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CAPITAL TA L E S O F T H E C I T Y

CHRISTMAS YULE FUEL DECEMBER 2016

HUTT VOTES FOR TRUTH

ISSUE 37

$4.90 GIVUS A GIFT

C R AY C R AY F I S H


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CAPITAL

MADE IN WELLINGTON

THE COVER: Kereru claus wishes you a Merry Christmas.

T

he earthquakes have turned things topsy turvey (literally) leading up to this issue, yet curiously much proceeds the same. We still have deadlines to meet and families and work to organise. It is an odd feeling. We in the wider Capital team appear to have been very lucky and have suffered minimal damage. We offer our sympathy and thoughts to the many people who are coping with not just the anxiety created by the earthquake but all the consequent problems. It is clear that it will take many months for Wellington to resolve the local problems. I hope that the floods and the resulting State Highway 1 and 2 closures after the earthquakes will help to keep the focus on solving Wellington’s roading problems. Bring on Transmission Gully. The amusing things to come out of these disasters are often family stories; the slow-moving family member who appears miraculously clad and with boots on urging others to hurry out, and those who rush, “naked as a jaybird” out onto the street, while others turn a deaf ear to the rocking and rolling and return to sleep. To interest and amuse you in this issue we have a new feature; Melody Thomas has temporarily forsaken birds of Wellington in What the Flock, to examine fish in the sea around us. Our chefs Nikki and Jordan show you how to prepare Christmas crayfish should you be lucky enough to have it on your menu; and our three Chrises for Christmas tell us about their traditional family treats. Our house renovation family in Karori left some of us in the office feeling a little bit exhausted after contemplating their mammoth efforts, but rejuvenated again by the beautiful pictures. A surprising result in the local body elections in Lower Hutt is examined by John Bishop, and our Welly Angel, DeirdreTarrant, offers punters her usual cheerful advice. And to add real authenticity to your Christmas try making our very own piwakawaka, cleverly designed for us by Hannah Boekhorst. I want to thank all the people who help each month to get this magazine out, and to wish them and our readers a Merry Christmas. See you in the New Year.

SUBSCRIPTION Subscription rates $77 (inc postage and packaging) 11 issues New Zealand only To subscribe, please email accounts@capitalmag.co.nz

C O N TA C T U S Phone +64 4 385 1426 Email editor@capitalmag.co.nz Website www.capitalmag.co.nz Facebook facebook.com/CapitalMagazineWellington Twitter @CapitalMagWelly Instagram @capitalmag Post Box 9202, Marion Square, Wellington 6141 Deliveries 31–41 Pirie St, Mt Victoria, Wellington, 6011 ISSN 2324-4836 Produced by Capital Publishing Ltd

PRINTED IN WELLINGTON

This publication uses vegetable based inks, and FSC® certified papers produced from responsible sources, manufactured under ISO14001 Environmental Management Systems

Alison Franks Editor editor@capitalmag.co.nz

The opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher. Although all material is checked for accuracy, no liability is assumed by the publisher for any losses due to the use of material in this magazine. Copyright ©. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored or transmitted in any form without the prior written permission of Capital Publishing Ltd.

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CONTRIBUTORS

S TA F F Alison Franks Managing editor editor@capitalmag.co.nz Campaign coordinators Lyndsey O’Reilly lyndsey@capitalmag.co.nz Haleigh Trower haleigh@capitalmag.co.nz Michael Benton michael@capitalmag.co.nz Griff Bristed griff@capitalmag.co.nz Factotum John Bristed john@capitalmag.co.nz Art direction Shalee Fitzsimmons shalee@capitalmag.co.nz Design Rhett Goodley- design@capitalmag.co.nz Hornblow Accounts Tod Harfield accounts@capitalmag.co.nz Craig Beardsworth

Factotum

Gus Bristed

Distribution

CONTRIBUTORS

BILLIE OSBORNE I l lu str ator

MEG WYPER Sty li st & Ph oto g r apher

Billie is a honours graduate from Massey University where she studied illustration and design. Raised a Dunedinite, she now lives in Newtown, building her career as an illustrator. She can be found feeding her coffee addiction, hijacking her friends' dogs for walks, or settling down with a g&t to Kath & Kim.

Meg is a new mum, maker of many things, blogger, photographer and wife to a Scot. Her musings can be found at megandlou. co.nz and on Instagram @megandlou.

ALEX SCOTT Writer

J O H N B I SHO P Writer

Alex does a little bit of everything. When she's not painting, cartooning or making tiny objects, she's writing and sub-editing. A transplanted Aucklander, she's enjoying learning why Wellingtonians are always raving about their city. You can find her online at Instagram.com/thisisalexscott

John Bishop is a Wellington writer and advisor who helped out in the 1989 reorganisation of local government, and has been active in civic affairs in Lower Hutt and Wellington cities.

Melody Thomas | Janet Hughes | John Bishop Ashley Church | Beth Rose | Tamara Jones Laura Pitcher | Joelle Thomson | Hannah Boekhorst | Anna Briggs | Charlotte Wilson Griff Bristed George Staniland | Sarah Lang Bex McGill | Sharon Greally | Alex Scott

STOCKISTS Pick up your Capital in New World, Countdown and Pak’n’ Save supermarkets, Moore Wilson's, Unity Books, Commonsense Organics, Magnetix, City Cards & Mags, Take Note, Whitcoulls, Wellington Airport, Interislander and other discerning region-wide outlets. Ask for Capital magazine by name. Distribution: john@capitalmag.co.nz.

SUBMISSIONS We welcome freelance art, photo and story submissions. However we cannot reply personally to unsuccessful pitches.

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CONTENTS

10 LETTERS 12 CHATTER 14 NEWS BRIEFS

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TALES OF THE CIT Y Justin Duckworth walked 830km in 31 days, mimed in his youth and can peel 10 sacks of potatoes in an hour. He’s also Bishop of Wellington

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CHRISTMAS YULE FUEL

CULTURE Art, dance, film, theatre, design – we have our finger on the Wellington pulse

Previously we’ve grilled Carols, Marys and Murrays in a punny attempt at yuletide humour – now for three Chrises

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24

GATHER

TELL VOTERS THE TRU TH

Forage and reutilise – add the festive vibe yourself with these crafty ideas

A risky decision to tell it like it is won a Lower Hutt councillor a different ward

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36

FISHY BUSINESS Bye bye birdy – a new column featuring fish is here – first up the Yellowtail Kingfish

CHRISTMAS PĪWAKAWAKA Make your own festive fantail

T E R A¯ K A U T H E A T R E ’ S

THE UNDER T OW 8


CONTENTS

44

LO CAL GIFT GUIDE Buy local this Christmas with our festive shopping guide

50 LIFESTYLE 52 EDIBLES

70

HOM E G ROW N HA PPI N E S S A six bedroom Northland home provides a huge palette for a lifelong designer

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64

WHAT WOULD DEIRDRE D O

SUMMER READS Seven book buffs share their summer picks

54

SHEARERS’ TABLE

TORQUE TALK

Go cray-cray for crayfish

56

Fizz fare for the festive season

“To have read or heard about our local history is one thing, but to see it portrayed in the way Te Rākau Theatre does is special and unique and not to be missed.” The Dominion Post

Roger Walker runs his eye over the ninth generation Honda Civic

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SLOAN RANGER

BUBBLE BUBBLE

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On motor bikes since he was two Sloan Frost has broken many bones and won plenty of titles

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PLAYS

W h AT u N G A R O N G A R O T E TA N G ATA , T O I T ū T E W h E NuA .

THE PERFECT GIFT FOR THE WELLINGTONIAN IN YOUR LIFE

MAN dISAppEARS buT ThE LANd REMAINS.

College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Massey University sponsored season of Te Rākau Theatre’s The Undertow

—1—

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ThE RAGGEd 1840

—2—

dOG & bONE

G E N E R AT I O N S

1869

177

—3—

pubLIC WORKS 1917

—4—

T h E L A N d E AT E R S T h e D a y A f te r To m o r row

84 BABY, BABY 85 DIRECTORY 86 CALENDAR

YEARS OF WELLINGTON STORIES 9

Written by Helen Pearse-Otene Directed by Jim Moriarty

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17 – 2 9 J CALENDAR A N U A R Y 2 0 17 S O U N D I N G S T H E AT R E , T E PA PA www.theundertow.nz | Book at Ticketek


LETTERS

NOT GO OD ENOUGH In your current issue, (#36, November) Auckland theatre person Kip Chapman is quoted as saying Circa Theatre “is not good enough for Wellington” and “should pull its socks up.” I am very interested in that statement and would have liked to have heard more from him about what he thinks is lacking at Circa. I, along with many I know, have criticisms of Circa and its limited offering to the local theatre scene. I hope you are planning a feature looking at what they offer. Name and address supplied, Kelston SO LONG NAN What a lovely tribute to his grandmother from Ian Apperley. She was clearly an important influence in their family. If we all had such loved grandmothers, and strong families, we would be a happier and better community. S Match, Khandallah GOING ON A BEER HUNT Hey, thanks for the beer guide in this issue, (p68 #36) it’s really interesting and a great help now when I am buying beer. I have tried all of the top choices in the last couple of weeks (and a few others). My partner is also using it and, finally, developing a bit of decent taste in beers. Cheers. Top Sixer, Te Aro CITY PARTNER:

DEVELOPED BY:

EARLY DEMENTIA MORE LIKELY

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I was impressed to read about that ultra athlete (Dave Oliver) featured in your magazine recently (#34, September). His achievements are impressive but I do wonder medically whether humans are really meant to push themselves to these limits so often and whether it means they are more likely later to succumb to other ailments earlier. Nervous system ailments and early onset dementia seems to be on the rise. I know there is a place for being fit but are these extremes healthful? D Downes, Taranaki

You can send letters to editor@capitalmag.co.nz with the subject line Letters to Ed

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How many steps does it take you to get to check in? CLOSER.FAS TER.EASIER

Drive up or book online at wellingtonairport.co.nz


RD E R S E C TCI H OA N THT EE A

DAIRY ME

NEW

DISNEY DOWNUNDER Most of us don’t want to be associated with crabs, but Jemaine Clement gamely volunteered to voice a villainous hermit crab in new animated film Moana, written by his mate Taika Waititi. Quite the change of direction for Disney, Moana is about a Polynesian princess and navigator who sets sail in search of a fabled island, and teams up with demigod Maui. The “3D computer-animated musical fantasy comedy adventure film” is out on Boxing Day. After a change from vampires, Taika?

KALPANA PATEL

IN THE NEIGHB OURHO OD

2 Moxham Avenue, Hataitai. Hataitai Dairy.

This horse story left us struggling to rein in the puns. In September 1865, Mr J Leech petitioned Wellington’s Town Board to remove an unclaimed horse carcass from outside his Egmont Street premises. Recently the Wellington City Council included the anecdote in its call for proposals to paint murals on the laneway’s garages, pillars, walls and door. Ruth Taylor and Rachael Gannaway painted a horse-skull mural, while Kelly Spencer went for a unicorn (representing a horse in heaven). Charlotte Hawley paints the final mural from 10 December.

What is your favourite lolly? Jetplanes. Average hours worked each day? 13–14 hours. Do the whole family work at the dairy? Just me and my husband. The best thing about working here is being my own boss.

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C HAT T E R

WELLY WORDS TENDERLY CLOSE A Wellyworder was picking up a takeaway salad from Fidels when she saw the cashier's wrist come perilously close to the metal spike on which staff stack receipts. As the Eftpos whirred, she asked if he'd ever stabbed himself on it. "Ha!' he replied. "It actually stabbed my nipple this morning!" Health and Safety, nothing to see here.

VEGAN SUBTERFUGE While a group of young men were dining at Laundry Bar on Cuba they were delighted to order the Pulled Pork burger. Until one Wellyworder noticed the word ‘vegan’ alongside pulled pork. General dismay ensued, with claims of “sneaky vegans” being thrown around. To be fair, we don’t know how the boys missed it in the first place, “Vegan” being part of the name of the dish. Either way, reports are that it was delicious.

DESIGN A BREEZE Our fourth in the series of Capital tea towels is from local designer Kelly Spencer. This year’s design has a touch of red and is ontopic with a bike and a nod to Wellington’s breeze. Kelly is known for her skill with hand-lettering and type (closely followed by illustration). She operates from a studio space she shares with a handful of talented local freelance artists/designers. Our teatowels are available with subscriptions.

NUDE QUAKERS Earthquake stories are rampant right now. After thorough investigation and careful analysis, we have concluded that men are much more likely than women to run out into the street in the middle of the night with no clothes on while their partner chases them up holding a dressing gown. Whether to save the significant other’s dignity, or for warmth in case of apocalypse, we cannot be sure.

IT'S COOL TO KORERO With the season of ham and pavlova upon us, you might need to say... My tummy is really full. Kua tino kī taku puku

CHORAL CHRISTMAS CAROL CRACKER There’s nothing quite like letting loose with hearty carol singing as yuletide approaches. Community singing (and indeed having a good bellow in the shower) has a calming effect. The perfect tranquilizer, it both soothes the nerves and elevates your spirits. The science suggests endorphins, hormones associated with feelings of pleasure, are released. The effect might also be from oxytocin – another hormone found to alleviate anxiety and stress. Oxytocin also enhances feelings of trust and bonding which may explain why singing lessens feelings of depression and loneliness. So gather some elves around you, find a ukulele, piano or kazoo whistle and Deck the Halls. • •

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15 Dec Christmas on the Harbour with Sol3 Mio Waitangi Park 7.00pm 24 Dec Community Carols St Pauls Cathedral Hill Street 10.30pm


NEWS BRIEFS

CLEVER K AU PA PA Calling all Māori business trailblazers. Callaghan Innovation has opened its new hub for Māori business development at Gracefield Innovation Quarter in Lower Hutt. And they want you. “It is a place to connect with Māori, cook up new ideas and help your business grow. We help all Māori businesses that want to innovate,” enthuses Interim Chief Executive Hemi Rolleston. Callaghan currently collaborates with food-and-beverage company Kono, dairy-processing business Miraka and leading interactive book production house Kiwa Digital. So what’s your big idea?

XERO-ING IN

FASHION SOS

VICTOR VICTORIOUS

Wellington firm Xero has been named NZ’s third highest-growth technology exporter in a roundup of the top 100 by the Technology Investment Network. The cloudaccounting company saw a 67% increase in revenue in the 2016 financial year, from $123.9 million to $207.1 million. “Xero is well placed to outpace its competitors and achieve its goal of reaching $1 billion revenue,” says CEO Rod Drury.

“This is the end of fashion as we know it,” declared trend forecaster Lidewij Edelkoort last year. But is fashion really dead? That will be the question on everyone’s lips at the first international End of Fashion conference at Massey University on 8/9 December. Seventy-five of the world’s leading thinkers and designers in the fashion realm will unpack topics such as sustainability, the impact of globalisation on national fashion, and the rise of the power blogger.

Victor Rodger will spend 2017 in the capital as the Victoria University of Wellington and Creative New Zealand Writer in Residence – the first ever recipient of Pasifika descent. Best known for the 2013 play Black Faggot, his work has been praised for its boldness and candour. Ken Duncum at the International Institute of Modern Letters says “Victor is our greatest Pasifika dramatist. His work never settles for the comfortable, is always subversive, intelligent and vibrant.”

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NEWS BRIEFS

WAT E R G R E AT I D E A ! From drinkability to swimmability, water quality leaves a big question mark over the future of New Zealand. Now, South Wairarapa farmer Grant Muir and his son James with help from Victoria University have designed a device that lets communities monitor the health of their water ways with real-time data. The idea was one of three awarded a $25,000 grant at the 2016 WWF Conservation Innovation Awards last month. “This award will allow for the nationwide rollout of the prototype and will have a major impact on the restoration of our fresh water for generations to come,” promises Grant.

COT TAGE INDUSTRY

STRAIGHT TALKERS

BUILDING GOLD

Travel back in time to one of the 10 oldest buildings in the capital, the six-room cottage where English settlers William and Sarah Randell welcomed their 10th child in 1877. The home is now run by the Randell Cottage Writers Trust, which accommodates authors throughout the year. “Because it’s not a museum, it’s hard to show Wellington how special it is,” explains Sian Robyns of the trust. An open day on 4 December is a chance to perambulate the grounds and appreciate the beautifully restored residence.

No techno-babble or mumbo jumbo here. The New Zealand Institue of Economic Research tells it like it is. And now they’ve been named the WriteMark New Zealand Plain English Awards People’s Choice for Best Communication. “The NZIER helped to better inform the public about the implications of TPPA from an independent source and in easy-to-understand language,” says ExportNZ Executive Director Catherine Beard. “We need more of these types of plain English reports.”

Capital’s car reviewer Roger Walker has another life. Despite his passion for cars, his real job is as an architect known for his unconventional designs. Think the doll’s house apartments in Hataitai on the way to the airport. Roger has recieved The New Zealand Institute of Architects 2016 Gold Medal Award, the highest individual honour an architect can achieve in New Zealand for an outstanding contribution to the practice of architecture.

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SECTION HEADER


TA L E S O F T H E C I T Y

W h a t ’s mime is yo u r s WRITTEN BY ALEX SCOTT | PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHETT GOODLEY-HORNBLOW

CHEAP EAT S Little Penang

MUSIC

James Taylor

DESTINATION Camino de Santiago

READS

Sci-fi & fantasy

ALLERGIES

Cats, dogs, horses

BISHOP JUSTIN DUCKWORTH is a man of many talents and much generosity.

W

hen Bishop Justin Duckworth speaks of his misspent youth, it’s not what you might think. “In my late teens, early 20s I ended up teaching myself to juggle and fire-eat and unicycle,” he recalls. “Me and my wife did mime as well.” Along with a bit of street performance for extra cash, Justin joined Jenny touring New Zealand schools with Mime International, a group based out of Wellington Teacher’s College, where Jenny was studying. “We ended up touring Vanuatu and later on Zimbabwe. You can imagine how strange it is to go to Vanuatu or Zimbabwe as white-faced mimes – just the cultural kind of strangeness of it. But in another sense it wasn’t strange because there are no words, so there’s no language barrier.” While he has a talent for performance, there is one area he admits always lets him down. “I used to play bass and I was the only bass player I knew who had no rhythm,” he laughs. “In church, I can’t even clap in time, that’s how bad I am.” His first ever job was at a fish and chip shop in Stokes Valley, where he grew up. “I’d arrive after school and be given 10 sacks of potatoes. I’d peel them and cut the eyes and the bad bits out. Then I would chip them. I could do 10 sacks in just over an hour.” The unlimited free food was irresistible to the 14-year-old. “Four days a week, I lived on fish and chips.” Now Bishop of Wellington, Justin lives in Thorndon with Jenny and their youngest daughter Maya, 17. Their

older children Luca, 21, and Jesse, 20, are completing their tertiary studies. The family home has a revolving door. “There are about nine or ten people living with us at the moment,” he says. But there have been as many as 20. “It was complete carnage,” he says. “There were so many people everywhere for about two or three weeks.” Justin and Jenny even gave up their bedroom to a family who was between homes. “But that’s life and you do that and you open your doors to make room for people.” There’s no doubt helping people is his favourite part of his job. “Whenever I get to help somebody make a difference in the world, then I’m a very happy person.” In his downtime, Justin can often be found running or walking along the waterfront. When he’s fit, he loves the hills. “There’s nothing like Mt Kaukau when it’s a bit misty with the low cloud.” Tramping is a popular family pastime. They’ve done a number of the great walks: Waikaremoana, Abel Tasman and the Heaphy Track. After Christmas, Justin and Jenny plan to take time out to visit their fathers. Looking ahead, they hope to return to the Camino pilgrimage route in Spain, which they visited in 2013, walking 830km over 31 days. For relaxing closer to home: “I think I’m pretty happy to go to a beach or a lake and just be in a bach and sit there eating delicious food, walking or running during the day, reading books and swimming. You can’t go past the ideal Kiwi holiday like that. That’s pretty special.”

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CULTURE

PUTTING HIS S TA M P O N I T Mark Stamper, the American founder/artistic director of Wellington's new professional choir Inspirare, moved here last year for his partner’s work, planning to stay five years. “But it may be permanent.” He’s drowning the pain of President Trump by preparing for Inspirare’s second concert Tidings of Joy (11 December, St Andrews on the Terrace). Samuel Marsden Collegiate choir Altissime joins Inspirare’s 24 paid members singing holiday favourites. Stamper funded the first concert in September, making half the sum back from tickets, and hopes pending charitable-trust status and ensuing grants will help fund the choir.

FARE FROM ESTÈRE

GOING DEF

RUSSIANS RETURN

Estère was one of the faces on our second issue cover back in 2013. Three years later and it’s all guns blazing. She’s just released a taster from her forthcoming album – the single Ambition is the story of one woman's outrageously ambitious desires. Estère was part of the line up at Toast Martinborough last month and is playing Auckland’s New Year’s Eve gig at the Wonder Garden on 31 Dec.

The first-ever Def Jam NZ Showcase (The Grand, 10 December) gives 16 up-andcoming R&B, hip-hop and urbanmusic artists “one song, one shot” to impress Def Jam talent scout Michael Neely, assuming they make it through heats and semi-finals. If “Big Mike” decides to sign someone, they’ll be flown to the US next year to do radio shows and opening gigs.

For the first time in 15 years the St Petersburg Ballet Theatre is coming to Wellington, bringing its world-toured production of Swan Lake (5–7 January). Playing Odette/ Odile, principal ballerina Irina Kolesnikova performed here aged 21, and, now 36, will return with her daughter. “I remember the little hillside houses, that cute cable tram, and is the bucket fountain still working? Oriental Bay will be a priority: the salt water soothes our battered feet.” The ballet stages 200-plus performances every year.

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CULTURE

SOLO SHOW Law firm Chapman Tripp sponsored Wellington’s theatre awards for 22 years, thanks in part to its former partner Neil Gray, father of actor Tanemahuta Gray. But after its sponsorship was pulled last year, the awards organisers couldn’t find another naming sponsor (they’re still open to offers). The Wellington Theatre Awards now have 15 sponsors, from local theatres through to Park Road Post, contributing what they can. Eighteen awards reward everything from acting to lighting design. Te Whaea on 11 December.

MINING THE FAMILY

BACK TO THE FUTURE

SANTA’S HELPER

In 1912, Waihi Trade Union of Workers leader Bill Parry went on strike with his fellow gold-miners, and got thrown into prison. A century later, his great-great-niece Lorae Parry – an award-winning playwright, actor and director – wrote a play about the bitter six-month strike. Parry also plays two miners’ wives in the musical drama Scarlet & Gold (Circa, 25 November to 22 December).

Fancy travelling back in time 70 million years to see a Tyrannosaurus Rex, from the safety of a cave, naturally? London’s Natural History Museum has created the next-best thing – nine nearly life-size animatronic dinosaurs – and Te Manawa in Palmerston North has scored the first Southern Hemisphere showing of the touring exhibition Dinosaur Encounter (until 26 February). See the toothy T-Rex, the horned Triceratops and the studded Ankylosaurus in a suburban set, lumbering over busted concrete and making guttural sounds, with spotlights overheard and sirens blaring. Roadtrip with the kids, anyone?

David Jones, the new kid on the Lambton Quay block, is shelling out an unspecified amount to help the council stage the very first Very Welly Christmas (10–11 December). Closed to traffic, Lambton Quay will have a giant snow dome, a photo booth, giveaways, carols by community choirs, and cultural performances. The 67-year-old tradition of the Santa Parade continues – on both days – before Santa returns to an impatient queue of kids inside the department store.

Spectacular scenery, gourmet food and warm rural hospitality. An exhilarating three-day walk that’s second to none. Vouchers available – a perfect gift for Christmas.

www.toracoastalwalk.nz


CULTURE DIRECTORY

CO AS T E L L A M U S I C F E S TIVA L

THE MOCKERS REUNION CONCERT

M IDG E URE LIVE AT S AN FR A N

Coastella Music Festival returns to the Kāpiti coast in February 2017, after the success of its “near perfect” inaugural year. Showcasing local and international artists, and featuring the music of Ireland – join us for this summery discovery! Early bird tickets are on sale now. Visit coastella.co.nz for the full line-up.

Live at San Fran on Cuba St, The Mockers reform their classic line-up for their first New Zealand tour in 30 years. Reuniting from around the world, Andrew Fagan, Brett Adams, Geoff Hayden, Tim Wedde, and special guest, Wellington’s own Gareth Curtis. Playing all The Mockers hits like Forever Tuesday Morning, One Black Friday, Swear It’s True and My Girl Thinks She’s Cleopatra.

San Fran proudly hosts UK legend Midge Ure on his retrospective Something From Everything Tour – covering a remarkable 40 years of his influential career. The former Ultravox frontman along with multi-instrumentalists Cole Stacey and Joseph O’Keefe will perform songs from his vast back-catalogue – including Ultravox, Visage, Rich Kids and solo albums.

San Fran, 171 Cuba St 22 January 8pm Ticketek.co.nz

San Fran, 171 Cuba St Sat 18 March, 8pm Ticketek.co.nz

Saturday 25 February 2017 Southward Car Museum, Kāpiti Coast Tickets from Eventfinda

M AH A RA G AL L E RY

A R TIST S ' O PEN S T UDIO S WHANGANUI

The collecting passion; from Pablo Picasso to Sue Soo. Explore the stories behind artworks from private collections.

Monday –Saturday 10am – 4pm Sunday 1 – 4pm 20 Mahara Place, Waikanae www.maharagallery.org.nz

A diverse taster of Whanganui’s expanding arts community: from glass to photography, ceramics to painting. Open studios over the weekends, artist led workshops and gallery floor talks weekdays.

Regionwide 24 March- 2nd April www.openstudios.co.nz 20

CAPITAL LIM IT ED EDIT IO N T EA T O W EL Give the gift that is local this Christmas. Each gift subscription purchased before Dec 20 will receive our 2016 limited edition illustrated teatowel. Subscribe at capitalmag.co.nz/subscribe


CULTURE

MARKET MAN

FULL CIRCLE

By Sarah Lang

By Sarah Lang

In 2005, a waka passed under San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge to open the touring exhibition Maori Art Meets America. The exhibition’s creative director Darcy Nicholas (above) – a prominent Māori painter, sculptor, writer and curator – saw some indigenous-arts events in the States. “I thought ‘let’s do one at home, but more contemporary’.” Nicholas, who had helped establish Pātaka Art+Museum and Māori arts-promotion organisation Toi Māori Aotearoa, suggested they join forces to establish the Toi Māori Art Market. They did, in 2007. Now it’s time for the fifth (usually-biennial) showcase of Māori arts across the spectrum, also celebrating Toi Māori Aotearoa’s 20th birthday. Nicholas, the event’s longtime creative director, stepped back this year to focus on family. However, the Art Market (10–11 December) at the waterfront wharewaka includes two of his paintings; one is based on his sculpture Hinerangi, a hooded, faceless figure staring down the spectre of war at Pukeahu National War Memorial Park. The weekend celebrates more than the visual arts. Twelve recording artists including Warren Maxwell and Don McGlashan sing songs featuring Hone Tuwhare’s poetry in Tuwhare: The Concert (9 December), originally performed in 2006. The following evening Atamira Dance Company performs Pango/Black in a whare-like set.

On 22 February 2011, the Christchurch earthquake ended a days-old exhibition on the late artist Leo Bensemann at Christchurch Art Gallery, which became a Civil Defence HQ then was closed due to damage. The borrowed artworks were undamaged, but had to be returned. “It was terribly frustrating,” says curator Peter Simpson, an Auckland writer, editor and academic. Five years later, Simpson has completed a book, Bloomsbury South (AUP), about “The Group” – a clique of artsy friends (including Bensemann) living in Christchurch in the middle decades of the last century. Another exhibition was the natural next step, since many of The Group painted each other. Now Leo Bensemann & Friends: Portraiture and the Group is showing at the NZ Portrait Gallery (24 November to 28 March), with 50 seldom-seen paintings by and of group members, including Evelyn Page, Rita Angus, Toss Woollaston, Doris Lusk and Colin McCahon. To draw attention to an under-appreciated artist, Simpson’s included 18 portraits of or by Leo Bensemann, including his 1940 portrait Caroline Oliver, depicting Oliver (who died young) as she painted another artist. “These are intimate portraits created within a tight little circle,” says Simpson, who has spent three years on the exhibition. “It’s a very happy occasion for me.” No quakes please.

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F E AT U R E

Te l l vo t e r s t h e t r u t h : a cautionary tale of politics in the H u t t Va l l e y W R I T T E N BY J O H N B I S H O P

Politics is in turmoil internationally – think Brexit and Trump. Voters are feeling ignored, downtrodden and powerless to do anything about their situation, and reluctant to act anyway. Party machines and political consultants tell candidates to stick to the message - that is simple slogans, nothing that might upset their current target constituency.

P

olls, media and commentators often seem to be getting their predictions wrong, and trust in political institutions, in politicians and in the media that supposedly keeps them honest is declining. The “revolt of the ordinary people” against political elites who have run things for decades is an important factor in the surprise results in elections recently. One of the more interesting local election contests recently took place in Lower Hutt, where four-term city councillor Chris Milne switched wards deliberately to take on another councillor, Max Shierlaw, who was so difficult to work with that it was affecting the ability of the council to operate effectively. Milne was first elected to the council in 2004, after earlier running as an ACT Party candidate for Parliament. Losing his seat in 2007, he won it back in 2010. He represented the Central Ward, which comprises the shopping and better residential areas of the city, although he and his wife Jan and their family had lived in Normandale on the western hills above the Hutt River since 1981. The Western Ward elects two councillors: Max Shierlaw and Margaret Cousins were the incumbents and both were standing again. “I'd found Max’s behaviour so dysfunctional that I decided that I was not prepared to continue to be on the council with him,’ Chris Milne says. “Taking him on in an election was the only way to address the problem: telling the voters what was really going on was the only way to get him voted out.

“No one thought I could do it, but I did, by talking directly and honestly to voters.” Milne won, topping the poll with 2, 272 votes: Cousins was second on 1,731 and Shierlaw missed out – third on 1,367. We asked Milne if he saw himself as part of the same political phenomenon as Brexit and Trump. “One thing that Brexit and Trump have in common is that the campaigners were not afraid to speak directly to voters in terms that reflected their daily experiences. “In Britain, this was immigration and loss of cultural identity. In the USA, it was the hollowing out of middle-class opportunity and economic well-being.” In Normandale, Maungaraki, Belmont, Kelson and the other suburbs of the Western Ward, it was about how Max Shierlaw interacted negatively with others, about how no one spoke out about it, and about how it wasn’t reported, said Milne. “For many years Councillor Shierlaw had traded on his reputation as someone who held others to account and was prepared to speak out on issues. But for many councillors, council staff and leaders of a significant number of local organisations he was, unbeknown to the public, their bête noire.” Milne considers the media silence part of the problem. “The media is thoroughly complicit in the web of misinformation. Rather than publish hardhitting stories about candidates, they report PRgenerated events and other irrelevant sideshows.” “You would think that it would be of interest to the

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F E AT U R E

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F E AT U R E

media that a sitting councillor, and chair of a council committee, was without doubt a serial complainant and litigant? I'd seen it reach the point that the council’s relationship with key external agencies and other councils around the region was at risk. Apparently, it was of no interest, and was not publicised. “I'd found that one school board received 21 complaints about the administration of the school, and threats to sue the board chair. “Another school board was subjected to several years of complaints to multiple government agencies, chewing up staff time, budgets and morale, and damaging the reputation of the school. “Both schools enjoyed very high ratings from ERO, so I was satisfied the complaints were vexatious and unwarranted. “The complaints even extended to an Invercargill school principal, Sky TV, and various councils in the Wellington region. “The response was silence from the media, councillors, boards and, in fact, everyone. “Would other councillors speak out? No. Not just in the Hutt but in fact seldom, if ever, anywhere. “The fourth estate were well aware of all of these issues, but never reported them. Other councillors knew. “But, crucially, voters didn’t know and, unless prepared to become private detectives, could not know.” A key tactic was a handwritten letter Milne sent to every household in the ward explaining in great detail the problems generated by their councillor Max Shierlaw. In the letter, he wrote of a “pattern of destructive and divisive behaviour” that had “undermined the internal culture of our council.” Milne said that “After repeated warnings over online misbehaviour, Mayor Ray Wallace ordered the suspension of Shierlaw’s council email account.” Milne challenged voters to Google “Max Shierlaw” and “complaint”. In Milne’s own election pamphlet, headlined The Man with a Plan, he wrote, “This year Western Ward voters will get the chance to choose between two out of three sitting councillors. One of us will have to go.”

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“Voters learned, although it was never reported in the media, that Cr Shierlaw had resigned as a trustee of a key council trust after he failed to work constructively with the board and undermined one of council’s key projects. “The Trust’s trustees didn’t say anything. Other councillors didn’t say anything. The general view was that nothing could be done because the people of the Western Ward kept electing him. What do you expect from Western Ward voters when there’s a conspiracy of silence from those who have a duty to the public to tell the truth?” Milne’s letter blew it all into the open. “I asked whether this was the sort of person you’d want running your city.” Milne backed up his statements about Shierlaw with a ratepayers’ pledge, which he and nine other candidates for council signed, promising not to vote for any rates increase “above inflation plus growth in the City's rating base,” and “not to allow debt to rise beyond a prudent level.” His pamphlet stressed his and his family’s long association with the city and with various community groups in the western hills, and included endorsements from local identities. “Hardly anyone believed I would win. It was simply too risky to tell the truth, to likely be labelled a trouble-maker or not a team player; and people told me this was simply not how voters would want to see a campaign conducted. “My intuition was the opposite. I believed that voters would reward someone who busted through the silence and told it how it was.” Late in the campaign Chris received a phone-call from a voter. The voter explained that they had all the candidate brochures and flyers on their dining table, the voting handbook with candidate profiles and the voting papers. “The voter asked if I could please come around and help them decide how to vote. “I don’t know why I’m calling you”, he said, “except that your letter is the only authentic piece of information to come through my letterbox.” Milne’s straightforward, tell the truth, approach worked. He topped the poll, and ousted Shierlaw.

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F E AT U R E

Christmas yu l e fu e l

W R I T T E N BY A L E X S COT T P H OTO G R A P H Y BY A N N A B R I G GS

With another year of work nearly over, and summer days stretching out in front of us, Christmas is the time of year we can sit back, relax and spend quality time with our families. We ask three Chrises to tell us about their Christmas and share their signature dishes on Christmas Day.

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C h r i s sy Hill

Chrissy Hill has sweet memories of her mother’s miniature fruit mince pies packed into tins in case neighbours popped in for a cuppa. Later in the day, they would be served with a lovely dry sherry. Chrissy, who runs architectural visualisation company Stantiall Studio, has inherited the same spirit of generosity. “I package the precious sweetmeats in cellophane bags and give them as presents.” The ritual begins in November, for use in December, with preparation of about 30 minutes. “Time is the essence to make sure everything is well macerated,” but they can be started just a day ahead. The low-sugar recipe has evolved with her tastes and dietary requirements. She makes them gluten-free, with organic sulphur-free Christmas fruit –

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a preservative-free version that’s easier on the stomach. Fresh Granny Smith apples, citrus rinds and banana add authenticity and depth of flavour. And, she adds dryly, “I try to put as much alcohol in it as possible.” The secret to a perfect tart is balance. You want mixture that isn’t too sloppy and pastry that isn’t too dry and crumbly. Chrissy’s criterion for a happy Christmas Day, meanwhile, is simple. “It doesn’t matter if you’re having a piece of cheese on toast; it’s about the feeling of all being together and everyone being happy and healthy.” But she’s not about to turn her nose up at a lunch of whitebait fritters and crayfish washed down with Veuve Cliquot at sister Ruth Pretty’s home on 25 December.


M i n i Fest i ve C h r i st m a s fr u it m i n ce p i es (gluten & sulphite free)

Fruit Mince (Makes approx. 4 cups): Rind of 1 lemon Rind of 1 large mandarin or small orange ½ cup raw or brown sugar juice of 1 lemon 2 Granny Smith apples, unpeeled, cored & roughly chopped 1 large ripe banana, peeled 1 cup sultanas, 1½ cups mixed fruit 1 tsp each ground cinnamon, mixed spice, nutmeg, salt ½ tsp ground cloves, 1 cup sultanas 1/3 cup brandy (or sherry, port, whiskey) Sweet shortcake pastry (GF): 175g cold butter 175g GF flour, plus extra for rolling 1 tsp baking powder 175g caster sugar, 175g ground almonds 2 eggs

To make fruit mince, place the citrus rind and sugar in the food processor and blitz to a crumb. Add all ingredients from lemon juice to ground cloves. Blitz to a chunky pulp (not a paste). Transfer to a bowl. Add sultanas and mixed fruit. Stir in brandy. The fruit will absorb the liquid as it sits. To make the tarts, heat oven to 180°C (fan bake). Add butter to food processer. Pulse until roughly cut up. Add sifted GF flour and baking powder and other dry ingredients. Process to breadcrumb consistency. In a separate bowl, lightly beat eggs then add dry ingredients. Process until a ball forms. Remove pastry from processor and wrap in cling wrap. Chill for about 30 minutes. Lightly grease the mini muffin pans. On a well-floured bench, roll out two-thirds of the pastry to about 3mm thick. Cut into rounds large enough to cover base and sides of mini muffin holes. Gently mould to fit. Fill the bases with the fruit mince. Roll out remaining pastry and cut out shapes or cobble piece together for lids. Bake 15 to 20 minutes or until golden brown. Cool in pans on a rack then carefully remove. The pastry is very light, buttery and shortcakey, so handle with care. When ready to serve decorate (cover up any imperfections) with a generous flurry of sifted icing sugar.

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Chris Ts e

Writer Chris Tse can’t overstate his penchant for a particular pork product. “Ham is my favourite thing in the whole world,” he laughs. “I grew up in kitchens at my parents’ shops and in my grandmother’s kitchen. She played a big role in looking after me when my mum and dad were working long hours. As a kid I got to cook a lot with my porpor.” Chris prepares the Christmas meat alongside his father, an experienced cook, and is also responsible for salads and veges. “The ham takes a couple of hours to prep. We usually have that at lunch and it lasts for a few days after.” Sammies are a common vehicle for leftovers, and he describes a macaroni soup with ham 32

broth – “real comfort food”. Chris is also looking forward to his aunty Chris’ bramble bombe dessert. Family will travel from Auckland for a capital Christmas this year. “It’s really just a day where we get together and eat nonstop. If it’s fine, we’ll probably go to the park to play with my little cousins.” Past family activities include a Secret Santa where everyone makes something another family member can wear. “You see a side of your family you don’t usually get to see, that they’re just as wacky as you.” This year, mahjong is on the table if the weather turns. “My porpor passed away five years ago so we’ll probably play a game in her honour.”


Christmas Ham ham (about 2–3kg) pineapple rings in juice glacé cherries (optional) apricot jam citron tea syrup or honey ginger tea syrup* honey seeded mustard cloves (soaked in cold water) *Available from most Asian grocery stores. If you’re using the citron version, remove any peel before adding it to the glaze mixture.

Preheat oven to 140˚C. Using a sharp knife, lightly score a criss-cross pattern into the surface of the ham. Press a clove into the intersection of each diamond. Alternatively, you could use this as an opportunity to carve a message into your ham, like “I still want a pony” or “Gran sees all.” Be creative! In a bowl, combine the juice from the pineapple rings, the apricot jam, the citron tea or ginger tea syrup, and the seeded mustard. My Dad and I don’t measure things out when it comes to the glaze – we like to rely on intuition and/or laziness. It comes down to the size of your ham, but equal quantities of juice, jam, syrup is generally a good rule of thumb, then use the honey and mustard to tweak the sweetness and spice of the glaze to suit your taste. Glaze the ham generously with this gloriously sticky mixture, then decorate with the pineapple rings. If you insist, you can place a glacé cherry in each pineapple ring and then consider your life choices. Cover the ham loosely with foil to protect it from drying out. Bake for approximately 45 minutes to an hour, depending on the size of your ham. Use a metal skewer to check the temperature of the thickest part of the ham – you’re essentially just heating it through. Remove the foil for the last 10 minutes and crank the heat up to about 180°C to give the skin some colour. Remove the cloves before serving. 33


C h r i s sy Lawrence

Christmas can be a battleground for vegetarians, dodging drumsticks and skirting steaks in the search for animal-friendly fare. That’s where Chrissy’s roasted tomato tart comes in. The recipe is a real lifesaver for the florist and her two vegetarian offspring. Hannah, 26, and Benjamin, 23, both choose to live meat-free and are partial to Mum’s savoury tart, which she rates high on the simplicity-tastiness scale. “It’s based on an Annabel Langbein recipe so hopefully it’s pretty foolproof,” she explains. “It has a cheese crust and roasted tomatoes and balsamic. You put that over the shell and top it off with cheese and herbs.” Chrissy has put her own spin on the dish, using feta in place of blue

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cheese. Is there a knack to getting it just right? “Luck,” she laughs. Husband John and son Joshua, 20 – the carnivores of the family – do okay for themselves, says Chrissy. The Christmas spread is usually a traditional affair consisting of potatoes, turkey, ham and lots of salads. “They do better than us,” she concedes. Christmas hosting is on extended-family rotation. “This year, we’re going to Hawke’s Bay to my sister-in-law’s. We’ve been there on holiday but never for Christmas.” In true Kiwi style, the occasion promises to be filled with food, family and “maybe a bit of sport in the back yard”. Beautiful blooms are another key ingredient for a happy Christmas Day. “I always have flowers around,” says Chrissy.


Ro a ste d to m a to and basil tart Cheese pastry 1 cup high-grade flour 1 tsp salt good pinch of cayenne 130g cold butter, chopped into small pieces 100g grated tasty cheese Filling 8 medium tomatoes, cored, cut into wedges 2 tsp balsamic vinegar 2 tbsp good olive oil 2 tsp sugar salt and freshly ground black pepper 75–100g feta fresh basil 35

Whizz pastry ingredients together in a food processor until a ball forms. Roll out and chill before cooking. Roll pastry onto a 28cm flan tin and set in the fridge for 15 to 20 minutes. Combine the tomatoes in a bowl with the balsamic vinegar, olive oil and sugar. Then season with salt and pepper. Spread onto a roasting dish and roast at 150°C for 90 minutes or until the tomatoes have shrivelled. Then set aside. Bake the pastry for 10 minutes at 200°C then reduce to 180°C for 15 minutes or until crisp and golden. Once cooled, take the pastry base out of the tin and arrange the tomatoes on top. Crumble the feta and sprinkle over. Garnish with fresh basil. Serves 6. We love this with a glass of chilled Red Barrel rosé from the stunning Hawke’s Bay family vineyard.


SOMETHING FISHY

NEW

Yellowta il kingfish Name: Yellowtail kingfish or southern yellowtail kingfish. Māori names: Kahu, haku, warehenga. Scientific name: Seriola lalandi lalandi.

Catch: Fisherman targeting kingfish will most likely use lures or live bait (where a smaller fish is caught first then sent back out to sea on a hook to lure the larger predatory fish). They are prized by fishermen for being an exhilarating challenge, their streamlined, muscular bodies and powerful tail making them unstoppable on all but the best tackle. Their natural curiosity makes them an easier target for spear-fishermen. The legal catch length is 75cm and there is a bag limit of three.

Looks like: A large, solid-bodied, streamlined game fish that can grow to over 50kg and 1.8m long. Kingfish are dark green with a white stomach, yellow tail and a yellow stripe running down their side, which is your best bet in identifying them if you don’t know much about fish. Kingfish are countershaded, a common camouflage for ocean-dwelling fish, the effects of which are most obvious in the adult of the species. This means pigmentation is darker on top – making them difficult to see when looking down from above – and lighter on the bottom, resulting in the same effect when looking up from below.

Cook: Kingfish are delicious eating – the thick white fillets are often consumed as steaks, but they also make great sashimi (their flesh is regarded as “sashimi-grade” by the Japanese.) Did you know? New Zealand is known for having the largest yellowtail in the world, with 21 out of 22 world records held by Kiwis. The all-tackle record is shared by two Bay of Plenty anglers who caught 52kg fish in 1984 and 1987. Locally, Newtown painter Doug Quirk (aka “Kingi slayer”) hooked a 24kg kingfish on Oriental Parade in 2011, pulling it in after a big fight in front of a gathered crowd who cheered when the fish was finally pulled ashore.

Habitat: Predominantly found around the North Island but also occurring at the top of the South Island in summer. Juvenile kingfish (referred to by fisherman as “rats”) often hang out around rafts of floating debris or seaweed, while the large predatory adults occur in schools ranging from a few fish to well over a hundred and are found mostly in open coastal waters, preferring (though not entirely restricted to) areas adjacent to rocky outcrops, reefs and pinnacles – particularly around off-shore islands.

If they were human they would be: Big, beautiful and one of the strongest fish in the ocean pound for pound – we couldn’t help but think of super-athlete Sonny Bill Williams. His sister, rugby sevens centre Niall, might not be as big but we reckon she’s fast and strong enough to be considered a kingi too.

Feeds on: Smaller fish species like baitfish, garfish, squid, octopus, koheru, baby flounder, mackerel and kahawai.

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own here in the southern hemisphere, the traditional white Christmas is often experienced only vicariously in the yearly round of festive films. Luckily for us, December 25 is a summer celebration, which means we have full creative licence to do as we please and create our own aesthetic. Discover the thrill of foraging, use fabric simply and effectively, and set the scene for a Capital Christmas that’s easy on the planet and your pocket – a Christmas pressie in itself. MEG WYPER talks us through the ins and outs of making something yourself.

Wrea t h s

Ta b l e l i n e n s

Wreaths pretty much do the same thing that Christmas trees do – they make Christmas feel real. You will need a hoop, floral tape and wire, all of which can be found at craft stores. Use greenery as a base; evergreen hedging works well as it holds its shape and colour for weeks. Make small bunches of two or three uniform strands. Use 10cm pieces of wire to wrap the ends of each bunch together. Make enough small bunches to cover the hoop. Using the floral tape, attach the bunch ends to the hoop. Use this as your base then poke in flowers, bits of ribbon and other Christmassy things.

Table cloths and napkins can be expensive. Fabric can be cheaper and is bought by the metre, which means you can get the right length for your table, especially if it is a skinny table. A metre should get you 6–8 decent-sized napkins. Just run the raw edges through a sewing machine. I didn’t have enough fabric for this table, so used three different colours and layered them together. Occasionally you can find some real gems in second-hand shops – just keep an eye out.

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Wi l d f l owe r s

Cand les

Wra p p i n g

D eco ra t i o n s

Borage flowers and leaves make wonderful additions to water, very refreshing on a hot summer’s day. Add the flowers to the ice cube tray and a stem of the plant to a jug of sparkling water – or a gin and tonic, if that’s more your jam. Nasturtiums can be found all over Wellington and are super tasty in salads and on crackers with cheese, and they also make rad cake decorations.

Beeswax candles bring such warmth to the table, because we all know that a Kiwi summer needs more warmth. I used a large log to support them, but driftwood would also work really well and look great. Use a drill to make holes the size of your candles. If the holes are a little too big, drip a bit of hot candle wax into the bottom to hold the candle in place.

The Japanese have been using fabric this way for years. It’s traditionally known as furoshiki and involves a square piece of fabric and a simple knot. Wrapping with fabric is a good way to use up scraps what would otherwise be wasted. Keep an eye out for discounted remnants in fabric stores, and lengths in second-hand shops going cheap.

Rosemary grows everywhere. Grab long strands of rosemary which can be looped and knotted to create napkin rings, place settings or decorations for the Christmas tree; using twine or ribbon just knot to keep it in place and tie a bow at the knot to decorate.

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F E AT U R E

Fo ra g i n g We Wellingtonians are super lucky to be surrounded by so much greenery. We have such a plentiful supply of places to forage, and once you get into it, the challenge of hunting for new spots becomes really exciting. It’s a good way to get a bit of greenery into the home when you’re on a budget, and it can also be a great cardio workout. Start a wee community amongst friends, share your favourite spot, and go for walks. A few words of advice though; only take what you need. A few other things to consider: • Something growing on another property that has crossed over your boundary is technically yours for the pruning. But to avoid any neighbourly resentment, feel free to politely mention to the owner that you’d like to take a clipping. • Collecting from marine reserves, national parks and private property is out of bounds. If you’re unsure as to where you can forage and what you can and can’t take, just give the council a call. If you’re planning to eat something you’ve foraged, it’s best to stay away from things growing along main roads.

Fine print, small print, or “mouseprint” is less noticeable print smaller than the more obvious larger print it accompanies that advertises or otherwise describes or partially describes a commercial product or service.[1] The larger print that is used in conjunction with fine print by the merchant often has the effect of deceiving the consumer into believing the offer is more advantageous than it really is, via a legal technicality which requires full disclosure of all (even unfavorable) terms or conditions, but does not specify the manner (size, typeface, coloring, etc.) of disclosure. There is strong evidence that suggests the fine print is not read by the majority of consumers.[2]Fine print may say the opposite of what the larger print says. For example, if the larger print says “pre-approved” the fine print might say “subject to approval.” [3] Especially in pharmaceutical advertisements, fine print may accompany a warning message, but this message is often neutralized by the more eye-catching positive images and pleasant background music (eye candy). Sometimes television advertisements flash text fine print in camouflagic colors, and for notoriously brief periods of time, making it difficult or impossible for the viewer to rea Fine print, small print, or “mouseprint” is less noticeable print smaller than the more obvious larger print it accompanies that advertises or otherwise describes or partially describes a commercial product or service.[1] The larger print that is used in conjunction with fine print by the merchant often has the effect of deceiving the consumer into believing the offer is more advantageous than it really is, via a legal technicality which requires full disclosure of all (even unfavorable) terms or conditions, but does not specify the manner (size, typeface, coloring, etc.) of disclosure. There is strong evidence that suggests the fine print is not read by the majority of consumers.[2]Fine print may say the opposite of what the larger print says. For example, if the larger print says “pre-approved” the fine print might say “subject to approval.” [3] Especially in pharmaceutical advertisements, fine print may accompany a warning message, but this message is often neutralized by the more eye-catching positive images and pleasant background music (eye candy). Sometimes television a colors, and for notoriously brief periods of time, making it difficult or impossible for the viewer to rea Fine print, small print, or “mouseprint” is less noticeable print smaller than the more obvious larger print it accompanies that advertises or otherwise describes or partially describes a commercial product or service.[1] The larger print that is used in conjunction with fine print by the merchant often has the effect of deceiving the consumer into believing the offer is more advantageous than it really is, via a legal technicality which requires full disclosure of all (even unfavorable) terms or conditions, but does not specify the manner (size, typeface, coloring, etc.) of disclosure. There is strong evidence that suggests the fine print is not read by the majority of consumers.[2]Fine print may say the opposite of what the larger print says. For example, if the larger print says “pre-approved” the fine print might say “subject to approval.” [3] Especially in pharmaceutical advertisements, fine print may accompany a warning message, but this message is often neutralized by the more eye-catching positive images and pleasant background music (eye candy). Sometimes television advertisements flash text fine print in camouflagic colors, and for notoriously brief periods of time, making it difficult or impossible for the viewer to reaine print, small print, or “mouseprint” is less noticeable print smaller than the more obvious larger print it accompanies that advertises or otherwise describes or partially describes a commercial product or service.[1] The larger print that is used in conjunction with fine print by the merchant often has the effect of deceiving the consumer into believing the offer is more advantageous than it really is, via a legal technicality which requires full disclosure of all (even unfavorable) terms or conditions, but does not specify the manner (size, typeface, coloring, etc.) of disclosure. There is strong evidence that suggests the fine print is not read by the majority of consumers.[2]Fine print may say the opposite of what the larger print says. For example, if the larger print says “pre-approved” the fine print might say “subject to approval.” [3] Especially in pharmaceutical advertisements, fine print may accompany a warning message, but this message is often neutralized by the more eye-catching positive images and pleasant background music (eye candy). Sometimes television advertisements flash text fine print in camouflagic colors, and for notoriously brief periods of time, making it difficult or impossible for the viewer to rea Fine print, small print, or “mouseprint” is less noticeable print smaller than the more obvious larger print it accompanies that advertises or otherwise describes or partially describes a commercial product or service.[1] The larger print that is used in conjunction with fine print by the merchant often has the effect of deceiving the consumer into believing the offer is more advantageous than it really is, via a legal technicality which requires full disclosure of all (even unfavorable) terms or conditions, but does not specify the manner (size, typeface, coloring, etc.) of disclosure. There is strong evidence that suggests the fine print is not read by the majority of consumers.[2] Fine print may say the opposite of what the larger print says. For example, if the larger print says “pre-approved” the fine print might say “subject to approval.” [3] Especially in pharmaceutical advertisements, fine print may accompany a warning message, but this message is often neutralized by the more eye-catching positive images and pleasant background music (eye candy). Sometimes television a colors, and for notoriously brief periods of time, making it difficult or impossible for the viewer to rea Fine print, small print, or “mouseprint” is less noticeable print smaller than the more obvious larger print it accompanies that advertises or otherwise describes or partially describes a commercial product or service.[1] The larger print that is used in conjunction with fine print by the merchant often has the effect of deceiving the consumer into believing the offer is more advantageous than it really is, via a legal technicality which requires full disclosure of all (even unfavorable) terms or conditions, but does not specify the manner (size, typeface, coloring, etc.) of disclosure. There is strong evidence that suggests the fine print is not read by the majority of consumers.[2]Fine print may say the opposite of what the larger print says. For example, if the larger print says “pre-approved” the fine print might say “subject to approval.” [3] Especially in pharmaceutical advertisements, fine print may accompany a warning message, but this message is often neutralized by the more eye-catching positive images and pleasant background music (eye candy). Sometimes television advertisements flash text fine print in camouflagic colors, and for notoriously brief periods of time, making it difficult or impossible for the viewer to rea

Buying or selling property? Use our experience. We SEE the small print.

30 Years

PARTNERS Ramona Rasch LLB David Leong LLB 1st Floor Kilbirnie Plaza 30 Bay Road | Kilbirnie, Wellington | Tel 04 387 7831 | www.raschleong.co.nz


F E AT U R E

Christmas P ÄŤ w a ka w a ka Instead of baubles this Christmas, try this cheeky fantail tree decoration.

41


F E AT U R E

Trace

H ow to Trace the template to create as many fantails as you'd like. They're easy enough for the kids to make too.

Cut out

Fold

cut

fold

Assemble

fold fold

fold

Bingo!

fold

fold

42


EAT, DRINK, AND BE MERRY.

Celebrate the festive season at Portlander. Silly jumpers optional (but highly recommended). www.portlander.co.nz | (04) 498 3762 | Corner Featherston and Whitmore Streets

MÄ rama mÄ ra-ma 1. (stative) be clear, light (not dark), easy to understand, lucid, bright, transparent. 2.

(modifier) light, not dark, clear.

3.

(noun) brightness, clearness.

4.

(wine) with hidden depths.


Gifts under $40 To w n b e l t

4

2

1

3

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Tiki salt and pepper shakers – $17.50 – Pukeko Gift Shop Areaware cubebot – $35 – The Dowse Shop Organic Tahitian vanilla essence – sm $10 lg $18 – Good Fortune Coffee Rosamaro Brut Altemura – $24 – Mediterranean Foods 500gm coffee bag – $9.99 – Good Fortune Coffee Fortune teller's cup – $15 – Good Fortune Coffee Classic panettone in tin – $32 – Mediterranean Foods Wellington in Your Pocket – $25 – Unity Books Super Hands scribble bowl – $28 – Made It Calfhide coin purse – $22 – Cranfields Frank 2017 diary – $30 – Small Acorns 44


8

7 5

11

10

6 9

The local gift guide 2016

Show your love for local this Christmas with our Wellington gift guide. From edible to sustainable, practical to lavish, we have plenty of options for under the tree. And in the words of the great philosopher Beyonce – "If you like it, put a [bow] on it".

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Gifts $40-150 Re d r o c k s

3 5

2

1

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

4

Tibetan singing bowl – $90 – Trade Aid Vintage lassi cups – from $65 – Small Acorns Solar charger– $59 – Sustainability Trust Diamond Deli gift pack – $150 – Queen Sallys Diamond Deli Seresin Estate gift pack – $100 – Seresin Estate Paradise gardens wall calendar – $60 – Tea Pea Bamboo kids dining set – $45 – Cranfields Sun, wind & sea collection – $130 – Wellington Apothecary Wahine stacking dolls – $46 – Pukeko Gifts Odi–Merletto necklace – $83 – Made It Paul Maseyk mugs – $46 – The Dowse Shop 46


6

7

10

11

9

8

47


Gifts above $150 Blue skies

5 2 4

1 7

3

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Winchester bullet cufflinks – $179 – REAL Aotearoa Wall mounted shag's head – $280 – Sue Dasler 2 Flexivouchers for 2017 concert season – $170 – Chamber Music New Zealand Soren vegan briefcase – $320 – Mandatory Menswear Sleeveless Nights dress by Trelise Cooper – $259 – Goodness On Point sunglasses by Trelise Cooper – $249 – Designer Clothing Gallery Wooden watches – $229 – Mandatory Menswear Snail sterling silver ring – $211 – REAL Aotearoa Large platter – $320 – Sue Dasler Staedtler lignum fountain pen with free ballpoint – $238 – Gordon Harris 48


9

6

8

10

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LIFESTYLE BRIEFS

KEEP CALM A N D C A R RY O N Suffering from lack of sleep, high alertness or persistent fear? Never fear Calmingstone is here. In the midst of disorderly events like earthquakes, threatened tsunamis and flooding, a local Wellington start up company has seized the moment and launched a stress-control device. Calmingstone combines smart technology with the science of meditation. It is a hand-held intuitive product that anyone can use - whether you’re an athlete preparing for a game or you’re just feeling everyday pressures. We guess it’s today’s IT answer to rosary and worry beads! Chamomile tea anyone?

LAT TE FOR THE SKIN?

IN SUSPENSION

WHAT A WAY TO GO

Coffee Perhaps is a new fragrance designed by Wellington perfumier George Bowler (featured #13). The fragrance has notes of ground coffee, cigarette smoke, white musk, cotton and cedar wood. It’s been made especially for the Dowse’s Solo 2016 exhibition of contemporary art work which showcases a range of media and provides a snapshot of current contemporary art practice in Wellington.

It’s been 18 months since artist Neil Dawson’s hanging orb Ferns was taken down from Civic Square. Since 1998 it was buffeted by the gentle zephyrs that scud through our city and the aluminium was showing signs of stress. Wellington Sculpture Trust Chair Sue Elliot said the replacement is being made from steel this time. In total $215,000 is required to reinstate the art work and Elliot is hoping a current crowd funding campaign will raise $55,000. It is hoped Ferns will be back in place by April 2017.

Last month Capital’s annual Beer Necessities survey resulted in a large quantity of half empty bottles of beer. Contrary to popular public opinion a journalist cannot live by beer alone so we set about finding other uses for it. The best by far is snail bait. Place a container in the garden so that the top is flush with the surrounding soil in your garden, and pour in a hearty slurp of old beer. Snails, they fall in and drown. In large numbers. It’s carnage.

SHOP ONLINE FREE NZ SHIPPING 50 B O TA N I C A L T E A S , T O N I C S & S K I N C A R E M A D E B Y H E R B A L I S T S W E L L I N G T O N A P O T H E C A RY. C O . N Z C U B A M A L L 0 4 8 0 1 8 7 7 7


www.loxys.co.nz wellington@loxys.co.nz 04 803 3133 Instagram @loxysnz

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college st, wellington jackson st, petone jervois rd, herne bay goodness.co.nz


EDIBLES

H AVA N A A B A L L Geoff Marsland has created a “coffee empire” over the past 25 years in Wellington. He and Tom Scott have produced an autobiography/business story telling the tale of his “swashbuckling adventures” over the past two and half decades. It goes from Geoff’s early days working on a deep-sea fishing boat, to his first cafes Midnight Espresso and Deluxe, through to today, distributing coffee around the country. Cuba Street’s identity helped shape Marsland’s coffee culture, or is it the other way around? Released late last month at Unity Books, this is a coffee table book in every sense of the word. Also available at Whitcoulls, Moore Wilson’s and Havana HQ.

FIDEL'S FRESHEST

WAIRARAPA RECIPES

TACO CLEANSING

Life is busy at Fidel’s Cafe; to save space, owners Roger and Potti started cold-pressing juice off-site in their Bakehouse Kitchen on Arthur Street and this has now blossomed into a whole new range of fresh juices available for purchase. Havana Brothers’ cold press is available from Moore Wilson’s and many cafes around town. Cold pressed juice is made by a two-step process, first grinding the fruit or veges to a pulp, then extracting the juice with a hydraulic press. Available in four different flavours.

At The Beach is a cookbook memoir by Margaret Brooker, inspired by time in her family beach house at Flat Point in the Wairarapa. Recipes are coupled with evocative fishing anecdotes and tales of life at the beach. Brooker has particular expertise with seafood recipes and is renowned for her “waste not” approach to cooking.

Wellington’s favourite Mexican restaurant La Boca Loca is planning to open a new taquería in the city. Boquita, which translates as “ little mouth”, will be on Kent Terrace. The restaurant will be entirely “plant based.” There will be no meat or dairy anywhere on the menu. They want a place where “vegans, vegetarians, omnivores and coeliacs can eat together in harmony.” At the time of writing they were hoping to be open by this month. El Jefe taco with navy beans sounds like it will be a crowd favourite.

NYE at Havana Bar 10 course degustation & The Richter City Rebels to count us into 2017

info@havanabar.co.nz for bookings

52


EDIBLES

CREAMIUM WAT E R F R O N T S H A K E S The Enormous Crocodile bikes are Wellington famous, and now they also have their own milkbar. Shake is in the home of croc bikes at Herd St on the waterfront, and it is serving milkshakes, ice creams and hot chocolates. Their most popular shake is authentic Dutch chocolate. They have collaborated with the Wellington Chocolate Factory to make a limited edition gourmet series of shakes. Hokey Pokey icecream is proving a hit among the tourists, according to owner Aston Christie.

FROM CACAO WITH LOVE

SOX ON THE RUN

ECO-FRIENDLY OIL?

Wellington mum Alexandra Sereda moved here from Russia two years ago. She is hand-making boutique chocolates, called Cacao for Me. Sereda likens chocolate to a miniature miracle “with its chemistry, flavour, smell and shine.” Her Green Boost chocolate with pistachios and matcha filling is probably her most popular. She can be found online, or at many of Wellington’s city markets.

You can now enjoy a juicy Southern Cross steak, or salad, in the comfort of your own home from an online ordering system. All of the packaging is recyclable and sustainable. A new menu is also available, both online and in house, with dishes such as a vegan Eggs Benedict with avocado “eggs” and also sticky sesame cauliflower nibbles. Catering is also available.

As well as fine organic wines, Marlborough’s Seresin Estate also produces organic olive oil. Their oils are characterised by a fruity, grassy flavour on the palate, with a pleasant peppery finish. Seresin use biodynamic practices in farming grapes and olive trees. This means “working in harmony with seasonal, earthly and celestial rhythms.” Instead of pesticides, vines are sprayed with teas made from local herbs and minerals; and the owners view the entire vineyard as an living organism, which accommodates many different species together.

MEXICO WELLINGTON

41 Dixon Street • 04 894 6982 53


S H E A R E R S ' TA B L E

Crayfish with mango salsa and pumpkin purée BY N I K K I & J O R DA N S H E A R E R

Wellington coastlines are a “supermarket” for a range of kaimoana including crayfish (Koura). Often though, you need to have someone in the know or have a favour to call in to be able to access prime spots. Don’t despair, because we have amazing businesses in Wellington that provide the goods without the toil… does come at a cost though. We were lucky enough to have Jordan’s gorgeous partner Jason, from Wellington Kayak Fishing, harvest a beautiful crayfish for our photo INGREDIENTS 1x 400ml can coconut cream 1 stalk fresh lemongrass, cut into 3 pieces 2 red chillies, finely diced 3cm ginger, peeled and diced zest and juice of one lime 2 tsp fish sauce 2 tsp palm sugar, grated ¼ pumpkin, peeled and cubed into 2cm chunks 1x large fresh crayfish ½ cucumber, seeded and diced 2 red chillies, seeds removed and diced ½ cup coriander, roughly chopped 1 mango cheek, diced 2 spring onions, finely sliced juice of one lime Salt 50g butter

shoot… all legs intact! Make sure you leave these delectable crays alone during mating season (especially females with eggs)… as we need all the females for future baby crayfish. On Masterchef 2014 we won the Samoa challenge with a version of this dish – try it, we promise it will be a winner for you too. What better way to evoke Kiwi summers than fresh crayfish washed down with gin and pomegranate spritzers… Christmas NZ style!

METHOD 1.

For the pumpkin purée: To a medium pot add coconut cream, lemongrass, chilli, ginger, lime zest and juice, fish sauce, palm sugar and pumpkin. 2. Simmer on a low–med heat until pumpkin is soft. 3. Remove lemongrass stalks and blitz the rest of the ingredients with a stick blender until smooth. 4. Set aside and keep warm. 5. Bring a large pot of heavily salted water to the boil. 6. Drop in whole crayfish and simmer for 4 minutes. Remove crayfish from the water and set aside to cool. 7. For the salsa: mix together cucumber, chillies, coriander, mango, spring onions, and lime juice. Season with a touch of salt. 8. Remove tail from crayfish and peel. Gather the rest of the crayfish meat. 9. Heat BBQ or griddle pan, add butter. Sear crayfish tail in butter for approximately 1 minute each side. Quickly sear the remainder of meat. 10. To serve: For a gorgeous Christmas sharing platter, spoon pumpkin purée onto a platter alongside crayfish and salsa. For individual entrées, divide ingredients between four plates. Drool.

INGREDIENTS

Gin and pomegranate spritzer

ice 2 Tbsp fresh pomegranate seeds 45ml gin (we use Rogue Society) pomegranate juice sparkling water with a twist of lemon rosemary sprigs – to serve

54

METHOD

1. 2. 3.

Fill a tall glass with ice and 2 Tbsp fresh pomegranate seeds. Add gin and top with half and half pomegranate juice and sparkling water. Stir to mix, and serve with a rosemary sprig… so super simple.


Bubble bubble Is that special bottle of fizz great value, or are you in a Christmas frenzy and about to spend way more that you can afford? To help take the panic out of buying, wine writer JOELLE THOMSON has done the work for you and provides her helpful selections here.

I

t’s fizzy, it’s festive and it’s staring us in the face every time we pop into the supermarket for a little of what we fancy. It’s made everywhere from France, Italy and Spain to Argentina, Australia, New Zealand and the United States. And it is not made with a soda stream, which can inject CO2 into any old chardonnay that’s looking for a new lease of life. It is on-trend to DIY fizzy wine at home, but why would you when a world of good quality bubbles is pouring into this country faster than you can say Lindauer. The following wines were the best of a bigger bunch. All were poured for a blind tasting into Zerruti tasting glasses – better for tasting than skinny bubbly flutes. There were 24 wines tasted. There are many more sparkling wines on the market, but the best here offer exceptional value for money, year in, year out. My marks out of 20 are noted next to each. Hope you enjoy.

䰀愀氀愀

䌀栀漀挀漀氀愀琀

㄀㜀 匀甀渀搀愀礀猀

䴀愀搀攀氀攀椀渀攀  䌀栀愀爀氀攀猀

䌀甀爀愀琀攀

䴀愀搀攀氀攀椀渀攀 䌀栀愀爀氀攀猀

嘀椀攀眀 琀栀攀 猀甀洀洀攀爀 挀漀氀氀攀挀琀椀漀渀猀 漀渀氀椀渀攀⸀⸀⸀⸀  氀漀漀欀戀漀漀欀猀Ⰰ 椀搀攀愀猀Ⰰ  猀栀漀瀀瀀椀渀最⸀⸀⸀⸀  漀爀 琀爀礀 琀栀攀 爀愀渀最攀 椀渀 猀琀漀爀攀

昀愀猀栀椀漀渀簀猀椀稀攀猀 ㄀㐀⬀ 匀甀洀洀攀爀 䌀漀氀氀攀挀琀椀漀渀猀  愀爀攀 椀渀 猀琀漀爀攀 一漀眀

娀䔀䈀刀䄀一伀⸀䌀伀⸀一娀      圀攀氀氀椀渀最琀漀渀㨀 㐀  䨀漀栀渀猀琀漀渀 匀琀 ☀ ㄀㈀㜀 䘀攀愀琀栀攀爀猀琀漀渀 匀琀    䰀漀眀攀爀 䠀甀琀琀㨀 ㌀㌀  䠀椀最栀 匀琀     䄀氀猀漀 䄀甀挀欀氀愀渀搀Ⰰ 䠀愀洀椀氀琀漀渀Ⰰ 䌀栀爀椀猀琀挀栀甀爀挀栀   

56


LIQUID THOUGHTS

$25 and under

What to look for…

Grandin Brut RRP $17.99

Value – that an elusive combo of noticeably above average flavour with a low price tag.

French sparkling made using the traditional method – like champagne, in other words. This means it gained its bubbles and flavours from a second fermentation in the bottle. It was made in Burgundy so Pinot Noir and Chardonnay are among the key ingredients. It’s light and yeasty in aroma and widely available. 17/20

Dibon Cava Brut Reserve $21.99

Lindauer Special Reserve Blanc de Blancs $13 to $14

It’s easy to pronounce, affordable to buy and looks appealing, but Dibon Cava’s best attribute is its fresh bakery aromas. This Spanish sparkling wine has body to burn and is made in the region of Penedès. 17/20

If Chardonnay and bubbles are on your short list for Christmas drinking, join the club. This wine is creamy, full-bodied, dry and fresh. It’s made entirely from Gisborne Chardonnay grapes. 18.5/20

Col de' Salici Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore Brut 2015 $27

Ruby Bay Jewel Methode Traditionelle $38

$25 to $50

What to look for… Flavours as intense as the aroma of walking into a bakery, because most of these wines are made with extended lees contact (lees are the left-overs from fermentation and they impart bread, pastry and bakery-like aromas).

2013 Deutz Marlborough Blanc de Blancs $32.99 Now we’re getting serious, thanks to a long-standing relationship between the French Deutz Champagne house and New Zealand’s Pernod Ricard, which made this richly flavoursome, full-bodied, dry and creamy bubbly. It gets a gold medal from me. A stunner. 18.5/20

Super refreshing, dry and lemony in flavour, with frothy bubbles. This is made from Italy’s Glera grape and is a very good prosecco, worth the money. 17/20

57

Ruby Bay vineyard is one of the most picturesque in the country and also home to the grapes in this full-bodied bubbly made mostly from Pinot Noir (54%) which gives it its toasty richness. The balance is Chardonnay, which brings creamy smoothness. It is one of the best bubbles I have tasted all year. 18.5/20


LIQUID THOUGHTS

2011 Akarua Bannockburn Methode Traditionelle RRP $48

Champagne Charles de Cazanove tete, cuvée NV $39.95–$49.95

Undoubtedly the top sparkling wine from Akarua in Central Otago with its vibrant fresh citrus aromas and intense fresh bakery flavours. A top drop for sure. 17.5/20

Awesome new champagne to this country, with a full body and rich, dry, toasty flavours, thanks to being made mostly from Pinot Noir grapes in Reims, Champagne. 18.5/20

$50 to $99

Best of the bunch What to look for… Exceptional flavour, full body and a lingering impression. A tall order, in other words, but one that this trio of wines all have in spades.

Gatinois Grand Cru Ay Tradition NV $54.95

Champagne Bollinger Special Cuvee $99

Ruinart Champagne Rose RRP $100

Grand Cru champagne is made entirely from grapes grown on a top rated vineyard – a rarity at this price and one which overdelivers massively with its full body and big toasty taste. 18.5/20

Bollinger is an old favourite, but to ensure it was put through its paces, it was tasted blind twice and it still came up shining with intense yeasty flavours of hot buttered toast with notes of lemon zest, ripe grapefruit, fresh apple pastry and a long, full-bodied and flavoursome finish. 19/20

Pink champagne may be thin on the ground but it can be fullbodied and distinctively berrylike in flavour – when it’s good, as this stellar example shows. 17.5/20

58


S I M P LY ST U N N I N G M E AT S

WELLINGTON ... A DIFFERENT VIEW

East by West Ferries to Matiu Somes Island and Days Bay From Queen’s Wharf

www.eastbywest.co.nz Ph 04 499 1282

Available in-store or online www.prestonsmasterbutchers.co.nz WELLINGTON, PORIRUA, PALMERSTON NORTH


FO OD DIRECTORY

Edible Christmas Christmas is one of the joyous times of the year, when we look forward to a certain amount of over-indulgence. We have gathered a few gift ideas ideas here, for easy interesting and quirky presents to delight the foodies amongst you. Available now at all good retailers

Luxury Juices, Celebrate Christmas in Style.

At Moore Wilson’s, Ontrays Food Emporium or online at www.arahi.nz

Wellington roasted coffee for people who make great stuff

90 Abel Smith St, Te Aro

emporio.co.nz

Artisan NZ products Delicious Care Packages Gourmet Antipasto Platter Christmas Treat Boxes Delivered Chilled Nation wide www.angeldelivery.co.nz or call Natalie on 0800 826 435

60


Email: info@golfstudio.co.nz Phone : 04 801 7651 Bookings : thegolfstudio.gettimely.com


WA I R A R A PA FA M I LY H O L I DAY Bed & Breakfast Package

rooms from

$174 per night*

Cushions Galore for Christmas!

W W W. S O LW A Y. C O . N Z | 0 8 0 0 S O LW A Y *Offer subject to availability, terms & conditions apply.

Give your home a lift for the new season. We have heaps in-store or see them in our new Online Catalogue. Great gift idea, too - Susie T

11 Walter Street Wellington Ph 801 5974

www.cottonstore.co.nz

LEARN FROM

Skilled experienced eye care

INDUSTRY

PROFESSIONALS CREATIVE COURSES FOR ALL AGES

RATA STUDIOS TUTOR: SUSAN FOGARTY PROFESSIONAL IMPROVISOR AND ACTOR

141 Featherston St

T

473 6275

mgoptometrist.co.nz

RATASTUDIOS.CO.NZ

RATASTUDIOSNZ

RATA

STUDIOS Igniting Creative Futures


C U L I N A RY CAPERS WRITTEN BY ALEX SCOTT | PHOTO BY RHETT GOODLEY-HORNBLOW Ian Hornblow’s family was the first in Wellington to sell fresh bread on a Sunday – his car windscreen would steam up during early-morning deliveries. “I used to drive my Holden down the hill with my head out the window and see a whole queue of people waiting. It was a four-minute trip up the street and back for fresh loaves. You’d cut the top off and smother it with butter and Marmite and it would still be steaming.” The culture of food is something he’s always relished. His family ran adjoining stores Hornblow’s Food Market and Hornblow’s Dairy in Newtown for 45 years. “Newtown was a total melting pot where cultures collided,” Ian remembers of his childhood. “Next door was Kim Young, the fruiterer. The Island Bay fisheries were just down the road. There was a really cool Asian restaurant across the street...” It was a tight-knit community with sharing at its heart. When Friday late-night trading came in, parents started working longer hours and Ian’s mother was concerned the other shop kids might miss a meal. “Mum would make a big stew and we used to pass the pot round on a Friday night,” he tells. Sure enough, the next week, the same pot would come back filled with something else delicious. Ian’s current culinary adventure involves running his Hoot Hot Sauce and PanMan paella operation from a new commercial kitchen in Wadestown. There will be designated days when it opens as a shop and prepared meals available on occasion too. He’s keen to make the experience a community one, encouraging other businesses and enterprising youngsters to make use of the space. Today, integrity and sustainability are integral to his food philosophy. “I’m right into the new generation,” Ian explains. “Us old farts, we’ve changed a wee bit, but the new generation is taking it to another level. It’s gonna be an experience.”

63


BY THE BOOK

B o o k s fo r beach and bach Are you after a book that’s the perfect Christmas gift, a breezy read for beach

Mi chael Papps

and bach, or one you just can't put down?

Captain of the Wellington Firebirds cricket team (which has Twenty-20 matches at the Basin Reserve on 16, 22 and 26 December)

Seven Wellingtonians give us their top picks for great Christmas presents and

Stocking Stuffer: Stroke of Genius (Penguin Random House, $48) by Gideon Haigh. Haigh is a brilliant writer and his latest work focuses on one of cricket’s most iconic images: George Beldam’s 1905 photograph of Australian batsman Victor Trumper, capturing him mid-stroke. This action shot is a big part of the legend of Trumper, one of the game’s first real stars. How did that image change cricket, and who is the real Trumper? A great gift for cricket fans.

summer reads

On My Wishlist: The Kiwi Pair (Penguin Random House, $40) by Eric Murray and Hamish Bond with Scotty Stevenson. Eric Murray and Hamish Bond, who are apparently chalk and cheese, have an incredible record of success, dominating world rowing for years. And these guys aren’t showing any signs of slowing down. For me, it’s always interesting to get an insight into what makes other sportspeople tick. Summer Read: 2016 New Zealand Cricket Almanack (Upstart Press, $55), edited by Francis Payne and Ian Smith. Most of my summer will be spent on the field with the Wellington Firebirds but the 69th edition of the New Zealand cricket-lover’s bible will never be far away. With all the details of New Zealand cricket at international, national and domestic levels, it’s always a good reference for records or a bit of rain-break trivia. It would also make a good gift.

this paper boat 64

www.unitybooks.co.nz

64


BY THE BOOK

D ebora h Cod d in g ton

James Shaw

Martinborough writer and Te Muna Valley Wines producer

Green Party co-leader

On My Wishlist: All I want for Christmas is books, starting with Susan Quinn’s Eleanor and Hick, The Love Affair that Shaped a First Lady (Penguin Random House, $30), about the very close relationship between former journalist Lorena Hickok and President Roosevelt’s wife Eleanor. It’s been called a “parallel portrait of two unconventional women caught up in the maelstrom of 20th-century politics and world affairs”. Plus their own, brief, love affair.

Stocking Stuffer: Cooking 4 Change: 101 Famous Kiwis Share their Favourite Recipes (Potton & Burton, $49.99). This is a great gift for more than just the recipient – the proceeds from this book go to four fantastic New Zealand charities. It’s not a competition or anything, but I think my recipe for eggy crumpets with bacon stacks up pretty well. Taika Waititi takes two pages to explain how to make scrambled eggs on toast – and every word’s worth reading. On My Wishlist: The Pigeon Tunnel: Stories from My Life by John le Carré (Penguin Random House, $38). I’ve been a huge le Carré fan for many years now – I particularly loved The Constant Gardener so I hope someone might give me his new autobiography for Christmas. The former spy has observed some of the most important events in global history, and he’s always had a particular knack for shining a light on some of the evils of the modern world.

Stocking Stuffer: It would probably be taken the wrong way, but I’d love to give my writer friends Steven Pinker’s The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century (Penguin Random House, $30). This lovely, funny howto-write guide isn’t bossy, and reassures you that stylish writing may break rules. Book of the Year: A tough choice, but the book that really moved me was Between the World and Me (Text Publishing, $35) by Ta-Nehisi Coates, a memoir in the form of letters to his son. Heartbreaking, confronting, it draws power from understatement in dealing with race in America and the endless wrong-headed concept that whites are somehow entitled to subjugate everyone else.

Book of the Year: Mysterious Mysteries of the Aro Valley by Danyl McLauchlan (VUP, $40). I grew up and still live in Aro Valley, so I may be biased, but I really, really loved this book. The sequel to Unspeakable Secrets of the Aro Valley follows a hapless hero who uncovers a global conspiracy. It’s exactly how I like my satire: biting and close to home. Read with a Garage Project Aro Noir beer in hand.

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BY THE BOOK

N i ki Wa rd

Just i n McKenzi e

Proprietor of Ekor Bookshop & Café on College Street (where her picks are available)

Wellington bar baron (C.G.R. Merchant & Co, Hawthorn Lounge and Cuckoo Cocktail Emporium)

Stocking Stuffer: The GCHQ Puzzle Book (Penguin Random House, $38). I love any puzzle book that challenges those friends who believe themselves the cleverest person in the room, and this one is winning on all fronts. A beautifully produced hardback, it features 140 pages of puzzles and challenges created by staff from the British intelligence organisation GCHQ, the UK’s signals intelligence and cyber security agency. Test yourself against Britain’s leading codebreakers.

Stocking stuffer: Don’t Puke On Your Dad: A Year in the Life of a New Father (Beatnik, $30) by Toby Morris. Making a name for himself with his cartoons, Aucklander Toby Morris has followed up with a graphic novel. His black-and-white illustrations chart his first year of fatherhood, from fatigue to projectile puking (I have a two-year-old, so I know all about it.) A great little reality check for first-time dads on the night shift – and the perfect present for fathers or fathers-to-be.

Summer Read: Snowdrift And Other Stories (Penguin Random House, $37) by Georgette Heyer. Heyer, who died in 1974, has been my secret reading pleasure ever since I read Friday’s Child at my grandmother’s house as a child. This new collection of her short stories, published for the first time in book form, is sure to delight any fan of Heyer’s wonderful world of romance, intrigue, escapades and duels at dawn set in the British Regency era of the early 1800s.

Summer Reads: In Proper Drink: The Untold Story of How a Band of Bartenders Saved the Civilized Drinking World (Ten Speed Press, $54.95), Robert Simonson tells the story of the contemporary craftcocktail revival and its characters. The Manhattan: The Story of the First Modern Cocktail with Recipes by Philip Greene looks at how the Manhattan became the mother of all cocktails, also with recipes. On My Wishlist: A Briefcase, Two Pies and a Penthouse by Brannavan Gnanalingam (Lawrence & Gibson, $23). This satirical novel about the inanity of government departments sounds Kafka-esque and oh so Wellington. Rachel McManus, who’s just started work at the New Zealand Alarm and Response Ministry, must investigate a mysterious briefcase left in Aro Valley with a man’s business cards, a gossipfilled diary, and two fruit pies. Intriguing.

On My Wishlist: Waterlife by Jha Rambharos (Tara Books, $70). This handsome hardback, with exquisite illustrations of marine creatures based on Indian folk art, is entirely made by hand and so breathtaking that you’ll want to frame the entire book. It comes from the Indian publisher Tara Books, which brings artists, writers, and designers together to collaborate on handmade books. A selection of this publisher’s treasures is coming to New Zealand in time for Christmas.

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182 VIVIAN ST, WELLINGTON


BY THE BOOK

M urd och Step h en s

Sara h Lang

founder of the Doing Our Bit campaign to double NZ’s refugee quota

Capital’s books and culture writer

Stocking stuffer: Murdoch: The Cartoons of Sharon Murdoch (Potton & Burton, $39.99) by Sharon Murdoch. Murdoch, who draws the newspaper cartoons about Munro the ginger cat, is on the pulse of all things political and was Cartoonist of the Year at the 2016 Canon Media Awards. This collection of 150 full-page cartoons skewers the events of New Zealand’s recent social and political history with insight, wit, and a commentary written by art historian Melinda Johnston. The first run sold out quickly. On My Wishlist: Foams: Spheres Volume 3 (Semiotext(e), $58) by Peter Sloterdijk, translated by Wieland Hoban. German philosopher Peter Sloterdijk has been described as the most erudite man currently living on the planet. Foams completes his Spheres trilogy: a 2,500-page re-telling of the history of humanity focused through the concept of the sphere (e.g. the womb, hell). Here it is at last translated into English. Book of the Year: Hera Lindsay Bird (VUP, $25) by Hera Lindsay Bird. The talent matched the hype and the slim, squat volume became one of the most popular books of poetry ever published in New Zealand. Bird, who won the 2011 Adam Prize for poetry and works at Unity Books, has transcended the cosmic-Seinfeld spirit of her early public readings with this earthy debut. Follow her on Twitter (@HeraLindsayBird) for eviscerations and zingers in real time.

Stocking stuffer: Gently parodying The Famous Five, the four books in the Enid Blyton for Grown-Ups series will have your family laughing around the Christmas tree. Written by UK humourist Bruno Vincent, Five Go Gluten Free, Five Go Parenting, Five Go on a Strategy Away Day, and Five on Brexit Island (Hachette, $19.99 each) re-imagine the kids as adults facing modern challenges, but still having a spiffing time. And Annual (Gecko Press, $39.99), a modern-day Kiwi update of the old kids’ annual featuring stories, comic strips, essays, satire, poems, games and puzzles, is perfect for the kids’ stockings. On My Wishlist: I’m hoping to spend some lazy days with The Wish Child (VUP, $30), the new novel by awardwinning Wellington-raised writer Catherine Chidgey. It’s about two German children whose days spent playing together in 1939 reverberate throughout their lives. I’m also keen to read The Walking Stick Tree (Escalator Press, $45), an essay-style memoir by Wellington author Trish Harris, who’s lived with acute arthritis since age six. Summer Read: The Wonder by Emma Donoghue (MacMillan, $34.99). Donoghue follows her novel-turnedfilm The Room with another gripping psychological thriller. Set in 1859, it’s about an 11-year-old Irish Catholic girl who claims to live only on water. What happens when two nurses arrive to watch her round the clock? That may sound grim, but The Wonder has a surprisingly light touch, and even a dash of romance.


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H o m e g row n happiness W R I T T E N BY S H A RO N ST E P H E N S O N P H OTO G R A P H Y BY A N N A B R I G G S

From its carefully curated interior to its familiar façade, this Wellington apartment is steeped in history.

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hen Charlotte Schaefer was born, it’s rumoured she didn’t cry. Her family jokes that she was probably too busy mentally rearranging the furniture in her Kenepuru Hospital room to make a sound. Growing up in Waikanae, Charlotte would spend hours styling her bedroom and moving furniture around. “I get bored easily and am constantly curating the spaces I live and work in,” says Charlotte. It's fortunate she’s now got room to play with. Charlotte and creative director husband Jamie run their agency, Homegrown Creative, from the sixbedroom Northland home they've owned since 2002. The business and its three full-time staff occupy the front part of the 256sqm house, in a purposebuilt studio that was added in 2012. The rest is a bright, welcoming home for the couple and their four children – Molly (10), George (8), Matilda (5) and three-year-old Hettie. It wasn’t always like this. When Jamie and Charlotte, who worked in communications before joining her husband's business, spied the 1907 dwelling, it was home to more vermin than people. “It had once been a doctor’s surgery and then a pottery studio, but had been rented for about 15 years,” says Jamie. “There were rats living in the walls, the floorboards were rotten, there were worms behind the skirting boards and the ceilings were mouldy. It was horrible but knew we could do something with it.”

It also helped that they had prior knowledge of crucial things about the location – like where the sun rose and set, how noisy (or not) the street was, and access to parking. “We were renting next door when this house came up for sale so we knew all about it. We would listen over the fence to what people were saying at open homes!” Millennials should close their ears, but the couple managed to save and borrow the $13K needed for a deposit to buy the five-bedroom house. Despite the scale of the project, at the age of just 24, they were undaunted by the prospect of tackling most of it themselves. “My grandfather was a cabinet maker and I spent my childhood learning basic building skills from him,” says Jamie. The couple undertook the renovation in stages, as budget and family needs allowed. The first stage involving knocking down the poky lean-to kitchen and conservatory at the rear of the house, and replacing it with a whitewashed, open-plan space that opens out to a courtyard garden. While the kitchen was “the cheapest you could buy”, they pimped it with a blue glass splash-back that can be scribbled on. The blue glass panel is repeated in front of the kitchen bench, which faces a 3.7m-long table made by Jamie from American ash (actually two

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tables that can be separated) which is the heart of the home, and seated 20 people last Christmas. The kitchen’s long floating shelves are the perfect spot to display Charlotte's beloved collection of Tony Sly pottery and Rachel Carley ceramics, and her beloved cookbooks – which have recently been culled since she discovered Japanese minimalist Marie Kondo. “I have her book beside my bedside, and recently donated 40 bin-bags full of clothes, books, toys and fabric to refugees and the local church. I'm obsessed with de-cluttering now.” Adjacent to the open-plan space is the family room, which was once the dining room. They designed and had the blue velvet banquette made. It adds a touch of glamour to the room and also provides ample seating and oodles of overflow kitchen storage in the drawers beneath. A velvet curtain was son George’s idea; it cleverly conceals the TV, and can also be drawn to close off the space when adult diners require privacy. As you’d expect, much of the artwork was created by Jamie, including a bold “Not Bad” artwork in the dining room (a nod to his father's favourite saying), and the bird-inspired piece hanging in the family room,

which incorporates vintage sewing patterns under acrylic sheets. The red floral artwork in the living room was recreated from a section of the house’s original wallpaper, which Jamie liberated from under several subsequent layers, while the framed artwork on the third floor landing features fishing licenses that once belonged to Jamie's grandfather and great-grandfather. “They date from 1907 to 1941 and were in a satchel for years. Charlotte surprised me by having them framed and gave it to me for Christmas one year.” Stage one of the renovation also included turning a large dining room and laundry into a family bathroom and daughter Molly's room, along with a separate toilet. The latter features bright orange toile wallpaper and a pink door. “It's such a tiny space we decided it should make a big impact,” says Charlotte. “Plus, I was determined to use toile somewhere.” The laundry has now been tucked into the secondfloor hallway, across from the room that was once George’s bedroom but has now been designated the craft room. Like their creative parents, the four children love pottering with crafts, and this room gives them the luxury to do so.

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At the front of the house is the master bedroom, which feels much larger than it is, thanks to the 3.6m stud. The major structural change was the addition of a wall to create a walk-in wardrobe, although the couple say they probably spent longer scrubbing the room’s original pressed tin ceiling with wire brushes to remove years of mould. “We actually managed to salvage all the house's ceilings,” says Jamie proudly. Charlotte was in interiors heaven in the master bedroom, making not only the fabric-covered head-board from Designers Guild fabric from Small Acorns, but also the cushions and throws (as she did in the rest of the house). A 70-year-old wooden cabinet, which takes pride of place here, was the first piece Jamie's grandfather ever made. Next door is the compact sun-room, which was where the original front door once opened. It has sweeping views of the street, and Charlotte's window displays have become famous in the neighbourhood. Every year, for example, she hangs 24 Christmas stockings, and the year she didn’t the couple fielded many questions as to where they were. Stage two of the renovation began in 2012 and involved turning the large disused loft space into extra

bedrooms for their growing family. They called on architect David Melling to help. Matilda and Hettie share the front room, while George has the back bedroom, which features vintage drawers from the Parliamentary Library where Charlotte once worked. The pull-out couch, which Charlotte's had recovered, belonged to her grandparents. In between the two renovations, the couple landscaped the 580sqm section, including “relocating almost every bit of dirt” at the sun-splashed rear of the house. The result is a stepped garden which features zones for play (the trampoline, fort and monkey bars), and for relaxing and dining (BBQ, pizza oven and raised veggie gardens). Being designers, they were never going to be happy with a white or grey house, instead opting for a light blue colour, Resene Cut Glass, on the exterior. The choice has proved popular with passersby, who often knock on the door to ask about the colour. “One day I was working in the studio when a couple of elderly women walked up to the house and held out a paint chart,” laughs Jamie. “They asked what the colour was, and a week later left a bottle of wine for us.”

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SPORTS

Sloan Ra n g e r BY J O H N B R I ST E D | P H OTO G R A P H BY A N N A B R I G G S

It’s a long ride between your first time on a motorbike and becoming a champion if you’re only two when you begin.

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onsider current New Zealand Superbike champion Sloan Frost. He’s almost certainly ridden motorbikes for a greater proportion of his life than almost anyone else in New Zealand. Frost is a Wellington refrigeration engineer who didn’t begin riding “road” motorcycles until he was 26, and eight years later won the 2016 title. Frost says that as a very young child he was fascinated by every motorcycle he saw or heard, and always wanted to stop in the street and check them out or watch them going by. “One day my mother went to a motorbike shop with her brother; they were there to look at a farm bike. Mum

had some money in her pocket to pay the power bill but there was a tiny 50cc kid’s motorcycle on show, and she used that money to buy it, which disconcerted Dad not just because of the money, but also because at the time I was just over two years old. “Dad rapidly became one of my greatest supporters. Once I’d learnt how to ride the motorcycle Dad ripped the trainer wheels off my pushbike so I could learn to ride that. “Initially Dad took me down to the domain, where I rode the motorbike in little circles, and as I got better the circles became bigger and bigger. I wasn’t allowed to race other kids until I was eight. We raced motocross, which is

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just an extension of rough farm riding and is raced on proper circuits on specialised rough country motorcycles with knobbly tyres. You see them racing on TV with mud flying and motorbikes flying over bumps. I kept racing until I was 25.” Frost was mostly among the top three until he was 16, and once he got into the seniors worked his way up to New Zealand’s top ten. He did some racing in Australia and “won a few State titles” there. It’s a demanding sport, and as injuries began to get the better of him Frost thought he’d had enough motocross. Frost shows scars all over his body, and says he thinks he’s broken most of his bones at some time or other. In the meantime his father “had a midlife crisis” and bought a road bike (an ordinary motorcycle). Frost thought that looked pretty attractive and had a ride. “You get on a road bike and go anywhere you like. You’re not stuck on a paddock, you feel so free.” But being competitive, he soon found that some things don’t change. “You’re bound by speed limits and you can’t really do what you want to do”. So the next progression was to a track racing circuit, and he found that all those years of motocross experience meant that he was “quite good’ at it, so he “just had” to go motorcycle racing – on a very powerful road bike. The day we visited two workmates were working on his Suzuki racing bike collection. One bike was screaming on a dynamometer. (And for enthusiasts: the 1,000cc engine was registering 290 horsepower (200kw) at 14,000 revs “but you lose a third of that in transmission to the road”. He says that bike weighs 180 kgs or so, which is an astonishing power to weight ratio.) Looking back Frost thinks he should have been track racing when he was 16, and he regrets having been “so old” when he began. Frost credits older motorbike owners with giving

him a lot of help. “Some were fairly well off and had very good bikes, and they were very generous in lending them a young guy keen for a chance to see what he could do on a “good” bike.” He’d grown up watching successful motor racers like Andrew Stroud often winning on their Suzukis, so he “pestered them” and Suzuki eventually caved in to his entreaties to put him on the factory team. Last year was his biggest year so far. He swept the New Zealand floor in the 1000cc superbike class, winning the NZ title, the NZ Grand Prix title, the NX TT title, and the Suzuki title. One of Frost’s next big events is the traditional Whanganui street race on Boxing Day. It’s known as the Cemetery Circuit – not because riders die on the track, but because it runs right through the middle of the Whanganui cemetery. Frost notes “But still, it’s tricky, there’s diesel and paint on the road, tram tracks, gutters, bridges and so on, and you can’t make any mistakes.” He’s looking forward to racing against the Irish professional motorbike rider Michael Dunlop who’s been described as ”the best street racer in the world” and has 11 times won what’s been called “the world’s most dangerous sporting event”, the Isle of Man TT (tourist trophy) in the UK. Frost points out that Whanganui is a very different proposition from the 37-mile Isle of Man street circuit, where more than 200 people have died there since it first ran in 1907. He notes that rider safety has improved enormously over the years and he now rides in a racing suit so sophisticated that in the event of an accident it deploys its own airbags. He has two young children: Does his wife worry about him racing? “She met me in a racing environment and knows that’s what I do.” It looks like motorcycles are in the blood. Frost’s two boys, six and two-and-a-half years old, also got motor bikes when they were two.

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JDAS Photography Sloan Frost Hampton Downs

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W E L LY A NG E L

W h a t wo u l d D e i r d r e d o? W I T H D E I R D R E TA R R A N T

MOMMIE DEAREST We (two children) gave my mother for her 55th birthday a very nice, expensive cooking dish she had several times said she would like to have. I overheard her telling her best friend how hurt she was and sad that it wasn’t more personal. She has everything. What should we have given her? Never enough, Karori Next time give what she wants, but also something special and a treat – flowers or a manicure or tickets to a show. Birthdays are for pampering.

LAME FRIENDS My friend (in the same neighbourhood) has some social issues. He is fun sometimes and I get that he doesn’t have many friends, but I don’t want to only hang out with him. I think he might have Asperger’s. His mother is so keen that he has a friend that she is always telling him to come over. How do I tell him I like him but don’t want him as a boyfriend, or around all the time? In hiding, Miramar

Tricky. Just be charming and positive and very busy. Find time to chat but make it clear you have other commitments. Enjoy time with him and be a friend.

am writing this response as the earth is roller-coasting its way to dawn. All you need is love!

CAT T Y NEIGHB OURS

CRAZY SPENDER My debt went crazily out of control when I was a student and afterwards. I am embarrassed about how silly I was. I was advised to go bankrupt to cope with it. My partner is talking about us living together now. Do I tell him about the whole thing, or is that past history? Impecunious, Thorndon Tell him. Life goes forward but best with a clear conscience or it will eat away at you. He will understand.

THE FAMILY WHO HAS EVERYTHING What is the best Christmas present for the family who has everything they need? Fed up, Te Aro Experiences, consumables and treats can never be beaten. Anything you give is special – it is the thought that counts. I

We have a beautiful purebred cat. She's one year old and happily plays outside during the day. Recently, our neighbours have taken to locking our cat inside their home, feeding it and keeping her for days on end. We have let them know it's not on, but they seem to think they're doing us a favour and won't stop. We miss our cat and are not sure what we should do? Pouty pussy, Island Bay This is ridiculous! She is your cat and you should definitely have control! How weird! Tell them again or ask that they put in a cat door so she can come home. Cats do move about – maybe she likes it better over there?

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T O R Q U E TA L K

Civic Res p o n s i b i l it y W R I TT E N BY RO G E R WA L K E R | P H OTO G R A P H Y BY R H E T T G O O D L E Y - H O R N B LOW

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regard Honda as a big happy family of vehicles, and the Civic as one of its most important members. Inspired by the British Mini, it first appeared in 1972 as a more sensible Japanese version, with a transverse 1200cc engine driving the front wheels. Like the Mini, the first Civic was an efficiently packaged two-door car with good interior space inside modest external dimensions, but unlike the Mini, it also included a useful-sized boot and electrics that didn’t drown in the rain. The Civic really appealed to me as ideal for my growing family. Unfortunately, in those days the Government required you to have overseas funds in order to purchase a car. So, like many others, I bought a Corolla van (commercial vehicles were exempt from the overseas funds rule, and rear windows and an extra row of seats were easily installed). So after all these years, I have never owned a Civic. But I’ve still got my tiny Honda Beat, a 600cc three-cylinder micro convertible. People suggest that it was the result of a one night stand in 1991 between a Civic car and a Fireblade motorcycle. It was imported from Japan as a test vehicle, I bought and still use it lots. Of all the hundreds of Japanese car names, Civic must be one of the most sensible – the car certainly is. Incidentally there is a dedicated car yard on Auckland’s North Shore called “the Civic Centre.” The Civic grew up with its customers – a bit like the smaller Jazz, which joined the family in 1982. From the original Civic that I first fancied, there have been nine more iterations maturing into this all-grown-up one. Today’s Civic is a lot bigger than those first Civics. It’s now a tech-laden platform re-engineered from scratch to be larger, lower, lighter and more rigid than before. Using high-strength steels and new VTEC engines, it is a formidable competitor in the crowded medium-size car market. And just to remind the Honda family of the car’s important sporty DNA, back in Japan at the Honda headquarters there’s a portrait of racing driver Ayrton Senna hanging above the mantlepiece. There are two versions in New Zealand, the sub-$30K Civic and the $35.5K Turbo. That money also gets you five

years’ warranty and servicing. The level of sophistication is astonishing for a car with such humble beginnings. The Turbo has a 1500cc engine which produces 100kw with remarkable economy. Advanced active safety systems are standard on both models, and the car has some neat features. The CVT gearboxes have a little difference: on the steering wheel there’s a clever paddle shift manual override, which you can flick without changing the car out of automatic to get a higher or lower “gear” when you suddenly want to go quicker to pass, or use the engine to brake when going downhill. Driver technologies include the latest smartphone connectivity for Apple and Android phones. This allows you to do nearly all the things you want to do with your phone while driving. It effectively puts your phone right there on your car’s built-in display. You can get directions, make calls, send and receive messages, and listen to music, all in a way that allows you to stay focused on the road. The cars sport myriads of the excellent electronic safety aids which nearly all new cars have these days. You get a few more with the top models and a few less with the entry models. The direction indicator doesn’t just tell you when there’s a car on the left-hand side; if you indicate when you want to change lanes, a camera shows it to you on the dashboard screen. The centre screen has 15 different language options including English, the interior features high-quality materials and instrumentation, and the boot is enormous. The new Civic is also to come in a yet-to-be-seen Type R version. This bonkers, track-focused missile is shortly to have a crack at being the fastest front-wheel-drive car around the famous Nurburgring circuit. I had a long time getting to know her behaviour on both motorway and winding road environments, on both smooth and rough road surfaces.The car showed its refinement and maturity, being as settled or as responsive as required and always comfortable. Controls all feel solid, and so well placed as to be intuitive. If the Civic were a person it would probably be Nadia Lim, providing a wholesome, healthy and delicious motoring experience.

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Step outside BY M E LO DY T H O M A S

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very year it happens and every year we are surprised – we wake up one sunny January morning, blink, and suddenly we are back in December facing down the barrel of yuletide. Even for those who love Christmas so much they get dressed up, cover their faces with glitter and dance around like a good-tidings fairy (*cough* me *cough*), the combination of too many people in confined quarters, stress-drinking and additional pressure on already-stretched pockets can be too much for even the happiest families. Plus depending on how old your kids are, you likely haven’t had a good night’s sleep or a therapeutic orgasm for anywhere from a month to five years – so it’s little wonder many of us struggle through to this point only to collapse at the finish line under the weight of keeping all our stuff together. This time round my feelings are especially mixed – while I often wish for time to slow down so I might properly enjoy the good stuff, I know I’m not alone in thinking 2016 has been a pretty tough one. The year of Trump, Brexit, #alllivesmatter, more scary quakes and an increasingly heartbreaking European refugee crisis, where we said goodbye to the holy musical trifecta of Bowie, Prince and Cohen as well as homegrown hero Helen Kelly and the best thing about Australia (the Great Barrier Reef). Don’t even get me started on house prices, homelessness and the ever-growing gap between the Haves and Have Nots… I’ve never been more in need of a bit of vitamin D-therapy, or more grateful to live in the hemisphere where the transition from old year to new is eased by a (mostly) temperate climate. There are many valid criticisms of the claim that New Zealand is one of the best places in the world to live, but one way in which we are inarguably blessed is in our relative abundance of and proximity to the bounty of mother nature. Even in our biggest cities we are never more than a few hours away from beaches, mountains, bush walks, national parks, swimming holes, freshwater lakes, waterfalls, natural hot springs… mostly free and available for the enjoyment of all.

If you didn’t grow up in an outdoorsy family you’d be forgiven for thinking that packing up the kids for a camping, hiking or bach adventure requires too much energy to be worth it, but you’re missing one crucial fact: nature is the lazy parent’s best friend. We took our firstborn camping for the first time when she was only a few months old, and when she was a month shy of her first birthday we upped the ante with a three-week camping trip to Maraehako on the East Cape. People thought we were nuts, but it remains one of my absolutely best and happiest memories. Like most days at home, we were up with the sun, but that’s so much more tolerable when you can just unzip a wall of your house and watch it rise together, snuggled up in bed arguing over whose turn it is to put the coffee on. Gone was the need to seek out entertainment – suddenly grass and sand and trees were more than enough. And while I’ll admit there was one night where we roamed the campsite at 3am with an unsettled baby crying out from her pram, for the most part Sadie slept better while camping then she ever did at home – even now she’s up at 6.30am on the dot if she sleeps in her own bed, but has to be woken at 8 from a camp bed. I recently stumbled upon a gem on Twitter from Spencer Madsen (a poet and small-press publisher, as it turns out) that read: “Suffering from depression? Just exercise a lot, socialise more, eat better, and do all the other things depression prevents you from doing.” Of course seasonal blues, state-of-the-world angst, and bone-deep parental exhaustion are not comparable to clinical depression, but the idea that it can be hard to do the things that are best for you is one we will all recognise. But when the pohutukawa are in flower and the ocean temperature is Wellington’s version of swimmable, reconnecting and re-grounding the whole family can be as straightforward as stepping outside and closing the door behind you.

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CALENDAR

F R E E W E L LY Feeling the pinch? Check out the following ideas...

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HAPPY TRAILS The Hutt never does anything by halves and their river trail is a classic example of this. Beginning at the Hikoikoi Reserve in Petone and meandering north along the river to Te Marua at the foot of the Tararuas the Hutt River Trail is a gentle 29km walk. It suits bikes and prams as well so start anywhere along the route. Bikes can be hired from the Hutt Valley i-Site in Laings Road.

SUPREMELY RECOMMENDED In 2004 New Zealand dispensed with its connection to the Privy Council in London and created its own court of “last appeal”. The Supreme Court sits at the northern end of Lambton Quay. If you’d like to see how our highest court operates or just look at a beautifully designed building then tours run for an hour on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. The Old High Court Building next door is well worth looking at too.

3 Flavours Original Dark Chocolate and The Bircher Gluten-free, Grain-free Dairy-free, Paleo, Organic ingredients AT ALL GOOD FOOD STOCKISTS AND ONLINE YUMNZ.CO.NZ

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DECEMBER Ongoing TE MANAWA DINOSAUR ENCOUNTER

PANGO/ BLACK

15

Atamira Dance Company brings to the stage a meditation on the space of Te Kore.

CHRISTMAS ON THE HARBOUR WITH

7.30pm The Opera House

SOL3 MIO AND GUESTS! 7.00pm Waitangi Park

326 Main Street, Palmerston North

HANDEL'S MESSIAH, PERFORMED BY THE NZSO

16

3

6.30pm Michael Fowler Centre

CRICKET, WELLINGTON FIREBIRDS V

GUSTAV HOLST’S THE PLANETS PERFORMED BY ORCHESTRA WELLINGTON

KINGS

10-11

4.00pm Basin Reserve

TOI MAORI ART MARKET

7.00pm Michael Fowler Centre

Te Wharewaka o Póneke, Wellington waterfront

4

11

NANJING TO NEW ZEALAND Nanjing Little Red Flower Art Troupe, the first children’s art troupe in China 7.00pm Te Papa

7 CRICKET, 20/20 BASIN BLAST Wellington Blaze take on the Melbourne Stars Rebel WBBL

CRICKET, WELLINGTON FIREBIRDS V ACES 4.00pm Basin Reserve

DRAGON BOAT OPEN DAY Have a go at dragon boating – rain or shine.

26

Open to anyone 15+

CEMETERY CIRCUIT RACE DAY

10.30am Frank Kitts Park, Jervois Quay TIDINGS OF JOY Inspirare, a new choral ensemble, present their second concert 7.30pm St Andrews on the Terrace

Wellington Firebirds playing the Melbourne Stars

COUNSEL IN CONCERT – A CELEBRATION OF SHAKESPEARE IN MUSIC

4.00pm Basin Reserve

Crown Law makes music

THE GREAT KIDSCAN SANTA RUN/WALK

12.15pm and 5.30pm St Andrews on the Terrace

A 2–3 km Santa-suit fundraiser fun run, for KidsCan

TWILIGHT MARKET

6.30pm Frank Kitts Park

Browse the stalls, find unique products 6.00pm The Lodge, 276 Shelly Bay Road

7.30pm Opera House

10 POP-UP SHAKESPEARE

CRICKET, WELLINGTON FIREBIRDS VS STAGS

JANUARY

13

TUWHARE: THE CONCERT

From 7.30am Downtown Whanganui.

4.00pm Basin Reserve

12.00pm Basin Reserve

9

22

2 FOOTBALL, WELLINGTON PHOENIX V ADELAIDE UNITED 7.35pm Westpac Stadium SUMMER FESTIVAL RACES AND PICNIC DAY 12.00 midday,Tauherenikau, Featherston

14 THE 12 STORYTIMES OF CHRISTMAS

4

Free event full of fun, games, carols and festive stories.

OTAKI FAMILY RACES

6.30pm , Central Library

11.00am Otaki Racecourse, Te Roto Rd

THESE ARE A FEW OF MY FAVOURITE SINGS

5—7

Actors from local theatre groups perform scenes from famous plays once a month, organised by Shakespeare Globe New Zealand

performed by Georgia Jamieson-Emms

Swan Lake by the St Petersburg Ballet Theatre

11.00am Central Library

6.30pm Bats Theatre

7.30pm St James Theatre

UEEN MARGARET COLLEGE

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