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ArtZone THE NEW ZEALAND ART & DESIG N GUIDE

$6.50

THE MATARIKI SPECIAL


18 MARCH-25 JUNE 2017

30 The Octagon Dunedin New Zealand www.dunedin.art.museum A department of the Dunedin City Council

A Dunedin Public Art Gallery Visiting Artists Project supported by Creative New Zealand Toi Aotearoa


18 March - 03 September New Zealand Maritime Museum cnr Quay & Hobson Streets www.maritimemuseum.co.nz


WHAT’S ON AT THE PAH... Auckland Festival of Photography Exhibitions Here, Now, Then, Always 17 May – 2 July Opening Tuesday 16 May, 6-8pm

EDWARDS+JOHANN Events Growing from the Edge of Spaces 30 May – 9 July Opening Monday 29 May, 6-8pm

PA H HOMESTEAD

Greg Semu, The Raft of the Manu – Resurrected, 2015, mixed media. Collection of the Wallace Arts Trust.

WALLACE ARTS TRUST

Edwards+Johann, An Embezzlement of Sort #1, 2013, drawing on C-type photograph, Collection of the artists.

The Pah Homestead, TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre 72 Hillsborough Rd, Hillsborough, Auckland www.tsbbankwallaceartscentre.org.nz Open Tuesday – Friday 10am-3pm, Saturday & Sunday 8am-5pm


THE ORIENTAL CARPET

AS ART

For me, the most beautiful expression of the oriental carpet as an art form is in the weaving of the Gabbeh Luri. This remarkable example is part of a small revivalist collection aimed at preserving and maintaining the integrity of this age-old tradition. When I was discussing a similar piece in the collection with a client she said “It looks so contemporary, like something inspired by Paul Klee’s paintings.” “No,” I replied. “I think you will find that Paul Klee, particularly with his Tunisian Series, was inspired by images like these.” Contemporary or otherwise, this piece like the others in the collection, has a loveliness that is quite simply timeless. Richard Pointon

Oriental Carpets and Collectibles. Established 1987.

Showroom 6 Armidale Street, Petone. Phone: 021 434 972 Website richardpointon.co.nz Open 6 Days FROM 9.30am - 4.30pm (Closed Tuesdays)

RICHARD P O I N TO N


… Francis Upritchard,Vincent Ward, Dan Arps, Shane Cotton, Tony de Lautour, Julia Morison, Bill Culbert, Peter Robinson, Neil Dawson, Rita Angus, Saskia Leek, Eddie Clemens, David Hatcher, Tony Fomison, Séraphine Pick, Jason Greig, Joanna Langford, Miranda Parkes, Zina Swanson, Robert Hood, Ruth Watson, Heather Straka, John Coley, Olivia Spencer Bower, Marie Le Lievre, Raymond McIntyre, Emily HartleySkudder, Quentin MacFarlane, Hamish Keith, Anton Parsons, Chris Heaphy, Ronnie van Hout, Barry Cleavin, Pat Hanly, Jim Speers, Toss Woollaston, Bill Sutton, Margaret Stoddart, Juliet Peter, John Hurrell, Sydney L Thompson, Trevor Moffitt, Alan Pearson, Ngaio Marsh, David Low, André Hemer, Philip Trusttum, Allen Maddox, Paul Cullen, Gordon H Brown, Mark Adams, Simon Morris, Darryn George, Mark Braunias, Dick Frizzell, Tjalling de Vries, Tom Kreisler, David Cook, Maddie Leach, Joyce Campbell, David Rittey, Jane Zusters, Jonathan Mane-Wheoki, Carl Sydow, Paul Johns …

D U N E D I N PA G

www.fina.canterbury.ac.nz


As the Director of the Centre for Art Studies at the University of Auckland, Linda Tyler curates the art collection artcollection.auckland.ac.nz and manages Gus Fisher Gallery, as well as monthly-changing digital and on-site exhibitions in the Window projectwindow.auckland.ac.nz.

Editor: Alison Franks. Editorial Assistant: Craig Beardsworth. Contributors: Catharina van Bohemen, Francesca Emms, Alex Scott, Lily Hacking, Avenal McKinnon, Laura Pitcher, Janet Hughes, John Bristed. Design: Shalee Fitzsimmons, Rhett Hornblow. Distribution & Accounts: Tod Harfield. Advertising: Craig Beardsworth. Email: sales@artzone.co.nz

Reuben Friend is an artist, curator and the Director of Pātaka Art+Museum is Porirua. He has a Master’s Degree in Māori Visual Arts from Te Pūtahi a Toi Massey University in Palmerston North and a degree in Māori Visual Arts from Toimairangi School of Māori Visual Arts in Hastings. From 2009 to 2013 he was the Curator of Māori and Pacific Art, City Gallery Wellington and from 2013 to 2015 worked as the Exhibitions Manager at Logan Art Gallery.

Alex Scott does a bit of everything. When she’s not painting, cartooning or making tiny objects, she’s writing and sub-editing. A transplanted Aucklander, she’s enjoying learning about why Wellingtonians are always raving about their city.

Telephone: (04) 385 1426 Email: edit@artzone.co.nz Website: www.artzone.co.nz Post: Box 9202, Marion Square, Wellington, 6141. Deliveries: 31–41 Pirie St, Mt Victoria, Wellington, 6011.

The opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher. Although all material is checked for accuracy, no liability is assumed by the publisher for any losses due to the use of material in this magazine.

ISSN: 1176-3752

Copyright. © All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored, or transmitted in any form without the prior written permission of Richfield Holdings Ltd

Produced by: Capital Publishing Ltd for Richfield Holdings Ltd


Welcome

Chevron Te-Whetumatarau Hassett, Portrait of Grand-Dad in his garden, from the Ko TĹ?ku Taumata Tonu, Ko Hawaiki series, photograph, 2016.

Matariki and its growing importance in the New Zealand calendar interested us when planning this issue. Matariki is the MÄ ori name for the star cluster known as the Pleiades. When the constellation appeared in the sky just before dawn in late May or early June, it traditionally signalled the start of the MÄ ori New Year. This year Matariki begins on 25 June. The seven stars in the constellation were the framework Lily Hacking used to compile coverage of the seven Maori artists presented in this issue. We also asked Reuben Friend, director of Pataka Art + Museum in Porirua, about the growing interest in the Matariiki festival. He discusses the issues in a column on page 15. Our previous issue looked at the resurgence of interest in craft, particularly the ceramic arts. And the refreshing of craft continues. Linda Tyler reviews Vanished Delft, an exhibition of contemporary object making at Pah homestead, and Lily Hacking looks at textile work from Emma Fitts in a new show at the Dowse Art Gallery. Catharina van Bohemen talks to photographer Bruce Foster about the beauty in his work, even while it inexorably records the detritus of our world. A winter expedition to Taranaki appeals? The art excitement is summarised on page 56. So do plan a road trip now. Of course the biennale in Venice would also be an attractive destination. Just choose whatever art viewing helps enhance your winter. Alison Franks Editor


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Contents

Camera obscura

10 Short reports

High fibre diet

18

Emma Fitts is one of many artists being drawn to fabric and fibre

Carve it up Wood sculpture in Auckland

12

The inevitability of Matariki

15

20

Matariki

23

Reuben Friend looks at Matariki.

Seven stars in the Matariki constellation and seven stellar artists


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Contents

Conservator of the piece

Frames need care and attention too

High fibre diet Emma Fitts is one of many artists being drawn to fabric and fibre

36 Notepad

18

Carve it up Wood sculpture in Auckland

38

20

Objects of affection

40

Grand tour Taranaki

54

Listings

57

Artist index

84

Linda Tyler reviews an object show at Pah Homestead


10 Camera obscura Chris Corson-Scott insists on using analogue film and a heavy, “oldfashioned” 8x10 view-camera. In our digital age, these large cumbersome cameras are antiquated, but combined with recent technology they can still provide a unique image quality. Corson-Scott believes the combination results in a more human image – “finely detailed, yet softer, richer.” “A Poet Writing Before the Falls and Freezing Works, Mataura, 2016” exemplifies the lyrical, many-layered aesthetic of Corson-Scott’s work. Here, the raw face of industry is contrasted with artistic endeavour, and the velocity of nature with that of factory production. The image is part of his new exhibition Photographs from the South Island, at Trish Clark Gallery from 13 June. The series calls attention to former industrial or repurposed sites and decayed and largely forgotten New Zealand. A Poet Writing Before the Falls and Freezing Works, Mataura, 2016, archival pigment print


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Short Reports

One hundred days New Zealand artists are featuring at documenta for the first time. Held in two locations this year – Kassel, Germany and Athens, Greece – documenta is one of the world’s largest and most highly regarded contemporary art exhibitions. Works by the late Ralph Hotere, last year’s Walters Prize nominee Nathan Pohio and Mata Aho Collective have been selected for the 100-day exhibition.

At the Reddy

For the first time ever a New Zealand Governor General will attend the Venice Biennale in an official capacity. The Right Hon Dame Patsy Reddy says that supporting New Zealand’s arts and culture is of huge interest to her: “I am keen to do what I can to put a spotlight on New Zealand art practice during my term as Governor-General.” In April Dame Patsy and Sir David Gascoigne hosted a reception at Government House to celebrate Lisa Reihana, New Zealand’s Biennale artist for 2017. Reihana will present Emissaries which includes an expansive multichannel project alongside photo-based

and sculptural works. Dame Patsy says, “I am sure Lisa’s exhibition will be an absolute highlight of the Biennale, and will cement Lisa’s reputation as one of our most fearless and accomplished artists”. Reihana was recently named among the 2017 Distinguished Alumni by the University of Auckland, in recognition of her outstanding achievement in the field of fine arts.

Creative plenty

Work has begun in the Bay of Plenty region to turn the area into a hub for creativity and innovation. Tauranga City Council and Western Bay of Plenty District Council have agreed to fund the development of an Arts and Culture Strategy led by Dawn Hutchesson, a national creative-sector specialist. All residents will get to have their say on the strategy before it goes to the councils for adoption later this year.

Small packages

Karin Strachan has won the 2017 Small Sculpture Prize with “Sleeping Alone”. Dr Zara Stanhope, Principal Curator at Auckland Art Gallery, selected Strachan’s

clay zoomorphic figures for the $3,000 prize. The annual competition, New Zealand’s only prize for small sculpture, is run by the Waiheke Community Art Gallery.

Loom large Marta Katarzyna Buda is a freelance textile designer known in New Zealand fashion circles for creating printed fabrics for designers such as Auckland label Penny Sage. Buda also hand-weaves her own limited-edition bags (right) – made with mercerised cotton and raw hemp on a table loom and hand-finished – that are retailed at various design and fashion stores here and overseas. Recently she launched a new project with her partner Douglas Johns. Best Wishes Studio sells lightweight handwoven naturally dyed organic cotton towels made by Women Weave, a charitable trust supporting rural women in India. The couple feel strongly about an oversaturated consumer market, so have focused on useful items that benefit their makers. Best Wishes produces small quantities, with the aim of eventually creating a range of products from different makers. They are currently working with Hohepa Homes in Hawkes Bay to produce pure beeswax candles.


Short reports


A showcase of Taranaki creativity

Octopus Arabesque (2017), Hugh Cargill (detail)

Roberta Thornley A Serious Girl 27 May — 20 August 2017

38 TaupĹ? Quay Whanganui 4500 New Zealand

Phone 06 349 0506 www.sarjeant.org.nz

Sarjeant Gallery is a cultural facility of the Whanganui District Council

Roberta Thornley, Trampoline, 2017. Image courtesey of the artist and Tim Melville Gallery.


15 Column

NEXT PAGE: Digital render of Pakati Pakemana 2017, 3D printed polyamide, 300x283x50mm

E tipu e rea mō ngā rā o tōu ao Ko tō ringa ki ngā rākau a te Pākehā, hei ora mō te tinana. Ko tō ngākau ki ngā tāonga a ō tīpuna Māori, hei tikitiki mō tō māhuna. Ko tō wairua ki tō atua, nānā nei ngā mea katoa. – Tā Apirana Ngata

The inevitability of Matariki By Reuben Friend The observance of Matariki as a nonthreatening, apolitical occasion on which to celebrate Māori culture has started to gain serious purchase amongst non-Māori audiences and organisations across the country. And rightly so. But in securing mainstream popularity for it, have we crossed a line? Has the contemporary world distorted the way we observe and understand Matariki today, and what role do artists play in framing Matariki as a national

festival for all New Zealanders? The passing of the Pleiades constellation, Matariki, has been observed by indigenous communities in Aotearoa New Zealand and Oceania for many centuries. But it was not celebrated in the way that it is today until 1995, when a small-scale two-week community festival called Te Whakanui i a Matariki was launched at Pipitea Marae in Wellington. Championed by Māori politicians and artists such as Diane Prince and the late MP Whetū Tirikātene-Sullivan, Te Whakanui i a Matariki demonstrated that the kaupapa of Matariki, of new life and renewal, could help facilitate discussions of Māori empowerment and the reclamation of customary practices.

This concept was picked up by government organisations such as the Māori Language Commission, the Ministry of Education and the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa in the early 2000s, and the events they held were for many New Zealanders the first real introduction to Matariki as a national season of celebration. For Māori communities this format provided some excellent opportunities to promote and celebrate Māori art and culture, but with some pitfalls which we find ourselves negotiating today. Major New Zealand retailers and multinational corporations have recognised the significance of Matariki to New Zealanders and have begun to support the festivities. New Zealand


16 Column

Post has for several years produced limited edition Matariki stamp collections featuring contemporary artworks by Māori craftspeople and artists. ANZ Bank regularly commissions Māori artists to design Matariki-themed graphics for their ATM machines, and even New World supermarket has begun to advertise Matariki deals and discounts for Flybuys members. It can be argued that this is a sign of maturity, that our nation is grown up enough to embrace indigenous cultural practices as part of our collective identity. It can also be argued that, in a market-driven economy, Matariki may head down the same path of commercialisation as Halloween, Easter and Christmas, if it has not already. This concern raises questions around cultural authenticity, commodification and intellectual property rights. Māori sculptor and digital artist Kereama Taepa designed the 2015 Matariki ATM graphic for ANZ and I asked him about the confluence of cultural politics and economics in his artwork, and specifically

how he contextualised this in relation to his upcoming Matariki exhibition at Pātaka. Taepa’s exhibition, Whakapī (from 20 May – 13 August 2017), looks at the way that Māori philosophies and worldviews change in relation to everyday experiences and ways of being. Taepa uses the analogy of the iro, or maggot, from which the term whakairo (meaning carving or artistry) derives. When Māori observed iro eating the flesh of a carcass, they saw that the maggots would leave a circular pattern on the softbone tissue from where they had eaten around the edge of the cartilage towards the centre. This reductive process became the philosophical basis for Māori carving in pre-colonial times. In working with 3D printed imagery today, Taepa replaces the iro with a pī, or honey bee, to create a new philosophical principle for his art practice. Unlike the reductive process of whakairo, the creation of a beehive is an additive manufacturing process, where the bees essentially 3D print a home for their young using wax secretions

from their abdomens. In this way Taepa reconsiders philosophical concepts from te ao Māori in order to make sense of contemporary circumstances. Most Māori communities today exist within a predominantly Western capitalist society, and certain sectors of Māori society have become exceedingly successful at it. Consequently, Taepa says, our worldview can often suffer from an acute case of post-colonialism. While it is inevitable that our perspective on the world will change, we need not lose sight of who we are as a people or as a nation under the pressure of global influences. For Matariki to remain relevant we must develop new understandings of what the season means for Māori and for all New Zealanders. Like the analogy of the iro and the bee, we can reconsider the philosophies of te ao Māori in relation to the realities of our contemporary experience, while safeguarding the core principals that define our identity. Artistic expression can honour deeply held cultural values while acknowledging the fundamental changes in the way we live.


18 Review

A growing number of contemporary artists are being drawn to fabric and fibre. A renewed appreciation for the handmade object and a strong surge of interest in female histories and narratives — and pursuits such as knitting, weaving and sewing traditionally associated with women — are partly responsible for this revival of textile art. Lily Hacking reviews a new fabric exhibition.

Fibre diet From Pressure to Vibration – The Event of a Thread The Dowse until 2 July 2017 This exhibition shows a new suite of felted works by Christchurch artist Emma Fitts alongside textile pieces pulled from the collection of The Dowse Art Museum that speak to the history of textile art in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Fitts’ practice regularly engages with archives, and with historical and contemporary feminist figures, and the tactility of the material lends itself to a certain intimacy. During the Olivia Spencer Bower residency she made a series of textile banners dedicated to various women, Marlow Moss, Rowena Cade, Marilyn Waring, Olivia Spencer Bower, Rita Angus, Rhona Haszard, Louise Henderson, and Ngaio Marsh. Using fabrics selected

to reflect something of the biography of each figure, the banners included garment patterns for outfits specifically designed for each woman; and they were hung in a way that transposed the layout of Olivia Spencer Bower’s home into the gallery. In this latest exhibition at The Dowse Art Museum, the contours of Fitts’ works once again define the space and guide the visitor through the gallery, as if gently moving them from room


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to room. Her large scale felt pieces hang suspended from the ceiling, with enough space below to glimpse the feet, socks, and ankles of fellow visitors. The layout of the exhibition is based on the design of the Café Samt und Seide / Velvet and Silk Café (1927), which was created by Lilly Reich and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe for a German fashion industry exhibition. Bauhaus designers and weavers including Anni Albers, Lilly Reich and Otti Berger informed the work in vari-

ous ways, and each of Fitts’ six felted pieces refers to one of the tactile exercises used at the Bauhaus school of art and design. Each exercise is paired with another thematic – pressure and architecture, modernism and pricking, rubbing and three-dimensional fibre art, pain and storytelling, temperature and the local textile industry, vibration and raranga (weaving) – inspired by the textile pieces from The Dowse collection. The intention is to draw out the history of these particular works in

the context of New Zealand textile art. Hanging alongside Fitts’ pieces are works selected with curator Melanie Oliver, including textiles by Margery Blackman, Jenny Hunt, Kathleen Low, Georgia Suiter, Erenora Puketapu Hetet, Philipa Devonshire, Whiona Epiha, Joan Calvert, Zena Abbott, Sheila Reimann, Ruth Castle, and Judy Patience. dowse.org.nz/exhibitions/detail/ from-pressure-to-vibration-the-eventof-a-thread


20 Carve it up Art enthusiasts of all ages will have the rare chance to watch wood sculptors in action at Lake House Art’s biennial Wood Craft Festival. From 13 May chunks of raw macrocarpa, cedar, pohutukawa, Norfolk pine, and totara will be transformed into sculptures, when emerging and established artists step out of their comfort zones to create a work “on the fly” in Lake House’s grounds, within a strict time limit of seven days. Workshops and presentations are programmed to facilitate understanding of ecological issues, sustainability being a central theme. The festival will also work with local schools to encourage the next generation to see the beauty and function of native flora and fauna. The awards will be presented on 23 May and the finished sculptures open to the public until mid-June.


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Seven stars of Matariki

We celebrate seven emerging and established artists of Māori descent, beneath the seven stars of Matariki. Compiled by Lily Hacking.

Matariki is the Māori name given to the Pleiades or Seven Sisters star cluster. Made up of seven stars – often called Te Uru o Te Rangi, Tupua a Rangi, Tupua a Nuku, Waiti, Waita, Waipuna a Rangi and Mereope (or Matariki) – the constellation appears in late May or early June and signals the beginning of the Māori new year. Traditionally it is a time for preparing crops and sharing the harvest, but it is also a time for celebration and for wānanga (learning). Different tribal groups celebrated Matariki at different times. Some did so when Matariki rose in May/June. Others celebrated at the first new moon, or full moon, after the rising of Matariki. In modern times, the new moon following the rising of Matariki signals the New Year. This year, Matariki is due to begin on 25 June.


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Seven stars of Matariki Jade Townsend, Ur Promo Gurl, 2017, Online promo image for Dark Objects, sponges, second hand tapestry, secondhand polystyrene ‘L’.

One Jade Townsend

Jade Townsend is interested in the intersection of contemporary art, advertising and consumer culture. Working with a range of materials — including found objects, vinyl, and LED lighting — her practice addresses issues about and ideologies of mass-production, authenticity and the allure of luxury goods. In R.I.P Kirks (2016), Townsend engaged with the closure of iconic Wellington department store Kirkcaldie & Stains, reworking memorabilia from Wellington Museum’s collection. Shopping and Other Rituals (2016) consisted of LED sculptures of English words and Chinese characters, developed during her Asia New Zealand Foundation residency in Beijing and her project Typical Relics (2014), commissioned by fashion label Comme des Garçons. Townsend moved to the United Kingdom as a teenager and gained a BA (Hons) Fine Art from Manchester Metropolitan University (2009). Having spent the last few years in New Zealand she returns to the UK in June where she will take up a residency at the Slade School of Fine Art in London. iheartbeingsingle.com

Two Bridget Reweti

(Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāi Te Rangi) works in moving image and photography, exploring marginalised histories and contemporary indigenous narratives through landscape and the environment. Tauutuutu (2016) emerged during a residency in Canada, with Reweti engaging in cultural exchanges that embodied the concepts of exchange rates and gift economies. I thought I would of climbed more mountains by now (2015) critically responds to Hugh MacDonald’s film This is New Zealand (1970). It recently screened in the United Kingdom and is included in her new show This Time of Useful Consciousness–Political Ecology Now, at The Dowse Art Museum, 14 April – 30 July. Reweti has a Masters in Māori Visual Arts and Postgraduate Diploma in Museum and Heritage Studies. She is a member of Mata Aho Collective, a group of four Māori women whose large-scale textile works are founded in mātauranga Māori. The group is exhibiting at documenta this year, the first time New Zealand has featured in the international exhibition. bridgetreweti.com


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Seven stars of Matariki Nathan Pohio, The Feral Horses of Natasha Von Braun, 2015.

Three

Four

(Waitaha, Kati Māmoe, Ngāi Tahu) creates minimal cinematic installations that address traditional and contemporary Māori experience using selected revisionist cinema histories. Two iterations of the work, which saw Pohio nominated for the Walters Prize, will be exhibited at documenta this year. Raise the anchor, unfurl the sails, set course to the centre of an ever setting sun! reproduces archival photographs depicting Lord and Lady Plunket arriving in Tuahiwi in 1905, on the day the Ngāi Tahu land claim was brought to vice-regal attention. The Feral Horses of Natasha Von Braun (2016) refers to the daughter of Prof. Leonard Nosferatu Von Braun in Jean-Luc Godard’s Alphaville (1965), and engages with the notion of the revisionist Western, a movement intended to disrupt the Hollywood standard that placed the figure of a heroic white man at its centre. Pohio is Assistant Curator at Te Puna O Waiwhetu Christchurch Art Gallery and has a Masters of Fine Arts from University of Canterbury School of Fine Arts. nathanpohio.com

(Ngāti Wai, Ngāti Ati Awa) is a painter whose practice explores concepts of tangata whenua, whakapapa and turangawaewae. Gossage’s landscape paintings are informed by the spiritual connection to whenua and its history, passed down through generations of storytelling. Painting predominantly in oil, charcoal, kokowai (burnt red clay), and oil pastel, she aspires to communicate a sense of time passing, and the constantly changing and regenerative character of the natural environment. Gossage endeavours to capture the wairua (spiritual essence) and mauri (living life principle) of a place and the bond with her tipuna through her landscape painting. Her recent exhibition Whenua (2017) at Artis Gallery features a suite of paintings reflecting her relationship with Pakiri, a coastal area north of Auckland, and Little Barrier Island, the ancestral home of Ngāti Manuhiri. Gossage has a Master of Art & Design (2015) from Auckland University of Technology. arohagossage.com

Nathan Pohio

Aroha Gossage


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Seven stars of Matariki

Chevron TeWhetumatarau Hassett, Koka Hinemoa, 2016.

Five

Chevron Te-Whetumatarau Hassett (Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Kahungunu, Rongomaiwahine) is a photographer whose name refers to the sacred mountain overlooking Hinerupe Marae in Te Araroa. Hassett’s work is distinctly personal and comes from a desire to understand better his Māori and Pākeha heritage. Ko Tooku taumata tonu, ko Hawaiki (2016) is a book in three parts: beginning with Te Kore (nothingness); moving through Te Pō (darkness); and into Te Ao (light). Using Māori mythology as both structural and conceptual frameworks, the project was inspired by a book written by his grandfather, and features a series of photographs of Hassett’s whānau. Ordered like a mihimihi or pepeha, the book first introduces his grandfather, then his grandmother, and so on. This year Hassett will graduate with a Bachelor of Design majoring in photography from Massey University. He is completing photo essay commissions and is in the early stages of a long-term project on the East Cape. chevhassett.com


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Seven stars of Matariki PREVIOUS PAGE, LEFT: Ngahuia Harrison, Waterfall / Smoke, 2013, 08:07 HD video.

Six

Ngahuia Harrison (Ngātiwai, Ngāpuhi) is a PhD student at Auckland University of Technology. Working mainly in film and photography, she explores how Ngātiwai concepts and philosophies relating to the environment and the transference of mātauranga (knowledge) can be applied to creative practice. Harrison’s most recent project engages with the Treaty settlement process, the issues that arise from different understandings of history and whakapapa, and the role of kaumātua and kuia in negotiations. Her exhibition seeks to create a space for contemplation in the face of urgency. It takes its title from a patere (chant) recited by Harrison’s tupuna at the Māori Land Court: E takarae ki te muri i raro mata raranga mai kaewa ki te rangi ko au ki raro whakaaro rangi ai (I stumble on ahead, my face turns skyward; although I am below my thoughts are floating through the sky), St Paul Street Gallery, 13 April – 26 May. stpaulst.aut.ac.nz/exhibitions/future-exhibitions

PREVIOUS PAGE, RIGHT: #Hui (2015), Untitled Society Art Gallery, EPCOR Centre, +15 window spaces, 2015, Calgary, Canada.

Seven Cora-Allan Wickliffe

Cora-Allan Wickliffe (Ngāpuhi, Tainui) is a multi-disciplinary artist. Often working through performance, her practice explores constructed identities and colonial misrepresentations of Māori and Pacific people. Wickliffe and her partner Daniel Twiss recently founded BC Art Collective (‘Before Cook’, ‘Before Columbus’, ‘Before Christianity’) to provide new opportunities to engage with indigenous culture. Twiss is Native American and an inaugural event Indian Tacos was held earlier this year, with Wickliffe and Twiss serving up indigenous American cuisine and conversation. Be back in 5 minutes (2016) was exhibited at The Blak Dot Gallery in Melbourne in the exhibition Fifty Shades of Blak. The series of paintings,which reference tourist statues featuring the indigenous body, was particularly influenced by the Napier statue Pania of the Reef. Wickliffe is Curator and Exhibitions Manager of Corban Estate Arts Centre and will be exhibiting at Blue Oyster Gallery in August. cora-allan.co.nz


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Matariki calendar

Region

Gallery

Auckland

Auckland Art Gallery

Hamilton

Rotorua

Taranaki

Kapiti

Wellington

Waikato Museum

When

Events

10 June, 12.30pm

Curator Nigel Borell will talk about some of the gallery’s works in connection with Matariki as a time of family, reflection and celebration.

10 June 1pm & 3pm

Two screenings of seven short films, each to celebrate Matariki.

until July 13

Te Whānau Maarama: The Heavenly Bodies is a celebration of Māori astronomy, the traditional Maaori societal view of the night sky and how it is being revitalised in the modern world.

25 June, 10am–5pm

Make Matariki stars. Materials provided.

Penny 23 June– Haka Gallery 28 July

Matariki Exhibition 2017 plus the launch of Matariki Calendar 2017– 2018 Artworks from artists from NZ, Australia, Wales and Hawaii.

Aotea Utanganui

17 June, 11am–3pm

Create. Grow. Harvest. Come and celebrate Puanga. Puanga was traditionally a time to create new tools and repair old ones. Come to the Museum and see our gardening taonga, learn about gardening techniques and create your own kono to store kumara or potatoes.

Mahara Gallery

16 June

For all the family, free entry, runs until 8pm, including kapa haka, lanternmaking followed by lighting up the cultural thread between Mahara Gallery and Whakarongotai marae.

16 – 25 June

Highlights include cooking demonstrations, dance and storytelling performances, and the iconic Kaumātua Kapa Haka competition. Each year this brings top notch performers from around Aotearoa for two days of good-natured but fierce competition.

Te Papa


PHANTOM F

Born in Christchurch, 1982 posters@0800phantom.co.nz 0800 PHANTOM

Billsticker Eil Wright wears a Matt Couper limited edition Phantom T Shirt


PATAKA HP WAIKATO MUS HP F

20 May – 13 Aug 2017

Shane Tuihalangingie Image courtesy of the artist

www.pataka.org.nz


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Featurette

When conserving art is mentioned we think of paintings but what about the frames? Alex Scott talks to a Manawatu man who restores rare gilt frames.

Conservator of the piece “There are still a few nuts to crack on this one,” says Detlef Klein, managing director of Manawatu Museum Services. He’s referring to an ornate, gilded frame from 1884 that is sitting in his workshop. The gold leaf finish is cracked and the decorative lotus leaf moulding has split and is peeling away from the timber substrate. But the experienced conservator loves a challenge. This assignment was entrusted to Klein by Whanganui’s Sarjeant Gallery; one element of the restoration of two

significant artworks and their frames, funded by a $125,000 grant from the Stout Trust. The works are both by 19th-century English artists. The Flight into Egypt, 1884, by Frederick Goodall (the gallery’s largest piece) and The Fountain of Youth, 1892, by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones, are collectively valued at upward of one million dollars. Klein and his assistants – among them a paintings conservator and a gilder – chose to tackle the larger and more challenging frame first. On a basic level, it consists of moulded decoration fixed to a timber substrate. Over the years, fluctuations in temperature and humidity have caused the timber base

to contract and expand. The tension has created cracks in the substrate and between the substrate and the moulding, gradually loosening the bond between the elements. The conservators are going to fix all that. They’ll start by “relaxing“ the composition material – a mixture of whiting, linseed oil, rabbit skin glue and colophony resin – from which the decoration is moulded. “We have to very carefully humidify it to make it moist without affecting the timber and without affecting the very sensitive gold leaf surface,” he explains. “From here it can be laid flat again and reaffixed with rabbit skin glue.” They’ll


37

also need to make up losses in the frame, carry out timber repairs, clean the surface, regild… the list goes on. While it might, in theory, be easier to start from scratch, the brief is about resuscitation, not replacement. “The longer we take in terms of allowing time lapses between each bit of work, the stronger the empathy for the work itself and for the complex issues that might still face us in terms of bringing back to life the original,” says Klein. The complete restoration of both frames is projected to take up to two years. A personal passion for preserving the past has fuelled the conservator’s

work to date. “Original, historic items are under threat all the time,” he stresses. “They either get lost in fires, earthquakes, natural disasters or from people just trashing them because they don’t understand the value of them. Sadly, a lot of it also happens through ill-considered restoration.” Originally training in furniture and object conservation in the early ‘80s, Klein has accumulated decades of experience at Te Manawa Museum, the Historic Places Trust and Massey’s Museum Studies Programme, his skill set growing vastly. Today, Manawatu Museum Services offers restoration of, among other things, monuments,

historic architectural interiors and even horse-drawn vehicles. The old adage about variety holds true for Klein. “That keeps me going. Even though now I’m getting close to nominal retirement, I’m still very passionate about what I do and I think that’s quite rare,” he reflects. “It’s the team-work, the back-andforth consultation with the client, really understanding the artwork’s needs, and sort of becoming part of the actual object itself. When it’s completed to the high degree of success that I expect of myself and I know it can stand up to international review, then I’m happy.”


38 Notepad

Lost and found

After a lengthy search, Lost Arts Emporium have finally found their dream home. Kate and Warren Fransham have bought the former Marton Railway Station Hotel, which they are converting into a “lost arts” school,with workshops, a gallery, and accommodation for artists. They plan to attract tourists and visiting artists by hosting exhibitions, residencies and market days. Their store, Wellington Potters Supplies, will continue to operate online with a larger range.

Contemporary competition

Waikato Museum has received hundreds of entries for the 2017 National Contemporary Art Award. Elizabeth Caldwell, this year’s judge and Director of City Gallery Wellington, says the competition attracts artists of the highest calibre. The exhibition never fails to generate entries that push boundaries and create significant visual experiences. The winner will be announced on 28July and the exhibition runs until November at Waikato Museum.

Phantom a favourite

Virginia King’s Phantom Fleet has won the Fuller’s People’s Choice Award at the biennial 2017 Headland Sculpture on the Gulf exhibition. The three hanging vessels made from stainless steel have been thought by visitors to suggest boat hulls or empty seed pods. Suspended over Waitemata? King’s intention was that “the vessels evoked rising seas and the urgency of addressing global warming.” King often draws attention to the environment in her art work.


39 Notepad

Face off Angus Trumble, Director of the National Portrait Gallery of Australia in Canberra, has been selected to be the international judge for the Adam Portraiture Award 2018. The New Zealand Portrait Gallery which runs the award encourages artists to prepare now. The winner receives a cash prize of $20,000.

Haier and higher

Touch Me

Dick Frizzell, national treasure and co-founder of Cooking 4 Change, has designed artwork exclusively for fridges. The Freezzell Fridges are provided by Haier New Zealand, wrapped in the customised artwork and then donated to charities as chosen by the public. The Incubator, an artist collective study and project space in Tauranga, is one of the ten lucky recipients. They can use their fridge, or sell it to raise funds.

Audiences can enjoy a “sensory art experience” when Raglan artist Yaniv Janson’s work Please Do Touch is exhibited in Montenegro in eastern Europe, later this year. The installation series focuses on five sustainable development goals and makes use of visual, body, oral and kinetic languages to speak of human experiences. Janson says that sensory interaction with the art encourages audiences to engage with the social and environmental topics raised, on as many levels as possible.


Vanished Delft, The Small Drawing Room in VD

In a world of mass production the handcrafted object stands out. Linda Tyler reviews an exhibition celebrating the handmade.

Objects of affection Vanished Delft: Handmade Material Culture at the Pah Homestead, curated by Anna Miles, 14 March – 14 May 2017, at the Pah Homestead, TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre for the Auckland Arts Festival. What is the future for the applied arts in the age of Briscoes? Curator Anna Miles reboots the history of craft exhibitions, showing us a slice of the local action. Taking inspiration from Warwick Freeman’s lava door handles (fashioned in gratitude for the applied arts’ modest duty of usefulness) she shows craft in Aotearoa to be flourishing in spite of the ubiquity of cheap massproduced imports. The appeal of the maker’s touch endures. As she explained in her opening speech, no actual Delftware was harmed


41 Review

in the curating of the exhibition. She preserves the integrity of purpose, sorting the things she has corralled into ten categories – garden objects, ornaments, tools, home textiles, floor coverings, tableware, items of personal adornment, ceramics, furniture, and other domestic equipment. It’s an ecumenical approach. The catalogue gives necessary directions since well over a hundred objects appear in the show. In the ballroom, drawing room, hall and morning room of the Italianate mansion named after a Māori fortification, these objects are put into play with the decorated interior of the Victorian house itself. Strategically positioned around each room are examples of Arts and Crafts furniture from the Wallace Collection, introducing the principles of a movement idealising medieval craft and demonising capitalism and manufacture. There is a strong whiff of William Morris’s golden

rule in the air: Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful. Old art/craft divides are ignored in the installation, and the border crossings invite fresh appreciation. You can imagine settling back into Sriwhana Spong’s oversized seat, fresh from its outing in Sculpture in the Gulf, while you are served tea off Ryder Jones’ “Table” (from Brancusi’s Jacuzzi) made from pencils, rope and broomsticks. One of Mark Braunias’ paintings turned into a quilt invites admiration by the fireplace in the ballroom. Five months of labour produced the embroidery on silk noil by Areez Katki that is suspended from the ceiling nearby. Based on Maurice Ravel’s ballet suite Daphnis and Chloe, the chain stitch and French knots conjure up geographical associations with the Basque country to the Greek isle of Lesbos. Nearby a trio of Cheryl Lucas’

prosaic green Christchurch chimney flues stands sentry on the floor. Despite their disparities, these three artefacts manage to connect both conceptually and visually. Some visitors were heard to complain of chaos: it looked, some said, like sale day at Smith and Caughey’s. Surrealism was mentioned – it was all as beautiful as the chance encounter of an umbrella and a sewing machine on a dissecting table. How else could the route from Peter Wood’s silver epergne to Daphne Simons’ electric fan that slices cucumbers be explained? Keen to avoid rounding up the usual suspects and serving us warmed-up modernist leftovers, Vanished Delft champions the vitality of making over mastery. Craft traditions will never vanish, it suggests – they are being sampled and re-imagined all the time.


42 Books

Changing Face

Christchurch’s contemporary street art scene has become a vital source of energy for the rejuvenated city. Now Lonely Planet’s Street Art has ranked Christchurch alongside New York, San Francisco and London as one of the street art capitals of the world. Featuring Christchurch murals by Anthony Lister, Seth, Rone and Buff Monster, and vivid photography, festival details, insider knowledge and maps, Street Art is a beautiful and practical addition to your coffee table or carry-on.

Burning Bush

Kushana Bush inhabits a singular position within contemporary New Zealand art. Her meticulously detailed compositions, multi-ethnic characters and open-ended narratives reach across history, culture and society. The Burning Hours, published by the Dunedin Public Art Gallery to accompany the exhibition of the same name, focuses on paintings Bush produced from 2014 to 2016. It includes essays by Justin Paton, Heather Galbraith and exhibition curator Lauren Gutsell. Be drawn into the conversation initiated by this special visual language.

Labour of Love?

For nearly 150 years, Dunedin School of Art has fostered outstanding artists, producing resourceful graduates and versatile individuals. Jim Tomlin was Head of School for three decades and, upon retirement, realised the importance of recording the life and times of art education in Dunedin. So, in a labour of love, he researched, documented and wrote the text for Dunedin School of Art: A History capturing a comprehensive history of New Zealand’s oldest art school.


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45

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48

Featurette

Bruce Foster, Intertidal #9, 2015, pigment on rag paper, 540 x 800mm

The beach often ends up with the detritus of humans. Catharina van Bohemen talks to Bruce Foster - a photographer who has found beauty in the sand.

It’s a shore thing Growing up in 1950s Whanganui, the River City, Bruce Foster fished for spotties from the wharves. There was little awareness then of the effects of pollution. By the time the river reached the sea, the city’s sewage, and effluent from an abattoir, a timber treatment plant and a tannery had darkened and burdened the water. Foster saw and remembered. He also remembered Castlecliff beach. In winter, logs from forest clearance, tumbled and churned down the flooded river and eventually fetched up on the beach.

Those memories of stained water and a storm-tossed shore have shaped a lifetime’s work photographing the margins of land and sea and the effect of man-made change at these fragile borders. Foster’s early work, Sea Views, anatomised the boundaries between land and sea, and their suggestions of deep, distant secrets and mystery. A visit to Raoul Island in the Kermadecs in 2012 confirmed the artificiality of these boundaries. In the 70s, Raoul was said to have “fallen silent” because of the decimation of native birds by predators, and the forest by pigs, goats and exotic plants.

Extensive work by DOC over thirty years means the birds now sing again and the forest is regenerating. On the remote shoreline an invasive matter washes up. Plastic. These and later encounters with marine litter, on Easter Island, became the subjects of Foster’s series Invasive Species and Mapping the Pacific. A chance visit by Foster to Mangawhai spit in 2014 has resulted in three suites of work, exploring different aspects of human incursions into the natural world. His research photographs show a stark, textured landscape of dunes, many cloaked by eroding middens. Layers of bleached pipi and tuatua shells are littered with remnants


49

Featurette

of exploded oven stones, jagged rocks about the size of a fist. These fragments tossed onto the midden by human hands 400 or so years ago, hold their histories in their surface colours and textures. Other photos show an extensive sand dune rising at the base of the spit. The charred remains of a forest lie beneath, its exposed blackened edges traversing the dune. Carbon particles are blasted from this ragged boundary by the wind and blend with the sand into intricate patterns. It’s significant to Foster that carbon is the fundamental element in all life forms – and that these particles have become

mingled with sand. The sand’s tiny angular translucent grains, mostly of quartz, are the result of hundreds of millions of years of weathering of the earth’s crust. Along this shoreline, as on Raoul, the detritus of civilisation washes in: countless small domestic items, plastic bags and bottles. Storm surges carry this material beyond the fore-dunes, and gales distribute the lighter objects over the dunes. Foster discovers and records these objects as they fold into nature. For him, the spit suggests a metaphor for humanity, a symbol of our persistent failure to recognise our place in the natural world around us.

Carbon Imprints is showing at the Vivian Gallery in Matakana throughout May. Each of Foster’s images is a meditation on form, texture and light. Horizons and immensity have vanished as he brings his eye close to patterns the wind has made on the marriage of carbon and quartz. Housekeeping is the May exhibition at the Bowen Galleries. It is a selection from two suites of work, Intertidal and Carbon Ghosts. These are beguiling, uneasy images, through which Foster again wants to remind us that we have taken the natural world for granted for too long.


Art Notepad Zone THE NEW ZEALAND ART & DESIG N GUIDE

Colonial Gothic to Māori Renaissance: Essays in memory of Jonathan Mane-Wheoki

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Jonathan Mane-Wheoki (1943–2014) was a much loved and respected academic who made a considerable contribution to New Zealand art history over almost half a century. Colonial Gothic to Māori Renaissance, edited by Mark Stocker and Conal McCarthy, is a tribute to his memory from friends, colleagues and former students.

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52 Quite literally

“Five years closed is a remarkably long time. It stopped our momentum and it will take time to get back on the exhibition circuit.”

Christchurch Art Gallery director Jenny Harper explains why visitor numbers are a third lower than pre-quake levels as the reopened attraction struggles with the recovering city centre. Despite road works, construction works and a populace reluctant to come back into the CBD the gallery has still attracted 442,000 in 16 months. Christchurch Press 18 April 2017

“When we don’t need to do breakfast in schools and all the kids have shoes on their feet, when mental health have enough funds to keep patients safe and in treatment, when senior citizens have all the support they need in their own homes, when the Life Flight Trust no longer needs donations... maybe then we can buy some art.” Facebook commenter Amanda Sim weighs in on a debate about a Neil Dawson sculpture to be installed above Masterton’s busiest intersection. The cost of Ascension has increased $34,000 to $320,000 due to weather proofing alterations. Despite the cost being met entirely by public trusts many are not happy about the price tag. Stuff.co.nz 10 April 2017


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New Zealand Academy of Fine Arts 1 Queens Wharf Wellington

Left: 2016 Parkin Drawing Prize winner Catastrophe by Hannah Beehre.

details available at www.parkinprize.org.nz www.parkinprize.nz


54

Grand tour

Mention of Taranaki conjures up epic surf, a symmetrical mountain, oil and fertile soil. Look harder and you find a thriving arts and culture sector. The Len Lye Centre and Govett Brewster Art Gallery have dominated recent media coverage thanks to an impressive makeover – the undulating shiny facade is a beacon of provincial vision and daring, and there is plenty more. We select a few exhibitions worth a visit.

Taranaki Around the corner from the Govett Brewster Art Gallery, the regional museum and library Puke Ariki is preparing an exhibition of regional artists. Home Work: Taranaki Art 2017 shows over 80 selected works. The last time it ran in 2014 the public loved the fact that established artists sat alongside the less experienced – selectors choose the works purely on merit, not name. Visitors not only get to view the work but can also participate in workshops and explore their artistic side. It runs from 9 June to 19 November.

South of New Plymouth lies Patea, the town made famous by its Maori club’s hit song in the 80s. It’s also home to a museum. Aotea Utanganui mounts The Wonder Gardens this winter. Before huge home theatre screens and gaming consoles, people used the green spaces around them for enjoyment. The show looks at the whimsical aspects of the way free time was spent in South Taranaki parks and gardens. Established in 2014, the Taranaki Arts Trail gives the public an annual opportunity to meet more than 60 artists in their studios, in an effort to

increase the understanding in the community of the processes and skills involved in creating a work of art. Studios open from 9.30 to 4.30 on 10 and 11 June. A brochure and map will help you plan your trip. The biennial Taranaki Arts Festival storms into town from 17 August to 3 September. More than a quarter of the 45 shows scheduled are international acts. Locals love the diverse offerings, and between them they and the 10% of patrons who are overseas visitors bought 21,000 tickets in 2015. Get amongst it.


Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries, Photographer F. G. Radcliffe? (35-R2176) Aotea Utanganui Museum of South Taranaki, King Edward Park, Photographer F. G. Radcliffe (2002.101). From The Wonder Gardens, Aotea Utanganui.


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Maps / Listings North Island

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Canterbury Museum - Rolleston Ave Centre of Contemporary Art - 66 Gloucester St Chamber241 – 241 Moorhouse Ave Christchurch Art Gallery – 49 Worcester Ave City Art Depot – 96 Disraeli Street Form Gallery – 468 Colombo Street Ilam Campus Gallery – Block 2 School of Fine Arts, Arts Road Jonathan Smart Gallery - 52 Buchan St L'Estrange Gallery – 53 Nayland Street PG Gallery 192 – 192 Bealey Avenue The National – 241 Moorhouse Ave The Physics Room – 209 Tuam Street

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CHAMBERS 241

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JONATHAN SMART

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CHRISTCHURCH ART GALLERY

DURHAM ST NORTH

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HAREFORD ST

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PG GALLERY 192 PETERBOROUGH ST

THE NATIONAL

Brett McDowell Gallery - 5 Dowling St Dunedin Public Art G - 30 The Octagon Gallery de Novo - 101 Stuart St Hocken Collection - 90 Anzac Ave Inge Doesburg - 6 Castle St Mint Gallery - 32 Moray Pl Moray - 55 Princes St Otago Arts Society - 22 Anzac Ave Otago Museum - 419 Great King St


62 Region Northland–Auckland Northland ART AT WHAREPUKE 190 Kerikeri Road, Kerikeri Ph: 09 407 8933 info@art-at-wharepuke.co.nz www.art-at-wharepuke.co.nz Hours: Open 7 days 10am–5pm Gallery & Sculpture Park. BURNING ISSUES GALLERY 8 Quay Side, Town Basin, Whangarei Ph: 09 438 3108 www.burningissuesgallery.co.nz Hours: Open 7 days 10am–5pm Specialising in contemporary New Zealand handcrafted, blown and cast glass, quality ceramics and jewellery. KAAN ZAMAAN GALLERY 4 Hobson Avenue, Kerikeri Ph: 09 407 5191, Mob: 021 163 4478 julia@kaanzamaan.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–4pm, Sat–Sun 9am–12pm. What I can’t put in words. 12 May–30 Jun. A retrospective exhibition of mixed media work by JULIA REINHOLT, COLIN HARRISON, ANNA VALDONI. Exhibition of Muka Prints, a selection of New Zealand and European artists for everyone plus the annual Muka Youth Prints for children, EDWARD MACKENZIE exhibition of the Ata series of NZ prints and assemblages 3–27 Aug. www.EdwardMackenzie.com

REYBURN HOUSE (NORTHLAND SOC. OF ARTS) Reyburn House Lane, Town Basin, Whangarei Ph: 09 438 3074 nsa@reyburnhouse.co.nz www.reyburnhouse.co.nz Hours: Tues–Fri 10am–4pm, Sat–Sun 1pm–4pm, closed Monday Gallery has an active exhibition programme changing monthly. Also a gallery shop for a fine selection of painting, jewellery, pottery, hand blown glass and much more. THE SHUTTER ROOM 7 Rust Avenue (opp public library entrance), Whangarei www.shutterroom.com Hours: Wed–Fri 12–4pm and Sat 10am–1pm VILLAGE ARTS 1376 Kohukohu Road, North Hokianga Ph: 09 405 5827 gallery@villagearts.co.nz www.villagearts.co.nz Hours: Open 7 days. Winter hours 10am–4pm Showcasing Hokianga’s richly diverse arts community.

WHANGAREI ART MUSEUM TE MANAWA TOI Te Manawa - The Hub, Town Basin, Dent St, Ph: 09 430 4240 whangareiartmuseum@wdc.govt.nz www.whangareiartmuseum.co.nz Hours: Daily from 10am–4pm. Closed Christmas day, Boxing day and Good Friday.

Auckland ANNA MILES GALLERY 10/30 Upper Queen Street Ph: 09 368 5792 am@annamilesgallery.com www.annamilesgallery.com

You Would Think, Glen Snow.

ANTOINETTE GODKIN GALLERY APT Y32, 30 York Street, Parnell Ph: 09 309 9468 antartnz@gmail.com antoinettegodkin.co.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 11am–4pm, Sat 12pm– 3pm or by appointment.


63 63 Auckland Region ART INDUSTRY theblackshed, 37 Papakura, Clevedon Rd, Clevedon Village Ph: 021 238 2382 www.artindustry.co.nz Hours: Thurs–Sun 9am–4pm An artist’s space run by James & Cheryl Wright. Unique works by established and emerging artists.

ARTSPACE Level 1, 300 Karangahape Road, Newton Ph: 09 303 4965 media@artspace.org.nz www.artspace.org.nz Hours: Tues–Fri 10am–6pm, Sat 11am–4pm.

Hinemoa, the Belle of the Kainga, Te Arawa, Charles F Goldie.

Ten Latin Days, Nicky Foreman.

ARTIS GALLERY 280 Parnell Road, Parnell Ph: 09 303 1090 artis@artisgallery.co.nz www.artisgallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 9.30am–5.30pm, Sat 10am–4pm, Sun 11am–4pm NICKY FOREMAN, Minutiae 16 May–6 Jun, MEDAL ARTISTS NEW ZEALAND (MANZ) Sculpture Exhibition Upheaval/ Reconstruct 20 Jun–16 Jul.

Haifa 1957, Marti Friedlander.

AUCKLAND ART GALLERY TOI O TAMAKI Cnr Wellesley & Kitchener Streets Ph: 09 307 7700 hello@aucklandartgallery.com www.aucklandartgallery.com Hours: Open daily, 10am–5pm. The Body Laid Bare: Masterpieces from Tate, until 16 Jul, Colour is an Abstraction, until Mar 2018, Shout Whisper Wail! The 2017 Chartwell Show, 20 May–17 Oct, MARTI FRIEDLANDER Journeys, 10 Jun–Mar 2018.

AUCKLAND MUSEUM Domain Drive, Panell, Auckland Ph: 09 306 7067 info@aucklandmuseum.com www.aucklandmuseum.com Hours: 10am–5pm, seven days (closed Christmas Day) The oldest art society in New Zealand holding 6 major exhibitions a year.


64 Auckland

Elemental, Rona Ngahuia Osborne and Dan Mace.

CORBAN ESTATE ARTS CENTRE 2 Mt Lebanon Lane, Henderson Ph: 09 838 4455 info@ceac.org.nz www.ceac.org.nz Hours: Open 10am–4.30pm daily Free entry. For information on exhibitions, art classes, artist’s studios and events visit ceac.org.nz ESTUARY ARTS CENTRE 214B Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa Ph: 09 426 5570 admin@estuaryarts.org www.estuaryarts.org Hours: 7 Days 9am–4pm Gallery, classes, cafe.

Spring Shapes, Samantha Totty.

Dragon, Wang Dongling.

ENDEMICWORLD 62 Ponsonby Road, Grey Lynn Ph: 09 378 9823, Mob: +64 21 996 722 elliot@endemicworld.com www.endemicworld.com Hours: Mon–Sat 10–5, Sun 11–3 Endemicworld was founded in 2007 by Elliot Alexander. 120+ NZ and international artists exhibit at our Ponsonby Road gallery features in The New York Times and other intl media.

FHE GALLERIES 221 Ponsonby Rd, Ponsonby 1011, Auckland Ph: 09 306 0293 fhe_galleries@xtra.co.nz www.fhegalleries.com Hours: Mon 10am–4pm, Tue–Fri 10am– 5pm, Sat 11am–3pm (or by appointment). The gallery presents individual works of excellence from New Zealand, the Pacific, and other cultures. FHE Galleries also offer services in informed design, for private and corporate interiors.

FINGERS CONTEMPORARY JEWELLERY 2 Kitchener Str, Auckland Central, opposite Auckland Art Gallery, 09 373 3974 jewellery@fingers.co.nz www.fingers.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–5.30pm, Sat 11am–4.30pm. Exciting works from leading New Zealand and international jewellers available.


65 65

Auckland Region

GEORGE FRASER GALLERY Elam School of Fine Arts, The University of Auckland, 25a Princes Street Ph: 09 923 8000 elamoffice@auckland.ac.nz www.georgefraser.auckland.ac.nz Elam galleries are open to the public exhibiting a wide programme throughout the year supporting fine arts research at Elam and hosting national and international visiting artists. For more information and the latest event listings please visit our website.

Photo: Sam Hartnett.

GUS FISHER GALLERY 74 Shortland Street Ph: 09 923 6646 gusfishergallery@auckland.ac.nz www.gusfishergallery.auckland.ac.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 10am–5pm, Sat 12pm–4pm.

Sat–Sun 10am–3pm Exhibitions, art classes for children and adults, venue hire, artists studios, events and café.

Bâteau Mouche on the Seine, Piera McArthur.

JONATHAN GRANT GALLERIES 280 Parnell Road, Parnell Ph: 64 9 308 9125 jg@jgg.co.nz jgg.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 9.30am–5.30pm, Sat 10am–4pm, Sun 11am–4pm PIERA MCARTHUR, Pomp & Circumstance 4 May–4 Jun. KURA GALLERY, AOTEAROA ART + DESIGN PWC Tower, 188 Quay Street Ph: 09 302 1151 www.kuragallery.co.nz Hours: Open 7 days From Maori carving to unique NZ art, sculpture, jewellery.... LAKE HOUSE ARTS CENTRE 37 Fred Thomas Drive, Takapuna, North shore City Ph: 09 486 4877 info@lakehousearts.org.nz www.lakehousearts.org.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 9.30am–4pm,

MAIRANGI ARTS CENTRE 20 Hastings Road, Mairangi Bay Ph: 09 478 2237 office@mairangiarts.co.nz www.mairangiarts.co.nz Hours: Gallery open from Mon - Sat 9.30am - 4pm (unless otherwise stated). Studios open for classes 7 days (unless otherwise stated). MALCOLM SMITH GALLERY Uxbridge Arts and Culture, 35 Uxbridge Road, Howick Ph: 09 535 6467 www.malcolmsmithgallery.org.nz Hours: Mon–Sat 10am–4pm, Thur until 8pm. MCCAHON HOUSE MUSEUM 67 Otitori Bay Road, French Bay, Titirangi Ph: 09 817 6148 or 09 817 7200 mccahon@mccahonhouse.org.nz www.mccahonhouse.org.nz Hours: Wed – Sun 1pm–4pm (except for public holidays) The House today operates as a vibrant insight into Colin McCahon’s significant Titirangi Years (1953-1959) and provides a window into the era of Titirangi during the 1950s. Koha Admission suggested $5 per adult.


66 Auckland MICHAEL LETT 312 Karangahape Road, Cnr K Rd & East St, Auckland 1145 Mob: +64 9 309 7848 contact@michaellett.com www.michaellett.com Hours: Tue–Fri 11am–5pm Sat 11am–3pm

Whangarei Boat Sheds , Grant Reed.

MONTEREY GALLERY 5 Cook Street, Howick, Auckland Ph: 09 532 9022 anne@monterey.gallery www.monterey.gallery Hours: Mon–Wed 10am–4pm, Thur–Fri 10am–6pm, Sat 9am–4pm GRANT REED, Whangarei Boat Sheds.

NATHAN HOMESTEAD GALLERY 70 Hill Road, Manurewa Ph: 09 267 0180 nathanhomestead@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz Hours: Mon–Thur 9am–7pm, Fri 9am– 5pm, Sat 1pm–3pm. Closed Sunday. Nathan Homestead Gallery offers a wide range of exhibition programming with local, emerging and internationally recognised artists on display throughout the year. NEW ZEALAND MARTIME MUSEUM, EDMISTON GALLERY Cnr Quay & Hobson Streets, Viaduct Harbour, Auckland Ph: 09 373 0800 info@maritimemuseum.co.nz www.maritimemuseum.co.nz Hours: Daily, 9am–5pm Folk art, ship souvenirs and navigational equipment - a showcase of maritime treasures from the Museum archive 40 Years. Official Volvo Ocean Race photography exhibition charting four decades of one of the toughest events on earth. NORTHART Norman King Square, Ernie Mays St, Northcote Shopping Centre Ph: 09 480 9633 manager@northart.co.nz www.northart.co.nz Hours: Open daily 10am–4pm.

PARNELL GALLERY 263 Parnell Road, Parnell Ph: 09 377 3133, Fax: 09 377 3134 art@parnellgallery.co.nz www.parnellgallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 9.30am–5.30pm, Sat 10am–4pm, Sun 11am–4pm. CAROLINE BELLAMY, 2–16 May, SOFIA MINSON 13–27 Jun, TIMOTHY JONES 4–18 Jul. PROJECTSPACE GALLERY Elam School of Fine Arts, The University of Auckland, Ground floor, 20 Whitaker Place Ph: 09 923 8000 elamoffice@auckland.ac.nz www.elamprojectspace.auckland.ac.nz Hours: See website for hours Projectspace gallery is open to the public throughout the academic year. Exhibitions include a curated selection of solo and group exhibitions by Elam School of Fine Art students in various media including installation, painting, sculpture, printmaking, moving image, mixed media and photography. For more information and the latest exhibition listings please visit our website.


67 67 Auckland – Waiheke Island Region TE TUHI 13 Reeves Rd, Pakuranga Ph: 09 577 0138 info@tetuhi.org.nz www.tetuhi.org.nz Hours: 9am–5pm daily (closed on public holidays) YONA LEE In Transit (Arrival) until 16 Oct. The Raft of the Manu – Resurrected, Greg Semu.

Natasha Keating, 2017

STUDIO ONE TOI T 1 Ponsonby Road, Ponsonby Ph: 09 376 3221 info@studioone.org.nz www.studioone.org.nz Hours: Mon–Thu 9am–7pm, Fri 9am– 5pm, Sat 9am–4pm. Studio One Toi Tū is a community arts centre in the heart of Auckland. It is a hub for creatives and offers a wide programme of exhibitions, courses, events and studio hire options. TE TOI UKU 8 Ambrico Place, New Lynn Ph: 09 827 7349 www.portageceramicstrust.org.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 10am–4pm, closed public holidays.

New Tuscan Sunset Scans, André Hemer.

TE URU WAITAKERE CONTEMPORARY GALLERY 420 Titirangi Rd, Titirangi Ph: 09 817 8087 info@teuru.org.nz www.teuru.org.nz Hours: Mon–Sun 10am–4.30pm YUKIHIRO TAGUCHI, More In-Formation until 9 July, Watching Windows until 9 July, Roger Ballen’s Theatre of the Mind 27 May–20 Aug.

THE PAH HOMESTEAD TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre Ph: 09 639 2010 enquiries@wallaceartstrust.org.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 8am–3pm, Sat–Sun 8am– 5pm. Vanished Delft: Handmade Material Culture at The Pah Homestead curated by ANNA MILES until 14 May, Erased Tattoo: Recent Acquisitions from the Wallace Arts Trust Collection until 21 May, Leo Bensemann & Friends: Portraiture and The Group curated by PETER SIMPSON until 28 May, MAX OETTLI Men until 28 May, Cycles: Repetition & Redirection curated by MIRIAM HARRIS until 28 May, Here, Now, Then, Always 17 May–2 Jul, EDWARDS + JOHANN Events Growing From The Edge of Spaces 29 May–9 Jul.


68 Auckland–Coromandel THE VIVIAN GALLERY 39 Omaha Valley Rd, Matakana, R D 5, Warkworth 0945 Ph: 09 4229995, Mob: +021 669844 thevivian@thevivian.co.nz www.thevivian.co.nz Hours: Daily Wed–Mon 11am–5pm, Closed Tuesdays A purpose built gallery exhibiting mainly group shows of contemporary New Zealand artists that change every five weeks. Set in three acres of rural landscape, a must visit destination four kilometres past Matakana Village on the road towards Leigh. TIM MELVILLE 4 Winchester St, Grey Lynn Ph: 09 378 1500 tim@timmelville.com www.timmelville.com MATT ARBUCKLE, 2–27 May, ELLIOT COLLINS 2–24 June, Ten Year Group Show 27 June–5 August. TRISH CLARK GALLERY 1 Bowen Avenue, Auckland CBD Ph: 09 379 9556 info@trishclark.co.nz www.trishclark.co.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 12pm–5pm, Sat 12pm–4pm. HEATHER STRAKA The Strangers’ Room until 7 Jun.

TWO ROOMS 16 Putiki Street, Newton Ph: 09 360 5900 info@tworooms.co.nz www.tworooms.co.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 11am–5pm, Sat 11am–3pm. WEST COAST GALLERY Seaview Road, Piha Ph: 09 812 8029 www.westcoastgallery.co.nz Hours: 7 days, 10am–5pm Comprehensive range of West Auckland artists. Monthly exhibitions.

Waiheke Island

Tress, Frances Rood .

WAIHEKE COMMUNITY ART GALLERY 2 Korora Road, Oneroa, Waiheke Island Ph: 09 372 9907 director@waihekeartgallery.org.nz www.waihekeartgallery.org.nz Hours: 7 Days, 10am–4pm

Coromandel

Royal, Ingrid Boot.

BREAD AND BUTTER GALLERY 26 Albert St, Whitianga, 3510 Ph: 07 666 4927 sales@breadandbutter.co.nz Hours: 10–4 seven days a week.


69 69 Bay ofRegion Plenty–Hamilton Bay of Plenty

Hamilton

Molly Morpeth Canaday Award.

Toi Mauri - A Rising Force, Todd Couper.

TAURANGA ART GALLERY Cnr of Wharf & Willow Streets, Tauranga CBD Ph: 07 578 7933 office@artgallery.org.nz www.artgallery.org.nz Hours: Open daily 10am–4.30pm Until 15 June After Paradox Inside, TAG reopens 1 July with the 80s Show with works from the Fletcher Collection, an atrium project by SARA HUGHES, contemporary Māori artist TODD COUPER'S first survey exhibition, plus a 10th anniversary collection show. #TAG10

WHAKATĀNE MUSEUM AND ARTS TE KŌPUTU A TE WHANGA A TOI Whakatāne Library and Exhibition Centre, Esplanade Mall , Kō kahoroa Drive, Whakatāne Ph: 07 306 0505 museumandarts@whakatane.govt.nz www.whakatanemuseum.org.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 9am–5pm, Sat–Sun 10am–2pm. Closed public holidays. Museum display and three gallery spaces showcasing work by local and national artists.

Rotorua ROTORUA MUSEUM Oruawhata Drive, Government Gardens Ph: 07 350 1814 rotorua.museum@ROTORUALC.NZ rotoruamuseum.co.nz

ARTSPOST GALLERIES AND SHOP 120 Victoria Street Ph: 07 838 6928 artsPost@hcc.govt.nz www.waikatomuseum/artspost, facebook. com/artspost Hours: Daily 10am–5pm, free entry Three galleries and retail store showcasing the best of New Zealand art and design. CALDER & LAWSON GALLERY Gallagher Academy of Performing Arts, University of Waikato Ph: 07 858 5100 academy@waikato.ac.nz www.waikato.ac/academy/gallery Visit our website for more details. SANDZ GALLERY 6 Kent Street, Frankton, Hamilton Ph: 07 8474344 sandzgallery@gmail.com sandzgallery.co.nz Hours: Exhibits work of our studio artists and community artists from Waikato area. Contact us for gallery hire/exhibition details. SKINROOM 123 Commerce Street, Frankton, Hamilton skinroom@outlook.com www.skinroomgallery.com Skinroom is an independent artist-run space in Frankton, Hamilton, founded in 2016. Creative directors are Geoffrey Clarke and Eliza Webster.


70 Waikato–Hawke's Bay WAIKATO MUSEUM, TE WHARE TAONGA O WAIKATO 1 Grantham St Ph: 07 838 6606 museum@hcc.govt.nz www.waikatomuseum.co.nz Our exhibitions bring you the stories of our arts, history, culture and science. Find us on Facebook www.facebook.com/waikatomuseum. REBECCA HOLDEN Sand In The Apricot Jam until 11 June.

Waikato HERITAGE GALLERY 85 Victoria St, Cambridge Ph: 07 827 4346 sandra@heritagegallery.co.nz www.heritagegallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 9.30am–5pm, Sat & Sun 9.30am–4pm A quality selection of contemporary creative arts of NZ – jewellery, ceramics, glass, paintings and prints.

WALLACE GALLERY, MORRINSVILLE 167 Thames Street, Morrisville Ph: 07 889 7791 info@morrinsville.org.nz

www.morrinsvillegallery.org.nz Hours: Tue–Sun 10am–4pm. Free entry – donations greatly appreciated.

Gisborne PAUL NACHE GALLERY Upstairs 89 Grey Street now@paulnache.com Hours: Wed –Fri 11am–5pm, Sat 11am– 2pm (or by appointment) Please refer to paulnache.com for opening dates, artists and upcoming projects. TAIRAWHITI MUSEUM Kelvin Park, Stout St Ph: 06 867 3832, Fax: 06 867 2728 info@tairawhitimuseum.org.nz www.tairawhitimuseum.org.nz

Hawke's Bay ELECTRA GALLERY Ruataniwha Street, Waipukurau Ph: 06 858 8388 info@thefestival.org.nz www.thefestival.org.nz/electra HASTINGS CITY ART GALLERY 201 Eastbourne Street East Ph: 06 871 5095 www.hastingscityartgallery.co.nz Hours: Open 7 days, 10am–4.30pm FREE ENTRY

HASTINGS COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE 106 Russell Street South, Hastings Ph: 06 878 9447 info@creativehastings.org.nz www.creativehastings.org.nz Hours: Weekdays 9.30am–4pm, Sat 10am–2pm Showcasing Hawke’s Bay Artists.

Indra’s Bow (detail), Tiffany Singh and Jo Blogg.

MTG HAWKE’S BAY 1 Tennyson Street, Napier Ph: 06 835 7781 www.mtghawkesbay.com


71 71 Region Hawke's Bay– Taranaki

PAPER-WORKS 268 Clifton Road, Te Awanga Mob: 027 450 7517 info@paper-works.co.nz www.paper-works.co.nz Hours: Thur–Sun 11am–3pm, or by appointment. Original Works on Paper – paintings, etchings, lithographs, screenprints, photography, art books and more... PARLOUR PROJECTS 306 Eastbourne St East, Hastings Mob: 021 450 279 info@parlourprojects.com www.parlourprojects.com Hours: Wed–Sat, 10am–3pm or by appointment.

TENNYSON GALLERY Cnr Tennyson & Hastings Streets, Napier Ph: 06 834 1331 info@tennysongallery.nz www.tennysongallery.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–5pm, Sat 10am– 4pm, Sun 11am–3pm. Exciting new glass and ceramic work, and paintings, prints and mixed media from around the country, plus a superb collection of contemporary New Zealand jewellery. THE RABBIT ROOM 29A Hastings Street, Napier therabbitroomgallery@gmail.com www.therabbitroom.nz Hours: Tue–Thu 1–4pm

Taranaki AOTEA UTANGANUI MUSEUM OF SOUTH TARANAKI 127 Egmont St, Patea 4250 Ph: 0800 111 323 museum@stdc.govt.nz www.museumofsouthtaranaki.wordpress.com Hours: Mon–Sat 10am–4pm, closed Sundays, Christmas Day and Good Friday. Aotea Utanganui Museum of South Taranaki has on display some of the oldest dated wooden artefacts in New Zealand; taonga that date to around 1400 from the Waitore site, near Whenuakura. These artefacts help tell the story of people who lived in South Taranaki over six hundred years ago.

Govett-Brewster Art Gallery.

GOVETT-BREWSTER ART GALLERY/ LEN LYE CENTRE 42 Queen Street, New Plymouth 4342, Aotearoa Mob: +64 6 759 6060 govettinfo@govettbrewster.com www.govettbrewster.com Hours: Open six days: Sat, Sun, Mon, Wed, Thu, Fri 10am–6pm. CLOSED TUESDAYS. LEN LYE , ROBERT GRAVES , LAURA RIDING On an Island until 9 Jul, OSKAR FISCHINGER’S Raumlichtkunst (c. 1926/2012) until 6 Aug, FLORIAN PUMHÖSL , PAUL BONET Revealed #2 until 27 Jul, TOM KREISLER Open Collection ongoing, LEN LYE Fountain III ongoing.


72 Mangaweka–Whanganui Mangaweka YELLOW CHURCH GALLERY State Highway 1, Rangitikei Ph: 06 382 5774, Mob: 0275266612 www.webs.com/mangawekagallery Hours: Open most days 10am - 5pm RICHARD ASLETT, plus other local and funky international artists.

Waiouru

exhibition spanning thirty years of artistic practice 20 May–6 Aug Whenua Hou: New Maori Ceramics AARON SCYTHE, DAN COUPER, DAVINA DUKE, HANA RAKENA, HERA JOHNS, JESS PARAONE, STEVEI HOUKAMAU, TRACY KEITH 3 Jun–27 Aug. Developed and toured by Tauranga Art Gallery Toi Tauranga and Objectspace.

NATIONAL ARMY MUSEUM State Highway I, Waiouru armymuseum.co.nz Hours: Open daily 9am to 4.30pm Discover NZ's military history, stories of courage, honour and sacrifice. Guided tours, Research Library, Kidz HQ , Home Fires Café, Gift Shop.

Whanganui SARJEANT GALLERY TE WHARE O REHUA WHANGANUI 38 Taupo Quay, Whanganui Ph: 06 349 0506 info@sarjeant.org.nz www.sarjeant.org.nz Hours: Mon–Sun 10.30am–4.30pm. ROBERTA THORNLEY A Serious Girl A photographic exhibition based upon a dedicated Whanganui gymnast 27 May–20 Aug, EUAN MACLEOD Painting the painter A touring survey

Pitt Island Shag & Chatham Island Shag, Angela Tier.

TREE OBJECT | SPACE | DESIRE Ceramics & Photography, 37 Taupo Quay, Whanganui Ph: 06 348 7650 www.treeobjectspace.com

Boxed Animals, Philip Trusttum.

WH MILBANK GALLERY 1B Bell Street, Whanganui Mob: 027 628 6877 bill.milbank@gmail.com whmilbank.co.nz Hours: 11am–5pm all days except Mon. If travelling a call or text will ensure I am here. We hold NZs largest stock of PHILIP TRUSTTUM's paintings & drawings and a showroom dedicated to presenting changing aspects of his work. As well, I curate exhibitions with local and national content and stock work by artists from Whanganui, around New Zealand and beyond. 


73 73 Manawatu–Porirua Region Manawatu

Horowhenua

Te Manawa.

TE MANAWA MUSEUM/GALLERY/ SCIENCE CENTRE 326 Main Street, Palmerston North Ph: 06 355 5000 enquiries@temanawa.co.nz www.temanawa.co.nz Hours: Open daily.

Wairarapa ARATOI MUSEUM OF ART AND HISTORY Bruce St, Masterton Ph: 06 370 0001 info@aratoi.co.nz www.aratoi.co.nz Te Marae o Rongotaketake – Redressing our Kahungunu History until 3 Sep,

Stuart Robertson

TE TAKERE CULTURE AND COMMUNITY CENTRE 10 Bath Street, Levin 06 368 1953 enquiries@tetakere.org.nz www.tetakere.org.nz In Winter 2017 a selection of iconic photographs from STUART ROBERTSON’s Peace in 10,000 hands exhibition will be auctioned for charities working in the space of domestic violence. A catalogue and schedule are available on our website.

Kapiti ARTEL GALLERY 9 Mahara place, Waikanae Ph: 04 297 0937 artelnz@gmail.com www.artelgallery.net Hours: Tues–Sun 10am–5pm New Zealand-made art, featuring Kapiti artists and makers.

AUGUSTIN GALLERY STUDIO 37 Kensington Dr, RD1, Waikanae Ph: 04 293 5956 peterfelix@clear.net.nz www.peteraugustin.com Hours: Studio open by appointment. Works by PETER AUGUSTIN. MAHARA GALLERY 20 Mahara Place, Waikanae, 5036 Ph: 04 902 6242 info@maharagallery.org.nz www.maharagallery.org.nz Hours: Tue–Sat 10am–4pm, Sun 1–4pm. Free entry. An emerging talent, early works by FRANCES HODGKINS until 4 Jun. new SPACE: until 7 May. Liminal LYNDA MAPPLEBECK . 10 May–4 Jun. LYNETTE RAWLINGSON Paintings.

Porirua PATAKA Cnr Norrie & Parumoana Street, Porirua City, Wellington Ph: 04 237 1511 pataka@pcc.govt.nz pataka.org.nz Hours: Mon–Sat 10am–4.30pm, Sun 11am– 4.30pm The 70’s Dames until 4 Jun, KERRY JANE SCOTT My Back Yard until 4 Jun, Painting our place: 30 Years of Mana Art until 11 Jun, Boundless: printmaking beyond the frame 20 May–13 Aug, KEREAMA TAEPA Whakapi 20 May–13 Aug, Influx 20 May–13 Aug, Recollections + WAYNE YOULE Collection Intervention 20 May–13 Aug.


74 The Hutt Valley– Wellington Region The Hutt Valley

Wellington

EXPRESSIONS WHIRINAKI ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT CENTRE 836 Fergusson Drive, Upper Hutt Ph: 04 527 2168 www.expressions.org.nz Hours: Open every day 9am–4pm, free entry.

ACADEMY GALLERIES 1 Queens Wharf Ph: 04 499 8807 info@nzafa.com www.nzafa.com Hours: Daily 10am–5pm, free entry.

ODLIN ART GALLERY Hutt Art Centre, 9–11 Myrtle St, Lower Hutt huttartsociety@xtra.co.nz www.huttart.co.nz Hours: Open daily 10am–4pm

ADAM ART GALLERY Victoria University of Wellington, Gate 3, Kelburn Parade Ph: 04 463 6835 adamartgallery@vuw.ac.nz www.adamartgallery.org.nz Hours: Tue–Sun 11am–5pm Free entry.

PETONE SETTLERS MUSEUM The Esplanade, Petone Ph: 04 568 8373 settlers@huttcity.govt.nz www.petonesettlers.org.nz Hours: Wed–Sun 10am–4pm. Free entry. THE DOWSE ART MUSEUM 45 Laings Road, Lower Hutt Ph: 04 570 6500 enquiries@dowse.org.nz www.dowse.org.nz Hours: Open daily 10am–5pm.

ALPHA GALLERY 55 Abel Smith Street, Te Aro Ph: 04 382 8468 alpstu@gmail.com www.alphagallery.org.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 9am–4.30pm Inclusive gallery in the heart of Wellington. ART WALRUS 111 Taranaki St Ph: 04 382 8383 enquiries@walrusgallery.co.nz www.walrusgallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Sat 9am–5pm, closed Sun

Joy, Tatyana Kulida.

ANTHESIS GALLERY 131 Willis St Suite #3, Te Aro. Web: www.AnthesisGallery.com Open by appointment and for monthly reception. Upcoming: Getting Dressed To Be Yourself Dec 16 6-9 pm. Fine Art and Traditional Portraiture by classically trained artists. AVID GALLERY 48 Victoria Street Ph: 04 472 7703 info@avidgallery.co.nz www.avidgallery.co.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 10am–6pm, Sat 10am– 4pm, Mon by appointment Exquisite hand-crafted jewellery and art objects from New Zealand’s leading artists.


75 75 Region Wellington BARTLEY + COMPANY ART 56A Ghuznee Street, Te Aro Ph: 04 802 4622 alison@bartleyandcompanyart.co.nz www.bartleyandcompanyart.co.nz Hours: Wed–Fri 11am–5.30pm, Sat 11am–4pm.

HAMISH MCKAY First Floor, 39 Ghuznee Street Ph: 04 384 7140 info@hamishmckay.co.nz www.hamishmckay.co.nz Hours: Fri–Sat 11am–5pm or by appointment.

Barbapapa, Martino Gamper.

True love waits, Aaron Waghorn.

BOWEN GALLERIES 41 Ghuznee Street Ph: 04 381 0351 info@bowengalleries.co.nz www.bowengalleries.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–5.30pm, Sat 10am–3pm. BRUCE FOSTER, 1 May–21 Jun, AARON WAGHORN 22 May–10 Jun, Four Young Artists Wellington/Auckland 12 Jun–1 Jul, DIANE PRINCE 24 Jul–12 Aug.

CITY GALLERY WELLINGTON Civic Square Ph: 04 801 3021 citygallery@wmt.org.nz www.citygallery.org.nz Hours: Daily 10am–5pm. PETRA CORTRIGHT, Running Neo-Geo Games Under Mame until 13 Aug, MARTINO GAMPER 100 Chairs in 100 Days until 13 Aug, COLIN MCCAHON On Going Out with the Tide until 30 Jul, SHANNON TE AO Untitled (McCahon House Studies) until 30 Jul. EXHIBITIONS GALLERY OF FINE ART 20 Brandon Street Ph: 04 499 6356, Mob: 021 062 2072 ron@exhibitionsgallery.co.nz www.exhibitionsgallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Sat 10.30am–4.30pm

Bluebird 1, Jane Hyder.

JANE HYDER STUDIO GALLERY Studio 21, Toi Poneke Art Centre, 61 Abel Smith Street Ph: 027 920 0337 hyder@clear.net.nz www.janehyder.com Hours: Open by appointment for art. Resident artist and art tutor JANE HYDER.


76 Wellington Region KIWI ART HOUSE GALLERY 288 Cuba St, Te Aro Ph: 04 385 3083 www.kiwiarthouse.co.nz Hours: Tues–Sun 10.30am–5.30pm KURA 19 Allen Street Ph: 04 802 4934 kuragallery.co.nz Hours: Open 7 days MILLWOOD GALLERY 291b Tinakori Road, Thorndon Ph: 04 473 5178 millwoodgallery@xtra.co.nz www.millwoodgallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 9am–5.30pm, Sat 10am–4pm An extensive selection of original prints and paintings by over 30 contemporary NZ artists including a wide range of Wellington images. NEW ZEALAND PORTRAIT GALLERY Shed 11, Queen's Wharf, Wellington Waterfront Ph: 04 472 2298 admin@nzportraitgallery.org.nz www.nzportraitgallery.org.nz Hours: Open daily 10.30am–4.30pm. Admission Free. Exhibitions on now.

NGA TOI | ARTS TE PAPA 55 Cable St, Wellington tepapa.govt.nz/arts Hours: Open 10am–6pm daily (closed Christmas Day) Discover the national art collection. On now, Level 5, Free entry, Te Papa.

PHOTOSPACE GALLERY 1st floor, 37 Courtenay Place Ph: 04 382 9502 www.photospacegallery.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–4pm, Sat 11am–4pm

ORA GALLERY & CAFE 23 Allen Street, Te Aro, Wellington Ph: 04 384 4157 marissa@oragallery.co.nz Facebook - ORA Gallery and Cafe NZ Art, Design & Gifts PAGE BLACKIE GALLERY 42 Victoria St Ph: 04 471 2636 info@pageblackiegallery.co.nz www.pageblackiegallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–5.30pm, Sat 10am–4pm. PETER MCLEAVEY GALLERY Level 1, 147 Cuba Street, Wellington, Te Aro Ph: 04 384 7356 olivia@petermcleaveygallery.com www.petermcleaveygallery.com Hours: Wed–Fri 11am–5pm, Sat 11am– 4pm, or by appointment. VERMILLION / YVONNE TODD new work until 13 May. WARREN VISCOE & OLEG POLOUNINEÂ 17 May–10 Jun.

Links, Macarena Bernal.

QUOIL NEW ZEALAND CONTEMPORARY JEWELLERY GALLERY 149 Willis Street, Wellington Ph: 04 384 1499 gallery@quoil.co.nz www.quoil.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–5.30pm, Sat and Sun 10am–4pm Quoil now represents jewellery artists from around the world. Browse the current show or peruse the drawers for a treasure-trove of wearable pieces.


77 77 Region Wellington –Blenheim ROAR! GALLERY Cnr. Vivian and Victoria Streets, 189 Vivian Street Ph: 04 385 7602 roar.gallery@gmail.com www.roargallery.org.nz Hours: Wed–Fri 11am–6pm: Sat 11am– 2pm. Closed Sunday ROAR! gallery is a professional gallery and exhibition space that supports artists with limited access to traditional dealer galleries. SOLANDER GALLERY 218c Willis St Ph: 04 920 0913 info@solandergallery.co.nz www.solandergallery.co.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 10am–5pm, Sat 10am– 4pm. On Paper Celebration of works on paper until 27 May, MERVYN TAYLOR Artist Craftsman Watercolours and Drawings 31 May–1 Jul. SUITE GALLERY 241–243 Cuba Street, Wellington Ph: 04 976 7663 info@suite.co.nz www.suite.co.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 11am–6pm, Sat 11am–4pm.

VINCENTS GALLERY Vincents Art Workshop, 5/148 Willis Street Ph: 04 499 1030 vincentsartworkshop@xtra.co.nz vincents.co.nz Hours: Mon 11–4, Tue 1.30–6.30, Wed 11–5, Thurs (Women’s day) 11–4, Fri 10–4 Solo and group shows featuring emerging artists at affordable prices. TOI PŌNEKE ARTS CENTRE 61 Abel Smith Street Ph: 04 385 1929 artscentre@wcc.govt.nz Hours: 10am–8pm Mon–Fri, 10am–4pm Sat–Sun facebook.com/toiponeke TURNBULL GALLERY Level 1, National Library of New Zealand, Molesworth Street, Wellington www.natlib.govt.nz Hours: Mon–Sat 10am–5pm See www.natlib.govt.nz for more information including related events.The Turnbull Gallery showcases the collections of the Alexander Turnbull Library. VESSEL 87 Victoria Street, Wellington Ph: 04 499 2321 www.vessel.co.nz Hours: Open 7 days Look - Love - Shop

WELLINGTON MUSEUM Queens Wharf, Wellington Waterfront Ph: 04 472 8904 museumswellington@wmt.org.nz www.museumwellington.org.nz Hours: Open daily 10am–5pm except Christmas Day

Picton THE DIVERSION GALLERY 10 London Quay, Picton Waterfront Mob: 027 4408 121 bspeedy@thediversion.co.nz www.thediversion.co.nz Hours: Wed–Sat 12pm–5pm | or by appointment.

Blenheim MILLENNIUM PUBLIC ART GALLERY Seymour Square Ph: 03 579 2001 marlpublicart@xtra.co.nz www.marlboroughart.org.nz Hours: 10.30am–4.30pm weekdays, 1pm– 4pm weekends.


78 Nelson–Region Christchurch Nelson CRAIG POTTON GALLERY + STORE 255 Hardy Street Ph: 03 548 9554 gallery@craigpottongallery.co.nz www.craigpottongallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–5pm, Sat 10am–2pm HÖGLUND GLASSBLOWING STUDIO & GALLERY 52 Lansdowne Road, Richmond, Nelson Ph: 03 544 6500 artglass@hoglund.co.nz www.hoglundartglass.com Hours: Open daily 10am–5pm NELSON PROVINCIAL MUSEUM cnr Trafalgar and Hardy Street, Nelson Ph: 03 548 9588 www.nelsonmuseum.co.nz Hours: 10am–5pm weekdays 10–4.30pm weekends and public holidays closed Good Friday and Christmas day. Free entry for local residents, $5 for visitors Stories from Te Tau Ihu, the top of the South Island from Tasman Bay to Golden Bay. Our treasure-filled exhibitions explore the region's history, cultures and natural environment, plus short-term touring exhibitions and children's programmes

RED ART GALLERY 1 Bridge Street Ph: 03 548 2170 red@redartgallery.com www.redartgallery.com Art Gallery - Store - Cafe THE SUTER ART GALLERY TE ARATOI O WHAKATĀ 208 Bridge Street, Nelson Ph: 03 548 4699 www.thesuter.org.nz Hours: Open daily 9.30am–4.30pm Art Gallery – Café – Store – Theatre WORLD OF WEARABLEART & CLASSIC CARS MUSEUM Cadillac Way off Quarantine Road, Annesbrook, Nelson Ph: 03 547 4573 info@wowcars.co.nz www.wowcars.co.nz Hours: Open every day, 10am–5pm (except 25th December). We recommend 60–90 min to view all galleries. World of WearableArt & Classic Cars Museum. Be amazed by the incredible garments that feature in the WearableArt Gallery, marvel at the extraordinary garments by artists from New Zealand and around the globe. View our world class Classic Car Galleries displaying some of the most sought after models in classic motoring, beautifully set under theatrical lighting. Our Museum is like no other. Museum includes a Cafe and Gallery shop.

Christchurch BRYCE GALLERY Cnr Riccarton Road & Paeroa Street Ph: 03 348 0064 art2die4@brycegallery.co.nz brycegallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–5pm, Sat 10am– 4pm, Sun 11am–4pm.

Late 19th century vase, Unknown

CANTERBURY MUSEUM Rolleston Avenue Ph: 03 366 5000, Fax: 03 366 5622 info@canterburymuseum.com www.canterburymuseum.com Hours: Open every day Oct–Mar 9.00am–5.30pm Natural and human history are joined by fine and decorative art. Rare Maori artefacts, Antarctic Gallery, Heritage Street, Asian Art. Frequent temporary art exhibitions.


79 79 Region Christchurch CENTRE OF CONTEMPORARY ART TOI MOROKI (COCA) 66 Gloucester Street, Central City www.coca.org.nz Hours: Tue–Sun 10am - 5pm, free admission Located in the heart of Christchurch city, CoCA Centre of Contemporary Art Toi Moroki is a national and international cutting-edge gallery. Be moved, be challenged, be inspired!

CHRISTCHURCH ART GALLERY TE PUNA O WAIWHETU Cnr Worcester Boulevard and Montreal Street, Christchurch Ph: 03 941 7300 info@christchurchartgallery.org.nz christchurchartgallery.org.nz Hours: Open 7 days 10am–5pm, Wed 10am–9pm FRANCIS UPRITCHARD, Jealous Saboteurs until 16 Jul, SHANNON TE AO Tenei Ao Kawa Nei until 23 Jul, CARL SYDOW Tomorrow never knows until 23 Jul, WAYNE YOULE Look Mum No Hands until 3 Sep, DON PEEBLES Relief Constructions until 3 Sep, KUSHANA BUSH The Burning Hours 10 Jun–15 Oct, FRANCIS SHURROCK, JULIET PETER, RUSSELL CLARK, WILLIAM SUTTON, RITA ANGUS, OLIVIA SPENCER BOWER, COLIN MCCAHON, TOSS WOOLLASTON.

Katie Thomas.

CITY ART DEPOT Ph: 03 365 3811 info@cityart.co.nz www.cityart.co.nz Hours: Mon to Fri 8.30am–5pm, Sat 10am–2pm

CHAMBERS241 241 Moorhouse Avenue, Christchurch Ph: 022 677 2810 gallery@chambersart.co.nz chambersart.co.nz Hours: Tues–Fri 11am–5.30pm and Sat 11am–4pm.

FORM GALLERY 468 Colombo Street, Sydenham Ph: 03 377 1211 info@form.co.nz www.form.co.nz Hours: Tue–Sat 10am–5pm, Sun 10am–3pm See us on Facebook. Object art retail & exhibition space.

ILAM CAMPUS GALLERY Block 2, School of Fine Arts, Arts Rd, University of Canterbury Ph: 03 364 2159 sarahe.brown@canterbury.ac.nz www.arts.canterbury.ac.nz/fina/exhibitions.shtml Hours: 9am–4pm Mon–Fri. JONATHAN SMART GALLERY 52 Buchan St, Sydenham, Christchurch Ph: 03 365 7070 www.jonathansmartgallery.com Hours: Wed–Fri 11am–5pm Sat 11am– 3pm KRISTIN HOLLIS, May/June, SASKIA LEEK & RICHARD REDDAWAY July.


80 Christchurch –Canterbury Region Canterbury

Wood Set, W.D Hammond.

Disordered Cube Necklace, Frances Stachl.

PG GALLERY192 192 Bealey Ave, Christchurch 8013 Ph: 03 366 8487 info@pggallery192.co.nz www.pggallery192.co.nz Hours: Tues–Fri 10.30am–5pm Sat 10.30am–2pm W.D HAMMOND, Inveigle, SAM HARRISON drawings/sculpture 2–26 May, NIGEL BUXTON large drawings 30 May–23 Jun, ROGER BOYCE 27 Jun–21 Jul.

THE NATIONAL 241 Moorhouse Ave, Christchurch Ph: 03 366 3893 info@thenational.co.nz www.thenational.co.nz Hours: Tues–Fri 10.30am–5.30pm, Sat 10.30am–4pm Contemporary jewellery and objects. THE PHYSICS ROOM Level 3, 209 Tuam Street www.physicsroom.org.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 10am–5pm, Sat & Sun 11am–4pm. 6 May–11 June NOVA PAUL Surplus Reality & HANNAH BEEHRE Westerlund 2.

50 WORKS GALLERY 50 London Street, Lyttelton Ph: 03 328 7653, Mob: 027 423 9812 50worksgallery@gmail.com www.50worksgallery.com Hours: Thu–Fri 2–4pm, Sat and Sun 11am–4pm 50 Works Gallery’s Spring Group Show features new works from eighteen artists who have exhibited at the gallery throughout the year, along with works from guest artists. Works in the exhibition include sculpture, paintings and prints.

From the series A Study For Cadence, Steve Carr.

ASHBURTON ART GALLERY Level 1, 327 West Street, Ashburton Ph: 03 308 1133 info@ashburtonartgallery.org.nz www.ashburtonartgallery.org.nz Hours: Open daily 10am–4pm, Wednesday 10am–7pm. Find us on Facebook or visit our website for current exhibitions and events.


81 81 Geraldine–Oamaru Region ARTS IN OXFORD 72 Main Street, Oxford Ph: 03 312 1639 artsinoxfordgallery@xtra.co.nz www.artsinoxford.com Hours: Tues–Sun 10am–4pm Find us on Facebook or visit our website for current exhibitions and workshops.

Geraldine

Mt Hays & Two Thumbs Range , Susanna Izard.

MCATAMNEY GALLERY AND DESIGN STORE Upstairs Old Post Office Building, 47 Talbot St Ph: 027 305 3000, Mob: A/H 027 305 3000 carolyn@mcatamneygallery.co.nz www.mcatamneygallery.co.nz Hours: Sat–Wed 11am–3pm, Thur, Fri and all other times by arrangement. Modern and Contemporary Art. BERNADETTE PARSONS, , SUSANNA IZARD, RICHARD BOLTON , A.A. DEANS.

SUSAN BADCOCK STUDIO Back of Old Post Office, 47 Talbot St Mob: 021 175 2853 susanbadcockstudio@gmail.com Hours: Open Tue–Sat 10–2pm or by appointment. Find us on Facebook.

Timaru AIGANTIGHE ART GALLERY 49 Wai-iti Road Ph: 03 688 4424 gallery@timdc.govt.nz www.timaru.govt.nz/art-gallery Hours: Tue–Fri 10am–4pm, weekends & public holidays 12–4pm. SAFFRON GALLERY OF ART LTD 325 Pages Road Mob: 021 034 4859 www.saffrongallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–4pm or by appointment.

Eyes On The Face of Time, Debbie Templeton-Page.

YORK STREET GALLERY OF FINE ART 21 York Street Ph: 03 684 4795 www.yorkstreetgallery.com Hours: Open Thurs, Fri and Saturday 11am–3pm or 24/7 at yorkstreetgallery. com and debbietempletonpage.com Sculptor DEBBIE TEMPLETON-PAGE Studio at back of the gallery. Contemporary traditional art works by renowned artists are featured throughout the year. Artists including - MARILYNN WEBB, LLEW SUMMERS, A.A. DEANS.

Oamaru THE FORRESTER GALLERY 9 Thames Street, Oamaru, 9400 www.culturewaitaki.org.nz Hours: Open daily. Free entry, donations welcome.


82 Dunedin Region Dunedin

Database J, Richard Killeen.

BRETT MCDOWELL GALLERY 5 Dowling Street, Dunedin Ph: 03 477 5260 brett@brettmcdowellgallery.com www.brettmcdowellgallery.com Hours: Mon–Fri 11am–5.30pm, Sat 11am–1pm RICHARD KILLEEN, Databases I, J and L until 11 May, BARRY CLEAVIN Drawings 1965 – 2015 12 May–1 Jun, SÉRAPHINE PICK 2–22 Jun, JOE L’ESTRANGE Weeds and State Houses 23 Jun–13 Jul.

DUNEDIN PUBLIC ART GALLERY 30 The Octagon Ph: 03 474 3240 dpagmail@dcc.govt.nz www.dunedin.art.museum Hours: Open daily 10am–5pm Exploded Worlds: Works from the Dunedin Public Art Gallery ongoing, Open Air, Still Life until 30 Jul, When Dreams Turn to Gold until 25 Jun, REBECCA BAUMANN Untitled (exploded view) until 25 Jun, SHANNON NOVAK The Expanded Gallery ongoing, EVE ARMSTRONG Growing Demand until 9 Jul, CAMPBELL PATTERSON call sick 17 Jun– 1 Oct.

HOCKEN GALLERY 90 Anzac Avenue, University of Otago Ph: 03 479 8871 hocken@otago.ac.nz www.otago.ac.nz/library/hocken/exhibitions Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–5pm, Gallery open daily 10am-5pm INGE DOESBURG GALLERY 6 Castle St Ph: 03 4667 627 ingedoesburg@gmail.com www.ingedoesburg.com Hours: Thu–Sat 12pm–2pm or by arrangement. MINT GALLERY 32 Moray Place Ph: 03 477 1763, Mob: 021 0255 9998 murray@mintart.co.nz www.mintart.co.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 10am–5pm, Sat 10am–4pm

Untitled, Philip James Frost.

GALLERY DE NOVO 101 Stuart Street, Dunedin Ph: 03 474 9200, Mob: 021 030 5199 art@gallerydenovo.co.nz www.gallerydenovo.co.nz Hours: Open Mon–Fri 9.30am–5.30pm, Sat & Sun 10am–3pm. Cardboard & Computers by MIKE WESTON and OTIS FRIZZELL 5–16 May; New works by ANGELA BURNS 18–30 Jun; Group Show 1 Jul.

MORAY GALLERY 55 Princes Street Ph: 03 477 8060 info@moraygallery.co.nz www.moraygallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–4.30pm Sat 11am–2pm.


83 Cromwell–Southland OTAGO ART SOCIETY First Floor, Dunedin Railway Station, 22 Anzac Ave, Dunedin Ph: 03 477 9465 otagoartsociety@xtra.co.nz www.otagoartsociety.co.nz The oldest art society in New Zealand holding six major exhibitions a year. Paintings, ceramics, jewellery, photography, wood ware, and other locally made gift ideas.

OTAGO MUSEUM Science | Nature | Culture, 419 Great King Street, Dunedin Ph: 03 474 7474 otago.museum@otagomuseum.nz www.otagomuseum.nz Hours: Open every day 10am–5pm (except Christmas day) Current open until 2 July, 2017 Otago Wildlife Photography Exhibition open until 23 July.

Cromwell

Southland

HÖGLUND ART GLASS GALLERY 1767 Luggate-Cromwell Rd, 9383 Ph: 03 442 7210 artglass@hoglund.co.nz www.hoglundartglass.com Hours: Open daily 9am–5pm Jewellery, hand blown glass and paintings

EASTERN SOUTHLAND GALLERY 14 Hokonui Drive , Gore Ph: 03 208 9907 jgeddes@goredc.govt.nz www.esgallery.co.nz Hours: Mon–Fri 10am–4.30pm, Weekends and Public Holidays 1pm–4pm. Closed Xmas Day, Boxing Day and New Years Day. MOTOKO WATANABE , until 28 May, Large Sculptures from the Collection DON DRIVER , PETER NICHOLLS & SCOTT EADY.

OCTA GALLERY AND WORKSHOP 71 Melmore Terrace, Cromwell 9310 Ph: 03 445 1594, Mob: 027 231 7502 octa@artlover.com Hours: 10am–4pm daily Chris and Gail de Jong’s long time passion with the arts is evident at OCTA, where they represent selected well known New Zealand contemporary Artists. The gallery also stocks an eclectic mix of limited edition prints by renowned 20th Century European artists. We also sell on behalf so expect the unexpected.’

SOUTHLAND MUSEUM & ART GALLERY NIHO O TE TANIWHA 108 Gala St, Invercargill Ph: 03 219 9069 office@southlandmuseum.co.nz www.southlandmuseum.com Hours: Mon–Fri 9am–5pm, Sat–Sun 10am–5pm. . Worlds largest indoor display of live Tuatara. Regularly changing art exhibitions and ongoing historical exhibitions of Southland's past. CITY GALLERY INVERCARGILL 28 Don Street, Invercargill Ph: 214 1319 www.citygallery@ihug.co.nz Hours: Tue–Fri 11am–4pm, Sat 11am–2pm Facebook: City Gallery Invercargill


84 Region Artist List ADAMS RICHARD

Solander G

Wellington

GRAVES ROBERT

ALLEN JIM

The Dowse

Hutt Valley

GREIG JAMES

ALVAREZ ALBERTO

Tim Melville

Auckland

ARMSTRONG EVE

Dunedin PAG

Dunedin

ASLETT RICHARD

Yellow Church Mangaweka

ATKINSON RAEWYN

BARRY KATHY BAUMANN REBECCA BEEKHUIS KATRINA BELL VANESSA BENSEMANN LEO BLACKBURN JOHN BLYTHE ANDREW

PG gallery192

Christchurch

PG gallery192

Christchurch

Kapiti

HERBER VERONICA

Pah Homestead

SHELTON ANNA

Auckland Art Gallery

The Dowse

Hutt Valley

HERBER VERONICA

Tauranga Art

SHRIGLEY DAVID

COCA

Bowen G

Wellington

HINES KERRY

Dunedin

HODGKINS FRANCES Dunedin PAG HODGKINS FRANCES Mahara Gallery

Te Tuhi

Auckland

Dunedin PAG

Dunedin

Pah Homestead

Auckland Bay of Plenty

The Forrester Gallery

Dunedin PAG

Oamaru

SINGH TIFFANY

Dunedin PAG

SKUDDER EMILY

Suite

Wellington

Kapiti

Waikato Museum

Auckland

HYDER J

Jane Hyder Studio Wellington

Artis Gallery

Auckland

JACKSON NICOLA JACOBSON SHELLEY

Auckland Kapiti

KAAN SIMON KREISLER TOM LEE YONA

Dunedin PAG

Hamilton Dunedin

SMITH EMMA

Dunedin

Pah Homestead

Auckland

STRAKA HEATHER

Trish Clark

Auckland

SUMMERS LLEW

York Street

TAYLOR IMOGEN

Dunedin PAG

TEMPLETON-PAGE

Te Tuhi

Auckland

Solander G

Wellington

TUFFERY M

McAtamney

Geraldine

Govett Brewster

Taranaki

TUU TELLY

Bowen G

Wellington

Te Tuhi

Auckland

UHILA KALISOLAITE

York St

Timaru Dunedin

Te Tuhi

Timaru

Auckland

Eastern Southland Southland

LEEK SASKIA

Dunedin PAG

Dunedin

VELLINGA NIKKI

Tauranga Art

Bay of Plenty

Eastern Southland Southland

LETT BARRY

Pah Homestead

Auckland

VELLINGA THEO

Tauranga Art

Bay of Plenty

LIEVRE MARIE

Jonathan Smart Christchurch

WEBB M

McAtamney

Geraldine

LYE LEN

Govett Brewster

WEBB MARILYNN

Kaan Zamaan Gallery Northland

CHERRY ROB

Suite

Wellington

COYLE SEAN

Pah Homestead

Auckland

MACLEOD EUAN

Tauranga Art Bay of Plenty

MADDOX ALLEN

Jonathan Smart Christchurch Waikato Museum

Hamilton

McAtamney

Geraldine

MAGUIRE MARIAN

Taranaki

Bowen G

Wellington

Tim Melville

Auckland

PG gallery192 Christchurch

MILES ANNA

Pah Homestead

Auckland

MORGAN TRACEY

Mahara Gallery

Kapiti

DEANS A.A

York Street

Timaru

DWYER JOHL

Tim Melville

Auckland

NEWBURY P

Auckland

NISHIOKA MIZUHO

Mahara Gallery

Taranaki

NOBLE JEM Te Tuhi

Te Tuhi

Auckland

Pataka

Porirua

DWYER JOHN

Tim Melville FISCHINGER’S OSKAR Govett Brewster FLAT RUSS Tim Melville

GOSSAGE AROHA

Auckland

Christchurch

Dunedin

HOLDEN REBECCA

Mahara Gallery

FRYKBERG SUSAN

Taranaki

ROBINSON JAMES

Pah Homestead

FRIZZELL DICK

Porirua

Govett Brewster

ROBINSON AIKO

BROCKIE BOB

DEANS A.A

Porirua

Auckland

BOREHAM CARILYNE

DAVIES ANTHONY

Pataka

Jonathan Smart Christchurch

Taranaki

DARRAGH JUDY

RAKENA RACHEL

Pah Homestead

Auckland

DABB BARRY

Pataka

HEAPHY CHRIS

Tim Melville

CAMINITI ALEX

Dunedin

Taranaki

RAKENA HANA

GUNN MAIRI

Hutt Valley

Govett Brewster

BUTLER STACEY

Dunedin PAG

PUMHÖSL FLORIAN Govett Brewster

RIDING LAURA

BONET PAUL

BROWN NIGEL

GRIERSON RONALD

Hutt Valley Auckland

Augustin Gallery

BARBER BRUCE

Taranaki

The Dowse

GRUENWALD AMANDA Trish Clark

The Dowse

AUGUSTIN PETER

Govett Brewster

Solander G

Auckland Wellington

Sarjeant Gallery Whanganui Artis Gallery

Auckland

MORTIMER ROGER

NUANE TUI PAGE DEBBIE

Pataka McAtamney

Porirua Geraldine Kapiti

York Street

Timaru

PATTERSON CAMPBELL The Dowse

Hutt Valley

PAUL JOANNA

Dunedin PAG

Dunedin

York Street

WHEELER PETE

Jonathan Smart

WHITE LOIS

Pah Homestead

Timaru Christchurch Auckland

WRIGHT GRACE

PG gallery192

Christchurch

ZON ERICA

Dunedin PAG

Dunedin


Massey University is proud to be the founding partner of Lux Light Festival, 12 – 21 May 2017 Fine arts and photography, MÄ ori visual arts, fashion and textile design, visual communication, industrial and spatial design, creative media production and commercial music. creative.massey.ac.nz Massey University Wellington College of Creative Arts Toi Rauwharangi

Photo: Jeff McEwan

Create Your Future


Matariki, 2015. Photo by Norm Heke. Te Papa

16 – 25 June Whänau focussed events celebrating the Mäori New Year Find out more: tepapa.govt.nz/matariki

Profile for Capital

Artzone 69  

Artzone 69  

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