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hillrag.com • August 2014


Est. 1981

D SOL

CAPITOL HILL

D SOL

CAPITOL HILL

832 5th Street, NE $799,500

1000 East Capitol St, NE #2 $409,000

Stan Bissey 202-841-1433 THE BISSEY TEAM

Pete Frias 202-744-8973 www.PeterFrias.com

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1749 Swann Street, NW $1,638,500 Genie Hutinet 202-413-7661

BRIGHTWOOD

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5920 2nd Place, NW $628,500

Pete Frias 202-744-8973 www.PeterFrias.com

Stan Bissey 202-841-1433 THE BISSEY TEAM

CAPITOL HILL 550 7th Street, SE UNDER CONTRACT IN 3 DAYS! Recently remodeled 3BR/2.5BA 3-level rowhouse w/ PARKING!

CT TRA N O C CAPITOL HILL 125 C Street, SE $1,460,000

4-1BR Apartments & PKG! Fern Pannill 240-508-4856

THE

Todd Bissey 202-841-7653

ECKINGTON

PETWORTH

5614 8th St., NW $549,500

1910 2nd Street, NE $759,500

Pete Frias 202-744-8973 www.PeterFrias.com

Todd Bissey 202-841-7653 THE BISSEY TEAM

BISSEY TEAM

AT JOHN C. FORMANT REAL ESTATE, INC.

Stan Bissey 202-841-1433

LEDROIT PARK

PETWORTH

51 Florida Ave., NW $798,500

607 Decatur Street, NW $738,500

Genie Hutinet 202-413-7661

Fern Pannill 240-508-4856

CT TRA CON CAPITOL HILL 1303 Potomac Avenue, SE $499,500 Genie Hutinet 202-413-7661

CAPITOL HILL

440 12th Street, NE #304 $449,000 Pete Frias 202-744-8973 www.PeterFrias.com

“WHERE WASHINGTON SHOPS FOR A NEW ADDRESS!”® 225 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE Washington, DC 20003

Tel: 202-544-3900 www.johncformant.com

Sales • Rentals • Commercial Leasing • Property Management • Investments


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BACK TO SCHOOL,

GIVING BACK At Fulcrum, we donate 5% of our commission to local schools. If you would like to hear more about how Fulcrum could donate to your neighborhood school or charitable organization, call us today. Visit fulcrumpg.com/giving to learn more

Your Fulcrum home search is powered by the best data out there. Choose Fulcrum and we will create a custom search of beautiful homes in your desired school district.

CURRENT & UPCOMING LISTINGS

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,500 $369 N O SO ING COM

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Arlington, VA

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Call Us to Get Your Home Sold or Find a New One!

“In addition to helping Buyers and Sellers on greater Capitol Hill & DC for over 14 years, we are committed to building community in Arlington, Alexandria & close-in MD.”

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What’s Inside? In every issue: 18 What’s on Washington 20 Calendar 66

Hill Rag Crossword 126 Classified Ads 132 Last Word

68

capitol streets 35

Bulletin Board

50

Southwest Small Area Plan Status

51

ANC6 Candidates Needed

52

ANC 6A Report

54

ANC 6B Report

Jonathan Neeley

56

ANC 6C Report

Charnice A. Milton

58

ANC 6D Report

Roberta Weiner

60

ANC 6E Report

Steve Holton

64

EMCAC Report

Charnice A. Milton

Irene Burski

Larry Janezich

Denise Romano

aug. community life 67

E on DC

E. Ethelbert Miller

68

IN MEMORIAM: Diana McLellan

70

South by West

Stephanie Cavanaugh

William Rich Elise Bernard

72

H Street Life

74

Barracks Row

76

Where We Live

Sharon Bosworth Andrew Lightman

real estate

94

79

1511 A Street NE: An Update

82

Changing Hands

Charnice A. Milton

Don Denton

arts and dining 91

At the Chef’s Table: Roberto Hernandez at Annette Nielsen

Mio Restaurant 94

Food with a View

98

Dining Notes

Emily Clark

Celeste McCall Lilia Coffin

100

Wine Guys

102

At the Movies

104

The Literary Hill

Mike Canning Karen Lyon


Meg: 202.329.4068 | George: 202.203.0339

What’s Your Hill Home Worth? We’ve got your number - contact us to find out.

114

THIS COULD BE YOU!

FOR SALE: 644 E ST SE • $669,000

on the cover:

Wine and Crabs. Cassandra Gillens. Acrylic on canvas, 48” x 36” Available at Zenith Gallery • www.zenithgallery.com, 202-783-2963 1429 Iris Street, NW, Washington, DC 20012

This month ZENITH GALLERY PRESENTS

California, Nigeria, Washington DC: The Passion of the Media and the Process from a Global Perspective Show Dates: Friday, June 13-September 6, 2014 Open: Friday and Saturday 12-6pm, Daily by Appointment: please call-202-783-2963

106

Art and The City

108

Jazz Project

COMING SOON:

Jim Magner

Jean-Keith Fagon

Close to Eastern Market 3/4 BR, 3 level beauty!

health and fitness 111

It’s the classic’s that stand the test of time! 2 BR, 1.5 Bath. This 1895 beauty has Metro, Eastern Market and Barracks Row just blocks away. Include large backyard and plenty of living and entertainment space on the inside.

Learning How to Cook and Eat Well Through Pattie Cinelli

Storytelling 114

Yes, I Can and You Can Can, Too!

116

Old Dogs and the People Who Love Them

Catherine Plume

Brittany Cartlidge, DVM

kids and family (See the 2014 Education Supplement)

homes and gardens 119

Clean Green Team Lights Up Potomac Gardens

Cheryl Corson, RLA, ASLA Derek Thomas

122

Garden Spot

124

Dear Garden Problem Lady

Wendy Blair

Look Us Up on Facebook! The Norris Group


F A G O N

MIDCITY

GUIDE TO CAPITOL HILL

YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

Capital Community News, Inc. • 224 7th Street, SE, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20003 202.543.8300 • www.capitalcommunitynews.com EXECUTIVE EDITOR: Melissa Ashabranner • melissaashabranner@hillrag.com Publisher: Jean-Keith Fagon • fagon@hillrag.com Copyright © 2014 by Capital Community News. All Rights Reserved.

Editorial Staff

M������� E�����: Andrew Lightman • andrew@hillrag.com CFO � A�������� E�����: Maria Carolina Lopez • carolina@hillrag.com S����� N���� E�����: Susan Braun Johnson • schools@hillrag.com K��� � F����� E�����: Kathleen Donner • kathleendonner@gmail.com F��� E�����: Annette Nielsen • annette@hillrag.com

Arts, Dining & Entertainment A��: D�����:

com L���������: M�����: M����:

Jim Magner • jjmagner@aol.com Emily Clark • clapol47@gmail.com Celeste McCall • celeste@us.net Jonathan Bardzik • jonathan.bardzik@gmail.

Karen Lyon • klyon@folger.edu Mike Canning • mjcanning@verizon.net Jean-Keith Fagon • fagon@hillrag.com Stephen Monroe • samonroe2004@yahoo.com R����� T������: Marissa Terrell • mterrell@sbclawgroup.com T������: Barbara Wells • barchardwells@aol.com T�� W��� G���: Jon Genderson • jon@cellar.com

Calendar & Bulletin Board

Roberta Weiner • rweiner_us@yahoo.com Jazzy Wright • wright.jazzy@gmail.com

BEAUTY, Health & Fitness

Patricia Cinelli • fitmiss44@aol.com Jazelle Hunt • jazelle.hunt@gmail.com Candace Y.A. Montague • writeoncm@gmail.com

KIDS & FAMILY

Kathleen Donner • kathleendonner@gmail.com Susan Johnson • schools@hillrag.com

Society & Events

Mickey Thompson • socialsightings@aol.com

Homes & Gardens

Derek Thomas • derek@thomaslandscapes.com Catherine Plume • caplume@yahoo.com

COMMENTARY

Ethelbert Miller • emiller698@aol.com T�� N��� • thenose@hillrag.com T�� L��� W��� • editorial@hilllrag.com

Production/Graphic/Web Design

C������� E�����: Kathleen Donner • calendar@hillrag.com, bulletinboard@hillrag.com

A�� D�������: Jason Yen • jay@hillrag.com Graphic Design: Lee Kyungmin • lee@hillrag.com W�� M�����: Andrew Lightman • andrew@hillrag.com

General Assignment

Advertising & Sales

Martin Austermuhle • martin.austermuhle@gmail.com Maggy Baccinelli • mbaccinelli@gmail.com Elise Bernard • elise.bernard@gmail.com Ellen Boomer • emboomer@gmail.com Elena Burger • elena96b@gmail.com Stephanie Deutsch • scd@his.com Michelle Phipps-Evans • invisiblecolours@yahoo.com Maggie Hall • whitby@aol.com Mark Johnson • mark@hillrag.com Dave Kletzkin • Dave@hillrag.com Stephen Lilienthal - stephen_lilienthal@yahoo.com Pleasant Mann • pmann1995@gmail.com Meghan Markey • meghanmarkey@gmail.com Charnice Milton • charnicem@hotmail.com John H. Muller • jmuller.washingtonsyndicate@gmail.com Jonathan Neeley • neeley87@gmail.com Will Rich • will.janks@gmail.com Heather Schoell • schoell@verizon.net Virginia Avniel Spatz • virginia@hillrag.com Michael G. Stevens • michael@capitolriverfront.org Peter J. Waldron • peter@hillrag.com

A������ E��������: Kira Means, 202.543.8300 X16 • kira@hillrag.com A������ E��������: Dave Kletzkin, 202.543.8300 X22 • Dave@hillrag.com C��������� A����������: Maria Carolina Lopez, 202.543.8300 X12 • Carolina@hillrag.com BILLING: Sara Walder, 202.400.3511 • sara@hillrag.com

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M������: Andrew Lightman D�����������: MediaPoint, LLC I����������: distribution@hillrag.com

Deadlines & Contacts

A����������: sales@hillrag.com D������ A��: 15th of each month C��������� A��: 10th of each month E��������: 15th of each month; editorial@hilllrag.com B������� B���� � C�������: 15th of each month; calendar@hillrag.com, bulletinboard@hillrag.com

We welcome suggestions for stories. Send queries to andrew@hillrag.com. We are also interested in your views on community issues which are published in the Last Word. Please limit your comments to 250 words. Letters may be edited for space. Please include your name, address and phone number. Send Last Word submissions to lastword@hillrag.com. For employment opportunities email jobs@hillrag.com. 16 ★ Hillrag.com


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Charlotte Hall Farmers’ Market and Auction The Charlotte Hall market is a place for farmers to sell and for farmers to buy--produce, junk, antique furniture, livestock, things that fell off trucks, picture frames and corn dogs. It is open yearround on Wednesdays and Saturdays (no exact times but longer, earlier hours in summer) and sellers operate off tables, under sheds and in make-shift buildings on the property. Take Branch Avenue south, continue on and make a left onto route 5 into St. Mary’s County. Watch for the market after about 40 miles out of DC on the left.

RIGHT: Goats, along with chickens, pigs and rabbits, are for sale at the market. Photo: Kathleen Donner

Overture 1812 Concert at Fort Myer This year, the United States Army Band performs its big summer concert on Saturday, Aug. 23, 7:30 p.m. at Fort Myer in Arlington. The concert concludes with Tchaikovsky’s spirited “Overture 1812” complete with the cannons of The 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard). This annual must-see musical extravaganza offers a musical program of traditional band music with vocal highlights and Herald Trumpet fanfare. This free performance will be held on Fort Myer’s Summerall Field. No tickets required. You must present a valid photo ID at the Hatfield Gate located on Washington Blvd (Rt. 27) and Second St. If you do not have a DOD ID, your vehicle will be searched upon entry. IDs will also be checked for walk-on patrons. usarmyband.com

LEFT: Lt. Col. Andrew Esch conducting Tchaikovsky’s Overture 1812. Photo: Courtesy of the U.S. Army Band

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Capital Dragon Boat Regatta The DC Dragon Boat Club is hosting a Capital Dragon Boat Regatta on Saturday, Aug. 23 at the Gangplank Marina in SW. Races are from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. There will be a beer garden and a 17 ft jumbo screen from which to view the races. Read more at capitaldragonboat.com. The sport of dragon boating is more than 2000 years old, but attracts more and more people across the globe each year including approximately 90,000 paddlers in the U.S. and Canada according to the International Dragon Boat Federation. The emphasis on teamwork is a highlight of dragon boating, challenging 22 people to work in unison to compete in races of 200 meters to 2 kilometers in length. The DC Dragon Boat Club promotes individual and community participation in the sport of dragon boating. They encourage awareness and stewardship of the area’s waterways through programs that foster physical fitness, camaraderie, and leadership skills. dcdragonboat.org.

Symbols of Honor: Heraldry and Family History in Shakespeare’s England at the Folger Discover the colorful world of heralds and their rivals, all competing to profit from the craze for coats of arms that seized England during the reign of Elizabeth I. In this show you will see pedigrees and family trees, books explaining heraldry’s complex rules, manuscripts illustrating actual coats of arms, and documents written by professional heralds seeking to regulate heraldic practise in a fast-changing society. Exceptional treasures include the original drafts of William Shakespeare’s own coat of arms. At the Folger Shakespeare Library through Oct. 26. Folger Shakespeare Library, 201 E. Capitol St. SE. folger.edu

RIGHT: William Smith. Alphabet or blazon of arms. Manuscript, 1597. Image: Courtesy of Folger Shakespeare Library

Phillips After 5 Phillips after 5 is a lively mix of art and entertainment, including live music, food, and cash bar, on the first Thursday evening of every month, 5-8:30 p.m. On Aug. 7, American summer at the Phillips continues with classic American cuisine through a moveable feast of food trucks, live Bluegrass music, and a bourbon tasting. On Sept. 4, celebrate the art of slowing down. Reservations are strongly advised for this popular event but tickets are also available at the door. Tickets are $12 ($10 for students and seniors). 1600 21st St. NW. phillipscollection.org

LEFT: Phillips after 5, first Thursdays at The Phillips Collection. Photo: The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC

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Photo: Courtesy of the U.S. Army Band

AUGUST CALENDAR SPECIAL EVENTS Marine Barracks Evening Parade. Friday evenings through Aug. 29 (no parade July 4). Guests admitted starting at 7:00 p.m. Guests should be seated by 8:00 p.m. Program begins at 8:45 p.m. The Evening Parade has become a universal symbol of the professionalism, discipline and Esprit de Corps of the United States Marines. The ceremony begins with a concert by the United States Marine Band. The event is free, however it is wise to make reservations online at mbw.usmc.mil. Marine Barracks (front gate), 8th and I sts. SE. 202-433-4073. The BIG Maze at the National Building Museum. Through Sept 1, the Museum, in partnership with BIGBjarke Ingels Group, will create a never before seen large-scale maze for the Museum’s historic home. Soaring 18 feet high and measuring 61 feet by 61 feet, the birch plywood structure will boast a series of twists and turns for visitors to weave through and explore. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448. nbm.org DC Africa Festival. On Aug. 3, noon-6 p.m., the DC Africa festival at Wilson Plaza, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, will feature live music and dance performances, a Children’s Village with fun games and programming, and a Wellness Pavilion with Africa-inspired movement and nutritional advice for healthy living. Additionally, the event will feature an African Culture Hut with a panoramic view of continent and diaspora cultures, contemporary designs and traditional African attires as well as arts, crafts and food vendors highlighting the best of Africa in DC. oaa.dc.gov Lecture: Michael Shiner’s Diary 1813-1869. Saturday, Aug. 23, 10-11 a.m. 200 I Street, SE. Presented by the Near Southeast Community Partners. Michael Shiner (1813-1869) was an enslaved man who started working in the Washington Navy Yard as a child. His diary recorded Presidential visits, citywide epidemics, catastrophic fires, and the construction of

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2014 Twilight Tattoo at Fort Myer

Wednesdays through Aug. 20 , 7 p.m. with preceremony pageantry starting at 6:45 p.m. Members of the 3rd US Infantry (The Old Guard), the US Army Band “Pershings Own,” Fife and Drum Corps and the US Army Drill Team will perform an hourlong sunset military Pageant. Over 100 Old Guard soldiers dressed in period uniforms will provide a glimpse of Army history from colonial times to the soldier of the future. Summerall Field on historic Fort Myer in Arlington, VA. twilight.mdw.army.mil


Capital Futbol Club Fall Academy & Programs Instruction by professional licensed soccer coaches on Capitol Hill

FALL PROGRAMS u7/u8 Boys & Girls Academy

u11 Girls Academy

u3/u4/u5/u6 Boys & Girls Academy

Will teach the basic techniques needed to succeed in soccer.

• Emphasis on ball control and footwork

• Fun introductory soccer events

• Emphasis on skill development

• Sept. - Nov.

• Sept. - Nov.

• 7 sessions of 1.5 hours

• Free demos in August and September

• 2 x per week + 4-6 games

Early bird registration online. REGISTER TODAY!

Early bird registration online. REGISTER TODAY!

• Free soccer ball to first 40 sign ups •Limited Space Available Early bird registration online. REGISTER TODAY!

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER

For More Info and to Sign Up:

www.capitalfc.org Capital FC is a soccer on the Hill (SOTH) partner

WOULD YOU LIKE TO SPONSOR A TEAM, AGE GROUP OR OUR CLUB? Contact Coach Whitney @ whitneym@capitalfc.org *Capital FC is a 501(c) nonprofit organization

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{august events calendar}

national monuments. It also described his neighbors and associates. This vivid account of Shiner’s observations and insight into the civic culture of the early 1800s. www. nearsoutheastcommunitypartners.org/ Mount Vernon Celebrates Purple Heart Day. On Aug. 7, at 1 p.m. the Military Order of the Purple Heart, Greater Washington Chapter 353, will join George Washington’s Mount Vernon in commemorating the oldest military decoration in the world on the anniversary of its first issuance. The event will feature brief remarks from “General Washington” and military officials in addition to musical performances. A wreathlaying ceremony, brief remarks and taps will take place at the Purple Heart Memorial. This event is open to the public and free of charge. MountVernon.org Truckeroo. Aug 8 and Sept 12; 11 a.m.-11 p.m. at the corner of Half St. and M St. SE. Over 20 food trucks, live music all day, shade and picnic tables and games. truckeroodc.com

Post Game Fireworks at Nat’s Park. Aug 15. Watch from inside the park or anywhere you can see the top of the park. washington.nationals.mlb.com Alexandria Summer Restaurant Week. Aug 15-24. 60+ restaurants throughout Alexandria, VA, including Old Town, Del Ray, Carlyle and the West End offer $35 three-course meals or $35 dinners for two. 703-7463301. AlexandriaRestaurantWeek.com Lane Memorial CME Church Crab Feast. Aug 16, 3:007:00 p.m. Enjoy music, food, and fellowship. $55 for adults, $35 for children 12 and under. For information and tickets, call Rob at 202-234-7145 or Doug at 240416-5727. Lane Memorial CME Church is at 1423 C St. NE. Honfleur Gallery and Vivid Solutions Gallery Annual East of the River Exhibition. Through Aug. 29, the East of the River Exhibition at Honfleur Gallery includes work by 9 artists who live, work, or have roots in the communities east of the Anacostia River. The Invisible Wall: Photographs from East of the River at Vivid Solutions

Gallery presents selections from photographer Susana Raab’s ongoing project to capture the daily humanity of these same communities. Honfleur Gallery, 1241 Good Hope Rd. SE. (202)365-8392. honfleurgallery.com

OUTDOOR MUSIC AND MOVIES NoMa Summer Screen. Wednesdays through Aug 20. Movies start at dark and are screened with subtitles. Aug 6, Top Gun; Aug 13, The Sandlot; Aug 20, rain date movie. Second and L Sts. NE. Coolers, children and friendly (leashed) dogs are welcome. nomasummerscreen.org Fort Dupont Summer Concerts. Saturdays, Aug. 2 and 9, 7-9 p.m. (new time), park opens at 4:00 PM. Lawn seating. Entrances to the park are Fort Davis Dr. and Ridge Rd.; Fort Davis Dr. and Massachusetts Ave.; and Randle Circle and Fort Dupont Dr. nps.gov/fodu

Momentum Dance & Fitness Studio Open House Aug. 9, 2-5 p.m. Talk with teachers and register for fall classes. 534 8th St. SE (upstairs). momentumdancetheatre.com LEFT: Auggie van Geertruyden, Piper Cherry, Destiny Brown, Damiyah Brown and Jonathan Kho. Photo: Roberta Rothstein

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SAVE! SAVE! SAVE! 10% OFF

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All Credit Cards Accepted August 2014 H 23


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Hill Center Galleries Regional Juried Exhibition Through Sept. 28, over 50 artists from the DC, Virginia, and Maryland area have their works on display, featuring a wide array of mediums and subjects. Philip Kennicott, Art & Architecture Critic at The Washington Post, juried the exhibition. The Galleries are open to the general public Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Saturdays 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; and Sundays, noon-5 p.m. Exhibition winner “New Monument Construction” by Raphael Warshaw

Military Band Concerts at the US Capitol. Weekdays in the summer (weather permitting) at 8 p.m. Mondays, US Navy Band; Tuesdays, US Air Force Band; Wednesdays and Thursdays, US Marine Band; Fridays, US Army Band. Free. West Terrace US Capitol Building. Canal Park Outdoor Film Series. Thursday nights (movies begin at sundown-- around 8:45 p.m.) 2014 theme is “It’s a Whole New Ballgame,” and includes sportsrelated movies of all kinds. Aug. 7, Rudy; Aug. 14, A League of Their Own; Aug. 21, The Blind Side; and Sept. 4, Moneyball. Movies shown in northern block of Canal Park, Second and “Eye” Sts. SE. yardspark.org Navy Band “Concerts on the Avenue.” Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. at the US Navy Memorial. The United States Navy Band and its specialty groups will perform. This event is free. 7th and Penn. Ave. NW. 202-737-2300. navymemorial.org Lunchtime Music on the Mall. Tuesdays and Thursdays in summer, noon-1:30 p.m. Music performed on the Na-

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tional Mall by the Smithsonian Metro Station, at 12th St. and Jefferson Dr. SW. Jazz in the Sculpture Garden. Fridays, through Aug 29 (rain or shine, except July 4), 5-8 p.m. National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden. Live jazz is performed by an eclectic mix of top artists from the Washington area. Visitors are entertained outdoors in front of the fountain or in the Pavilion Cafe (if it’s raining). The Pavilion Cafe features a seasonal tapas style menu and bar service during the concerts. Everyone can enjoy these concerts for free. You do not have to order food or drinks. 202-289-3360. nga.gov Rosslyn Outdoor Film Festival. Fridays at dusk. Aug. 8, Empire Records; Aug. 15, Miss Congeniality; Aug 22., Anchorman. Movies shown at Gateway Park, Lee Highway near Key Bridge. Air Force Band Concerts. Fridays in Aug. 8 p.m. Air Force Memorial at One Air Force Memorial Drive in Arlington, VA. (14th St. Bridge into Virginia, merge onto

Washington Blvd. and then Columbia Pike in the direction of the Navy Annex. Then follow signs.) Expect a pleasing mix of contemporary and patriotic tunes and spectacular views of the nighttime Washington, DC skyline. Concerts are free. airforcememorial.org Friday Night Live at National Harbor. Fridays through Sept. 19, 6-9 p.m. Performances include local and nationally touring bands playing a variety of genres: pop, rock, soul, funk, blues, country and jazz. nationalharbor.com Rock and Roll Hotel Rooftop Movies. Sundays, 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Join them on their rooftop deck for Sunday night movies shown on their massive projection screen. Happy hour specials all throughout the night, including on frozen drinks and wings. The rooftop deck has plenty of seating available, but feel free to bring a beach chair and settle in. Free popcorn. rockandrollhoteldc.com Free Summer Outdoor Concerts at Strathmore. Wednesdays, through Aug. 20, at 7:00 p.m. Parking is in


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In Loving Memory Janice L. Moncier February 23, 1946 to July 16, 2014 Beloved spouse of Ann Norwood. A memorial service will be held Saturday, August 9, at 1 p.m. at Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Avenue SE, Washington, DC. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to a favorite charity.

In Loving Memory

Rudolph “Rudi” Appl

June 6, 1935 to July 16, 2014 Rudi Appl, longtime Capitol Hill resident and beloved bartender at Mr. Henry’s for nearly fifty years, passed away Wednesday July 16 from heart failure. He was 79. There is a memorial get-together scheduled on Saturday September 6, upstairs at Mr. Henry’s Capitol Hill. The exact time is yet to be decided and will be posted on Mr Henry’s Facebook page.

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the Metro garage for $5 with Metro SmarTrip card or major credit card; enter off Tuckerman Lane. Strathmore, 10701 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD. strathmore.org

MUSIC National Building Museum Summer Concerts. Aug. 3 and 10, 2 p.m. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448. nbm. org Music at Ebenezers. Aug. 7, Science! and The Berkshires; Aug. 9, Arsena Schroeder; Aug. 10, Adam Burrows; Aug.14, Kirsten Arian, Rob Williams, Tom Bertram; Aug. 16, Matt Wheeler; Aug. 21, Ryan Aderrey, Elle Carpenter, John Schmitt; Aug. 23, Chris Monaghan; Aug. 29, Kwesi K and Michael Coleman. Ebenezers Coffeehouse, 201 F St. NE. 202-5586900. ebenezerscoffeehouse.com 2014 Capitol Hill Chamber Music Festival Concert. Aug. 3, 8 p.m. St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, 3rd and A Sts, SE. Suggested donation $20 or $25, 18 and under free. For more information, visit chcmf.org or call 202-543-0053. HR 57 Weekly Jam Sessions. Wednesdays and Thursdays, 8 p.m.midnight. Friday and Saturdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., featured performances. BYOB on Wednesday and Thursday only. Since 1993, HR57 has provided a place where aspiring musicians gather to learn the history and cultures of the genres of jazz and blues. It’s a venue for the exchange of ideas and information between aspiring and professional musicians, students, aficionados and the general public. $8. 1007 H St. NE. 202-253-0044. hr57.org

Harper-Simon Associates

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Tracy & Company a unique salon

Touria Deluca back on our team Inviting new friends and old $10 off any hair service with this coupon 428 8th Street SE • 202.546.4887 • www.tracyandcompany.net

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w w w. d cl i b r a r y. o rg

www.literaryhillbookfest.org

The DC Public Library presents

the

L iterary h iLL B ook F est

Reading Series A series of talks at Capitol Hill libraries by local authors inspired by the Literary Hill BookFest and based on Karen Lyon’s Literary Hill column in the Hill Rag

Northeast Neighborhood Library

August 19th 7 p.m.

at the Northeast Neighborhood Library

Louis Bayard, author of Roosevelt’s Beast In addition to his new psychological thriller about Theodore and Kermit Roosevelt’s ill-fated 1914 Amazon expedition, Lou has written four critically acclaimed historical novels: Mr. Timothy (a New York Times Notable Book), The School of Night, The Black Tower, and the national bestseller The Pale Blue Eye. Visit him at www.louisbayard.com.

330 7th St. NE Washington, DC 20002 northeastlibrary@dc.gov | 202-698-0058 Metro Stop: Union Station

Church of the Epiphany Weekly Concerts. Every Tuesday, 12:10 p.m. Event is free but a free will offering taken. 1317 G St. NW. 202347-2635. epiphanydc.org Jazz Night (and fish fry) in Southwest. Fridays, 6-9 p.m. Every Friday night. Expect a large, fun and friendly crowd. Westminster Presbyterian Church, 400 I St. SW (Fourth and I, south side of intersection). The cover is $5. Children are welcome and free under 16 years old. 202-484-7700. westminsterdc.org/ jazz Blue Monday Blues. Mondays, 6-9 p.m. Westminster Presbyterian Church. Local musicians perform, and the Southwest Catering Company provides a fish fry from 5:30-8:30 p.m. $5/general; free/ children under 16. Modestly priced food. 400 I St. SW. 202-484-7700. westminsterdc.org/blues Sunday Gospel Brunch Featuring the Harlem Gospel Choir. Every Sunday, 12:30-2 p.m. $30-$45. The Howard Theatre, 620 T St. NW. 202803-2899. thehowardtheatre.com

Southeast Neighborhood Library 403 7th St. SE Washington, DC 20003 southeastlibrary@dc.gov | 202-698-3377 Metro Stop: Eastern Market

Rosedale Neighborhood Library

1701 Gale St., NE, Washington, DC 20002 rosedalelibrary@dc.gov | 202-727-5012 Metro Stop: Stadium-Armory Sponsored by Capital Community News, Inc.

THEATER Gilbert & Sullivan’s “Patience, Bunthorne’s Bride” at CHAW. Aug. 2 and Aug. 7-9, 7 p.m. (Saturday matinees at 3 p.m.) Tickets are $20 and are available by calling 202-5476839 or at bwashington@ chaw.org. Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, 545 7th St. SE. chaw.org Signature’s Open House. Aug. 2, noon-10 p.m. Special ticket offers, free performances every fifteen minutes, kids’ activities and more! Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave. off I395 at the Shirlington exit (#6). signature-theatre.org

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The Fall of the House of Usher: A New Musical. Aug. 6-24. Tickets are $20, $15 for students. Anacostia Arts Center, 1231 Good Hope Rd. SE. pallastheatre. org Scena Theater’s Shining City at the Atlas. Aug. 9-Sept. 21. Dubliner John is convinced he sees his dead wife. He visits Ian, a fledgling therapist with his own troubles. Shining City examines the impulsive choices we make and their haunting effects on our lives. Atlas performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202399-7993. atlasarts.org Rorschach Theatre’s She Kills Monsters at the Atlas. Aug. 15-Sept. 14. It’s the 1990s in suburban Ohio and Tilly lives among the most fearsome creatures known to man: American high school students. Atlas performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-3997993. atlasarts.org Sunday in the Park with George at Signature. Aug. 15-Sept. 21. Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave. off I395 at the Shirlington exit (#6). signaturetheatre.org Shakespeare Theatre Free For All “The Winter’s Tale”. Aug. 19-31. Each summer, the Shakespeare Theatre Company presents a series of free Shakespeare performances. shakespearetheatre.org Yentl at Theater J. Aug. 28-Oct. 5. As a girl in 19th Century Eastern Europe, Yentl is forbidden to pursue her dream of studying Talmud. Unwilling to accept her fate, she disguises herself as a man. But when she falls in love, Yentl must decide how far she’s willing to go to protect her identity. Theater J, 1529 16th St. NW. 800-494-8497. Audition for St. Mark’s Players “Dracula”. Fall 2014. Based on the Bram Stoker Novel. Version by Steven Dietz (1996). Get details at stmarksplayers.org/smp. St. Marks Church is at 301 A St. SE.

SPORTS AND FITNESS Washington Nationals Baseball. Aug. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 and 24. Games at Nat’s Park. Tickets, $10, up. washington.nationals. mlb.com Washington Mystics Basketball. Aug. 5, 13 and 16. Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW. wnba.com/mystics DC United at RFK. Aug. 17, 8 p.m. vs. Colorado; Aug. 20, 8 p.m. vs. Waterhouse FC; Aug. 31, 2:30 p.m. vs. New York. RFK Stadium. dcunited.com Free public tennis courts in Ward Six. King Greenleaf Recreation Center, 201 N St. SW; Garfield Park, Third and G sts. SE; Randall Park First and I sts. SW; Rosedale Recreation Center, 1701 Gales St. NE; Sherwood Recreation Center, 640 10th St. NE. All courts are open daily, dawn to dusk. Some are lighted for extended evening play. Courts are available on a firstcome, first-served basis for onehour intervals; extended use of tennis courts requires a permit. Proper shoes and attire is required. 202-6710314. dpr.dc.gov/dpr DC Public Outdoor Pools. Nearby outdoor pools are East Potomac Pool at 972 Ohio Dr. SW; Randall Pool at South Capitol and I Sts. SW; and Rosedale Pool at 1701 Gales St. NE. All outdoor pools are open weekends, noon- 6 p.m. Weekday hours are 1- 8 p.m. (after June 18). Every pool is closed one day a week for cleaning and maintenance. All pools are free for DC residents. Have picture ID. dpr.dc.gov Tidal Basin 3K Monthly Run. Third Wednesday of each month at noon. This run is free and informal. West Potomac Park (meet on Ohio Dr. at West Basin Dr., near the Tourmobile stand). 703-5053567. dcroadrunners.org

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Woodrow Wilson Bridge Half Marathon. Oct. 5. Registration now open. 703-587-4321. wilsonbridgehalf.com Marine Corps Marathon Registration. Register online at marinemarathon.com. Marathon is Sunday, Oct. 26. Annual Hope for the Homeless Golf Tournament (save the date). Sept. 22, 1:30 p.m. Tournament at the Glenn Dale Country Club benefits the Capital Hill Group Ministry. chgm.net

SALES AND MARKETS Art Enables Annual Inventory Sale. Opening reception, Aug 9, 1- 4 p.m. Features 50% off selected art and 10% off new animal-themed works. Show and sale closes Sept. 5. Art Enables, 2204 Rhode Island Ave. NE. 202-554-9455. art-enables.org Randall Community Center Yard Sales. Aug 16, 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. Table space is free. Call 202-554-6973. Randall is at So. Capitol and I Sts. SW. Alexandria Art Market. Second Saturday of the month (rain or shine), through Oct, 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. in the Nicholas A. Colasanto Park, adjoining the Del Ray Artisans gallery at 2704 Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria, VA. The variety of original artwork from over 25+ artists will be displayed for sale including, painting, photography, pottery, jewelry, and glasswork. 703-627-7656. TheDelRayArtisans.org H Street FRESHFARM Market. Saturdays, 9 a.m.-noon through Dec. 20. The H Street Market is celebrating it’s 10th anniversary this year. SNAP (EBT/Food Stamps) accepted. 13th and H Sts. NE. freshfarmmarket.org U Street Flea. Saturdays and Sundays, 10 a.m.- 5p.m. The U Street Flea fea-

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tures a diverse mix of art, crafts, fashion, jewelry, imports, antiques, collectibles, furniture, and more. The market is in the parking lot, next to Nellie’s Sports Bar (three blocks east of U Street Metro), at 912 U St. NW. ustreetflea.com Clarendon Night Market. Alternate Saturdays, May 17-Oct. 25, 3- 9 p.m. It features a diverse mix of art, crafts, fashion, jewelry, imports, antiques, collectibles, furniture, and more. Bistro lights will be strung among the tents creating a festive evening shopping bazaar. It is in the Wells Fargo Bank parking lot, 3140 N. Washington Blvd. at the intersection of Washington, Wilson and Clarendon Blvds in North Arlington, VA. ClarendonMarket.com Aya Community Markets @ SW Waterfront. Saturdays, through Nov. 22, 9 a.m.- 1 p.m. at 900 4th St. SW on the grounds of Christ United Methodist Church. dreamingoutloud.net RFK Stadium Farmers’ Market. Open Saturdays, year round (weather permitting), 8 a.m.- 3 p.m. The market also has merchandise vendors. It can be seen in the RFK parking lot from the intersection of Benning Rd. and Oklahoma Ave. NE. Branch Avenue Pawn Parking Lot Flea Market. Saturdays. Set up (depending on the weather) after 10 a.m. 3128 Branch Ave., Temple Hills, MD Fresh Tuesdays at Eastern Market. Every Tuesday, 3 p.m.- 7 p.m. Tuesday afternoon farmers’ line of fresh produce. Eastern Market, 200 block of 7th St. SE. 202-698-5253. easternmarketdc.com Union Market. Tuesday-Friday, 11a.m.8 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday, 8 a.m.- 8 p.m. Union Market is an artisanal, curated, year-round food market featuring over 40 local vendors. 1309 5th St. NE. 301-652-7400. unionmarketdc.com


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Nat’s Add “Pups in the Park” Game in September

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The Washington Nationals have two remaining “Pups in the Park” games that will take place on Sept. 7 at 1:35 p.m. and Sept. 24 (recently added) at 7:05 p.m. Families are urged to purchase discounted tickets for them and their dogs, and support the Washington Humane Society. The fee is $25 for humans and $10 for dogs. The $10 dog ticket will benefit the Washington Humane Society. washington.nationals.mlb.com

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Eastern Market. Daily except Mondays and important holidays. Weekdays, 7 a.m.- 7 p.m.; Saturdays, 7 a.m.- 5p.m.; Sundays, 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Flea market and

arts and crafts market open Saturdays and Sundays, 9:00 a.m.- 6 p.m. Eastern Market is Washington’s last continually operated “old world” market. On weekends the market area comes alive with


farmers bringing in fresh produce, craft and flower vendors, artists, a flea market and street musicians. 200 block of 7th St. SE. 202-6985253. easternmarketdc.com Anacostia Big Chair Flea Market. Saturdays, 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. The market features a diverse mix of art, crafts, imports, antiques, collectibles and furniture. 2215 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. SE. bigchairmarket.com Dupont Circle Farmers Market. Sundays year round (rain or shine), 9 a.m.- 1 p.m.. During the peak season, there are more than 30 farmers offering fruits and vegetables, meat, poultry, fish, cheeses, fruit pies, breads, fresh pasta, cut flowers, potted plants, soaps and herbal products. 20th St. and Mass. Ave. NW, 1500 block of 20th St. NW (between Mass. Ave. and Q St. in the adjacent parking lot of PNC Bank). 202-362-8889. freshfarmmarket.org Georgetown Flea Market. Sundays year around (except in the case of very inclement weather), 8 a.m.- 4 p.m. Antiques, collectibles, art, furniture, rugs, pottery, china, jewelry, silver, stained glass, books and photographs.. 1819 35th St. NW. georgetownfleamarket.com Maine Avenue Fish Market. Open 365 days a year. 7 a.m.- 9 p.m. 1100 Maine Ave. SW. 202-4842722.

CIVIC LIFE Congresswoman Norton’s NW District Office. Open weekdays, 9- 6 p.m. 529 14th St. NW, suite 900. 202-783-5065. norton.house.gov Monthly ANC meetings are not held in August. ◆

Saturday, Sept.13, 2014 / 8 AM – 5 PM FREE ADMISSION • FREE LUNCH ON-SITE LEGAL CLINIC • WORKSHOPS No Onsite Registration for this Event

Register at www.ota.dc.gov Call (202)719-6560

Kellogg Conference Center at Gallaudet University 800 Florida Ave. NE

“Tenant Knowledge is Tenant Power” Sessions Include the Following Tenant Issues: Rent Control, Facts & Fees, Security Deposits, ADA & Beyond.

DC Office of the Tenant Advocate August 2014 H 33


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{capitol streets}

Bulletin Board H Street/Benning Road Streetcar Parking Enforcement Begins The District Department of Public Works has begun ticketing and/or towing vehicles along H St. and Benning Rd. NE that are parked in such a way as to impede the path of the streetcar, including cars parked outside of the white lines and illegally doubleparked vehicles. The District’s streetcar vehicles are scheduled to permanently return to the corridor this month for additional testing before passenger service begins. The fine for vehicles blocking the path of the streetcar is $100. At DPW’s discretion, vehicles may also be towed to clear the streetcar’s path and then relocated within the immediate neighborhood. Ticketing will be an ongoing occurrence along the corridor

ABOVE: Kim’s Garden, a four-year multi-agency and community garden project, created in memory of the late Kim Brenegar, was dedicated on July 8, 2014. The garden is located next to Christ Our Shepherd Church near Eastern Market and features a commissioned mosaic centerpiece, Washington Globe lights and a hand-crafted fence to protect the indigenous flora, among other garden details. Pictured here for the dedication and ribbon cutting are community members who made it happen: Juliet BrenegarMichaud (Friends of Kim Brenegar) cuts the ceremonial ribbon with, from left, Jeanne Brenegar-Frey, Allison Strodel, Dr. Gilbert Frey, John P. Thomas (Urban Forestry Administration), Lionell Thomas (DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities), Joe Ardizzone (Friends of Kim Brenegar), Deirdre Saunder (artist) Dr. Sharia Shanklin (Department of Parks and Recreation), Andrew Didden and Melissa Didden Hennessy (National Capital Bank) and Stewart Brenegar. Photo: Ed Brenegar

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{capitol streets / bulletin board}

ABOVE: President and CEO of the Washington, DC Economic Partnership speaks on the subject of market trends of DC restaurants at last year’s forum.

DCRA Entree Food and Drink Forum The Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs’ Small Business Resource Center will host its second “Entrée Food & Drink Forum” on Aug. 25, 8:30 a.m.- 1 p.m. at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. This year’s event will offer support to a broader array of stakeholders by expanding its focus to include breakout sessions devoted to catering, vending, delis, bakeries, and restaurants . District government subject-matter experts will be on hand to provide overviews of the regulatory process in areas such as business licensure, zoning, sidewalk cafes, and alcohol and beverage licensure, and to answer any questions attendees might have. To register, go to entreedc. com. For additional assistance, call 202-442-4538.

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and is not expected to cease. The DC Streetcar Team has been issuing “warning tickets” to vehicles on H/Benning that are improperly parked, prior to actual enforcement. Outreach will continue to spread the word that DPW is now ticketing, and to educate motorists about proper parking along the streetcar corridor.

10th and Kent Place, NE Block Party On Saturday, Aug. 23, 4-9 p.m., join area neighbours for music, games, BBQ, potluck, moon bounce and an ice cream truck. The block party boundaries include 11th St., 9th St., Florida Ave., West Virginia Ave., and K St. Get in touch with organizers at 10thandkent@gmail.com.

Robert David Sneed Robert David Sneed, former proprietor of Sneed’s Barber Shop at 8th St. and I St. SE, died on Wednesday, June 11. Mr. Sneed will be remembered for his service to his customers in the U.S. Military who frequented his business.

Atlas Appoints Douglas Yeuell as Executive Director The Atlas Board of Directors named Douglas Yeuell Executive Director of the Atlas Performing Arts Center. His appointment comes four months after serving as Interim Chief Operating Officer following the departure of former Executive Director Sam Sweet. During his tenure as Interim COO, Yeuell oversaw all aspects of operations, administration and programming in advance of the Atlas’ 2014-15 performance season. Committed to the Atlas’ mission of fostering the artistic growth of professional and aspiring artists, Yeuell’s key initiative is to maintain a high quality roster of contemporary performances and partnerships with DC’s vibrant and emerging performing artists in theatre, music, spoken word, dance and choral arts. Yeuell will also focus on enhancing current arts partners’ relationships within the arts community and at the Atlas. Yeuell also plans to increase the Atlas’ profile in arts education through the development of outreach and educational programs. atlasarts.org


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COLDWELL

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rate the Nation's Birthday! b e l e C Capital Fringe to Purchase 1358 and 1360 Florida Ave. NE

Thank You for Supporting Capitol Hill’s 4th of July Parade • Grand Marshall Ward 6 Council Member Tommy Wells

Capital Fringe has signed a deal with Jamie Smith and Leigh Conner to purchase 1358 and 1360 Florida Ave. NE, the current location of the CONNERSMITH art gallery and the offices of the (e)merge art fair. The property, which was once an auto body shop, will feature three black box theaters, a scene shop, art gallery/event space and a beer garden. It will be a year-round operation to further incubate early stage artists, and to allow for creative endeavors to germinate and grow within the District. Capital Fringe is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization founded in the summer of 2005 with the purpose of infusing energy into performing arts in the Washington, DC region through an annual Fringe Festival and year-round Fringe Training Factory. Capital Fringe’s vigorous programs ensure the growth and continued health of the local and regional performing arts community by helping artists become independent producers while stimulating the vibrant cultural landscape in our city. capitalfringe.org

• Organizers Phil Guire and Jeanne Harrison • Capitol Hill Coldwell Banker Office • The Naval Lodge • Barracks Row Mainstreet • The Hill Rag • Ward 6 Council Democratic Nominee Charles Allen • Marine Color Guard • Miss United State Pageant Contestants • Capitol Hill’s Public, Public Charter & Private Schools

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Daily Fermentation, Tomato Technology and Tasting Coffee at Southeast Library On Monday, Aug. 4, at 7 p.m., come learn about some simple ways to ferment food including sauerkraut, sour bread starters, yogurt, and kombucha. On Saturday, Aug. 9, at 12:30 p.m., local gardener Lori Kenepp will share knowledge from her years of preserving

and raising heirloom tomatoes and will offer tips for success in your own garden. On Saturday, Aug, 16, at 11 a.m., staff from Peregrine Espresso and MadCap Coffee will offer guided tasting activities that explore the finer points of appreciating good coffee. Southeast Neighborhood Library, 403 7th St. SE. 202698-3377. dclibrary.org/southeast


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Flee the British 5k and Kids Fun Run To commemorate the 200th anniversary of the burning of Washington, Congressional Cemetery is hosting the Flee the British 5k on Saturday, Aug. 24, 8 a.m. Chase Dolley as she rescues the famed portrait of George Washington from the flames, and feel what it’s like to be chased by the British to the finish line. Bring the family and join them for a 2k Kids Run that begins directly after the 5k race. This historic 5k race will be held amongst the graves of many of the key players in the War of 1812. Registration is $40 and includes a t-shirt. The kids fun run is $10. Register at congressionalcemetery.org.

Silent Film Series at Hill Center Aug. 7, there will be three short films starring Gloria Swanson. Lovers of Sunset Boulevard should come enjoy some of this film divas earliest work. Aug. 14, The Cameraman starring one of the most thrilling, inventive, and delightful filmmaker ever, Buster Keaton. Aug. 21, All Night starring Rudolph Valentino tells the story of a married society couple that persuades an unmarried pair to take their places at a party while they pretend to be the servants. Aug. 28--Pollyanna, starring Mary Pickford, is a comedy about an orphaned girl that manages to stay positive by playing the “glad game.” She infects her new family with positivity and the audience with laughter. All films are free and begin at 7 p.m. Register online at hillcenterdc.org or call 202549-4172.

Saturday, Sept.13, 2014 / 8 AM – 5 PM FREE ADMISSION • FREE LUNCH ON-SITE LEGAL CLINIC • WORKSHOPS No Onsite Registration for this Event

Register at www.ota.dc.gov Call (202)719-6560

Kellogg Conference Center at Gallaudet University 800 Florida Ave. NE

“Tenant Knowledge is Tenant Power” Sessions Include the Following Tenant Issues: Rent Control, Facts & Fees, Security Deposits, ADA & Beyond.

www.bjonsax.tv Also available at:

DC Office of the Tenant Advocate August 2014 H 41


NoMa BID Installs New Bike Repair Facility and Pumps To serve cycling traffic from the Metropolitan Branch Trail and the new cycle track on First St. NE, the NoMa BID has installed a bright orange FIXIT station, an outdoor, tamperresistant repair station that includes all the tools necessary to perform basic repairs and maintenance, from changing a flat to adjusting brakes and derailleurs. The tools and air pump are securely attached to the stand with stainless steel cables and tamper-proof fasteners. Hanging the bike from the hanger arms allows the pedals and wheels to spin freely while making adjustments. The FIXIT station is located just off the Metropolitan Branch Trail ramp on M St. NE, under the underpass and across from the M St. entrance to the NoMa/ Gallaudet U Metro station. The NoMa BID also installed five, tamper-resistant, bright orange air pumps at the following locations: 1st and M Sts. NE, northwest corner of the intersection; M St. NE, off the Met Branch Trail ramp next to the new Fixit Station; 3rd and L Sts. NE, southeast corner of the intersection; 1st St. NE, just south of K St. NE, adjacent to the Burnham Wall; and No. Capitol at H St. NE, adjacent to UDC. An additional location is in the works north of Florida Ave. The BID began installing the air pumps several years ago, and recently sought a more weather-hardy and tamper-resistant option for these new pumps.

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Thomas Landscapes Over 20 Years of Experience

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Rumsey Pool Mural Work Begun Work has started on the mural at William Rumsey Aquatic Facility, 635 North Carolina Ave. SE. The mural, to be located on the left entrance wall, will be painted by noted artist Aniekan Udofia, who has been with the MuralsDC program since its inception. Udofia has painted multiple art projects throughout the city including the Duke Ellington mural and the mural on the side of Ben’s Chili Bowl.

St. Augustine’s Episcopal Church Begins New Role as “Church Without Walls” St. Augustine’s Episcopal Church, a fixture in Washington, DC’s southwest community since 1965, announces a new phase of life in its neighborhood. Under a unique partnership with developer PN Hoffman, the church sold a portion of its site for Hoffman to construct high quality condominiums. St. Augustine’s will build a new church on the northern portion of the site including a second-story sanctuary featuring spectacular views of the Washington Monument. The new church’s glass and steel sanctuary will be designed by MTFA Architecture, inc. of Arlington, Va, a company that specializes in church architecture. During its transition, St. Augustine’s is holding its 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship service and Sunday school in the fellowship hall of Christ United Methodist Church at 900 4th St. SW. The Service of Evening Prayer

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is held Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m., at Westminster Presbyterian Church at the corner of 4th and I Sts. SW. The new church should be completed in mid-2016.

Dance Place Grand Re-Opening Community Open House On Saturday, Sept. 6, 10 a.m.-10 p.m., come and celebrate the new and improved Dance Place. There will be free classes, performances and tours throughout the day at locations up and down 8th St NE in Brookland at Dance Place, Brookland Artspace Lofts, Edgewood Arts

Center, Studio 21 and the Arts Walk at Monroe St. Market. End the night with an energetic dance party at Dance Place led by DC Casineros. Visit danceplace.org for event schedule. On Wednesday, Sept. 10, 4-6 p.m., there will be a ribbon cutting ceremony as Dance Place officially inaugurates its renovated space and celebrates 28 years as a cultural anchor in Brookland. On Saturday, Sept. 13, 6:30-11 p.m., Dance Place will celebrate its re-opening with a party and performance that highlights the diverse programming and beautifully renovated space. There will be performances featur-

Lobby Project Welcomes New Photography Exhibit by Anthony Palliparambil, Jr.

The NoMa BID and the Washington Project for the Arts present a new photography exhibition by Anthony Palliparambil, Jr. in the Lobby Project at 1200 First St. NE. In this exhibit From the Archives, Anthony Palliparambil, Jr. uses images from his personal archive of photographs and edits them using only software and applications on an iPad. The idea is that in a matter of seconds, you can take a photograph, apply a vintage-effect filter, and post it for millions to view. Interested in exploring this approach to “fast art” in an original way, Palliparambil regularly shares the images on various social media platforms to encourage feedback from an international audience, and invites his followers to submit photographs from their own archives to be transformed into new works – creating art from art. From the Archives features 280 works created from the collective archives of Anthony Palliparambil, Jr., and his followers. Palliparambil is a painter and photographer from Bowie, Md.

August 2014 H 45


ing Baakari Wilder with live jazz by Herb Spice & the Cinnamonstix, Coyaba Women & Youth Drum Ensemble, PEARSONWIDRIG DANCETHEATER and a collaborative piece choreographed by Shannon Quinn and Sylvia Soumah for ReVision dance company and Coyaba Dance Theater. There will be a new commissioned work choreographed by Dance Place’s Co-Director Deborah Riley in honor of Howard and Geraldine Polinger. Tickets are $150 ($125 tax deductible donation). Dance Place is at 3225 8th St. NE. 202269-1608. danceplace.org

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703.765.9344

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The District Department of Transportation announces the debut of its new tumblr page, ddotdc.tumblr.com, an online resource for historic, transportation related photos and documents. The agency’s tumblr page is an effort to showcase the District’s transportation past and give the public a look into the collections that are housed in DDOT’s Library and Archives. For the full story, visit ddotdish.com.

District’s Saturday Free Summer Meals Program Expanded Free summer meals are offered on Saturdays across the District at select Department of Parks and Recreation and D.C. Public Library locations for children 18 years old and under. The District ranks No. 1 in the nation in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Summer Food Service Program, which provides free, nutritious meals and snacks


during the summer months at government sites and non-profit organizations throughout the District. Meals are offered from noon-2 p.m. every Saturday through Aug. 16 at the 15 DPR locations. Meals in Ward 6 are served at King Greenleaf Recreation Center, 201 N St. SW, 202645-7454 and Rosedale Community Center, 1701 Gales St. NE, 202-727-2591.

Invasive Insects Threatening DC’s Ash Trees Arborists from the District Department of Transportation’s Urban Forestry Administration recently discovered a number of small, invasive beetles that pose a threat to some trees in the District. Adult emerald ash borers (EABs, aka Agrilus planipennis) were found inside ash trees near Oxon Run in Ward 8 and were sighted in other locations throughout the District, which UFA has identified on an interactive map. The larvae of these insects, which are native to China, grow and devour the insides of ash trees before chewing their way out through telltale D-shaped tunnels. Currently, the District has 215 ash trees in public space (that is, street trees); however, there are hundreds–if not thousands–of ash trees located on private property.

11th Street SE OnRamp to Westbound I695 Closed As part of the 11th Street Bridge Project, the District Department of Transportation has closed the 11th Street SE onramp to westbound I695 (Southeast/Southwest Freeway). The ramp is

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Designer/artist Aniekan Udofia and Art Director Mia Duvall take advantage of the glorious weather to work on the mural. Photo: Kathleen Donner

scheduled to reopen on Saturday, Aug. 23, weather permitting. The two month closure of this ramp is needed to allow crews to complete final construction. During the closure, traffic will be detoured to I St. and Virginia Ave. SE to access westbound I695 via the 3rd St. SE onramp.

mit would allow customers to purchase and consume beer--brewed at the brewery--while on the licensed premises from 1-9 p.m., seven days a week. The annual fee for the permit is $1,000. ABRA is now accepting and processing permit applications.

New Permit Allows On-Premise Consumption at DC Breweries

The Federal Highway Administration and the District Department of Transportation has released a Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the proposed reconstruction of the Virginia Avenue Tunnel. The FEIS incorporates feedback from the community and identifies “Alternative 3 - Two New Tunnels” as the Preferred Alternative for construction. The FEIS and a fact sheet are available at virginiaavenuetunnel.com. Copies of the FEIS are also available for review at Southeast Neighborhood Library, 403 7th St. SE and Southwest Neighborhood Library, 900 Wesley Pl. SW.

A permit is now available to District breweries that will allow customers to purchase and drink the brewery’s beer while visiting the facility. The new law is a provision of the Fiscal Year 2015 Budget Support Emergency Act of 2014 that took effect July 15. Under the Manufacturer Tasting Permit Emergency Amendment Act of 2014, a brewery can apply for an on-site sales and consumption permit with the Alcoholic Beverage Regulation Administration. The per-

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Virginia Avenue Tunnel Project Update


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{capitol streets}

Southwest Small Area Plan

Redevelopment Moves Forward, But Not Without Community Concerns

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hile Southwest redevelopment projects advance and are considered by residents to be “inevitable,” neighborhood planners and community members continue to clash on the best way to proceed while preserving neighborhood character. The Southwest Small Area Plan faces similar conflict on its lengthy course to city approval and eventual completion.

Background A Small Area Plan is a “framework” for the “redevelopment and preservation” of a particular neighborhood that can be submitted as legislation to the City Council, and then subsequently adopted and given approval or rejected. Small Area Plans are most importantly a way for residents and businesses to have input into the future character and resources of their neighborhood. Small Area Plan developers must consult with a SAP Advisory Committee made up of neighborhood commissioners and leaders in order to best reflect what the community wants from redevelopment. According to Melissa Bird, Ward 6 Community Planning Coordinator with the Office of Planning, there are over 35 members on the committee with seven advisory meetings already having taken place. “Community input is a huge part of the planning process,” Bird said at a June 25 neighborhood meeting held at the Capitol Skyline Hotel to discuss the proposals. The Southwest Small Area Plan focuses on the area bounded by Maine Ave. SW, P St. SW, South Capitol and the Interstate 695. It is still in its feedback and revision phases, according to Associate Director for Neighborhood Planning Tracy Gabriel.

A Continuing Process Gabriel noted the significant changes over the past few years happening in and around Southwest, including the Nationals Baseball Stadium, the proposed new soccer stadium at Buzzard Point, the SW Ecodistrict and the Wharf project. She explained

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by Irene Burski the proposed Small Area Plan as the next step of an evolutionary growth and multiple project process. “Southwest is incredibly unique, and we want to move forward in the best way and with the best tools to preserve that,” Bird said. Issues including historic and green space preservation in addition to deciding where new development should take place pose other potential gridlock regarding the project. In the Draft Recommendations, developers committed broadly to promoting “preservation of its outstanding modernist architecture, landscape architecture, public housing and urban design,” as means of maintaining historic character, but how this goal will be met is not clear. In contrast, the Draft Recommendations offer more details regarding how to revitalize and maintain green space, calling for better pedestrian and bike access along I Street, renovating the Randall Recreation Center located on South Capitol Street and an enhanced Lansburgh Park. “We believe Lansburgh Park can become the Central Park of Southwest,” Bird said.

The Library Question A renovation and rebuilding of the Southwest library branch is also in the works. Officials allocated over $8 million in the city budget for the library spanning from 2012-2018, but planners are unsure whether the library will be simply renovated at its current location (900 Wesley Place SW), or moved to a new site and rebuilt entirelyand whether it will be a single-use, stand-alone building, or a mixed-use space, with the library spanning the first floor and condo and apartment real estate above.

Low Density vs. High Density; Redevelopment vs. Displacement Perhaps most contentious to community members is the plan’s proposed changing of traditionally lowdensity areas of Southwest to areas of high-density. Those living in the historically quieter and less congested quadrant of the District do not want this characteristic of the area to change as a conse-

quence of urban renewal, making large portions of the small area plan cause for concern among existing residents. “I count 17 different building properties on this list, and unless I’m wrong, all but for two, the density goes up,” 15-year Southwest resident and activist Rick Bardash said at the June 25 neighborhood meeting. “Twenty years from now, SW will have double the population if all of these things happen. We want a neighborhood, and we can’t have a neighborhood when density is twice as much.” Additionally, community activists worried that the plans and expansion will displace residents of the Greenleaf Complex, a public housing complex just south of M Street, despite assurances from Bird. According to statistics from the District of Columbia Housing Authority (DCHA), Greenleaf Gardens Apartments alone has 278 apartment units, with about 36 percent of residents being children. All together, Greenleaf Gardens Apartments, along with Greenleaf Senior, Greenleaf Extension and Greenleaf Addition, make up about four city blocks of space. “No one wants to see current residents displaced during the planning process and building process,” Bird said. “People want to make sure there is a place for everybody to stay in Southwest.” Community activist and 38-year District resident Thelma D. Jones noted that there is a definitive and deep distrust between lower income residents of Southwest and developers, left over from a long citywide history of redevelopment leading to complete gentrification. “What they do know and remember is that when urban renewal occurred before, more than 23,000 people were displaced,” Jones said. “That fuels even greater fear and anxiety. [The residents] have lost faith.”

What Next? Organizers hope to finalize the Southwest Small Area Plan by the end of the summer, and send the plan to City Council by the fall. More information on the Southwest Area Plan can be found at http://swneighborhoodplan.org/. u


ANC6 Candidates Needed

ANC6B and ANC6D Still Shy of Sufficient Candidates as Deadline Looms

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here are still five seats – three in ANC6B and two in ANC6D – which currently have no candidates for the fall election. To become a candidate, a nominating petition signed by 25 registered voters in a candidate’s Single Member District (SMD) must be filed with the DC Board of Elections by August 6. These nominating petitions will be posted in the Board’s office for a ten-day challenge period during which any registered District voter may challenge the validity of any petition by a written statement signed by the challenger and filed with the Board. The statement must specify concisely the alleged defect(s) in the petition. Petitions are declared invalid most frequently because residents who are ineligible to sign them are disqualified, which takes the number of signatures below the required 25. Following is a list of the Single Member Districts in the four Ward Six ANCs which comprise Capitol Hill, the current commissioner for each SMD, and the potential candidates who have picked up nominating petitions as of 5:5.3 p. on July 25 (according to the DC Board of Elections) to get their names on the ballot in the general election in November. ANC6A – Four Commissioners Retire – But Candidates Emerge for all SMDs ANC6A01 – (J. Omar Mahmud, retiring) Candidates: Raphael V. Marshall, Andy Clark, J. Omar Mahmud ANC6A02 – (Gloria Nauden, retiring) Candidates: Phil Toomajian ANC6A03 – (Chris Ward, incumbent) Candidates: Chris Ward ANC6A04 – (Nick Alberti, incumbent) Candidates: Nick Alberti, Matt Levy ANC6A05 – (Jay Williams, retiring) Candidates: Dan Allen, Patrick A. Malone ANC6A06 – (Andrew Hysell, retiring) Candidates: Todd Slover ANC6A07 – (Sondra Phillips-Gilbert, incumbent) Candidates: Sondra Phillips-Gilbert

by Larry Janezich ANC6A08 – (Calvin Ward, incumbent) Candidates: Calvin Ward A map of ANC6A’s SMDs can be found here: http:// www.anc6a.org/map.html ANC6B – Seven Commissioners Retire – Three Seats. Currently Have No Candidates ANC6B01 – (Vacant, Dave Garrison resigned) Candidates: NONE YET ANC6B02 – (Ivan Frishberg, retiring) Candidates: Gerald Sroufe, Diane Hoskins

ANC6C04 – (Mark Eckenweiler, incumbent) Mark Eckenweiler ANC6C05 – (Mark Kazmierczak, incumbent) Mark Kazmierczak ANC6C06 – (Tony Goodman, incumbent) Tony Goodman A map of ANC6C’s SMDs can be found here: http:// anc6c.org/map.html

ANC6B03 – (Phil Peisch, retiring) Candidates: James M. Loots

ANC6D – Two Commissioners Retire – No Candidates Yet for Two Seats ANC6D01 – (Sam Marrero, incumbent) NONE YET

ANC6B04 – (Kirsten Oldenburg, incumbent) Candidates: Kirsten Oldenburg

ANC6D02 – (Stacy Cloyd, incumbent) Stacy Cloyd

ANC6B05 – (Brian Pate, retiring) Candidates: NONE YET

ANC6D03 – (Rachel Carroll, incumbent) Rachel Carrol

ANC6B06 – (Nichole Opkins, retiring) Candidates: Nick Burger, Anthony Cassillo

ANC6D04 – (Andy Litsky, incumbent) Andy Litsky

ANC6B07 – (Sara Loveland, retiring) Candidates: Daniel Chao ANC6B08 – (Chander Jayaraman, incumbent) Candidates: Chander Jayaraman ANC6B09 – (Brian Flahaven, incumbent) Candidates: Brian Flahaven ANC6B10 – (Francis Campbell, retiring) Candidates: Denise Rucker Krepp, Peter Gould A map of ANC6B’s SMDs can be found here: http:// www.anc6b.org/?page_id=20 ANC6C – All Commissioners Will Seek Re-Election – Currently Have No Opponents ANC6C01 – (Daniele Schiffman, incumbent) Daniele Schiffman ANC6C02 – (Karen Wirt, incumbent) Karen Wirt ANC6C03 – (Scott Price, incumbent) Scott Price

ANC6D05 – (Roger Moffat, incumbent) Roger Moffat ANC6D06 – (Rhonda Hamilton, retiring) NONE YET ANC6D07 – (David Garber, retiring) Josh Hart, Meredith Fascett A map of ANC6D’s SMDs can be found here: http:// www.anc6d.org/map.html Nomination petitions can be picked up here: DC Board of Elections 441 4th Street, NW, Suite 250 North Washington, DC 20001 Tel: 202-727-2525 TTY: 202-639-8916 Tollfree: 1-866-DC-VOTE The DC Board of Election’s Candidate Guide to Ballot Access can be found here: https://www.dcboee.org/home.asp Larry Janezich edits Capitol Hill Corner, a community news blog at www.capitolhillcorner.org u

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ANC 6A by Denise Romano

C Street Improvement Project Update In his officer’s report, Chair Nick Alberti announced that the city will soon restart the C St. Improvement Project, aimed to improve traffic flow and pedestrian safety, between 23rd and 16th Sts. NE. Although this project was discussed at length in the past, the contractors are apparently starting over from scratch. Community meetings will be held in the near future regarding lane reduction, re-doing medians, crosswalks and other traffic safety measures. The ANC believes that the impact of traffic on 17th and 19th Sts. should be evaluated and safety issues addressed. However, the DC Water and Sewer Authority (WASA) is doing work on both these streets and hasn’t said when the work will be completed. Road redesign won’t be attempted until after that work is completed. The commissioners unanimously voted that Chair Alberti will craft a letter to WASA asking 1) why the ANC was not informed of the work, 2) that DC WASA consider the urgency of safety concerns and accelerate the schedule and 3) what work is planned for 19th St. and when it might be completed. ANC 6B has already sent a letter asking that the process be sped up, citing both the urgency of traffic calming patterns and the need to keep ANCs and residents informed with the project.

ANC supports LCC Run on September 13 Lieutenant Daniel Banasik of the National Guard announced information regarding the Land Component

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Commander’s (LCC) Run, a joint run with the Air Force, on Saturday, September 13. Held to motivate troops and boost morale, the run will take place from RFK Stadium, around Lincoln Park, and then back to the stadium. There will be no trash and no blocked streets, being “smooth with as low-impact as possible.” Activities will take place between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m., with the run itself only lasting about 20 minutes. The ANC unanimously voted to send a letter of support for the event.

Economic Development and Zoning Business Commissioners voted 5-1-1 to approve a recommendation that the ANC write a letter of support for BZA case 18798, located at 1425 North Carolina Ave. NE, for special exceptions from the lot occupancy and rear yard setback requirements, as well as additions for the buildings that exceed permitted lot occupancy in connection with the construction of a rear deck; as well as in support of a variance from the definition of a “yard,” which prohibits any structure occupying more than 50 percent of a yard, in the event the Zoning Administrator and BZA deem that requirement applicable to a structure below four feet in height. The owner of the property was present at the meeting and insured the ANC that the deck will be permeable and will not compromise the air space of neighbors, since the house already takes up nearly half of the yard space. Chair Alberti expressed that he felt it did not meet requirements for a variance.

Alcohol Beverage and Licensing Business Commissioners voted unanimously to recommend that the ANC write a letter of support and approve a request by Smith Commons, located at 1245 H St. NE, for a summer garden endorsement, under the condition that the garden be closed on 11 p.m. on weeknights and 12 a.m. on weekends. The establishment’s attorney and manager were present and residents expressed that they were good neighbors. In an unanimous vote, commissioners recommended that the ANC


ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 6A NICK ALBERTI, CHAIR, 202-329-1193 Serving the Near Northeast, North Lincoln Park, Rosedale, and Stanton Park communities ANC 6A generally meets the second Thursday of the month, at Miner Elementary School, 601 15th Street, NE.

www.anc6a.org Next ANC 6A meeting is 2nd Thursday, September 11 Alcohol Beverage Licensing Committee

3rd Tuesday, August 19, 7pm • Sherwood Recreation Center Corner of 10th & G Streets, NE • Chair, Jay Williams, 906-0657

Transportation & Public Space Committee

3rd Monday, August 18, 7pm • Maury Elementary School 13th Street & Constitution Ave NE Chair, Omar Mahmud, 546-1520

Economic Development & Zoning Committee

3rd Wednesday, August 20, 7pm • Sherwood Recreation Center Corner of 10th and G Streets, NE • Chair, Dan Golden, 641-5734

Community Outreach Committee

3rd Monday, August 18, 7pm Maury Elementary School • 13th Street & Constitution Ave NE Chair, Elizabeth Nelson, 543-3512

Please check the Community Calendar on the website for cancellations and changes of venue.

Advisory Neighborhood Commission 6C P.O. Box 77876 • Washington, D.C. 20013-7787 • www.anc6c.org Call (202) 547-7168 for meeting time and location. ANC 6C generally meets the second Wednesday of each month.

ANC 6C COMMISSIONERS ANC 6C01 Daniele Schiffman Daniele.Schiffman@gmail.com

ANC 6C04 Mark Eckenwiler 6C04@anc.dc.gov

ANC 6C02 Karen Wirt (202) 547-7168 6C02@anc.dc.gov

ANC 6C05 Mark Kazmierczak 6C05@anc.dc.gov

ANC 6C03 Scott Price (202) 577-6261 6C03@anc.dc.gov scott.price@anc.dc.gov

ANC 6C06 Tony Goodman (202) 271-8707 tonytgood@gmail.com

ANC 6C COMMITTEES Alcohol Beverage Licensing Committee Contact: (870) 821-0531 anc6c.abl.committee@gmail.com

Transportation and Public Space Committee First Thursday, 7 pm Contact: (202) 641-4264

Grants Committee Contact: SDucote@afscme.org Planning, Zoning, and Environment Committee First Wednesday, 7 pm Contact: zoning@eckenwiler.org Twitter: @6C_PZE

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formally protest the CR license renewal of The Pursuit, located at 1421 H St. NE, unless The Pursuit agrees to amend its Settlement Agreement to strike Section 3 (d), which would have allowed later hours in the outdoor seating area, after a trial period. In addition, Commissioner Jay Williams will represent the ANC on future meetings with this establishment.

AARP Needs Volunteer Tutors at Miner Elementary School Monica Green, a representative for the AARP, announced that the organization has partnered with Miner Elementary School to recruit tutors to teach students in grades Kindergarten through three to read. Tutors will be helping students who need it the most, or who are “at risk.” Volunteers must have a high school diploma or GED, like being around children and be available at least five hours per week, mostly during the morning during school days. No experience is needed. Community Outreach Chair Elizabeth Nelson said that she will assist with outreach. For more information, contact Green at 202-434-6426 or by email at MGreen@ aarp.org.

Other Business Resident Vanessa Ruffin was present at the meeting, expressing frustration with construction going on adjacent to her home on Wylie St. NE. She told commissioners that the construction has been disturbing her property, including having backhoes and other equipment in her rear yard; damage to her fence and excavating part of her property line. She said she reached out to DCRA, Zoning, the Historic Preservation Review Board, the Department of Planning and the police department, with no response. Commissioner Omar Mahmud said that he will look into the matter. ANC chairs met with the city’s Chief Financial Officer to exchange information between the Office of Tax and Revenue and the Department of Conservation and Recreation in regards to issues such as vacant properties and long-term planning from the Department of Transportation, with a focus on deteriorating alleyways. The ANC is still working on getting a commitment from the city to expedite improvement of these issues. In her Single Member District (SMD) Report, Commissioner Sondra Phillips-Gilbert said that she is working on rectifying noise issues and

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rat abatement in her community, as well as illegal dumping at the Gibbs Elementary School site. In his SMD report, Commissioner Calvin Ward said that he was working on issues involving two abandoned homes in his district. The properties are a nuisance to neighbors and he is trying to resolve all related problems. Naomi Mitchell of Councilmember Tommy Wells’ office announced that legislation is being reviewed by Council that would allow the creation of Conservation Districts, to address community concerns including “pop-ups”. ANC 6A meets on the second Thursday of every month, but DOES NOT MEET IN AUGUST, at Miner Elementary School. The 6A committees meet at 7 p.m. at the following dates: Alcohol Beverage and Licensing, third Wednesday Tuesday of every month at the Sherwood Recreation Center. Community Outreach, third Monday of each month, Maury Elementary School. Economic Development and Zoning, third Wednesday of each month, Sherwood Recreation Center. Transportation and Public Space, third Monday of every month, Maury Elementary School. Please visit www.ANC6A.org for the latest information regarding meetings. u

for &Pizza, but this time it was by a narrower margin. Salis then asked the BZA to further delay his hearing—this time until September—so he could continue to look into ways to make his application more amenable to neighbors and the Commission. After meeting with the city’s official rodentologist, Salis returned to July’s ANC 6B regular meeting with a plan that included odor scrubbers in trash storage facility’s venting system and an agreement that &Pizza’s fast food exception would last only ten years rather than the usual 20. At the meeting, &Pizza argued that their establishment, which would be highly regulated, would likely create fewer problems than a traditional sit-down restaurant, which could move into the building as a matter of right should &Pizza’s request for an exception be denied. “There’s merit to the argument that you could get a coffee shop in there that without those restrictions would have more of an impact than this plan here,” said commissioner Brian Pate. “I think this is the best rodent mitigation plan we’ve seen on the Row. Will it work? That’s the question. I’m not going vote to oppose it at this point.” After &Pizza’s request was adjusted for the exception to last seven years rather than ten, commissioners approved it, 6-4.

DC Water Delaying 17th Street Safety Improvement Project

ANC 6B by Jonathan Neeley

ANC 6B Approves & Pizza on Barrack’s Row In May, ANC 6B commissioners voted against &Pizza’s bid for a fast food exception at 405 Eighth Street SE, the building currently occupied by Oxxo Cleaners. Commissioners felt that another fast food restaurant on Barrack’s Row would exacerbate the area’s considerable rat infestation problem. 6B’s opposition, however, left the door open for &Pizza owner Steve Salis: in its letter to the BZA, the Commission said it supported Salis’ request for a delayed hearing so that he could find a way to curb the rat problem and come to an agreement with opposing neighbors. In June, 6B again voted against an exception

In May, DDOT informed ANC 6B that it would begin construction on the 17th Street Safety Project in September of this year. Paired with 19th Street SE, the project is long overdue, as vehicles frequently speed down both streets en route to I-296 and I-695; in May, a pedestrian was struck and killed by a driver at the intersection of East Capitol and 17th Street SE. Plans for the project include narrowing 17th Street SE down from two lanes to ne, adding a bike lane, and installing new speed limit signs along the corridor. In June, however, the DC Water and Sewer Authority informed DDOT of plans to replace an aging water main on 17th Street SE between C Street SE and Potomac Avenue SE. These plans will delay the safety project by another 18 months. ANC 6B sent a letter to DC Water calling the additional delay unacceptable and asking for an explanation on why DDOT nor the ANC were informed of the upcoming work sooner. The letter also requests that DC Water move its timeline


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RENOVATIONS REMODELING

Metrobus Consolidation of Stops Along the 30s Line As part of its “Less Stop, More Go” program, Metrobus plans to eliminate the following 30s Bus line stops along Pennsylvania Avenue SE: Sixth Street Eastbound and Westbound, Seventh Street Westbound, 12th Street Eastbound, and 17th Street Westbound. ANC 6B sent a letter supporting all but the Sixth Street Westbound and 12th Street closures, the latter of which is right next door to Frager’s Hardware, CVS, and Watkins Elementary School. Instead, ANC 6B is in favor of eliminating the Fifth Street Westbound and the E Street Eastbound stops. Metrobus will release new bus timetables on September 1st.

moveDC Transportation Plan The District Department of Transportation recently distributed a draft of moveDC, its 30year transportation plan for a modal shift that decreases the number of cars and personal vehicles on the road and ups the number of bikes and pedestrians. The plan includes investigation of pedestrian, bike, vehicle, and parking issues as well as a new Metro line and special express bus lines to connect commercial corridors around the District. Citing a number of short and medium term transportation projects that have consumed its time—Barney Circle and the SE Boulevard Study and the CSX Virginia Avenue Tunnel Recon-

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{capitol streets / anc news}

struction project, for example— ANC 6B sent a letter to DDOT requesting an extension of the July 31st moveDC comment deadline to September 12th so that it can adequately review and weigh in on the draft.

Pedestrian Safety at Eighth Street SE Pedestrian safety along the corridor of Eighth Street SE between C and D Streets SE, which sits just below Pennsylvania Avenue and at the north end of Barracks Row, remains a concern for ANC 6B. While DDOT recently added pedestrian crosswalk signs, it said the ANC’s request for a one-way stop sign on the southbound lane at the intersection of Eighth and D Street SE was unwarranted. ANC 6B sent a letter to DDOT asking that the traffic calming assessment that residents requested in April be accelerated.

DC General ANC 6B has long been clear that it views the homeless shelter at the former DC General hospital, which sits in Hill East on Reservation 13, as an unsatisfactory solution to the city’s homeless crisis. On July 10th, 6B Chair Brian Flahaven testified before the city’s Committee on Human Services to voice 6B’s support for Jim Graham’s PR20-845, a resolution that would close DC General. In his testimony, Flaheven noted that DC General is old and deteriorating, said the facility is burdened by a request for too many services for too many people, and called it “an outrage and embarrassment to our city.” Flahaven said ANC 6B hopes for DC General to be replaced by smaller scale shelters, permanent supportive housing, and a rent supplement program, paid for by the estimated $14 billion per year that the District currently spends on the shelter. He also pushed for either a specific closure date or a plan for achieving benchmarks. “Without some sort of time component,” Flahaven testified, “We fear that both the Mayor and Council will ignore this resolution to the detriment of shelter residents and the city.”

DC National Guard Run The DC National Guard Commander’s Run, part of an effort to remind District residents of the DC Guard’s availability to the community, will take place on Saturday, September 13th. The route is

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short: straight down East Capitol from the Armory, around Lincoln Park, and back. There will be no roadblocks, only guards to prevent traffic from passing in and out of formations, and in an effort to keep noise levels low, troops will not use cadences to keep time. A time window of 7 to 9am is blocked off for the event, but the run itself will only take 30 minutes—its start depends on when the Commander kicks it off.

the request must be made on behalf of a disabled person, there must be a current disability-related need for the request, and the request must not fundamentally alter the nature of DC’s historic preservation laws, programs, or policies. Commissioner Eckenwiler agreed with CHRS’ assessment, as he was not persuaded that the alley is an inadequate alternative. The motion to support the application failed with a 3-3 vote.

Commissioners Resigning

700 Constitution Avenue

Commissioners Dave Garrison (ANC6B01), Ivan Frishberg (6B02), Phil Peisch (6B03), Brian Pate (6B05) Nicole Opkins (6B06), Sara Loveland (6B07), and Francis Campbell (6B10) will not seek re-election in November. u

Terry Busby of Urban Structures, Inc. presented concept revisions for proposed renovations at 700 Constitution Ave. NE. The original plan included 18-foot high rooftop penthouses connected by a trellis. While the developers significantly reduced the height in their revision, some residents raised concerns that the trellis could be visible from C Street. “The Capitol Hill Restoration Society has a long-standing opposition to rooftop elements that are visible from the street for amenity purposes on residential structures,” said Tallant. “So, we’re certainly not singling out this applicant or opposing regardless of previous history. We believe that in Capitol Hill, the use of rooftop elements for recreational purposes is inconsistent with the historic district.” Recognizing the possibility of approval, CHRS recommended further reducing the penthouse height. The Commission voted 6-0 approving the revisions, provided that the developers seek approval from the Board of Zoning Adjustment (BZA) to remove the trellis; once the developers receive a case number, the Commission will write a letter of support to BZA.

ANC 6C

by Charnice A. Milton 630 D Street, NE Richard Thoreson and his wife, Lucy Brown, want to renovate their property, a row house located at 630 D Street, NE. However, a proposed basement entrance became a major discussion point. Thoreson argued that they suffer from medical conditions that currently does not impair mobility, but could worsen over the years. However, Commissioner Mark Eckenwiler (ANC 6C04) questioned whether or not access from the rear or alley is possible. Commissioner Scott Price (6C03) supported the application, saying, “From my point of view, working with Capitol Hill Village and other folks on the Hill, we want to try to make Capitol Hill appropriate for people as they grow older, so they don’t have to leave.” However, Drury Tallant, a representative from the Capitol Hill Restoration Society (CHRS), stated that its Historic Preservation Committee voted against supporting the application. “To alter the historic fabric on the presumption one might one day be physically impaired, we believe, jumps the gun on when that kind of accommodation should be undertaken,” he said. Moreover, Tallant indicated the application does not meet the Historic Preservation Office’s (HPO) criteria for reconciling historic preservation laws with accessibility:

Stuart-Hobson Parking Stuart-Hobson Middle School is currently in its second phase of renovation, with plans to expand its recreation area; as a result, approximately 26 teacher parking spaces will be converted into ball fields. Therefore, DC Public Schools (DCPS) proposed designating curbside parking for teachers along all four sides of the school building during school hours (8 a.m. to 4 p.m.). However, one of the sides, F Street, is designated as Ward 6 residential permit parking (RPP) with two hours for visitors. As a result, the Transportation and Public Space Committee recommended supporting the request for the other three sides (E, Fourth, and Fifth Streets), which currently has the teachers only designation.


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{capitol streets / anc news}

Commissioner Eckenwiler supported the committee’s recommendation and added two provisions. First, the Commission would request the DC Department of Transportation (DDOT) to designate the teacher’s spaces as RPP from 4 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Second, DDOT should delay installing signage until the developers receive a permit for the recreation area expansion. If construction has not begun within six months after the permit is issued, then the signs will revert to its current state. The Commission approved this motion with a 6-0 vote.

Other News •

The Commission voted 5-0, as Commissioner Daniele Schiffman (6C01) left the meeting early, to not support Alibi Restaurant and Lounge’s application for a sidewalk cafe. • The Commission voted 5-0 to send a letter to DDOT, Giant, and the Metropolitan Police Department asking them to comply with laws prohibiting truck drivers from using residential streets. • The Parks and Events Committee met for the first time on July 1. They discussed triangle parks owned and managed by the National Park Service and the NoMa neighborhood’s participation in the Playable Arts DC program. Future meeting times and locations will be announced later. • The Commission voted 5-0 to support the Mid-City East Plan, a proposal to reconstruct the N, New York, and North Capitol Street intersection. • The Commission approved Caroline Crenshaw as chair of the Parks and Event Committee and Ned Russell as the at-large member of the Transportation and Public Space Committee. Commissioner Tony Goodman (6C06) • named Mae Carroll as his single-member district (SMD) representative for the Parks and Event Committee. • Commissioner Mark Kazmierczak named Sally Donner as his SMD representative for the Alcoholic Beverage Committee. ANC 6C meets every second Wednesday of the month at 7:00 p.m. at the Heritage Foundation (214 Massachusetts Avenue). The next meeting will be on Thursday, September 11 (as there is no August meeting). u

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ANC 6D by Roberta Weiner

DC United Is Heard From While still awaiting any news from the District about its plans for the projected soccer stadium at Buzzard Point, representatives of DC United made a presentation to the Commission, saying that they were actively moving forward with their plans. Craig Stauffer and Victor Melara focused on the outreach they are doing in the community, starting a soccer program this summer for 200 children at Amidon School, and meeting with the local Community Benefits Coordinating Council (CBCC) to begin discussions with the hope of putting together a mutually beneficial agreement. They are also planning a soccer program for the Randall Rec Center. They reported that District and Council officials are working on the issues surrounding the acquisition of the Reeves Building. They expect it will take 12 to 18 months for the city to assemble the land for the development, and they will be in the stadium by 2017, Commissioner Andy Litsky asked about transportation plans, an issue that has troubled the Commission since the project was proposed. They said they have a safe plan mapped out from the Navy Yard metro and they would like to take the lead from the District, working with the ANC and the South West Neighborhood Assembly (SWNA). They said they want to continue to work with the community to make sure all questions are answered as the project moves forward.

What’s With the CSX Tunnel? The status of the CSX Tunnel is, at present, indeterminate, awaiting a DDOT sign-off on a Record of Decision (ROD)--but not if ANC 6D and local neighbors have anything to say about it. The ANC unanimously passed a lengthy resolution, authored by Commissioner David Garber, pointing out the many questions that remain unresolved, and requesting that no action be taken until after the City Council, now in recess until September, returns to work and can act on a series of issues within its purview. Some of the issues include: the funds in the 2015 District budget that have been allocated for a comprehensive rail study and plan to coordinate

all rail inventory and develop a safety plan would be substantially undermined; there is no public, binding agreement between CSX and the District to reroute shipments of crude oil and other hazardous materials around the city; the questions raised by the future of economic development in a growing neighborhood; and affordable housing during construction for residents with medical issues; and, emergency response in case of a derailment. Finally, there is, according to the resolution, the unresolved question of whether DDOT preapproved CSX’s preferred proposal before any plans had been shared with the public, suggested by newly-released documents dating as far back as 2010. The resolution will be sent to the Mayor, City Council, DDOT, and the Federal Highway Administration.

The Small Area Plan (SAP) That Isn’t Several months ago the Office of Planning instituted a process to develop a Small Area Plan (SAP) for Southwest to define its future growth and the scope of change. To that end, several large community meetings were held, with comments written down. However, Kael Anderson, President of SWNA, who is heading a large group of Southwest civic leaders, told the ANC that the SAP is inadequate for a host of reasons and does not come close to approaching its goal. “As it stands, the SAP needs to become a neighborhood plan,” he said, “not a real estate development plan.” Following up, Commissioner Litsky offered a resolution to be sent to the Office of Planning, requesting a six month delay in implementing any plan “to allow time for residents to work with city officials to develop a comprehensive neighborhood plan that successfully addresses the challenges and opportunities in the Southwest neighborhood.” It points out that community comments haven’t been adequately incorporated into the draft, and that the draft recommendations are not associated with implementation proposals. The resolution passed unanimously.

In Other Actions… •

Ratified the contract of, and introduced, new ANC administrative assistant Joshua Habursky, a Georgetown U. student. He can be reached at the ANC office, 202/554-1795


August 2014 H 59


{capitol streets / anc news}

Agreed to send a letter to DCRA supporting a series of public art installations on the façade of the Capitol Skyline Hotel at 1st and I Streets SW. The program, sponsored by the Washington Project for the Arts (WPA), which is now headquartered at the hotel. The first presentation will be by local artist Julie Wolfe who will exhibit a series of large circular monotypes mounted on wood on the front of the building. Proposed a change to the ANC by-laws, to be voted on at the September meeting, that will allow ANC Committee members to attend and participate in meetings via Skype, if at least two members are present at the meeting location. Unanimously supported a resolution urging the DC Public Library to re-label the restrooms at the Southeast Library from single sex to gender neutral. Citing children and adults with opposite sex caretakers, transgender people and, simply, those waiting to use a stall when the opposite sex one is vacant, the unanimously passed resolution asked that the signage be changed not only in Southeast but all libraries throughout the City. Approved several races using 6D streets, none of which will disrupt local traffic or residential movement within the community. The\y are: Saturday, September 30 – Lighthouse for the Blind 4th Annual Light the Way 5K; Saturday, October 11th – National Law Enforcement Officers -4th Annual Run to Remember; Saturday, October 18th – Best Buddies Challenge Ride (a bicycle race held mostly inside Nationals Park); and Thursday, November 27 – SOME’s 13th Annual Thanksgiving Day 5K Trot for Hunger. Gave its okay to two events: On Saturday October 4th\, Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move campaign will come to Southeast. For the second year, the DC Children and Family Expo will be held at the King-Greenleaf Rec Center; and the annual Summer in Lansburgh Park reunion of residents and former residents who grew up in Southeast. Discussed and approved several alcoholic beverage license renewals, and discussed a pending Settlement Agreement for the soonto-open Harris Teeter on 2nd Street SE that is still being negotiated. The major issue, ac-

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cording to Alcoholic Beverage Licensing Committee chair Coralie Farlee, is whether the store can display wine at locations in the store other than its wine department. • Began a discussion of school boundaries, unanimously approving a resolution previously approved by fifteen other ANCs, urging fair discussion of the complex issue. The Commission subsequently, after a discussion of the issues, tabled a motion submitted by Commissioner Stacy Cloyd with suggestions specific to Ward 6 until more information was available to all the Commissioners. ANC 6D will not meet in August. The next meeting of the commission will be on Monday, September 8 at 7:00 p.m. at 1100 4th Street SW, DCRA Conference Room, 2nd Floor. u

mentioned that parking granted by the nearby condo unit is a month-to-month lease and there is no guarantee that parking will still be available for potential tenants in the future. The board voted in favor of not supporting the zoning request when taken before the city and encouraged the development group to continue to work with the community to resolve the parking issue and possibly down scale the project to four or six residential units. “This is a very unusual set of circumstances and the level of increased density that is represented by those eight units is a deal breaker,” said ANC 6E01 Chairman Alexander Padro. Representatives of Newton Street Development agreed to revise their plans and work with the board and area residents.

Parcel 23 Project

ANC 6E by Steve Holton

Zoning Request Denied Newton Street Development 3, LLC appeared before the ANC 6E Board’s July meeting to request zoning relief to allow renovation to an existing building for residential use located at 1740 New Jersey Ave. NW. Due to long term vacancy the structure has had its challenges with water infiltrating over a foot into the building and roof damage. The current owner has proposed to develop the parcel into an eight-unit condominium. Floor plans propose a four story building with two residential units on each level. To help alleviate parking concerns the development group noted that a nearby condo unit has designated four parking spaces for potential tenants and metro and bike share discount cards will be made available to encourage occupants to use public transportation. Visitor parking will also be restricted to anyone who occupies the building. ANC 6E02 Commissioner Kevin Chapple said that area residents are against such a project that will produce dense residential occupancy to what used to be a single family home and that parking in the area is already horrendous. “I believe the property is too small of a footprint for that many residents,” said Chapple. Chapple also

A short list of four developers presented their plans before the board on their respective development projects on a parcel of land located at the Southwest corner of Eight and O St. NW. Plans for each group are as follows in alphabetical order: 1) ANR Companies: Project will enhance community and family look by having a retail operation on the O St. side and community outdoor space for events and public art on the Eighth St. portion. A parking deck of 90 spaces will be constructed and 25 will be dedicated to the Immaculate Conception Church located across the street. 2) Four Points Development: 172 residential unit project with 17 units being dedicated to affordable housing. There will be a parking deck with 135 spaces with 25 of them reserved for the church. There will be two floors of retail space totaling 20,000-square-feet. Retail space plans calls for a full service gym on the second floor a large room for community use that can also be used in partnership with the church. 3) Madison Investments: Plans call for a condominium unit with a two level parking garage with 59 spaces for residents and 25 for the church on the second level. The structure will house 71 condo units with 21 of them being a part of affordable housing. Retail space will be 8,400-square-feet with dining, bakery, and coffee shop options. There are also streetscape plans to highlight the retail portion. 4) Roadside Development: Residential units will be constructed on the Eight St. side with


commercial use on O St. Retail structures will emulate the existing neighborhood and residential plans will contain a set amount of affordable housing units. The board voted to communicate support of the plan set forth by Four Points Development to the Deputy Mayors Office of Planning and Economic Development who will ultimately make the final decision on the Parcel 23 Project.

Expression of Interest A representative from the Deputy Mayors Office was on hand to announce redevelopment plans for two parcels of land located at Second and H St. NW which is just north of Capitol Crossing. The city representative solicited feedback and comments from the board to see what community needs are and what residents would like to see at this site. The “Expression Of Interest� period goes until the end of August at which point they will short list recommendations and issue a Request For Proposal to potential developers. The site is currently a gravel parking lot.

Shaw Crime Watch DCPD Officials spoke before the board and gave a monthly crime report for the area. Extra manpower has been deployed to increase presence in the area for the summer months. Auto and bicycle theft has risen since this time last year and an increased foot-beat should help decrease the problem. A majority of auto theft has been concentrated on vehicles with out of state plates and officials encourage residents with visitors to urge their guests to lock personal valuables

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Representatives from Property Group Partners were present to give details on the transportation impact of the Third Street Tunnel Construction Project located at the 200-300 blocks of Massachusetts Ave. NW. Construction will take up to 15 months and a water line and high voltage transmission line will have to be relocated in order to complete the project. Highway ramps and other structures will be shifted around but no traffic lanes will be lost. The plan is to construct a tunnel or portal that will run under Massachusetts Ave. and onto the highway. Visit www. thirdstreettunnel.com to see complete details on the project.

202-544-1515 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE, Washington, DC 20003

The board granted a Request for Support for Modification of Planned Unit Development for City Market located at the 1500 block of Ninth St. NW by Roadside Development. Only technical changes will be made which will not be visible from the street. The board will be in recess for the month of August and will reconvene at 6:30 p.m. on Sept. 2 at the Northwest One Library, located at 155 L St. NW. Visit www.anc6e.org to view the ANC 6E newsletter. Follow on Twitter, @ANC6E, and on Facebook by searching ANC6E. u


August 2014 H 63


{capitol streets / EMCAC report}

Eastern Market Advisory Committee Report by Charnice A. Milton Business Plan and Market Study Eastern Market Community Advisory Committee (EMCAC) Chair Donna Scheeder asked ANC 6B Commissioners Ivan Frishberg (ANC 6B representative) and Brian Pate (former ANC 6B Representative) to recommend next steps in creating a new business plan and gathering community input. Commissioner Pate (filling in for Commissioner Frishberg) stated that EMCAC needed to gather empirical data in order to “...pierce some of the rhetoric around parking issues and who has the advantage over who...” He offered a resolution to send a request to the Department of General Services (DGS) to sponsor a market study looking at issues such as mobility concerns, demographics, as well as customer habits and demographics. The study would focus not only on Eastern Market, but surrounding commercial corridors as well. CHAMPS Representative and EMCAC Co-Chair Chuck Burger asked about the estimated cost, which would be at least $50,000 to 60,000. Timing was also an issue, as Richard Layman, the Eastern Market Public Development Corporation representative, stated that 120 days is an unrealistic timeline for the study; while Layman suggested a 180-day timeline, Commissioner Pate stated that the 120-day timeline was just a suggestion to “...start the ball moving.” EMCAC passed the resolution with a vote of 6-0.

Marketing In her first EMCAC appearance as Eastern Market’s marketing communications manager, Annette Nielson discussed recent press appearances and social media work. She also discussed other promotional ideas, including holding tours and other activities for summer camps, palm cards, and branded merchandise (i.e. bags, aprons, etc.). However, Burger stressed a focus on repeat business and customer loyalty, suggesting programs like a loyalty discount card program. Layman agreed, adding that promotions must be tied to revenue. For instance, children who went on the tour could take home a coupon that they pass along to their parents.

sonal and professional reasons. “...I think that is indicative of what happens when you have a start-up market that is not a link to FRESHFARM,” he said. FRESHFARM is an organization that provide economic opportunities for area farmers at local farmer’s markets. As Eastern Market is “starting from scratch,” they are looking for new ways to maintain it. Margeson announced that he will visit the Farm to Family Farm Bus, a community-supported agriculture (CSA) program, to convince them to sell their wares at the Market.

Security Continuing a conversation that began in May, EMCAC discussed the Market’s security issues. During his Market Manager’s Report, Margeson reported that the contracting division is preparing a request for proposal (RFP) for an independent police group to provide security during weekends. Later in the meeting, he stated that officers from the Protective Services Department (PSD) who want overtime tend to go to Eastern Market. Meaning that about 15 PSD officers come for three spots on Saturdays and Sundays. Margeson hopes for more consistency in the ranks. Non-food Vendor Representative Erika Rubel discussed the problem that prompted the discussion (PSD officers failing to respond when called) and asked if PSD officers can be called away. Margeson explained that while that is possible, it should not happen. Commissioner Pate suggested sending a letter to the head of PSD, highlighting public safety issues and the need for officers to take the job more seriously. “My hunch is that this is treated like a special event...” he said. “You show up and get your overtime... That is not this detail. That is not what’s going on here.”

Other News • •

New Farmers According to Eastern Market Manager Barry Margeson, Fresh Tuesdays are becoming more popular with customers, especially now that the farmers are bringing strawberries, corn, and goats; he expects business to increase when the farmers bring peaches. Later, Burger discussed bringing aggregate farmer sellers; Eastern Market currently has one. Burger believes that bringing more aggregate farmers would help bring more selections to Fresh Tuesdays. Margeson addressed a customer’s question about the amount of non-Amish farmers in the Market. He explained that while non-Amish farmer participation is at its highest, they have lost four or five due to per-

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• •

Eastern Market vendors will be featured in T.G.I. Friday’s “Summer of Fridays” blog, a promotion for their handcrafted menu. Eastern Market has four new interns: Zach Horowitz, Freddie Potter (both from The Washington Center), Dominiqua Eldridge (District Leadership Program), and Debra Thomas (DC Summer Youth Program). Eastern Market accepted six new vendors: four prepared food, one arts and crafts, and one entho-specific. The pottery studio flooded on June 15, possibly due to faulty floats. Margeson believes that this is a symptom of system-wide issue and plans to hire a mechanical engineer to help find a solution.

The Eastern Market Community Advisory Committee will hold its next meeting on July 30 at 7 p.m. in the Market’s North Hall. For more information, visit easternmarket-dc.org. u


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COMING THIS SEPTEMBER! For decades the HillRag has been your #1 trusted resource for finding home improvement service companies to help with all of your home design, renovation and maintenance needs. This Fall look for our special issue to include topics like: • Innovative Renovation Ideas for Smaller Spaces • Urban Landscape and Gardening Trends • Going Green and Energy Conservation at Home and much more!

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202.543.8300 Dave x22 | Kira x16 | Andrew x19 | Carolina x12 August 2014 H 65


Classical Elements

Crossword Author: Myles Mellor • www.themecrosswords.com • www.mylesmellorconcepts.com

by Myles Mellor and Sally York Across:

1. Rio Grande city 7. Go down 10. Sent 16. Past 19. Shrewdness 20. Shooting marble 21. Loosen, in a way 22. One side in checkers 23. Act carelessly 27. Furnace output 28. Kind of penguin 29. Chemical compounds 30. Keys 32. Electro-acoustic transducers 35. Round number? 36. Picket line crossers 38. Buddhist who has attained Nirvana 41. Headed 42. Conceit 45. Mozart’s “L’___ del Cairo” 46. Middle Eastern natives 50. Poodle’s cry 52. Do everything possible 59. Penetrating 60. Tempter 61. Before now 62. Hindu loincloth 63. Gumshoe 64. Sparing no expense 67. Vandalizes, in a way 68. Spanish titles 71. Unit of electrical conductance 73. Kind of analysis 76. Insect stage 78. Cheer starter 79. Web site? 83. Like fans 85. Hungers (for) 87. Typos 88. Feel out of place 92. Winner’s take 93. Son of Daedalus 94. Like one in a series 95. North Sea feeder 96. Radios 99. African antelope 101. They have flat tops 103. Kind of tradition

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105. Arranged anew 110. Like some cycles 114. Eat at a restaurant 117. Some teas 119. Gallop 120. Become friends quickly 124. “___ Time transfigured me”: Yeats 125. Invisible 126. Elhi org. 127. Out of sorts 128. Deli loaf 129. Lecherous goat-men 130. Electric ___ 131. Underline

Down:

1. Indian martial art 2. Suffers 3. Bucolic 4. Expresses theatrically 5. Kind of line 6. In the past 7. Dome-shaped shrines 8. Fast finisher? 9. Contemptible person: Var. 10. The writer Saki’s real name 11. Tiny toiler 12. United Nations agcy. 13. In arrears 14. Parrot 15. Legal paper 16. More dry 17. Family subdivisions 18. ___ favorite 24. Pseudopods move them 25. Crowd sound 26. Virtuoso 31. Short dog, for short 33. Newbie 34. Once, once upon a time 37. Massage target 39. Nocturnal lemur 40. Level 42. “Goodness gracious!” 43. See 42-Down 44. “Beetle Bailey” pooch 46. Vehicle with caterpillar treads 47. Bother 48. ___-friendly

Look for this months answers at labyrinthgameshop.com 49. Day of “Pillow Talk” 51. Athletic field in ancient Greece 53. Surpass 54. They hold water 55. Directs 56. Fix, in a way 57. Young sheep 58. “48___” 63. Island nation east of Fiji 65. Evergreen shrub 66. Job 69. XC 70. Latin dance 72. Arctic whale 73. Ancient Hebrew unit of measure 74. Poetic paean

75. Peruvian coin 77. Rhine tributary 80. British poet laureate Nahum 81. Particular 82. Sonatas, e.g. 84. Religious image: Var. 86. Tiny amount 87. Small amphibians 89. Carpentry tool 90. U.N. agency acronym 91. Eager 96. Eccentric man 97. Like a prickly plant 98. Sioux branch 100. Whistler, e.g. 101. Used at the table

102. Web browser 104. Denebola’s constellation 106. Some horses 107. Quote from Homer 108. Skip off 109. Itinerary 111. Green 112. Wise enders 113. Swamp plants 115. Heavy load 116. It parallels the radius 118. Bribes 121. Door opener 122. Occupational suffix 123. Profit


{community life}

E on DC

After Our Burning In August by E. Ethelbert Miller

T

here was a time when one thought about the “Long Hot Summer” and how August couldn’t step inside from the heat. In many American cities there were riots by folks letting off steam or maybe the weather making them crazy. Go figure. There was always an incident of alleged police brutality to stir the urban pot. Around the world these days it seems it’s always August. So much “pressure” where unemployment is high or when the Cold War is now a bundle of hot spots around the globe. I’m tired of religious and political conflicts. Maybe Christmas should come in August or everyday should be Ramadan. Where are the Jewish holidays this month? Can a Buddhist stop sweating during meditation? There are many unanswered questions this summer and next year I fear there will be more. Maybe it was the March on Washington back in August 1963 that raised the temperature in America and young people started dancing in the streets. Some of us didn’t know what a “Vandella” was until Martha came along and had that hit record in 1964. It was my parents who kept my brother, sister and myself indoors. We didn’t play in the streets or sit on the stoops in the South Bronx. When my mother heard about the Harlem riot in 1964 she simply pulled her curtains and closed the windows. Nothing was coming inside – especially the heat. My father was a lover of jazz and that Miles Davis coolness. Maybe that’s how we survived back then. August in Washington can be an excuse for doing nothing. I remember I wanted to

plan a cultural event one August and someone mentioned how folks leave D.C. to get away from the heat. Not a good time for fundraising or anything else. It seems there was always an August excuse when it came to trying to improve the conditions of the world. August is the month when you begin to accept the fact that you wasted your summer. The summer reading list seems as silly as your New Year resolutions which started laughing at you before the end of January. If you have children Labor Day is now around the corner. What comes after the death of heat? Where does the Devil go in August? Does he hide in Rock Creek Park? This summer I did accomplish something that didn’t require sweating. I wrote a series of poems - “Fifty Love Poems To A Friend.” Neruda’s work “directed” me and so there is that one poem of despair. I often wonder, which month is the saddest of the year? Is it August? A month so hot it burns? Too many of us are on fire with our anger preventing touching. Even our souls are ablaze. Yes, like James Baldwin, I fear the fire next time. August, August, burning bright. How do we live each day without despair? What garment of hope can one still cling to? There must be more than summer love. I desire something that never ends. I fear my heart is growing cold. E. Ethelbert Miller is a literary activist. He is the author of several collections of poems and two memoirs. Mr. Miller has been the director of the African American Resource Center at Howard University for forty years. u

August 2014 H 67


IN MEMORIAM

T End of an Era Diana McLellan, Queen of the Hill by Stephanie Cavanaugh

here was champagne and plump strawberries dipped in chocolate, baklava coiled like escargot and topped with crumbled pistachio. The bartenders were busy at the tables set under the trees. The sun shone brilliantly on a polished crowd. Diana McLellan’s funeral, held a few days after her death on June 25th, was quite the bash. Neighborhood friends rubbed shoulders with journalistic glitterati, names you’d know if not the faces: Maureen Dowd, Kevin Chaffee, Michael Satchell, Chuck Conconi, Annie Groer, Stephanie Mansfield, Mike Mossetig, Susan Watters, Ann Geracimos, Marguerite Kelly. Washington’s grande dame of gossip, a Brit of fabulous cleverness and style, who lived in wabi sabi splendor on Constitution Avenue for 50 years, and one of Capitol Hill’s great characters, was laid to unorthodox rest on a bed of lavender, wrapped in a glorious saffron-colored silk shroud that peeked through the intricately woven wicker basket that served as her coffin for the “green” funeral she had carefully planned in her last days. Crammed into the tiny chapel at Congressional Cemetery, it was hot. No one cared. Paper fans were deployed to supplement the ceiling fan’s whir. Her daughter, Fiona Newell Weeks, conducted a ceremony both moving and amusing. Granddaughter Tara read a poem she wrote about her beloved Oomi celebrating her 70th birthday. Joe Weeks, son-in-law and wry wit, recalled his first Christmas gift, a notepad from Continental Airlines, which deftly summed up her initial sentiments about the marriage. Grandson Sam flubbed the title of her poetry book, Making Hay, solemnly calling it Haymaker. Neighbor, Roy Forey, talked about dinner parties with Diana and her husband Dick that rivaled the Algonquin Round Table, where wine flowed, candles dripped, and conversation sparkled. Then the mourners, or celebrants, whichever, trailed to the grave site behind a funeral director so handsome one suspected she vetted his appearance: Bring on the candidates Fiona darling, one imagines her saying, propped up against downy pillows in a lacy peignoir. The casket rested on brass rails, topped with an elegant spray of white flowers, but refused to descend. “She doesn’t want to leave us yet,” the director said gravely. Guests were told they could toss dirt onto the lid -- at which that son-inlaw said with a twinkle: “She tossed around enough dirt in her life time.” The guests headed to lunch at Mr. Henry’s, her favorite haunt, where Diana’s fat-tired Raleigh bike stood in state in the window, the glass patched with photos of Diana and Raquel Welch, Joan Rivers, Ronald Reagan, and Princess Diana. There were snaps of her bandaged head, illustrating a piece about her highly public, rather hair-raising facelift -- a Washingtonian feature. (You can read the details of her fabulous career in obituaries in the New York Times and the Washington Post - this is about our neighbor). And there was Diana ... serving a burger at the restaurant in 1974?


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www.davelloyd.net davidlloyd@realtor.com Enthusiastically serving clients on both sides of the river. “She was writing an article and told me, ‘I want to learn about waitressing,’” said owner Alvin Ross, a few days later. “I said, come in tomorrow and I’ll put you on the floor...that’s the only way to write it.” How was she? “Oh she was terrible, just terrible,” he said, slapping the table for emphasis. But it made a great story for the Washington Star, her berth for many years before becoming the Post’s Ear. You can read it still, on the wall of the ladies room stall. “’Miss, am I going to get my orange juice?’ ‘Didn’t I ask for mayo? I thought I asked for mayo.’ ‘Miss, was that congressman Blah at the next table?’ (How should I know? To me he was always Red Tie. He left 50 cents).” After that, “she tipped very well,” said manager Michael Fry. Perpetual luncher, long-time acquaintance and political mover Terry Michael looked up from his computer and remarked, “Today’s gossip columnists are hacks. Diana had a sassy British attitude towards the rich and famous she was covering, funny without being nasty. She gave them what they deserved, without sticking in a knife.” “Yes, savage but sweet so to speak,” adds Ann Geracimos. “For that reason, I think of her - and think often of her - as ‘the great dissembler,’ in a positive sense. She could produce an ‘honest lie’ - lying by omission, concealing at the same time she was revealing truths.” No matter where Diana’s column landed, it was a must-read. Maggie Hall, journalist, and author of the A to Z of Marmite, the definitive work on that indigestible substance, began stealing Diana’s stuff in 1980, as a newly arrived correspondent for British tabloid, The Daily Mirror. “In the time honored way of a bit of healthy ‘lifting’ (or plagiarism, as the purists would label it), I never had any reservations about using Diana’s lively observations on life in DC and beyond,” she wrote in an email. “And that

was good enough for my bosses back in London. ‘How do you know this?’ they would ask. ‘Got it from Diana McLellan’, I would tell them. ‘Great. That’s fine then,’ was the unfailing response. Her Facebook page was filled with her book bits: the recently reprinted The Girls, Sappho Goes to Hollywood, featuring steamy tales of Garbo and Dietrich (which might yet make it to a theater near you), and the newly published Making Hay (illustrated by New Yorker cartoonist Peter Steiner, of which she was very proud). She made a game of photographing the volumes snuggled against the zucchini and capons at Eastern Market. And on the counter at Clothes Encounters. “We just loved Diana,” said Linda McMullen, proprietor of our vintage emporium. Diana loved them too, particularly digging through the bargain basket, about which she’d often remark: “This is a very disappointing $2 bin.” “Nicky, who works in the store, is totally star struck,” said McMullen. “It was hard for her to grasp that Diana was a celebrity too, ‘This woman you spoke to every week had her obituary in the New York Times.’” She wrote about the shop for Washingtonian in 1990. “She was part of the store, and we miss her,” McMullen said. “She paid as much attention to me and this little store on the Hill as she did to the stars.” Said Maggie Hall, to end it all, “I was in Britain when Diana got the grim news that she was dying. I phoned her, my mind and voice wracked with emotion and was promptly told: ‘Now Darling Maggie - no blubbering.’ Diana’s final offering to us was based on that mantra. She wrote the playbook on how to behave when you - and all those around you - know you’re very close to death.” And to that we say, amen. u

Arlington N. $1,559,900

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5,000+ sqft. architectural gem nestled in the woodlands of Lee Heights. Flexible floor plan just perfect for multi-generational living. An entertainer’s delight.

Arlington N. $1,229,900

Magnificent remodel just “over the river and through the woods”. Grand proportions, 4br’s, 3 baths, and gardens straight out of a Monet painting.

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Arlington N. $679,900

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Tastefully updated and reconfigured open floor plan with curved archways, gorgeous new kitchen & huge backyard. Just one mile from Ballston & Metro.

Arlington N. $795,000

Turnkey lux remodel and Metro! Fab 4br, 3 bath mid-century modern with open floor plan tucked away on quiet cul-de-sac garden lot yet just a few blocks from Metro and parks.

Arlington N. $719,900

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Expansive 4br, 3bath split foyer with open and airy floor plan, 2 FP’s, refinished hardwoods, and a huge daylight lower level. All just a few blocks from Metro and bike trails.

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4701 Old Dominion Drive • Arlington, VA 22207 August 2014 H 69


{community life / south by west}

South by West article and photos by William Rich Westminster Seeks Developer Partner In mid-July, Westminster Presbyterian Church released a Request for Qualifications (RFQ) to find a partner to redevelop its property at 400 I Street, SW. The church property is a rectangular parcel just under two thirds of an acre located north of Waterfront Station and two blocks from the Waterfront Metro. Westminster does not own the landscaped area that fronts 4th Street, SW – it is District owned land, but it is looking to purchase the land to increase the footprint of the parcel. Westminster is looking for the following in their space: • Sanctuary/Worship space equaling 7,000 square feet  • A multi-purpose dividable room to allow a seated event for up to 600 people (Sanctuary/Worship included in this space)  • A commercial kitchen of 1,000 square feet  • Four separate offices (150 square feet each)  • Session (Board) meeting room, one of which able to accommodate 20 tabled persons  • Space for a mail/copier/computer room - 300 square feet  • Storage space - 500 square feet  • 25 parking spaces  In addition, the church wants to achieve the following goals out of the development:  • Affordable housing component  • 2,500 square-foot restaurant located at street level  • Workforce Development Center  • Community center space  • Maintain and enhance church mission and programs  Westminster is following the lead of other churches in Southwest including St. Augustine’s Episcopal Church and St. Matthew’s Lutheran Church in offering up their land in exchange for new sanctuary space. St. Augustine’s has partnered with PN Hoffman, where construction will soon be underway on a 108-unit mixed income condo building and a new sanctuary at The Wharf development. Meanwhile, St. Matthew’s is working with

Trammell Crow, who will replace their sanctuary and build a 200-unit apartment building at M Street and Delaware Avenue, SW. RFQ responses were due by 5pm on July 25th. The next step will be to release a Request for Proposals (RFP) to a short list of developers and then choose a developer partner. The chosen developer will be able to enter a long-term lease agreement with Westminster for their land (although there is an option to purchase) and can build multifamily housing on the remaining land that is not occupied by a new Westminster church. Westminster Presbyterian Church, located just to the north of Waterfront Station, is looking for a developer partner to build The current zoning for the parcel is R-3, a new sanctuary. but the Office of Planning is recomlocated on the D Street, SW and Virginia Avenue, mending through the Southwest Neighborhood Plan that the church parcel should be reSW sides. An interesting note about the shape of zoned from moderate density residential to medium the original building – a notch was created on the density residential with low-density commercial. southeast corner along Virginia Avenue, SW because row houses were there when it was originally built. The former Terminal Refrigerating & WareMuseum of the Bible Planned housing Company building at 300 D Street, SW is Near Smithsonian the only large, Neo-Classical-style warehouse still The District’s Historic Preservation Review Board standing in the District. (HPRB) evaluated plans for a new, private Museum of the Bible planned by the owners of the Hobby Lobby arts and crafts store chain in the former Washington Design Center building at 4th and D streets, SW on July 24. The museum owner is applying for historic designation of the building, hence the involvement of HPRB.

Building History According to the landmark application, 300 D Street, SW is an eight-story building that was originally built in 1923 in the Neo-Classical Revival style (an addition to the east was built in 1983 when it became the Washington Design Center) for the Terminal Refrigerating & Warehousing Company for use as housing cold and dry storage warehouses, an ice manufacturing plant, and the company’s offices. Trains used to enter the building on the 4th Street, SW side on a spur line to deliver goods and loading docks were

RIGHT: The former Washington Design Center near the Federal Center SW Metro is up for historic nomination and a Museum of the Bible is planned for the building.

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Museum Plan SmithGroupJJR has designed the museum to restore some elements of the building that were lost when it was converted to the Washington Design Center and create a new addition to replace the 1983 version (which will be demolished) as well as build a large glass atrium above the existing building with a green roof. The museum will be approximately


400,000 square feet, about 30,000 SF larger than the existing building and addition. The main entrance will be located on 4th Street where the train used to enter the building and the loading dock bays that were on D Street will be retrofitted with windows and an open framed canopy above. The new addition will be made of oversized handmade bricks and have been designed to look like stacked bibles. On the first floor of the museum, there will be a lobby, museum shop, orientation desk, media wall, and security station. A grand staircase in the new addition will lead to the other floors. Above the first floor is a mezzanine level that will have a coffee shop and multipurpose room. The second through fourth floors will contain permanent exhibit space, while the fifth floor will contain an affiliated museum and performance hall. The sixth floor will have conference space, restaurant, lounge, and biblical garden. Special exhibits and museum support will be in the first basement level and space will be carved out in a second basement level for storage and staff support. The adjacent office building will also receive a onestory addition for an institute with a conference hall, offices, library, education center, and housing units for visiting scholars.  The museum will be open later into the evenings than the Smithsonian museums nearby and the restaurant will be open to the public without having to pay for admission. The former tenants of the Washington Design Center have already vacant the building and the museum is scheduled to open in 2017.

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William Rich is a blogger at Southwest…The Little Quadrant that Could (www.southwestquadrant. blogspot.com). u

August 2014 H 71


{community life / h street life}

H Street Life by Elise Bernard

T

he past month saw the opening of several new businesses along the H Street NE Corridor, with the promise of more to come. Even as the Corridor matures, it continues to be a great place to live, work, or play for our diverse community.

Sticky Fingers Sweets and Eats to Open H Street NE Location Fans of the popular eatery Sticky Fingers (www. stickyfingersbakery.com) will be thrilled to learn that owner Doron Petersen plans to open a new restaurant at 406 H Street NE. The new place will not be a carbon copy of the Columbia Heights Sticky Fingers, but you’ll still be able to get their signature vegan cupcakes and sandwiches. The new retro 1950s style restaurant will have seating for 50 patrons inside a 2,600 square foot space. Inside that space you’ll find a full bar serving beer, wine, and cocktails. Aside from the baked goods, the new spot will feature a bistro menu. Customers will be able to dine there for breakfast, lunch, or dinner seven days a week (bar hours Fridays and Saturdays). In addition to traditional table service, the new location will have a lunch counter, and a grab-and-go option for when you really need to eat and run.

Micho’s Offers Fast Casual Lebanese on the West End H Street NE residents welcomed their newest fast casual option by lining up for a first taste and chattering excitedly about it on Twitter. Micho’s (500 H Street NE) serves fresh Lebanese food for dine-in or carryout. The menu is heavy on the wraps (also available in bowl form), with a build your own wrap option. The familiar tabouleh and fattoush salads make an appearance, as do labneh, baba ganoush (referred to simply as “baba”), and hummus. Those with a sweet tooth will surely want to sample the baklava. Care to relax with a drink? The bottle water and fountain sodas share menu space with bottled and draft beers, as well as homemade sangria and margaritas. In nice weather you might be lucky enough to grab a seat on the patio.

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The Pursuit (of Happiness) I wrote briefly last month about the newly opened wine bar The Pursuit (1421 H Street NE, http://www. thepursuitwinebar. com), but I sat down Wine pairs surprising well with grilled cheese at The Pursuit recently for a more indepth discussion with Beyond their tie-dyed tee shirts, they offer scentowner Thomas Boised oils, tapestries for hanging on the wall, and posters vert. In addition to a wide selection of wines by perfect for decorating a dorm room. This is Schow’s the glass, The Pursuit also boasts a nice cocktail first DC location, but he has five other locations in menu featuring house infused spirits, and a qualVirginia and North Carolina. He told me he looked ity beer list. Food offerings include a line up of at a number of H Street NE locations before settling bar snacks (nuts, olives, hummus, etc.), charcuteon his new home. He’s excited to be a part of a growrie and cheese boards, and a build-your-own grilled ing corridor, and told me he planned to take a class cheese menu. They also serve brunch on Saturdays in American Sign Language to enable him to better and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Brunch conserve the local deaf community. sists of the typical waffles and french toast, plus an impressive looking shrimp and grits, and a buildPo Boy Jim Offers More Than your-own breakfast sandwich menu.

Just Sandwiches

Island Dyes Offers Tobacco Accessories & Tie-Dye Island Dyes (331 H Street NE, http://islanddyes.net) is the newest addition to the western end of the H Street NE Corridor. Island Dyes is a shop for the 21st Century, where cutting edge materials science meets artisanal craftsmanship. You have probably never seen the owner at a high end glass shop bang a large multi-hundred dollar piece on a shelf or throw a smaller piece across the length of the shop, but this is exactly what I saw Glen Schow do when I visited Island Dyes. He was demonstrating the strength of his glasswares, and doing so quite effectively. These are pieces that are made to last. They also sell some more fragile art glass with some price tags in the thousands. Island Dyes began roughly twenty years ago as a maker and seller of original tie-dyed shirts, but expanded its offerings over the years. These days the focus is unquestionably on their hand-crafted glass pieces, but you’ll also find a good selection of decorative textiles.

Do you have a taste for New Orleans cuisine? If so, indulge yourself at Po Boy Jim (709 H Street NE). The newly opened eatery features an extensive menu of po’ boys, some traditional, and others much less so. On a recent visit I ordered the shrimp po’ boy ($12, served with fries), and also tried the Rasta po boy ($9 with fries). My po’ boy was excellent. The Rasta, filled with a house made vegan patty, coconut, and black-eyed peas, is an unexpected delight. I hardly have high expectations for vegan or vegetarian fare offered at Cajun or Creole restaurants, but the Rasta is worth a try even for dedicated carnivores. It’s crunchy, juicy, and packed with flavor. Beyond sandwiches exist options such as shrimp and grits ($15), blackened salmon ($18), and chicken fettuccini with Cajun alfredo sauce ($15). The adult beverage offerings are still evolving, but I recommend the Moonshine Margarita ($10, made with a white whiskey). They also have a selection of draft and bottle beers, and wines by the glass. Those who prefer their drinks a bit softer


The Rasta po boy at Po Boy Jim

will appreciate the vanilla and lime swank (limeade), ginger sorrel, and the draft cane sodas in flavors like ginger, black cherry, and blueberry.

BAB Aims to Bring Korean Fusion Cuisine to H Street NE The owner of the very popular Tony’s Breakfast (1387 H Street NE, www.tonysbreakfast.com) has big plans for a new concept along the H Street NE Corridor. The new restaurant, called BAB, will serve Korean fusion fare. Don’t think traditional Korean offerings, this is more Korean influence and flavors infused into a variety of other foods (some with American roots, and others born in Vietnam). Korean American owner Justine Choe grew up in the DC area, and been a part of H Street NE for years. Though the menu is still in flux, Choe suggested she might serve a Korean take on chili fries. Imagine fries topped with buttered kimchi and onions, crispy pork belly, scallions and cheddar with sour cream. Other possibilities include the K-sadilla (kimchi quesadilla with cheddar and buttered kimchi and shiso leaves), and Good Seoul (potatoes, Korean sweet potatoes and plantains fried with kimchi sour cream).

Kitty’s Saloon to Take Over Former Souk Space A new sign turned heads the other day when it went up at the space most recently home to Souk. Kitty’s Saloon (1208 H Street NE, http://kittyssaloon.com) will serve what they term “contemporary redneck cuisine.” Get ready for cornbread, gator tots, and other guilty pleasures. The second floor will feature a whiskey bar.

DC Scoop Draws a Crowd in Its 4th Year Union Market (1309 5th Street NE, http://unionmarketdc.com) recently hosted the fourth annual DC Scoop at Dock 5. The family-friendly event attracted over 5,000 visitors eager to partake of a selection of sweets from over 15 different creameries, from gelato to ice cream sandwiches and popsicles to liquid nitrogen scoops. Aside from sampling icy treats, patrons could visit a photo booth or get their faces painted. There was even an ice cream eating contest for kids. For more on what’s abuzz on, and around, H Street NE, you can visit my blog http://frozentropics.blogspot. com.You can send me tips or questions at elise.bernard@gmail.com. u

August 2014 H 73


{community life / barracks row}

Three New Businesses Open, More Sidewalk Cafes Debut

A

by Sharon Bosworth

moonless night, a potholed alley, a low rustle in the air --since way before Dickens this classic brew has been a reliable set up for fictional plots. For Barracks Row Main Street some very real, afterdark action in one particular alley has held our recent attention. Earlier this year a group of 7th Street neighbors and 8th Street restaurant owners met with us to discuss the rat population boom in the alley behind the 500 block of 8th Street. Not the stuff of NCIS drama maybe, but rat eradication is a goal to unite us all. Cava, 527 8th St SE; Matchbox, 521 8th St SE; Medium Rare, 515 8th St SE and Ted’s Bulletin, 505 8th St SE are four of eight Row eateries which back on to that alley. Stirred up by the ongoing construction at the Church of Latter Day Saints, 522 7th St SE, rats could be seen on the restaurants’ video surveillance cameras as they searched nightly for food and nesting places. The alley’s crumbling asphalt invited rodent homesteading because burrowing was super easy. Then, there was the convenient food supply provided by old style dumpsters.

Technology Verses Rats First, ANC6B, neighborhood residents, 500 block businesses and Barracks Row Main Street teamed up and went to work to convince the District Department of Transportation that rebuilding this alley was a top priority. Then, the restaurant group shared among themselves information about modern rat resistant dumpsters. Efforts are being made to bring every restaurant into voluntary compliance with the new technology. In response to neighborhood concerns BRMS and the community raised the issue of the need for a drain in the alley. At press time DDOT confirmed that they definitely will construct a drain as part of the project the E Street entrance to the alley. A feasibility study is underway to build a state-of-the-art compacting dumpster which all 500 block restaurants on the west side could share. As we go to press the 8th Street alley has been rebuilt by DDOT with rebar reinforced concrete to withstand the weight of daily deliveries and trash trucks. The next phase of the plan --to replace dumpsters with modern models --will

Capitol Hill Village coming soon to Barracks Row

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and never abated when Ambrose won Food Network’s Cupcake Wars. Matthews is moving her business, Skin Beauty Lounge, from the second floor above Sweet Lobby to larger quarters at 749 8th St SE, 2nd Floor above District Doughnut. Matthews plans to expand services to include massage, facials, waxing and beauty consultations. Meanwhile, on the first floor, the month of August will be the soft opening for District Doughnut – the owners have never before had a bricks and mortar business but have won devoted fans with their food truck and catering. Open for breakfast and for dessert, especially after parades, the District Doughnut crew wants to greet you coming and going with smiles, scrumptious retro doughnuts and coffee just the way you like it.

Lower 700 Block Takes Off

Momentum Dance mime appears on the Row

happen this fall; a central compacting dumpster may follow soon after.

Growing on the Row We count over 155 businesses on Barracks Row and many, like Capital Teas, opening soon at 731 8th St SE, have big plans for growth. New Capital Teas locations are also under construction in Charlottesville and Philadelphia. But owners Winnette Ambrose and Meeka Mathews love the Row so much they are expanding right here. In late summer Ambrose is opening Souk, 705 8th St SE, a destination for spices and other ingredients as well as retail items plus intriguing dishes from Souk’s menu. Souk’s older sibling is Sweet Lobby at 404 8th St SE. There, business boomed

Capitol Hill Village will be relocating soon to the Row at 725 8th St SE, 2nd Floor, with parking convenient for its many volunteers at the lot under the freeway. Also, in the 700 block three new sidewalk cafés will be open soon: by mid month District Doughnut will install small tables and chairs out front; next door, Café Kimchi, 751 8th St SE will add sidewalk seating and at Capital Teas, a sidewalk café will be available for seating in addition to the courtyard and dining room. These same eateries will also soon be sporting new signage and awnings paid for through a Barracks Row Main Street – DC Department of Small and Local Business Development signage grant, bringing the number of Barracks Row businesses to receive these improvements to a total of fifteen over the last three years. New sidewalk cafes blossoming in the formerly dormant lower 700 block, replete with handsome signs and awnings will give patrons attending Restaurant Week a fresh impression of the Row. Zest, 735 8th St SE (plus sibling, Agua 301 at the Lumber Shed); Lavagna, 539 8th St SE; Belga, 514 8th St SE (plus brand

extension, B Too, in Logan); and Ambar, 523 8th St SE will all be participating in Restaurant Week, August 11-17.

High Heels and Software There are further developments on the 500 block. After a long wait for DC permits Schechuan House, 515 8th St SE, 2nd Floor (above Medium Rare), will be open by July 28 with a menu of classic Asian take-out. The historic townhouse at 530 8th St SE, owned for many years by Thomas Queen, Esq. has been sold to Taoti Creative, an eighteen year old software design firm originally located near Dupont Circle, founded by Brent Lightner. With the river nearby, our corridor suits Lightner’s important week–end ritual: after Friday staff meetings, the Skipper takes web designers for an inspirational spin on his boat. For more information: 202-546-8946, www.taoticreative.com. But the Taoti team may not be so apt to head for the water when they discover Momentum Dance and Fitness Studio, 534 8th St SE, just two doors away. Classes include Bollywood and High Heel dance as well as Director Roberta Rothstein’s special version of Barre Fitness… all guaranteed to foster out-of-the-box insights. momentumdanceandfitness.com.

DDOT, Give Us a Date! Business owners shop the Row year-round for space and our Barracks Row Main Street office is asked regularly for guidelines on opening a business here. We’ve been privileged this summer to have Robert Hanifin, an intern from Cornell University’s Master of City Planning program, working at our office. He has been compiling information on zoning and permitting how-to’s and best practices that we’ll release as a guide later this fall. After winning a grant from DDOT earlier this year (funded by performance parking money) Barracks Row is waiting for an installation date from DDOT for tree box surrounds. A historic component of 8th Street before it was improved by DDOT in 2003, the original surrounds were removed during streetscape reconstruction and never replaced. On all five blocks of Barracks Row tree box surrounds (similar to those at Eastern Market) will add refinement and help us maintain flowers and plantings to be installed seasonally by Capitol Hill Business Improvement District and BRMS. u

August 2014 H 75


{where we live}

76 H Hillrag.com

Construction begins on a massive reacreation of the Southwest waterfront. Photo: Andrew Lightman


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Questions about Distribution? Email distribution@hillrag.com or call 202-400-3512 August 2014 H 77


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COLDWELL BANKER DOMINATES THE CAPITOL HILL LUXURY MARKET The following represents properties settled on Capitol Hill thus far in 2014 for $1.0M and over. All data MRIS ADDRESS

LIST OFFICE NAME

SELL OFFICE NAME

1004 D ST SE

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Metropolitan Regional Information Systems, Inc.

$1,141,000

11 5TH ST SE

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

$2,150,000

113 5TH ST NE

Chatel Real Estate Company

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

$1,000,000

119 4TH ST NE

Chatel Real Estate Company

RE/MAX Allegiance

$1,183,000

120 3RD ST NE

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Prudential PenFed Realty

$1,200,000

RE/MAX Allegiance

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

$1,206,000

W.C. & A.N. Miller, Realtors, A Long & Foster Co.

Redfin Corp

$1,085,000

TTR Sotheby’s International Realty

Keller Williams Capital Prop.

$1,200,000

W.C. & A.N. Miller, Realtors, A Long & Foster Co.

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

$1,175,000

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Century 21 Redwood Realty

$1,300,000

TTR Sotheby’s International Realty

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

$1,250,000

RE/MAX Allegiance

Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc.

$1,320,000 $1,250,000

1205 C ST NE 121 TENNESSEE AVE NE 1216 EAST CAPITOL ST NE 128 13TH ST SE 131 NORTH CAROLINA AVE SE 1331 CONSTITUTION AVE NE 1335 MARYLAND AVE NE 1336 A ST SE 143 11TH ST NE 1436 NORTH CAROLINA AVE NE 146 13TH ST SE

Keller Williams Capital Prop.

Keller Williams Capital Prop.

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Washington Fine Properties, LLC

$1,625,000

Keller Williams Capital Prop.

RE/MAX Allegiance

$1,000,000

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

RE/MAX Allegiance

$1,250,000

1533 EAST CAPITOL ST SE

DCRE RESIDENTIAL LLC

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

$1,200,000

208 5TH ST SE

Prudential PenFed Realty

McEnearney Associates, Inc.

$1,299,500

225 11TH ST SE

Weller-Davis, Inc.

Weller-Davis, Inc.

$1,010,000

226 11TH ST NE

Prudential PenFed Realty

Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc.

$1,160,000

RE/MAX Allegiance

Keller Williams Realty

$2,850,000

Washington Fine Properties, LLC

Tristar Realty Inc

$1,297,500

TTR Sotheby’s International Realty

Best Address Real Estate, LLC

$1,600,000

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

$1,150,000

John C. Formant Real Estate, Inc.

RE/MAX Allegiance

$1,540,000

412 3RD ST SE

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

$1,175,412

433 6TH ST NE

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Captial Properties Group Inc

$1,050,000

TTR Sotheby’s International Realty

Re/Max Choice

$1,200,000

DC Home Buzz

RE/MAX Town Center

$1,099,000

608 A ST NE

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Prudential PenFed Realty

$1,384,500

624 C ST NE

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

TTR Sothebys International Realty

$1,100,000

625 A ST NE

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Prudential PenFed Realty

$1,505,000

Washington Fine Properties, LLC

Redfin Corporation

$1,265,000

660 G ST NE

DCRE RESIDENTIAL LLC

Keller Williams Capital Properties

$1,050,000

712 A ST NE

Prudential PenFed Realty

Prudential PenFed Realty

$1,087,000

717 NORTH CAROLINA AVE SE

TTR Sotheby’s International Realty

TTR Sotheby’s International Realty

$1,195,000

723 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NE

Prudential PenFed Realty

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

$1,985,000

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

$1,495,000

Prudential PenFed Realty

Prudential PenFed Realty

$1,250,000

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Weichert, REALTORS

$1,250,000

Prudential PenFed Realty

Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc.

$1,565,000

Allison James Estates & Homes

Metropolitan Regional Information Systems, Inc.

$1,200,000

23 D ST SE 251 8TH ST NE 325 MARYLAND AVE NE 408 3RD ST SE 410 E ST SE

441 NEW JERSEY AVE SE 503 SEWARD SQ SE

649 LEXINGTON PL NE

8 4TH ST SE 808 CONSTITUTION AVE NE 900 MARYLAND AVE NE 908 INDEPENDENCE AVE SE 917 MARYLAND AVE NE

202.547.3525 - Main Office INFORMATION DEEMED RELIABLE BUT NOT GUARANTEED

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CLOSE PRICE


{real estate}

1511 A Stre et NE An Update

A rendering of the proposed condominium at 1511 A Street. Photo credit: Toye Bello

by Charnice A. Milton

T

his spring, Hill East community members met with developer Taiwo Demuren and his consultant, Toye Bello, regarding plans to demolish the house located at 1511 A Street, NE and build an 18-unit condominium. Many neighbors raised concerns about Demuren and Bello’s backgrounds, past work, and potentially illegal plans. “We want developers to build on the Hill,” said Todd Sperry, a neighbor who lives two doors down from the property. “But they should use com-

August 2014 H 79


mon sense; don’t give us sub-par architecture.”

The ANC Steps In

Proudly Presenting

418 South Capitol

Gracious living in the Shadow of the Capitol. 2bdrm, 2bath and full Garage! Want your voice heard on the Hill? Want to live and work close to the heartbeat? Don’t miss this outstanding opportunity!

Dee Dee Branand

“At home on the Hill”

605 Pennsylvania Avenue, S.E., Washington, D.C. 20003 Office: 202 547-3525 Cell: 202 369-7902 Email: dbranand@cbmove.com Web: www.deedeebranand.com

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On April 10, Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 6A considered the case during its monthly meeting and voted unanimously to send a letter to Zoning Administrator Matthew Le Grant requesting an investigation for possible zoning violations. A month later, the developers again presented their plans to the Commission. “They used a plan that wasn’t up to date and avoided answering any questions,” said Commissioner Calvin Ward (6A08), whose single-member district includes the project. “It seemed like they were covering something up.” In a second letter to Le Grant, Commission Chair Nicholas Alberti noted some measurement issues with the plans. First, the plans show that the property grade is located immediately below the front porch when it is actually farther down; this could lead to an inaccurate floor area ratio (FAR) calculation. Second, the curb the developers used to measure building height was higher than the existing curb, which could lead to a taller building than allowed in a C-2-A, or mixeduse commercial, zone. Also, Commissioner Alberti pointed out that the project’s structural engineer, Suresh R. Baral, had his engineer’s license revoked in September 2013. In March 2011, Baral submitted another architect’s plan for a Boost Mobile Store with his signature and seal. “Baral’s utter disregard for his professional and regulatory responsibilities in conjunction with his total lack of candor demonstrates he cannot be trusted with the responsibilities of being a licensee,” wrote Wiley V. Johnson, III, the Virginia Board for

Architects, Professional Engineers, Land Surveyors, Certified Interior Designers and Landscape Architects’ presiding member. “Baral also fails to appreciate the risk to the public created by his actions.”

When the Community Speaks Thanks to the community’s persistence, the DC Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs (DCRA) investigated the project; as a result, DCRA stopped issuing permits and rescinded the structural review permit. Also, the DC Board of Professional Engineers began the process of revoking Baral’s license in DC. Finally, the DC Board of Architecture and Interior Design is investigating architect Benyam Zerihun, who, according to the Board’s database, does not have a professional license. “The best part is that the ANC and the DC government is supporting us,” said Sperry. “The DCRA doesn’t always expect this type of response.” He noted that while the DCRA does not have the resources to address every case thoroughly, it helps when the community speaks out.

The Developers’ Response While the community is happy with the DC government’s response, Bello sent an email to someone in the DCRA, calling their actions “...unpredictable, [and] therefore undefined.” He continued,“While we do not begrudge the need for DCRA to perform as diligent a review as deemed fit, it is not unreasonable to conclude that community effort has and continues to influence DCRA’s apprehension in bringing the review of this project to a conclusion under applicable provisions of the effective municipal regulations.” As a result, he and Demuren agreed to suspend community engagement until further notice. “Mr. Demuren


has kept and will continue to keep his commitment of good faith and transparent engagement with concerned neighbors,” Bello wrote, “but such commitment cannot fairly coexist and run parallel with an active and negative effort at undermining the subject of negotiations by the other party or specific members of that party.” “I don’t think anyone on A Street was trying to undermine the project,” said Sperry of Bello’s response. “They just want it to be legal.” However, he was “not surprised, but disappointed” at Bello’s and Demuren’s decision to stop working with the community, especially in light of recent investigations and the development team’s past track record. In May, the Hill Rag published some of the developers’ past projects, including a 2007 project on Morse Street.“Toye Bello is a former Zoning Administrator. He knows the bylaws,” Sperry stated. “Yet he is submitting plans with inaccuracies and there are still ethical issues involved.” While there has not been any major updates on the case since June, Sperry says that the community is still motivated to find a solution. “The neighborhood is united and galvanized by this issue,” he said. “I’ve come home to letters from the neighbors.” While he is willing to let city officials and DCRA handle the case, he and other community members will continue to conduct research and inform others. “If there are violations, they will get addressed on all levels,” he said. ◆

Making Your Real Estate a Success Story! The GranT, ryall & andrew Group

Just listed! 205 3rd St, SE 3BR, 2.5BA, bay front $975,000

Grant Griffith 202.741.1685 Ryall Smith 202.741.1781 Andrew Glasow 202.741.1654 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage 605 Pennsylvania Ave. SE • 202.547. 3525

ENJOY THE REST OF THE SUMMER!

WE ARE ALWAYS HERE TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS! Joan Carmichael Realtor 202.271.5198 joanvcarmichael@gmail.com Bridgette Cline Realtor 202.271.4196 bcline8041@aol.com for all you real estate needs 1000 Pennsylvania Ave., SE Wash., DC 20003 office #202-546-0055 August 2014 H 81


{real estate / changing hands}

Changing Hands Changing Hands is a list of most residential sales in the District of Columbia from the previous month. A feature of every issue, this list, based on the MRIS, is provided courtesy of Don Denton, manager of the Coldwell Banker office on Capitol Hill. The list includes address, sales price and number of bedrooms. NEIGHBORHOOD FEE SIMPLE 16TH STREET HEIGHTS 1501 GALLATIN ST NW 1608 MONTAGUE ST NW 1521 VARNUM ST NW 1410 DECATUR ST NW 1205 INGRAHAM ST NW

CLOSE PRICE BR

$1,250,000 $850,000 $850,000 $635,000 $611,000

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY PARK 4410 VAN NESS ST NW 4705 46TH ST NW 4924 46TH ST NW 4015 VEAZEY ST NW 4937 WESTERN AVE NW 4320 RIVER RD NW 4924 ALBEMARLE ST NW

ANACOSTIA

1438 BANGOR ST SE

BERKLEY

2010 48TH ST NW 4745 RESERVOIR RD NW 4900 ASHBY ST NW

BLOOMINGDALE

132 U ST NW 74 V ST NW 25 RHODE ISLAND AVE NW

BRENTWOOD

1814 CORCORAN ST NE

BRIGHTWOOD

1304 SHERIDAN ST NW 509 SOMERSET PL NW 815 QUINTANA PL NW 424 PEABODY ST NW 623 TEWKESBURY PL NW 7518 EASTERN AVE NW 820 UNDERWOOD ST NW 617 POWHATAN PL NW 5814 5TH ST NW 914 SHERIDAN ST NW 715 SOMERSET PL NW

BROOKLAND

1223 IRVING ST NE 1336 NEWTON ST NE 914 IRVING ST NE 3307 22ND ST NE 4625 12TH ST NE 2914 10TH ST NE 3205 7TH ST NE 2819 5TH ST NE 1319 SHEPHERD ST NE 4318 VARNUM PL NE 4419 13TH ST NE 800 DELAFIELD ST NE 1034 CRITTENDEN ST NE 2420 4TH ST NE

82 H Hillrag.com

8 4 4 5 4

$1,659,000 $1,025,000 $864,000 $855,000 $809,500 $803,100 $712,000

4 3 3 3 3 3 2

$212,000

3

$1,150,000 $995,000 $840,000

5 4 4

$910,500 $865,000 $659,500

3 6 4

$400,000

3

$565,000 $560,000 $542,000 $535,000 $450,000 $437,500 $415,000 $381,020 $300,000 $290,000 $260,000

3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 8 3

$921,000 $800,000 $737,000 $610,000 $609,000 $565,000 $500,000 $495,000 $480,500 $400,000 $399,999 $360,000 $336,000 $330,000

5 6 4 4 3 4 2 3 3 4 3 3 3 3

CAPITOL HILL

325 MARYLAND AVE NE 1331 CONSTITUTION AVE NE 503 SEWARD SQ SE 433 6TH ST NE 623 4TH ST NE 1441 EAST CAPITOL ST SE 643 CONSTITUTION AVE NE 1333 INDEPENDENCE CT SE

$1,600,000 $1,250,000 $1,099,000 $1,050,000 $997,000 $990,000 $975,000 $960,000

5 4 4 3 4 4 3 3

120 5TH ST SE 1323 SOUTH CAROLINA AVE SE 230 12TH ST SE 324 8TH ST SE 641 INDEPENDENCE AVE SE 25 3RD ST NE 812 3RD ST SE 445 2ND ST SE 419 L ST SE

$958,000 $945,500 $941,500 $935,000 $935,000 $926,000 $905,000 $900,000 $900,000

3 4 4 3 3 2 3 3 4


CHECK OUT

THESE SUMMERTIME SALES!

15 10TH ST SE 333 A ST NE 507 G ST SE 130 10TH ST SE 612 C ST SE 305 E ST NE 718 13TH ST NE 809 E ST SE 1362 NORTH CAROLINA AVE NE 630 PICKFORD PL NE 1632 G ST SE 1441 D ST SE 1313 POTOMAC AVE SE 1121 3RD ST NE 6 14TH ST NE 636 14TH PL NE 900 MARYLAND AVE NE

CENTRAL

1313 22ND ST NW

CHEVY CHASE

3921 HUNTINGTON ST NW 3717 MORRISON ST NW 3809 JENIFER ST NW 3101 RITTENHOUSE ST NW 5010 39TH ST NW 3816 MILITARY RD NW 6634 BARNABY ST NW 3270 ABERFOYLE PL NW 3356 RUNNYMEDE PL NW 5445 30TH ST NW 6121 WESTERN AVE NW 3208 RITTENHOUSE ST NW 3723 JENIFER ST NW 6419 BARNABY ST NW 5320 29TH ST NW 6432 31ST ST NW 5338 42ND PL NW 5527 39TH ST NW 3922 JENIFER ST NW 5513 30TH PL NW 2932 MCKINLEY ST NW 6112 UTAH AVE NW 6423 BARNABY ST NW 3364 STUYVESANT PL NW 5811 32ND ST NW 3737 MILITARY RD NW 4109 EMERY PL NW 3255 PATTERSON ST NW 5229 CHEVY CHASE PKWY NW 2971 MCKINLEY ST NW 5149 NEBRASKA AVE NW 6319 31ST PL NW 6006 BROAD BRANCH RD NW 3213 PATTERSON ST NW

CHILLUM

6638 BLAIR RD NW

CLEVELAND PARK 3403 36TH ST NW 3201 36TH ST NW 2926 NEWARK ST NW 3646 CUMBERLAND ST NW

COLONIAL VILLAGE 1730 JUNIPER ST NW 1717 JUNIPER ST NW 7947 ORCHID ST NW 1654 PRIMROSE RD NW

COLUMBIA HEIGHTS 3011 13TH ST NW

$867,500 $853,000 $850,000 $845,000 $837,000 $800,000 $770,000 $730,000 $690,000 $650,000 $573,800 $571,000 $557,500 $552,501 $490,000 $693,000 $1,250,000

3 3 2 3 2 3 3 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 4 5

$1,205,000

4

$1,950,000 $1,789,000 $1,487,000 $1,469,000 $1,375,000 $1,250,000 $1,191,000 $1,100,000 $1,090,000 $1,025,000 $1,000,000 $995,000 $975,000 $975,000 $970,000 $945,000 $940,000 $926,500 $910,000 $900,000 $900,000 $890,000 $880,000 $875,000 $855,000 $830,000 $827,200 $810,000 $800,500 $800,000 $800,000 $755,000 $720,000 $705,000

5 6 5 4 4 5 4 4 4 5 5 4 5 4 4 4 4 5 3 5 4 3 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

$300,000

2

$3,300,000 $3,025,000 $1,430,000 $1,500,000

4 6 4 5

$1,470,000 $925,000 $925,000 $720,000

4 4 4 4

$1,080,000

4

!

LD

SO

11 10th St SE 3BR/2.5BA $925,000

!

LD

SO

Beautiful Capitol Hill row home with all the quality finishes down to the door knobs. 3 beds, 1 bath up w spacious Master bedroom, living room with hearth and oneof-a-kind mantel flows into dining room. Kitchen overlooks rear gardens and enclosed solarium for bike storage! Bonus finished basement play/entertainment area complete with full bath and lots of storage.

R T! DE C N A U TR N CO

108 14th St SE 2BR/2BA $619,000

Incredible opportunity! Victorian bayfront on with lush front and rear garden space with off-street parking -- you could even build your own garage! 3 bedrooms and 1 bathroom up, main level with front living room dining room in center and rear kitchen with steps out to long rear yard of grass and mature landscape.

!5 LD SO

YS DA

Charming front façade shows off period details near the leafy intersection of 14th & A Streets SE. Inside, crisp clean modern interior with spiral stairway, two sided fireplace flows from dining room to living room, convenient rear patio space and two master suites on 2nd level!

R T! DE C N A U TR N CO

315 18th St SE 4BR/3.5BA $825,000 Federal Porch-Front end unit has sun cascading across all 3 levels with windows everywhere. Double living room greets you as you enter, and the open floor plan flows to the HUGE kitchen island with french doors out to rear deck and yard with off-street parking. Fully finished lower level and gleaming hardwoods throughout.

1258 Florida Ave NE 3BR/1.5BA $560,000

1617 H St SE 4BR/3.5BA $825,000 SOLD $930,000 Porch front features a foot print 20 Feet Wide, with tall ceilings over three levels. 3 real upper bedrooms, huge master bath, Open kitchen with granite and stainless, restored heart pine and oak floors, unique central butler’s pantry, rear den and deck and lower guest suite ensure an unforgettable package.

G IN ! M N O C OO S

YOUR HOUSE HERE!

In times of market shift, homebuyers and sellers are finding our energy, creativity, and direct experience more vital than ever. For the BEST RESULTS, put us to work today! Call Joel for a free consultation on market values, smart improvements, and more!

August 2014 H 83


{real estate / changing hands}

1432 NEWTON ST NW 1361 PERRY PL NW 1114 SPRING RD NW 3815 14TH ST NW 3642 PARK PL NW 1459 MONROE ST NW 2629 13TH ST NW 726 GIRARD ST NW 3525 NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE NW 4130 ARKANSAS AVE NW 1368 SPRING RD NW 3322 NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE NW 1319 FLORIDA AVE NW 1226 QUINCY ST NW 1427 MERIDIAN PL NW 3614 13TH ST NW 822 PRINCETON PL NW 745 IRVING ST NW 1432 PARKWOOD PL NW 764 IRVING ST NW 733 PRINCETON PL NW 710 KENYON ST NW 756 HOBART PL NW

$1,050,000 $969,900 $867,500 $799,900 $799,000 $765,000 $761,000 $750,000 $725,000 $710,000 $685,000 $680,000 $650,000 $649,000 $630,000 $620,000 $599,000 $571,000 $530,000 $512,500 $480,000 $475,000 $206,000

CONGRESS HEIGHTS 319 PARKLAND PL SE #1-4 3225 5TH ST SE 443 OAKWOOD ST SE 3367 MONTEREY LN SE 125 FORRESTER ST SW 2914 7TH ST SE

$299,000 $275,000 $252,000 $250,000 $181,950 $125,000

CRESTWOOD 1729 WEBSTER ST NW

$600,000

DEANWOOD 5504 EADS ST NE 918 44TH ST NE 4008 AMES ST NE 4409 SHERIFF RD NE 4632 HUNT PL NE 1056 48TH PL NE 5716 BLAINE ST NE

$287,500 $253,500 $250,000 $205,000 $145,000 $131,000 $80,000

6 5 4 3 4 3 3 4 3 2 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 4 2 3 3 3

FORT LINCOLN

4 3 2 3 2 3

HILL CREST

4 3 3 3 3 3 2 3

DUPONT 15 DUPONT CIR NW 1728 CHURCH ST NW 1822 FLORIDA AVE NW 1735 CHURCH ST NW

$20,000,000 $1,195,000 $1,125,000 $1,300,000

ECKINGTON 31 R ST NW 2024 3RD ST NE 321 U ST NE 39 U ST NE

$685,000 $660,000 $645,000 $525,000

FOGGY BOTTOM 835 NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE NW

$1,060,000

FOREST HILLS 4716 32ND ST NW 2920 UPTON ST NW 5195 LINNEAN TER NW

$1,250,000 $1,210,000 $810,000

FORT DUPONT PARK 3920 C ST SE 444 BURBANK ST SE 1148 45TH PL SE 1646 40TH ST SE 3117 E ST SE 1545 FORT DUPONT ST SE 630 CHAPLIN ST SE

84 H Hillrag.com

$236,500 $230,000 $220,000 $215,000 $140,000 $125,000 $100,000

7 5 3 3 3 4 4 3 2

3229 FORT LINCOLN DR NE $445,500 3244 ROBERT CLIFTON WEAVER WAY NE $434,000

FOXHALL 4452 Q ST NW

$1,080,000

GEORGETOWN 3007 Q ST NW 1231 28TH ST NW 3102 P ST NW 1347 30TH ST NW 3327 RESERVOIR RD NW 1411 30TH ST NW 1506 33RD ST NW 1065 THOMAS JEFFERSON ST NW 2724 OLIVE ST NW 1025 CECIL PL NW 1657 31ST ST NW

$5,000,000 $2,620,000 $2,600,000 $1,800,000 $1,650,000 $1,500,000 $1,100,000 $1,065,000 $1,045,000 $680,000 $95,000

3 2 2 3 2 3 2

5

5 3 4 3 4 5 3 4 2 2 99

GLOVER PARK 2034 37TH ST NW 2428 39TH ST NW 2135 TUNLAW RD NW

3128 WESTOVER DR SE 2124 32ND PL SE 2210 32ND ST SE 1404 30TH ST SE 1706 29TH ST SE 2016 37TH ST SE #202 3944 PENNSYLVANIA AVE SE 2020 32ND PL SE

$880,000 $769,000 $725,050 $515,000 $425,000 $391,297 $376,000 $290,000 $63,000 $315,000 $305,000

KALORAMA 26 KALORAMA CIR NW 1949 BILTMORE ST NW 1952 CALVERT ST NW 1804 VERNON ST NW

$2,300,000 $1,800,000 $1,750,000 $1,375,000

3 3 3 2 4 3 4 3 2 3 3 4 6 7 5

KENT 4948 LOWELL ST NW 5146 KLINGLE ST NW 5044 DANA PL NW 5236 MACOMB ST NW 5012 FULTON ST NW 5403 HAWTHORNE PL NW 5116 FULTON ST NW 5158 FULTON ST NW

$4,650,000 $2,150,000 $1,400,000 $1,215,000 $1,035,000 $869,000 $735,000 $725,000

LILY PONDS 14 33RD ST NE 4403 NASH ST NE 3360 AMES ST NE 3436 BAKER ST NE 3328 CLAY PL NE

$275,000 $263,000 $225,000 $156,000 $152,000

LOGAN CIRCLE 4 5 4

3 4

1003 O ST NW

$1,205,000

MARSHALL HEIGHTS 5401 C ST SE 5112 D ST SE 5136 H ST SE

$305,000 $203,000 $130,000

MASSACHUSETTS AVE HTS 2605 31ST ST NW

$2,050,000

MICHIGAN PARK 1724 ALLISON ST NE

$400,000

7 5 5 5 4 3 2 2 3 3 2 2 2 4 4 3 3

MOUNT PLEASANT 1847 LAMONT ST NW 3166 18TH ST NW 3150 19TH ST NW 2059 PARK RD NW 1750 HOBART ST NW

$1,307,000 $1,176,000 $1,100,000 $979,000 $940,000

6 4 4 5 4

NOMA 1109 ABBEY PL NE

$557,000

3

OBSERVATORY CIRCLE 3827 CATHEDRAL AVE NW

$1,275,000

6

OLD CITY #1 251 8TH ST NE 1336 A ST SE 121 TENNESSEE AVE NE 628 F ST NE 424 15TH ST NE 637 8TH ST NE 516 F ST NE 1436 A ST NE 216 11TH ST NE 1329 E ST SE 706 7TH ST NE 634 14TH ST NE 1219 INDEPENDENCE AVE SE 310 14TH ST NE 1132 7TH ST NE 432 13TH ST NE 834 5TH ST NE 430 15TH ST SE 1020 7TH ST NE 1729 INDEPENDENCE AVE SE 1111 3RD ST NE 1636 MASSACHUSETTS AVE SE 312 16TH ST NE 934 4TH ST NE 127 18TH ST SE 1525 CONSTITUTION AVE NE 525 25TH PL NE 333 18TH ST NE 2027 BENNING RD NE 1503 CONSTITUTION AVE NE

$1,297,500 $1,250,000 $1,085,000 $985,150 $925,000 $900,000 $850,000 $830,000 $830,000 $750,000 $725,000 $703,000 $690,000 $661,825 $659,900 $640,000 $635,000 $617,000 $580,000 $557,000 $550,000 $500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $465,000 $459,000 $385,000 $380,000 $360,000 $285,000

OLD CITY #2

605 P ST NW 905 N ST NW 1713 WILLARD ST NW 941 S ST NW 1842 13TH ST NW 1326 9TH ST NW 2226 12TH ST NW 42 NEW YORK AVE NW 424 WARNER ST NW 1532 1ST ST NW 69 BATES ST NW 221 R ST NW

$1,850,000 $1,800,000 $1,080,000 $985,000 $938,000 $817,500 $813,300 $680,000 $675,000 $625,000 $580,000 $400,000

4 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 2 6 4 2 3 2 3 3 3 2 11 4 3 5 4 4 2 5 3 3 4 3

PALISADES 4865 POTOMAC AVE NW 2502 CHAIN BRIDGE RD NW 5631 POTOMAC AVE NW 4576 INDIAN ROCK TER NW 5139 SHERIER PL NW

$2,395,000 $1,920,000 $1,433,000 $1,335,000 $1,170,000

PETWORTH 5 3

4319 8TH ST NW 4624 9TH ST NW 4623 8TH ST NW 4705 4TH ST NW 5014 5TH ST NW 818 MARIETTA PL NW

$710,000 $699,000 $680,000 $644,000 $629,000 $618,000

7 6 5 4 5 4 4 3 3 4 4


New Listing! Randle Heights | 2402 24th St SE

Three big bedrooms, two living areas, large kitchen, separate dining room, garage.

524 VARNUM ST NW 5016 9TH ST NW 723 GALLATIN ST NW 6019 5TH ST NW 4917 4TH ST NW 3927 7TH ST NW 5027 3RD ST NW 5306 NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE NW 5023 5TH ST NW 211 INGRAHAM ST NW 5032 N CAPITOL ST NW 4513 NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE NW 5115 4TH ST NW 4614 4TH ST NW 814 LONGFELLOW ST NW 5116 CAPITOL ST NW 407 DELAFIELD PL NW

RANDLE HEIGHTS 1524 MISSISSIPPI AVE SE 1718 22ND ST SE 1906 VALLEY TER SE

RIGGS PARK

4809 SOUTH DAKOTA AVE NE 673 JEFFERSON ST NE 5129 SOUTH DAKOTA AVE NE 5306 EASTERN AVE NE 1247 GALLATIN ST NE 5872 EASTERN AVE NE

SHAW

1417 5TH ST NW 1556 3RD ST NW 415 RICHARDSON PL NW 1800 8TH ST NW 1525 MARION ST NW 1634 3RD ST NW

SHEPHERD PARK 1204 HOLLY ST NW 7511 12TH ST NW

SPRING VALLEY

4951 ROCKWOOD PKWY NW 3740 FORDHAM RD NW 4911 LOUGHBORO RD NW 4814 WOODWAY LN NW 4711 QUEBEC ST NW 5120 UPTON ST NW 4007 49TH ST NW 4219 50TH ST NW

TAKOMA PARK

6200 SLIGO MILL RD NE

TRINIDAD

1314 STAPLES ST NE 1949 H ST NE 1279 PENN ST NE 1408 MONTELLO AVE NE 1764 LYMAN PL NE 1812 L ST NE 1742 LANG PL NE 1211 RAUM ST NE 838 21ST ST NE 1817 L ST NE

WAKEFIELD

4520 36TH ST NW 3522 DAVENPORT ST NW

WESLEY HEIGHTS 2510 FOXHALL RD NW

$600,000 $585,000 $569,000 $560,000 $550,000 $550,000 $530,000 $525,000 $507,500 $494,000 $467,000 $415,000 $410,000 $405,000 $399,900 $349,000 $315,000

4 3 2 3 4 5 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3

$490,000 $320,000 $260,000

5 3 3

$410,000 $399,999 $390,000 $375,000 $330,000 $325,000

3 3 3 3 3 3

$1,180,000 $1,020,000 $907,000 $780,000 $706,000 $670,000

4 5 3 3 2 3

$694,000 $675,000

3 3

$2,725,000 $2,500,000 $1,900,000 $1,713,000 $1,600,000 $1,560,000 $1,375,000 $1,192,250

Licensed in DC, MD & VA

Anacostia River Realty

7 6 10 6 5 5 6 4

$520,000

4

$629,000 $464,000 $459,000 $418,000 $380,000 $379,000 $300,000 $300,000 $290,000 $235,424

4 3 3 4 3 2 3 4 3 2

$1,325,000 $726,000

4 4

$6,833,333

7

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www.AnacostiaRiverRealty.com The East of the River Experts!

Mark Spiker 202.341.9880

jackie@jackiev.com 202-547-5088 Licensed in DC, VA, MD & FL

August 2014 H 85


{real estate / changing hands}

2927 44TH PL NW 4545 KLINGLE ST NW 4331 CATHEDRAL AVE NW 4410 MACOMB ST NW 4344 HAWTHORNE ST NW

$2,743,000 $2,350,000 $1,645,000 $1,480,000 $1,302,500

6 5 5 4 5

WOODRIDGE

1509 CHANNING ST NE $430,000 4 2804 MYRTLE AVE NE $390,000 4 2504 LAFAYETTE AVE NE $385,000 4 1817 FRANKLIN ST NE $375,000 3 2201 TAYLOR ST NE $306,000 3

CONDO ADAMS MORGAN 1848 WYOMING AVE NW #403 2611 ADAMS MILL RD NW #406

$415,000 $339,900

ANACOSTIA 1304A TALBERT CT SE

$399,999

BARRY FARMS 1500 EATON RD SE #301 1500 EATON RD SE #102

$192,000 $170,000

BLOOMINGDALE 34 CHANNING ST NW #3 34 CHANNING ST NW #2 34 CHANNING ST NW #1

$710,000 $538,000 $445,000

BRENTWOOD 1333 ADAMS ST NE #4

$220,000

BROOKLAND 728 LAWRENCE ST NE #A 3940 7TH ST NE #3 330 RHODE ISLAND AVE NE #203 3940 7TH ST NE #1 30 HAWTHORNE CT NE #30 401 EVARTS ST NE #404 1031 MICHIGAN AVE NE #302 2625 3RD ST NE #104 613 HAMLIN ST NE #12

$649,900 $328,000 $315,000 $307,000 $290,000 $275,000 $209,000 $150,000 $140,000

CAPITOL HILL 103 11TH ST SE #A1 1526 MASSACHUSETTS AVE SE #1 901 D ST NE #202 1485 A ST NE #1485 22 15TH ST NE #22 440 12TH ST NE #109 629 4TH ST NE #1 1000 EAST CAPITOL ST NE #2 13 14TH ST NE #13 1391 PENNSYLVANIA AVE SE #239 1815 A ST SE #103 101 NORTH CAROLINA AVE SE #207

$819,000 $715,000 $679,000 $563,000 $560,000 $501,100 $475,000 $375,000 $359,000 $338,000 $329,777 $235,000

1 1 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 3 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 0

CENTRAL 1099 22ND ST NW #1008 2425 L ST NW #238 1010 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #802 801 PENNSYLVANIA AVE NW #PH11 1280 21ST ST NW #409 400 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #508 400 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #1116 601 PENNSYLVANIA AVE NW #1106 1150 K ST NW #707 2012 O ST NW #13

86 H Hillrag.com

$995,000 $899,000 $675,000 $560,000 $526,000 $485,000 $475,000 $470,000 $439,000 $412,000

2 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1

2130 N ST NW #508 1260 21ST ST NW #1014 555 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #316

$250,000 $249,500 $370,000

CHEVY ASE 4750 41ST ST NW #204 5201 WISCONSIN AVE NW #406

$703,000 $610,000

CLEVELAND PARK 2737 DEVONSHIRE PL NW #14 3881 NEWARK ST NW #475 2732 ORDWAY ST NW #6 3410 39TH ST NW #F714 3541 39TH ST NW #507 4007 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #211 2902 PORTER ST NW #24 4301 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #A214 4301 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #1012 3830 39TH ST NW #109 3871 RODMAN ST NW #D-58 4007 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #314

$574,500 $504,500 $435,000 $431,000 $399,999 $395,000 $395,000 $379,900 $370,000 $330,000 $212,000 $370,000

COLUMBIA HEIGHTS 1346 MONROE ST NW #B 1305 CLIFTON ST NW #4 1307 IRVING ST NW #1 1332 PARK RD NW #32-C 1466 HARVARD ST NW #TH4 610 NEWTON PL NW #10 1531 PARK RD NW #5 1390 KENYON ST NW #506 610 NEWTON PL NW #5 751 FAIRMONT ST NW #2 701 LAMONT ST NW #21 1419 CLIFTON ST NW #206 1451 PARK RD NW #313 3318 SHERMAN AVE NW #202 1420 HARVARD ST NW #303 1417 NEWTON ST NW #502 1308 SHEPHERD ST NW #B 1436 OGDEN ST NW #6 1421 COLUMBIA RD NW #B4 610 IRVING ST NW #104 610 IRVING ST NW #T-04 1439 EUCLID ST NW #101 3900 14TH ST NW #619 1106 COLUMBIA RD NW #204 1372 RANDOLPH ST NW #203 430 IRVING ST NW #201 2656 15TH ST NW #C-3 1519 PARK RD NW #B-1

$655,000 $632,000 $628,000 $615,000 $595,000 $549,000 $545,000 $545,000 $500,000 $489,000 $475,000 $446,000 $404,900 $395,000 $372,500 $349,000 $335,000 $329,800 $319,400 $319,000 $305,000 $299,900 $287,500 $280,000 $280,000 $280,000 $279,000 $130,000

0 0 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 0 1 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0

DUPONT 1414 22ND ST NW #52 2200 17TH ST NW #201 2107 S ST NW #A 2301 N ST NW #116 1817 RIGGS PL NW #2 1624 CORCORAN ST NW #E 2141 P ST NW #503 1817 RIGGS PL NW #1 1527 16TH ST NW #5 1919 16TH ST NW #2 2200 17TH ST NW #105 1401 17TH ST NW #201 1390 V ST NW #219 1830 17TH ST NW #T-1 1731 WILLARD ST NW #104 1621 T ST NW #603 1545 18TH ST NW #513 1711 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #234 1711 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #815 1901 16TH ST NW #303

$1,250,000 $799,900 $759,000 $675,000 $659,000 $649,000 $621,000 $605,000 $598,000 $580,000 $580,000 $529,000 $515,000 $425,000 $410,000 $403,400 $380,000 $362,500 $256,500 $205,000

2 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 0 0

ECKINGTON 131 QUINCY PL NE #1 147 R ST NE #10

$629,000 $388,500

FOGGY BOTTOM 700 NEW HAMP. AVE NW #1105/1106 2401 H ST NW #204 2401 H ST NW #611 1010 25TH ST NW #504 522 21ST ST NW #902

$2,950,000 $425,000 $330,000 $290,000 $195,000

FOREST HILLS 4701 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #401 2723 ORDWAY ST NW ##5 2939 VAN NESS ST NW #306 3883 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #416 4707 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #411 2939 VAN NESS ST NW #1015 4007 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #406 2712 ORDWAY ST NW #5 3701 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #300

$630,000 $462,000 $415,000 $365,000 $326,000 $324,500 $324,000 $310,000 $309,900

FORT LINCOLN 3137 BERRY RD NE #17

$199,900

3 2 2 2 1 1 0 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2

GARFIELD 2737 DEVONSHIRE PL NW #101

$429,000

GEORGETOWN 3052 R ST NW #APT 306 3303 WATER ST NW #C-4 2516 Q ST NW #C-201 1077 30TH ST NW #209 1077 30TH ST NW #205 3210 GRACE ST NW #202 1080 WISCONSIN AVE NW #2002 1077 30TH ST NW #201 2500 Q ST NW #323

$1,550,000 $1,400,000 $1,025,000 $830,000 $815,000 $569,000 $507,500 $500,000 $267,940

GLOVER PARK 2325 42ND ST NW #409 2325 42ND ST NW #412 2325 42ND ST NW #221 3901 TUNLAW RD NW #701 2325 42ND ST NW #405

$375,000 $371,000 $370,000 $333,500 $309,000

H ST CORRIDOR 1614 ISHERWOOD ST NE #201 315 I ST NE #PH

$265,000 $824,000

HILL CREST 2053 38TH ST SE #B 3937 PENNSYLVANIA AVE SE #102 3907 PENNSYLVANIA AVE SE #102 2016 37TH ST SE #302

$107,000 $75,000 $73,500 $63,000

KALORAMA 2009 COLUMBIA RD NW #4 1835 CALIFORNIA ST NW #G 2001 ALLEN PL NW #102 1822 VERNON ST NW #103 1831 BELMONT RD NW #102 1833 CALIFORNIA ST NW #101 2022 COLUMBIA RD NW #404

$740,000 $545,000 $465,000 $465,000 $379,000 $365,000 $334,000

LEDROIT PARK 249 FLORIDA AVE NW #21 2020 FLAGLER PL NW #FL04 2201 2ND ST NW #13 5 RHODE ISLAND AVE NW #303 2311 1ST ST NW #1

$327,500 $356,000 $349,000 $185,000 $786,000

1 2 2 2 3 2 1 1 1 0 2 2 2 2 1 2 3 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2


The Best of Both Worlds: City Loft Living On Country Waterfront!

LOGAN 1401 Q ST NW #204 1402 SWANN ST NW #7 1711 13TH ST NW #1 1111 11TH ST NW #806 1445 N ST NW #303 1445 N ST NW #304 1401 R ST NW #404 1423 R ST NW #502 1420 N ST NW #612 1441 RHODE ISLAND AVE NW #815 2125 14TH ST NW #207-W 2020 12TH ST NW #PH16 2106 10TH ST NW #4 1341 Q ST NW #A 1444 CHURCH ST NW #207 1423 R ST NW #505 1401 CHURCH ST NW #310 1300 N ST NW #718 1215 N ST NW #1 1300 N ST NW #117 1117 10TH ST NW #1111

$840,000 $700,000 $679,000 $575,000 $520,200 $515,000 $480,000 $465,000 $415,000 $340,000 $468,000 $1,500,000 $854,000 $791,000 $743,000 $705,000 $479,900 $451,000 $439,000 $425,102 $467,500

MCLEAN GARDENS 3430 39TH ST NW #698

$480,000

MOUNT PLEASANT 1738 PARK RD NW #4 1674 BEEKMAN PL NW #C 2627 ADAMS MILL RD NW #109 1673 PARK RD NW #203 3155 MOUNT PLEASANT ST NW #206 3510 16TH ST NW #402 1615 KENYON ST NW #52 1763 COLUMBIA RD NW #404 3510 16TH ST NW #101 2630 ADAMS MILL RD NW #305-A 3602 16TH ST NW #3

$750,000 $715,000 $466,500 $415,000 $375,000 $355,000 $320,000 $277,900 $265,267 $260,000 $547,000

MOUNT VERNON 475 K ST NW #508 1130 5TH ST NW #3

$683,555 $655,000

2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 0 2 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 2

$535,000 $399,999

NORTH CLEVELAND PARK 4444 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #605

$447,500

OBSERVATORY CIRCLE 3051 IDAHO AVE NW #315 3901 FULTON ST NW #204

$180,000 $180,000

OLD CITY #1 1200 EAST CAPITOL ST NE #3 1413 A ST NE #1413 1409 G ST NE #21 1409 G ST NE #26 401 13TH ST NE #305 1391 PENNSYLVANIA AVE SE #329 1524 INDEPENDENCE AVE SE #B0-1 1367 FLORIDA AVE NE #102 1100 7TH ST NE #4 1609 ISHERWOOD ST NE #4 618 L ST NE #2 PH

$655,000 $560,000 $519,900 $485,000 $480,000 $460,000 $379,000 $369,000 $339,000 $265,000 $790,000

OLD CITY #2 1111 11TH ST NW #907 1707 13TH ST NW #2 1515 15TH ST NW #709 1300 13TH ST NW #206 1515 11TH ST NW #2-2

$1,015,000 $860,000 $797,500 $790,000 $777,000

$704,000 $630,000 $527,000 $505,000 $485,000 $485,000 $480,000 $455,000 $449,000 $445,000 $435,500 $430,000 $425,000 $405,000 $330,000 $330,000 $320,000 $315,000 $297,500 $269,000 $266,700 $257,300 $215,000 $189,500 $35,000

PENN QUARTER 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 0 2 2 2

NOMA 301 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #401 115 NEW YORK AVE NW #3

1721 21ST ST NW #203 910 M ST NW #618 1209 13TH ST NW #213 1708 5TH ST NW #2 1813 19TH ST NW #D 1210 V ST NW ##1 2032 16TH ST NW #8 2001 16TH ST NW #203 555 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #715 2004 11TH ST NW #127 1211 13TH ST NW #101 811 4TH ST NW #214 811 4TH ST NW #1114 1239 VERMONT AVE NW #605 1910 T ST NW #11 1711 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #205 424 RIDGE ST NW #4 1731 WILLARD ST NW #204 1718 P ST NW #413 1239 VERMONT AVE NW #401 1711 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #519 1727 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #111 1322 15TH ST NW #1 55 M ST NW #104 460 L ST NW #G2-144

2 2 2 0 0 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 3 3 2 1 2 2

616 E ST NW #618 601 PENNSYLVANIA AVE NW #501 555 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #1206 915 E ST NW #306

$665,000 $535,000 $429,000 $279,000

PETWORTH 610 NEWTON PL NW #11 610 NEWTON PL NW #8 610 NEWTON PL NW #7 610 NEWTON PL NW #6 610 NEWTON PL NW #4 4800 GEORGIA AVE ST NW #201 3921 7TH ST NW #4 804 TAYLOR ST NW #205 4800 GEORGIA AVE ST NW #102 5407 9TH ST NW #209 922 MADISON ST NW #302

$549,000 $511,000 $500,000 $480,000 $460,000 $439,900 $405,000 $309,000 $284,900 $267,500 $260,000

RLA (SW) 248 G ST SW #128 208 G ST SW #143 273 G ST SW #102 350 G ST SW #N-324 350 G ST SW #N-405 350 G ST SW #N-314 800 4TH ST SW #N-524 1250 4TH ST SW #W614 700 7TH ST SW #431 300 M ST SW #N310

$629,000 $548,500 $480,000 $436,000 $365,000 $358,000 $316,000 $300,000 $255,000 $245,000

2 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0

$661,000 $499,000 $459,900 $436,850 $408,000

SHERIDAN STATION 2517 SAYLES PL SE #4 2501 SAYLES PL SE #8 2517 SAYLES PL SE #1 2517 SAYLES PL SE #5

$376,900 $317,900 $261,900 $253,400

SW WATERFRONT 1425 4TH ST SW #A504 800 4TH ST SW #N-123

$389,000 $231,750

Bonnie Baldus Grier Associate Broker bonniegrier@gmail.com

301.807.1400

“We are part of Capitol Hill, We don’t just work here... We live here, too. Let our neighborhood experience work for you...”

2 2 1 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 3 3 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1

SHAW 1523 3RD ST NW #2 1523 3RD ST NW #1 125 BATES ST NW #3 1806 6TH ST NW #101 1806 6TH ST NW #202

Enjoy breathtaking views of the Wicomico River & nearly 8 acres of peace and tranquility; or perhaps your passion is kayaking or fishing. This property offers something for everyone. Old-fashioned post and beam construction combine with a contemporary interior open plan to make the perfect weekend retreat or year round home. Spacious 2nd story loft master suite offers built-ins & spa bath. Amenities include a gourmet kitchen, wine cellar and radiant floor heating . Located less than an hour and a half from Capitol Hill - without crossing the Bay Bridge! Owners will consider financing for well qualified buyer. $799,000

2 2 2 2 1 2 3 2 2 2 0

202.546.3100 210 7th Street, SE. #100. WDC 20003 www.monarchtitle.net

Your Neighbor On The Hill

“The road to success is not always straight; let me help you through the real estate maze to a happy and successful destination”

Deborah Charlton

Long and Foster Realtors Christie’s Great Estates

(202) 415-2117 (202) 944-8400 DC.DC@LongandFoster.com www.yourneighboronthehill.com August 2014 H 87


TRINIDAD 1104 HOLBROOK TER NE #202 1104 HOLBROOK TER NE #201

$257,000 $255,000

U STREET 2120 VERMONT AVE NW #301 2120 VERMONT AVE NW #314 2131 10TH ST NW #4 2001 12TH ST NW #403 2004 11TH ST NW #432 2120 VERMONT AVE NW #319 2100 11TH ST NW #408 2250 11TH ST NW #101 2125 14TH ST NW #722 2100 11TH ST NW #G-06

$437,000 $350,000 $856,000 $615,000 $549,000 $397,000 $824,000 $725,000 $580,000 $374,000

VAN NESS 2939 VAN NESS ST NW #639

$285,000

WAKEFIELD 4740 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #712 4600 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #320 4740 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #304

$500,000 $475,000 $315,000

WATERFRONT 1435 4TH ST SW #B801

$199,000

WESLEY HEIGHTS 3205 SUTTON PL NW #D 3101 NEW MEXICO AVE NW #816 43054345 MASS. AVE NW #4305 4201 CATHEDRAL AVE NW #424E 3101 NEW MEXICO AVE NW #521 3101 NEW MEXICO AVE NW #231 4201 CATHEDRAL AVE NW #409E 4200 CATHEDRAL AVE NW #715

$637,000 $627,000 $590,000 $530,000 $490,000 $460,000 $252,000 $225,500

WEST END 2501 PENNSYLVANIA AVE NW #2C 1177 22ND ST NW #5A 1177 22ND ST NW #3E 1177 22ND ST NW #4H 1099 22ND ST NW #1003 2600 PENNSYLVANIA AVE NW #702 1155 23RD ST NW #N4L 2301 N ST NW #413

$2,000,000 $1,545,000 $1,175,000 $935,000 $862,000 $800,125 $595,000 $535,000

1 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 0 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 2 1 2

WOODLEY PARK

2737 DEVONSHIRE PL NW #5 $424,500 1 2818 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #4 $249,900 0

CoOp 16TH STREET HEIGHTS 1365 KENNEDY ST NW #307

$155,000

CAPITOL HILL 516 A ST NE #104

$452,500

CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS 4000 CATHEDRAL AVE NW #749B

$285,000

CLEVELAND PARK 3601 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #203 3409 29TH ST NW #4

$430,000 $360,000

1 2 1 1 2

DUPONT 1701 16TH ST NW #234 1701 16TH ST NW #820 1734 P ST NW #33

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$449,000 $437,500 $360,000

2 1 1


1701 16TH ST NW #640 1701 16TH ST NW #425

FOGGY BOTTOM 940 25TH ST NW #310-S 950 25TH ST NW #605-S 730 24TH ST NW #508 950 25TH ST NW #711-N

FOREST HILLS

3001 VEAZEY TER NW #1613

GLOVER PARK

3900 TUNLAW RD NW #620 3900 TUNLAW RD NW #605

KALORAMA

2220 20TH ST NW #31 2220 20TH ST NW #54 2122 CALIFORNIA ST NW #162 1875 MINTWOOD PL NW #26

MOUNT PLEASANT

2853 ONTARIO RD NW #201 2853 ONTARIO RD NW #410 2853 ONTARIO RD NW #411 1820 CLYDESDALE PL NW #404 2853 ONTARIO RD NW #420

NORTH CLEVELAND PARK 3024 TILDEN ST NW #504

OBSERVATORY CIRCLE 4101 CATHEDRAL AVE NW #1204

OLD CITY #1

1000 NEW JERSEY AVE SE #802

OLD CITY #2

1725 17TH ST NW #202 1701 16TH ST NW #252

PETWORTH

215 EMERSON ST NW #103

RLA (SW)

1301 DELAWARE AVE SW #N-721

TIBER ISLAND 430 M SW #N505

WATERFRONT 550 N ST SW #S702 429 N ST SW #S104 520 N ST SW #S-519 510 N ST SW #N625 429 N ST SW #S-203

WOODLEY PARK

2854 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #23 ◆

$315,000 $289,000

1 1

$258,000 $240,000 $205,000 $190,000

0 0 0 0

$317,500

1

$250,000 $211,000

1 1

$755,000 $625,000 $499,000 $292,000

3 2 2 1

$1,000,000 $515,000 $475,000 $401,400 $360,000

3 1 1 2 1

$364,000

1

$797,483

3

$380,000

2

$359,900 $330,000

1 1

$140,000

2

$196,000

1

$485,000

2

$885,000 $390,000 $349,500 $270,000 $185,000

3 2 1 1 0

$295,000

1

10 th Street Auto repAirS

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Specializing in all aspects of Real Estate Settlements

We Guarantee Attention to Detail & Personalized Service 650 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE Suite 170 Washington, DC 20003-4318 202-544-0800

August 2014 H 89


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{arts & dining} At the Chef’s Table

Roberto Hernandez at Mio Restaurant by Annette Nielsen

T

he popular Mio Restaurant in downtown DC, owned by restaurateur Manuel Iguina, recently announced the appointment of Roberto Hernandez as executive chef. Hernandez, who has worked as a restaurant consultant and previously served as a guest chef at Mio, is taking the reins at the restaurant affectionately known as the “Embassy of Latin America in DC.” “Roberto is a rising star that will add and give continuity to Mio’s mission to see Puerto Rican cuisine as a staple in the nation’s capital and in the mid-Atlantic,” says Iguina, “and we’re very proud and happy to have him as an addition to our culinary team.” Chef Hernandez grew up in Ponce, Puerto Rico, a city of about 200,000, filled with family, tradition and great food. “Cooking has been a family affair since I can remember – my (Cuban) grandmother would make certain lunch and dinner were prepared every day and the stove was always busy. Her fried rice would take three days to make – on the first day the pork chops and ham were cooked, the second day the rice, and on the third day these ingredients and more came together with the eggs – a real layering of flavors.” Hernandez says he also grew up eating things like oxtail and tongue, what he calls his idea of a poor man’s foie gras. Hernandez attended college in San Juan where he studied mechanical engineering. He cooked his way through college, but found he was happiest when he spent time in the kitchen. “I was terrified to tell my dad that I was going to ignore my engi-

A focused Roberto Hernandez preps the vegetables to be used in the blistered corn salsa. All photographs by Willie Lora, loramedia.com

The vibrant colors reflected in the corn salsa ingredients are a feast for the eyes before they’re even tasted.

neering training and go into the restaurant world. It turns out that my mom had already told him about my plans and he said to me, ‘So, when are we opening a restaurant? You don’t have to chase my dream!’” Hernandez enrolled at the Lincoln Culinary Institute in West Palm Beach, Florida and after completing his studies, he worked for a number of years in resorts and restaurants from West Palm to Miami. “In Florida, I had a real experience of working in America, but in a very international way – you’d find so many different nationalities from French, Portugese, Brazilian, Cuban and more – and that exposed me to different cuisines. You can learn from everyone in the kitchen, from the dishwasher to the chef – they can all be great mentors.” It was while working for Trump Mar-a-Lago as the Chef de Cuisine, that a friend asked him to consult on a hotel concept. That work took him from Miami, on to Sweden and back to Florida. After a dozen years away from home, he returned to Puerto Rico. “It was really important to be reconnected with family,” says Hernandez. “ It’s one of the best things I’ve ever done. A friend was looking for help with a restaurant, and it turned out that with the growth of the food culture in Puerto Rico, there was a need for this type of consulting work there.” It was through his restaurant consulting, that Hernandez was invited to be a guest chef at Mio where Iguina, a longtime fixture in the District’s res-

August 2014 H 91


{arts and dining}

taurant scene had been working to create an engaging and welcoming place serving authentic Puerto Rican cuisine. “We started Puerto Rican Fridays – or Lechon Friday – in 2010 – where we roast a suckling pig,” says Iguina. The Lechon Asado Ajili Mojili y Pique del Pais is a traditional way to prepare the roast pig with a melding of Puerto Rican flavors including hot sauce, garlic, citrus and spices. During late spring, Hernandez was in DC consulting on Mio’s brunch menu. “I’m always drawing on taste memories from the classic dishes my grandmother would make, while combining those flavors with French techniques

I learned in culinary school. The typical breakfast in Puerto Rico is different than eggs and bacon. We look for more of an island or Caribbean feel that incorporates tropical fruits like pineapple, papaya, mango – and also root vegetables like a hash with jicama and batata (sweet potato) which might be served up with poached eggs and guava or with a sofrito hollandaise,” states Hernandez. “We’re also creating the traditional Puerto Rican dumpling that’s typically made with cod or red beans.” It was after making such a good impression as a guest chef that Hernandez was invited to lead the kitchen at Mio. At Mio, they serve a special Arabica sundried coffee grown exclusively

Grilled Pork Tenderloin Over Blistered Corn Salsa Yield: 2-3 servings

For pork tenderloin: 1 to 1 ½ pound pork tenderloin, silver skin removed 1 teaspoon cumin 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon oregano (dried) 1 tablespoon Kosher salt 1 teaspoon black pepper 2 tablespoons achiote oil* Mix dry ingredients and oil together; rub into tenderloin, wrap tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight. If you’re cooking the tenderloin on the grill, pre-heat to medium-high heat; if using your oven, prepare in a pre-heated oven at 425 degrees. Cooking times will vary on the grill, but should take 15 -20 minutes or so and the internal temperature should register 145-150 degrees at the thickest end of the tenderloin. After tenderloin is cooked, remove from heat and let rest for 5 to 10 minutes. Cut in ½-inch to 1-inch slices and serve with blistered corn salsa. *You can make your own achiote oil. Take annatto seeds (known as achiote in Spanish) – you can find them in the spice aisle at the supermarket – and steep about 1 tablespoon of seeds in about a half cup of olive oil; heat until they start sizzling, and keep on the heat for a minute or so. Don’t boil, as the seeds will become bitter. Remove from heat and let stand until the sizzling stops and strain out the seeds when ready to use. The oil can be stored in a lidded jar for a few days.

For Avocado Mousse: 1 whole avocado 1 garlic clove 2 tbsp olive oil 1 leaf of culantro (also known as long cilantro or

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Mexican cilantro) In a blender process the oil, herb and the garlic. Then add avocado in chunks and blend until smooth. Set aside.

For Blistered Corn Salsa: 4 ears of corn, shucked and using a knife, remove all corn from the cob 1 red bell pepper, seeded and diced 1 green pepper, seeded and diced 1 jalapeño pepper, seeded and diced 3 cloves garlic (sliced and toasted in a small pan over medium-low heat until lightly browned) 1 small bunch of cilantro, chopped fine juice of one lime canola oil olive oil white vinegar, to taste salt and pepper Gently take corn kernels off the cob and place in a large bowl; toss with a few tablespoons of canola oil and season lightly with salt and pepper. Put corn in a pre-heated pan over high heat, until the corn starts popping. Give it a shake and let it set again until it pops again. (The goal is to get nicely charred spots on the kernels.) Remove from heat and let it cool down. Mix in peppers by hand. In a medium-sized bowl, whisk together lime juice, a ¼ cup olive oil and a couple of tablespoons of white vinegar. Season corn and pepper mixture with dressing. Sprinkle with salt & pepper, to taste. Place a few slices of pork tenderloin on a bed of the blistered corn salsa. Garnish with avocado mousse and a sprinkling of freshly chopped cilantro.

Chef Roberto Hernandez seated with owner Manuel Iguina enjoying a chat in the inviting seating area at the entrance to Mio.


for the restaurant in Puerto Rico. During August, the restaurant will be participating in a celebration of National Coffee Month with coffee-inspired entrees like Coffee Rubbed Beef Short Ribs with Five Chiles, Coffee Citrus Spiced Cured Salmon as well as Mio Expresso Granita and Orange Zest for dessert. As for libations, they’ll be highlighting the owner’s special Café Colada prepared with coconut cream, fresh crushed pineapple, Puerto Rican white rum and Mio’s espresso. At Mio, you’ll instantly feel the warmth of the personalities here, note the vibrancy in the décor’s colors, and in the open kitchen you’ll see Roberto Hernandez at the helm with Manuel Iguina’s cohesive staff cooking up authentic Puerto Rican cuisine. Try this flavorful summer recipe from Roberto Hernandez – a great way to use the grill and keep the heat out of your kitchen. Mio Restaurant 1110 Vermont Ave., NW 202.955.0075 miorestaurant.com Annette Nielsen has been engaged in food, farming and sustainability issues for nearly two decades. The food editor of the Hill Rag, Nielsen’s experience includes catering, coordinating artisanal and farm-based food events and teaching cooking classes. She’s the editor of two Adirondack Life cookbooks, and is at work on an Eastern Market cookbook. Nielsen heads up Kitchen Cabinet Events, a culinary, farm-to-fork inspired event business. A native of the Adirondacks, she’s a long-time resident of both NYC and DC, she returned to Washington, DC from Washington County, NY; annette@hillrag. com. u

Sidamo Coffee and Tea Single Origin Coffee Freshly Roasted on Site! Organic & Specialty Coffees from Around the World 25 Types of Loose Teas Bagels, Salads, Sandwiches & Desserts • Catering Ethiopian Coffee Ritual Sundays @ 2pm

202-548-0081 Mon.-Fri. 7-7 Sat. 8-6, Sun. 8-5 sidamocoffeeandtea.com FREE 417 H Street, NE August 2014 H 93


Food With

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{arts and dining}

A View by Emily Clark

A

s the heat and humidity descend upon the District, many of us would like nothing more than to escape. But sometimes that’s not possible, and instead many of us outside for meals to enjoy the fresh air. Across the city, outdoor tables crowd the sidewalks as diners settle in to eat, drink and

people watch. But there are a few places around town where it’s possible to feel like you’re on vacation even when you’re not, places where the views are spectacular and the vibe tranquil. Here are some ‘vacation in place’ choices for gazing at the river, looking at sculpture or watching the planes take off and land at Reagan Airport. Cuisine ranges from fantastic to blah, but then everything tastes better with a view.

Capitol Riverfront This is a neighborhood that’s growing up so fast it has jump started the kind of liveliness and sophistication associated with much more established places. Two restaurants, Osteria Morini and Agua 301, face the architecturally lovely Capitol Riverfront park and the Anacostia River. During the day, kayakers drift on the water and kids splash and play in a giant shallow pool alongside. All summer, free Friday night concerts fill the area with music. But the magic happens at night—blue lights on the South Capitol Street Bridge in the distance (complemented by blue-lit benches in the

The lights of Yards Park from Agua 301 in Capitol Riverfront. Photo: Courtesy Agua 301

park) will make you feel as if you’ve been hologrammed to Istanbul, where the bridge over the Bosporus has lights that change color. Locally, the color stays blue, but you can sit back with a signature cocktail and feel hypnotized by the lights and their reflection on the water. Osteria Morini has great handmade pasta and interesting cocktails, Agua 301, sophisticated tacos, bocaditos for light snacks and killer margaritas (the blood orange is my favorite).

Southwest Waterfront Even though the Waterfront is at the beginning of a massive redo, Cantina Marina will survive. Think of a Mexican dive cum neighborhood bar at water’s edge, this water being the Potomac. You can sit on the deck with the river practically lapping your feet, maybe with one of Cantina’s weird jalapeno/margarita/beer combos, gazing on the big tour boats. One caveat: sometimes in summer, Cantina is so crowded you can’t even get a drink, much less a table. This is especially true on Nationals game nights, when Cantina runs a shuttle from bar to ballpark. Best to try at lunch. Cuisine is mostly Tex-Mex and Cajun, with a daily catch. And you can bring your dog, but don’t scare the ducks.

East Potomac Park

ABOVE: The view from the Mandarin’s balcony. Photo: Courtesy Mandarin LEFT: Summer days at Cantina Marina. Photo: Andrew Lightman

If you like the laid back feeling of a country club golf resort, head to this DC outpost just off the freeway. The East Potomac Grille sits right on the golf course and has counter service, reliable food including burgers and dogs, wraps and salads, even breakfast for the early risers. Although there is indoor seating, it’s much more restful to sit out on the colonnaded deck with a beer, looking out at the green of the fairway stretching to the horizon, dotted with trees. The

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The Best of Capitol Hill Eating From

to

Lunch and Dinner Daily Happy Hour 3:30 pm - 7 pm Weekend Brunch 10:30 - 3 pm

Join us for brunch on Saturday & Sunday from 10:30a-3p

Join us for Game day specials before and after the game

Happy hour daily 3-7p, 9close Tue. night 1/2 price Wine Night Wed. night 16.95 1 1/4 lb Lobster!

301 Water Street, SE Yards Park 202-484-0301 • www.agua301.com

735 8th Street, SE Washington, DC 202.544.7171 • www.zestbistro.com

BEST HAPPY HOUR ON THE HILL! EVERYDAY 4:00-7:30! @ The Upstairs Piano Bar From 7:30 PM Onwards There Is Always Something Going On! Live Piano Tuesdays Through Saturdays Sundays & Mondays - Karaoke Brunch All Weekend Saturdays & Sundays -- 10 AM to 3 PM Regular Menu Also Available

500 Eighth St. SE 202-543-5906 www.bananacafedc.com Available for Catering and Private Parties!

Early evening dining with a splendid view of th Potomac at Indigo Landing. Photo: Courtesy Indigo Landing

park also boasts an underused Olympic sized pool and the whole place is family friendly. Being there transports me back to junior high at the local country club, minus the awkward boys and mean girls. After a meal, drive along the water out to Hains Point before heading back home.

National Gallery Sculpture Garden Light meals, good desserts and essential coffees make the Sculpture Garden’s Pavilion Café an oasis surrounded by art. Enjoy salads, pizza, sandwiches or a Mediterranean platter, while indulging your kids with hot dogs or PBJs. On a hot afternoon, we sat with a custard-filled strawberry tart and cappuccino and watched the arcs of water shoot up in the huge fountain where people sit to dip their feet. Sitting at the other end of the café affords a view of Lichtenstein’s whimsical house sculpture. After awhile, take a stroll through the garden, where there’s a cross section of modern sculpture, and you might feel as if you’re in Paris. On Friday evenings during the summer, throngs of people come for jazz.

The (Not so) Secret Garden The Empress Lounge outdoor garden bar at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel may be the only urban getaway where you feel the need to spiff up a bit. Although indoors it’s nearly impossible to find a table, you can go outdoors and seat yourself. OK, so it isn’t Giverny, but it is pretty, with a green lawn and flowerbeds with a color riot of impatiens. There’s an artisan libations menu—each drink created by a different bartender—featuring cocktails like pomegranate mojito, bourbon with watermelon and honey and several drinks featuring vodka and elderflower. Along with the drinks, you can order from the tapas like Kobe sliders, Philly cheesesteak eggrolls and sesame tuna salad. Walk to the edge of the garden for a lovely view of the Jefferson Memorial dome and the Washington Channel, replete with sleek boats that you wish you could sail away on.

Plane, Boats and Monuments

UNPRETENTIOUSLY DELICIOUS Serving the best Cuban Puerto Rican & Tex Mex cuisine 96 H Hillrag.com

Imagine a sailing vacation with views of the Capitol and the Washington Mon-


ument, not to mention one of the departure runways at Reagan National Airport. Indigo Landing, just south of the airport, sits at the end of a spit on a wide expanse of the Potomac. Indigo is in Alexandria, so technically you are out of town. You don’t actually have to be on a boat—you can just watch sailboats of all sizes go by while you dig in to crab cakes, salmon or any number of sandwiches. Brunch is especially enjoyable under a shade umbrella with a bloody Mary. Sit back and watch the planes take off, happy and relaxed in the knowledge that you didn’t have to drag yourself through security to be packed in like a sardine on an oversold flight. Sometimes there’s just no place like home. u Osteria Morini 301 Water Street SE 202-4840660 osteriamorini.com Agua 301 301 Water Street SE 202-484-0301 agua301.com Cantina Marina 600 Water Street, SW 202-554-8396 cantinamarina.com East Potomac Grille 972 Ohio Drive, SW 202-479-2596 golfdc.com Pavilion Café at the Sculpture Garden National Gallery of Art 202-289-3360 pavilioncafe.com Empress Lounge Mandarin Oriental Hotel 1330 Maryland Avenue, SW 202-554-8588 mandarinoriental.com/DC Indigo Landing 1 Marina Drive, Alexandria 703-548-0001 indigolanding.com

Red Rocks, James O’Brien & Doug Baj’s award-winning Neapolitan pizzeria, has opened its sizeable doors at 1348 H Street NE. Customers can now enjoy 7000 square feet of indoor/outdoor dining, with bars on 3 levels including a rooftop bar that features spectacular views of downtown DC. More than just great pizza, RedRocks has expanded its menu to include fresh pastas, salads, and a wide array of creative Italian dishes. The bar menu is just as formidable: 20 craft beers on tap, a creative cocktail list, and wine offerings from several regions. After dinner, climb the stairs and discover Redrocks 2nd floor nightclub “The Lodge” that has quickly become…the neighborhood’s most essential DJ venue” – Washington Post, Going Out Gurus.

1348 H St, NE 202-621-7300 • www.redrocksdc.com

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{arts and dining / dining notes}

Dining Notes

the kitchen will be Ed Scarpone, currently souschef at New York’s DGBG, named after New York’s now-defunct music club. Menu? Expect Scarpone’s gussied-up burgers and sausages, among other signature delights. Boulud is no stranger to the Nation’s Capital. Now 59, he first arrived in the United States in the 1980s as private chef to the European Commission’s delegation.

by Celeste McCall Chicken on the Move First, the bad news: Looks like Barracks Row is losing Chicken Tortilla, where we occasionally pick up a crisp and juicy Peruvian-style rotisserie chicken along with black beans and rice. Good news: Chicken Tortilla is being reborn as Ocopa, a joint venture of Chicken Tortilla’s Eddie Migues and Italo Rodriguez, and Peruvian-born chef Carlos Delgado. Named for a Peruvian sauce concocted with a black mint called huacatay, Ocopa is about to debut (if not already) at 1324 H St. NE. Delgado’s menu will showcase Peruvian-style sushi, stews simmered in clay pots, and, naturally, rotisserie chicken. His 25-seat enterprise will also feature a 10-seat ceviche bar. Pastry chef Neni Ramirez will create desserts, while bartender Glendon Hartley oversees cocktails. Like its Barracks Row forebear, Ocopa will offer carryout.

More Chicken Speaking of rotisserie chicken, we also satisfy our craving at Canales Deli at Eastern Market, where an entire, succulent chicken goes for a mere $7.99. Peter and I feasted on it one night, and later enjoyed a stir-fry and chicken salad, all from one bird.

More Market News Curds come our way at the Peachy Family Dairy stand at Eastern Market. Found outdoors (usually) on weekends, the Amish-operated business has introduced fried cheese curds. Dusted in glutenfree flour, a hefty portion of the tasty little morsels sells for $7. You might also try Peachy’s merguez “gork” sausage (half pork and half goat), snuggled in a bun, $6.

Debuts

The long awaited Indian restaurant, Masala Art, has arrived at 1101 Fourth St. SW…Micho’s Lebanese Grill, serving fine Middle eastern cuisine and carryout, has opened at 500 H St. NE…Capital Teas is set to open soon (if not already) at 731 Eighth St. SE. For updates visit www.capitalteas.com...Nearby, District Doughnut is arriving at 749 Eighth St. SE, next to Café Kimchi… Addis Ethiopian Restaurant debuts at 707 H St. NE.

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Green, Green Sweetgreen, the leafy restaurant chain with an offshoot at 221 Pennsylvania Ave. SE, has unveiled its umpteenth location. You’ll find it in the Twelve12 complex, the 218-unit apartment building in the heart of the Yards. Located on the corner of Fourth Masala Art, now open in Southwest, serves this lamb seekh kebab scented with jalapeno and served with mint chutney. Photo: Celeste McCall

Bistro Brunch Barracks Row’s venerable Trattoria Alberto has joined the Hill’s expanding mid-day, weekend options. Offered Saturdays and Sundays from 10:30 a.m. ‘til 3, guests may choose from favorites like smoked salmon platters, assorted omelettes, grilled steak salad, Italian (or meatball) subs, sandwiches and fruit plates, along with mimosas, bloody marys and Trattoria’s wine and beer listing. Brunch for two with a drink each is about $40 before tip. Trattoria Alberto is located at 506 Eighth St. SE; call 202-5442007 or www.trattoriaalbertodc.com.

Beyond Philly Cheese Steaks

Spike Mendelsohn has widened his empire—first to Dupont Circle, where he’s unveiled an intimate lounge with lobbyist buddy Vinoda Basnayake—then to Philadelphia, where another Good Stuff Eatery arrived at 108 S. 18th Street. Like its sister eatery in the Washington area, Philly’s Good Stuff dispenses burgers, fries and “seasonal” milk shakes. For more information visit www.goodstuffeatery.com

Coming Soon Celebrity chef Daniel Boulud, who operates several high-end restaurants in New York, is opening an outpost of his DGBG Kitchen and Bar in Washington. The latest DGBG should arrive around Labor Day at CityCenterDC, the snazzy development under construction around 10th and H streets NW, the site of the old convention center. Heading up

Serving blueberry basil lemonade outside the new Sweetgreen at Capitol Riverfront.

and Tingey SE, Sweetgreen is near Bluejacket Brewery, BUZZ Bakery, Harris Teeter and—Nationals Park.

Java Buzz Get your buzz on, because August is National Coffee Month. Celebrating the java bean is Mio Restaurant, in the Shaw neighborhood. Throughout August, Mio is creating a la carte specials showcasing 100 percent Arabica sundried coffee beans. The coffee is grown in Puerto Rico especially for this promotion. Priced from $9 to $24, coffee-infused dishes include coffee-rubbed rack of lamb with five kinds of chiles; coffee citrus-spiced cured salmon; coffee flan; café colada and Mio’s coffee espresso. Guests


host your next dinner party in

may also purchase coffee beans, priced at $12 for an 8-ounce bag. Open daily, Mio is located at 1110 Vermont Ave. NW, including for Sunday brunch. Call 202-9550075 or www.miorestaurant.com.

www.ChefNeilW ilson.com

Speaking of Coffee Congrats and best of luck to Peregrine Espresso, which is headed to Coffee Fest Portland! (Oregon), the bi-annual coffee tradeshow slated for October 17-19. Peregrine, with locations at Eastern Market, Union Market and MidCity, will vie for “DaVinci Gourmet’s America’s Best Coffeehouse.” Already declared a regional champion, Peregrine will compete with five other regional winners for the top prize of $10,000.

• • • • • • •

A diverse product line of quality beverages from all over the world One of the largest and most unique wine selections on Capitol Hill A friendly and knowledgeable staff Located just minutes form Downtown, DC and Alexandria, VA 1 block south of Eastern Market Metro on the vibrant Barracks Row Owned by the Williams Family since 1978; established before 1919

The best weekly wine tastings on “The Hill”- Sat (3-6pm)

Cooling off As Washington’s muggy, August heat envelops us, here’s a refreshing, nostalgic note from husband Peter: “I’ll admit I’m an old-fashioned tightwad,” he said. “One of my little pleasures is riding my 1958 Western Flyer bike around the Hill on Sunday afternoons. On hot days, I sometimes take a break to enjoy a refreshing Popsicle or Fudgesicle--for only 35 cents-from such small old-fashioned groceries as the Corner Market at Fourth street and East Capitol NE or Mott’s, at 12th and Gessford Court SE. A throwback to my boyhood! Thank God, you can still get something cool for less than a dollar these days--rather than spending as much as $6 for an ice cream/ gelato/frozen yogurt cone. And, for just two bucks, you can treat yourself to a generous scoop of Turkey Hill sorbet (or ice cream) in a sugar cone at Eastern Market’s Fine Sweet Shoppe. By the way, Celeste bought my beloved bike at a yard sale 35 years ago for only $4.” u

301.699.2225 ChefNeilWilson@aol.com

202.549.7422 ChefJasonLawrence@hotmail.com

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{arts and dining / wine guys}

Libations for Your Summer Celebrations

L

by Lilia Coffin

azy August is filled with long weekends, beach days, barbeques, golf, and, generally, great excuses for day drinking. The classic go-to tends to be light beer, and lots of it, but why bore your taste buds? It’s practically an insult to all the amazing summer food. There are too many outstanding alternative drinks to try that are worth just that little bit more in effort or dollars to make the last days of summer feel ideally decadent. Below, just a few;

Beer In the summer heat, you want a crisp, light, but flavorful beer. A beer that doesn’t take itself too seriously, but with more to entertain the taste buds than a Bud Light could ever hope to offer. Now, one could go the hoppy citrusy route, and try out the Mikkeller Single Hops; five beers, five singular hops, (the Challenger, Galena, Bravo, Magnum, and Cluster) each offering a tweaked flavor from the last, making the complete set for a laidback Belgian IPA DIY beer tasting. Usually $6.99 a bottle, it’s just $40 for a case. There’s also the softer, more malt-driven La Gambiere Ambre and Blonde for when you want a beer to soothe the burn of hot wings while still giving off silky floral notes and nutty fruit. The British Oakham Ales: Inferno, Citra, and Scarlet Macaw, are for those who want to drink all day (only 4% alcohol), but who still want to feel fireworks on their tongues. Bright citrus, hops, and fruit burst out of these big bottle beers.

Wine Wine for summer? Yes! Bright crisp whites beat a beer any day for refreshment and smoky reds pair better with a barbecue’s burgers and grilled steak. Portuguese Vinho Verde means ‘green wine’ because of just how zesty its effervescent citrus can be. Las Lilas Vinho Verde is the perfect example of this, with lemon lime notes and just a hint of minerals. Gruner Veltliner from Austria shares the delicate body, but with green apple, pear,

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and flowers, and for that try Green Gruner Veltliner; a burst of spring perfect for pairing with late summer. Barbecuing any kind of meat calls for a red, but the heat nixes anything too heavy or soft. Tannins, medium body, a bit of peppery spice, all make for a perfect wine for grilled meat. The Syrah and Grenache of Raspail-Ay Gigondas from the Rhone is ideal. Dry Creek Cabernet Sauvignon has the tannins and body, but with a hint of earth that complements grilled veggies too. Barrique Cellars Syrah is denser but with enough blackberry and pepper to round out the perfect steak dinner.

Liquor and Cocktails For Margaritas, Mojitos, and Manhattans, good liquor is required, and the big names just can’t offer the nuance that smaller producers can. Good tequila doesn’t have to be expensive, as Zapopan’s pure agave recipe proves at $20, and it’s ideal for filling a pitcher. When sipping alone, bring out the limited production single barrel Herencia Mexicana; Blanco, reposado or anejo, all are smoother and more complex than you ever believed a tequila could be. The best rum we’ve found, Silver or Dark, aged or young, has been Vizcaya. It’s almost too good to be mixed. For bourbon, single barrel and age are harder and harder to come by… except for right now when we have Schneider’s select single barrels of Elmer T. Lee, Eagle Rare 10 Year, Four Roses Barrel Strength, Jefferson’s Reserve, Dickel, and many more soon to arrive. Mix them in a cocktail if you must, but an ice cube and a sunset is all I take with my whiskey. Please consider these simply as suggestions for the next time you’re out in search of drinks for your August get-togethers. All I ask, really, is that when you choose what you are bringing to your buddy’s this summer, you think outside the beer fridge. Lilia Coffin is a Wine Consultant at Schneider’s of Capitol Hill. www.cellar.com. u


Rated One of the Best Wine Shops by Washingtonian Magazine July “Best & Worst” Issue Listed in the Wall Street journal as one of the most enjoyable places to shop for wines nationwide. “Best Website Award”, 2008 by the Wine Spectator’s Market Watch

Voted “Best Liquor Store” and “Best Wine Selection” an unprecedented FIVE years in a row by the City Paper

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Chateau La Moutete Grande Reserve Provence Rose ...................... $19.99 Argot Couture Rose- Sonoma ..................................................... $19.99 Barrique Cellars Sauvignon Blanc- Santa Ynez .............................. $24.99 Los Haroldos Chardonnay- Argentina ........................................... $9.99 Wohlmuth Sauvignon Blanc Steinriegel- Austria ............................ $39.99 Wohlmuth Gelber Muskateller Steinriegel- Austria.......................... $29.99 Cornarea Roero Arneis- Piedmonte .............................................. $22.99 Toluca Lane Pinot Noir- Oregon .................................................. $39.99 Domaine Drouhin Pinot Noir- Oregon ........................................... $39.99 Onix Classic Priorat .................................................................. $24.99 Maimai Merlot Malbec- New Zealand .......................................... $19.99 Bob’s Special Delivery (Cabernet-Merlot-Shiraz)-S. Africa................ $14.99

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T H I S M O N T H! “One of the Best Wine Stores in the Country is Right Here on Capitol Hill” SELECTION The country’s most complete range of spirits, beer & wine. Our old and rare wine list is the most extensive anywhere, and it’s in your neighborhood. PRICING We will not be undersold. Come see for yourself. SERVICE Second to none, with seven full time wine specialists to assist you. Come in and be treated like family!

View descriptions of the wines at www.cellar.com

300 Massachusetts Ave., NE • www.cellar.com 1-800-377-1461 • 202-543-9300 • fax: 202-546-6289

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(202) 425-7262 Helping Families & Individuals Enjoy Healthy Lives

August 2014 H 101


{arts and dining / movies}

Sun-drenched Southern France and Gloomy Hamburg

Settings for Woody Allen’s Latest and for a Le Carré Adaptation by Mike Canning Magic in the Moonlight With “Magic in the Moonlight,” Woody Allen continues his Magical Mystery Tour of European locales begun almost ten years ago with “Match Point.” He returns to European settings because he gets financing more easily there than from a Hollywood studio. His most successful foreign incursion was his paean to the French capital in “Midnight in Paris” (2011). This time he takes a dip in the waters of Southern France. The story is a trifle (meaning that sweet dessert as much as the word itself) but flushed in the golden glow of the French Riviera (The film, which opened on July 25th, runs 97 min. and is rated “PG-13”). Stanley Crawford (Colin Firth) is a renowned English magician famous for his disappearing elephant trick. He is contacted by a colleague, Howard Barkan (Simon McBurney), who tells him of a young American medium making a splash in France with well-off sponsors. Barkan, who has witnessed the girl’s powers, invites the skeptical Stanley to witness the prowess of Sophie Baker (Emma Stone) and to try to debunk her. Posing as a businessman, Stanley inveigles himself into the company of a well-off family headed by Grace Catledge (Jacki Weaver), desperate to commune with her dead husband, and her feckless son Brice (Hamish Linklater). Brice is besotted with Sophie, who is tightly chaperoned by her mother (Marcia

Gay Harden). These, and others, are treated to Sophie’s séances, where even the doubting Stanley cannot find a flaw in her performance, so much so that he begins to question his lifelong dismissal of the afterlife and all religions. His newfound desire to believe even leads him to pray for the life of his beloved Aunt Vanessa (Eileen Atkins), injured in an accident. But has he just created another illusion for himself? This is Woody doing period again—the time is 1928—and the décor, the clothes, the cars, the settings all are exquisite, as is the music, which, with classic pop songs and lively jazz band numbers, sweetly evokes the epoch. The period feel, along with much of the bantering dialogue, suggests, at best, early Noel Coward and his tart love comedies. Stanley’s character brings to mind master magician/debunker Harry Houdini (who died in 1926). Finally, however, the sum of the clever details and the lush settings do not add up to a fully satisfactory whole. For a famous debunker, for example, Stanley seems way too easily swayed by what looks like a rather conventional, uncomplicated séance. This makes the conversion away from cynicism to belief too facile. While Allen has a talented cast, few are fully drawn, so fine character actresses like Harden and Weaver have thin roles that do not resonate. This leaves one to focus on the principals. Colin Firth is ideal for the caustic, brilliant conjurer, and he mostly holds his own. As is so often the case, of course, he’s that Allen protagonist who represents the dark views (and obsessions) of the director himself, such as an unknowable God and the futility of human hope, yet here he does it with a confident exterior. His co-star, Emma Stone as Sophie, offers some wide-eyed charm and occasional wit, but her character lacks the weight and pith to fully contest her antagonist. One other familiar Allen trope surfaces again: a much older male lead romancing the new hot actress (the nebbish’s wish fulfillment). Woody himself did it so many times (memorably with “Manhattan” in 1979) but more recently, too, and creepier, in “Whatever Works” (2009) with 61-year-old Larry David wooing Evan Rachel Wood (then 21). In “Magic in the Moonlight” Firth is twice as old as Stone (53 to 25) so, you could say, Woody is working that age difference again. However, this time, Colin Firth is so urbane and dashing that you can hardly blame young Emma for succumbing to his charms.

A Most Wanted Man

Colin Firth and Emma Stone in “Magic in the Moonlight.” Photo by Jack English © 2014 Gravier Productions, Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

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“A Most Wanted Man” will be remembered as the last lead film role that Philip Seymour Hoffman ever played (he has a featured role in two upcoming “Hunger Games” films). This great movie actor, who died of a drug overdose last February, stars as the head of a special antiterrorist unit of German intelligence based in Hamburg, a unit which is trying to trace a major threat to his country. That film is based on a


WIDE SHOE OUTLET Men’s and Women’s sizes up to 15 EE Brands: Naturalizer • Soft Spots Ros Hommerson • Propet Walking Cradles • Easy Street Slingshots are Back the case—all tumble toward a tense and suitably bleak ending. Even with its North American leads, “A Most Wanted Man” is very much a European film, directed by Anton Corbijn, a Dutchman, and adapted for the screen by Andrew Bovell, an Australian, peopled with a slew of German character actors, and shot on location in Hamburg. It also unfolds very much in the spirit of Le Carré’s novels, showPhilip Seymour Hoffman stars in “A Most Wanted Man.” Photo Credit: Kerry Brown; Courtesy of Roadside Attractions ing the painstaking, even grubby work full of detours and compromises occarecent (2008) novel of the same name by the sionally justifi ed by a half-hearted appeal to a master spy writer, John Le Carré, and Hoffman higher purpose. A good bit of the grubbiness gives it all he’s got (This film is rated “R” and comes across in Hoffman’s characterization of runs 122 min.). Bachman, an unkempt, solitary man—bit of a The convoluted plot is triggered by the ardrinker—in a shabby overcoat and ever wary rival in Hamburg of an illegal Chechen immilook. Hoffman pulls off this type with ease, and grant Issa Karpov (Grigoriy Dobrygin) who is also invests his protagonist with skills in dogged at first sheltered by a Turkish family and later detail work, good instincts, and a fi erce dedicomes to be represented by an idealistic immication to his tight-knit team. It is a fi ne swan gration lawyer Annabel Richter (Rachel McAdsong for the actor. ams). Hoffman, as spy man Günther Bachman, I emphasized that it was a “European” has a hunch that Karpov’s presence will lead to fi lm because it differs so from what a standard bigger fish, including an outspoken Arab paciUS production would have done with this fist Dr. Abdullah (Homayoun Ershadi) who may same material. It sticks closely to the dense, be involved in funding terror groups. Karpov’s urgent storytelling of Le Carré’s novel; it dismotives are scrutinized also because he states he plays no love interests, provides no car chases must make contact with a major Hamburg bankor explosions, avoids over hyped music, and er Tommy Brue (Willem Dafoe), implying the shows Hamburg’s mean streets, not its touristy prospect of some kind of financial deal. ones. And that makes it that much more efBachman, working with his crack team fective as a spy tale. led by his assistant Nina Haas (Irna Frey) and Le Carré himself and two of his sons were tech whiz Max (Daniel Brühl), must contend producers on the film, so my guess is that the also with the head of local domestic intelliformer David Cornwell is quite pleased with gence Dieter Mohr (Rainer Bock), eager to the result. simply make arrests rather than letting Bachman and company gain crucial intelligence by stalking the suspects. Adding an extra spin is the presence of Martha Sullivan (Robin Wright), a Berlin-based CIA officer also interested in pursuing the case. The hiding of Karpov, the possible compromising of Annabel, the time pressure on Bachman to close

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Hill resident Mike Canning has written on movies for the Hill Rag since 1993 and is a member of the Washington Area Film Critics Association. He is the author of “Hollywood on the Potomac: How the Movies View Washington, DC.” His reviews and writings on film can be found online at www. mikesflix.com. u

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the

LITERARY HILL

A Compendium of Readers, Writers, Books, & Events

by Karen Lyon

A local eco-friendly publisher inspires kids to recycle creatively.

A local tour guide offers his expertise at planning family-friendly outings.

Family Guide to DC If you’re wondering what to do with the kids next weekend, wonder no more—Chris Sylvester has got you covered. He has kindly packed all the wisdom he’s accrued giving family-friendly tours since 2006 into “The DC Capital Kids Family Guide to Washington, D.C.” Locals and tourists alike will appreciate the guide, which includes all the memorials and monuments, museums and historic sites, parks and gardens, festivals, sports and performing arts venues in the metropolitan DC area. Each write-up includes a brief description of the site as well as essential information on getting there, getting in, and finding a place to eat nearby. In addition, Sylvester has designed scavenger hunts for every site with questions tailored to specific age groups. At more than 400 pages, this com-

prehensive guide gives you everything you need to plan the best DC family outing ever—including where to find the nearest bathroom. Chris Sylvester owns the tour company, D.C. Capital Kids, which specializes in private customized tour for families and groups visiting the nation’s capital. For more, visit www.dccapitalkids.com.

Washington A to Z

Local author Laura Krauss Melmed runs the gamut in her book for young readers, “Capital! Washington D.C. from A to Z.” From the [A]ir and Space Museum and the [C]apitol to the [R]oosevelt Memorial and the National [Z]oo, each letter of the alphabet highlights a capital attraction. Melmed introduces each entry with a charming poem and tucks facts about the site in among Frané Lessac’s delightful, folk-like illustrations. A colorful map plots the locations by letter throughout the DC area. Recommended for grades 3-5, “Capital!” would make a wonderful souvenir of a memorable trip to Washington—or could serve as an impetus to inspire your favorite child to come visit. Laura Melmed is the author of many award-winning children’s books, including the interactive “Doodle Washington D.C.” Find her at www.childrensbookguild.org/ Laura Melmed takes kids melmed.html. on an alphabetic tour of the nation’s capital.

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One Man’s Trash The newest offering from Green Kids Press, a DC publisher devoted to eco-friendly books for kids, has already won a Mom’s Choice Award, and it’s easy to see why. “The Bicycle Fence,” written by Tom Noll and illustrated by Brandon Fall, is the story of Little Tommy, who becomes known as L.T. when he starts outgrowing his clothes—and his bike. L.T.’s dad is such a fan of recycling that his truck is a patchwork of multicolored parts, so when he takes L.T. to the salvage yard to find parts to make him a new bike, L.T.’s heart sinks: “He hoped his bicycle wouldn’t turn out the same way.” Happily, Mom comes to the rescue—and even inspires L.T. to a further burst of creative recycling. “The Bicycle Fence” includes loads of tips for young readers on how to save the planet and invites them to join L.T.’s Recycling Club at www. LTsRecyclingWorld.com. The original L.T., Tom Noll is an artist and recycler who was known for the white bicycle fence he installed when he lived in Manassas, Virginia. For more, visit www.greenkidspress.com.

The Wheelbarrow Puppy Club Who wouldn’t fall for a wheelbarrow full of adorable puppies? But few would tumble as hard as Hill author Christina Valenti, who not only rescued one of the pups, but brought her home to


DC all the way from China. Valenti recounts her experience in her debut children’s book, “The Wheelbarrow Puppy Club.” Told from the point of view of Wu (“five” in Chinese), the story begins on the streets of Beijing, where the puppies huddle together in a wheelbarrow while a “cold, harsh wind ruffled their fur.” Wu and her companion San (“three”) fear that they are “destined for a winter in the wheelbarrow,” when a man and woman stop by and pick one up. And just like that, Wu has a new home, a new name and, eventually, Who could leave a new country. But she still an adorable puppy behind in China? Not thinks of San and hopes that Christina Valenti. he has a happy life, too. Winsome illustrations by DM Eason complement the text and make you want to adopt the whole wheelbarrow-full of big-eyed puppies. Valenti is currently working on the next book in the Puppy Club series. Visit her at www.christinamvalenti.com.

More Hill Books for Young Readers Katy Kelly’s series of books featuring Lucy Rose and Melonhead have been delighting local kids for years. Her latest, “Melonhead and the We-Fix-It Company,” will be out in paperback in October and a brand new adventure is scheduled for publication next spring. Visit her at www. katykellyauthor.com Platypus Media (www.platypusmedia.com) has recently re-released its signature title by Dia Michels, “If My Mom Were a Platypus: Mammal Babies and Their Mothers,” which was recommended by the National Science Teachers Association. Michels is also the force behind Science, Naturally!, a local publisher of award-winning books on science and math for young readers (www. sciencenaturally.com). Young adults can keep it local with a number of home-grown books: the “War of the Seasons” series by Janine K. Spendlove, about a magical world called Ailionora (www.ailionora.com); James L. Swanson’s exciting historical accounts of the Lincoln and JFK

assassinations; and Anna McCormally’s fantasy adventure, “The Six Days,” published locally by Giant Squid Books (www.giantsquid.com).

Also for Kids on the Hill The venerable Fairy Godmother at 319 7th St SE offers a huge selection of books, plus the expertise to help you choose just the right title. Look for many of the books above, as well as Lawrence Yep’s American Girl series featuring Isabelle, a young dancer who lives in D.C. The Playseum at 545 8th St SE (www.playseum. com) carries a variety of books, both used and new, to read there or purchase and take home with you. You can even create your own book at the Build-a-Book Workshop. Used books for kids can be found at Capitol Hill Books, 657 C St SE (www.capitolhillbooks.com) or Riverby Books, 417 E Capitol St SE (www.riverbybooks.com). And don’t forget the Southeast and Northeast Neighborhood Libraries (www.dclibrary. org), which offer reading times and other programs for kids and families.

This Month on the Hill Authors of books for all ages will be at the Library of Congress’s annual National Book Festival at the Convention Center, Aug. 30, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. www.loc. gov/bookfest/. The Literary Hill BookFest Reading Series presented by the DC Public Library features Louis Bayard, author of “Roosevelt’s Beast,” Aug. 19, 7 p.m., Northeast Neighborhood Library, northeastlibrary@ dc.org, 202-698-0058.

The Lyon’s Share Dear readers, have you been following the news about students who want to get a heads-up on potentially troubling content in books they’re assigned to read? They call these “trigger warnings”—although “spoiler alert” seems more like it—and insist that, without them, they might get very upset indeed. Goodness, what if there’s a rape or a murder or—eek!—a suicide? Lest we expose the poor dears to such trauma-byproxy, I guess we’ll have to forget about teaching Shakespeare—as well as Flaubert, Tolstoy, Virginia Woolf, and pretty much the rest of the literary canon. But if they can’t handle even fictional reality, what does that leave? Oh, you delicate young people—that would be such stuff as dreams are made on. u

THE POETIC HILL

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iana McLellan (1937-2014) was an award-winning journalist who wrote the Washington gossip column the Ear in the 1970s and ‘80s. She was also the author of three books: “Ear on Washington,” “The Girls: Sappho Goes to Hollywood,” and “Making Hay,” a book of poems from which the selection below is taken. She died on June 25, leaving many grieving friends on Capitol Hill.

WHEN IT’S MY TURN When it’s my turn to rush toward the light, I’ll pack my pockets tightly for the run And squeeze among bright scraps of past delight, Epiphanies and moments in the sun The love of friends and other loves I’ve known, Beauty of waters, trees and streets and skies; A kiss of fame; ecstatic work alone; Familiar chatter; music; laughing eyes; Small children’s trusting hands; all questing talks, Old women’s wisdom; swimming turquoise sea; Stars, wine and candles after winter walks; Joy in the blood—all these, I’ll take with me. Back on sweet earth’s beloved pulsing heap I’ll leave betrayal, guile, and pain—to sleep. If you would like to have your poem considered for publication, please send it to klyon@literaryhillbookfest.org (There is no remuneration.) u

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{arts and dining / art}

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t could be a question, a suggestion, or a statement. It’s up to you. Fatima Argun brings colors and forms together to begin the conversation. The painting is intended to be interactive, a dialog between you and the canvas. Even the titles could begin a discussion: “Four Heads are Better Than One.” “Free to Be.” “Gathering My Thoughts.” It all starts with color. Fatima is looking for movement and dynamics. She listens to jazz as she paints to get a sense of how the colors look and “sound” together. Or she might paint to the intricate classical compositions of Bach or to African drums. If you look closely, and listen, you might hear the rhythms and the tone in each work. Fatima works intuitively. Each work begins with spontaneity. “It comes from the heart. I wouldn’t know any other way

to work.” It can derive from ordinary things, something in her immediate surroundings— colors in a certain pattern, or objects in the environment. It could be the celebration of nature expressed in poetry, “primarily Rumi.” Fatima Argun grew up in Michigan and has degrees from the University of Texas and an MBA in public policy from Johns Hopkins. She has worked and traveled throughout the world, but keeps coming back to the Washington area. She likes the vibrant, inclusive nature of the art world here. She has shown extensively and has been in every ArtOMatic since 2000. Her work is primarily “abstract,” but there is an intuitive life force that you can share to create your own images. You can see, and invent, any reality—anything you want. That’s what makes Fatima Argun happy. See more of her work at www.gallerie21.com, and look for upcoming shows.

by Jim Magner Jim Magner’s Thoughts on Art

artandthecity

Artist Portrait: Fatima Argun

Looking at art is as powerful as the original act of creation itself. A work of art is never finished until you look at it—you make it complete in your own way. Once the images are in your head, they belong to you. Your mind can do anything it wants with them. They are knocked about by your cultural heritage, your experiences and even your mood. The artwork has a meaning that you now share with the artist. That’s why looking at art is so individual. If you are drawn to a work at all, you can be pulled into a visual conversation, but you have to really look, and listen. Sometimes the message is deep, profound and even sad, but often it is just a statement of joy about a place, a time or color. For me, the conversations work best when I am standing at arm’s length of an original work, not a picture of it. It’s the human-to-human translation. I am standing right where Rembrandt, Turner or Van Gogh stood, and thought, and questioned. It is as if I can follow every brush stroke and share the decisions deliberately made. Something happens— it’s like I can tap into their vision, their doubts, and at last, their acceptance as they finally turn away. It now belongs to us—the both of us. That is what makes looking at art so powerful. And it is why a finger painting by a three year old has more intrinsic value than a reproduction of the Mona Lisa. The ultimate conversation with the artist comes when you own a work of art. Perceptions and meanings are joined and a

From left: Tangerine Era The Blue Escape Any Which Way

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bond is created. It’s now a part of your life. Together you fashion a parallel intangible reality.

At the Museums “Andrew Wyeth: Looking Out, Looking In” National Gallery of Art - West Bld. 7th and Constitution NW – Nov. 30 Andrew Wyeth, 1917-2009, is one of the best-known and publically loved painters of 20th century America. His works in tempura and watercolor always contained a quiet, lonely loveliness, and were often sentimental at a time when many, if not most, prominent artists and critics rejected, and often despised those qualities. This major exhibition focuses on Wyeth’s fascination with windows, which he described as beginning in the summer of 1947, and includes some 60 works on paper. As usual, the gallery’s curators provide insights regarding his craft as well as his vision. You can read the excellent explanations and analysis, or you can stand in the middle of the room and turn in a circle and discover where you eye lands first in each composition—the focal point. It is usually the brightest spot on the canvas, but sometimes it is the darkest. Check out his use of diagonals as well as secondary focal points to move your eye around the picture. Degas/Cassatt National Gallery of Art - West Bld. 7th and Constitution NW – Oct. 5 The other major show at the NGA is Degas/ Cassatt. Mary Cassatt is closely associated with Degas, with whom she painted and grew as an artist, but had a reciprocal influence on his work as well. That influence is not well understood, and is closely examined in this exhibit. It includes over 70 works in a variety of media. Again the curators provide “groundbreaking technical analysis” and much historic information, but just wandering through, looking at these great works can alone be worth it. The two-way “Influence” is there certainly, but Degas is always Degas, and Cassatt is always softer and warmer.

At the Galleries “This Place Has a Voice” Various Capitol Hill Locations

Culminating Sept 20. Three projects are being developed independently, but will converge and become one celebration—one festival—on Sept 20, in and around the Capitol Riverfront and Canal Park (located between the baseball stadium and the Navy Yard). The three projects, which have been several years in development, are: The Cube at Canal Park; Capitol Hill Alphabet Animal Project; and Then and Now. Bruce McKaig, of the Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, is the project administrator and lead artist. For complete explanation and timetable: www.thisplacehasavoice.info.

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Juried Show Hill Center at Old Naval Hospital 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE -- Sept. 28 Over 50 artists from the DC, Virginia, and Maryland area have their works on display, featuring a wide array of mediums and subjects. Philip Kennicott, Art & Architecture Critic at The Washington Post, juried the exhibition. For a list of award winners and other information, see www.hillcenterdc.org. “Zenith Zoo” Zenith Gallery Presents 1111 Pennsylvania Ave., NW – Aug. 30 “Zenith Zoo: Artistic Interpretations of our Planetary Partners” is a fun show that has serious implications for the appreciation of animals. It runs through August and includes the interpretations of over ten Zenith artists. You will find almost every artistic medium, and subjects to laugh with, and some to simply admire. www.zenithgallery.com. American Painting Fine Art 5118 MacArthur Blvd., NW Washington, D.C. 20016 -- Sept. 27 “Images of Washington“ by over 20 members of the Washington Society of Landscape Painters delivers just that, “plein air” works by the region’s prominent society of outdoor painters. These are recent works that capture the city streets and parks as we all experience them. www.classicamericanpainting.com. u

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{arts and dining / music}

P roject by Jean-Keith Fagon

Thoughts of A Jazz Lover Jazz can be enigmatic, an alchemy of mysterious sounds and moods that is spontaneous and yet deliberate in its free flowing creativity. The music can be complex, but good jazz feels as simple as first love—it goes straight to the heart and rests there, beating gently. At times, the music can be so life-like that it speaks to you with honesty and love. One still gets a keen sense of understanding of the complexity of the music. There is such a high note of haughtiness, perhaps a sort of natural aristocracy from a kind of inbred austerity about jazz that puts it in a class by itself, elevating one to a higher ground of one’s consciousness. It almost borders on elitism, and yet jazz strikes one as a beautiful music for everyone. And it is, especially for those of us who not only enjoy but truly love the music. True, most good jazz musicians more than likely think of jazz as the arbiter of modern music. And on a good day, I think they are correct. You can walk in your door after a hard day’s work and a harrowing Metro ride, put on Sarah Vaughn and your world is transformed. Your mind clears, your body relaxes and suddenly life is pretty good. There’s no drug in the world that can do that. Jazz is beautiful music.

Outset ••• Itamar Borochov Quartet, RealBird Exploration is a hallmark of jazz, one that makes the music so fascinating and intriguing when musicians dare to push the boundaries. Jazz can make you feel happy, sexy, reflective, even sad, but the best of jazz is an exploration into the soul. Such is “Outset,” Itamar Borochov’s in-

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triguing new album. The first track of Outset, “Pain Song,” is a whopping 12:42 minutes of mind-explosive music, breathtaking in scope, taste, and musical passion. “Samsara” is another sensational joie de vivre of ecstatic deliverance into a never-ending world of “let’s see how long we can ride this one.” Also noted are “Boston Love Affair,” “Ovidia,” and “One for Uzi.” This is the kind of jazz that is prepared for those who are already in the zone, meaning in the mood for that unexpected sweet surprise. This is a jazz album worthy of recognition for its brilliance in so many avenues. Credits should be given to Itamar Borochov (trumpet), Hagai Air (alto sax), Avri Borochov (bass), and Aviv Cohen (drums).

Silver Soul ••• Kim Waters, Red River Entertainment Saxophonist Kim Waters’ urban contemporary album contains a wealth of R&B vocals and sultry grooves that explore the attraction, courtship, intimacy, aphorism and mystique of love. The album showcases eight songs that Mr. Waters wrote and a pair of R&B vocal tunes that he co-wrote including “Anything You Need” featuring his wife, Dana Pope, and “Laying Beside Me” highlighting the melodious voice of Eric Roberson. A tandem of compelling covers – a soprano sax take of John Legend’s hit “All Of Me” and “Fireflies,” illuminated by a stunning lead vocal by Zendaya – completes the session. Love and romance has been Mr. Waters’ focus throughout

a productive and successful recording career that began with 1989’s Sweet & Saxy. Over the years Mr. Waters has racked up a trove of hits including 14 No. 1 singles, four No. 1 albums, 16 Top Ten singles and crossover sets that have logged time on the Billboard 200, urban, contemporary jazz, Heatseekers and Top Independent Albums charts.

Slam Dunk ••• Gerald Albright, Concord Music The new album, Slam Dunk, from Gerald Albright is a summer of a blockbuster smooth jazz. A bright, new day begins with “True Colors,” making the music a kind of pied piper for everyone. “Because Of You” flows with that loving, trademark sweetness of his saxophone, followed a poignant and powerful rendition of “It’s A Man’s, Man’s, Man’s World.” On “Where Did We Go Wrong?” we get the full story about love from the rich, soft-rock ballad-style voice of Peabo Bryson. “Fiesta Interlude” is cause for celebration and dancing. The final cut, “Gospel,” is Mr. Albright reminding us that in the end we have only ourselves to trust and be kind to each other. All CDs and DVDS reviewed in this article are heard through Bowers & Wilkens Nautilus 801 speakers and ASW 4000 subwoofer, and Rotel Preamp 1070, amplifier 1092 and CD player 1072. B&W speakers are now available at Magnolia, Best Buys (703.518.7951) and IQ Home Entertainment (703.218.9855). CDs are available for purchase through amazon.com For more information about this column, please email your questions to fagon@ hillrag.com. u


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{health & fitness} Learning How to Cook and Eat Well Through Storytelling

T

wenty Hill children and parents spent a week this summer learning how to prepare simple healthful meals using whole fresh foods. They created ethnic dishes, cooked with foods from different countries and learned about the countries where the foods came from. They were part of the Family Cooking Summer Camp Workshop designed to teach parents and children the value of healthful nutrition, to develop healthful eating habits, to provide basic training in food safety and preparation and to stimulate the children to learn more about diet and nutrition. Vera Oye Yaa-Anna, a culinary storyteller and nutrition educator from Liberia in West Africa, teamed up with the Polite Piggy Day Camp organization that runs the Maury and Tyler after-school programs, to give participants a unique perspective on preparing a meal. “I teach the African tradition of culinary storytelling, not just cooking. Most dishes we prepared were international ethnic dishes from places such a Jamaica, Mexico, Africa and Caribbean countries.” Vera designed her program with parents as participants because, she said, “Both parents and children will reap many benefits of cooking together.” Not only do they learn how to cook but

by Pattie Cinelli

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Children preparing a green salad. Parent cooking with the tiny chefs. The most attentive chef. Student chefs get ready to eat their hand-made pizzas.

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Summer’s here. It’s the perfect time to get fit! Partner with Pattie Cinelli to get in shape • Feel and look good • Learn how to lose weight without dieting • Find an exercise program you enjoy and that works • Learn techniques to release stress • Schedule a wellness consultation to learn your options • Schedule a single, partner or group session in your home, office, Results the Gym or Lavender Retreat

Pattie has 30 years in the fitness business. Her knowledge, her experience and her caring will help you meet your health and fitness goals.

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they also develop reading and math skills, experiment with ingredients, try new foods, learn cause and effect and develop proper dining etiquette.” Vera teaches the difference between whole foods and processed foods. She drinks water and discourages soda consumption. She said she believes that making time to eat dinner as a family is a natural outcome of cooking together. Camp participants cooked with yucca and plantain and cooked jerk chicken and fufu (looks like dumplings). Vera said a particular favorite dish was egusi which is made from dried melon seeds (cantaloupe, watermelon, honeydew) that are pounded into a flour base. They also made coconut candy, rice bread and corn bread. Vera said she gives an in-depth explanation of the foods they use. It is a “hands-on” experience for all. They feel, taste and smell the food. “I share the many ways one food can be used.” For example, she used coconut. It can be used to make bread, candy, chicken, water, sugar and milk. “Once they see how it can be used they have a better appreciation and understanding for that food. They take a culinary journey to other countries, which truly intrigues them.” The last day of camp culminated with a feast. Parents attended and children performed an African dance. Vera’s company, Oye’ Palaver Hut, Inc. is a non profit West African culinary theatre that is fashioned after the cultural hub of West African villages. “Palaver is a place that every village has where we go to entertain guests, settle disputes and come together with people to tell stories. It is like a town center.” Vera has been in DC since 1997. She started teaching children to cook in 1998 at the former Friendship House where she began her pro-

gram telling stories. “In Africa, food is a huge part of storytelling.” This is the third grant Vera has received from Capitol Hill Community Foundation for her summer camp. Last year she said, when talking about how some Africans hunt for their food, one child thought Washingtonians hunted for theirs in Rock Creek Park. “I laughed until I cried,” she said. In past camps Vera took kids to volunteer one day at Martha’s Table. “I wanted them to include outreach to other children in the community.” She also brought them to shop at Eastern Market. This fall Vera will have her own TV show on a DC cable TV station. “Many years ago Americans ate as a family. I want to help create our own rituals, even if it’s just one day a week.” She also wants to demonstrate how families can be more thoughtful about meals and and make dining special with just a little effort. “Stop eating on paper plates and use table clothes. I want to show how you don’t have to use expensive things. You can buy dishes at a thrift store. I also want the audience to learn an appreciation for the food they are eating.” Vera will also be holding her after school culinary storytelling workshops as part of the after school programs this fall at Tyler and Maury Elementary schools. She welcomes visitors to these programs. Interested observers can contact Vera at: oyepalaver11@verizon.net. To learn more about Vera’s programs or to contact her, log onto her website at: www.oyepalaverhut.org. Pattie Cinelli is a fitness professional who offers clients a way to incorporate health, fitness and fun through her mind/body/balance programs. She has been writing her health/fitness column for more than 25 years. To contact Pattie email her at: fitness@pattiecinelli.com. u


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{health and fitness / food}

Yes,

I Can and You Can Too!

Can,

Peaches abound at Eastern Market.

Preserving Summer’s Bounty Article and Photos by Catherine Plume

E

astern Market is overflowing with locally grown peaches, tomatoes, green beans and squash of every imaginable shape and color. If only we could pack away some of these goods for those dark days of January and February, I kept thinking. For several years I’ve been intrigued by the idea of canning fruits and vegetables, but vaguely remembered tales of exploding jars and illness from eating improperly preserved goods kept me at bay. Then last year I decided to give it a try. If generations of women had successfully nourished their families on home-canned food, I figured I could, too. According to PickYourOwn.com, Napolean is credited with inventing modern canning as in 1795 the French military offered a cash prize for a new method to preserve food. Nicolas Appert suggested canning and the process was proven in 1806 using a glass jar, a tin lid, and sealing wax. In 1858, John Mason invented a threaded glass jar with a removable sealing lid, and in 1886, the Ball family began producing glass fruit jars. In 1903, Alexander Kerr developed the wide-mouthed glass jars and a flat metal disk rimmed with a rubber gasket flat and held in place by a threaded metal ring – the same canning system that is widely used today. Ball and Kerr jars are now produced by the same company and are essentially the same.

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Tools of the Trade

Canning is taking on renewed popularity, and canning equipment is readily available. Frager’s stocks jars in a variety of sizes and shapes along with essential canning tools at their E Street location while Hill’s Kitchen carries canning pots. Basic tools you’ll need include: • A canning pot deep enough to submerge glass jars for prep and waterbath; • A rack to rest jars on to keep them from breaking during the waterbath; • A jar lifter for getting jars in and out of hot water; • A wide mouth funnel to fill jars without making a huge mess. • A canning lid wand to get lids out of hot water;

Jars and lids and rims appropriate for what you’ll be canning. While there are some short cuts (you can set jars on a dishtowel during the waterbath to keep them from breaking) these tools will help ensure that your canning experience is safe and renders a quality product that you can proudly and confidently share with your family and friends. Canning is work, and with the food prep and waterbaths, it’s hot work. Here are a few tips to make your canning experience more fun. • Set aside at least three hours of time for canning. Between food prep, jar sterilization and processing, there are a lot of moving parts to a canning operation and you’ll need to focus on the task at hand. • Only can one product at a time. Don’t try to can peaches and tomatoes on the same day. Think twice before attempting to make sweet pickles and dill pickles on the same day. • Don’t get carried away with canning large quantities. While there’s some economy of scale, honestly, what will you do with 17 pints of pickles? • Think about what you’re canning and the size and shape of jar you want for your goods ahead of time, and have the quantity you need on hand before you start to can. A quart of peach


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preserves is a lot of peach preserves, so smaller jars might be more appropriate (and better for gifts). On the other hand, a quart of canned tomatoes can be perfect for those winter soups. Wide mouth jars are easier to fill. • Take instructions on processing food VERY seriously. Prepare jars and lids according to directions. While the jars and rims can be reused, DON’T reuse lids on another batch of canned goods. If a lid will move up and down after its set for an hour after processing, don’t store the jar. You can eat the food immediately or refrigerate. • Date and describe your jars as you store them. Six months from now, applesauce and pear preserves will start to look similar and you’ll want to be able to tell them apart. So how do you know how much produce to buy and how many jars it will yield? While there are a plethora of recipes, I’m partial to the experts. Ball has an excellent online recipe guide at www.freshpreserving.com. They also publish books that contain a wide variety of recipes and information on canning. Nowadays, strawberries are available year round, and while eating California or even Chile strawberries in January is acceptable, I’d rather be eating local berries, even if they’re canned. Canning allows you to learn about and take advantage of our local growing season. While the growing season for local strawberries and blueberries is past, August is prime season for peaches, tomatoes, and peppers – and apple season is just around the corner. I can’t wait! Catherine Plume is the Blogger for the DC Recycler, www.dcrecycler. blogspot.com; @dc_recycler on Twitter u

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s a child, I was a voracious reader. One of my favorite books was “All Creatures Great and Small” by James Herriot. For those of you who are unfamiliar with the book, it follows the adventures of a veterinarian in rural England in the 1930’s. As enthralling as I found the stories, I am thankful that veterinary medicine has come so far since then. The level of care we as modern veterinarians are able to provide to our patients is unprecedented. Pets are living longer than ever before, which is wonderful. However, as a pet owner, there are some challenges in senior pets that can put stress on the human animal bond. The focus of this article is on our canine friends since my colleague, Dr. de la Cruz, wrote about senior kitties last month. My childhood dog Raven lived for 17 years. I feel so fortunate that I had him from elementary school until I graduated from veterinary school. But the last few years of his life were marked with health issues and challenges that I did not anticipate when he was a puppy. I experienced the stress and expense of his significant medical issues and admit that I had difficulty letting him go. This experience has allowed me to compassionately relate to clients who are going through similar issue with their dogs. You, as the pet owner, know your dog better than anyone. It is important for you to recognize what is normal for your dog and what is

not. Changes in things like weight, activity level, appetite, thirst, urination and defecation can be important signs of a medical issue. Having your older dog examined by a veterinarian every 6-12 months is a great way to monitor their health and hopefully prevent small issues from becoming major issues. Checking routine blood work is also a great way to screen for some potential health issues in older dogs. Behavior changes can occur and can be the most disruptive to the human animal bond. But it is sometimes difficult to differentiate a behavioral issue from a medical issue. House soiling is commonly misinterpreted as a behavior problem in a senior dog. It is important to consider medical possibilities like a urinary tract infection or kidney disease prior to assuming it is a behavioral issue. Any condition that causes discomfort can cause irritability or aggression.


Consider environmental modifications such as providing a memory foam bed or stairs to get up on the couch or bed to help your stiff senior dog be more comfortable. My dog had both orthopedic and neurologic issues that made walking on hardwood floors almost impossible. I used yoga mats to connect the kitchen and bedroom floors to areas with carpets. I also had to block the steep staircase with a baby gate so he wouldn’t fall and hurt himself. Older dogs also need to be taken outside more often to eliminate, which can be difficult with our busy DC lives. This is an area where a dog walker could be very helpful. Aging dogs may develop a condition called cognitive dysfunction. This decline in cognitive function can cause many different clinical signs that can include confusion, depression, changes in interactions with housemates or owners, nighttime restlessness and increased anxiety. Cognitive dysfunction is a diagnosis of exclusion once other medical issues have been ruled out. There is a medication licensed to treat cognitive dysfunction in dogs called Anipryl (selegiline), which my dog Raven was on for this condition. It is up to you as the pet owner to decide what steps you are interested in taking with your dog when faced with a serious illness like cancer. For some people, they want to do the maximum diagnostic and treatment options that are available. This may include referral to a veterinary specialist, extensive diagnostics, chemotherapy and/or radiation. Specialists are a wonderful resource when you are interested in going the

extra mile with your dog. For other people, their main goal is palliative care. Either way, it can be difficult to decide which road to take. The decision to euthanize a pet is always very difficult. But I think it takes on special significance when you have an older dog and they start to develop increasingly challenging health issues. When you are faced with a sudden life or death crisis, it almost makes the decision to euthanize easier. But when your old dog is on a slow gradual decline, the decision to let go is much harder. It can be difficult to determine if you are keeping the dog alive for them or for yourself. And owners often struggle with guilt about euthanizing a beloved senior dog because their house soiling, anxiety and health issues have become overwhelming. However, it is important to recognize that the quality of life of your dog is important but so is yours as their owner. I love old dogs. Every time I see a grey muzzled sweet old dog face, I feel like I am with my dog Raven all over again. And I feel privileged to understand exactly what owners of senior dogs are going through and can help provide care and advice to them. With regular preventative veterinary care, dogs today can live happy lives into their golden years. Dr. Brittany Cartlidge is an associate veterinarian at AtlasVet (The Atlas District Veterinary Hospital) 1326 H ST NE.(202) 552-8600. Dr. Cartlidge graduated from the University of Florida School of Veterinary Medicine in 2008. u

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{home & garden} Clean Green Team Lights Up Potomac Gardens Article and photos by Cheryl Corson, RLA, ASLA

E

very two weeks during the growing season, the sound of mowers and leaf blowers fills the air in Potomac Gardens as a uniformed landscape crew makes its way through the grounds. The men maintaining these grounds are called the Clean Green Team, and most of them have lived in Potomac Gardens since they were kids. Now they are paid to care for the landscape where most of the residents know them and their families. Not only that, but some of the landscapes they now maintain were recently carved out of concrete with help from Clean Green Team personnel.

Everybody Wins Since the mid-1990s, The Little Lights Urban Ministries (http://www.littlelights.org/ ) has offered faith-based services to over one hundred children from the Potomac Gardens Public Housing Complex and the surrounding neighborhood. It is managed by husband and wife team Steve and Mary Park with the help of about 30 other full and part-time staff. The Clean Green Team is a new social enterprise of Little Lights, and has about ten members. The D.C. Housing Authority, which owns Potomac Gardens, supports the landscape maintenance through an arrangement with Little Lights Ministries. In exchange, Little Lights organizes training, purchases and maintains landscape equipment, and manages the staff and their schedule.

Kids playing ball in the new courtyard

Clean Green Team, July 2014: Left, Lawrence Dozier, Clarence Campbell, Rubin Davis. Back middle: Curtis Bates, Gary Sams, Henry Dent, Antonio Smith

Every two weeks, the Clean Green Team spends two days maintaining the grounds at Potomac Gardens and another two days maintaining the grounds of Hopkins Plaza, a nearby public housing development. They mow, trim, blow, weed, water, prune, and mulch. The crew sports uniforms, steel-toed boots, hats, safety goggles, gloves and ear protection. They get a lot of compliments on their work from residents, who are neighbors, friends, and family members. A Poolesville, Maryland, landscape contractor, D & A Dunlevy (http:// www.dadunlevy.com ), has taken the Clean Green Team under their wing, travelling down to Potomac Gardens every two weeks to hold team meetings and provide training. Angie Dunlevy, company co-founder, was a Little Lights volunteer about seven years ago. This relationship led to the mentoring role now played by Dave Dunlevy and his son Blake. They have taught the Green Team men the basics of landscape maintenance, have introduced them to safe chain saw operation, and even organized a field trip where they were given the opportunity to climb trees using ropes and harnesses. “I liked being up there,� says Clean Green Team member Clarence Campbell,

August 2014 H 119


saying he’d been a little afraid heights before.

Potomac Gardens Landscape Potomac Gardens is a series of fourteen threestory brick apartment buildings forming various courtyards around the 1200 block of G Street, SE. There are Little Lights campers with summer coordinator Dwaine Brown, about 350 units in the posing in the new Potomac Gardens courtyard. complex, built in the mid-1960s by General a success. Play areas are separated Contractor Edward M. from pedestrian circulation areas, Crough, and designed by Metcalf but both are easily visible and accesand Associates Architects. In 1971 sible. Kids can toss a football without Potomac Gardens won an Award for interfering with pedestrian traffic, Excellence in Architecture. I can’t and residents can watch what’s going say if most of the original courtyards on from their apartments overlookwere completely paved, but everying the space. “It’s real pretty around one I spoke to at Potomac Gardens here now, and it was really terrible only remembers them this way. “It before,” says resident Bonita Guerwas all concrete,” residents told me rero. ”I like to wake up and look out without affection. of my window” she continues, “EvIn recent years, D.C. Public erybody’s got a chair by their kitchHousing allocated funds for some en window.” Ms. Guerrero has just capital improvements to Potomac articulated the famous “Eyes on the Gardens and some of these conStreet” concept advanced by Jane Jacrete courtyards were the beneficiacobs in her famous 1961 book, “The ries. Enough paving was removed Death and Life of Great American in the first courtyard to install some Cities.” Ms. Jacobs believed that grass and trees. Another courtyard streets are safer when more people got a concrete seat wall around an are on them and can see them from existing planted area with an older their windows. The new Potomac shade tree. Gardens courtyard seems to work The next project was more amin exactly this way. bitious. And it occurred partly due General contracting was by D to the existing Clean Green Team & A Dunlevy, with paid assistance structure. A large courtyard was rewith planting by the Clean Green designed to include a large, rectanTeam who now water the trees they gular artificial turf play area, surplanted and watch them grow. It’s a rounded by raised concrete planters. great arrangement. Team member Around the perimeter are widened Clarence Campbell says, “Before I walkways.New crape myrtles and became a landscaper I didn’t pay atmaple trees line the space and will tention to grass and trees. Now I noprovide shade in a few years. tice things like that all over.” Completed in March 2013, residents call the new courtyard

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Future Directions Clarence says he’s been interested in architecture and design since junior high school. When he was younger he did artwork at the Corner Store with Kris Swanson, participating in her annual art shows. He plans to take his GED test this year to get his high school diploma and position himself for attending college. Ruben Davis, another Green Team member, has always liked to draw and might be interested in the same thing. The two grew up together. Other team members, like Gary Sams and Lawrence Dozier are interested in full time landscape maintenance jobs. The workforce training they have done at Potomac Gardens for the past three years will be a big help to them when applying for positions. A local university has offered to host interested team members at the landscape architecture and landscape management departments this fall so they can see what students and teachers work on together. Meanwhile, Little Lights Ministries hopes to expand opportunities for the Clean Green Team by finding additional landscape maintenance clients. The group has a van and driver, tools, energy, and available time in their schedule. Contact Little Lights Ministries to discuss your landscape maintenance project.

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{home and garden / garden spot}

Creating the Perfect Garden Article and photos by Derek Thomas

T

he savvy gardener knows that summer is the perfect time to begin thinking about creating the perfect garden or re-thinking your outdoor spaces.

The process

There are several things that you can plan now to make sure that you have to successful garden this fall and for years to come. Ask yourself, what is your garden going to be. Would you like to have a formal manicured space or is a casual country cottage garden more your style? Taking the time to do a bit of research and perusing gardening books will help you in this decision process. Good old-fashioned walking through the neighborhood and seeing what others have done can also go a long way in helping to get the creative energy flowing. Imitation is still the finest form of flattery. Check out local universities for summer courses and gardening or check with the cooperative extension service in DC for any workshops that may be offered in planning, designing or creating gardens. Many garden centers now offer gardening courses or have wonderful manuals to help you create or redesign your garden space. Next, make a schematic of your garden areas and write down in each area the kind of exposure that it has. If you have a garden that faces south, you have full sun during summer days and very sunny fall and winters. A south facing garden will be ideal for plants that enjoy full sun. If your garden faces east or north you’ll be able to get away with partial shade

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and some shade loving plantings. These are plants that desire morning or no sun during the summer months. A garden that faces west will need plants that are tough and drought resistant. Researching your exposure and the plants that you like and making sure that they are a good fit will go a long way in ensuring that your garden is successful. Once you have chosen the plants it is time to start thinking about what you want to do for the layout. If you have a very formal garden, draw out the exact placement of each plant, as formal gardens are meticulous and very well thought out and designed. This sketch will enable you to visualize the space and the plantings within and will enable you to have perfect symmetry or perfect asymmetry depending on the level of formality. If you’re thinking about a cottage garden, plants can have a placement that is done in drifts and groups where there is a flow and ebb and the lines are slightly blurred from plant to plant. Your layout approach can be simply placing pots on the prepared earth and staying away from placements of any straight lines. (Plants in nature do not grow in straight lines, and a cottage garden has a relaxed, done by nature feel). Research your plants maximum heights and plant taller plantings to the rear and shorter plantings to the front. Specimens can always be placed randomly throughout the garden as long as the plant is a worthy specimen plant. Once you have your plant list decided it is now time to think about your soil condition. The University of the District of Columbia is now offering free

soil testing to DC residents. You can get the information needed to get your soil tested at https:// docs.google.com/forms/d/196iyqIAI3w0vIncl_ ZEN7CYAxSBamwJ0qP0bKioY_Rg/viewform most soil in DC tends to be slightly acidic and also tends to have a large clay content. Amending your soils with sufficient organic compost is essential to making sure that the garden succeeds. Heavy clay soils will benefit with the additive of sand or gypsum. Adding an inch to an inch and a half of mulch to your garden will help to retain moisture. Soil health equals plant health.

Top Plants for Hill Gardens What follows is a list of a few of the top contenders for great plants for any Capitol Hill garden. 1. Aucuba Japonica; this variegated form of Japanese laurel is an evergreen shrub with large, glossy, dark green leaves. The leaves are boldly speckled with golden yellow. The females have small purple flowers in spring followed by red berries in fall. Perfect for a specimen plant or informal hedge. Grows well in any but waterlogged soil. Plant in full sun for best color. Plant a male close by for heaviest berries. 2. Bergenia; this low growing, clump forming, evergreen perennial is one of the first to bloom in spring. Depending on the variety the flowers vary from red to white to shades of pink and magenta. The leaves are smooth, oval, leathery and with toothed margins. Plant under larger shrubs for added protection in winter. Grow in any welldrained soil. In full sun to part shade. 3. Euonymus Fortunei. This wonderful compact, mounding, evergreen shrub is also a climber when supported. Its leaves are small, ovate, and are brilliantly golden in variegation.


FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Cottage gardens can have elegance in their unstructured approach to design. Formal gardens are clean and rely on the use of straight lines and negative space Through planning even small Capitol Hill spaces can be come outdoor oases Plants like Acuba and holly make this garden inviting and have all season interest. A cottage gardens charm is the collision of plants that create a explosive display

Use this plant to fill in the or maroon flowers in late gaps, add color, and consummer to mid fall. This trast, or wall train for a shrub provides great interhardy evergreen climber. est in late summer. Grow When trained as a climber in well-drained slightly althis plant can reach heights kaline soil. Prune aggresof up to fifteen feet. Grow sively when young to enin any soil except water courage branching. Seeds logged. Leaves have best freely, to prevent unwantcolor in full sun. ed plants prune seedpods 4. Helleborus hyin early winter. brids; these evergreen, 7. Liriope Muscaclump forming, early-flowri; This tough as nails plant ering (late winter to very is perfect for tree boxes and early spring) perennials are heavy traffic areas. Liriope well suited to a shaded borwill form clumps of dark Using plants like Allium as focal der. At a time when most green, strap like leaves. points will add texture and depth to plants are still dormant the Spikes of small violet flowthe garden. Helleborus erupt with their ers open in fall followed by large clusters of nodding, pastel hued, freckled black berries. Grow in well-drained slightly acidflowers. They are the first sign that spring is on ic soil. Grow in sun to shade. its way. Grow in fertile, neutral to alkaline soil. 8. Rudbeckia, Black-Eyed Susans; these Helleborus will prefer moist soil but during time tough herbaceous perennials are well suited to of drought if planted in shade they will survive the parching and air pollution that our city garquite well. dens can dish out. These prolific bloomers erupt 5. Hemerocallis, daylilies; these are the from early summer to frost. They are a native of stars of many a herbaceous perennial border. North American grasslands and meadows. The With many different colors and flower shape flowers are daisy like with intense yellow petals and sizes available there is a daylily that is perand dark brown centers. Excellent in sunny borfect for your sun-drenched garden. Dependders Soil should be well drained. Fertilize in earing on the variety that you choose you can have ly spring with a slow release fertilizer. flowers from late spring to late summer. When As with any project this is just the beginestablished they can be very drought tolerant. ning of creating a beautiful lasting garden space. Their strap like leaves resembles an ornamenThrough proper planning now, before shovel tal grass. Plant in well-drained, fertile soil. Diand plant hit earth, you can have the garden of vide clumps every few years in spring or fall. your dreams that is as perfect as it can be and 6. Hibiscus Syriacus. This fast growing, maybe just this once claim success in the findeciduous shrub produces large white, pink, icky world of nature. Enjoy. u

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Dear Garden Problem Lady, by Wendy Blair Is it really true that marigold flowers in a garden provide some kind of protection against insect pests that eat leaves, flowers and veggies? Perhaps only “some kind” of protection. They might do so by actually attracting Japanese beetles, thereby sparing other plants. They might do so by feeding nectar to beneficial insects. But even for these putative helps, they must be planted densely – and thus at the same time rob other plants of water and nutrients. The short answer is, “No.” Did you know that there is a charming ALL WHITE garden in the 1000 block of South Carolina Avenue, SE? I wish you could supply me with a plant list for an all-white garden of my own! OK, here goes. First, for dappled shady gardens, from spring to fall: Snowdrop, Crocus, Hepatica, white Primrose, Trillium, Erythronium, Violet, Pansy, Foxglove, Hydrangea, Astilbe, Impatiens, Gypsophilla, Hemerocallis, Japanese Anemone, Autumn Crocus. Second, here is a list for gardens with plenty of sun: Candytuft, white Iris, Narcissus, Tulip, White Asiatic Lily, Peony (festiva maxima), Spirea, Rose, Petunia, Morning Glory, Sweet Alyssum, Verbascum, Verbena, Delphinium, Larkspur, Hollyhock, white Gladiolus, Dahlia, Moonflower, Aster, Daisy, and Chrysanthemum. Third, to make you entirely thrilled, consider some ground covers with silvery-white leaves, such as Stachys (lamb’s ears), variegated Vinca, Caladium and Everlasting.


My friend tells me that my bluebells are not Mertensia. Great Scott! I feel crushed. How can two friends quarrel over bluebells? But we have. Help! Plant identification can be a life and death matter – but only for the plant. When it is just among us pedants, things get ugly. First, do a bit of research. Look online for pictures of the different kinds of bluebells – Spanish bluebells (Hyacinthoides hispanica) have blade-shaped leaves, grow roughly a foot tall, and their bell-shaped, periwinkle-blue flowers appear on all sides of a straight stalk. Common (aka English) bluebells (Hyacinthoides non scripta), also have blade-shaped leaves but their fragrant bell-shaped flowers grow on one side only of a curving stalk. Then find pictures of Virginia bluebells (Mertensia Virginica – a different plant entirely). Its leaves are oval shaped, its flowers bell shaped. These open in a pink bud and fall in clusters from a curving stem. All are pretty spring ephemerals commonly confused one with another. So even though all bluebells have disappeared until next spring, if the facts warrant it, make your friendly apologies. Please name some flowers that will stay blooming all fall. Rudbekia, Aster, Zinnia, Chrysanthemum, Cleome, Petunia, Turtlehead, Salvia, Sedum Autumn Joy, Sweet Autumn Clematis, Goldenrod. The Capitol Hill Garden Club’s regular meetings on the second Tuesday evening of each month will resume Tuesday, September 9, 2014 at the NE Library, corner Maryland Ave. and 7th St. NE. Feeling beset by gardening problems? Send them to the Problem Lady c/o The Capitol Hill Garden Club at andrew@hillrag.com. Your problems might prove instructive to others, and help them feel superior to you. Complete anonymity is assured. u

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August 2014 ★ 127


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128 ★ Hillrag.com

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August 2014 ★ 129


G G ROOFING

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130 ★ Hillrag.com

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contact CAROLINA at 202.400.3503 carolina@hillrag.com August 2014 ★ 131


{the last word}

A Night at Diana’s Table I was lucky enough to dine at Diana’s table. The invite offered in the most casual terms--“just neighbors and friends and a peasants’ meal,” but it was more than that. Welcomed and introduced to everyone, no one could ever be on the fringes. Plied with liquor and opening chatter we were ushered into the dining area. With candles dribbling hot wax and flickering in the inebriated air, Diana and Dick held court at each end of the table Diana disappeared behind the curtains and like Merlin from King Arthur’s court conjured up tureens filled with wonderful vegetables, beans, and tender meat in a sauce that was always delicious Quickly we transformed into a huge debating table where participants fought for their point of view. Speakers’ corner on octane, Algonquin on Constitution Avenue. Then as the wine flowed and some took to liqueurs, others lit up, engulfing us all and sending us in a time machine to the fifties. On occasion Edith might be persuaded to play the “old Joanna” and those of us with bigger egos than voices sang the memories of old. We left Diana’s table without a care. We were in the moment and only our beds beckoned. Of all the tables I have been invited to, Diana’s was the best. Not by an inch--by a mile. Yes, the guests were great, the diversity, the stories, but it was the master of ceremonies, the conductor, the Air Commodore’s daughter who shone the brightest and made an invitation to her table one you would never turn down. Roy Forey – royforey@comcast.net

Remembering Diana McLellan I will miss long-time Hill resident Diana McLellan, who died June 25 from cancer at her daughter’s home in Easton, Maryland. Diana was 76, but her exuberance and sharp wit made her seem much younger. She was a familiar sight around Eastern Market, peddling her sturdy English bike, purchasing produce and schmoozing with friends and neighbors. I met Diana in the 1980s, after her “Ear” fame and celebrity hobnobbing, when we worked together at The Washington Times. Since neither of us drove, we often took the shuttle from the Hill to the Times, located in far Northeast by the National Arboretum. Diana always kept us entertained, delivering often offcolor remarks in her wonderful British accent. Sometimes my boss, John Rosson, who lived in Southwest, would give the two of us rides back to the Hill. One time Diana made a comment—which cannot be repeated here--that was so funny that Rosson nearly ran off the road. Diana and I eventually left the paper. She went on to contribute to the Washingtonian and also wrote “The Girls: Sappho Goes to Hollywood,” and “Making Hay,” a book of poetry. But we kept in touch. Diana and I both frequented Close Encounters, the consignment shop on Seventh St. SE. For awhile, we swam at the same Southwest health club. More recently, Diana invented an attractive cover-up for those unsightly super cans we

132 H Hillrag.com

use for garbage. (Yes, the same ones the city replaced without removing the old ones until we complained.) Unfortunately, excessive red tape prevented Diana from obtaining a patent for her clever invention. Diana’s death caught Peter and I by surprise. We keep thinking we will see her. Celeste McCall

In Memory of Rudi Appl June 6, 1935 to July, 16, 2014 Rudi Appl, longtime Capitol Hill resident and beloved bartender at Mr. Henry’s for nearly fifty years, passed away Wednesday, July 16 from heart failure. He was 79. Born in Brno, Czechoslovakia in 1935, Rudi traveled widely from the Middle East to Canada where his family emigrated after WWII. In the early 1960’s Rudi ended up in Nassau in the Bahamas and worked at The Paradise Island resort owned by A&P supermarket heir and filmmaker Huntington Hartford. His friendship with Hartford led him to a brief stint as a Hollywood stand-in for Marlon Brando and Robert Stack. Finding the studio system restrictive, Rudi eventually moved to DC and settled here permanently in 1966. Rudi was famous for charming his customers and friends with yarns about his colorful past. He seemingly knew everybody and proudly kept separate European and US address books. He had a knack for remembering faces and names and drew in a loyal crowd of regulars whenever he worked behind the bar. Everybody has a story about Rudi. His friendly and engaging manner disarmed everyone. Rudi had been a fixture at Mr. Henry’s for so long that it was said that he “conveyed with the property.” He will be sorely missed by Capitol Hill oldtimers and newcomers alike. Rudi Appl is survived by two brothers - Joseph Appl of Hailer, Germany and Alois Appl of Meeholz, Germany. He is also survived by three nephews - Karlfred of Maerstetten, Switzerland, Dietmar of Meerholz-Geinhausen, Germany and Thomas of Hailer-Geinhausen, Germany. Deitmar and his Rudi Appl


wife Birgit have two daughters, Christina and Luisa. Christina will be visiting here on September 2. There is a memorial get-together scheduled on Saturday, September 6, upstairs at Mr. Henry’s Capitol Hill. The exact time is yet to be decided and will be posted on Mr. Henry’s Facebook page. Joelle Buchanan – joelle@yarmouthm.com

Janice L. Moncier

In Memory of Janice L. Moncier, Longtime Resident of Capitol Hill, 1946 to 2014 Jan Moncier, 68, of Washington, DC, died July 16 at the Washington Home and Community Hospices after a multi-year battle with breast cancer. A resident of F Street NE since 1988, Jan lived with her partner (and later spouse) of 33 years, Ann Norwood. A dedicated neighborhood activist, Jan participated in neighborhood cleanups and “orange hat” crime watches and advocated for years for the recent repaving of the alley behind their house. She was always willing to do battle with city agencies, and one of her last efforts was to ask for a zoning variance for their new garage. Interested in historic preservation, she attended workshops sponsored by the Capitol Hill Restoration Society and accumulated a basement full of hardware, skylights, and door frames used to restore elements of their Victorian row house. Jan was born and raised on a small tobacco and dairy farm in East Tennessee. She was an avid 4-H Club member throughout her childhood, and her projects on health, leadership, recreation, and “home grounds beautification” remained interests throughout her life. A graduate of Wheaton College, in Illinois, she earned a master’s in physical education from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. Jan taught in the Department of Defense school system for five years, living in Iceland and Germany. Upon her return to the U.S., Jan worked as a broker, became a Certified Financial Planner, and later (2008) she retired from ICMA-RC, a retirement planning services company. Following Jan’s initial breast cancer diagnosis in 1996, she received support services from the Mautner Project, a DC-area lesbian health organization. After completing treatment, she volunteered with Mautner and in 1999 received its direct services award. Jan was known for her extreme generosity; love of gardening, travel, and women’s basketball; and her devotion to finding a good deal on Craigslist.

She is survived by Ann Norwood M.D., Colonel, U.S. Army Medical Corps (retired). Jan was preceded in death by her parents, Mark and Bonnie Wilhoit Moncier; her sister, Sherrie Rockstad; and her brother, David Moncier. A memorial service will be held Saturday, August 9, at 1 p.m. at Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to a favorite charity. Ann Carper – acarper2012@gmail.com

Preservation’s Costs Concerning the shotgun house article in the Washington Post (July 15, 2014), it is a great thing that the newspaper has shown interest in our neighborhood and its problem houses. I hope to see not just one article and leave it at that, for that does not help us. There have been so many examples of quarrels between neighbors, and you can see that 29 years of that house being left an eyesore is not good for us. The preservationists just want the house restored, and a professor who goes on about its importance, and then there is the owner who says it makes no economic sense to restore it. Indeed he feels the house is unsound, and is probably right, a cheap house built around 1853, yet no one seems to want to find common ground. I suspect the preservationists are idealistic people, who want something, but have no idea as to costs and construction problems, and economic usage. Everyone probably thinks that the owner just wants profit ...!...though in my 52 years on the Hill, that is quite unfair.........many excellent renovations have been done by people who had good taste, and displayed it in their work. Good tasteis something many people think they have, but the local civic groups feel they have the angle here,

and that owners should bow to their wishes. Do the Preservationists have a divine right ? I feel one has to answer ‘no.’ Yet the power they have is immense, and can make a project stand still for years. The Harris Teeter/Jenkins Row site on Pennsylvania Ave. stood as an eyesore for 15 years, the Heritage Society building on Pennsylvania Ave took three years and immense legal costs to achieve what? The Quillian property (shotgun house) has been an eyesore for 29 years, and Frager’s burntout building is about to join the list of no compromise on anything............another eyesore. We are as bad as countries in the Middle East, arguing about things that should be patched up, but failing to do so. And the rules the law of ‘78 introduced were good, yes, but erratic and arbitrary.........one side of F St NE is historic, the other is not, though I feel the unhistoric side is better. The historic area ended at 12th St. SE, then was extended to 13th St.--beyond these boundaries, you can do what you like! Back on Pa Ave., you can see many one story buildings and then four story buildings beside them. Pity the guy with three or two storys; he has to stay where he is, whereas the four story guys come and build things way out of proportion, all evidently OK with the law. Who is to help us with these inconsistencies? The law sets 1945 as the break year for historic preservation, ie if your house is pre ‘45, alterations are difficult or impossible, but why ‘45? And little thought it seems is given to cost or economic concerns of the owner. The permit or appeal process is so cumbersome and costly that I have great concerns about our main street, Pennsylvania Ave SE. I hope additional talk may occur as a result of the Post article, so that the article may not be a ‘one shot’ deal , but rather something that may bring a new day to our discordant community. Gerry Dunphy – fgtdunphy@gmail.com u

August 2014 H 133


Independence Day on Capitol Hill Photos by Andrew Lightman

134 H Hillrag.com


Hillrag Magazine August 2014  
Hillrag Magazine August 2014  

Our flagship publication delivering all of your news from the Capitol Hill area of Washington, DC

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