashdown! Water Stewardship in Frogtown for an amount not to exceed $10,000. g) Partner Grant Agreement with Frogtown Farm for Cultivating Water Ambassadors at Frogtown Farm for an amount not to exceed $15,000. h) Partner Grant Agreement with Hamline Midway Coalition for Building Community Through Clean Water Education for an amount not to exceed $5,000. i) Partner Grant Agreement with Great River Greening for Field Learning for teens in CRWD for an amount not to exceed $15,000. j) Partner Grant Agreement with In Progress for Our Sacred Water for an amount not to exceed $20,000. k) Partner Grant Agreement with Urban Roots for Youth Conservation Internships for an amount not to exceed $15,000. l) Partner Grant Agreement with Saint Paul Parks and Recreation for Parks Ambassadors for an amount not to exceed $8,000. m) Grant Amendment with City of Saint Paul for Swede Hollow Surface Water Improvements for an amount not to exceed $7,515. n) Agreement with Ramsey County for 2019 Lake Monitoring Services for an amount not to exceed the fee schedule. o) Cooperative Construction Agreement with Roseville Area Schools for Parkview Center School foe n amount not to exceed $124,449.50. p) Consultant Services agreement with Equity Literacy Institute for Implicit Bias Training for an amount not to exceed $2,000. 2) Board Approved Agreements 3) General Updates a) BWSR Board meeting to be held at CRWD, Wednesday, March 27, 2019 b) Metro MAWD, Tuesday, April 16, 2019. c) Moos Family Lecture Series, Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Our Mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District.


4) Past and Upcoming CRWD events and meetings a) b) c) d)

Como Lake Public Advisory Group, Mississippi River Room, Thursday, March 24, 2019 6:00-8:00 PM Board Workshop, 5:00 PM, Wednesday, April 3, 2019 Board Meeting, 6:00 PM, Wednesday, April 3, 2019 Wednesday, April 10, 2019 CAC meeting

W:\04 Board of Managers\Correspondence\Administrator's Report 2019\Administrator's Report 3-13-19.docx

Our Mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District.

Profile for Capitol Region Watershed District

March 20, 2019 Board of Managers Meeting  

March 20, 2019 Board of Managers Meeting