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ArtZone THE NEW ZEALAND ART & DESIG N GUIDE

$6.50

THE JEWELLERY SPECIAL


… Francis Upritchard, Vincent Ward, Dan Arps, Shane Cotton, Tony de Lautour, Julia Morison, Bill Culbert, Peter Robinson, Neil Dawson, Rita Angus, Saskia Leek, Eddie Clemens, David Hatcher, Tony Fomison, Séraphine Pick, Jason Greig, Joanna Langford, Miranda Parkes, Zina Swanson, Robert Hood, Ruth Watson, Heather Straka, John Coley, Olivia Spencer Bower, Marie Le Lievre, Raymond McIntyre, Emily HartleySkudder, Quentin MacFarlane, Hamish Keith, Anton Parsons, Chris Heaphy, Barry Cleavin, Pat Hanly, Jim Speers, Toss Woollaston, Bill Sutton, Ronnie van Hout, Margaret Stoddart, Juliet Peter, John Hurrell, Trevor Moffitt, Ngaio Marsh, Sydney L Thompson, David Low, André Hemer, Philip Trusttum, Joyce Campbell, Allen Maddox, Nathan Pohio, Mark Adams, Simon Morris, Darryn George, Mark Braunias, Dick Frizzell, Tjalling de Vries, Gordon H Brown, Tom Kreisler, David Cook, Terry Urbahn, Maddie Leach, Grant Lingard, David Rittey, Alan Pearson, Jane Zusters, Jonathan Mane-Wheoki, Carl Sydow, Ella Sutherland, Jacquelyn Greenbank, Paul Johns, Philippa Blair, Paul Cullen, Hannah Beehre, Bing Dawe, Austen Deans, Euan Macleod, Jason Ware, Joanna Braithwaite, Cornelius (Kees) Bruin, Peter Trevelyan ...

www.fina.canterbury.ac.nz


WHAT’S ON AT THE PAH... Notes towards a Speculative Fiction 14 November 2017 – 21 January 2018

Strangely Familiar: Portraits by Wayne Youle 23 January – 18 March 2018

Ground Floor Galleries

Opening Celebration: Monday 22 January, 6pm

Opening Celebration: Monday 13 November, 6pm

An exhibition toured and developed by the New Zealand Portrait Gallery Te Pukenga Whakaata

Tim Thatcher, The Moment of Flames Flames, 2003, Acrylic and varnish on board.

Wayne Youle, Capt. Capt. Pat Pat of of the the HMS HMS freedom freedom on on the the eve eve of of his his maiden maiden sun, 2014, Acrylic on canvas. voyage to the sun

The Pah Homestead, TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre 72 Hillsborough Road, Hillsborough, Auckland www.tsbbankwallaceartscentre.org.nz Open Tuesday – Friday 10am-3pm, Saturday & Sunday 8am-5pm


Create Your Future Fine arts and photography, MÄ ori visual arts, fashion and textile design, visual communication, industrial and spatial design, creative media production and commercial music.

Study at: creative.massey.ac.nz Massey University Wellington College of Creative Arts Toi Rauwharangi

Chev Te-Whetumatarau Hassett, BDes (Hons), Photography, 2016


Francesca Emms is a freelance writer based in Wellington. Most of her writing is non-fiction work for magazines and websites but she also write plays and stories for film, stage and radio. Francesca holds a Master of Arts in Creative Writing from Victoria’s IIML, enjoys tap dancing and gets car sick really easily.

Editor: Alison Franks. Contributors: Francesca Emms, Janet Hughes, Craig Beardsworth, Mary-Jane Duffy, Laura Pitcher, Sarah Catherall, Dan Pointon, Sophie McKinnon. Design: Shalee Fitzsimmons, Luke Browne. Distribution & Accounts: Tod Harfield. Advertising: Haleigh Trower. Email: sales@artzone.co.nz

Sophie McKinnon is a prospective graduate student at Teachers College, Columbia University in New York. She became a Fellow at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2015. Prior to New York Sophie was based in China for eight years, managing public programs at the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing. She is from Wellington.

Mary-Jane Duffy is a poet and essayist. She manages the Creative Writing programme at Whitireia Polytech. She lives in Newlands where she wants to establish an artists’ colony.

Telephone: (04) 385 1426 Email: edit@artzone.co.nz Website: www.artzone.co.nz Post: Box 9202, Marion Square, Wellington, 6141. Deliveries: 31–41 Pirie St, Mt Victoria, Wellington, 6011.

The opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher. Although all material is checked for accuracy, no liability is assumed by the publisher for any losses due to the use of material in this magazine.

ISSN: 1176-3752

Copyright. © All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored, or transmitted in any form without the prior written permission of Richfield Holdings Ltd

Produced by: Capital Publishing Ltd for Richfield Holdings Ltd


Welcome

Moniek Schrijer, Double Happiness, 2016, projection image. See page 31 for the story.

Jewellery is on our mind this issue. We look at who made the cut for Schmuck 2018 and talk to jewellers about courses and training. Mary-Jane Duffy chats to Moniek Schrijer, one of our award-winning jewellers, about her residency in China and its influence on the direction of her work. Long-time collector Alister Harlow talks about what sparks his collecting instinct, and decorative art and design curator Justine Olsen tells Sarah Catherall what she is looking for as she builds the Te Papa collection. Dan Poynton talks to jeweller Hannah Upritchard about her work in London. Sophie McKinnon considers the confronting moral and ethical questions being raised in the West by the large recent Chinese exhibition, Theatre of the World: Art in China After 1989, at the Solomon R Guggenheim Museum in New York. Photographs by Roberta Thornley have commanded our attention for some time. Her work featured in Art Zone in 2012 (issue #45) and she was noticed back in 2008 by the late photographer Marti Friedlander as ῾one to watch’. Appropriately, she has this year won the Arts Foundation’s Friedlander award. Feast your eyes upon her work on page 28. This issue we asked someone with fresh first hand knowledge of training to compile our education special. Laura Pitcher, a recent Massey graduate, has also has just completed the requirements for a Master’s in International Journalism from Edinburgh Napier University. She talked to a number of art and design graduates about their training and what motivated them to take their various courses.

Alison Franks Managing editor


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Contents

Top pot 08 Richard Stratton’s take on the tea pot

In Dan’s hands Framer Daniel Metcalf keeps art safe

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Short reports

To broach the subject Alister Harlow admires sculpture on a small scale

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Gift guide

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Top delegates

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Ten gift ideas for any time of year

NZ jewellery heavyweights off to Schmuck

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Contents

An accidental jeweller

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Meet jeweller Hannah Upritchard in her London studio.

Books feature Two from Otago

Strong foundation

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Quite literally

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Jewellery that laughs Moniek Schrijer’s contemporary jewellery is turning heads

Marti Friedlander Photographic Award winner Roberta Thornley is one to watch

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Foreign Assesment 44

Education Listings

48 61


8 Top pot A teapot ‘steeped in history’ has won the 2017 Portage Ceramic Awards prize. Wellington artist Richard Stratton says his Forced Turn Teapot is based on his research into ‘industrialised historical ceramic practices and formulas of European and English Basaltes wares.’ Judge Emma Bugden, previously Senior Curator at The Dowse Art Museum and now a Whanganui-based writer and curator, is the first New Zealander to judge the awards. She said Stratton’s deconstructed teapot ‘is not just a compendium of methods; it held my gaze with its sincerity and vigour, from its brutalist structure to the delightful whimsy of the handle.’ Forced Turn Teapot will be on display, along with other award winners and finalists, at Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery until 11 February.

Richard Stratton, Forced turn Teapot.


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Short reports

All by itself

The big three-O

Almost there

The Mahara Gallery Trust Board is now planning for a standalone gallery. This follows the Kāpiti Coast District Council’s decision to halt the plans for a new combined library and art gallery in Waikanae. Mahara has been offered the Field Collection, which includes a number of works by Frances Hodgkins, but a museum-standard facility is required to store and display it. Last month the Paraparaumu Rotary Club said it would be ‘a tragedy’ if Kāpiti lost the significant collection, and pledged $10,000 to boost the project.

Page Blackie Gallery is turning 30. Established by Marcia Page in 1987 as Tinakori Gallery, it became Page Blackie Gallery in 2007 when James Blackie joined Marcia as co-Director. They specialise in mid-career and senior New Zealand artists, and the resale of renowned works and estates. As a duo, they represent 20 artists including Max Gimblett, Heather Straka and Dick Frizzell.

The historic Sarjeant Gallery, one of New Zealand’s oldest purpose-built galleries, needs $34.9 million for restoration and seismic strengthening. With 90% of its funding target already raised, the Sarjeant Gallery Trust is well on its way to securing $16 million of Government funding which would take it over the line. Whanganui District Council has agreed to act as guarantor if the trust cannot meet the December 20 deadline, but gallery director Greg Anderson says, ‘We have every expectation that our ongoing fundraising programs will achieve the remainder.’ He says the next steps are to complete the detailed designs and procurement plans, and to find and retain a principal contractor. ‘We hope to begin construction in the last quarter of 2018, with the project taking about two years to complete.’


Trade and Exchange (hoard anything you can’t download) 2017 (detail). Courtesy of the artist.


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Gifts for art lovers Our top ten gift ideas for the art lovers in your life include blown glass, bling, books and a bag to put them all in. Spread the joy this season, and don’t forget to treat yourself too.

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They may look like refined ceramics at first glance, but these pots, created by Lumojo, are actually full of honey. Pick up a taster set for the honeyeater in your house.

Camille Walton plays with colour, scale and materials with her jewellery. This ring, made from sterling silver, is a great gift for someone who prefers to wear art rather than hang it.

Ann Shelton’s Dark Matter traces the 20-year career of the photographer. Perfect for the photography lover or just someone who covets objects of desire.

Instead of traditional dots and tiles, you’ll find skulls, grumpy old men and raggedy cats on these dominos by artist David Shrigley. Fantastic diversion at the bach.

Thread bound and ready for action, this classic diary can be found in the bags of creatives everywhere. One side of each spread is for planning and the other, ideas.

Ann Shelton’s Dark Matter, $90, Gordon Harris

Domino set, $55, Dunedin Public Art Gallery shop

Moleskine large 2018 diary, $52, Gordon Harris

Lumojo taster gift set, $45, Auckland Art Gallery

Molten ring by Camille Walton, $215, Quoil


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Gifts for art lovers

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Greg Swinburne pays homage to his hometown of Whanganui with this beautiful blown and hand carved glass bowl.

Take a walk on the wild side with these brushes, made from the finest quality Russian squirrel hair and goose feathers. Suits gouache, ink and water colours.

This series of tote bags come with pithy commentary about the art world on one side. Perfect for the market, beach or shopping.

Treat your wall to a screen print from Palmerston North artist Ngatai Taepa. One of an edition of fifty prints, it comes ready to be framed.

Te Kuiti sculptor Doug Marsden is a self-taught carver who captures New Zealand’s wildlife in bronze, including this two-inch-high ruru.

Big Mouth bowl by Greg Swinburne, $535, New Zealand Glassworks

Winsor & Newton squirrel brush, $30.70– $246.95, Takapuna Art Supplies

Ngatai Taepa Te Pitau a Tiki Revisited, 2012, $850, Page Blackie Gallery

Bronze ruru by Doug Marsden, $200, Pataka

We Go To The Gallery tote bag, $59, Dunedin Public Art Gallery shop


14 Photography by Connor Hill

Your art’s in safe hands with framer Daniel Metcalf, as Dan Poynton discovers.

In Dan’s hands Pieces of art have to be looked after. While the original artist’s creation is revered, desired, it is also lugged about and handled for purposes of display or sale, and needs special measures to keep it in good shape. Frames by Daniel is a small Auckland firm that specialises in transporting and presenting art, employing great care and a fair bit of that mythical Kiwi ingenuity to keep the taonga from harm. ‘We sort of throw ourselves at anything we’re asked about,’ says

Daniel Metcalf, the versatile and pragmatic owner of Frames by Daniel. ‘If it’s reasonable we’ll tackle it.’ The Henderson-based company makes art-boards, stretchers, easels, plinths and boxes for freighting art to any specifications required. They also offer canvas stretching. Daniel set up a furniture building business soon after leaving school. An art-student friend was working for him and also doing bits and pieces for the local art students, and when he left to do his OE, Daniel took over his work and the business grew from there. Frames by Daniel has been going 15 years now, but it remains an intimate outfit with just one other full-timer and a couple of part-timers.

This, and some original methods of working, has allowed Daniel to keep his costs down and focus on his customers’ needs, he says. ‘I just like to be fair,’ says Daniel. ‘Artists don’t have a lot of money to spend and I’m about half the price of my competitors.’ For example, after checking out different ways of constructing artfreight boxes, Daniel came up with his own construction methods that are less labour-intensive than normal. ‘By keeping my prices low I get artists who buy more than just one thing, so I don’t lose out that much,’ he says. ‘I’m quite a creative person so I enjoy the challenge of some of the special stuff we have to do,’ he says,


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listing art-gallery exhibition walls and even kitchens as some of Frame by Daniel’s peripheral projects. ‘Quite often an artist will come to me with an idea which is probably achievable but way over the top and I usually find a cheaper way to achieve the look for them,’ says Daniel. ‘I’m not reserved in coming forward and saying this is a silly way to do it – we can do it this way and achieve the same thing.’ He says he basically doesn’t like having to do more work than he has to. ‘When I buy stuff I like to get the best price I can so I treat my customers the same way,’ says Daniel. Frames by Daniel does a lot of work transporting art-pieces here and internationally for organisations such as the Wallace Art Awards. They work intimately with a lot of New Zealand’s leading artists, and this requires a sensitivity toward

their work, although Daniel modestly denies this. ‘To try and paint something I don’t think I’d have any joy at all, but I’m quite creative with wood,’ says Daniel. ‘I’m a visual person and like building hands-on. I’m not so good with writing and reading, which has its drawbacks if you want to repeat something because you haven’t always got it written down.’ ‘I’ve been dealing with an older artist called Mervyn Williams whose art I really enjoy,’ he says. ‘We’ve been doing some maquettes for some sculpture projects he’s had in his head for about 25 years, but we met up and managed to get them out of his head and start producing them.’ These days, boards and especially rounds are the big thing, says Daniel, because artists tend to apply a lot more media than before, and canvases don’t work as well for this.

Also, there are constant requests for idiosyncratically shaped boards, and so Daniel employs the latest computer controlled cutters. ‘We can get a program written up for any shape – we can basically do anything,’ he says. ‘We even produce boards in the shape of artists’ logos.’ And what skills are most necessary for such work? Daniel isn’t quite sure but does say you’ve got to be good at measuring. Focus is also important. ‘One of the young guys who worked for me was an artist and when he had an exhibition coming up you could tell because he was a bit switched off and mistakes got made,’ he says. But Daniel obviously has the focus for this work. ‘We’re never quiet here,’ he says. ‘There’s always plenty to do.’


19 Peter McKay, New Tomb, sterling silver, copper, 1992,39mm x 38mm x 9mm

Jewellery collecting is a growing part of the art scene in New Zealand, writes Sarah Catherall.

To broach the subject Alister Harlow doesn’t look at a brooch the way many of us do. The Auckland accountant turns it over, and stares at the back of it, to check for a message from the artist who has made it. ‘Brooches often start a conversation between the maker and the wearer,’ says Harlow, who has been collecting them for more than 30 years and now boasts about 500 pieces of jewellery in his collection. He adds: ‘My view is that jewellery is sculpture on a small scale, and I generally buy things that I can wear.’ A growing number of collectors are choosing to collect jewellery, particularly as New Zealand’s jewellery-making scene is vibrant and internationally renowned. Public institutions like Te Papa, the Dowse Art Museum and Auckland Art

Gallery all collect jewellery, holding works by New Zealand jewellery artists such as Warwick Freeman and Lisa Walker. Alister never buys a piece because it’s fashionable, or the jeweller is in vogue. Rather, he covets the works of certain jewellers he likes − Peter MacKay, and Koji Miyazaki, the Japanese jeweller who owns Form Gallery in Christchurch. Alister also looks out for pieces by Swiss-born Kobi Bosshard, and the ring maker Jens Hansen. Why brooches, though? ‘Their makers say that brooches are the most challenging and rewarding format. Brooches are static, while other jewellery items are mobile and tactile. They also only suit a certain climate because you need a jacket or a coat to wear a brooch.’ ‘A serious collector will look at the back of the brooch rather than the front. You can tell how serious someone is by seeing if the collector checks the back of the brooch.’

The criteria that guide what he will collect have stayed constant since he began collecting three decades ago. He says a brooch must be masculine, its design is important, and most of the works he covets are made of silver. ‘Silver is a semi-precious material that is permanent and a lot of jewellers are comfortable working with it. There is no other material like it,’ he says. Alister is always interested in the narrative of a piece, such as Peter MacKay’s observations about nature. He is the proud owner of 30 brooches by Peter MacKay, including a number of the jeweller’s Metaphysical Hearts brooch series, along with his simple fish and bird brooches. Peter MacKay brooches can also be found stored in a filing cabinet in one of Te Papa’s giant art storerooms. Since the early 1990s, New Zealand’s national museum and gallery has been building


20 up an impressive jewellery collection. When Te Papa’s national art gallery, Toi Art, reopens in March next year after an extensive renovation, an exhibition by Wellington jeweller Lisa Walker will be a key part of it. Te Papa’s decorative art and design curator Justine Olsen says the jewellery collection sits within the national art collection. ‘I look at the relationship between art and jewellery. That’s why Lisa Walker is so critical. She is a jeweller but she builds relationships with art and always has.’ Te Papa’s acquisition of jewellery really began when a significant collection – the Bone Stone Shell collection (a touring exhibition from 1998 to 1993) – was acquired by the museum in 1993. ‘The collection encapsulated contemporary jewellery as it was at the time, looking at New Zealand moving away from Europe to its place in the Pacific,’ says Justine. With 47 pieces of jewellery and adornment art by 12 contemporary

artists, the works in the collection from the 1970s and 1980s showcased New Zealand’s changing cultural identity. It features paua, bone and argillite necklaces by Warwick Freeman, John Edgar’s greywacke and jade amulets, Inia Taylor’s finely carved bone necklaces and Elena Gee’s pendants. Says Justine, ‘The collection showed a shifting away from Europe to the Pacific, which was hugely significant. Local materials like pounamu, schist, and paua were used in the works.’ Bone Stone Shell was also a turning point as it sparked a deliberate effort by Te Papa to track the careers of some of the artists represented, and the museum continues to collect their more recent works. Pulling out a filing cabinet, Justine points to two Alan Preston necklaces made out of pieces of road, which Te Papa purchased from a dealer gallery in 2013. ‘You identify leaders in the field and you follow their work. When it comes to

acquiring now, we identify the younger generations and their strengths.’ Pointing to a sheepskin necklace by Lisa Walker, she says she also looks for key examples of a jeweller’s style when making acquisitions. Te Papa also considers questions of national and cultural identity. Most wellknown contemporary jewellers are represented in Te Papa’s collection, and Olsen covers the whole gamut − from senior artists to graduate students dubbed ones to watch. ‘It is a very energetic scene,’ she says. Te Papa is also trying to build up its historical jewellery collections from the colonial and modernist periods to show a wider spread of the development of the adornment art scene. ‘I tend to think long-term. You might think, in 50 years’ time, how will this look? You hope and think that because these objects resonated in so many ways at the time that they become incredibly important in the future.’


149 Willis Street, Wellington www.quoil.co.nz


22 Lisa Walker, What Karl didn’t take with him, 2010. Purchased 2010. Te Papa

Top delegates Part of the Handwerksmesee International crafts and trade fair, the Schmuck jewellery exhibition in Munich is the longest standing of its kind and one of the most highly regarded in the world. An extensive program of events all over the city has developed around the special jewellery show, but Schmuck remains the focus and rationale for the annual gathering, which has been running for almost six decades. More than 912 applications from 65 counties were received by Schmuck organisers and only 21 artists have been chosen to participate in 2018. Lisa Walker and her partner Karl Fritsch, both Schmuck regulars, were the only New Zealanders to make the cut this year. Lisa and Karl met in Auckland in 1994. German-born Karl was a student of the Academy of Fine Arts in

Munich at the time and was a key reason Lisa decided to move to Munich (see Art Zone #43). Lisa was a student of Professor Otto Künzli at the Munich Arts Academy from 1995 to 2001. The couple lived and worked in Munich until they moved to Wellington with their children in 2009. Lisa, who uses a large range of materials and techniques, makes what she calls ‘reactionary work’. She pushes the boundaries and questions the notion of beauty. Te Papa will be featuring I want to go to my bedroom but I can’t be bothered, which charts Lisa’s 30-year evolution as a jeweller when it opens its brand new purposebuilt art gallery, Toi Art in March next year. Justine Olsen, Curator of Decorative Art and Design at Te Papa, says an extraordinary range of Lisa Walker’s works will be on display – made from materials including copper, pearls, and pounamu, and found objects like LEGO, cell phones, and egg beaters. Karl’s whimsical, wearable rings are a

favourite with fine art and jewellery collectors alike. He began with traditional goldsmith’s practical training before studying at the jewellery department at the Munich Academy of Fine Arts. He has exhibited around the world and was awarded the Herbert Hoffmann Prize at the 1995 Handwerksmesee. A new partnership between Creative New Zealand and Objectspace has been set up to use the knowledge and expertise of the gallery to benefit artists operating internationally. Objectspace will liaise between the fair and exhibiting New Zealand artists, co-ordinate freight, and help connect artists with people and opportunities during the fair. Creative New Zealand supports the New Zealand artists exhibiting at Schmuck with grants of up to $3,000 for flights and accommodation. If they are also accepted to attend the emerging artist competition Talente, another part of the Handwerksmesse trade fair, additional support is offered.


24 Written by Dan Poynton

An accidental jeweller If you peer into a rather unlikely wild garden in the middle of Clapton in London’s East End you might find Hannah Upritchard burrowing around in her little cave-like studio. Looking at the surrounding artifacts and found objects you might ask what in the world she’s up to. Actually Hannah wasn’t quite sure herself until about 11 years ago. ‘I’m an accidental jeweller,’ she laughs. ‘I started making jewellery because I wanted to make myself some wedding rings and I couldn’t afford any I liked.’ The rather bizarre result was a ring bearing an enormous monkey face for her husband Christian – in honour of Hannah’s nickname – and a camel for herself ‘because I think he looks like a camel.’ People started asking her to make them rings, then other things, and

gradually Hannah Rings was born. This ‘accidental jeweller’, who grew up in New Plymouth and Christchurch, says she wanted to become a writer and in those days she never even looked at jewellery let alone wore it. ‘I was quite a dark young person,’ muses Hannah. ’I had a few years when I was cross with the universe and then I got it out of my system with a bit of Russian literature and gender studies.’ Just as she was finishing her final exams at Victoria University she had a mysterious brain haemorrhage. Although this took three months from her life, and still affects her memory, she says it effected a positive shift in her. ‘It made me feel I’m going to live a little bit first and then decide where I’m going and not worry, because there’s no rush to be an adult in this universe,’ she says. So she took off overseas, and since making her own wedding rings she’s gradually picked up the craft from other jewellers, from Rio de Janeiro to Süd Tirol.

‘I’m a little bit of an opportunistic parasite type,’ says Hannah. “Basically I’m like MacGyver – invent it and usually it works.” The young woman who ‘never learnt how to make jewellery’ ended up creating an eclectic range with a personal and extremely flexible character, earthy, quirky and somehow mythical. Often rough round the edges, like Japanese ceramics, and totally instinctive. ‘I get all my inspiration from my gut,’ says Hannah. The ‘bumps, faults and tarnishes’ are as much an essential part of her work as the quality of her materials ‘because life is a bit bumpy and tarnished and I like that when you wear jewellery it actually polishes on you and grows with you.’ Mass-produced ‘Michael Hill eternity bands with huge diamonds’ are not her thing. ‘It just horrifies me, and that’s why I couldn’t find anything to buy for my wedding,’ she says.


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Bespoke (custom-made) jewellery is Hannah’s favourite way of working. Looking at her website, it seems almost all of her work is “bespokenly” unique as she rarely makes the same thing twice. ‘That’s how I started out, and bespoke really pushes you to learn new skills,’ she says. ‘It was an efficient way of getting my own visual language because the work was so diverse it meant I had to really fix on something quite fast that was me.’ She says she loves having people in her home and generally looking after them, and bespoke jewellery is an extension of this. ‘I’m being paid to make an extremely special present for someone. It’s a delightful moment when you hand the piece over at the end and you see their face just light up. So I’m pretty lucky with my job.’

A big part of the ethos of Hannah Rings is to use recycled, found or fairtrade materials as much as possible. ‘There’s enough stuff in the world already, we don’t need to dig more up,’ she says, once again voicing her disgust at today’s mass-produced jewellery. ‘Especially when you could buy a beautiful Roman ring for 200 quid from an antique dealer and they’ve been dug out of the ground, sitting there forever.’ A favourite way for Hannah to find materials is to stroll down to the Thames and indulge in an English eccentricity called ‘mudlarking’. ‘You scavenge in the mud by the side of the river,’ she says gleefully, relating how in the 15th-century Indian sailors dumped their goods at the side of the Thames for their wives and children to pick up and sell.

‘But if something ever went into the mud the people back then believed in evil spirits, and I guess it was because the mud was so disgusting you could actually get really sick from touching it,’ Hannah tells. ‘So not even for gold would they reach into this mud, and now you can find handfuls of things like garnet.’ Her Thames garnet rings are the striking result. But there are also sculpted barnacles, bronze hairpins, sloth earrings, lion’s faces, donkey cuffs, flying owl rings, dog rings, pig rings, possum bone bracelets... So hard to choose. But what about her homeland? ‘I’m the world’s most ridiculously buoyant human,’ says Hannah, but she still comes back home for three months every year to replenish the batteries. ‘I really need New Zealand for my soul.’


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Notepad

Pride of Porirua

Mitchell to transmit

Dane Mitchell will represent New Zealand at the 2019 Venice Biennale. The Auckland artist and lecturer at AUT’s School of Art and Design has exhibited in more than 70 shows around the world. He makes art which ‘investigates the connection between tangible objects and intangible phenomenon and our senses and consciousness.’ For the 58th International Art Exhibition in Venice he’s going to transmit broadcasts throughout the historical city, from the exhibition’s home base at the Giardini della Biennale.

City Gallery Wellington is closed until March. A major refurbishment of the foyer and entranceway is planned, along with changes to the main staircase and general building maintenance. The gallery will reopen on 3 March with the exhibition This Is New Zealand. Bill Culbert and Ralph Hotere’s Fault, which has been running on the exterior of the gallery since 1994, will remain while the work is carried out.

Change is good

They’re engaged!

Talent show

Pātaka Museum’s new interactive children’s gallery Our Harbour – Te Awarua-o-Porirua is now open. Pātaka director Reuben Friend says the gallery, which features murals, objects from Pātaka’s history collection and lots of interactive games, captures the essence of Porirua. Visitors are invited to explore the history of Te Awaruao-Porirua Harbour and learn about the lives of people and creatures who have lived there.

Michael Browne has won the Governor-General Art Award 2017. The Wellington painter says his art is a process of continuous change. Most recently his work has been inspired by the colours, patterns and images he absorbed on a trip to India. Solo 43, a retrospective of Michael’s huge body of work, is at the Academy Galleries in Wellington until 14 December.

Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki has appointed its very first Head of Public Engagement. Neal Stimler comes from The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and gallery director Rhana Devenport says she’s is thrilled to have appointed such a highly skilled leader. Two other roles in the new public engagement team have been filled by Johnny Hui and Ioka Magale-Suamasi.

Closed

Mahara Arts Review is an exhibition which showcases the creative talents of the Kāpiti to Horowhenua region. Michael Tuffery and Margriet Windhausen select the works, which must have been made in the last year and not exhibited anywhere else. There are seven prizes including a $1000 Open Award sponsored by John Mowbray. At Mahara Gallery until 14 January.


28 Strong foundation Roberta Thornley has won the Arts Foundation’s Marti Friedlander Photographic Award. Roberta is the first recipient of the award since Marti, who noted Roberta’s potential back in 2008, passed away in November last year. Roberta’s work is described as simple, discreet and evocative. Sarjeant Gallery curator Greg Donson describes Roberta as a photographer who engages with her subjects to explore what it means to be human. The Friedlander award, which includes a $25,000 donation, is presented every two years to an established photographer with a record of excellence. Roberta Thornley, Float, 2009, archival pigment ink photograph on Ilford Galerie Gold Fibre Silk paper, 680 x 750mm


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Jewellery that laughs

Contemporary jeweller Moniek Schrijer talks to Mary-Jane Duffy, about memory, meaning and the language of materials.

I am wearing my Moniek Schrijer necklace as I write. She won’t like me telling you this because it’s one of her rejects. I bought it from her when she was still a student in the Whitireia jewellery programme in 2012. It is made of four Bakelite napkin rings in different colours joined by a grey compound flecked with silver wire, and hung on grey electrical cable. What I love about it — and in much of Moniek’s work — is a bold poetic eye for combining and reconfiguring materials. But not in a way that obscures their origins; in a way that relocates them as jewellery with a gutsy, experimental elegance. And an anarchic wittiness.


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Jewellery that laughs

LEFT: Moniek Schrijer, Shrunken Rings, 2016, sterling silver, oxidised bronze, 4652mm x 20 x 20 mm

PAGE 34: Moniek Schrijer, Fucken haywire, 2017, gold plated no.8 wire

PAGE 35: Moniek Schrijer, Double Happiness, 2016, projection image

Moniek is part of the contemporary jewellery community that has been developing in Aotearoa since the seventies. These days it’s connected to the international network of jewellers, and a number of practitioners regularly go overseas for exhibitions and projects. In Wellington the presence of heavyweight internationals Lisa Walker and Karl Fritsch lends experience and support to the local jewellery community. An exhibition of Lisa Walker’s work will re-launch the new Te Papa art spaces in 2018. Thanks to the hard work of Peter and Hilda Deckers, a pathway for emerging jewellers has been forged to international exhibitions, espe-

cially the annual showcase of international work, Schmuck, in Munich. The bar is high. Last year Moniek won the prestigious Herbert Hoffman Prize at Schmuck alongside two other international jewellers. The winning work was a smartphone-shaped necklace called Tablet Of, inscribed with a series of personalised symbols on its ‘screen’—symbols for tools, music, love, sadness etc. Ursula Ilse-Neuman, one of the four jury members who selected the winners, noted in a 2016 New York Times article that ‘Moniek does a lot with symbols, mixing old communication systems with new ones. Maybe her tablet in the future will be an archaeological find.’


36

Jewellery that laughs

Moniek Schrijer, Smiley, earring, 2017, holographic glass, silver , gold plated brass, Pounamu

This year thanks to Asia New Zealand and the Wellington City Council, Moniek has a residency on Xiamen, an island off the coast of China. The residency is based at the Chinese European Art Center (CEAC), which was established by Icelandic couple Ineke and Sigurður Guðmundsson in 1999. She told me they were still coming to terms with her work and what sort of artist she was. There’s not much contemporary jewellery produced in China yet—but you can bet it’s coming. Before she thought of applying for the residency, she had an exhibition at The National in Christchurch, called Double Happiness, which is the translated name of the Chinese character for joy and marriage. It is used by Chinese companies to brand everything from soy sauce to cigarettes. This exhibition included

a series of mutated symbols suggestive of maps, signage, objects, shadows, floor plans, diagrams or landforms. Each iteration of the symbols was a different size and in a different medium; the collection included rings, necklaces, sculptural objects, 3-D prints, and wall projections. Old and new symbols seemed to collide and become a new industrial language or a codification of an old one. As wall projections, the symbols evoked strange urban and rural landscapes, and as rings and necklaces, mementoes of a distant, lost past. These ideas have an obvious pertinence to China with its ancient modernity and culture of mass production. I asked her if being in China has affected her work in any way. She wondered if Xiamen is giving her a true experience of China, whether it was in fact China-lite,


39

Jewellery that laughs

Moniek Schrijer, Scribble ring, 2014 - ongoing, chromed bronze

but valued the range of materials she can access via the internet. She has discovered, for example, that she can buy the ceramic sunflower seeds used by Ai Weiwei in his Sunflower seeds (2010) shown at the Tate Modern, as well as any other number of ready-mades. An exhibition at the CEAC that will mark the end of her residency there. Called Diamonds and Rust, it opened on 25 November 2017. This exhibition examines memory through works made from computer hard drives, found and cast brass, ceramic sunflower seeds, painted bone, Ch’ing Dynasty coins, and miniature shopping carts. This list of materials itself is redolent with ideas about memory—ancient memories, found memories, memory storage, bought memory, collective memory, and the memory of materials cast in other materials.

And there it is, the thing that is so interesting about Moniek’s work; the way that she expands meaning and creates new meaning, often metaphorical, in the language of materials. There are quieter themes too: our careless consumerism and the ephemeral memory of the digital age. These themes don’t hit you over the head — they laugh at you. Connecting materials in fresh, metaphorical ways— the hard-drive pendants in the shape of the Ch’ing coin; the delicately painted blue bones called Bone China; the flakes of found brass threaded like a lei — she makes the voices of ancestors and wifi radio waves bounce off each other. And she shows, to quote Ursula Ilse-Neuman again, that ‘jewellery makers are not only body ornamenters, but thinkers’.


40 Book reviews

From the south Two recent books published by University of Otago Press examine the work of exhibiting artists.

Miranda Parkes: the merrier Hocken Collections, University of Otago Reviewed by Craig Beardsworth, former assistant editor ArtZone

Fifty years of the Frances Hodgkins Fellowship was celebrated last year. The Hocken Collection and Dunedin Public Art Gallery mounted a 49-artist*, two-institution behemoth exhibition. Miranda Parkes is the latest in a distinguished line of New Zealand artists who have been supported for a year in Dunedin to explore their practice. This is a 100-page catalogue marking the milestone. As a catalogue it is not intended to analyse, the artist’s modus operandi is in detail. It contains four short essays or ‘thoughts’ by Robyn Notman, Andrea Bell, Sophie Bannan and Parkes. They are in large bold fonts that make for quick, easy reading. It is

not the writing though that will draw in the readers but rather the punchy design. Parkes is known for her riotous use of colour and form. Three dimensional canvases are ‘puffed up and ruffled’ according to Notman, and are ‘exuberant and sensual.’ Even the works with more muted palettes have a liveliness about them − activity abounds in them and thus in the catalogue design. Daniel Blackball Alexander has captured Parkes’ dynamism with clever treatment of images. Many berate each other from facing pages, vying for attention with bright washes of colour behind them while others sit alone positioned at the top of a page facing a blank page. Some pages are on high gloss, others on thicker paper. A poem meanders its way across six leaves of uncoated paper, calm among the cacophony of colour. This is design at its best, capturing the spirit of the subject. It’s loud and unforgiving, joyous and rowdy – just like the art. * in 1996/97 one artist held the fellowship for two years.


41 Undreamed of… 50 Years of the Frances Hodgkins Fellowship Otago University Press Reviewed by Janet Hughes, a Wellington scholar, writer and editor

This is a solid academic history of the University of Otago’s Hodgkins Fellowship – it has been held with distinction by a parade of New Zealand’s finest – and a systematic survey of the artists who have held it over its 50 years so far. It is also an engaging coffee table book, with high production values and generous illustrations. The scene is set with an opening discussion of the fellowship’s impact on the arts in New Zealand, by Priscilla Pitts, and another by Joanne Dell of the factual history of its foundation. This pattern is followed in the body of the book, with paired essays about each of the holders

of the award. The first, again by Priscilla Pitts, focuses on the artist’s art-making practice and their reception and impact, putting their careers in a philosophical and art-historical frame. Andrea Hotere’s essay then gives us a more personallyfocussed account of the artist’s life and work, working as much as possible from interviews and personal documents. The result has a fine balance, the art and the artist emerging out of these complementary accounts in a richly complex way that neither single approach could have yielded. Pitts’ essays are eloquent and scholarly, often with a striking take on the material. They form an impressive whole. Hotere’s are more uneven, necessarily because the source material is variable. The most engaging are generally those incorporating first-hand interviews, though they are never less than illuminating contributions. There is a scattering of small errors (mostly in names), which editing ought to have caught in an otherwise thoroughly scholarly volume.

This is a book to dip into, but I quickly found myself reading at length, a testament to its engaging writing and absorbing topic. The illustrations are very well chosen, mostly depicting key works discussed in the text, and the standard of reproduction high. And the captions are scrupulously complete, with the details of size and media that are crucial to reading scaled-down flat photos of full-size artworks in countless materials. It’s become common for art books to omit some of this detail, presumably in search of a clean-looking page. This volume is consistently scholarly and thorough in such matters. In detailing the chronological story of the successive fellowships, the book delivers a selective but representative enough history of the visual arts in New Zealand in the modern and subsequent era, such has been the success of the fellowship itself in targeting its largesse. And it’s so affordable at $59.95 it’s downright necessary.


42 Quite literally

“ …undoubtedly one of the worst exhibitions of contemporary art staged in the past decade.” Andrew Russeth reviews Damien Hirst’s 2017 Venice Biennale show Treasures from the Wreck of the Unbelievable. Described as the ‘most talked-about art show on earth,’ it has received mixed reviews from visitors and critics alike. Artnews international, 5 August 2017

“...the gallery’s decline in budget has made it impossible to produce an exhibition programme of substance...”

“Hey, I’m not going to live for another 50 years, this is an absolute given…”

Arts patron Dame Jenny Gibbs on the financial crisis facing Auckland Art Gallery. Cuts in the gallery’s operating budget could see them closing the doors for up to two days a week.

Nelson Art collector and patron of Suter Art Gallery Sally Hunt, on selling 123 paintings from her collection. The collection included works by Neil Dawson, Toss Woollaston and Max Gimblett as well as Jane Evans, of which she owned 80 works. The auction, which was held in November at the International Art Centre, had Toss Woollaston’s Tasman Bay selling for $110,000.

NZ Herald, 8 November 2017

Nelson Mail, 4 November 2017

“He’s lived with pigs for eight days, cooked himself in an oven in front of a princess and become a human couch.” Journalist Sanele Chadwick describes Tongan-born artist Kalisolaite ‘Uhila who has won this year’s Contemporary Pacific Artist Award. ‘Uhila uses performance to experience and document situations including homelessness, poverty and isolation, with a particular interest in the Pacific Island community. Newshub.co.nz, 1 November 2017


29 September 2017

29 April 2018

The tactile exhibition Knot Touch celebrates the versatility and traditions of knots. Workshops, activities and demonstrations suitable for all ages and abilities throughout the exhibition. Installation by Jae Kang Check our website for more details www.maritimemuseum.co.nz

NZSAG Members Exhibition 1st Dec 2017 - 31st Jan 2018

Images from left; Details of exhibition pieces by David Traub, George Agius, Barbara Bullock and Karin Barr

STUDIO | GALLERY

2 Rutland Street, Whanganui 4500

Phone 06 927 6803 www.nzglassworks.com


44

Foreign assessment Yin Xiuzhen, My Clothes, 1995, wooden trunk with adhered paper, clothes, cement, and bronze plaque; colour video

Gu Dexin, Plastic Pieces, 1983-85, 287 burned plastic pieces

You can see and feel the spaces created by censorship and silence in China After 1989 writes Sophie McKinnon.

Free speech, metaphorically Theatre of the World: Art in China After 1989 The year 1989 is synonymous with seismic shifts worldwide, and in China, one particular student-led protest calling for democracy met a violent end in Tiananmen Square. A 150-piece exhibition filling the rotunda and atrium of the Solomon R Guggenheim Museum in New York does not offer a survey or conclusive narrative of contemporary art around this period. It provides a platform for the profoundly complicated history of two generations of artists and their work. Two weeks before China After 1989 opened, word that works involving deliberately created animal violence would be displayed surged through the activist community. Change.org released a petition to have these pieces

removed which garnered 750,000 signatures, while the Guggenheim received threats of retribution. In 2003, China was inaugurating new president Hu Jintao and economic growth was hitting a record high. In Beijing the same year, artist couple Sun Yuan and Peng Yu staged a performance which tethered pairs of ‘american pit bulls’ to treadmills. The dogs faced each other, salivating with aggression but unable to make contact. The seven-minute video was initially included in the exhibition but now only a title screen appears. Theater of the World, a large installation created ten years earlier by Paris-based artist Huang Yong Ping, features live insects and reptiles who inevitably engage in a vicious struggle for resources and survival. The question really is not whether the works were ethically sound at the time they were created (though the absence of moral critique of artworks in China at that time is itself revealing)

but what these pieces expose in terms of alternative contexts and histories. While Dogs that can never touch each other records a critically challenging moment in its concept and realization, ultimately re-staging Theater of the World condones creating an artificially sustained environment of violence for the purposes of metaphor and to represent a political standoff. Alexandra Munroe, Samsung Senior Curator for Asian Art at the Guggenheim, insisted in an artnet interview that the exhibition was “intended to be brutal”. Many of the works in the show have a remarkably corporeal violence: whether Xu Zhen‘s gradually reddening back from the repeated slaps of unseen hands in Uncertain Pleasures; Gu Dexin’s intestinally writhing plastic pieces and propaganda-like statements of stark brutality (co-curator Philip Tinari called Gu ‘the most important Chinese artist you have never heard of’); or Yang Jiechang’s monumental


46

Foreign assessment abstract ink painting detailing the paths of volunteers carrying bodies away from Tiananmen Square in 1989. One wall texts describes China’s artist community in the 1990s as bringing ‘art back into the realm of visceral reality’. Visitors to the exhibition can view references to the now removed pieces: empty structural parts and video monitors paired with thoughtfully PR’d wall texts represent the clash of two distinct ideologies. What seems curious is that proponents of free speech and the debunking of culturally dominant frameworks would fail to see their condemning of these pieces as an exercise in exactly such domination, with fundamental disregard for the worldview in which these works originated. The conditions in which they were created − largely isolation, displacement, and political oppression of the artists − gave rise to work which responded to brutality with brutality. Failure to exhibit the works as intended silences the validity and authority of that experience. At numerous points in the show, the parallels with or divergence from global movements is salient. Lin Tianmao, one

of only nine women artists included, rejects a feminist classification in interviews, explaining that feminism was an imported Western construct irrelevant to her practice at the time of making work in China while Qui Zhijie’s Map of the Theater of the World plots international politics and ideology as bilingual geography. Critics of the show, aside from those seeking to remove works, have noted the unusual failure to incorporate native China-based, Chinese curatorial perspectives. Apart from a modest film series organized by Ai Wewei, Hou Hanru (artistic director of the MAXII in Rome) is the only Chinese curator, and he has resided overseas for the past two decades. Some questioned the authenticity of the presentation, in which a tumultuous and uniquely Chinese era is documented by foreigners, for foreigners. Indeed, the non-Chinese contribution to documenting, archiving, collecting, and critiquing Chinese contemporary art after 1989 has been significant. Zhou Tiehai mocks this very fact with a large ink and collage piece titled “There Came a Mr. Solomon to China” (1994), responding to the inflated accounts of American writer

Andrew Solomon’s visit to China in 1993. While the exhibition makes it very clear that all the work is included precisely because its aesthetic merit lifts it out of an instrumentally ‘Chinese’ definition, the navigation of concepts from a Chinese context is what lends gravity and meaning to many of the pieces on view. One overwhelmingly large demographic visiting this exhibition has been Chinese, both overseas and local. On a busy Friday morning, small crowds of visitors speaking Mandarin cluster around some of the rarer ephemera, such as original brochures from the 1989 ‘no U-turn’ exhibition, traces of which have been all but erased from the object-based narrative of contemporary art in China. The majority of the works on view are held in private collections, and, because of sensitivity about their production and critique, are not accessible to the public in mainland China. Their entry into Guggenheim institutional history in one sense validates their contribution to a global arthistorical canon, and while this doesn’t acknowledge the rising generation of curatorial talent, it does offer contact with work which is seldom possible.


N ATA L I E G U Y:

THEN AND THEN AGAIN 22 January to 24 February 2018

Opening Saturday 20 January, 2.30PM (09) 535 6467

35 Uxbridge Road, Howick, Auckland

exhibitions@uxbridge.org.nz

Mon - Sat 10am - 4pm, Thu until 8pm

malcolmsmithgallery.org.nz

Gallery Shop Workshops

In association with:

“Providing a hands on, practical engagement with the fundamental principles of visual art” 09 489 7213 / www.aucklandatelier.co.nz 124 Anzac Street ,Takapuna, Auckland 0622, New Zealand


48 Education special By Laura Pitcher Art courses range from evening classes or weekend retreats to post-graduate opportunities. Here not only are multi-level courses offered but specialisation also. Photography, sculpture, electronic arts, jewellery, design and conceptual art tuition are on offer.

Read on to find out about the success of some students and graduates.


49

Nadine Smith, Sound of the sea, 2016, Brooch, dried seaweed, paint, ebony from piano keys and sterling silver.

Lovely bones It’s not a surprise to find out that Wellington jeweller Nadine Smith also works in the medical field. Her work is scattered with body parts in quantities that make sense for someone medically qualified, or possibly an axe-murderer. Working part-time as a nurse, she says her concepts relate to the ‘fragility of life’ and humans’ relationship with technology. She says her two occupations ‘go hand in hand’. Perhaps not so coincidentally, hands make multiple appearances in her work. She describes herself as an ‘avid recycler with magpie tendencies’, foraging for objects to use in her work.

When she was growing up on the Kāpiti Coast, she says her family would spend many weekends combing the beach for rocks and fossils, which was the start of her collecting objects. Smith likes to give new life to the gathered material. ‘There is humour in my work as a lot of combinations are happy accidents,’ she says. Having graduated with a Bachelor of Nursing in 1996, in her mid-thrirties she decided to take a gap year and study art at Weltec. She then went on to complete a Bachelor of Applied Arts at Whitireia Polytechnic, graduating in 2009. It was at Whitireia, she says, she found her love of jewellery making, under the guidance of Peter Decker.

Eight years later, Smith has exhibited at Pataka, The Refinery Gallery, Alliages in France and, most recently, at the Pah Homestead in the Leanings, Handshake4 exhibition, open until 10 December. The Handshake project was curated by Wellingtonian Peter Deckers as a way to support New Zealand jewellers after their studies. Smith was one of six mentees selected by Ruudt Peters from the Netherlands for the two-year programme. Her assigned mentor is sculptor Regan Gentry. Her work will be at Toi Poneke for the International Festival of the Arts in March 2018 and at Corban Estate Arts Centre during Auckland Art Week next year.


50 Donna Marie Patterson, High Country Weather, Ink on Cotton paper, 75cm x 100cm, 2016

Home away from home Donna Marie Patterson’s deep relationship with New Zealand’s landscapes has always been the source of her drawings and sculptures, even when she’s away from home. The focus of her work is often on West Coast rivers, forests and glaciers, using repetitive forms to show ‘nature’s contant state of flux.’ Working previously as an

accountant and IT specialist, Patterson has always known she would pursue the arts but was waiting until her three daughters were more independent before she studied. She has just finished her Bachelor with Honours in Art at the University of Canterbury’s Ilam School of Fine Arts and is enrolled in the Master’s programme for next year. This year, she has exhibited in three solo shows, two at Refinery Art Space and one at Project Space, along with over ten group exhibitions across the

country, including the Wallace Art Awards exhibition. She has been a finalist in the National Contemporary Art Award, SELECT Art Award and the Zonta Female Art Award, and won a highly commended in the Molly Morpeth Painting and Drawing Award along with two scholarships from the University of Canterbury. Latino artists and their use of multiple media platforms were the main inspiration drawn from her recent travel scholarship to New York and Los Angeles. It has influenced her new body of work which will be exhibited at PG Gallery next year. Patterson often takes her fine art papers away with her when she travels, drawing in hotels. ‘It is surreal to draw inspiration from the Southern Alps, while being in tropical countries such as Singapore or Thailand’. At home, she has several studio and work spaces, but still manages to ‘take over the house.’ It has become a running joke with her family that she uses the bathroom for dying resins, spare room for art papers and the hallway for finished sculptures.


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52

Education

Chloe Rose Taylor, Valued Member Object, 2017, leather, freshwater pearls, stuffing, textured silver

Chloe Rose Taylor, Birth of Venus, Vases (Pair), 2017, cast resin, paint, freshwater pearls, 255x 112mm

New room for heirlooms Jewellery often becomes heirlooms, passed down from generation to generation. For Wellington jeweller Chloe Rose Taylor her heirlooms became a ‘blob’, which she melted down for her exhibition SuperValue at The National in October. The idea for SuperValue came to Taylor at the Auckland Art Fair in 2015. She submitted a Twinkie for inclusion on the trade table, but it was declined on the basis that it wasn’t worth anything. Taylor began to think about how worth is subjective. She created work that unsettled the meaning of value. She paired gold, diamonds and pearls

with novelty brooches, two-minute noodles and of course, a Twinkie. Originally from Christchurch, Taylor began a Bachelor of Arts at Canterbury Polytechnic. Two years into her degree, jeweller Areta Wilkinson came to speak to her class. Inspired by the speech, Taylor moved to Wellington in 2011 to major in contemporary jewellery at Whitireia. ‘I was interested in jewellery because it combines art and sculpture with wear-ability.’ she says. ‘Jewellery becomes our armour.’ Despite being drawn to making jewellery she never wears any, aside from her engagement ring. ‘Everyone finds it strange that I never wear any jewellery. My work is about other people and what I think they would enjoy wearing’ she says. Since graduating in 2013, Taylor has

exhibited throughout Australasia. Her first major solo exhibition was Rock Lobster at The National in 2015. This year, Taylor has been working in her home studio in Wellington. She’s exhibited in the group exhibition The River Lie at The Suter, along with her solo exhibition at The National. She’s also experimenting with metal and silversmithing, something she says she loved to do while studying, but after graduating moved on to resin. Taylor says she doesn’t want to be boxed in as a ‘jeweller’ and doesn’t want her work to take itself too seriously. Instead, her work makes weird and wonderful things out of the ordinary, in any form that works best. Whether that’s a melted blob of Grandma’s old jewellery, a moulded poo shape on the floor of the exhibition, or a Twinkie in a frame.


IDEAS BECOME CAREERS @ ideaschool

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enrol now Call Victoria on 974 8000 x5019 ideaschool@eit.ac.nz


55

Education briefs

Here come the drums

Massey University industrial-design graduate Rachael Hall has received an international Red Dot Award for her honours project, a handcrafted drum, Patō (‘to strike’). The drum has also won a supreme award ECC NZ Student Craft/Design award and gold at the New Zealand Best Awards this year. The design is a modern take on the traditional Tongan lali (drum) and is electronic, tuneable and portable. Hall, who is half Tongan, flew to Singapore in October to collect her Red Dot Award, with help from Massey’s Pasifika Directorate. Hall is now a Massey technical assistant and is looking to get Patō manufactured. She plans to continue to design instruments.

Double Dan

Dan Cunliffe was a double finalist in the ECC New Zealand Student Craft/Design Awards this year. The EIT graduate’s two projects were a collection of ceramic beakers and flasks, Ceramic Collections, and a concrete and timber coffee table, Coffee Table 65. They were created as coursework over the past two years. Born and raised in Napier, Cunliffe says the art scene there is thriving and he is eager to get involved in the community now that he has finished his degree. But as a solo father, he says finding a balance between creative time and family time can sometimes be difficult. His passion is with materiality and construction, and he is hoping to eventually run his own business.

Two on Dixon

From March 2018, Whitireia and WelTec students from all areas of the arts will study together under one roof in the Te Kāhui Auaha building on Dixon Street, Wellington. The new purpose-built campus has dance studios, performance spaces and mixing rooms for students of performance arts. It will also cater for the applied arts, with facilities for jewellery making, graphic design and textiles. Whitireia’s art programmes have been running for 30 years. The new location for creative students is just a stone’s throw from Whitireia’s central campus on Dixon St, where media and communications students are based.


56

Education

Harry Culy, Swimming pool, Woodville,archival pigment print on Ilford photographic paper, framed in Tasmanian Oak, 1016 x 812.8mm

Take me back When photographer Harry Culy came back from overseas travel, he visited the place where he’d always felt a sense belonging as a child, his grandmother’s farm. But this time he felt instead an overwhelming sense of displacement and disconnection from his surroundings. From this feeling, his project Rose Hill, at Parlour Projects, arose. Rose Hill, showing until 22

December, contrasts picturesque New Zealand landscapes, with empty, still moments in landscape. Culy started at his grandmother’s farm, Rose Hill, Maraekakaho, then explored the wider Hawkes Bay area on a ‘photographic road trip.’ Inspired by the Gothic element in Aotearoa’s art tradition, the work explores the feeling of displacement, something he says is a ‘universal feeling among youth at the moment’. Culy graduated with Honours in Photography at Massey University Wellington only a few months ago,

and has already curated exhibitions and has shown his work in Australia and New Zealand. Earlier this year he curated Where the River Bends at Ilam Gallery in Christchurch. He has also exhibited in a two-person show Evidence at China Heights in Sydney. In his spare time, he’s been running a project called Bad News Books, making small affordable booklets and collaborating with other New Zealand photographers. The booklets featured in the graduate-run Wellington gallery Playstation last month.


Distance study opportunity for Painting and Photography in Central Otago Dunedin School of Art at Otago Polytechnic A distance option is available in the second and third year Bachelor of Visual Arts for those specialising in Painting or Photography Location: By distance in Central Otago - Year 2 and 3 Bachelor of Visual Arts only. Duration:

Two years full-time

Delivery: By distance with regular visits by Dunedin School of Art staff to Central Otago.

Start: February, 2018 Apply now! For more information please contact: Mark.bolland@op.ac.nz Victoria.bell@op.ac.nz www.op.ac.nz/art

Image: Michael Greaves, from Excessive Memory, 2017 (detail)

Introducing Wintec’s brand new

Are you involved with a museum or gallery ? Join your professional organisation to connect with our community. www.museumsaotearoa.org.nz

Bachelor of Design degree Creating problem solvers wintec.ac.nz/creative


59

Worn but not old Vivienne Worn, recent Elam graduate, is fascinated with historical female painters. Earlier this year, she had been researching the work of French avantgarde painter, Marie Laurencin, when she came across a book of handmade lithographs. Having previously only seen Laurencin’s work online, Worn was ‘completely taken’ with the ‘delicate graceful drawings.’ From this fascination, the idea for her exhibition in April this year, Re-reading Laurencin, at

Window Gallery, Auckland University’s gallery space. Not only is Worn intrigued by Laurencin’s work, closely reading her marks and trying out the possibilities it raised for her own work, but she is also fascinated with Laurencin herself. She says Laurencin’s international career spanned over forty years, and she ‘invented her own, very distinctive, painterly language’. Worn was also a finalist this year in The Wallace Arts Award and was included in a Graduate Art Fair in Guangzhou, China. She has a couple of shows

already in the pipeline for next year, including an exhibition at Enjoy Gallery. Worn says she has been developing a method of painting that sits between abstraction and figuration over the past two years. She will continue to revisit the work of historical female painters. ‘I have recently become fascinated with the British modernists who were active at the same time as the likes of New Zealanders Frances Hodgkins and Rhona Haszard.’ Worn says. ‘I look forward to delving into that portion of history next.’


THE PERFECT GIFT FOR ART LOVERS

60 Aotearoa: The New Zealand Story Award-winning illustrator Gavin Bishop has created an accessible and engaging non-fiction history of New Zealand. Defining moments of our past are showcased through Bishop’s evocative art; from Gondwana right through to what might happen tomorrow. Even the most reluctant reader will pore over this richly illustrated book full of Maori legends and New Zealand facts. All subscriptions received by 1 February go into the draw to win a copy.

Subscribe online now at artzone.co.nz New Zealand 1 year / $30.50 / 5 issues 2 years / $61 / 11 issues / 1 issue free Asia / Pacific 1 year / $65.60 Rest of the world 1 year / $83


61 61 Region

Maps / Listings North Island

South Island

Northland 66

Picton 78

Auckland 66

Blenheim 79

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Nelson 79

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71

Christchurch 80

Bay of Plenty

71

Canterbury 81

Rotorua 71

Geraldine 81

Hamilton 71

Timaru 82

Waikato 72

Oamaru 82

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Mangaweka 73 Whanganui 73 Manawatu 74 Wairarapa 74 Horowhenua 75 Kapiti 75 Hutt Valley

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Artist list

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Auckland Museum – Domain Dr Sanderson – Osborne Lane 2 Kent St

Antoinette Godkin – APT Y32, 30 York St Artis – 280 Parnell Rd Jonathan Grant – 280 Parnell Rd Parnell Gallery – 263 Parnell Rd


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Academy Galleries – 1 Queens Wharf Adam Art Gallery – Victoria University, Gate 3, Kelburn Pde Art Walrus – 111 Taranaki St Avid – 48 Victoria St Bartley + Co – 56A Ghuznee St Bowen Galleries – 41 Ghuznee St City Gallery – Civic Square Green St Projects – 2 Green St, Newtown Hamish McKay – 39 Ghuznee St Jane Hyder – Studio 21, Toi Pōneke Arts Centre, 61 Abel Smith St Kiwi Art House – 288 Cuba St Kura Gallery – 19 Allen St New Zealand Portrait Gallery – Shed 11, Queens Wharf Ora Design Gallery – 23 Allen St Page Blackie Gallery – 42 Victoria St Quoil – 149 Willis St Suite – 241 Cuba St Te Papa – Cable St Toi Pōneke Arts Centre – 61 Abel Smith St Turnbull Gallery – National Library Molesworth St Vessel – 87 Victoria St Vincents Gallery – 5/148 Wills St Wellington Museum – Queens Wharf


CHAMBERS ART GALLERY

FORM GALLERY

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Bryce Gallery – Cnr Riccarton Road & Paeroa Street Canterbury Museum – Rolleston Ave Chambers Art Gallery – 241 Moorhouse Ave Form Gallery – 468 Colombo Street Ilam Campus Gallery – Block 2 School of Fine Arts, Arts Road Jonathan Smart – 52 Buchan St PG Gallery 192 – 192 Bealey Avenue The National – 241 Moorhouse Ave The Physics Room – 209 Tuam Street Windsor Gallery – 386 St Asaph St

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CANTERBURY MUSEUM

WORDSWORTH ST

CASS ST

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JONATHAN SMART

MOORHOUSE AVE

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CARLYLE ST

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WINDSOR GALLERY

THE PHYSICS ROOM

THE NATIONAL

DURHAM ST SOUTH

BRIDGE OF REMEMBRANCE

DURHAM ST NORTH

MOORHOUSE AVE

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PG GALLERY 192

GLOUCESTER ST

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Blue Oyster Art Project Space – 16 Dowling St Brett McDowell Gallery – 5 Dowling St Gallery De Novo – 101 Stuart St Hocken Gallery – 90 Anzac Ave Mint Gallery – 32 Moray Pl Moray – 55 Princes St Otago Art Society – 22 Anzac Ave


66 Region Northland–Auckland Northland ART AT WHAREPUKE 190 Kerikeri Road, Kerikeri Ph: 09 407 8933 info@art-at-wharepuke.co.nz www.art-at-wharepuke.co.nz Hours: Open 7 days 10am–5pm Gallery & Sculpture Park BURNING ISSUES GALLERY 8 Quay Side, Town Basin, Whangarei Ph: 09 438 3108 www.burningissuesgallery.co.nz Hours: Open 7 days 10am–5pm The finest contemporary object art gallery in Northland. Showcasing the best of local and national artists for over 20 years. JULIA REINHOLT CONTEMPORARY ART | CONSULTANT 25 Kemp Road, Kerikeri Ph: 09 407 5191, Mob: 021 163 4478 www.kaanzamaan.co.nz Hours: Mostly open or by appointment. Suspect Device 2 Dec–28 Jan ceramics and painting by BERNARD WINKELS & SCOTT MCFARLANE. With video work Where the sun goes down by SCOTT MCFARLANE, HAMISH MACLEAN, KELLY MICHAEL, JASON TAYLOR.

MEGAN DICKINSON GALLERY 12 Rust Ave, Whangarei Ph: 027 338 1578 megan@mdgallery.co.nz www.mdgallery.co.nz Hours: Tue, Wed, Fri 10–4pm. Thurs 12–6pm, Sat 9.20–1.30pm. Newly opened in July 2017, MD Gallery brings a fresh art concept to the region, showcasing artists with a connection to Northland. REYBURN HOUSE (NORTHLAND SOC. OF ARTS) Reyburn House Lane, Town Basin, Whangarei Ph: 09 438 3074 nsa@reyburnhouse.co.nz www.reyburnhouse.co.nz Hours: Tues–Fri 10am–4pm, Sat–Sun 1pm–4pm, closed Monday. Gallery has an active exhibition programme changing monthly. Also a gallery shop for a fine selection of painting, jewellery, pottery, hand blown glass and much more. VILLAGE ARTS 1376 Kohukohu Road, North Hokianga Ph: 09 405 5827 gallery@villagearts.co.nz www.villagearts.co.nz Hours: Open 7 days 10am–4pm Showcasing Hokianga's richly diverse arts community.

WHANGAREI ART MUSEUM TE MANAWA TOI Te Manawa - The Hub, Town Basin, Dent St, Whangarei Ph: 09 430 4240 whangareiartmuseum@wdc.govt.nz www.whangareiartmuseum.co.nz Hours: Daily from 10am–4pm. Closed Christmas Day, Boxing Day and Good Friday.

Auckland ANNA MILES GALLERY 10/30 Upper Queen Street Ph: 021 471 047 am@annamilesgallery.com www.annamilesgallery.com ANTOINETTE GODKIN GALLERY APT Y32, 30 York Street, Parnell Ph: 09 309 9468 antartnz@gmail.com antoinettegodkin.co.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 11am–4pm, Sat 12pm–3pm or by appointment.


67 67 Auckland Region ART INDUSTRY theblackshed, 37 Papakura Clevedon Rd, Clevedon Village Ph: 021 238 2382 www.artindustry.co.nz Hours: Thurs–Sun 9am–4pm An artist's space run by James & Cheryl Wright. Unique works by established and emerging artists.

ARTSPACE Level 1, 300 Karangahape Road, Newton Ph: 09 303 4965 media@artspace.org.nz www.artspace.org.nz Hours: Tues–Fri 10am–6pm, Sat 11am–4pm. AUCKLAND ART GALLERY TOI O TAMAKI Cnr Wellesley & Kitchener Streets Ph: 09 307 7700 hello@aucklandartgallery.com www.aucklandartgallery.com Hours: 10am–5pm daily except Christmas Day. The Corsini Collection until 21 Jan, YAYOI KUSAMA's The Obliteration Room 9 Dec–4 April, MICHAEL STEVENSON Serene Velocity in Practice 12 Nov–6 Feb.

UNITY, Weston Frizzell.

ARTIS GALLERY 280 Parnell Road, Parnell Ph: 09 303 1090 artis@artisgallery.co.nz www.artisgallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 9.30am–5.30pm, Sat 10am–4pm, Sun 11am–4pm OTIS FRIZZELL & MIKE WESTON Populism 5–17 December.

Takashi Tsuneizumi / New Zealand Geographic

AUCKLAND MUSEUM Domain Drive, Parnell, Auckland Ph: 09 306 7067 info@aucklandmuseum.com www.aucklandmuseum.com

Hours: 10am–5pm, seven days (closed Christmas Day). The oldest art society in New Zealand holding 6 major exhibitions a year. Special exhibitions at Auckland Museum include Being Chinese in Aotearoa (closes 21 Jan), a photographic exhibition exploring 175 years of Chinese life in New Zealand, and the ever-popular New Zealand Geographic of the Year (15 Dec – 25 Feb), featuring some of the best NZ photography.

Botanical Abyss, Georgie Malyon.

ENDEMICWORLD 62 Ponsonby Road, Grey Lynn Ph: 09 378 9832, Mob: 021 996 722 elliot@endemicworld.com www.endemicworld.com Hours: Mon–Sat 10–5, Sun 11–3 endemicworld was founded in 2007 by Elliot Alexander. 120+ NZ and international artists exhibit at our Ponsonby Road gallery. Features in The New York Times and other international media.


68 Auckland ESTUARY ARTS CENTRE 214B Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa Ph: 09 426 5570 admin@estuaryarts.org www.estuaryarts.org Hours: 7 Days 9am–4pm Gallery, classes, café. FINGERS CONTEMPORARY JEWELLERY 2 Kitchener Street,, Auckland 1010, 09 373 3974 jewellery@fingers.co.nz www.fingers.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–5.30pm, Sat 11am–4.30pm Exciting works from leading New Zealand and International jewellers available as well as new works on show during the Auckland Arts Festival. GUS FISHER GALLERY 74 Shortland Street Ph: 09 923 6646 gusfishergallery@auckland.ac.nz www.gusfishergallery.auckland.ac.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 10am–5pm, Sat 12pm– 4pm. DENYS WATKINS, Dynamo Hum, 17 Nov–15 Dec. Strangers Arrive: Emigrés and the Arts in New Zealand, 1930–1980, 24 Nov–15 Dec. Chiado, 22 Dec–24 Feb.

Winter at the Shearer’s Kitchen, Ida Valley. Grahame Sydney.

JONATHAN GRANT GALLERIES 280 Parnell Road, Parnell Ph: 09 308 9125 jg@jgg.co.nz jgg.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 9.30am–5.30pm, Sat 10am–4pm, Sun 11am–4pm Works by FRANCES HODKINS, C.F. GOLDIE, PIERA McARTHUR, RAY CHING & GRAHAME SYDNEY KURA GALLERY, AOTEAROA ART + DESIGN 95A Customs St West Ph: 09 302 1151 www.kuragallery.co.nz Hours: Open 7 days From Maori carving to unique NZ art, sculpture, jewellery....

LAKE HOUSE ARTS CENTRE 37 Fred Thomas Drive, Takapuna, North Shore City Ph: 09 486 4877 info@lakehousearts.org.nz www.lakehousearts.org.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 9.30am–4pm, Sat–Sun 10am–3pm Exhibitions, art classes for children and adults, venue hire, artists studios, events and café. MAIRANGI ARTS CENTRE 20 Hastings Road, Mairangi Bay Ph: 09 478 2237 info@mairangiarts.co.nz www.mairangiarts.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 9.30am–4pm, Sat & Sun 10am–2pm Hibiscus & Bays Arts Awards 9 November–10 December, 2017. Oriental Brush Calligraphers 18–22 January, 2018. Ontogeny – V.R Ocean Project 3 February–11 March, 2018. MCCAHON HOUSE MUSEUM 67 Otitori Bay Road, French Bay, Titirangi Ph: 09 817 6148 or 09 817 7200 mccahon@mccahonhouse.org.nz www.mccahonhouse.org.nz Hours: Wed – Sun 1pm–4pm (except for public holidays) The House today operates as a vibrant insight into Colin McCahon's significant Titirangi Years (1953-1959) and provides


69 69 Auckland Region a window into the era of Titirangi during the 1950s. Koha Admission suggested $5 per adult. MICHAEL LETT 312 Karangahape Road, Cnr K Rd & East St, Auckland 1145 Ph: 09 309 7848 contact@michaellett.com www.michaellett.com Hours: Tue–Fri 11am–5pm Sat 11am–3pm. NATHAN HOMESTEAD GALLERY 70 Hill Road, Manurewa Ph: 09 267 0180 nathanhomestead@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz Hours: Mon–Thur 9am–7pm, Fri 9am– 5pm, Sat 1pm–3pm. Closed Sunday. Nathan Homestead Gallery offers a wide range of exhibition programming with local, emerging and internationally recognised artists on display throughout the year. NORTHART Norman King Square, Ernie Mays St, Northcote Shopping Centre Ph: 09 480 9633 manager@northart.co.nz www.northart.co.nz Hours: Open daily 10am–4pm.

NZ MARITIME MUSEUM, EDMISTON GALLERY Cnr Quay & Hobson Street, Viaduct Habour Ph: 09 3730800 info@maritimemuseum.co.nz www.maritimemuseum.co.nz PARNELL GALLERY 263 Parnell Road, Parnell Ph: 09 377 3133, Fax: 09 377 3134 art@parnellgallery.co.nz www.parnellgallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 9.30am–5.30pm, Sat 10am–4pm, Sun 11am–4pm. 21 Nov–5 Dec ROSS JONES Made to be Played With. STUDIO ONE TOI TŪ 1 Ponsonby Road, Ponsonby Ph: 09 376 3221 info@studioone.org.nz www.studioone.org.nz Hours: Mon–Thu 9am–7pm, Fri 9am– 5pm, Sat 9am–4pm. Studio One Toi Tū is a community arts centre in the heart of Auckland. It is a hub for creatives and offers a wide programme of exhibitions, courses, events and studio hire options.

TE TUHI 13 Reeves Rd, Pakuranga Ph: 09 577 0138 info@tetuhi.org.nz www.tetuhi.org.nz Hours: 9am–5pm daily (closed on public holidays) SHANNON TE AO, With the sun aglow, I have my pensive moods, until 22 Apr. 15TH ISTANBUL BIENNIAL, International Board Project, until 30 Nov. GARY PETERS, A slow take, ANNA RANKIN, Hail to, until 24 Feb. TE URU WAITAKERE CONTEMPORARY GALLERY 420 Titirangi Rd, Titirangi Ph: 09 817 8087 info@teuru.org.nz www.teuru.org.nz Hours: Mon–Sun 10am–4.30pm KUSHANA BUSH; The Burning Hours until 28 Feb, Portage Ceramic Awards 2017 until 11 Feb, Leading Ladies until 28 Jan, LOUISE MENZIES; Gorgon Malkin Witch until 28 Jan.


70 Auckland

The Moment of Flames, Tim Thatcher, 2003.

THE PAH HOMESTEAD TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre, 72 Hillsborough Rd, Hillsborough Ph: 09 639 2010 enquiries@wallaceartstrust.org.nz tsbbankwallaceartscentre.org.nz wallaceartstrust.org.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 10am–3pm, Sat & Sun 8am–5pm. LEANINGS: handshake 4, until 10 Dec 2017, AUCKLAND STUDIO POTTERS: Fire and Clay, until 10 Dec 2017, MAPURA STUDIOS: Colour Light, until 10 Dec 2017, Notes Towards a Speculative Fiction, until 21 Jan 2018, FRANCES ROOD: Biostructure, until 4 Feb 2018, SAM HAMILTON: Apple Pie, until 4 Feb 2018, Roundhouse, 12 Dec–11 Feb 2018 Recent Acquisitions, 12 Dec–11 Feb 2018, JAPAN FOUNDATION: Handcrafted Forms, 1 Feb–25 Feb 2018, Strangely Familiar: Portraits by WAYNE YOULE , 23 Jan–18 March 2018, BOB JAHNKE ata, 13 Feb– 8 April 2018.

THE VIVIAN GALLERY 39 Omaha Valley Rd, Matakana, RD 5, Warkworth 0985 Ph: 09 422 9995 thevivian@thevivian.co.nz www.thevivian.co.nz Hours: Daily Wed–Mon 11am–5pm, Closed Tuesdays. Discover and explore outstanding contemporary art from many of New Zealand's top artists – and see what makes The Vivian Gallery such a well-loved destination. Check out our website to see what's going on, and don't forget to sign up to our mailing list to receive invites to the show openings and artist talks! TRISH CLARK GALLERY 1 Bowen Avenue, Auckland Central, 1010 Ph: 021 378 940 trish@trishclark.co.nz www.trishclark.co.nz Hours: Tuesday to Friday: Midday–5pm, Saturday: Midday–4pm, Sunday / Monday: Closed. Kimsooja until 22 December 2017, PHIL DADSON Elemental 11 February–24 March 2018.

TWO ROOMS 16 Putiki Street, Newton, Auckland, 1145 Ph: 09 360 5900 info@tworooms.co.nz www.tworooms.co.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 11am–5pm, Sat 11am–3pm. Closed from 23 December 2017 until 16 January 2018. Open by appointment until 31 January 2018. 1 December 2017–31 January 2018 Model Painting – Featuring SELINA FOOTE, NOEL IVANOFF, LEIGH MARTIN, SIMON MORRIS, MILAN MRKUSICH, JOHN NIXON, JAN VAN DER PLOEG, JEENA SHIN. Build Up – JUDY DARRAGH. WEST COAST GALLERY Seaview Road, Piha Ph: 09 812 8029 www.westcoastgallery.co.nz Hours: Dec – Apr open 7 days, 10–5pm. Comprehensive range of West Auckland artists. Monthly exhibitions.


71 71 Waiheke Island–Hamilton Region Waiheke Island

Bay of Plenty

Rotorua

WAIHEKE COMMUNITY ART GALLERY – TE WHARE TAONGA O WAIHEKE 2 Korora Road, Oneroa, Waiheke Island 1081 Ph: 09 372 9907 director@waihekeartgallery.org.nz www.waihekeartgallery.org.nz Hours: 10am–4pm 7 days. Waiheke Community Art Gallery's range of exhibitions inspires and delights, bringing the best of New Zealand art to the Island and offering the best of Waiheke art to the world.

TAURANGA ART GALLERY Cnr of Wharf & Willow Streets, Tauranga CBD Ph: 07 578 7933 office@artgallery.org.nz www.artgallery.org.nz Hours: Open daily 10am–4.30pm BOB JAHNKE, ATA: a third reflection and BRIDGET REWETI Irihanga until 7 Jan. The Future Machine until 21 Jan. JAE KANG Waves of your Breath and ROGER BALLEN's Theater of the Mind until 11 Feb, and KEREAMA TAEPA Insert Coin until 6 May.

ROTORUA MUSEUM Oruawhata Drive, Government Gardens Ph: 07 350 1814 rotoruamuseum.co.nz Hours: Closed for earthquake strengthening.

The Coromandel

WHAKATĀNE MUSEUM AND ARTS TE KŌPUTU A TE WHANGA A TOI Whakatāne Library and Exhibition Centre, Esplanade Mall , Kākahoroa Drive, Whakatāne Ph: 07 306 0505 museumandarts@whakatane.govt.nz www.whakatanemuseum.org.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 9am–5pm, Sat–Sun 10am–2pm. Closed public holidays. Museum display and three gallery spaces showcasing work by local and national artists.

BREAD AND BUTTER GALLERY 26 Albert St, Whitianga, 3510 Ph: 07 866 4927 sales@breadandbutter.co.nz www.breadandbutter.co.nz Hours: 10am–4.30pm Mon–Fri, 10am– 4pm Sat, 10am–2pm Sun.

Hamilton ARTSPOST GALLERIES AND SHOP 120 Victoria Street Ph: 07 838 6928 artspost@hcc.govt.nz www.waikatomuseum/artspost, facebook.com/artspost Hours: Daily 10am–5pm, free entry. Three galleries and retail store showcasing the best of New Zealand art and design. CALDER & LAWSON GALLERY Gallagher Academy of Performing Arts, University of Waikato Ph: 07 858 5100 academy@waikato.ac.nz www.waikato.ac/academy/gallery Visit our website for more details.


72 Hamilton–Hawke's Bay WAIKATO MUSEUM, TE WHARE TAONGA O WAIKATO 1 Grantham St Ph: 07 838 6606 museum@hcc.govt.nz www.waikatomuseum.co.nz Our exhibitions bring you the stories of our arts, history, culture and science. Find us on facebook.com/waikatomuseum SKINROOM 123 Commerce Street, Frankton skinroom@outlook.com www.skinroomgallery.com SKINROOM is an independent artist-run space in Frankton, Hamilton, founded in 2016. Creative directors are Geoffrey Clarke and Eliza Webster.

Waikato

WALLACE GALLERY, MORRINSVILLE 167 Thames Street, Morrinsville Ph: 07 889 7791 info@morrinsville.org.nz www.morrinsvillegallery.org.nz Hours: Tue–Sun 10am–4pm. Free entry – donations greatly appreciated.

Gisborne PAUL NACHE GALLERY Upstairs 89 Grey Street now@paulnache.com Hours: Wed –Fri 11am–5pm, Sat 11am– 2pm (or by appointment). Please refer to paulnache.com for opening dates, artists and upcoming projects. TAIRAWHITI MUSEUM Kelvin Park, Stout Street Ph: 06 867 3832, Fax: 06 867 2728 info@tairawhitimuseum.org.nz www.tairawhitimuseum.org.nz

Hawke's Bay ELECTRA GALLERY Ruataniwha Street, Waipukurau Ph: 06 858 8388 info@thefestival.org.nz www.thefestival.org.nz/electra HASTINGS CITY ART GALLERY 201 Eastbourne Street East Ph: 06 871 5095 www.hastingscityartgallery.co.nz Hours: Open 7 days, 10am–4.30pm FREE ENTRY.

HASTINGS COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE 106 Russell Street South, Hastings Ph: 06 878 9447 info@artsinc.co.nz www.artsinc.co.nz Hours: Weekdays 9.30am–4pm, Sat 10am–2pm Showcasing Hawke's Bay Artists. MTG HAWKE'S BAY 1 Tennyson Street, Napier Ph: 06 835 7781 www.mtghawkesbay.com PAPER-WORKS 268 Clifton Road, Te Awanga Mob: 027 450 7517 info@paper-works.co.nz www.paper-works.co.nz Hours: Thur–Sun 11am–3pm, or by appointment. Original Works on Paper – paintings, etchings, lithographs, screenprints, photography, art books and more... PARLOUR PROJECTS 306 Eastbourne St East, Hastings Mob: 021 450 279 info@parlourprojects.com www.parlourprojects.com Hours: Wed–Sat, 10am–3pm or by appointment.


73 73 Region Hawke's Bay–Whanganui TENNYSON GALLERY Cnr Tennyson & Hastings Streets, Napier Ph: 06 834 1331 info@tennysongallery.nz www.tennysongallery.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–5pm, Sat 10am– 4pm, Sun 11am–3pm. Exciting new glass and ceramic work, and paintings, prints and mixed media from around the country, plus a superb collection of contemporary New Zealand jewellery. THE RABBIT ROOM 29A Hastings Street, Napier therabbitroomgallery@gmail.com www.therabbitroom.nz Hours: Tue–Thu 1–4pm.

Taranaki

www.museumofsouthtaranaki.wordpress.com Hours: Mon–Sat 10am–4pm, closed Sundays, Christmas Day and Good Friday. Aotea Utanganui is a purposebuilt museum that embodies the spirit and energy of the South Taranaki region. The museum plays an active role within our community both today and for the future. A museum that is welcoming and inspirational while striving toward excellence in research, curatorship, preservation and educational engagement. A modern museum with ambitious future plans, prepared to embrace the digital age. We achieve this through: collaboration, creativity, innovation & flexibility.

Mangaweka

PERCY THOMSON GALLERY Prospero Place, 56 Miranda Street, Stratford Ph: 06 765 0917 www.percythomsongallery.org.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10.30am–4pm, Sat–Sun 10.30am–3pm.

SARJEANT GALLERY 38 Taupo Quay, Whanganui Ph: 06 349 0506 info@sarjeant.org.nz www.sarjeant.org.nz Hours: Mon–Sun 10.30am–4.30pm. WENDY FAIRCLOUGH, Common Ground 25 November, 2017 to 11 February, 2018. Stunning cast and blown glass installation and still life works by 2016 Tylee Cottage artist in-residence RICHARD STRATTON Living History 9 December, 2017 to 11 March, 2018. New works linking contemporary and traditional ceramic techniques. Toured by the Dowse Art Museum.

Waiouru Patea Museum facade, Richard Wotton.

AOTEA UTANGANUI MUSEUM OF SOUTH TARANAKI 127 Egmont St, Patea 4250 Ph: 0800 111 323 museum@stdc.govt.nz

NATIONAL ARMY MUSEUM State Highway 1, Waiouru armymuseum.co.nz Hours: Open daily 9am to 4.30pm Discover NZ's military history, stories of courage, honour and sacrifice. Guided tours, Research Library, Kidz HQ , Home Fires Café, Gift Shop.

YELLOW CHURCH GALLERY State Highway 1, Rangitikei Ph: 06 382 5774, Mob: 027 526 6612 www.webs.com/mangawekagallery Hours: Open most days 10am - 5pm Resident RICHARD ASLETT, plus other local and funky Inter/national artists. Home of the infamous FAKES & FORGERIES exhibition – ON NOW! – Runs to 14 Jan 2018. Inspiring & emerging artists wanted – email samples now!

Whanganui


74 Whanganui–Wairarapa Manawatu

TEN ONLY 2015, Philip Trusttum.

Blackout 9, Katerina Smoldyreva.

GALLERY 85 85 Glasgow St, Whanganui, 4500 Ph: 027 270 9497 raynerbrothersgallery@gmail.com Hours: Wed–Fri 12–4pm, Sat 10am–1pm. London to Dublin, a group show, 12 Jan–10 Feb. Catharsis, new works by KATERINA SMOLDYREVA, 16 Feb–10 Mar. RAYNER BROTHERS GALLERY 85 Glasgow Street, Whanganui Mob: 027 270 9497 raynerbrothersgallery@gmail.com www.raynerbrothers.com Hours: Wed–Fri 12pm–4pm, Sat 10am– 1pm. Big Eyes, a group show, 12 Jan–10 Feb. The Silence of the Sheep, New works by LAUREN JOAN LYSAGHT, 16 Feb–10 Mar.

WH MILBANK GALLERY 1B Bell Street, Whanganui Mob: 027 628 6877 bill.milbank@gmail.com whmilbank.co.nz Hours: 11am–5pm all days except Mon. If travelling a call or text will ensure I am here. We hold NZs largest stock of PHILIP TRUSTTUM's paintings & drawings and a showroom dedicated to presenting changing aspects of his work. As well, I curate exhibitions with local and national content and stock work by artists from Whanganui, around New Zealand and beyond.

TE MANAWA MUSEUM/GALLERY/ SCIENCE CENTRE 326 Main Street, Palmerston North Ph: 06 355 5000 enquiries@temanawa.co.nz www.temanawa.co.nz Hours: Open daily from 10am.

Wairarapa ARATOI MUSEUM OF ART AND HISTORY 12 Bruce Street, Masterton Ph: 06 370 0001 info@aratoi.co.nz www.aratoi.co.nz Hours: 10am–4.30pm. ELIZABETH THOMSON, Cellular Memory until 2 April, STEPHEN ALLWOOD Darkness and Delight Until 28 January, Wairarapa Art Review Until 18 February.


75 75 Horowhenua–The Region Hutt Valley Horowhenua

AUGUSTIN GALLERY STUDIO 37 Kensington Dr, RD1, Waikanae Ph: 04 293 5956 peterfelix@clear.net.nz www.peteraugustin.com Hours: Studio open by appointment. Works by PETER AUGUSTIN

Sunflowers, Ramila Parbhu.

MAHARA GALLERY 20 Mahara Place, Waikanae, 5036 Ph: 04 902 6242 info@maharagallery.org.nz www.maharagallery.org.nz Hours: Tue–Sat 10am–4pm, Sun 1–4pm. Free entry. 3 Dec 2017–14 Jan 2018 Mahara Arts Review. 21 Jan–18 Feb Moving Continents DEB DONNELLY, TIFFANY SINGH, JUI PIN CHANG. Hokopapa BRENDA TUUTA.

TE TAKERETANGA O KURA-HAU-PŌ 10 Bath St, Levin Ph: 06 368 1953 enquires@tetakere.org.nz www.tetakere.org.nz In January 2018 Kapiti artist RAMILA PARBHU will exhibit paintings inspired by her heritage that acknowledge the planet as a living being, so we remember to look after the Earth.

Kapiti ARTEL GALLERY + STORE 9 Mahara Place, Waikanae Ph: 04 297 0937 artelnz@gmail.com www.artelgallery.net Facebook/ArtelGallery Hours: Mon–Sat 9am–5pm, Sun 10am–4pm We're a large gallery showcasing works by NZ artists and makers; with original art and prints, ceramics and glass, pounamu and jewellery.

Porirua PĀTAKA Cnr Norrie & Parumoana Street, Porirua City, Wellington Ph: 04 237 1511 pataka@pcc.govt.nz pataka.org.nz Hours: Mon–Sat 10am–4.30pm, Sun 11am–4.30pm Dark Horizons until 22 Jan 2018, NANDITA KUMAR Tentacles of Dimensions until 22 Jan 2018, KERRYANN LEE Fruits in the Backwater

until 22 Jan 2018, THE GUILD OF WOODWORKERS WELLINGTON Turning Plus until 3 Dec 2017, PETER AUGUSTIN Couleur vivante 1 Dec 2017–21 Jan 2018, Anywhere Island 27 Aug 2017–22 Jan 2018, BIRGIT MOFFATT & FIONA CHRISTELLER in-visible threads 1 Dec 2017–21 Jan 2018, TOI WĀHINE 8 Dec 2017–22 Jan 2018.

The Hutt Valley

Mino ware Shino sake bottle, saki cup and tea cup.

EXPRESSIONS WHIRINAKI ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT CENTRE 836 Fergusson Drive, Upper Hutt Ph: 04 527 2168 www.expressions.org.nz Hours: Open every day 9am–4pm, free entry. Handcrafted Form: Traditions and Techniques 25 November–22 January 2018 Traditional Japanese crafts.


76 The Hutt Valley–Wellington HUTT ART GALLERY Hutt Art Centre, 9–11 Myrtle St, Lower Hutt huttartsociety@xtra.co.nz www.huttart.co.nz Hours: Open daily 10am–4pm. PETONE SETTLERS MUSEUM The Esplanade, Petone Ph: 04 568 8373 settlers@huttcity.govt.nz www.petonesettlers.org.nz Hours: Wed–Sun 10am–4pm Free entry. THE DOWSE ART MUSEUM 45 Laings Road, Lower Hutt Ph: 04 570 6500 enquiries@dowse.org.nz www.dowse.org.nz Hours: Open daily 10am–5pm.

Wellington ACADEMY GALLERIES NZ ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS, 1 Queens Wharf Ph: 04 499 8807 info@nzafa.com www.nzafa.com Hours: Daily 10am–5pm, free entry.

ADAM ART GALLERY Victoria University of Wellington, Gate 3, Kelburn Parade Ph: 04 463 6835 adamartgallery@vuw.ac.nz www.adamartgallery.org.nz Hours: Tue–Sun 11am–5pm Free entry. ART WALRUS 111 Taranaki Street Ph: 04 382 8383 enquiries@walrusgallery.co.nz www.walrusgallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Sat 9am–5pm, closed Sun. AVID GALLERY 48 Victoria Street Ph: 04 472 7703 info@avidgallery.co.nz www.avidgallery.co.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 10am–6pm, Sat 10am– 4pm, Mon by appointment Exquisite hand-crafted jewellery and art objects from New Zealand's leading artists. BARTLEY + COMPANY ART 56A Ghuznee Street, Te Aro Ph: 04 802 4622 alison@bartleyandcompanyart.co.nz www.bartleyandcompanyart.co.nz Hours: Wed–Fri 11am–5.30pm, Sat 11am–4pm. Summer group exhibition 6–22 December, MARIE LE LIEVRE from 7 Feb.

BOWEN GALLERIES 41 Ghuznee Street Ph: 04 381 0351, Mob: 021 472 640 info@bowengalleries.co.nz www.bowengalleries.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–5.30pm, Sat 10am–3pm. MARIAN MAGUIRE, 27 Nov–15 Jan, MATTHEW MCINTYRE WILSON 27 Nov–15 Jan, SIMON OGDEN 29 Jan–17 Feb, IAN NORTH 29 Jan–17 Feb. GREEN ST PROJECTS 2 Green St, Newtown Ph: 022 097 6052 greenstgallery@gmail.com Hours: Wed–Sat 11–4pm. GENE PAUL WALKER, (new paintings) 29 November–23 December, BILLY WILSON (new work) 14 February–3 March, 2018. HAMISH MCKAY First Floor, 39 Ghuznee Street Ph: 04 384 7140 info@hamishmckay.co.nz www.hamishmckay.co.nz Hours: Fri–Sat 11am–5pm or by appointment.


77 77 Wellington Region

Sydney garden shop, Jane Hyder.

JANE HYDER STUDIO GALLERY Studio 21, Toi Poneke Art Centre, 61 Abel Smith Street, and Karori Studio Ph: 027 920 0337 hyder119@gmail.com janehyderart.com Hours: Open by appointment for art. Resident artist and art tutor JANE HYDER. KIWI ART HOUSE GALLERY 288 Cuba St, Te Aro Ph: 04 385 3083 www.kiwiarthouse.co.nz Hours: Tues–Sun 10.30am–5.30pm. KURA 19 Allen Street Ph: 04 802 4934 kuragallery.co.nz Hours: Open 7 days.

NEW ZEALAND PORTRAIT GALLERY Shed 11, Queen's Wharf, Wellington Waterfront Ph: 04 472 2298 admin@nzportraitgallery.org.nz www.nzportraitgallery.org.nz Hours: Open daily 10.30am–4.30pm. Admission Free. Exhibitions on now. ORA GALLERY & CAFE 23 Allen Street, Te Aro, Wellington Ph: 04 384 4157 marissa@oragallery.co.nz Facebook - ORA Gallery and Café NZ Art, Design & Gifts. PAGE BLACKIE GALLERY 42 Victoria St, Wellington 6011 Ph: 04 471 2636 info@pageblackiegallery.co.nz pageblackiegallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–5.30pm, Sat 10am–4pm. Page Blackie Gallery specialises in both historic artworks and work by leading contemporary New Zealand artists.

Nature brooch, Fabiana Gadano.

QUOIL NEW ZEALAND CONTEMPORARY JEWELLERY GALLERY 149 Willis Street, Wellington Ph: 04 384 1499 gallery@quoil.co.nz www.quoil.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–5.30pm, Sat and Sun 10am–4pm. QUOIL now represents jewellery artists from around the world. Browse the current show or peruse the drawers for a treasure-trove of wearable pieces.


78 Wellington–Picton Region

Baby's first heart attack, Nathaniel Gordon-Stables

Watching Miss NZ Contestants, Cuba Mall, Wellington, 1971, Ans Westra.

SUITE GALLERY 241–243 Cuba Street, Wellington Ph: 04 976 7663 info@suite.co.nz www.suite.co.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 11am–6pm, Sat 11am–4pm. ANS WESTRA 29 Nov–19 Dec, Summer Series 20 Dec–21 Feb.

VINCENTS GALLERY Vincents Art Workshop, 5/148 Willis Street Ph: 04 499 1030 vincentsartworkshop@xtra.co.nz vincents.co.nz Hours: Mon 11–4, Tue 1.30–6.30, Wed 11–5, Thurs (Women's day) 11–4, Fri 10–4. Solo and group shows featuring emerging artists at affordable prices.

TOI PŌNEKE ARTS CENTRE 61 Abel Smith Street Ph: 04 385 1929 artscentre@wcc.govt.nz toiponeke.nz Hours: 10am–8pm Mon–Fri, 10am–4pm Sat–Sun. TURNBULL GALLERY Level 1, National Library of New Zealand, Molesworth Street, Wellington www.natlib.govt.nz Hours: Mon–Sat 10am–5pm See www.natlib.govt.nz for more information including related events. The Turnbull Gallery showcases the collections of the Alexander Turnbull Library. VESSEL 87 Victoria Street, Wellington Ph: 04 499 2321 www.vessel.co.nz Hours: Open 7 days Look - Love - Shop.

WELLINGTON MUSEUM Queens Wharf, Wellington Waterfront Ph: 04 472 8904 www.museumswellington.org.nz Hours: Open daily 10am–5pm except Christmas Day.

Picton THE DIVERSION GALLERY 10 London Quay Mob: 027 4408 121 bspeedy@thediversion.co.nz www.thediversion.co.nz Hours: Wed–Sat 12pm–5pm or by appointment. See website for holiday


79 79 Region Picton –Nelson season hours. NIGEL BROWN, JAMES ROBINSON, WAYNE SEYB, MARY McFARLANE, DON DRIVER, FATU FEU'U Natural Forces 21 Nov–16 Dec. JS PARKER Colour & surface recent paintings, 18 Dec–27 Jan. MICHAEL SMITHER Pleasure Boats, 13 Feb– 10 March.

CRAIG POTTON GALLERY + STORE 255 Hardy Street Ph: 03 548 9554 gallery@craigpottongallery.co.nz www.craigpottongallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–5pm, Sat 10am–2pm

Blenheim MILLENNIUM PUBLIC ART GALLERY Seymour Square Ph: 03 579 2001 marlpublicart@xtra.co.nz www.marlboroughart.org.nz Hours: 10.30am–4.30pm weekdays, 1pm–4pm weekends.

Nelson ATKINS GALLERY 8/34 Bridge Street, Nelson Ph: 03 545 6010, Mob: 021 842 481 linda@atkinsgallery.nz atkinsgallery.nz Hours: Tuesday to Friday 10am to 5pm, Saturday 10am to 2pm.

Kowhai and Fern, Emma Bass.

RED ART GALLERY 1 Bridge Street Ph: 03 548 2170 info.redartgallery@gmail.com www.redartgallery.com Art Gallery - Design Store - Café.

THE SUTER ART GALLERY TE ARATOI O WHAKATŪ 208 Bridge Street, Nelson Ph: 03 548 4699 www.thesuter.org.nz Hours: Open daily 9.30am–4.30pm Art Gallery – Café – Shop – Theatre WORLD OF WEARABLEART & CLASSIC CARS MUSEUM Cadillac Way off Quarantine Road, Annesbrook, Nelson Ph: 03 547 4573 info@wowcars.co.nz www.wowcars.co.nz Hours: Open every day, 10am–5pm (except 25th December). We recommend 60–90 min to view all galleries. World of WearableArt & Classic Cars Museum. Be amazed by the incredible garments that feature in the WearableArt Gallery, marvel at the extraordinary garments by artists from New Zealand and around the globe. View our world class Classic Car Galleries displaying some of the most sought after models in classic motoring, beautifully set under theatrical lighting. Our Museum is like no other. Museum includes a Cafe and Gallery shop.


80 Christchurch Region Christchurch BRYCE GALLERY Cnr Riccarton Road & Paeroa Street Ph: 03 348 0064 art2die4@brycegallery.co.nz brycegallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–5pm, Sat 10am– 4pm, Sun 11am–4pm.

Late 19th century vase, Unknown.

CANTERBURY MUSEUM Rolleston Avenue Ph: 03 366 5000, Fax: 03 366 5622 info@canterburymuseum.com www.canterburymuseum.com Hours: Open every day April–Sep 9am– 5pm, Oct–Mar 9am–5.30pm Natural and human history are joined by fine and decorative art. Rare Maori artefacts, Antarctic Gallery, Heritage Street, Asian Art. Frequent temporary art exhibitions.

CHAMBERS ART GALLERY 241 Moorhouse Avenue, Christchurch CBD Ph: 022 677 2810 gallery@chambersart.co.nz chambersart.co.nz Hours: Tue–Thu 11.30am–5.30pm, Fri 11am–5pm & Sat 11am–3pm.

good" a new installation, and HAMISH COLEMAN / EMILY HARTLEYSKUDDER "Doubles and Trebles (Reprise)" a collaborative exhibition extending notions of painting. January 26–17 February BRENDA NIGHTINGALE new painting and installation.

FORM GALLERY 468 Colombo Street, Sydenham Ph: 03 377 1211, Mob: 021 513 323 info@form.co.nz www.form.co.nz Hours: Tue–Sat 10am–5pm Object art, jewellery, retail & exhibition space. See us on Facebook and Instagram. ILAM CAMPUS GALLERY Block 2, School of Fine Arts, Arts Rd, University of Canterbury Ph: 03 364 2159 sarahe.brown@canterbury.ac.nz www.arts.canterbury.ac.nz/fina/exhibitions.shtml Hours: 9am–4pm Mon–Fri. JONATHAN SMART GALLERY 52 Buchan St, Sydenham, Christchurch Ph: 03 365 7070 www.jonathansmartgallery.com Hours: Wed–Fri 11am–5pm, Sat 11am–3pm December 1–23 ET AL "the uncommon

Homonoia People Part I, Andy Leleisi'uao.

PG GALLERY192 192 Bealey Ave, Christchurch 8013 Ph: 03 366 8487 pggallery192@gmail.com www.pggallery192.co.nz Hours: Tues–Fri 10.30am–5pm Sat 10.30am–2pm NIC MOON, until 1 Dec, XMAS17 featuring JOANNA BRAITHWAITE, DARRYN GEORGE, KATHARINA JAEGER, ANDY LELEISI'UAO, EUAN MACLEOD 5–23 Dec, Summer Show 30 Jan–24 Feb.


81 81 Christchurch–Geraldine Region THE PHYSICS ROOM Level 3, 209 Tuam Street, Christchurch Central Ph: 03 379 5583 www.physicsroom.org.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 10am–5pm, Sat & Sun 11am–4pm. Property is Theft, REUBEN MOSS & Kaitani featuring the University of Canterbury Fijian Students Association and new work by KULIMOE'ANGA STONE MAKA. Curated by EMA TAVOLA.

Canterbury ARTS IN OXFORD 72 Main Street, Oxford Ph: 03 312 1639 artsinoxfordgallery@xtra.co.nz www.artsinoxford.com Hours: Tues–Sun 10am–4pm Find us on Facebook or visit our website for current exhibitions and workshops. ASHBURTON ART GALLERY Level 1, 327 West Street, Ashburton Ph: 03 308 1133 info@ashburtonartgallery.org.nz www.ashburtonartgallery.org.nz Hours: Open daily 10am–4pm, Wednesday 10am–7pm. See our website for current exhibitions and events.

Viola Vibrato, Keith Morant.

WINDSOR GALLERY 386 St Asaph St, East of Fitzgerald Ave Ph: 03 366 0724 info@windsorgallery.co.nz www.windsorgallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 9am–5pm, Sat 10am–1pm We have over 15 Artists Exhibiting. Off street parking.

Geraldine

Pig Paddock No 3, Trevor Moffitt.

MCATAMNEY GALLERY AND DESIGN STORE Upstairs Old Post Office Building, 47 Talbot St Ph: 027 305 3000, Mob: A/H 027 305 3000 carolyn@mcatamneygallery.co.nz www.mcatamneygallery.co.nz Hours: Sat–Wed 11am–3pm, Thur, Fri and all other times by arrangement. Modern and Contemporary Art. BERNADETTE PARSONS, SUSANNA IZARD , RICHARD BOLTON, A.A. DEANS . SUSAN BADCOCK STUDIO Back of Old Post Office, 47 Talbot St Mob: 021 175 2853 susanbadcockstudio@gmail.com www.susanbadcockstudio.co.nz Hours: Tue–Sat 10–2pm or by appointment. Find us on Facebook and Instagram.


82 Timaru –Dunedin Region Timaru AIGANTIGHE ART GALLERY 49 Wai-iti Road Ph: 03 688 4424 gallery@timdc.govt.nz www.timaru.govt.nz/art-gallery Hours: Tue–Fri 10am–4pm, weekends & public holidays 12–4pm.

by renowned artists are featured throughout the year. Artists including MARILYNN WEBB, LLEW SUMMERS and A.A. DEANS.

Oamaru THE FORRESTER GALLERY 9 Thames Street, Oamaru, 9400 Ph: 03 433 0853 info@forrestergallery.com www.culturewaitaki.org.nz Hours: Open daily. Mon–Fri 10.30am– 4.30pm, Sat–Sun/Public holidays 1pm– 4.30pm. Closed Xmas, Boxing and New Year's days.

11am–1pm MARTIN THOMPSON, 16 February–15 March, JASON GREIG 16 March–5 April. GALLERY DE NOVO 101 Stuart Street, Dunedin Ph: 03 474 9200, Mob: 021 030 5199 art@gallerydenovo.co.nz www.gallerydenovo.co.nz Hours: Open Mon–Fri 9.30am–5.30pm, Sat & Sun 10am–3pm.

Auto-portrait with Twelve Disciples, 2010/11 Greg Semu.

Dunedin Bronze and cast lead crystal, Debbie Templeton-Page.

YORK STREET GALLERY OF FINE ART 21 York Street Ph: 03 684 4795 www.yorkstreetgallery.com Hours: Open Thurs, Fri and Saturday 11am–3pm or 24/7 at yorkstreetgallery. com and debbietempletonpage.com Sculptor DEBBIE TEMPLETONPAGE Studio at back of the gallery. Contemporary traditional art works

BLUE OYSTER ART PROJECT SPACE 16 Dowling St, Dunedin Ph: 03 479 0197 admin@blueoyster.org.nz www.blueoyster.org.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 11am–5pm, Sat 11am–3pm. BRETT MCDOWELL GALLERY 5 Dowling Street, Dunedin Ph: 03 477 5260 brett@brettmcdowellgallery.com www.brettmcdowellgallery.com Hours: Mon–Fri 11am–5.30pm, Sat

HOCKEN GALLERY Hocken Collections, Uare Taoka o Hākena, University of Otago, 90 Anzac Avenue, Dunedin Ph: 03 479 8868 hocken@otago.ac.nz otago.ac.nz/hocken Hours: Open Mon–Sat 10am–5pm CONTINUITY & CHANGE, the Hocken's art across time 9 Dec 2017–27 Jan 2018, CAMPBELL PATTERSON Frances Hodgkins Fellowship exhibition 17 Feb–14 Apr 2018.


83 83 Region Dunedin –Invercargill MINT GALLERY 32 Moray Place Ph: 03 477 1763, Mob: 021 0255 9998 murray@mintart.co.nz www.mintart.co.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 10am–5pm, Sat 10am–4pm.

with the Arts is evident at OCTA, where they represent selected well known New Zealand contemporary Artists. The gallery also stocks an eclectic mix of limited edition prints by renowned 20th Century European artists. We also sell on behalf so 'expect the unexpected.'

MORAY GALLERY 55 Princes Street Ph: 03 477 8060 info@moraygallery.co.nz www.moraygallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–4.30pm Sat 11am–2pm.

Southland

OTAGO ART SOCIETY 1st Floor, Dunedin Railway Station, 22 Anzac Ave, Dunedin, 9016 Ph: 03 477 9465 otagoartsociety@xtra.co.nz www.otagoartsociety.co.nz Hours: Open daily 10am–4pm New Zealand's oldest and most active art society, operating out of the iconic Dunedin Railway Station. Regular exhibitions, classes, workshops, demonstration days and other activities on offer.

Cromwell OCTA GALLERY AND WORKSHOP 71 Melmore Terrace, Cromwell 9310 Ph: 03 445 1594, Mob: 027 231 7502 octa@artlover.com Hours: 10am–4pm daily Chris and Gail de Jong's long time passion

EASTERN SOUTHLAND GALLERY 14 Hokonui Drive , Gore Ph: 03 208 9907 jgeddes@goredc.govt.nz www.esgallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–4.30pm, Weekends and Public Holidays 1pm– 4pm. Closed: Xmas, Boxing, New Years Day, Good Friday. Permanent exhibitions feature The JOHN MONEY Wing and RALPH HOTERE Gallery. Baltimore to Gore: Baltimore Artists from the John Money Collection, 9 December to 19 February. RIVERTON COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE 149 Palmerston Street, Riverton-Aparima Ph: 03 234 9932 info@rivertonarts.org.nz www.rivertonarts.org.nz Hours: Wed–Sun 11am–4pm (During Exhibitions) JOHN HUSBAND, View from the Artists Studio 10 Dec 2017–4 Mar 2018. An overview of the extensive artis-

tic career of prominent Southland artist, Foster John Husband Q.S.O. SOUTHLAND MUSEUM & ART GALLERY NIHO O TE TANIWHA 108 Gala St, Invercargill Ph: 03 219 9069 office@southlandmuseum.co.nz www.southlandmuseum.com Hours: Mon–Fri 9am–5pm, Sat–Sun 10am–5pm. Worlds largest indoor display of live Tuatara. Regularly changing art exhibitions and ongoing historical exhibitions of Southland's past.

Invercargill CITY GALLERY INVERCARGILL 28 Don Street, Invercargill Ph: 03 214 1319 www.citygallery@ihug.co.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 11am–4pm, Sat 11am–2pm Facebook: City Gallery Invercargill


84 Artist list Region Wairarapa Auckland Mangaweka Kapiti Porirua Bay of Plenty Horowhenua Geraldine Christchurch Auckland Kapiti Porirua Horowhenua Christchurch Auckland Geraldine Timaru Kapiti Whanganui Auckland Auckland Christchurch Dunedin Southland Auckland Geraldine Christchurch Bay of Plenty Auckland Bay of Plenty Porirua Toi O Tamaki Porirua Christchurch Wellington Whanganui Christchurch Wellington Christchurch

MARTIN LEIGH MENZIES LOUISE MOFFATT BIRGIT MOON NIC MORRIS SIMON MOSS REUBEN MRKUSICH MILAN NIGHTINGALE B NIXON JOHN NORTH IAN OGDEN SIMON TEMPLETON-PAGE D PARBHU RAMILA PARSONS B PATTERSON C PETERS GARY VAN DER PLOEG J RANKIN ANNA REWETI BRIDGET SHIN JEENA SINGH TIFFANY HARTLEY-SKUDDER E SMOLDYREVA K STEVENSON MICHAEL STRATTON RICHARD SUMMERS LLEW TAEPA KEREAMA TAVOLA EMA THOMPSON M THOMSON E TUUTA BRENDA WALKER GENE P WATKINS DENYS WEBB MARILYNN WESTON MIKE WESTRA ANS WILSON BILLY MCINTYRE WILSON M

Two Rooms Te Uru Waitakere Pataka PG gallery192 Two Rooms The Physics Room Two Rooms Jonathan Smart G Two Rooms Bowen Galleries Bowen Galleries York Street G Te Takere CCC Mcatamney G Hocken Gallery Te Tuhi Two Rooms Te Tuhi Tauranga AG Two Rooms Mahara Gallery Jonathan Smart Gallery 85 Auckland AG Sarjeant Gallery York Street Tauranga AG The Physics Room Brett McDowell G Aratoi Museum Mahara Gallery Green St Gus Fisher Gallery York Street Artis Suite Green St Bowen G

Auckland Auckland Porirua Christchurch Auckland Christchurch Auckland Christchurch Auckland Wellington Wellington Timaru Horowhenua Geraldine Dunedin Auckland Auckland Auckland Bay of Plenty Auckland Kapiti Christchurch Whanganui Toi O Tamaki Whanganui Timaru Bay of Plenty Christchurch Dunedin Wairarapa Kapiti Wellington Auckland Timaru Auckland Wellington Wellington Wellington

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GALLERY NAME Physical Address: Phone Number: Email Address: Website Address: Mon–Fri 10am–4.30pm Description: This could include what activities and services you offer and a list of the artists and shows that will be held at your gallery for the next 10 weeks. NB Exhibitions are italicised and artist Names are Capitalised. For more information contact haleigh@artzone.co.nz

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Aratoi Museum Te Tuhi Yellow Church Augustin G Pataka Tauranga AG Te Takere Mcatamney G PG gallery192 Te Uru Waitakere Mahara Gallery Pataka Te Takere Jonathan Smart G Trish Clark Gallery Mcatamney G York Street G Mahara Gallery Sarjeant Gallery Two Rooms Artis Gallery PG Gallery192 Brett McDowell G Riverton CAC Two Rooms Mcatamney G PG gallery 192 Tauranga AG Parnell Gallery Tauranga AG Pataka Auckland AG Pataka PG gallery192 Bartley + Co Rayner Brothers PG gallery192 Bowen Galleries The Physics Room

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ALLWOOD STEPHEN TE AO SHANNON ASLETT RICHARD AUGUSTIN PETER AUGUSTIN PETER BALLEN  ROGER BINNEY DON BOLTON RICHARD BRAITHWAITE JOANNA BUSH KUSHANA CHANG JUI PIN CHRISTELLER FIONA CLEARMONT PHILIP COLEMAN HAMISH DADSON PHIL DEANS A.A DEANS A.A DONNELLY DEB FAIRCLOUGH WENDY FOOTE SELINA FRIZZELL OTIS GEORGE DARRYN GREIG JASON HUSBAND JOHN IVANOFF NOEL IZARD SUSANNA JAEGER KATHARINA JAHNKE BOB JONES ROSS KANG JAE KUMAR NANDITA KUSAMA  YAYOI LEE KERRY-ANN LELEISI' UAO ANDY LE LIEVRE MARIE LYSAGHT LAUREN J MACLEOD EUAN MAGUIRE MARIAN MAKA KULIMOE' ANGA


Belgian Mother and Child, c.1914, Frances Hodgkins, watercolour on paper, 1968/3/1. Collection of the Sarjeant Gallery Te Whare o Rehua Whanganui. Gift of Misses D. and T. Collier, 1968.

Frances Hodgkins P eople

Curated by Dr. Pamela Gerrish Nunn 16 Nov 2017 - 14 Feb 2018

New Zealand Portrait Gallery Shed 11, Wellington Waterfront (04) 472 2298 | www.nzportraitgallery.org.nz


NOW UNTIL 21 JAN 2018

THE

A WINDOW ON RENAISSANCE FLORENCE

Sandro Botticelli and Workshop Madonna and Child with Six Angels (detail) circa 1500, Florence, Galleria Corsini

COLLECTION BECOME A MEMBER TO ENJOY FREE ENTRY Media sponsor

Exhibition organised by the Galleria Corsini, Florence; Auckland Art Gallery Toi o TÄ maki; Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth; and MondoMostre, Rome.

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