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hillrag.com • January 2016


Est. 1981

D SOL

CAPITOL HILL

ON G SO N I COM

CAPITOL HILL

119 5th St, NE

Pete Frias 202-744-8973 www.PeterFrias.com

CAPITOL HILL

1103 9th Street, NE #2 $896,000 Todd Bissey

202-841-7653

518 9th St., SE Coming Soon

Genie Hutinet 202-413-7661

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BRIGHTWOOD

5802 7th Street, NW $455,000 Todd Bissey

202-841-7653

CAPITOL HILL

1520 Ind. Ave, SE #3 Pete Frias 202-744-8973 www.PeterFrias.com

CAPITOL HILL 10 7th Street, NE Landmark Property. Over 4,000 sq. ft. including the Carriage House. One of the top 3 most special properties to hit the market on Capitol Hill in 2015.

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THE

CAPITOL HILL

676 4th Street, NE #205 $387,500 Todd Bissey

202-841-7653

IAL ERC M COM

CAPITOL HILL

724 East Capitol St, NE 2,000’ Retail Space Stan Bissey

Todd Bissey 202-841-7653

SHAW

1717 New Jersey Ave, NW $879,500

202-841-1433

Genie Hutinet 202-413-7661

BISSEY TEAM

AT JOHN C. FORMANT REAL ESTATE, INC.

www.BisseyTeam.com

IAL ERC M COM

CAPITOL HILL

804 H Street, NE 2nd Floor Office Space Stan Bissey

202-841-1433

Stan Bissey 202-841-1433

CAPITOL HILL

1327 D Street, NE Price Adjusted Genie Hutinet 202-413-7661

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CAPITOL HILL

112 Kentucky Ave., SE Pete Frias 202-744-8973 www.PeterFrias.com

IAL ERC M COM

CAPITOL HILL

508 H Street, NE 3rd Floor Office Space Stan Bissey

202-841-1433

“WHERE WASHINGTON SHOPS FOR A NEW ADDRESS!”® 225 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE Washington, DC 20003

Tel: 202-544-3900 www.johncformant.com

Sales • Rentals • Commercial Leasing • Property Management • Investments


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HAPPY NEW YEAR AND ENJOY THE MILD WEATHER WHILE YOU CAN! Get your free roof inspection before the weather turns!

R.THOMAS DANIEL ROOFING

YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD ROOFER www.rthomasdanielroofing.com UNDER YOUR ROOF IS YOUR MOST VALUABLE ASSET... YOUR HOME!

PROTECT YOUR HOME NOW! Uncover Hidden Future Costs. Warning Signs Could Mean Higher Costs If Not Corrected Today! • Roof is over 10 years old • Interior water stains • Visible leaks or cracks • Loose attic insulation • Open joints and seams on roof • Drains/gutters filled with debris

Our Services: • Inspections • Repairs • Roof coating • Roof replacement • Gutters and spouts • Skylights • Brick and chimney re-pointing

CALL NOW FOR YOUR

FREE INSPECTION!

202.569.1080 202.544.4430

tom@rthomasdanielroofing.com SERVING CAPITOL HILL HOMEOWNERS FOR MORE THAN 90 YEARS Owner Tom Daniel, outside the original location of the family roofing business at 310 Independence Ave., S.E.

PROUD TO BE A SPONSOR OF CAPITOL HILL COMMUNITY FOUNDATION’S LITERARY FEAST 4 H Hillrag.com


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THE

BISSEY TEAM

AT JOHN C. FORMANT REAL ESTATE, INC. Todd Bissey 202-841-7653

Stan Bissey 202-841-1433 Est. 1981

Todd and Stan are amazing! I would use them for a transaction anywhere in Washington, D.C., but their combined knowledge of the Capitol Hill market is unparalleled. They have an incredible work ethic and are very focused on results. Best of all, they are really nice guys - you’re going to enjoy working with them! by Thomas & Amanda Corcoran, 529 6th Street, SE

Sold / Leased in 2015

SOLD

Capitol Hill

SOLD

Capitol Hill

SOLD

Capitol Hill

SOLD

16th Street Heights

SOLD

Capitol Hill

SOLD

Capitol Hill

SOLD

Capitol Hill

SOLD

Capitol Hill

SOLD

Capitol Hill

SOLD

Capitol Hill

SOLD

AU Park

SOLD

Capitol Hill

SOLD

Columbia Heights

SOLD

Capitol Hill

SOLD

Brightwood

SOLD

Brightwood

SOLD

Capitol Hill

SOLD

Chinatown

LEASED Capitol Hill

LEASED Capitol Hill

225 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE, Washington, DC 20003 • 202-544-3900 6 H Hillrag.com


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Sharing Our Success! Capitol Hill’s Coldwell Banker Supports You! When we opened our doors here on the Hill nearly 35 years ago, we tied our destiny to an emerging neighborhood full of promise but fraught with risk. Indeed, we suffered through two disastrous market downturns and have reinvented ourselves several times. Through all of the ups and downs, this community has never failed to support us and we in turn have never lost faith in the future of Capitol Hill. To date, we have contributed nearly $1,000,000 to our community! • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Capitol Hill Cluster School Capitol Hill Community Foundation Capitol Hill Arts Workshop Capitol Hill Day School St. Peter School Barracks Row Main Street Capitol Hill Children’s Baseball League Capitol Hill Children’s Hockey League Brent Elementary Maury Elementary Capitol Hill Village Capitol Hill Group Ministry Eastern High School Capitol Hill Merchants And Professionals Capitol Hill Restoration Society Young Marines Of Capitol Hill St. Coletta’s of Greater Washington

In addition, our individual agents last year alone contributed $50,000+ and literally hundreds of hours to community organizations. While we are proud of what we have accomplished, we know that we couldn’t have done any of this without the support of friends and clients. You won’t see this office on TV. You won’t hear from us on the radio. You won’t even get much mail from us. But, you will see us when you see the growth in our schools. You will see us when you see the growth in our community building blocks. You will see us in the progress of our Capitol Hill neighborhood. We welcome the challenges of the future and we look forward to hearing from you soon.

202.547.3525 - Main Office INFORMATION DEEMED RELIABLE BUT NOT GUARANTEED

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Grant, Ryall & Andrew

2016

Wish you a happy & healthy

Thank you for a fantastic 2015 – the results are in! Put our years of Washington real estate experience to work for you! Call us and let’s get started.

Grant Griffith, (202) 741-1685 | Ryall Smith, (202) 741-1781 | Andrew Glasow, (202) 741-1654 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage - Don Denton, VP Broker | 605 Pennsylvania Ave SE, WDC 20003 - Main: 202.547. 3525

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What’s Inside?

capitol streets 33

Bulletin Board

42

District Beat: Measuring School Success Jonetta Rose Barras

In every issue:

The Numbers: Paid Family Leave

46

Jonetta’s Take: Get Ready to Rumble

48

New Health Andromeda Clinic Garners Neighbors’

18 Calendar

Jonetta Rose Barras

Christine Rushton

Skepticism

14 What’s on Washington

Ed Lazere

44

Catherine Plume

50

DC Is a World Class Green City

52

South by West

54

ANC 6A Report

Elizabeth Nelson

56

ANC 6B Report

Jonathan Neeley

58

ANC 6C Report

Christine Rushton

60

ANC 6D Report

Andrew Lightman

62

ANC 6E Report

Steve Holton

62

Eastern Market Report

William Rich

Jan.

66 Hill Rag Crossword 136 Classified Ads

Other: 142 Capital Community News Holiday Party

72

Peter J. Waldron

community life 67

Capitol Hill Village’s Annual Gala Moves to a Naw’lins Beat

88

Mike Canning

68

Tradition That Can’t Be Extinguished

70

H Street Life

72

Top 10 Things to Know About Capitol Riverfront

74

Elise Bernard Michael Stevens, AICP

Our River The Anacostia: Winter Watershed Get-Aways

76

Bill Matuszeski

Cindy Janke (1943-2015)

Peter McCall

real estate 79

Jonathan Lewis

Changing Hands

Don Denton


103

on the cover: Thomas Dodd, “Behind the Veil”, 20x30, painterly photo montage. On exhibit at Gallery NK. From January 15-February 15, Gallery NK has an exhibit featuring Thomas Dodd and Steffen Faisst. Reception us Jan. 16th, 5-8 pm. For more information call Gallery NK. 202-608-1389 • 321 K Street, NE • www.galleryonk.com • email: info @galleryonk.com.

2016 health and fitness SPECIAL 88

Heard on the Hill

Jen DeMayo

92

Getting Fit After Kids

96

Pickleball Pops Up at Sherwood

Pattie Cinelli

98

Know Your Fitness Numbers

100

The District Vet

Christine Rushton

Lara Atella

Dan Teich, DVM

arts and dining 103

Dining Notes

Celeste McCall

106

The Wine Girl

Lilia Coffin Mike Canning

108

At the Movies

110

Art and The City

112

The Literary Hill

114

The Poetic Hill

Jim Magner Karen Lyon Karen Lyon

kids and family 117

Kids & Family Notebook

122

School Notes

Kathleen Donner

Susan Braun Johnson

homes and gardens 131

The Hill Gardener

Cheryl Corson, RLA, ASLA

134

Dear Garden Problem Lady

Wendy Blair


Give It a Try! Very pleasant longtime Hill resident saw this ad about our success with a tinnitus (buzzing or ringing in the ears) patient and decided to give us a try.

EST.

Two neck x-rays and three chiropractic adjustments later 60-70% improvement, and still improving. Also, her neck, shoulder tension and discomfort considerably better. Her only disappointment is that she didn’t think of chiropractic years ago. For the better health and life experience of you and your family Dr. David Walls-Kaufman Capitol Hill Chiropractic Center 411 East Capitol St., SE | 202.544.6035

Read More About This Subject On www.capitolhillchiropractic.com Serving The Capitol Hill Community Since 1984

Capital Community News, Inc. 224 7th Street, SE, Suite 300 Washington, DC 20003 • 202.543.8300 www.capitalcommunitynews.com EXECUTIVE EDITOR: Melissa Ashabranner • melissaashabranner@hillrag.com

PUBLISHER: Jean-Keith Fagon • fagon@hillrag.com • Copyright © 2015 by Capital Community News. All Rights Reserved.

Editorial Staff

M������� E�����: Andrew Lightman • andrew@hillrag.com CFO � A�������� E�����: Maria Carolina Lopez • carolina@hillrag.com S����� N���� E�����: Susan Braun Johnson • schools@hillrag.com K��� � F����� E�����: Kathleen Donner • kathleendonner@gmail.com

Arts, Dining & Entertainment

Men’s and Women’s sizes up to 15 EE Brands: Naturalizer • Soft Spots Ros Hommerson • Propet Walking Cradles • Easy Street Slingshots are Back

301-702 1401 www.simplywide.com

Free Gift With Ad

Don Denton • DDenton@cbmove.com

Kids & Family

Kathleen Donner • kathleendonner@gmail.com Susan Johnson • schools@hillrag.com

Homes & Gardens

Calendar & Bulletin Board

Production/Graphic/Web Design

General Assignment

Elise Bernard • elise.bernard@gmail.com Ellen Boomer • emboomer@gmail.com Stephanie Deutsch • scd@his.com Maggie Hall • whitby@aol.com Stephen Lilienthal - stephen_lilienthal@yahoo.com Pleasant Mann • pmann1995@gmail.com Meghan Markey • meghanmarkey@gmail.com John H. Muller • jmuller.washingtonsyndicate@gmail.com Jonathan Neeley • neeley87@gmail.com Will Rich • will.janks@gmail.com Heather Schoell • schoell@verizon.net Virginia Avniel Spatz • virginia@hillrag.com Michael G. Stevens • michael@capitolriverfront.org Peter J. Waldron • peter@hillrag.com Jazzy Wright • wright.jazzy@gmail.com Dr. Charles Vincent “Mickey Thompson Vincent

Beauty, Health & Fitness

Marlow Heights Shopping Center 4123 Branch Ave. Marlow Heights, MD

Real Estate

Jim Magner • jjmagner@aol.com Celeste McCall • celeste@us.net Jonathan Bardzik • jonathan.bardzik@gmail.com L���������: Karen Lyon • klyon@folger.edu M�����: Mike Canning • mjcanning@verizon.net M����: Jean-Keith Fagon • fagon@hillrag.com Stephen Monroe • steve@jazzavenues.com T������: Barbara Wells • barchardwells@aol.com T�� W��� G���: Lilia Coffin • lilia@cellar.com

A��: D�����:

C������� E�����: Kathleen Donner • calendar@hillrag.com, bulletinboard@hillrag.com

WIDE SHOE OUTLET

1976

Patricia Cinelli • fitmiss44@aol.com Jazelle Hunt • jazelle.hunt@gmail.com Candace Y.A. Montague • writeoncm@gmail.com

Derek Thomas • derek@thomaslandscapes.com Catherine Plume • caplume@yahoo.com Cheryl Corson • cheryl@cherylcorson.com

Commentary

Ethelbert Miller • emiller698@aol.com T�� N��� • thenose@hillrag.com T�� L��� W��� • editorial@hilllrag.com A�� D�������: Jason Yen • jay@hillrag.com Graphic Design: Lee Kyungmin • lee@hillrag.com W�� M�����: Andrew Lightman • andrew@hillrag.com

Advertising & Sales

Account Executive: Kira Means, 202.543.8300 X16 • kira@hillrag.com Account Executive: Laura Vucci, 202.543.8300 X22 • laura@hillrag.com Account Executive & Classified Advertising: Maria Carolina Lopez, 202.543.8300 X12 • Carolina@hillrag.com

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Deadlines & Contacts

A����������: sales@hillrag.com D������ A��: 15th of each month C��������� A��: 10th of each month E��������: 15th of each month; editorial@hilllrag.com B������� B���� � C�������: 15th of each month; calendar@hillrag.com, bulletinboard@hillrag.com

We welcome suggestions for stories. Send queries to andrew@hillrag.com. We are also interested in your views on community issues which are published in the Last Word. Please limit your comments to 250 words. Letters may be edited for space. Please include your name, address and phone number. Send Last Word submissions to lastword@hillrag.com. For employment opportunities email jobs@hillrag.com.

Capital Community News, Inc. Publishers of:

MIDCITY YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

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F A G O N

GUIDE TO CAPITOL HILL


January 2016 H 13


Designing America: Spain’s Imprint in the US

Designing America: Spain’s Imprint in the US displays the important contributions that Spain has made to the construction of the US territory, landscape and cities, from the first settlements to present day. Visitors learn about the historical, political and cultural events that have marked the course of 500 years of common history: a footprint still visible on North American soil. This exhibition is at the Former Residence of the Ambassadors of Spain, 2801 16th St. NW, through Feb. 28. Gallery hours are Monday to Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Friday to Sunday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. designing-america.com.

Map of the Northern Frontier of New Spain, with Spanish Provinces and Native American Tribes 1779 España. Ministerio de Defensa. Archivo del Museo Naval AMN 7-A-1

WONDER at the Renwick Gallery

Nine leading contemporary artists--Jennifer Angus, Chakaia Booker, Gabriel Dawe, Tara Donovan, Patrick Dougherty, Janet Echelman, John Grade, Maya Lin and Leo Villareal--have taken over different rooms and have created site-specific installations inspired by the Renwick. While these artists have creates strikingly different works, they are connected by their interest in creating large-scale installations from unexpected materials. Index cards, marbles, strips of wood—all objects so commonplace and ordinary we often overlook them—are assembled, massed, and juxtaposed to utterly transform the spaces. The Renwick Gallery—the first building in the United States built expressly as an art museum—has just reopened its doors after a two-year renovation. The Renwick Gallery is at Pennsylvania Ave. at 17th St. NW. renwick.americanart.si.edu/wonder.

Gabriel Dawe, Plexus A1, 2015, Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Courtesy Conduit Gallery. Photo: Ron Blunt

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Robert Stanton, Puff in The Critic and Moon in The Real Inspector Hound, at the Lansburgh Theatre, Jan. 5 through Feb. 14. Photo: Scott Suchman.

Shakespeare Theater Company’s FREE WILL Tickets

Shakespeare Theater Company reserves 1,000 tickets to every mainstage production to be distributed on a first-come, first-served basis completely free of charge until they run out. After that they will do their best to get you tickets through the low-cost ticket options STC has always offered—such as their 35 or Under discounts, $25 rush tickets and the $20 tickets already available for all performances. FREE WILL tickets are available in person, online and over the phone every Monday at noon for performances that week. When the box office is closed on a Monday holiday, FREE WILL tickets will be available on Tuesday both online and over the phone. Read more at shakespearetheatre.org/info/free-will.

Capital Fringe Show “Dishwasher”

Through Jan. 31, award-winning DC-based conceptual artist Brian Feldman brings back “Dishwasher,” the most talked-about and bestreviewed show of the 2015 Capital Fringe Festival--taking place in the home of the ticket buyer. Brian Feldman’s first-ever job was as an actor with Orlando Shakespeare Theater. His second? Dishwasher at a fast-food restauPhoto: Edward rant chain. At a mutuAlan Feldman ally agreed upon time, Brian will go the ticket buyer’s home and hand wash the dirty dishes in their kitchen sink. Once completed, they will hand him a monologue of their choosing which he will cold read on the spot. Finally, Brian will pose them a question: “Am I a better actor or dishwasher?” After receiving their answer, he will depart their home; posting the verdict on social media. Only 31 tickets are available for the Washington Metropolitan Area tour of “Dishwasher” (one per day). Get a ticket at brianfeldman.com.

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SAVE! SAVE! SAVE! WINTER SPECIAL!

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DCSEU Rebates Available

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www.polarbearairconditioning.com “We recommend Polar Bear for HVAC all the time, you are one of the best and most respectful companies we have ever had doing work in our house”. – Tami, Capitol Hill

All Credit Cards Accepted January 2016 H 17


JANUARY CALENDAR “Jazz in the Sanctuary” with Cheyney Thomas and Friends. Photo: Courtesy of Ebenezer United Methodist Church

Jazz in the Sanctuary at Ebenezer United Methodist Church. Jan. 31, 12:15 PM. All are welcome to this jazz service which happens on the fifth Sunday of every month that has a fifth Sunday. Free will offerings are accepted. 400 D St. SE. 202-554-9117. 18 H Hillrag.com


CAPITOL HILL VILLAGE CORNER

It’s Not About Old Age; It’s About Long Life The Key to Your Community

I mlk eVents

Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Event. Jan. 15, 7 to 9 PM. Keynote address by Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad. On-stage discussion on “Looking Back, Moving Forward.” Entertainment by the mime troupe Crazee Praize Nation. Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History on the National Mall. Call 202-6334844 to register. anacostia.si.edu. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Breakfast. Jan. 16, 8 to 10 AM. The MLK Memorial Breakfast raises funds to provide college scholarships for deserving, financially challenged District high school graduates. Grand Hyatt, 1000 H St. NW. Get tickets at upo.org. Let Freedom Ring! at the Kennedy Center. Jan. 18, 6 PM. Join the Kennedy Center and Georgetown University in a musical celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s legacy. This Millennium Stage event features The Let Freedom Ring Choir and other special guests. Free. kennedy-center.org.

n Washington DC there are 106,000 seniors. 50% more than children in public school. • 90+ is the fastest growing population: In 1980 there were 700,000 Americans over the age of 90. In 2010 there were 1.9 million, in 2015 there are an estimated 2.3 million.

In our society people live 34 years longer than their grandparents – • in 1900 life expectancy was 47; • in 2000 it was 73, • 2015 it is 77. Life expectancy grows by 5 hours a day, totaling 76 days a year. Old Age is no longer a disability – it is a new developmental phase with social, biological and psychological distinctions. • Seniors (until the age of 80) increase in their ability to acquire knowledge. • Seniors can understand the meaning and application to complex materials better than adults under the age of 30. • Seniors have a greater ability than other age groups to compile and aggregate information, knaowledge and wisdom towards problem solving. • Seniors have the highest levels of emotional flexibility among any age group --- meaning they can get along with diverse populations and see multiple perspectives. Capitol Hill Village is bringing Experts and Neighbors to Your Front Stoop: Capitol Hill Village Members are sharing their knowledge and expertise through the Village Voices series, monthly lectures on a range of historic, cultural, and social issues. All are free and open to the public. Reservations not required, but preferred. Call CHV offices at (202) 543-1778 or email: info@capitolhillvillage.org.

January 2016: Were the Monuments Men as Handsome as George Clooney?

The Monuments Men adventure began in DC and continued in battle zones in Italy, France, Belgium, and Germany. Learn the amazing story of saved art works, historic artifacts and the heroics on the front lines in Europe and the behind-the-scenes strategies. Featuring Maygene Daniels, long-time leader at the National Gallery of Art, and a world renown archivist. January 12, 2016 7:00 pm NE Library, 330 7th St NE.

February 2016: How did a Capitol Hill superhero save thousands of kids with a microscope? Dr. Miriam Wolff discovered and acted upon the connection between household paint and childhood lead poisoning which causes severe physical and cognitive disabilities. She made the scientific connection and spearheaded the political battle to reform laws and ensure the safety of children. Tuesday February 9th, 7-8 pm.

Washington National Cathedral MLK Concert. Jan. 18, 2 to 4 PM. The Cathedral honors the life and legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Continue his vision through music and poetry presented by the Cathedral and DC’s performing arts community. Attendees are asked to bring a new children’s book or non-perishable food item to donate. cathedral.org. MLK Peace Walk and Parade. Jan. 18, 11 AM (peace walk); noon (parade). Peace Walk at 2500 MLK Ave. SE. Parade starts at 2700 MLK Ave. SE; ends at 4201 MLK Ave. SE. mlkholidaydc.org. 2016 Dr. Martin Luther King Address at MLK Library. Jan. 20, 7 PM. Author, and historian Anthony “Tony” Browder will deliver the annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Ad-

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{january events calendar}

The Glass Menagerie at Ford’s. Jan. 22 to Feb. 21. One of the greatest American plays of the 20th century, The Glass Menagerie explores the visceral bonds of family. Southern matriarch Amanda frets constantly over her two live-in adult children—the painfully shy Laura and Laura’s restless poet, brother. Ford’s Theatre, 511 10th St. NW. 202-347-4833. fords.org.

Tom Story and Jenna Sokolowski for the Ford’s Theatre production of Tennessee Williams’s “The Glass Menagerie,” directed by Mark Ramont.Photo: Scott Suchman

dress. The lecture will take place in the Special Collections Department on the Third Floor of the library. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-727-0321. dclibrary.org/mlk. Visit the MLK Memorial. Open to visitors all hours, every day. 1964 Independence Ave. SW. nps.gov/mlkm.

SPECIAL EVENTS Three Kings Day Celebration at GALA. Jan. 3, 11:30 AM and 2 PM. GALA tells the story of the Magi with song, dance and storytelling at two performances. A procession with the Three Kings and live animals, including donkeys, goats, and sheep, begins at 1 PM at corner of

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Park Road and 14th Street NW. These bilingual presentations for the entire family preserve one of the most popular celebrations of Latino cultures. Free. GALA Theatre, 3333 14th St. NW. galatheatre.org. Restaurant Week Winter 2016. Jan. 25 to 31. Threecourse, fixed-price lunch ($22) or dinner ($35) at 250 of the Washington DC area’s favorite dining establishments. Reserve a table at RWDMV.com. Alexandria Winter Restaurant Week. Jan. 29 to Feb. 7. More than 60 Alexandria restaurants offer a $35, threecourse dinner or a $35, dinner for two. More than two dozen restaurants are also offering lunch deals at $10, $15 or $20 per person in addition to the dinner specials. AlexandriaRestaurantWeek.com.

MUSIC Jazz Night in Southwest. Every Friday, 6 to 9 PM. Jan. 2 (Saturday), Jazz Masters featuring Ernie Douglas & Whit Williams; Jan. 8, The Kristine Key Experience; Jan. 15, 17th Jazz Night Anniversary Celebration; Jan. 22, The Next Generation of Jazz; Jan. 29, Antonio Parker Grits & Gravy. The cover is $5. Children are welcome and free under 16. Reasonably priced meals offered. 202-4847700. Westminster Presbyterian Church, 400 I St. SW. westminsterdc.org Blues Night in Southwest. Every Monday, 6 to 9 PM. Jan. 4, Clarence Turner Blues Band; Jan. 11, Eddie Jones and the Young Bucks; Jan. 18, Vince Evans Blues Band; Jan. 25, Jacques & Margie Live!; Feb. 1, Avon Dews Blues


Breakfast | Late Night | Veggie Options www.benschilibowl.com 1213 U ST NW | 202.667.0909 1001 H ST NE | 202.733.1895 1725 Wilson Blvd. VA | 571.312.1091 Reagan National Airport

Saturday, Sunday and Monday Brunch 9 TV’s, 53 ft Full Bar | Kitchen Open Late www.bensnextdoor.com

1211 U ST NW | 202.667.8880

GRAND OPENING Share Plates | Spirits | Heated Rooftop www.ten01h.com 1001 H ST NE | 202.733.2405

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{january events calendar}

Church of the Epiphany Weekly Concerts. Every Tuesday, 12:10 PM. Jan. 5, Tyler St. Clare, Janna Critz, Joshua Barnett, Michael Jancarek; Jan. 12, Schola Epihaniensis: Rachel Evangeline Barham, James

Rogers, Oliver Mercer, Roger Isaacs,Voices Jeremy Filsell, piano Michelle Lundy, Harp; Jan. 19, Theo Davis, harpsichord & organ plays Bach, Couperin, Dupré & Duruflé on Epiphany’s grand organ; Jan. 26, Tzu-yi Chen, piano; Feb. 2, Amy Domingues ,Viola da Gamba Anthony Harvey, theorbo Jeremy Filsell, continuo. Free, but offerings taken. 1317 G St. NW. 202-347-2635. epiphanydc.org.

Photo: Andrew Lightman

Revue; Feb. 8, David Cole & Main Street Blues; Feb. 15, Electrified Blues Band w/ Charlie Sayles; Feb. 22, Full Power Blues. The cover is $5. Children are welcome and free under 16. Reasonably priced meals offered. 202-484-7700. Westminster Presbyterian Church, 400 I St. SW. westminsterdc.org.

Sunday Concerts at the Phillips. Jan. 10, Stewart Goodyear; Jan. 17, Yevgeny Kutik & Timo Andres; Jan. 24, Nadia

MLK Day of Service Each year, Americans across the country come together on the Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday, this year Monday, Jan. 18, to honor Dr. King’s life and legacy by serving their communities. The MLK Day of Service is part of United We Serve, the President’s national service initiative, which calls on Americans to work together to solve our most pressing problems. Looking for a MLK Day volunteer job? Search serve.dc.gov for events and opportunities that will make a difference in your neighborhood. Remembrance at Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial. Jan. 18, 8 to 9 AM. Keynote by Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson. The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial, 1964 Independence Ave. SW. thememorialfoundation.org.

Sirota; Jan. 31. Feb. 7, Sandrine Piau. $30, $15 for members, students, and visitors 6 to 18. Ticket includes museum admission for the day of the concert. Advance reservations recommended. phillipscollection.org/music.

Student Conservation Association volunteers work with Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell to help clean up the Anacostia River. Photo: Courtesy of the Student Conservation Association

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Music at the Library of Congress. Jan. 16, 2 PM, Alban Gerhardt, cello and Manne-Marie McDermott, piano; Jan.

20, 8 PM, Musicians from Marlboro. These free concerts are in the Coolidge Auditorium on the Ground Floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. loc.gov. Music at Mr. Henry’s. Capitol Hill Jazz Jam every Wednesday night. Shows run 8 to 11 PM. Doors open at 6 PM. No cover. Two item per person minimum.


Happy New year from tHe atlas! Start Fresh with these January Performances! Compelling Theater

Mosaic Theater Company of DC: Wrestling Jerusalem 1/6 - 24 Nu Sass Productions: Stone Tape Party 1/21 - 2/7 Mosaic Theater Company of DC: I Shall Not Hate 1/23 - 2/14 Laugh-Out-Loud Comedy

Scientist Turned Comedian: Tim Lee 1/8 - 9

facebook.com/atlasarts

Fun for the Young Ones

Claire Parsons Company: Marmalade 1/21 - 24 Daring Musical Explorations

Neil Rolnick 1/29

@atlaspacdc

Atlas INTERSECTIONS Festival 2016 2/26 - 3/6 • Tickets on Sale Now!

Christylez Bacon: Washington Sound Museum 1/30

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Henry’s Upstairs, 601 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. 202-546-8412. mrhenrysdc.com.

THEATER AND FILM

West Side Story at Signature. Through Jan. 24. The musical, a collaboration of Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim, Jerome Robbins and Arthur Laurents, is considered to be one of the greatest of all time. Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave. signature-theatre.org. The Critic & The Real Inspector Hound at Shakespeare. Jan. 5 to Feb. 14. Experience a madcap night of life in the theatre with two classic behind-thescenes comedies. Lansburgh Theatre, 450 Seventh St. NW. 202-547-1122. shakespearetheatre.org. Wrestling Jerusalem: Mosaic Theater Company of DC at the Atlas. Jan. 6 to Jan. 24. One man’s journey to comprehend the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as it courses through his divided psyche and argumentative community. The Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993. atlasarts.org. The Sisters Wosensweig at Theater J. Jan. 13 to Feb. 21. The Rosensweig sisters are different as can be: a nononsense international banker, a kvelling mother of four and a bohemian world-traveling journalist. When the three hilariously reunite at Sara’s London home for her 54th birthday celebration, a barrage of suitors and unexpected revelations make for one interesting weekend. Theater J, 1529 16th St. NW. 800-494-8497. washingtondcjcc.org. Between Riverside and Crazy at Studio. Jan. 13 to Feb. 28. Irrepressible ex-cop Walter Washington is facing eviction, City Hall and the recent death of his wife. Studio Theatre, 1501 14th St. NW. 202-332-3300. studiotheatre.org.

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Chocolate Covered Ants at Anacostia Playhouse. Jan. 14 to Feb. 7. Adrienne Taylor (Suli Myrie) is a professor at a fictitious women’s college where she’s researching the plight of the Black woman in America. “Chocolate Covered Ants” chronicles the final leg of her research —an examination of Black men—to determine what effect (if any) they have on the mental, social and physical survival of Black women. $35. Read more and order tickets at restorationstage. biz or 202-714-0646. The Anacostia Playhouse is at 2020 Shannon Pl. SE. Sweat at Arena. Jan. 15 to Feb. 21. A group of close friends shares everything: drinks, secrets and laughs. But, when rumors of layoffs shake up the local steel mill, the fragile bonds of their community begin to fray and a horrific crime sends shock waves across two generations. Arena Stage, 1101 Sixth St. SW. arenastage.org. Picasso at the Lapin Agile at Keegan. Jan. 16 to Feb. 13. This long running Off-Broadway absurdist comedy places Albert Einstein and Pablo Picasso in a Parisian cafe in 1904, just before the renowned scientist transformed physics with his theory of relativity and the celebrated painter set the art world afire with cubism. Keegan Theatre, 1742 Church St. NW. 202265-3767. keegantheatre.com. I Shall Not Hate: Mosaic Theater Company of DC at the Atlas. Jan. 23 to Feb. 14. The story of the Gaza fertility doctor (nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize) who refuses to relinquish his commitment to coexistence, even after tragedy befalls his family during Operation Cast Lead. The Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993. atlasarts.org. National Theatre Live at Sidney Harmon Hall. Jan. 24 and 26, Coriolanus (Encore); Feb. 4, Jane Eyre. $20. Sidney Harman Hall, 610 F St. NW. shakespearetheatre.org.

January 2016 H 25


The

C o n g r at u l at e s

Eliot-Hine Middle School of Capitol Hill on their tremendous achievement of earning accreditation as an International Baccalaureate World School!

Way to go!

Music at Rock and Roll Hotel. Jan. 8, Calm the Waters; Jan. 9, 16, 23 and 30, DJS Rex Riot & Basscamp; Jan. 11, Metz; Jan. 19, Torres; Jan. 22, Those Darlins “Farewell Tour”; Feb. 6, Beauty Pill. Rock and Roll Hotel, 1353 H St. NE. 202-388-7625. rockandrollhoteldc.com.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Folger. Jan. 26 to Mar, 6. This magical comedy of tangled lovers, mischievous fairies—and a band of players to boot—is given a fresh, new staging by Aaron Posner, with DC favorites Holly Twyford as Bottom and Erin Weaver as Puck. Folger Theater, 201 East Capitol St. SE. 202-544-7077. folger.edu. Iphigenia by We Happy Few at CHAW. Jan. 29, 7:30 PM. A staged reading of Racine’s Iphigenia performed by We Happy Few Productions. We Happy Few presents stripped down, small cast, ensemble productions to provide unique perspectives on classic texts. Free. Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, 545 Seventh St. SE. 202-547-6839. chaw.org. The City of Conversation at Arena. Jan. 29 to Mar. 6. Georgetown hostess Hester Ferris runs in an elite circle, opening

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her home for political foes to lay down arms and raise a glass. When her son’s formidable, conservative wife comes on the scene, the parlor pleasantries of DC’s past descend into entrenched posturing and an ultimatum that could implode the family. arenastage.org. Guards at the Taj at Woolly. Feb. 1 to Feb. 28. India, 1648: two imperial guards watch as the sun rises over the newly-completed Taj Mahal, an aweinspiring monument to the emperor’s dead queen. Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company, 641 D St. NW. 202-393-3939. woollymammoth.net.

spOrts AnD Fitness Washington Wizards Basketball. Jan. 8, 13, 16, 18, 20, 23, 25 and 28; Feb. 3 and 5. Verizon Center. nba.com/wizards.


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To schedule an audition, email AYCManager@congressionalchorus.org, or call 301-502-4952. Info: www.congressionalchorus.org January 2016 H 27


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Washington Capitals Ice Hockey. Jan. 10, 14, 22, 24 and 27; Feb. 2, 4 and 7. Verizon Center. capitals. nhl.com. Washington Capitals Practice Schedule. Non-game day, 10:30 AM; game day, 10 AM; and day after game, 11 AM. All practices are at Kettler Capitals Iceplex, 627 No. Glebe Rd., Suite 800, Arlington, VA. They are free and open to the public. kettlercapitalsiceplex.com.

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JFK 20K and MLK 5K. Jan. 16, 9 AM to 1 PM. The races start and finish in Carderock and will be outand-back courses on the C&O Canal Towpath. The 20K will count as the fourth DC Road Runners Snowball Series race. No race day registration. Online registration will close at 7 PM on Jan. 15. dcroadrunners. org/sign-up/jfk-mlk. Canal Park Ice Skating. Through midMarch. Mondays and Tuesdays, noon to 7 PM; Wednesday to Friday, noon to 9 PM; Saturday, 11 AM to 10 PM; and Sunday, 11 AM to 7 PM. Adults are $9; children/seniors/military are $8; and skate rental is $4. It’s open every day including all holidays but the hours vary. Canal Park is at 202 M St. SE. canalparkdc.org. National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden Ice Skating. Through Mar. 13. Open Monday to Thursday, 10 AM to 9 PM; Fridays, 10 AM to 11 PM; Saturdays, 11 AM to 11 PM; Sundays, 11 AM to 9 PM. $8.50 for adults; $7.50 for age 50 and over, age 12 and under, and students with a valid school ID for two hour session beginning on the hour. $3 for skate rental. Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-216-9397. nga.gov. Washington Harbor Ice Rink. Through mid-March. Monday to Tuesday, noon to 7 PM; Wednesday to Thursday, noon to 9 PM; Fridays, noon to 10 PM; Saturdays, 10 AM to 10 PM; Sundays, 10 AM to 7 PM.


Skating is $9-$10. Skate rental is $5. Washington Harbor is at 3050 K St. NW. 202-706-7666. thewashingtonharbour.com. Public Skating at Fort Dupont Ice Arena. Fridays, noon to 2 PM and Saturdays 12:45 to 1:45 PM. Public Skate, $5 for adults (13-64); $4 for seniors and children (five to 12); $3, skate rental. Fort Dupont Ice Arena, 3779 Ely Pl. SE. 202584-5007. fdia.org. Zumba @ Southwest Library. Mondays, 7 PM. Instructor Roshaunda Jenkins will lead this one-hour fitness and dance workout. All fitness levels are welcome. The class is free and no registration is required. Southwest Neighborhood Library, 900 Wesley Pl. SW. 202-724-4752. dclibrary.org/southwest.

MARKETS Eastern Market. Daily except Mondays and important holidays. Weekdays, 7 AM to 7 PM; Saturdays, 7 AM to 5 PM; Sundays, 9 AM to 5 PM. Flea market and arts and crafts market open Saturdays and Sundays, 9 AM to 6 PM. Eastern Market is Washington’s last continually operated “old world” market. 200 block of Seventh St. SE. 202-6985253. easternmarketdc.com. Dupont Circle Farmers Market. Sundays (rain or shine), year round, 10 AM to 1 PM. 20th St. and Mass. Ave. NW, 1500 block of 20th Street NW. 202-362-8889. freshfarmmarket.org. Branch Avenue Pawn Parking Lot Flea Market. Saturdays, year-round (weather permitting). Set up after 10 AM. 3128 Branch Ave., Temple Hills, MD. Fresh Tuesdays at Eastern Market. Tuesdays, 3 to 7 PM. Farmers’ line of fresh produce. Eastern Market, 200 block of Seventh Street SE. 202698-5253. easternmarketdc.com.

January 2016 H 29


Create a New You in the New Year Embrace a Holistic Approach to Fitness Partner with Pattie Cinelli to: • Learn how to lose weight without dieting • Find an exercise program you enjoy and that works • Learn techniques to release stress

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Union Market. Tuesday-Friday, 11 AM to 8 PM; Saturday-Sunday, 8 AM to 8 PM. Union Market is an artisanal, curated, year round food market featuring over 40 local vendors. 1309 Fifth St. NE. 301-6527400. unionmarketdc.com. Georgetown Flea Market. Sundays year around except in the case of very inclement weather, 8 AM to 4 PM. 1819 35th St. NW. georgetownfleamarket.com. Maine Avenue Fish Market. Open 365 days a year, 7 AM to 9 PM. 1100 Maine Ave. SW. 202-484-2722.

ciVic liFe

Congresswoman Norton’s NW District Office. Open weekdays, 9 AM to 6 PM. 529 14th St. NW, Suite 900. 202-783-5065. norton.house.gov. ANC 6A. Second Thursday, 7 PM. Meeting at Miner Elementary School, 601 15th St. NE. 202-4238868. anc6a.org.

Start the new year ready to: 1) Lose Weight 2) Improve Energy 3) Increase Strength 4) Get Results

ANC 6B. Second Tuesday, 7 PM. Meeting at Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. 202-543-3344. anc6b.org. ANC 6C. Second Wednesday, 7 PM. Meeting at Heritage Foundation, 214 Mass. Ave. NE, First Floor Conference Room. 202-547-7168. anc6c.org. ANC 6D. Second Monday, 7 PM. Meeting at 1100 Fourth St. SW, DCRA Meeting Room, Second Floor. 202-554-1795. anc6d.org. ANC 6E. First Tuesday, 6:30 PM. Meeting at Watha T. Daniel/Shaw Library, 1630 Seventh St. NW. anc6e.org. Have an item for the Calendar? Email calendar@hillrag.com. ◆

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{capitol streets}

Bulletin Board Tour the Harper Macaw Chocolate Factory Harper Macaw, which opened in December 2015, is a fine chocolate venture founded by a Brazilian chocolate maker and a US Marine Veteran with an ambitious yet tangible objective: To turn chocolate into a force for tropical reforestation. Find out how that works at harpermacaw.com. The Harper Macaw Chocolate Factory is at 3160 Bladensburg Rd. NE. Tours are Saturdays, 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., and 5:30 p.m. harpermacaw.com.

caw Photo: erMa l. Harp ng tunne ieh from i k l h o c o c llar Dima Hadi thing Ste y r e Ev

New Southwest Fire Station and Hotel On Nov. 24, there was a grand opening of a complex that includes a state-of-the-art fire station, a Hyatt Place Hotel, and local non-profit Kid Power, Inc. The new home for Engine Company 13 features a $10 million modern facility for FEMS units that will serve the rapidly growing population of Southwest DC. Once a surface parking lot, 400 E St. SW houses the first brand new fire station to be built in the District in more than 20 years. The entire project provided 450 construction jobs, January 2016 H 33


{capitol streets}

will bring over 150 permanent jobs to the 214-room hotel, and generate nearly $1.5 million in annual tax revenues. Engine Company 13, Truck Company 10 and Foam Unit 2 are presently housed at a station on the corner Sixth and E Streets, SW, built in 1960.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Keep Unsheltered Residents Safe this Winter

Call DC Shelter Hotline at 1-800-535-7252 if you see someone in who appears to need shelter from the cold.

DC Streetcar Pre-Revenue Operations Resume

Craft and Craft Beer Night at CHAW

DDOT has announced the start of PreRevenue Operations (PRO) for DC Streetcar as they prepare the system for safety certification to carry passengers. PRO, which simulates service along the corridor without passengers, began on Dec. 16 along H St. NE and Benning Rd. The PRO will run for at least three weeks and will be extended as needed. This is the second time that streetcar has initiated PRO. During PRO, all streetcars will run during the times listed below with projected headways of 15 minutes: Monday-Thursday, 6 a.m. to midnight; Friday, 6 a.m. to 2 a.m.; Saturday, 8 a.m. to 2 a.m. For more information, visit dcstreetcar.com.

On fourth Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m., join teaching artist Cherie Lester for an evening of crafting, craft beer and community. While you work on projects that allow you to unwind and engage your creativity, enjoy artful conversations with friends old and new. No experience necessary. The fee is $35. Call 202-547-6839 to register. Upcoming dates are Jan. 22, Feb. 26, Mar. 25, Apr. 22, and May 27. chaw.org.

-------------------------------------------------EMULSION Art Show Calls for Entries

The participation is open to anyone 18 years and older who resides or creates art within 50 miles of East City Art’s headquarters at 922 G St. SE. This includes the greater DC and Baltimore regions. The application deadline is Feb. 15. The exhibition venue is Gallery O on H, 1354 H St. NE in the heart of the Atlas Entertainment District. EMULSION will be on view Apr. 9 to 15, with week-long programing such as panel discussions and artist talks. Read more at eastcityart.com/category/callsfor-entry.

-------------------------------------------------Claude Dambreville “The Finest Fabric”, 16” x 20”

Haitian Art and Handicrafts at St. Mark’s Over 300 original Haitian paintings and a vast array of unique handicrafts will be available for sale at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, 301 A St. SE, on Feb. 5, 6 to 8 p.m. (opening reception); Feb. 6, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Feb 7, 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. The sale is free and open to the public, with handicrafts starting from $5 and paintings from $50. All sales are 50 percent tax deductible. For more information, visit thehaitiproject.org or call 845-797-2123. For the past 14 years, the Vassar Haiti Project has not only supported Haitian artists, but proceeds from art sales fund sustainable development initiatives in Chermaitre in rural northwest Haiti.

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Career Talks at Southeast Library

Looking for new strategies to make your resume stand out? Come to Southeast Library on Mondays, Jan. 4, 11 or 25 at 7 p.m., for a series of three-hour talks from Lynda.com, a database focused on making the most of your resume. At the end of each talk, use what you have learned to review and improve your resume. Southeast Neighborhood Library, 403 Seventh St. SE. 202-6983377. dclibrary.org/southeast.

-------------------------------------------------Registration Open for Cupid’s Undie Run

DC’s Undie Run is Saturday, Feb. 13. Festivities start at noon on the day of the race. Participants run and dance through the streets returning for postrace festivities and awards. Read more and register at cupidsundierun.com. Whether you’re interested in working packet pick-up, helping decorate the venue or working the course on race day, there are a variety of volunteer spots where they can use your help.

-------------------------------------------------Southwest AARP to Meet with Police Chief

The Southwest Waterfront AARP Chapter #4751 will hold its January luncheon meeting on Wednesday, Jan. 20, at noon in the River Park Mutual Home’s Community Room, 1311 Delaware Ave. SW. MPD Chief Kathy L. Lanier will speak and take questions. Lunch is $5. For further information, contact Chapter President Betty Jean Tolbert Jones at bettyjeantolbertjones@ yahoo.com or 202-554-0901.

-------------------------------------------------Village Voices: Monuments Men

Maygene Daniels, a world-renowned archivist at the National Gallery of Art will present a talk on the Monuments Men, Monday Jan. 12, from 7 to 8 p.m. at Northeast Library, 330 Seventh St.


NE. The Monuments Men true adventure story began in Washington, DC and continued in battle zones in Italy, France, Belgium, and Germany during and after the war. Listen to stories and see rich illustrations about the real Monuments Men (and women), the military officers who saved art, archives, libraries and cultural monuments in Europe during World War II. Capitol Hill Village is sponsoring a series, “Village Voices”, for the community to meet and learn from each other in informal, free, public discussions about a range of social, economic and political topics. The series is free, open to the public and does not require (but does prefer) registration. To register, call 202-543-1778 or email info@capitolhillvillage.org with your name and number attending.

----------------------------------------Affordable Senior Housing Planned for Ward 6

The District has approved plans to develop Plaza West, a Ward 6 development that will bring 223 units of affordable housing for seniors and families in the Mount Vernon Triangle neighborhood. This unique $84 million development project will provide 50 housing units for “grandfamilies,” grandparents raising grandchildren who make 30-40 percent of Area Median Income (AMI) and 173 units of housing serving individuals and families making 50-60 percent of AMI, with 11 of those units set aside for Department of Behavioral Health clients. The site at Fourth and K Streets NW, currently vacant, includes three parcels totaling nearly 34,500 square feet. The 12-story Plaza West development

January 2016 H 35


will provide on-site social services for grandfamilies and over 9,500 square feet of outdoor recreational space. Plaza West construction is set to begin early 2016 with delivery scheduled for the spring of 2017.

preserving digital photographs. Workshop takes place on Saturday, Jan. 30 from 10 a.m. to noon and from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Kiplinger Research Library at 801 K St. NW. Register at dchistory.org/digital-workshops.

Seven Screen Cinema Coming to NoMa

Get Ready for Atlas INTERSECTIONS 2016

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A 1,200 seat, seven-screen movie complex is coming to NoMa as part of JBG’s development between First and North Capitol Streets NE at Patterson. The project, breaking ground this winter, will include 220 apartments, 382,000 square feet of lofted office space, 28,000 square feet of curated retail and four levels of underground parking. nomabid.org.

---------------------------------------------Jobseeker Legal Clinics

Are you having difficulties getting or keeping a job? On Thursdays, Jan. 14, Feb. 11, Mar. 10 and Apr. 14, 3 p.m., attend a Jobseeker Legal Clinic at Southwest Library. Meet one-onone with an attorney from Neighborhood Legal Services Program to find out if you have a barrier to employment that an attorney may be able to help you resolve. You can get information about issues like criminal record sealing, credit reports, background checks, obtaining driving and professional licenses, resolving child support arrearages and other issues. Southwest Neighborhood Library, 900 Wesley Pl. SW. 202-7244752. dclibrary.org/southwest.

---------------------------------------------DC Personal Archiving Workshop

Wondering how best to maintain photos on your phone, digital camera, and social media accounts? The Library of Congress, DC Public Library, and the Historical Society of Washington, DC, invite you to join National Digital Stewardship Resident Jaime Mears for a how-to on

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Kicking off the Atlas Performing Arts Center 10th Anniversary, the Atlas Intersections Festival 2016 (Feb. 26 to Mar. 6) brings the best of DC arts and artists to the stage with performances, experiences and happenings in theatre, dance, music, vocal, choral, opera, visual arts, video, film, writing, sculpture, photography, circus, spoken word, public art, community art, and art space activation. Discover how art, culture and connection happen on H Street. atlasarts.org.

---------------------------------------------Author Reads Book on Family Lynching

On Sunday, Jan. 24, 3 to 5 p.m., at Westminster DC, 400 I St. SW, author Karen Branan will read from and sign copies of her book, “The Family Tree: A Lynching in Georgia, A Legacy of Secrets, My Search for the Truth.” It is the tragic story of the lynching of four African Americans, a woman, a preacher, and a relative of the author, by a mob made up of the author’s family, some of whom were law officers. The public reception will begin at 3 p.m. Readings by the author will begin at 3:30 p.m. and be punctuated by live music of well-known artists who have been part of Westminster’s Blue Monday Blues. A discussion of the current racial climate and its connections to the history related in the book will follow.

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The District’s First-Ever Tree Summit At the Tree Summit on Dec. 18,


January 2016 H 37


Lucinda Prout Janke Lucinda Prout Janke, 72, died unexpectedly on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 in Washington, D.C. An accomplished DC Historian, and 45-year resident of Capitol Hill, she is survived by her daughter Jennifer Lindsay and her son John, her brother H. Thompson Prout, her sister Shirley Baroody, her brother-in-law Robert C. Janke; cousins Debbie Macomber, Barbara Boucher, David Prout, Joan Witte, Ed Dixon, four grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Memorial services will be held Christ Church (620 G Street, SE) on January 16 at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in her memory to the Historical Society of Washington, D.C. and/or the Old Naval Hospital Foundation in support of the Hill Center Preservation Fund.

Mayor Bowser announced the launch of Canopy 3,000. This shortterm public-private partnership is aimed at expanding the number of trees planted on private property and public spaces throughout the District. Canopy 3,000 will plant an additional 3,000 trees in the District in 2016. The mayor committed the city to contributing $400,000 in seed funding, enough to plant over 1,300 trees. The mayor also announced the establishment of the Urban Forestry Advisory Committee to expand coordination and assist the District in meeting its Sustainable DC goal to achieve a 40 percent healthy tree canopy by 2032. For more information about tree initiatives and programs in the District, visit doee. dc.gov/trees.

---------------------------------------------District Traffic Safety Action Plan Released

Under “Vision Zero,” the city has committed to eliminating fatalities and serious injuries to walkers, bikers and drivers by 2024. The Vision Zero Action Plan is the result of an extensive planning process involving 30 government agencies, community groups and residents. The plan places a high priority on making safety improvements and refining how the city monitors and addresses hazardous street conditions. During the planning process, residents reported more than 4,500 hazardous locations. Those sites can now be mapped along with historical crash data to inform the District’s engineering, education, and enforcement efforts. For more information, visit dcvisionzero.com.

---------------------------------------------DC Water Expands Walk-in Payment Options

DC Water now authorizes cash walkin payments at more than 150 locations in DC, Maryland and Virginia. Over 50 of those locations are in the District. DC Water contracted with Global Express Financial Services, a vendor that works with local establishments to accept authorized walk-in cash payments on behalf of utilities. The payment centers have already begun accepting DC Water bill payments. The locations include convenience and grocery stores, delis and check-cashing centers. DC Water will close its 810 First St. NE payment office and drop box on Jan. 29, 2016. Payments post on the same day if paid by 2 p.m. The service is absolutely free. Authorized payment locations can be found at global-expresss. net/storelocator.

----------------------------------------------

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Free Small Business Legal Advice

The DC Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) provides International Lifeguard Training. Courses will be offered through June 2016.

There is a free Small Business Brief Advice Legal Clinic on Wednesday, Jan. 13 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. at the John A. Wilson District Building, 1350 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Room G-9. This clinic is for aspiring or ex-

Become a Trained Lifeguard

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DPR employs certified International Lifeguard Training Program lifeguards year round in order to serve District residents and guests at DPR Aquatic Facilities. The program is a single, integrated curriculum that successfully trains lifeguards and lifeguard instructors through proven methods and state-of-the-art rescue skills. DPR is offering an incentive and will waive registration fees for any class that starts on or before Monday, Feb. 1, 2016. Interested parties should register at dcdpr.asapconnected.com. For questions concerning lifeguard training, contact Aisha Moten at aisha.moten@dc.gov.


isting small business owners. Attendees will meet one-on-one with attorneys for brief advice on any legal issues their businesses may be facing.

----------------------------------------Pickleball Arrives at DPR

The fastest growing adult sport in the nation has arrived in DC. The “thwack” of a paddle on a pickleball can be heard at three DPR rec centers. Pickleball is a racquet sport that combines elements of tennis, table tennis and badminton. The court is smaller than a tennis court; it is the size of a doubles badminton court, and therefore easier for senior adults to play than traditional tennis. This program is offered at King Greenleaf Recreation Center at 201 N St. SW from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Tuesdays; at the Emery Recreation Center at 5701 Georgia Ave. NW from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesdays; and the Sherwood Recreation Center at 640 10th St. NE from 1 to 3 p.m. on Thursdays. Instruction is free. Attend a demonstration. Equipment is available to borrow dpr.dc.gov.

----------------------------------------Lowe’s Opens at Fort Lincoln

On December 3, Lowe’s opened a store at the Shops at Dakota Crossing, 2438 Market St. NE. This store brings 150 jobs to District. It is one of several new tenants coming to this Ward 5 development project.

----------------------------------------Historic Preservation Promotes Vibrant Neighborhoods

Rhonda Sincavage, Director of Publications and Programs at the National Trust for Historic

The Vassar Haiti Project and Vassar Club of Washington, D.C. host a

Haitian Art Sale at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church • CAPITOL HILL 301 A Street SE • Washington, DC 20003 Featuring 200 original Haitian paintings and thousands of unique handcrafts. Paintings start at $50, gifts start at $5, and all purchases are 50% tax deductible. All proceeds to fund sustainable development in Chermaitre, a mountain village in NW Haiti.

Friday, Feb. 5 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm (OPENING RECEPTION)

Saturday, Feb. 6 10:00 am - 4:00 pm Sunday, Feb. 7 9:30 am - 2:00 pm

For more information: http://thehaitiproject.org • haitiproject@vassar.edu • 845-797-2123

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CLIP & SAVE Brush Up on your Driving Skills

AARP Smart Driver Courses The AARP Smart Driver course is geared toward drivers 50+, covers practical defensive driving techniques and the normal changes in vision, hearing and adjusting reaction times associated with aging. Participants learn the latest rules of the road and tips on operating their vehicles safely in today’s challenging driving environment. DC participants should contact their auto insurance company about multi-year discounts. The award winning AARP Smart Driver classroom course is held all year, through out the city. Go to: www.aarp. org/drive & click on LOCATE to find a course near you or call-1-877-846-3299. Instructors add course locations through out the year. Or, take it online in the comfort of your home. The 6-hour basic course is for participants who have never taken an AARP driver-safety course. The 4-hour refresher is a review and update of concepts from the original course, for participants who have not taken a course during the two previous years. There is a course fee of $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members payable to the instructor for the classroom course, $19.95 & $24.95 via credit card for the online course. Looking for a rewarding volunteer opportunity for the New Year? Become a Smart Driver Instructor in your neighborhood. For more information, go again to; www.aarp.org/ drive. Click on “Volunteer” on the left, fill out the application, click ‘submit’. Your application will be forwarded to the DC team for follow-up.

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Preservation, addresses the Capitol Hill Restoration Society at 7 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 25 at Maury School, 1250 Constitution Ave. NE. Sincavage’s talk will explore the relationship between historic preservation, quality of life, and the continued vibrancy of communities. Capitol Hill, in the midst of rapid change, is confronted with issues such as the economics, diversity and environmental sustainability of the Historic District. The doors open at 6:30 p.m. The event is free, handicapped-accessible and the public is encouraged to attend; no reservations required.

------------------------------------DOEE Launches “Green Pathways” Website

The DC Department of Energy and Environment (DOEE) has launched Green Pathways. This new online portal connects residents with full-time and part-time green employment, internships, fellowships, volunteer opportunities, and summer jobs at DOEE. Through this program, DOEE anticipates hiring more than 60 full-time and part-time employees during the 2016 fiscal year. Committed to providing individuals with the opportunity to learn, gain valuable experience, and develop skills to help them progress in their education and career, DOEE’s Green Pathways has opportunities for individuals with varying levels of education, skills and experience. This program en-

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ables interested applicants to apply for current green employment opportunities or submit a resume for future opportunities. For more information about DOEE, or to browse Green Pathways opportunities, visit doee. dc.gov/greenpathways.

------------------------------------DC Jewish Civil Rights and Anti-War Activism

On Sunday, Jan. 24 from 2 to 4 p.m., visiting Scholar at George Washington University (and the Director of the Foundation for Jewish Studies), Lauren Strauss talks about the significant role Jews played in the Vietnam War protests as well as their part in the larger narrative regarding the era’s social movements. Anacostia Community Museum is at 1901 Fort Pl. SE. anacostia.si.edu.

------------------------------------SMART911 Mobile App Information

Smart911 (smart911.com) enables citizens to create a free safety profile for their households. These profiles provide critical, lifesaving data, such as floor plans and medical conditions to 911 call takers and dispatchers that they in turn can provide to police, fire and emergency medical personnel before their arrival at a scene.

Thomas Jenkins & Company Certified Public Accountants Corporation, Partnership, Trust, Individual Income Tax & Financial Planning

202-547-9004

316 Pennsylvania Avenue SE, Suite 402 Washington, DC 20003 www.tjcocpa.com

-------------------------------------

Have an item for the Bulletin Board? Email bulletinboard@ hillrag.com. u

January 2016 H 41


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District Beat

Measuring School Success

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C parents and education advocates went on a test-score rollercoaster during the closing months of 2015: Results from the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC), a new standardized assessment used by the city, indicated only 10 percent of 10th graders in public schools were either proficient or advanced in math; 25 percent reached those levels in English Language Arts (ELA). Then the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) report declared the city’s fourth graders displayed one of the “biggest gains” nationally in reading since 2013, causing elected officials to cheer. That was before the second round of PARCC scores arrived, revealing that only 24 percent of students in third through eighth grades were proficient or advanced in math; 25 percent of them reached that standard in ELA. That ride didn’t produce the giddy pleasure associated with roller coasters. Rather, some people wonder whether District residents, whose tax dollars finance public education, are being fleeced. Others wonder whether test scores are the only numbers to consider when measuring the system’s success. Deputy Mayor for Education Jennifer Niles has suggested high school graduation rates, student enrollment, and school modernization are equally important. Growth in those areas, she said during a press conference last fall, “[gives] us the momentum we need to drive toward providing a world-class education to all of our students.” Eboni-Rose Thompson, head of the residentled Ward 7 Education Council, said calculating multiple factors is important. “I do think in a lot of ways kids are better off than they were. A lot of people have the sense things are better. But do we know how much better?”

In the Mix Employing Niles’ measuring standard, the DC Public Schools (DCPS) education ecosystem

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by Jonetta Rose Barras seems healthy and thriving, at least on the surface. Public-school enrollment is 87,749, a two percentage-point increase over last year, according to a preliminary audit released by the Office of the State Superintendent for Education of the 201516 populations at DCPS and charter schools. The hike, resulting in 48,653 in DCPS and 39,096 in charters, may be attributed in part to the District’s pre-kindergarten program, which allows for three- and four-year-old children to attend school full time, free of charge. Each year has seen greater demand, instigating additional classes at many schools. Sara Maldonado, a spokesperson for the charter school board, said that Pre-k 3 and Pre-k 4 students account for 19 percent of its total enrollment; that population grew from 395 in 2002 to 6,425 in the 2014-15 school year. While both sectors have benefited, it appears that the DCPS’ enrollment numbers begin to dip after the fifth grade through the middle years; charters have been advantaged by that decline. The total number of white students in DCPS grew in the 2014-15 school year to 12 percent, up from 10 percent the previous year. Hispanic enrollment jumped from 15 percent in 2011-12 to 17 percent in 2014-15. The number of black students dropped, however, from 71 percent in 201112 to 67 percent in 2014-15. The charter sector also is predominantly African-American. The Equity report, published by the Office of the State Superintendent for Education (OSSE), indicates during 2014-15 that female enrollment in public schools was slightly higher than male, and many students participated in the free-lunch program, traditionally an indicator of economic status. Translation: Public schools in the District look pretty much as they have for the past decade: minority and working class. The complexion of the overall student body may not have changed but the city has dumped loads of money into the public education coffers. According to the 21st Century School Fund, in the past eight years, DC has spent nearly $5 billion to modernize buildings. Nevertheless, there are at least two dozen facilities in desper-

ate need of renovation. “The state of facilities is a distinctive but important component when we think about how we are doing,” said Matt Frumin, head of the Coalition for D.C. Public Schools and Communities. “It wasn’t that long ago when [it] was one of the true scandals. Bit by bit we are making real progress. “That’s the hardware,” continued Frumin.

Turning to Gold or Gold-Plated The 2014-15 operating budget for all schools – traditional and charters –excluding construction funds, was more than $1.2 billion. That included money for salary increases for “highly qualified” instructors and the supplement for “at risk kids,” which the DC Council approved two years ago. But the abysmal student achievement levels, or what Frumin might call the software, raise questions about whether residents are getting their money’s worth. Consider those high school PARCC scores, for example. None –nada, zilch –of the students was proficient in math at eight of the 16 participating schools. One of those schools, Ballou Senior High, received a multimillion dollar renovation. Only eight percent of Wilson High School’s students scored at proficient; it too went through major modernization. Benjamin Banneker, a predominantly black application-only high school, where 48 percent of the students are considered economically disadvantaged, continues to wait for improvements to its facility; it had a proficiency rate of only 32 percent in math. By comparison, 76 percent of students at Schools Without Walls were proficient; 39 percent of the overall population is African-American while 17 percent of all students are considered economically disadvantaged. “For eight years, DC leaders have said that the [schools] are getting better,” said Logan Wiley, a Ward 7 resident and educator. “The latest round of assessments that used PARCC showed that it was all a farce. Why should anyone listen to these snake-oil salespeople?” “We have seen consistent growth in every metric of success, and I expect to see the same


with PARCC in the coming years,” DCPS Chancellor Kaya Henderson said at the release of PARCC scores. “I am confident that DCPS is on the right track for ensuring all of our young people are college and career ready, and that we will see our scores improve each year.” Truthfully, those celebrated NAEP scores were not that great either. Only 31 percent of fourth graders were proficient in math; seven percent scored at advanced level. Only 19 percent of their eight-grade counterparts were proficient; four percent were advanced. Erich Martel, a retired DCPS teacher who has closely studied the results of education reform, noted that the NAEP scores are related to a shift in student demographics. “What they are doing is operating one mechanism of gentrification. There is a correlation between the increase of whites in the system, who are almost entirely middle-and upper-income,” he added. He has a point. The cohort of pre-kindergarten students who came into the system under former Chancellor Michelle Rhee has made its way through the system and is having favorable albeit minimal impact on academic results. “District fourth graders, who have benefitted from more rigorous instruction from the beginning of their academic lives, made significant progress in reading that outpaced gains made by other states,” said State Superintendent Hanseul Kang when announcing NAEP test results. That same trend was evident in the PARCC scores. A significant number of students were at basic. Officials expect an increasing number of them to reach proficient levels within the next two or three years. That may be why former State Board of Education President Robert Bobb has been a strong support of the Common Core curriculum and the PARCC assessment. He said the shift is “a major step forward for all students, regardless of zipcode.” He argued that under former DCPS Superintendent Clifford Janey, Chancellor Michelle Rhee, and current leadership there has been a “dogged focus on leveling the playing field.” What’s more, add-

ed Bobb “Any time you can advance even a point, it’s important.”

Metric Search If education reform were a political campaign, many people would be calculating the amount of money it has taken to realize inconsistent incremental increases academic performance. But as Frumin and others have cautioned, standardized test scores cannot be treated as the Holy Grail. “The key metric has to be growth, not the snapshot measures of proficiency.” Frumin used the illustration of two classrooms to make his point. In Classroom A, 85 percent of the students have been proficient over the last two years. In Classroom B, 40 percent were proficient last year; that number is up to 60 percent this year. “Focusing on the snapshot, it could look like nothing good is happening in Classroom B, but that clearly would be wrong,” he continued. “Focusing on growth, Classroom B looks stellar while Classroom A, not so much. We’re moving toward focusing on growth more, which is positive. But we need to make it a clear focus,” he added There also are other subjective but critical, areas, like extracurricular activities or the overall school environment, that parent should evaluate. “When one walks into a school, generally you can feel it: the joy, or the pall, the energy or the lack of it. Creating environments where kids, families and communities thrive is magic. We all worry about subjective measures, but we also lose something important when we lose sight of such factors. [end quote; who is talking] In other words, Niles may be right. There can be no single metric when evaluating public education success. The whole is equally as important as the parts. Parents trying to make that all important decision of where to enroll their children have to knock on the schoolhouse door, step inside, rummage through every nook and cranny, and search for the magic while talking with faculty, students, and other parents. Jonetta Rose Barras is a freelance writer and author. u

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Paid Family Leave is Good for Everyone The Numbers

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o one should have to choose between caring for the people we love and earning the money we need to get by. Yet every day in DC, too many working residents face this choice. While Social Security helps workers maintain their income when they retire or face a long-term disability, and Unemployment Insurance is there for workers who lose their job, we do not have any tools to support workers financially when they need time off to be with a new child, to recover from a short-term illness, or to care for an ill relative. Many workers simply don’t take time off, which can be harmful to their health or the health of their family. For workers who do take time off, it can mean a major loss of income and even a lost job. The District is one of a growing number of communities considering paid family leave insurance to address this gap. A proposal before the DC Council would create a fund to pay workers some or all of their wages for up to 16 weeks when they take time off for these family reasons. Paid family leave would support a healthier work-life balance in a city not known for that. When parents have paid leave, mothers and fathers develop stronger bonds with a new child, with lasting impacts on that child’s health and future success. Ensuring workers have time off during an illness or to care for an ill relative leads to better health and reduces the need for expensive interventions. And by helping workers keep their jobs and maintain their incomes, paid family leave would help DC residents pay the rent or mortgage and other bills. This would be especially helpful to low-wage workers, almost none of whom have paid leave benefits. The proposal would be funded in part by a new tax on employer payrolls, and in some cases by a deduction from employee paychecks. While it is unclear how much the program would cost, it is certain that the tax

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by Ed Lazere would be far smaller than what employers and employees pay into Social Security. A worker earning $20 an hour, for example, would pay just 12 cents per hour for this benefit under the leading proposal. Some businesses have complained that the cost of paid family leave would hurt them and the DC economy, just as they complained about indoor smoking bans and minimum wage increases, without evidence afterwards of any problems. In this case, a DC-created program would allow small businesses to provide a tremendous benefit they currently are not able to provide, and it would help all businesses by reducing turnover and enabling workers to be productive. It is hard to see how that is bad for business.

Paid Family Leave is Good for Families! The United States is the only industrialized nation without paid leave. In the U.S., seven out of eight people must give up their paycheck when they have a baby, become ill or care for a family member. One in four working mothers must return to work just two weeks after giving birth because they don’t have access to paid family and medical leave. Having access to paid leave helps parents bond with their children and helps people who are ill heal properly. Mothers who take maternity leave are more likely to begin breastfeeding and to breastfeed longer than mothers who do not take leave. Access to paid family leave is associated with improved infant and young child health. And fathers who take paternity leave are more likely to be involved in child-care activities in the child’s early years. Paternal involvement during early childhood has positive effects on the child’s later success in school.

Paid Family Leave Is Good for Women By making it easier for women to stay in the labor force after having a child, paid family leave increases the chance that a mom will stay


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with the same employer. Research from other communities suggests that paid family leave could result in 6,500 more women working in DC, narrowing the gap in labor force participation between men and women. Paid family leave also helps women maintain their earnings, because it decreases the risk of lost work experience and lost seniority. Paid family thus could narrow the $5,800 difference in the typical earnings of men and women in DC.

Paid Family Leave Is Good for Low-Wage Workers Most low- and moderate-income residents do not have paid leave benefits and thus risk losing their jobs and getting behind on bills when they need to take time from work. At a time of falling wages and high unemployment for DC residents without a college degree, paid family leave can help more families thrive. DC residents without a college degree increasingly stay unemployed for an extended period. In 2012, for example, more than half of the city’s African American residents who lost their jobs stayed out of work more than six months. In 2007, just one-fifth of unemployed workers had this kind of trouble.

Paying for Family Leave Insurance Some businesses and business groups oppose the legislation to create paid family leave, because it would require a tax of 1 percent on payroll (or less than 1 percent when all business expenses are considered). While any new cost on business should be weighed carefully, the cost here appears relatively modest, and it generates a sub-

stantial benefit in return. It would allow small businesses to support their workers in ways they cannot now. And it would help all businesses by reducing turnover that occurs when workers take unpaid leave. By giving workers time to attend to personal and family needs, it also would ensure that workers are at their most productive. The argument that this payroll tax will lead to business failures seems dramatic, especially given that the same claims are made every time a new business rule is raised. Businesses objected when the District required them to provide up to seven days of paid sick leave to workers, yet surveys after the fact show no widespread detrimental effects. It’s worth noting that paid family leave would be funded by a payroll deduction – rather than a tax on employers – for DC residents who work for the federal government or who work outside of DC. Yet even here the costs would be relatively modest, while giving workers a tremendous benefit. A resident earning $20 an hour would pay just 12 cents an hour, and a worker earning $50 an hour would pay 40 cents an hour. Paying a little bit from each paycheck so that we don’t have to go without pay when we have a child, need to care for an ill parent, or need time to recover from an illness is good for families, good for children, and good for the DC economy. Lazere is executive director of the DC Fiscal Policy Institute (www.dcfpi.org). DCFPI promotes budget and policy solutions to reduce poverty and inequality in the District of Columbia, and to increase the opportunity for residents to build a better future. For more information on DC’s paid family leave campaign, go to www.dcpaidfamilyleave.org/ u

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Arlington N. $679,900

Walk to Westover Village from this charming 3 bedroom, 2 bath Cape nestled on lovely garden lot offering 2,304 base sqft, living room with FP, upper level master with sitting room, lower level rec room, a relaxing sun deck and a fantastic level lot just perfect for pets and play.

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Jonetta’s Take Get Ready to Rumble by Jonetta Rose Barras

Will Gray go back on the campaign trail? Photo: Andrew Lightman

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or Mayor Muriel Bowser (D), 2015 may have felt like a never-ending round of political fights, as she sought to assert her executive privileges, control territory and launch somewhat controversial policies. But 2016 will make last year seem like a summer boat ride on the Potomac if former Mayor Vincent C. Gray (D) implements his revenge scheme. He has threatened to run for the DC Council, representing Ward 7 or serving in an at-large capacity. While he never made it to court or jail following an extensive federal investigation into corruption in his 2010 mayoral campaign, Gray’s comeback plan seems to have the contours of someone who did—Marion Barry. After being arrested in 1990, Barry was forced to abandon his reelection bid. Two years later, however, the three-term mayor, who had returned from prison, decided he wanted back in the game. He staked out the Ward 8 council seat that was held by his friend and political ally Wilhelmina Rolark. Unsurprisingly, he beat her. In 1994, he ran for mayor, winning a fourth term. Punch-drunk from the whipping by the congressionally appointed financial control board that stripped him of much of his mayoral prerogatives, Barry retired in 1998. The rocking chair didn’t fit well. So, once again, he tapped the Ward 8 coun-

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cil seat, which was held, this time, by Sandy Allen—a woman who had helped keep his voting base intact while he was in prison. If Gray runs for the Ward 7 council seat, as many predict, he, too, will betray a former ally and protégé, Yvette Alexander. Sometimes, it seems a foot-stool life for women in DC politics. “It’s not good,” said one government official, who, like others I spoke with, asked not to be quoted by name, worrying about the potential backlash from all sides. Forget about fairness. Gray has retained strong support east of the Anacostia River. In the 2014 Democratic Primary, he bested Bowser in both Wards 7 and 8—59.48 percent in the former and 57.02 percent in the latter. With numbers like those, will Gray become the newest member of the back-stabbers club? “In her last election, Yvette only got 40 percent of the vote,” said a political operative who likely will work in Alexander’s campaign. “It’s definitely going to be a competitive race.” Tangling with Alexander could mean shadowboxing with Bowser, who has counted the Ward 7 legislator as part of her council caucus--those members who are either enamored of the mayor’s policy agenda or worried about crossing her political machine, fondly called the Green Team. And, while that independent political action committee, FreshPac, may have closed down, as chief executive Bowser hasn’t lost the Midas Touch. She still can help candidates raise money. Who will step up and open their wallets for Gray? Can he match Bowser’s fundraising prowess-without a shadow campaign operation? Meanwhile, other primary council races dominated by incumbents, including Jack Evans in Ward 2, Brandon Todd in Ward 4, and Kenyan McDuffie in Ward 5, promise to be sleepers. If Republican Dave Oberting gets on the ballot as that party’s at-large candidate, he probably won’t have any opposition. It’s not clear yet whether the Statehood/Green Party will have a competitive primary. As in the past, most of the infighting will be relegated to the Democratic Party. Ward 8’s LaRu-

by May vying for a full four-year term could have a rematch with Trayon White, who came within striking distance during last spring’s special election. A loss by May “will be by default a rejection of the mayor,” said Melik Abul, Ward 8 resident and author of the newly created Countercreed blog. A potential win by Gray in Ward 7 and White in Ward 8 would spell trouble for Bowser; her enemies would be at the door. Scrutiny of her public policies similar to that endured over her crime-busting, body-camera installation plan would become the norm and not the exception— although that might be a good thing. Reducing crime will have to be among the tangibles Bowser produces in 2016, if she wants to keep her few east of the river voters out of Gray’s pockets. The mayor might have a stellar year in 2016, said Evans, “with the building of a soccer stadium and the Wizards’ practice facility.” That would mean, he continued, “there would finally be economic development east of the river.” Gray could surprise us and run for the at-large seat. If he jumps into the Democratic primary he could imperil incumbent Vincent Orange (D). In last year’s mayoral primary when they were both on the ballot, a politically wounded Gray slaughtered Orange. In Ward 5, for example, Orange received 573 votes (4.40 percent) while Gray received 6,155 (47. 26 percent). Since then, Orange has sidled up nicely to Bowser. He could become the recipient of her citywide voter support, campaign manpower and donor lists. Gray might have a better chance ditching the Democratic Party and making a run for the independent line, as incumbent Council member David Grosso (I) did nearly four years ago to gain his seat in the legislature. That would amplify the action in the November General Election. Grosso has gained popularity citywide and has a strong base. But, if Orange wins the June Democratic Primary and Gray is an independent on the General Election ballot, Grosso is vulnerable. Some voters, mostly African Americans, still see race before character and policy platform. This


is a presidential election year, which could result in a strong showing at the polls from Democrats in general and blacks in particular. They are likely to punch in for Orange and Gray, leaving Grosso on the sidelines—unless Bowser, buying the adage “the enemy of my enemy is my friend,” lends the incumbent an assist. You can bet 2016 will be a hot mess. Political junkies will be on an everlasting high, although it could get nauseous at times. Council candidates are likely to use the annual budget process as their stage to highlight their policies and blowout the difference between themselves and their opponents. They also will pander to special interest constituencies, introducing legislation that has little chance of passing the council but will give the impression that they care. The campaign to end homelessness will shift into high gear, as Bowser attempts to create traction around a signature policy issue that will serve as a key platform for her 2018 reelection. It might be an undercard compared to the expected political dynamics. But as she starts constructing ward-based shelters, Nimbyism will return to center stage with a vengeance. Some residents certainly will attempt to protect the character of their communities and their safety, against a population that includes a large number of people with substance abuse and mental health problems. That’s right: Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose. Jonetta Rose Barras is a freelance writer. u

January 2016 H 47


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New Health Clinic Garners Skepticism Andromeda Transcultural Health Fails to Communicate with its 15th Street Neighbors

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n ew mental health and substance abuse clinic on the 200 block of 15th Street SE caused a stir in the Capitol Hill community with its plans to open in January 2016. The clinic — Andromeda Transcultural Health — plans to serve about 100 patients in the 3000-square-foot, threestory location. Neighbors and the local Advisory Neighborhood Committee (ANC) commissioner didn’t hear about the group’s plans until renovations were nearly finished. Commissioner Chander Jayaraman (6B08) finally reached Andromeda’s executives on Dec. 14 and plans to hold a community meeting with them on Jan. 8 at 7 p.m. (Location to be announced.) This new site is Andromeda’s third in DC. Doctors at the clinic will see patients from all over DC and the local community who need help recovering from substance addictions and handling mental illnesses, said Warren O’Hearn, Andromeda’s finance and administrative director. They will not offer methadone treatments.

Asking More Questions, Receiving Slow Answers Sudden renovations to the 15th Street building caught neighbor and local realtor Evelyn Branic’s attention. She said she fears increased crime and danger in her mostly residential area with a clinic serving recovering addicts nearby. As someone who has lived in the Hill community for more than thirty years, she saw the damage drug activity did to the area in the1980s. But she said a previous clinic nearby cleared up the issue years ago. She didn’t realize the area needed help combating drug activity again. And she said that as a community member, she deserved a notification about the new clinic. “How often can this happen in our commu-

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by Christine Rushton nity that we don’t know who our neighbors are?” Branic said. “It baffles me that we needed something in this community.” For her, Andromeda’s clinic services also seem redundant with plans approved in 2014 to open a Community Action Group (CAG) drug addiction administrative office a few blocks away on the 100 block of 15th Street SE. Community conversations could have helped answer Branic’s and others’ questions — what are the security plans, what will the clinic offer? She said Andromeda didn’t reach out. The board at Andromeda sent a statement to the Hill Rag explaining their plans for the new site. In it, they said they will invite the community to conversations that will address their questions and alleviate concerns. They will also host an open house when services start. Jayaraman agreed with Branic’s concerns about the sudden and uncommunicative move into their neighborhood. He recently entered into conversation with the 7-Eleven store going in on the 1500 blocks of Massachusetts Avenue SE and Independence Avenue SE and already handles concerns about traffic coming to and from DC General Emergency Family Hypothermia Shelter and the CAG. “What I’m concerned about is there is going to be a potential increase in loitering, trash, criminal activity, even substance abuse,” Jayaraman said.

Filling a Service Gap on Capitol Hill Andromeda leased the new location for $6,000 a month in November and started immediately renovating. The deal came quickly after another location turned Andromeda down based on the substance abuse services they offer — O’Hearn said his team was offended. They accepted the more agreeable offer on 15th Street. O’Hearn said they saw a gap in service on Capitol Hill. “The area is underserved

in terms of mental health and substance abuse services,” the board said. “By working with the [Addiction, Prevention and Recovery Administration], we determined this was the best location that met our requirements.” The new site also sits within five blocks of two metro stations — Potomac Avenue and Stadium Armory — and several bus stops. Patients from other parts of the city can easily travel to appointments there. As for the building, the interiorwas compatible with Andromeda’s need to outfit the layout for a clinic, the board said. They acquired the necessary permits for renovation and plan to apply for a separate certification of occupancy upon completion. Andromeda started working in DC around 1970. The board said they look forward to expanding on Capitol Hill. “Our role is to serve people who need community health services,” the Andromeda board said. “We want to get to know our neighbors, just as we have at our other community facilities.” Ward 6 Commissioner Charles Allen said he wants to know more about what Andromeda plans to offer at the location. He understands the community’s concerns. But he said the clinic managers need to simply reach out and collaborate with their neighbors. “I think we should start with the presumption that a health care clinic is not a bad thing,” Allen said. “My expectation of everyone — a church, neighbor, a business — everyone has to be a good neighbor and has a responsibility to one another.”

Protecting the Clinic and Neighborhood The combination of a new 7-Eleven and clinic put residents near the 200 block of 15th Street SE on edge. Jayaraman hopes the city’s lack of a no-anti loitering law in that area won’t con-


WISHING YOU A PEACEFUL AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR

tribute to annoying behaviors on the street. “Someone could hang out all day for their appointment,” he said. Andromeda is actively considering security for their patients and neighbors, and will prepare as they did at their other two DC locations on the 1400 block of Decatur Street NW and on the 3600 block of 14th St. NW. “We’re concerned about the area, too,” O’Hearn said. “We want this to be a harmonious relationship.” The Andromeda board said they plan to install a professional security system through an agency before they open. This includes an alarm, electronic keypad to enter the building and a video surveillance system. Exterior lighting will also receive upgrades. “We will work collaboratively with local law enforcement, and will share concerns that have been experienced previously in the area and any that arise,” the board wrote. “We will foster a safe environment for our staff and our clients with the assistance of the local authorities.” David Navarro, a recovery support coordinator for Andromeda, said his team wants to help whoever needs help in the community as they have done in their other sites. “What we are trying to accomplish is to improve the community,” he said. “At the 14th St. site, the area used to be questionable. But since we’ve been there for 18 years, we’ve seen improvements.” The community meeting with Andromeda will take place on Jan. 8 at 7 p.m. u

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January 2016 H 49


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DC Is a World Class Green City!

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by Catherine Plume

here’s wind and solar powsome er purchases will cut very the District’s carbon good footprint by 110,000 news: tons each year.” The District is beThere are iming recognized as portant economa world leader for ic benefits as well. its efforts to ensure The wind and solar that it is a healthy PPAs combined are and vibrant place estimated to save to live and work. some $70 million The latest greenin taxpayer dollars ing effort involves a over the 20-year life 20-year power-purof the program. The chase agreement solar PPA will also (PPA) for the instalbring employment lation of solar phoopportunities, with tovoltaic systems the design and conon the roofs and struction of the solar parking lots of 34 photovoltaic arrays District-owned faestimated to create cilities. This agreemore than 140 jobs. DOEE Director Tommy Wells and DGS Associate Director for Sustainability and Energy Mark Chambers accept the global award for Green Energy at the 2015 C40 Cities Awards in Paris in December. Photo: C40 ment, coupled with The installation of the purchase of the solar photovoltawind energy earlier in 2015, means that the Disic arrays should be completed by the end of 2016. the recognition that the District is garnering. She trict will have enough green power to cover approxAccording to District officials, neither the wind nor notes, “This Power Purchase Agreement doubles imately 40 percent of its municipal use – the anthe solar PPA would be impacted should the Pepco down on my Administration’s commitment to renual power supply of 44,000 average US homes. merger with Exelon move forward. newable energy and sustainability – using District DC is one of the few large municipal governments The solar and wind PPAs are just part of efforts government assets as staging grounds to capture committed to using clean, renewable energy for to improve and green DC. The District is home to the sun’s energy and power our building portfolio. all of its electricity use, and the two PPAs will go more Leadership in Energy & Environmental DeBeyond renewable energy and cost savings, this a long way in meeting the District’s pledge to cut sign (LEED) and ENERGY STAR-certified buildproject will elevate the District’s local economy, 80 percent of greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. ings per capita than any other city in the country. spur small business development and create jobs.” DC’s greening efforts are now being recogMeanwhile the Bag Law enacted in 2009 has genPeople sometimes forget that green energy has nized on the world stage. On Dec. 3, at a meeting erated more than $10 million to clean up and proimportant health benefits for residents and workers. of the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group held tect the Anacostia River, while DOEE’s RiverSmart As a 2013 Washington Post article reports, the Disin conjunction with the Paris Climate Talks, or Homes program offers financial incentives to resitrict of Columbia has one of the highest rates of peCOP21, DC won the global award for Green Endents who reduce storm water runoff on their propdiatric asthma in the country, and among the highergy at the 2015 C40 Cities Awards. The District’s erty, and the DC Sustainable Energy Utility provides est rates of children who are hospitalized because Director for the Department of Energy and Enfinancial incentives and technical expertise to resiof an asthma attack. Meanwhile, most of the elecvironment (DOEE), Tommy Wells, and Departdents and businesses to reduce and green their enertricity delivered to DC comes from coal-powered ment of General Services (DGS) Associate Direcgy needs. DC Water is using state-of-the-art, anaeroplants emitting greenhouse gases (sulfur dioxide and tor for Sustainability and Energy Mark Chambers bic digestion technology to capture biogas to generate nitrogen oxide) that contribute to climate change accepted the award on behalf of the District. approximately one-third of the energy needed to opand negatively impact human and wildlife health. DC Mayor Muriel Bowser is pleased with erate the Blue Plains water treatment facility. DGS Director Chris Weaver notes, “The combined

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Sustainable DC logo

And greening efforts are continuing. A “foam ban” went into effect on Jan. 1, 2015, making it illegal for local food-based businesses (carry-outs, restaurants, and food trucks) to use polystyrene foam, Styrofoam. In 2017 these same businesses will be required to use compostable containers. These initiatives will help the District move toward the goals set out in the Sustainable DC Plan – a collaborative and community effort that began in 2011 and was led by DOEE and the Office of Planning to develop sustainability goals for environment, climate, energy, food, nature, transportation, waste, water, and the green economy. DC is proving that green investment is good for the environment and for the quality of life of all District residents! Catherine Plume is a lifelong environmentalist, a writer, and a blogger for the DC Recycler: www. DCRecycler.blogspot.com; Twitter @DC_Recycler. u

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South by West by William Rich 7th Street Recreation Pier May Be Built Sooner Hoffman-Madison Waterfront has submitted an application for Stage II PUD approval of 7th Street Recreational Pier, which was originally proposed to be built in Phase III of The Wharf but may now be developed during the initial phase, in concert with construction of 7th Street Park. The pier will be located at the terminus of Seventh Street SW, adjacent to the planned 7th Street Park, and is one of the four public piers planned for The Wharf. 7th Street Recreational Pier has been designed by Michael Vergason Landscape Architects and Moffatt & Nichol, according to the Zoning Commission application, as “a narrow quay for enjoying views of the water and the monuments, and will have a lower floating pier that can accommodate various rental activities and other water-based recreational programs.” On the upper portion of the pier, wooden benches, oversized swings, lighting, and a “fire feature” are planned. As designed the pier will gradually descend toward the water before rising to its terminus, 432 feet into the Washington Channel. Floating wetlands to the east of the pier will provide visual interest and environmental benefits. A large shade structure is planned for the area where the pier, wharf promenade, and 7th Street Park meet, which will include a gathering area and retail kiosk. In order to build the pier during Phase I of construction, a revised transition plan needed to be developed, specifically for the live-aboards at Gangplank Marina. The revised plan shifts access to Gangplank Marina away from the construction zone of the pier and moves the live-aboards to a centralized location. ANC 6D will need to give its support before the pier design is taken up by the Zoning Commission. The U.S. Commission of Fine Arts approved the concept design in July.

7th Street Recreational Pier at The Wharf has been designed to bring residents to the water’s edge. Rendering: Hoffman-Madison Waterfront

Leasing Begins for Trophy Office Building Leasing has commenced for 1000 Maine, an office building under construction at The Wharf, the development team announced. It will be a 250,000 square-foot trophy office building, designed by Kohn Pederson Fox and Fox Architects for LEED-Gold certification, with ground floor retail, a multi-story atrium, and panoramic views of the Washington Channel and monumental Washington. The office building is scheduled to deliver in 2017. Hoffman-Madison Waterfront is looking to land a high-profile anchor tenant. According to a press release, quoting Amer Hammour, chairman of Madison Marquette, 1000 Maine offers “both extraordinary creative office space and the opportunity for classic customized space within a top-tier trophy building with dramatic floor plates.” It overlooks the Potomac River and offers “a full complement of outstanding amenities” and “creates a new benchmark in excellence for office design created to appeal to the most discerning national and global office tenants.”

Riverside Baptist Church Redevelopment Plan

A new sanctuary for Riverside Baptist Church will rise from Maine Avenue SW. Rendering: PN Hoffman

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Back in October, PN Hoffman presented plans at an Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 6D meeting for a mixed-use development at the site of Riverside Baptist Church, located at Seventh Street and Maine Avenue SW. Plans call for a 164,000 square-foot rental apartment building of seven to nine stories on the north end of the site with approximately 170 units ranging in size from 450 to 1,500 square feet. There is space on the ground floor for community-serving uses such as a daycare center. On the south end of the site along Maine Avenue a new two-story sanctuary for Riverside will be built. Some changes have been made to the design from Geier Brown Renfrow (GBR) Architects and Studios Architecture since the planned unit development application was filed several months ago. The top two floors of the apartment building


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are now slightly more transparent. The church’s design has also been revised to provide a richer level of materiality. During the presentation Bao Vuong from PN Hoffman described the community benefits of the project, which includes – • A total of 10 percent of the gross building area will be set aside as affordable housing at various levels of area median income (AMI): o 2 percent for up to 50 percent of AMI o 6 percent for up to 80 percent of AMI o 2 percent for up to 100 percent of AMI • Along Seventh Street there will be 1,700 square feet of private space available for public use with bench seating, landscaping, and a water wall, which will serve as a gateway to The Wharf development to the south. • The residential building will be constructed to achieve LEEDGold status. • The intersection of Seventh and I streets will be reconfigured and simplified by removal of the median that currently exists, as well as the addition of more crosswalks and a parking lane on Seventh Street. • Residents of the apartment building will not be eligible for residential permit parking spaces. • A minimum of 6,900 square feet of space will be reserved for neighborhood-serving retail. • The developer will work with a resident group to determine which neighborhood-serving uses should be placed on the ground floor. A $25,000 set-

aside will help subsidize a daycare operator or other tenant type chosen by the resident group. • Residents have requested that the developer install a dog park within the property to minimize the presence of dogs in the surrounding neighborhood. PN Hoffman is exploring the idea of placing a dog run on the roof of the apartment building. The commissioners voted unanimously to support the conceptual public space design, but deferred support of the consolidated PUD until their November meeting. The reason for the delay was that the commissioners wanted PN Hoffman to draft a construction management plan for the development since it is located across the street from Jefferson Academy and AppleTree’s temporary home. AppleTree used to have facilities at Riverside and Amidon-Bowen, but moved to trailers on Jefferson’s campus last year. In addition, there was some concern among the commissioners about whether a one-time $25,000 subsidy would be sufficient to allow low-income children to use the proposed daycare facility. The commissioners voted to support the PUD application. The Zoning Commission met on Nov. 30 to consider the PUD, which resulted in PN Hoffman’s needing to have additional meetings to resolve issues with the neighboring Townhouse Management I association, an opponent of the PUD. Other issues to be resolved include having units on the penthouse level and the planned number of affordable units. After PN Hoffman addresses these issues the Zoning Commission will meet in January to vote on the PUD application. William Rich is a blogger at Southwest … The Little Quadrant that Could (www.swtlqtc.com). u

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ANC 6A Report by Elizabeth Nelson

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dvisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 6A Chair Phil Toomajian called the meeting to order at 7 p.m. with Commissioners Matt Levy, Omar Mahmud, Patrick Malone, Calvin Ward, Sondra Phillips-Gilbert, and Stephanie Zimny in attendance. Commissioner Chris Ward was absent.

Reports from DOH and DDOT The meeting began with a series of presentations from representatives of the Department of Health (DOH) and the DC Department of Transportation (DDOT). The speakers were introduced by Frank Maduro, a Ward 6 liaison from the Mayor’s Office of Community Relations and Services (MOCRS). DOH reported that, during a pest control walk-through that very morning, a vacant lot on the 900 block of H Street NE was identified as having a serious rodent infestation. DOH Rat Abatement does not generally work with commercial properties, but this was serious enough to be deemed a public health hazard, and bait was placed within the fencing. Residents are reminded that rodent problems are exacerbated by poor trash storage, but

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ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 6A PHIL TOOMAJIAN, CHAIR, PHILANC6A@GMAIL.COM Serving the Near Northeast, North Lincoln Park, Rosedale, and Stanton Park communities ANC 6A generally meets the second Thursday of the month, at Miner Elementary School, 601 15th Street, NE.

www.anc6a.org the unusually warm weather is a contributing factor. Sean Moore of DDOT reported on the status of the streetcar line on H Street NE. He couldn’t offer specifics but said that they are working toward certification with the Fire Department’s safety officer and that there are continuing problems with the Hopscotch Bridge. Pedestrian safety outreach is being conducted. The commissioners expressed frustration that more concrete information was not available, with Commissioner Mahmud calling for “greater transparency.” Moore agreed to attend a future meeting of the ANC 6A Transportation and Public Space (T&PS) Committee to allow for a more robust discussion of the issues. Gregg Steverson, also with DDOT, reported on the Maryland Avenue Traffic Safety Plan, also that a study of the 1200-1300 blocks of Constitution Avenue NE is scheduled for mid-March. He heard questions from the commissioners on several inquiries they had made months in the past but for which there has been no response. He also agreed to attend a future meeting of the T&PS Committee. There is a new policy under consideration for residential parking permits (RPP); it should be released for public comment very soon. Robert Horton was introduced as DDOT’s point person on sidewalk repair. He reported that repairs will be made to cobblestone areas on H Street NE and also sidewalks in Commissioner Phillips-Gilbert’s single-member district (SMD). When questioned about the rapid deterioration of new sidewalks, Horton explained that there is an interaction between de-icing chemicals and concrete. DDOT is investigating ways to

prevent this in the future. Steve McKindley-Ward represented the Urban Forestry Administration (UFA) as one of the Ward 6 arborists. Commissioner Toomajian asked how many street trees had died and how many were being replaced on H Street. Out of the 132 planting locations, 25 are dead or dying and will be removed. Half will be replaced this winter. One reason for the delay on the other half is issues with the high voltage wires associated with the streetcars. Also, businesses often object to trees that obscure their signs. In some locations the UFA is going to plant varieties of trees that may be better received by businesses. An audience member asked if larger tree boxes would help. McKindley-Ward responded that, while more open soil is generally better for trees, foot compaction is one of the biggest problems of urban trees – so simply removing paving in high pedestrian traffic areas is not necessarily beneficial. Another attendee asked if it would be better for UFA to plant fewer trees and use the resources saved to pay for watering services. McKindley-Ward replied that the contractor who plants the trees must water them twice a month but that this is insufficient for most newly planted trees. The UFA strongly encourages neighbors to assist with watering.

Next ANC 6A meeting is 2nd Thursday, Jan. 14th 7 p.m, Miner E.S., 601 15th St. NE Alcohol Beverage Licensing Committee - Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016 7pm at Sherwood Recreation Center • 640 10th St., NE Jay Williams - Co-Chair (906-0657) / Christopher Seagle - Co-Chair

Transportation & Public Space Committee - Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 7pm at Capitol Hill Towers Community Room • 900 G St., NE J. Omar Mahmud - Co-Chair (594-9848) / Todd Sloves - Co-Chair

Economic Development & Zoning Committee - Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2016 7pm at Sherwood Recreation Center • 640 10th St., NE Andrew Hysell - Co-Chair / Brad Greenfield - Co-Chair

Community Outreach Committee - Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 NOW HELD EVERY 4TH MONDAY OF THE MONTH

7pm at Maury Elementary School • 1250 Constitution Ave., NE Multi-purpose Room (enter from 200 Block of 13 Street) Dana Wyckoff - Co-Chair (571-213-1630) / Raphael Marshall - Co-Chair

Please check the Community Calendar on the website for cancellations and changes of venue.

Community Outreach Committee Actions The commissioners approved a grant request from the Miner Elementary School (601 15th St. NE) PTO in the amount of $760 to purchase a mobile display system to be used by staff and/ or PTO representatives at school and community events, plus banners advertising PTO meetings. These items

Advisory Neighborhood Commission 6C P.O. Box 77876 • Washington, D.C. 20013-7787 • www.anc6c.org • (202) 547-7168 ANC 6C generally meets the second Wednesday of each month. 214 Massachusetts Ave NE

ANC 6C COMMISSIONERS ANC 6C01 Daniele Schiffman Daniele.Schiffman@gmail.com

ANC 6C04 Mark Eckenwiler 6C04@anc.dc.gov

ANC 6C02 Karen Wirt (202) 547-7168 6C02@anc.dc.gov

ANC 6C05 Christopher Miller 6C05@anc.dc.gov

ANC 6C03 Scott Price (202) 577-6261 6C03@anc.dc.gov scott.price@anc.dc.gov

ANC 6C06 Tony Goodman (202) 271-8707 tonytgood@gmail.com

ANC 6C COMMITTEES Alcohol Beverage Licensing Committee First Monday, 7 pm Contact: (870) 821-0531 anc6c.abl.committee@gmail.com

Transportation and Public Space Committee First Thursday, 7 pm Contact: mark.kaz.anc@gmail.com

Grants Committee Last Thursday, 7 pm Contact: ducotesb1@gmail.com

Planning, Zoning, and Economic Development First Wednesday, 7 pm Contact: zoning@eckenwiler.org Twitter: @6C_PZE

Parks and Events Committee First Tuesday, 7 pm Contact: christinehealey100@gmail.com

January 2016 H 55


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will support Miner’s efforts to attract more community support.

Alcohol Beverage Licensing Committee Actions The commissioners voted unanimously to protest Sol Mexican Grill’s (1251 H St. NE) request for an extension of its hours for operation, alcoholic beverage sales and consumption, and live entertainment, unless an acceptable agreement is reached regarding the establishment’s management of garbage in its alley. Mark Samburg was approved as a new member of the Alcohol Beverage Licensing (ABL) Committee.

Transportation and Public Space Committee Actions The commissioners voted unanimously to send a letter of support for the 2016 Rock and Roll Marathon (Saturday, March 12), contingent upon receipt of the following: • A summary and description of the usage and location of traffic control officers (TCOs) in or adjacent to ANC 6A; • The summary provided to ANC 6B addressing their concerns about movement of participants out of the RFK area after the event and information about where to cross East Capitol Street; • A description of the door-hanger campaign and which neighborhoods in ANC 6A will receive door hangers, including a quality control program; • An update regarding efforts to find a C Street NE crossing; • A description of the bus-stop and/or bus notification campaign for X2, 90, and 92 buses; • Confirmation that the 10th Street NE checkpoint will be open to allow Capitol Hill Towers residents to access the building’s parking lot entrance; • Confirmation that staging of DPW trucks will be at RFK Stadium and not on neighborhood streets; • Notification of any other ANCs that express opposition to the event and the reasons for the opposition. Diane Thomas, representing the marathon’s

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organizers, distributed a packet of information including a map of the course and the requested information. Buses on affected routes will have notices posted a week in advance, as will bus shelters. Door hangers will be attached to residents’ doors rather than being dropped on the sidewalks, as many were last year. Most trucks associated with race cleanup will be staged at the start and finish lines. Those parked along the course will not be allowed to idle. There will be no music in or near Lincoln Park. TCOs will be deployed to allow traffic to cross East Capitol Street during the race. However, it appears unlikely that traffic will be permitted to cross 13th Street or C Street NE. This will present a serious inconvenience to anyone needing to drive from the northeast portion of ANC 6A to areas south or west during the five hours of the race. The ANC voted unanimously to send letters to DDOT requesting: • Traffic and pedestrian safety improvements at the intersection of Florida Avenue and K Street NE, including the elimination of an unnecessary curb cut; • Installation of a crosswalk and pedestrian crossing signs on the east side of Ninth Street NE where L Street and West Virginia Avenue intersect; • Retiming of the traffic light at 10th Street and Maryland Avenue NE so that the pedestrian walk signal automatically comes on when the light turns green.

Economic Development and Zoning Actions The commissioners voted unanimously to write a letter to the Bureau of Zoning Adjustment (BZA) in support of the request for variances from the requirements for floor area ratio (FAR), lot occupancy, rear yard, nonconforming structure, and height at 1313-1323 Linden Court NE (BZA 19145), to allow the construction of five one-family dwellings and a neighborhood-serving retail establishment. ANC support is contingent on all occupants being unable to apply for residential parking permits. The ANC unanimously agreed to write a letter to BZA in support of a special exception to permit an addition to an existing nonconforming, sin-

gle-family dwelling that exceeds the maximum lot occupancy and rear yard setback requirement at 916 K St. NE (BZA FY-16-02-Z).

Announcements Commissioner Zimny reported that the community survey initiated by the Miner Elementary School PTO has been completed. The information is being compiled and results will be made public soon. The school is interested in attracting greater enrollment from in-boundary students and also community members as volunteers. Commissioner Mahmud noted that a new playground is being constructed at Ludlow-Taylor Elementary School (659 G St. NE). ANC 6A meets on the second Thursday of every month (except in August) at Miner Elementary School. The 6A committees meet at 7 p.m. on the following dates: Alcohol Beverage and Licensing, third Tuesday of each month, Sherwood Recreation Center. Community Outreach, fourth Monday of each month, Maury Elementary School. Economic Development and Zoning, third Wednesday of each month, Sherwood Recreation Center. Transportation and Public Space, usually third Monday of every month, Capitol Hill Towers. In January 2016 it will meet on Jan. 25 due to the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. Visit www.anc6a.org for a calendar of events, agendas, and other information. u



ANC 6B Report by Jonathan Neeley Bullfrog Bagels Is Coming to Eastern Market Bullfrog Bagels, which has had a location on H


HISTORIC PRESERVATION

ESSENTIAL TO VIBRANT NEIGHBORHOODS Come hear Rhonda Sincavage, Director of Publications and Programs at the National Trust for Historic Preservation explore the relationships between historic preservation, quality of life, and the continued vibrancy of our community. Capitol Hill is on the cusp of rapid change, and as a community we are confronted with issues such as the economics, diversity, and environmental sustainability of the Historic District. In a 2011 TED Talk, Ms. Sincavage very effectively addressed these and other relevant issues for historic preservation in the national context, and will bring the discussion home to Capitol Hill.

MONDAY, JANUARY 25 AT 6:45 PM Street since fall 2014, will open a store at 317 Seventh Street SE after renovations are complete. Last month Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 6B signed a settlement agreement with Jeremiah Cohen, the owner, paving the way for the restaurant to obtain a liquor license. Bullfrog Bagels will be allowed to sell alcohol inside until 11:30 p.m. both on the weekend and during the week, and outside until 11:00 p.m. on the weekend and 10:30 during the week. Delivery trucks won’t be allowed in the rear of the building between 10:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m., but a small truck. The agreement says pre-7 a.m. deliveries will be “the exception, not the rule.” The road to a settlement was rocky. While Cohen says he sometimes needs to have bagel deliveries come in between 3 and 4 a.m., some residents say the store operating at such hours will disturb them. The parties disagree over about the law for when deliveries are allowed, and 6B commissioners were split over whether to sign the agreement or not; when they voted at 6B’s regular meeting, it passed by a vote of 6-3-1. Neighbors have filed a protest of Bullfrog Bagels’ liquor license.

Trader Joe’s Is Coming Too, Just a Little Later The commissioners endorsed a liquor license for Trader Joe’s, which will help anchor the Hine development at 700 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. The vote was 10-0, and Chair Kirsten Oldenburg said that the commission’s sentiment was “basically, get here quickly.” The store is expected to open in mid-2017, along with the rest of the building. The entrance to

the grocery store will be at 8th and Pennsylvania. Concerns about trash storage, an issue for many Hill businesses, wasn’t a problem for Trader Joe’s. All the establishments in the Hine building will funnel trash into an indoor room for pickup at a loading dock. Oldenburg noted that this is the first time Trader Joe’s has signed a settlement agreement in DC, and that the Trader Joe’s corporate office is on board.

Housing for People with Lower Incomes In the new year DC’s Zoning Commission will update the city’s zoning code, the laws that define what kinds of buildings can go on what land. One tool to help ensure that cities have space for people of all incomes is inclusionary zoning (IZ), which requires new housing developments to rent or sell a certain percentage of units at or below market rate to people making a certain percentage (or less) of the area’s median income. The commissioners sent the Zoning Commission a letter endorsing amendments to the zoning code that would price IZ units for people making even less money, and that would further incentivize building IZ units. The amendments call for IZ housing to be priced appropriately for people making less than 80 percent of the median income, and to allow developers to build more overall units in exchange for building more that will go toward low-income renters and buyers. The amendments were put forward by the Coalition for Smarter Growth, a group that advocates for equitable long-term plans for the re-

Maury Elementary School, 1250 Constitution Avenue NE Enter from the 200 block of 13th St. The event is free and handicapped accessible and the public is encouraged to attend. No reservations are required.

Capitol Hill is a special place. We promote, preserve, and enhance the character of our historic neighborhoods.

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January 2016 H 57


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gion. The Zoning Commission will hold a public hearing about potential changes to IZ regulations on Jan. 28.

Crime Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) Commander Jeff Brown spoke at 6B’s regular meeting in December. He reported that MPD had made 24 arrests related to street robberies over the last six months. Most street robberies happen at the hands of small groups of teens, so police are doing more to enforce the juvenile curfew that requires anyone under 17 to be off the streets between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. Brown also noted that while residents say they feel safer when they see more police on patrol, police presence often just causes criminals to go a few blocks over rather than actually deterring them. In an email to constituents, Chair Kirsten Oldenburg outlined November crime for the police service areas (PSAs) that cover 6B, which are 106, 107, and 108. The data takes time to process and was not released until mid-December. PSA 106 saw 51 crimes reported in November, down from 88 in October (a month that saw a big uptick from September). PSA 107 saw 65 crimes reported, down from 85 in October; in one reported crime a woman said a man came from behind and pushed her to the ground, forced pants down, then snatched her bag and fled. PSA 108 saw 59 crimes reported, five fewer than in October. One was a gun homicide on The block of Tennessee Avenue NE in early November was the site of a homicide and a suicide. ANC 6B’s next full meeting will be Tuesday, Jan. 12, at the Hill Center, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. u

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ANC 6C Report by Christine Rushton

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nti-abortion protestors with signs welcomed the Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 6C and community members to the monthly meeting on Dec. 9. The commissioners allowed Reverend Patrick Mahoney, who heads the Christian Defense Coalition, to speak at the start on the controversial Planned Parenthood site going in next to the Two Rivers Public Charter School on the corner of Florida Avenue and Fourth Street NE. Despite their legal inability to stop the Planned Parenthood construction, Mahoney and his supporters scolded the commissioners for showing a “complete lack of sensitivity and compassion” for the neighborhood. No commissioners responded. ANC (605) Commissioner Christopher Miller wore a pink Planned Parenthood shirt, and the meeting proceeded after Mahoney’s allotted time ran out. The quorum: Karen Wirt (6C02 chair), Tony Goodman (6C06), Mark Eckenwiler (6C04), Christopher Miller (6C05), Scott Price (6C03), and Daniele Schiffman (6C01). Schiffman exited part way through the meeting.

Communication Regulations for DC Departments Due to recent frustrations over the lack of communication by the DC Department of Transportation (DDOT), Price recommended the ANC advise the DC Council on appropriate response times for all District departments. Price said all departments should acknowledge they’ve received an advisement within five business days and should respond with an explanation for the acceptance or rejection of the point within 45 days. Also, if a project developing in the ANC’s jurisdiction costs more than $1 million, the commissioners should receive notification before the final decision. On continuing projects, Price recommended a commissioner be appointed as a representative to ad-

vise during department meetings. The ANC voted to support the initiative and send Commissioner Schiffman as a representative to the next DC Council meeting for ANCs.

Craft Beer Cellar on Track for Class A Liquor License Alcoholic Beverage Committee chair Drew Courtney detailed Craft Beer Cellar’s request for a new Class A liquor license to sell single, growler, and six-pack quantities of their product at their site on the 300 block of H Street NE. Courtney assured commissioners worried about the sale of liquor that conversations with the owners have been positive, with the exception of coming to an agreement on what specifically they will sell. Courtney recommended the ANC protest the application with the intent of withdrawing once a settlement is reached. If the license is ever transferred to another business, the ANC would maintain the agreed-upon settlement gained during the protest. The ANC voted unanimously to approve; Eckenwiler will head the final settlement.

DDOT Failure to Communicate Commissioners debated heavily over the proposed new NoMa Metro Circulator route from the DDOT set to start around 2018 or 2019. Mark Kazmierczak, chair of the ANC transportation and public space committee, explained that community members felt DDOT had not reached out early enough for input on where the routes should extend. The comments section of the project closed in December. The ANC voted to write a letter to DDOT. Goodman said the note needs to state that communication must improve in order to relieve frustration in the community. Commissioners also recommended to tell DDOT that proposed routes should not serve Benning Road or the Starburst Plaza Intersection nor duplicate already established routes. Price also added that the ANC needs to ask about plans to increase pick up of trash receptacles near any new stops to decrease litter from riders. The vote was unanimous for the letter, Schiffman absent.


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Fighting Prostitution on K Street First District Metro Police Lt. Joseph Cullen intended to speak on the effort to curb prostitution on K Street NE, but owing to official obligations could not attend. Commissioner Goodman spoke on his behalf. The police reported they have increased night patrols on K Street by Sixth and Seventh streets NE as well as North Capitol East. The officers average more than one arrest or ticket of cars making illegal right turns in order to circle the block for prostitutes. Increased lighting to the area helps deter people from loitering, especially in those areas. Goodman made a motion to send DDOT a letter asking to increase the streetlight level on K Street and to also prune the trees around the streetlights. Also, the commissioners recommended a second letter to ask the DC Public Schools, DC Office of Aging, and DC Public Works crews to increase sidewalk cleanup in the early morning so that students attending school will not pass used condoms on the street. The ANC voted unanimously, Schiffman absent.

PZE Updates Commissioner Eckenwiler, who also chairs the Planning, Zoning and Economic Development Committee (PZE), updated the commissioners on several construction projects in the area. First he talked about the status of their appeal of the work permit for a residence on the 500 block of Sixth Street NE. The zoning office accepted their appeal based on evidence that the project construction damaged the adjacent property and that the current permit violates zoning regulations. The owner is under a stop-work order pending a hearing on March 8 for the correct permit. Eckenwiler expressed hope that the hearing will result in a revoking of the work permit.

F Street Deck No Longer Obstructs Renovations to a row house on the 600 block of F Street NE required an update due to a pro-

posed change to the third-floor deck. Commissioners had expressed concern that the deck plans would block or alter the view of neighboring houses and would disrupt the uniformity of the houses on that block. They voted unanimously to reject the previous proposal, but considered the new proposal presented at the meeting. The project’s planning representative stepped forward to show the commissioners how the revised plans push back the third story without an overhang and use glass railings and windows with non-reflective coating to limit disruption to neighbors. The deck on the middle section also was moved back. Adjacent neighbors also sent 11 letters supporting the construction. Eckenwiler volunteered to testify at the Jan. 12 PZE meeting about the ANC’s support and previous concerns. The commissioners voted to support the new plans, Schiffman absent.

Saving Historic Covered Porches Residents with covered porches who want to add an overhang behind their house resort to ripping off their front porch roof in order to stay in the 60 percent of allowed overhang on historic properties. Goodman, sharing his own story as a property owner with a front porch, said on the 600 block of Fourth Street owners will take out their front porch and pillars built before 1950 in order to stay within zoning rules. The PZE wants to amend the regulations for historic porches to remove an incentive to alter historic structures. PZE committee members proposed to include the exception for porches up to 100 square feet, but Goodman recommended to the ANC that they advise the PZE to strike the 100 square-foot clause to allow varying sizes. Eckenwiler proposed the motion, which was accepted unanimously.

Bending Zoning Rules Commissioner Eckenwiler expressed his growing frustration with the city’s zoning administrator and the interpretations of regulations that actually violate the rules. He

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encouraged the ANC to support his efforts to remove ambiguity from zoning decisions, like the H Street overlay. For example, when Ben’s Chili Bowl requested to renovate its historic building on the 700 block of H Street, it also applied for a bonus for keeping the façade of the building intact. However, by the time construction finished, all that remained of the original building was one brick wall against the neighboring building, whereas the regulations stipulate an owner must retain 50 percent of the original. The lack of clarity on the rules for receiving a bonus for keeping the historic structure intact allowed the restaurant to collect what Eckenwiler felt was unfair. He called the zoning administrator’s decision a “ridiculous position.” The zoning administrator also announced in September that rules about sign height and not disrupting neighbors on side streets don’t apply. Eckenwiler proposed several amendments to the zoning rules for the H Street overlay: • Developers must retain 90 percent of the façade. • Any character-defining features must be preserved at all cost. • Preservation applies equally to all sides of a building. • Rules on sign height do apply. • Security grills must provide 70 percent visibility, no solid metal. The commissioners accepted unanimously the motion to send these recommendations to the zoning administrator and appointed Eckenwiler as a representative.

Other Actions

Lawyer Hired for Alibi Hearing

Fourth Quarter Report

Alibi’s application for a liquor license at its site on the 200 block of Second Street NW will go to a protest hearing on Jan. 6 over the added request of an entertainment endorsement. Commissioners expressed concern for using the space as a place to entertain in the evenings if Alibi extended its hours to 10 p.m. The commissioners voted with a count of five to hire an attorney for $5,000 to attend the hearing and parse the legal jargon. Schiffman had stepped out before this vote.

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The ANC delayed the vote on Addis Ethiopian’s application to extend its operating hours to 5 or 6 a.m., which would not extend the hours for offering alcohol. Commissioners expressed concern over the reputation of the restaurant on the 700 block of H Street NE. Neighbors have lodged a few noise and trash complaints, but Addis management has been cooperative with solving the issues. The ANC plans to revisit the application around March 2016. Toscana café did not receive a vote on its application to upgrade the liquor license to full wine, beer, and liquor sales. Courtney explained that Toscana’s representative suddenly decided not to sign the settlement agreement with the ANC and will instead go forward with the protest hearing in February. Commissioner Eckenwiler was appointed to represent at any upcoming hearings and mediation. The ANC did not support the application of XO on the unit block of K Street NE to hold regular events. They will restart negotiations on the application after a new attorney for XO is hired. Po Boy Jim’s on the 700 block of H Street NE refused to sign a settlement agreement with the ANC over a request to add an entertainment endorsement. The ABC Board will decide on the application sometime in February. Also, the ANC supported the request of Sugar Factory in Union Station to extend hours. Alcoholic Beverage Committee chair Courtney will finish his tenure in December and will work on an advisement-only basis with ANC 6C starting in 2016.

Commissioner and treasurer Miller announced the fourth quarter financial report, which was adopted unanimously. ANC 6C began the quarter with $47,196.69 and ended with $51,652.51. It received a total of $6,675.82 from the district allotment, $1.26 interest collected. During the quarter it disbursed $2,200: $1,800 for a grant to H Street for festival barricades, $120 for an American Sign Language interpreter, and $300 for the cost of transcribing the meeting minutes.

ANC 6C meets regularly on the second Wednesday of the month at the Heritage Foundation, 214 Massachusetts Ave. NE. The next meeting is on Jan. 13 at 7 p.m. u

ANC 6D Report by Andrew Lightman

A

t its meeting on Dec.14, ANC 6D grappled with an extensive agenda. Commiss1 (6D02), Vice Chair Andy Litsky (6D04), Chair Roger Moffatt (6D05), Rhonda N. Hamilton (6D06), Meredith Fascett (6D07), and Rachel Reilly Carroll (6D03) were present.

Construction Hours Representatives of Turner Construction and the owners of the new Homeward Suite Hotel planned at 50 M St. SE appeared before the commission to ask permission to perform afterhours and holiday construction. Routing restrictions imposed by the DC Department of Transportation (DDOT) on concrete trucks had, they argued, significantly impacted their ability to complete their project on schedule. They requested the commission support their request for an extension of working-hours two-nights a week till 10 p.m., and on some holidays through February, to facilitate concrete pours. The commission had already received complaints about work on the site before 5:30 a.m. and after 8 p.m., stated Commissioner Braverman Cloyd. Commissioners were concerned that granting the request would set a precedent. “If you multiply your request by every construction site, no one in Southeast will sleep,” pointed out Commissioner Braverman Cloyd. Commissioners labored to craft a resolution extending construction hours twice a week until 8 p.m. for a limited time. In return, they requested that Turner (1) perform no work before 7 a.m.;


(2) establish a complaint hotline for neighbors; (3) consult with the board of the next-door Velocity Condominium; and (4) limit all afterhours work to concrete pours. After intense discussion the commission decided against adding holidays to the expanded work hours. With those caveats, four commissioners voted in favor of sending a letter to the city in support of Turner’s request, with one against and two abstentions.

require elevator access. Commissioners raised concerns about the decision to shuttle residents to Navy Yard. They advised WMATA to consider offering service to L’Enfant instead. Also, they emphasized the necessity of notifying residents well in advance of the impact of the project on accessibility.

Wharf Stage Two PUD Approved

The DC Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) has secured $250,000 to repair the Duck Pond, stated Project Manager Peter Nohrden. The money will be used to address problems involving the electric and filtration systems. Nohrden promised a full capital needs assessment of the park this month. Another $100,000 is being dedicated to the stabilization of the Amidon Sidewalk Park. A community meeting improvements is planned for a date to be determined in January.

Representatives from The Wharf came before the commission to seek its support for their application for a stage-two planned unit development (PUD) for so-called Parcel 1, directly abutting the Fish Market. The plan involves the construction of an office building and small market pavilion. The 130-foot-tall office building would contain 245,712 square feet of ground floor retail and offices and would sit on top of a parking garage providing contiguous facilities for the entire Wharf. It would incorporate a two-story retail step down to the adjacent Market Shed. The Market Shed to be located between this structure and the Fish Market would contain 3,050 square feet of retail divided into shops of 500 to 900 square feet. The developers currently have no tenant for the office component of the PUD. The commissioners endorsed the PUD unanimously and appointed Commissioner Litsky to testify in its favor at the upcoming Zoning Commission hearings.

Escalator and Elevator Repairs at Waterfront Metro The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) plans to replace all three escalators as well as the surface elevator at the Waterfront Metro Station during the next two years, stated agency representatives. It will take approximately 35 weeks per escalator. The project will begin on Jan. 18, and almost all the work will occur afterhours. The surface elevator will be repaired between March and June this year. During this period, there will be no elevator service between the surface and the mezzanine level. Metro will provide a shuttle service to Navy Yard to accommodate those who

More Money for Southwest Parks

ABC Matters Hill Country has cancelled its license, reported ANC 6D’s ABC Committee Chair Coralie Farlee. The Park Tavern has also closed. It will reopen as a pizzeria with a CR license. There is also a scheduled mediation and protest involving Bardo’s Big River. Farlee also reported a vacancy on the committee. The commissioners voted, with Reilly Carroll abstaining, to send a letter to city officials recommending that the new soccer stadium not be exempted from proposed noise legislation.

CBCC Report Felicia Couts, coordinator of the Near SE/SW Community Benefits Coordinating Council (CBCC) reported on the organization’s activities. The CBCC plans to form a three-person enforcement committee to monitor the community benefits agreement reached with DC United concerning the new soccer stadium. They are working to increase programing at Randall Recreational Center by convening a Friends of Randall group. They are also working in support of a build-first approach to the renovation of Greenleaf Gardens and other local public housing complexes. Chair Moffat encouraged the group to provide quarterly reports in future.

Other Matters The commissioners voted, with Braverman Cloyd abstaining, to send another letter to the Public Service Commission reiterating opposition to the proposed merger between Pepco and Exelon. The commission unanimously approved the December agenda. The November minutes were approved with Commissioner Reilly Carroll abstaining. Next meeting will be Commissioner Moffatt’s last as chair. Diane Thomas gave commissioners a briefing on the route of the Rock’n’Roll Marathon. The commissioners resolved unanimously to send a letter to the council and mayor requesting that the laws regarding the requirement to build affordable housing linked to the disposal of public land be changed. Currently the law provides for a percentage of build units. Instead, a developer should be obligated for either a percentage of total units or of total space. This, argued Commissioner Reilly Carroll, would facilitate the creation of larger, family-friendly affordable units. The commissioners voted unanimously to send a letter to DDOT’s Public Space Committee in support of a public space application by the developers of 82 I St. SW. At the request of Commissioner Hamilton, the commissioners voted to send a letter to the DC Department of Energy and the Environment and the Deputy Mayor for Economic Development requesting the appointment of a Community Health Advocate and Advisory Board to oversee health assessments in the communities of Buzzard Point affected by the construction of the new soccer stadium and Pepco substation. The commissioners voted unanimously to request DDOT create a curbside pickup and drop off area in front of Van Ness Elementary School. Per the school’s own request, the area would be reserved on school days from 8 to 9 a.m. and from 3 to 4 p.m., with a 15-minute limit. Otherwise it would retain its standard residential permit parking. Commissioners asked that the signs be carefully crafted to reflect this. The commissioners voted unanimously to send the mayor a letter listing its concerns about the location of a new shelter for homeless families in ANC 6D. Commissioners were in agree-

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ment that wards with the highest median incomes should be the first candidates for such institutions. “Don’t just build in Ward 8 and say you will get to Ward 3 eventually. Start in Ward 3,” stated Commissioner Braverman Cloyd. The commission received a public safety briefing from PSA 105 Sergeant Mike Architzel. Property crime was down last month, while violent crime crept up. There have been four homicides in PSA 105 this year, which is very high, mostly involving personal disagreements. There has been an increase in robberies, mostly cell phone snatching. The next PSA 105 meeting is on Jan. 20. ANC 6D will meet next at 7 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 11, at 1100 Fourth St. SW, second floor. For more information visit www.anc6d.org. u

ANC 6E Report by Steve Holton Two Groups Tie for Capital Vista Project Three development groups presented plans at a previous meeting of Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 6E in hopes of getting consent for a development project on a parcel of land called Capital Vista that is bounded by Second and H Streets NW and New Jersey Avenue. The first plan up for consideration was FLGA LLC Thurgood Marshall College Fund Campus, which designed a 13-story graduate student dormitory with a college bookstore on the ground level. The second plan, by Voltron Dante Partners, called for lowincome affordable housing units as well as workforce housing units available to teachers, firefighters, and others. The group also agreed to set aside funds to cover various public activities throughout the community. The third and last plan, presented by the Argos Group, called for affordable housing

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units with an area designated for children to play and dogs to run. The building would have groundfloor retail space and a chef-training school. The commissioners noted that each project will have the same number of parking spaces, which will be minimal, and should not create additional parking problems for the area. The Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development asked each commissioner to rank the groups, one through three, in terms of how each project would suit the community. After the votes were tallied, the Argos Group and Voltron Dante Partners tied for first.

Protests Entertainment and Change of Hours Request Representatives of the restaurant Chaplin’s, at 1501 Ninth St. NW, came to the meeting and requested support for an entertainment endorsement and a change in hours during which they may serve alcohol. The establishment is not looking to change into a nightclub or tavern. It seeks to provide music to diners, but only inside, from 6:00 p.m. until midnight. The change of hours of alcohol service would push last call up 30 minutes from 1:30 to 2:00 a.m., and the establishment would open an hour early at 10:00 a.m. for the weekend brunch crowd. The restaurant also has plans for an enclosed outdoor seating area that will contain noise and provide climate control. The commissioners explained that they want to come to a voluntary agreement on the crowd noise and hours of operation change that is consistent with any bar and restaurant in the area. The commissioners also said that a voluntary or settlement agreement was the standard protocol with every other business in the area with a liquor license. ANC 6E01 Commissioner Alexander Padro noted that there has already been a noise complaint from a building resident located 801 P St. NW, directly across the alley from the establishment. The commissioners motioned to protest both requests so as to preserve peace, order, and quiet until parties can negotiate an agreement that addresses the concerns. After the motion passed, ANC 6E05 Commissioner Marge Maceda told Chaplin’s representatives that the commission would be happy to work on an agreement together. The protest will be commu-

nicated to both the DC Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Board and the Alcoholic Beverage Regulation Administration (ABRA).

Ice Cream Shop Seeks Support for Liquor License A representative from Dolci Gelati Café, at 1420 Eighth St. NW, asked for support of a license to serve beer and wine. The café currently serves Italian ice cream, gelati pops, sandwiches, and coffee but would like to create more foot traffic by adding a happy hour. The representative said he would like to work with a local craft beer provider who operates on the same block and add beer shakes to the menu. The commissioners voted in favor of supporting the request and will communicate their support to ABRA.

Next Meeting at New Location ANC 6E will meet again at 6:30 p.m. on Jan. 5 at the Northwest One Library on 155 L St. NW. Visit www.anc6e.org to view the newsletter; follow on Twitter @ANC6E and on Facebook by searching ANC6E. u

Eastern Market Report by Peter J Waldron EMCAC Out of Money The Eastern Market Community Advisory Committee met on November 18th in the North Hall, its usual venue, to accommodate the community and members’ Thanksgiving holiday schedules. Ordinarily, EMCAC meets on the last Wednesday of each month. The first item of business dealt with EMCAC’s concern that it is running out of money


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for such simple operations as transcription and paying for minutes. Suggestions have been made over the years to incorporate EMCAC’s operating expenses within the Eastern Market’s budget. However, there is no provision in the legislation, enacted in 1999, for this use of funds. EMCAC members are not compensated. EMCAC’s by-laws instead provide for each member organization to pay dues. According to Tom Kuchenberg, Treasurer of EMCAC, only two of the community member organizations have paid 2015 dues. Exceptions to dues payment are of those members who are politically appointed. Both Ward 6 and the Mayor’s representatives fall into this category. There was a brief discussion of merging two previously existing bank accounts of funds from gifts and sales of memorabilia at the Market. These accounts hold $300 & $600 respectively and are separate from the Enterprise Fund which is the legal repository for all Market revenue and expense funds. A motion to merge these two accounts was passed unanimously. The Enterprise Fund was used previously and properly to secure revenue for the Eastern Market but shortly after the fire and renovation in 2007-08 the Fund was “swept” by the District government of approximately $100,000. Since that time the Dept. of General Services has managed the Market and collects and distributes revenues and expenses, but with yawning gaps at times in how Market funds are accounted for. Currently the Enterprise Fund has a zero balance. The law directing all Market revenues to the Enterprise Fund has never been changed. Kuchenberg announced a Financial Committee meeting to be held in January, one of whose purposes is to breathe life back into the Enterprise Fund and to take a hard look at the final accounting from DGS about the Market’s profit and loss status.

Hine Update Mayor’s representative Jonathan Page reported that the predicted and feared issues of trucks idling and traffic congestion are currently ongoing problems at the Hine construction site. Concrete will begin to be poured in early January for

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the North building. One concern raised by Erika Rubel are the “swinging cranes” that loom high over the project. Although not strictly a concern of the Eastern Market this massive construction project affects the Eastern Market in multiple ways, one of which is heightened safety concerns. There are regularly scheduled meetings with Market Manager Barry Margeson to coordinate and work through problems that are associated with the nearby residents and the Eastern Market.

Manager’s Report Margeson proposed closing down the outdoor Fresh Tuesdays Market for the winter months of January and February. This was supported unanimously by EMCAC. Margeson also reported that the RFP for the 600 lights inside the South Hall has been completed at a cost of $23,000. The ongoing lease discussions for the South Hall merchants are once again under review and according to Margeson the discussions center on “reviewing the last lease we worked on with the merchants.“ Those talks ended abruptly in November 2013 with no conclusion. Finally Margeson reported that “ I have asked our General Counsel to provide input on merchants having keys to the market.” Merchants have been denied the ability to access their businesses since they returned to the South Hall after the renovation of the Market. There are four private events booked to the North Hall for the month of December.

Annual Financials Decisions and recommendations made by EMCAC membership which essentially acts as a board with similar statutory responsibilities , depend on timely and accurate financial information. DGS’s end of year information forwarded to EMCAC, continues to obfuscate rather than clarify the economic viability and status of the Eastern Market. It is not the kind of financial information that allows for effective oversight. Notably, North Hall revenues, projected to reach $300,000 in late summer, now show an eleventh hour debit posting of $69,000, charged instead to fiscal year 2016, for a revenue total for FY 15 of $186,000, nearly 40% below recent projections.

Earlier monthly accounting reports showed incomplete entries of expenses. The year end report shows no advertising expenses until the last two months of the year ($7800) and line items totaling $190,668.32 with “Other Services ” or “Contract Services” that was devoid of any detail. Energy costs were updated. Total Market revenue is reported as $837,519.24 with projected profit of $233,504.03 after expenses of $604,015.21 one quarter of which are personnel costs. South Hall merchants paid $241,878. 89 for stall rentals. Eastern Market outdoor vendors pay an average of $30 for outside stalls and account for $322,470.8532 in Market revenue. It is not the case for the privately run weekend markets with their specially arranged leases who operate on lower 7th St and who pay rent on an annualized basis just over $55,000 to DGS for public space, but who charge in excess of $100 per rental space for their sixty allotted stalls each of the two weekend days, producing revenues to the privately held weekend market companies estimated to be in the range of $600-700,000. The meeting ended with a proposal from Monte Edward’s to train docents for tours of the Market in order to generate income and interest. EMCAC’s Kuchenberg indicated that while he was interested in the history of the materials that were used in building the Eastern Market (1873) he found it even more interesting to learn on a tour that Adolf Cluss, the architect of the Market, was a great friend of Karl Marx and that they were in a local communist cell at the Navy Yard together. In fact, according to Kuchenberg’s telling, Cluss found his Navy Yard cell so inefficient in its work spreading the communist message that he left its membership and “joined an equally radical group from the 1850s and that was the Republican Party.” u


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“Eerie Apparitions”

Crossword Author: Myles Mellor • www.themecrosswords.com • www.mylesmellorconcepts.com

by Myles Mellor and Sally York Across:

1. Long-eared beast 4. Counter offer? 7. Fifth-century scourge 13. Trade punches 17. Brimmed hat 19. Fowl watcher 20. Braiding 23. Traveling slowly, as on a runway 24. Gravity hill 26. Like some lingerie 27. Caught some Z’s 29. Façade part 30. Coke’s partner 32. Compass dir. 33. Drone, e.g. 36. Atlas enlargement 37. Enjoyment spoiler 43. Leprechaun’s land 44. One of Alcott’s “Little Men” 45. Harmonize 46. Baja bread 50. Deck (out) 51. Headlight setting 52. Cheese on crackers 54. Exclamation of triumph 56. Relating to an electrode 58. Protective angel 62. Quickness of action 64. Special effects: (abbr.) 65. Forger 66. Ne plus ultra 68. Binge 69. Heir lines? 70. German city 71. Bowie’s last stand 72. Corroded 73. More flimsy 75. Stop trying 78. Athletic 82. Zoroastrian texts 83. Orient 84. It may be framed 85. Blood-typing letters 86. Breather 87. Educates 91. Can. neighbor 92. Like some parties 93. Broadway favorite

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97. OPEC land 101. A Simpson 102. Car protector 103. ___-tzu 104. Kind of gland 106. Football’s ___ Bowl 108. Proceeded in line 112. 1927 popular song 116. Draw on 118. Sioux branch 119. Edible nuts 120. Horseshoes players 121. Put in stitches 122. Lack of vigor 123. “___ la la!” 124. Mail boat

Down:

1. Exploits 2. Literally, “king” 3. Old German duchy name 4. Mediterranean capital 5. PC linkup 6. Yanks 7. Out 8. Fur cape 9. Meadowlands pace 10. Swear words? 11. Albanian money 12. Pitcher’s pride 13. Swing around 14. Citigroup’s 2010 CEO 15. Join the cast of 16. Iranian money 18. Go through 21. Christie’s “Death on the ___” 22. Itsy-bitsy biter 25. Bounding main 28. Incline 31. Military doctors 33. Dealt out 34. Away from the bow 35. Moldovan moolah 37. “La Scala di ___” (Rossini opera) 38. Subatomic particle 39. Start of a conclusion 40. Computer capacity 41. Hirsute 42. Gets

Look for this months answers at labyrinthgameshop.com 46. River in Argentina 47. Hair-raising 48. Sketches 49. Curse 51. Eat at a brasserie 52. Springy cord 53. Piquant 55. ___ hairdo 57. Least intelligent 58. Role for Dana 59. Most aloof 60. Lace tip 61. Lagerlöf’s “The Wonderful Adventures of ___” 63. Just right 66. Breathing 67. Surrenders

69. “___ next?” 71. Petri dish filler 73. Gorge 74. David, “the sweet psalmist of ___” 76. Approach 77. Salami choice 79. Evaluate 80. Skier’s transport 81. Eastern discipline 84. Havana residue 88. Good news on Wall Street 89. Cuckoo 90. Possessive pronoun 91. Four Corners state 92. Loot 93. Indulge

94. Face shape 95. Slobbish 96. Clumsy 97. Takes a powder 98. Creative spark 99. Stigmatize 100. Gossip 105. Grace period? 106. Sixth Jewish month 107. Saturn or Mercury 109. Emulated Pinocchio 110. Old Testament book 111. Secretary, for one 113. Resort 114. Mother ___ 115. High card 117. Likewise


{community life} Capitol Hill Village’s Annual Gala Moves to a Naw’lins Beat

O

by Mike Canning

ne of the Hill’s best parties of the year takes place next month with the eighth annual Capitol Hill Village Gala, both a rouser for its members and a contribution to its coffers. This year’s edition, with the theme of “Meet Me at Mardi Gras,” will celebrate and send up all aspects of that grand New Orleans extravaganza with music, food, and fun. Ever looking for new Hill addresses to discover, the gala this year will take place at Union Market, Dock 5 (upper level), 1309 Fifth St. NE, on Saturday, Feb. 27, from 7:00 to 10:30 p.m. Union Market, that hot new Northeast landmark, besides its lively Attendees check out silent auction items at CHV’s Gala. shops and eateries, has a vast second-story space available to organizations and comtured in a live auction portion, but literally dozens munity groups to host events. Plans call for that of offerings should intrigue partygoers in the extenspace to be festooned and draped in a lively evocasive silent auction. One of the most popular silent tion of the Mardi Gras spirit. auction categories is the vacation get-away, and this It’s a gala, so there will be dancing, from eleyear’s lineup is promising. It includes stays at condos gant to dirty. The tunes promise to cover the history in downtown Philadelphia and in New York City’s of New Orleans, a city with one of the richest muFlatiron District, as well as accommodations at a sical heritages in the country. The music will be difarmhouse in Vermont, an apartment on the coast rected by one D.J. Picayune, a record spinner who of Maine, and a lodge in the Blue Ridge Mountains. “promises a Bayou stomp.” Farther afield, you can bid on a private home in Hawaii’s garden island, Kauai, with ocean and mounCapitol Hill Village (CHV) Executive Ditain views, as well as a “casita” in Loreto, Baja Calirector Molly Singer enthuses: “What I love about fornia Sur, Mexico, on the Sea of Cortez, where you this event is that it will be a series of surprises and can fish, swim, and play golf breath-taking experiences and tennis year-long. throughout the evening, from Another significant sifirst arrival to last desserts.” lent auction item is the SaShe adds, “The music, the lon Dinner. This is usually decorations and lighting, the an intimate, informal occafood and the special activities sion in a Capitol Hill home and one-of-a-kind items for featuring a celebrity or expert auction are coming together conversing with guests who to create an experience not to have bid for the pleasure of be forgotten.” lively conversation and cuiThe auction portion of sine. Among the guests althe evening will allow all atready confirmed are Cokie tendees to get involved. SevRoberts, a contributing seeral major items will be feaCapitol Hill Village Gala 2016 logo, nior news analyst for Nation“Meet Me at Mardi Gras.”

al Public Radio and political commentator for ABC News, as well as Susan Page, the current Washington Bureau Chief for USA Today. Other categories of silent auction items are certificates to businesses on the Hill as well as a wide range of local restaurants, from Ambar to Zest. Items up for bidding include theater and sports tickets, music and photography lessons, and garden consulting. Phil Guire is this year’s chair of the gala, assisted by many volunteers. “I’m very excited to chair this year’s gala,” says Guire. “I look at it as an opportunity to increase CHVs visibility to younger Hill residents who might not be aware of the full scope of work done by the village. In addition I’m a sucker for a good party.” Gala organizers want to reach out to people not that familiar with the village and its functions and involve them in its efforts. Besides “letting the good times roll,” the gala serves as the major annual fundraiser for Capitol Hill Village’s expanding programs, new service initiatives, and ongoing awareness-raising about longevity and living on Capitol Hill. “Meet Me at Mardi Gras” calls for “festive” dress, with black-tie optional. Individual reservations will cost $125 with a range of donor and sponsors levels from $1,000 to $11,000. Parking is free and plentiful at the Union Market lot. Major sponsors already include National Capital Bank and Home Care Assistance. Capitol Hill Village supports its members through education, resources, and referrals, coordinated by the office staff and by volunteers who serve with tasks like driving and friendly visits. Balancing its service mission, the village offers a wide range of social activities including trips, theater visits, and restaurant outings, along with a variety of affinity groups. It has grown to more than 420 individuals assisted by more than 300 volunteers and a professional staff led by Executive Director Singer. Updates on the CHV Gala can be found at www.capitolhillvillage.org. u

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{community life}

Tradition That Can’t Be Extinguished

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ashington is a city of sirens. Any driver or pedestrian knows they can’t venture too far in any direction without yielding to the crescendo of horns and the rush of flashing lights. Whenever a fire truck races by, I often think back to my years as an undergraduate history major at U.C. Berkeley, and a research paper I wrote on the War of 1812. My paper focused on the single event that also seemed the most improbable: the burning of our nation’s capital by the British

by Jonathan Lewis that took place during the War of 1812 (actually in 1814), one that history nerds like myself refer to as “the Empire Strikes Back.” Toward the end of the war the British army suddenly and unexpectedly marched on Washington, which at the time did not have a strong military presence. After being fired upon by a few local residents, and with the memory of their loss during the Revolutionary War still fresh, the British soldiers took the opportunity to retaliate. By end of day on Aug. 24, British troops had burned as many notable public buildings and structures as

British Burn the Capitol, 1814, Allyn Cox, 1974, Corridor, House wing, First Floor. Painting: Library of Congress

army. The impetus for writing the paper came after reading a quote from then British Prime Minister Tony Blair. In his address to Congress on July 17, 2003, before discussing the close partnership between our countries fighting in the Iraq War, Blair opened with a bit of humor: “On our way down here, Senator Frist was kind enough to show me the fireplace where, in 1814, the British had burnt the Congress Library. I know this is kind of late, but sorry.” Blair was referring to a controversial event

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capital no less – reduced to a conflagration. The United States did not lose the war, of course, going on to defeat Great Britain in the star-spangled Battle of Baltimore and then again in the Battle of New Orleans (with the help of local pirates). Nevertheless, it’s perplexing that so many Americans today can easily recite the famous story of how George Washington routed the British army in the Revolutionary War, but remain unaware that there was a second war with Great Britain, or that they marched on Washington, or even that we fought alongside pirates.

A fireman observers his coworkers putting out the embers of the three-alarm fire that gutted Eastern Market on April 30, 2007. Photo: Andrew Lightman

they could find, including the Capitol, the President’s House, the Treasury, the War Office, the Arsenal, and even the main bridge across the Potomac. It should also be noted (in the interest of fairness) that some structures were preemptively torched by the Americans to prevent British troops from capturing them, including the Navy Yard and the USS Columbia. While residents’ lives were spared, there are plenty of witness accounts describing the awful experience of seeing their city – the American

The War of 1812 was allotted maybe five minutes of discussion during my entire high school education. Perhaps this is why I enjoyed painstakingly combing through 200-year-old British newspapers on microfiche (ah, those were the days) searching for firsthand accounts. I was also pleased to find that the British media seemed mostly indifferent, or even critical, of their military’s actions. One London daily, The Statesman, lamented how Washington – a city that “combines everything grand and beautiful” – should


be “visited by British vengeance.” Thankfully Capitol Hill and the rest of Washington have been fully restored since 1814. But history has its echoes, and fire has played an unfortunate recurring role in the story of our city. In 1851 newly acquired books at the Library of Congress met a similar fate when a chimney fire destroyed two-thirds of the library’s collection. When I ask longtime natives about their memories growing up, they invariably recall the riots in April 1968 – after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. – when over 1,000 fires burned across the

ter Bar, and Frager’s Hardware, a community treasure which is still recovering from a four-alarm fire in 2013. But there is another theme that strongly weaves through the history of Washington, and that is its propensity to bounce back. When the British military sets fire to your city less than 25 years after its founding, you develop a tough skin. Given all the frightening news we see and hear these days, including the recent ISIS threat to target Washington, it is worth noting that the strength of our city comes from a long history of perseverance and overcoming challenges. Neighborhoods like Capitol Hill thrive today because the residents care about preserving and enhancing the richness of this community. For a city that “combines everything grand and beautiful,” it’s a 200-year-old tradition worth keeping.

Jonathan Lewis is a Capitol Hill writer, poet, and history enthusiast. His historical essays include “The Diplomatic Relations between the United States and Pirates” and “The BurnThe iconic 93 year-old Frager’s Hardware Store burns on June 5, 2013. Photo: Andrew Lightman ing of Washington,” which was published in “Clio’s Scroll.” He is a frequent guest city. Even today in Capitol Hill, poet in the Hill Rag. His poems we sometimes contend with fire have appeared in international pubin a neighborhood that is blessed lications such as “Hawai’i Review,” with beautiful old buildings. Ma“Northern Virginia Review,” “Poetry Scotland’s The Open Mouse,” and jestic Eastern Market was gutrecently “Icelandic Connection.” In ted by a three-alarm fire in 2007, 2015 he received a Reader’s Award and other wonderful establishfrom “Orbis Literary Journal.” He ments along Pennsylvania Avenue can be reached at jonathanlewhave also endured fires: Capitol is10@gmail.com. u

Lounge, Tune Inn, Hank’s Oys-

January 2016 H 69


{community life}

H Street Life by Elise Bernard

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new year offers a chance to look back as well as a chance to move forward. This year we’ll bid adieu to a long-time H Street institution and hopefully catch a ride into H Street NE’s future on the long awaited streetcar.

The Year of the Streetcar? The H Street NE corridor’s streetcar has had a rough run, but 2016 looks like it might be the year it comes into its own. Since the District began laying the tracks in 2009, the streetcar has hit many a proverbial bump. Originally part of a 37-mile streetcar network that would wind through the city’s commercial corridors, it’s likely that H Street’s 2.4-mile line may be flying solo for a long while. The overhead wires used to power the streetcar have been a point of contention. They were opposed by groups like the Committee of the 100 on the Federal City and the National Park Service who worried they would obscure historic viewsheds. The H Street line finally got its wires, and they don’t look so bad. At one point the plan was to run the streetcar through a tunnel under the Hopscotch Bridge at Third and H streets NE and create a direct con-

nection to Union Station and its attractive Metro, MARC, Amtrak, and bus links. This plan fell apart during the summer of 2011 when Amtrak made it clear it had other plans. The DC Department of Transportation (DDOT) explored options but finally settled on the current plan to run the streetcar partway up the Hopscotch Bridge (which is unfortunately crumbling and in need of replacement) and drop riders off outside the parking garage leading to Nik da Pooh Designs’ booth at September’s Crafty Bastards. Union Station. In late 2013 the first damage, except maybe to the streetcar’s pride. streetcar made its appearance on H Street. NeighBut things have been looking up in recent borhood residents turned out to take in the sight and months. In mid-December the streetcar began prerevenue operations, the final testing phase, which shoot photos with their cell phones. You could feel DDOT nicknamed PRO. PRO will run throughA the excitement in the air, and the moment seemed at least the first part of January and possibly longer. full of possibility. It wouldn’t last. The project was This is the second time the streetcar has moved into plagued with missed this phase. deadlines and a series Today’s H Street corridor was built partly on of incidents in which the promise of a streetcar, but it has prospered the streetcar grazed without the actuality of one. Small business owncars that were parked ers have followed their dreams and opened restauover the line and partialrants, shops, and bars that residents enjoy and that ly in the streetcar’s path. bring visitors to the neighborhood. In May 2014 WAMU There’s been a tremendous amount of grousdubbed it “A Streetcar ing about the streetcar as of late, with many eager Named … Delay.” to point out the latest fender bender, even when the Streetcar fever streetcar wasn’t at fault. Like many, I’ve contracted had largely cooled by streetcar fatigue. However, that won’t stop me from February 2015, when excitedly hopping on board for a ride once it does the streetcar suffered start ferrying passengers down the corridor. That a small flash fire that looks like it could happen very soon. burned brightly atop

Folks explore a DC streetcar during the 2014 H Street Festival.

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one of its cars for a short time. The fire went out on its own, was confined to a small area, and caused no major

Ivy City Catches Crafty Bastards Cabin Fever Did last fall’s Crafty Bastards leave you wanting more? If so you’re in luck, because the curated


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202.957.2947 660 Penn Ave SE 202.545.6900 Dare@RealEstateOnTheHill.com Check out my blog for a weekly Capitol Hill open house update.

RealEstateOnTheHill.com

5-Star Premier agent

Park’s Hardware founder Kitong Park in 2009.

arts and crafts fair is staging a special event at the Hecht Warehouse on Saturday, Feb. 6, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Unlike its big brother, this one-day attraction will take place indoors. About 100 vendors will offer their wares for sale. The Ivy City location isn’t exactly close to the Metro, but don’t let that scare you off. They’ll be running shuttles all day between the NoMa-Gallaudet Metro (Red Line) station and the Hecht Warehouse. Frankly this sounds like an excellent excuse to make a day of it and add a visit to one of Ivy City’s distilleries or Atlas Brew Works (2052 West Virginia Ave. NE, Suite 102, http://www.atlasbrewworks.com).

Park’s Hardware Building Sells for $2.25 Million The building that Park’s Hardware called home for decades (920 H St. NE) sold recently for $2.25 million to 920 H LLC. Park’s Hardware opened in 1982 and has weathered many changes over the decades. The building has been listed for sale, on and off, for years, with the owners sometimes saying they were just testing the waters. Park’s was my goto when, as a carless young homeowner with

a fixer-upper, I needed basic tools or that elusive screw to fasten something that had come loose. The store stocked more than just hardware; the back room was dedicated to gardening supplies and one could even procure a fishing pole and live bait, if so inclined.

www.hillrag.com

Nando’s Peri Peri Brings Spicy Grilled Chicken to H Street The Nando’s Peri Peri (http://www.nandosperiperi.com) at 411-413 H St. NE should open sometime this month, according to the paper covering its windows. The Mozambican-Portuguese casual dining chain serves up spicy grilled chicken with sauces of your choice. The chicken is available in a selection of cuts or in salad or sandwich form. The sides include awesome fries and selections like butternut squash and grilled corn, coleslaw, or Portuguese rice. Vegetarian entrée options include a portobello mushroom halloumi wrap, a veggie wrap, and a veggie burger. For more on what’s abuzz on, and around, H Street NE, visit my blog at http://frozentropics. blogspot.com. You can send me tips or questions at elise.bernard@gmail.com. u

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Top 10 Things to Know About Capitol Riverfront

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by Michael Stevens, AICP

appy New Year to the Hill Rag community of readers! I wish you all a prosperous and successful 2016 and a year that is filled with surprises and exceeded expectations. At the beginning of a new year, tradition has it that we all make a list of things we want to change or do better – our resolutions for the coming year to better ourselves and our environments including family, friends, work, and neighborhoods. Here is a list of 10 things that will, and are, changing in the Capitol Riverfront for the betterment of this neighborhood and the city.

Park from the Navy Yard-Ballpark Metro Half Street exit/entrance. The original project was not built out due to the recession, but new owners are underway with exciting mixed-use projects that will add retail, restaurants, and entertainment uses along the street with residential and office above. These two large city blocks will be largely completed by the MLB All-Star Game in July 2018. In fact, Grosvenor’s F1RST project is well underway with an office building, new hotel, and new residential building. In total, this Half Street district will have approximately 3 million square feet of development and almost 200,000 square feet of retail offerings.

1. Whole Foods Under Construction

3. Three New Hotels

The 35,000 square-foot Whole Foods Grocery is under construction as part of the Agora residential building, and the project is substantially above ground. Anticipated to deliver in the second quarter of 2017, the Whole Foods will provide a shopping destination on the north side of the neighborhood and service the high-density residences north of M Street. WC Smith is designing Phase III of the Square 737 complex, The Garrett, which will be a 390-unit apartment building that joins Park Chelsea and Agora.

Our neighborhood is becoming a hospitality district with the addition of three new hotels – the Hampton Inn & Suites (168 rooms), which is now open; the Residence Inn by Marriott (170 rooms); and the Homewood Suites (195 rooms). These properties join the Courtyard Marriott at Navy Yard, a 204room hotel that opened in 2006.

2. Half Street Project The Half Street district was conceived as the urban entertainment district and gateway to Nationals

4. Four New Office Buildings With one office building under construction – 99M by Skanska – and three more in the active pipeline, the office market is showing signs of recovery in the neighborhood. DC Water hopes to start its headquarters office building on the river in 2016, and it will be closely followed by the new National Association of Broadcasters building at 1 M St. SE. Brandywine and Akridge will develop the fourth office building at 25 M St. SE.

5. Capper Community Center and Van Ness School

The Yards Marina currently under construction.

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A major part of the neighborhood’s civic infrastructure is being completed with the construction of the Capper Community Center and the reopening of Van Ness Elementary School in 2015. Van Ness will welcome its inaugural first grade class in the fall of 2016, and the Capper Community Center should open during the second quarter of 2016. These two facilities will

offer classroom education, afterschool activities, programming for seniors and families, and other community activities.

6. ICON Showplace Theater The 16-screen ICON Showplace Theater will break ground in 2016 and bring movies as an entertainment anchor one block east of Nationals Park. The theaters will sit on top of a four-level parking garage and offer reserved seating and parking, as well as a bar and restaurant on the top floor. This will be the first development by Forest City Washington on land they recently acquired from the District government.

Hampton Inn & Suites now open.

7. Wayfinding Signage The business improvement district (BID) team is finalizing a wayfinding signage system that will include informational kiosks, directional “blade” signs for pedestrians and autos, and new banners for the public realm. The DC Department of Transportation (DDOT) is reviewing the signage system for compliance and permitting, and the BID is also finalizing funding strategies. The wayfinding signage will help guide residents, employees, and visitors to the growing number of attractions and destinations within the Capitol Riverfront.

8. Yards Marina Forest City Washington has begun construction of the Yards Marina in the Capitol Riverfront, located on the Anacostia River in front of Yards Park. With approximately 50 boat slips in multiple finger piers, the marina will span from the east end of the pedestrian bridge in Yards Park to the border of the adjacent Washington Navy Yard. Half of the planned boat slips will be designated for short-term transient use (less than 10 days) and the other half will be for long-term use on a seasonal contract basis. Each boat slip will have a utility pedestal with


n.

Heather Schoell Capitol Hill Real Estate

area. The DC Office of Planning is finalizing a Buzzard Point vision plan that will serve as a framework for public and private investment in the area. There may be opportunities to renovate the two existing office buildings, where the Coast Guard was once located, as mixed-use buildings with a substantial JBG’s Half Street district residential project, 1244 South Capitol St., amount of square footcurrently under construction. age dedicated to housing. This could prove the value of Buzzard Point convenience electrical outlets and a water supas a new neighborhood on the river and encourply hookup. Yards Marina will also feature a waage additional development. Existing streets can ter taxi dock, a paddler dock for kayakers and be rebuilt and also function as linear parks that canoes, and an education dock for use with rivconnect to the river and other smaller scale open er-focused experiential instruction. The anticispaces. Retail would follow the residential develpated completion of the marina is spring 2016. opment, as well as the soccer stadium and its ancillary development. 9. Nine Residential Buildings As part of the largest development cycle in the As a new growth neighborhood, the CapCapitol Riverfront’s history, nine new residenitol Riverfront has been evolving for the past tial buildings containing 2,868 units are cur20 years, and the past two years have witnessed rently under construction. They are establishing the largest development cycle in the neighborthe Capitol Riverfront as DC’s “fastest growhood’s history. It has become the fastest growing neighborhood,” and when completed and ing residential neighborhood in the District, leased will almost double our residential popuand the office market is showing signs of growth lation (from 5,000 to over 9,000). Park Chelsea as well. With 30+ restaurants, a Harris Teeter and Arris will be the first of the nine new buildgrocery, and VIDA Fitness, the retail market is ings to open for leasing in early 2016. I Street SE firmly established. Nationals Park has brandwill also be reopened for traffic with the opening ed the Capitol Riverfront as a sports and enterof Park Chelsea, thereby assisting in east/west traftainment district, which will be enhanced by fic circulation in the SE and SW neighborhoods. the new DC United soccer stadium, the ICON Be on the lookout for possibly six new condomovie theater, and the Half Street entertainminium projects in the Capitol Riverfront, with ment district. At the end of the next three years two located in the lower Eighth Street area and the neighborhood will be 60 percent built-out the PN Hoffman project at Fourth and Tingey across four market segments – residential, office, Streets SE breaking ground in early 2016. Dock retail, and hotel. 79 by MRP Realty will deliver in 2016, and part On behalf of the Capitol Riverfront BID, of the site plan includes enhancements to Diaour board of directors, the Clean & Safe Teams, mond Teague Park and an extension of the Anaand our professional staff we wish you a Happy costia Riverwalk Trail. New Year and a successful and fulfilling 2016! Please join us by the river and celebrate all sea10. Buzzard Point Vision Framework sons in the Capitol Riverfront. It is envisioned that the new DC United Soccer stadium will be a catalyst for Buzzard Point and Michael Stevens is president of the Capitol Riverfront BID (capitolriverfront.org). u stimulate new mixed-use development in this sub-

202-321-0874 heathersdc@gmail.com

May the New Year bring you happiness, peace, and prosperity. Wishing you a joyous new year! I donate $500 of every sale to the Capitol Hill Community Foundation (capitolhillcommunityfoundation.org), to strengthen the fabric of our neighborhood.

When you work with me, you make a difference! We appreciated how Heather takes the time to get to know us and our needs. She worked relentlessly to find the perfect home for our family. ~ Tara C. Working with Heather was a breeze. She always anticipated all the questions that I had, making the process a walk in the park. ~ Jean Patrick Guichard Heather’s knowledge of the Hill and passion for local schools was a tremendous asset in our search for a family home. ~ Brian C.

A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC.

I appreciate your referrals! 216 7th Street, SE Eastern Market Office (C) 202-321-0874 (O) 202-608-1882 x175 heathersdc@gmail.com heatherschoell.penfedrealty.com @HeatherSchoell Heather Schoell Real Estate

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Our River: The Anacostia Winter Watershed Get-Aways

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Article and Photos by Bill Matuszeski year. And don’t forget your camera. The Gardens are at 1550 Anacostia Avenue, NE. To get there by car take I-295 to Burroughs Avenue and turn toward the River; at the T turn right and drive north to the gate. Or take Metro Orange to Deanwood Station and walk there, starting on Polk St, crossing 295 on a pedestrian bridge and turning left on Douglas and right on Anacostia – about four blocks. Open 8-4 daily in winter.

he holidays are over and we all need some time alone or with a companion or two. But we don’t need to fly off to Florida or the Caribbean. There are a number of great get-aways right here in the Anacostia watershed, places where you can walk and talk – even with yourself – while enjoying nature or history or both. While you probably have your own favorites, here are four places that will take you away, but let you get back home for dinner. And they all can be done in the winter – in fact, are probably better then than other times when they are more crowded.

Lake Artemesia

The Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens Located in far northeast DC, this is the only National Park Service unit devoted to water-loving plants. The entire site is nearly 100 acres, about three-quarters of which is tidal marsh. In summer, the ponds are filled with water lilies and lotus in bloom, but things are much quieter this time of year. But that doesn’t mean you are alone. A recent study identified a multitude of on-site species: 150 plants , 76 birds, 18 fish and 9 mammals. Other surveys have identified a total of 257 bird species at various times of the year. In 1880, Civil War veteran Walter Shaw pur-

Lake Artemesia

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The Ponds in winter at Kenilworth Gardens

chased 37 acres and began to build his water gardens. After years of success, he decided to open a business and begin to sell the water lilies and other aquatic plants. In 1912, his daughter Helen took over, expanded the business and became a national advocate for water gardens. But in the 1930’s, the Corps of Engineers began to “improve” the Anacostia shoreline and threatened to condemn and fill in the land. After much controversy, in 1938 Congress appropriated $15,000 to purchase the land and turn it over to the Park Service. Today we can enjoy the benefits of this purchase. Walk around the historic ponds and enjoy the birds and wildlife; take the boardwalk trail to the marshes beyond. Or if it is open, take the River Trail out to the construction site of the new section of the Anacostia Riverwalk Trail, which will bridge the last link of the 70-mile trail system – the three mile stretch from Benning Road to Bladensburg Marina – when it opens later this

This is a real secret spot. Right east of the train and Metro tracks in College Park is a 38-acre lake with fish and water birds and surrounded by trails and aquatic gardens. How it got there and got named is an interesting story. In the 1890s, the area, which was low and surrounded by Indian Creek and Paint Branch, was surveyed by Arthur Drefs, who decided to use the natural ponds to raise first bass and then goldfish. He named the largest lake after his daughter, Artemesia. She donated the ten lots in 1972 for open space. Just about then, Metro was building the Green Line alongside and was looking for a cheap source of sand and gravel. So Metro ended up saving $10 million by dredging the site and donated $8 million of it to build the Lake and the Park. The result was the large lake with fishing piers, picnic areas, gazebos and trails. One of the trails has been designated by Audubon as the Luther Golden Birding Trail. The grounds are open sunrise to sunset daily. And there are seldom many people around. Part of the reason is that it is very difficult to find and to park near. Various suggestions include the intersection of Vassar Drive and Sweetbrier Drive on the east; 55th Avenue off Berwyn Road on the north; or the intersection of 54th Avenue and Pierce Avenue on the west, using the path between the school and the tracks to connect to the Paint Branch Trail. Much easier is to approach on one of the trails by bike; the Indian Creek and Paint Branch Trails join right south of the Lake to form the Northeast Branch Trail. Finally, while out there you may want to add


you walk alongside. Add it to your get-away; you won’t regret it. Park at the mill or bike up there from Metro Green at West Hyattsville.

Brookside Gardens

View from the Teahouse at Brookside Gardens

a visit to the nearby air museum at the College Park Airport.

The Adelphi Mill This is the only surviving water-powered mill in Prince Georges County, located on the banks of the Anacostia’s Northwest Branch at 8402 Riggs Road. It is operated by the County Department of Parks and Recreation and is rented out for events – very popular for weddings. A beautiful fieldstone structure dating from 1796, it has been restored inside and out and the grounds are also quite beautiful and include a restored miller’s house. The mill ground grain and carded wool and was originally run by two brothers – thus the name “Adelphi”, Greek for “brothers”. In 1865 it was purchased by George Washington Riggs, who became the owner as well of Riggs Bank, now part of PNC. In 1951 it became public parkland and the restored mill was opened to the public in 1954. Since it is not regularly staffed and is open only for events, you have to be lucky to see the interior. The trail along the Northwest Branch from the mill to the Beltway is a classic stream valley of hills and woods and worthy of a walk any time of the year. It is on my list of favorite hikes, with a broad deep valley that goes two miles to the Beltway with hardly a building in sight and only one road crossing. The stream is filled with riffles and rapids and the air is filled with its sounds as

Many readers have undoubtedly been to Brookside Gardens in Wheaton, but only in winter to join the crowds to see the Christmas lights. But it is a great place to escape to when it’s cold and there are few folks around. It is part of the Anacostia watershed that is in Montgomery County; the Northwest Branch lies to its east and receives the waters of the streams and lakes in the garden. To the south over the hill lies the adjacent Wheaton Regional Park, which drains into Sligo Creek. Brookside Gardens is operated by Montgomery County Parks and is free to the public. It is open sunrise to sunset; the visitor center hours are 9-5 and the conservatories 10-5. It is 50 acres of display gardens, ponds, and woodland walks. There is a large pond with a gazebo in the form of a Japanese Teahouse as will as two conservatories that feature tropical plants, especially in winter. The woodland gardens and boardwalks are especially inviting, and if you are seeking more walks in the woods, the adjacent Park has miles of them. Just find your way to the gate on the far side of the teahouse. You can get to the gardens by Metro by taking the Red Line to its terminus at Glenmont and walking about a mile on Glenallan Avenue, which is on the far side of the parking garage when you come up the east side of the station. If you drive, take Georgia Avenue to right on Randolph Road and right on Glenallan at the second light. The best way to visit is to bring your bike on Metro and scoot down Glenallan to the Gardens, then return home by pedaling through Wheaton Regional Park and riding all the way down the Sligo Creek Trail to the Green Line at West Hyattsville. You will love it! Just bring warm gloves! Let me know if you have other favorite Anacostia Watershed Getaways; e-mail me at bmat@olg.com. u

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Cindy Janke (1943-2015) A Vibrant Voice for Capitol Hill History

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apitol Hill historian and author Lucinda (Cindy) Prout Janke and I shared an interest in Civil War history. So it wasn’t unusual we crossed paths at history lectures, symposia and meetings over the past few years. I got to know Cindy a few years ago when I volunteered as a docent at the Historical Society of Washington (HSW), where she was a longtime collections manager and curator. As a DC tour guide, I used Cindy’s richly illustrated 2013 publication, “A Guide to Civil War Washington, DC: The Capital of the Union,” on recent tours around town. I was impressed with her in-depth research, knowledge and passion about our nation’s capital, especially Capitol Hill. She made our past come alive as she guided her readers (and lecture audiences) through the changing landscape of our capital from the Civil War to the 21st century. Full of energy and enthusiasm, Cindy seemed to be in the prime of life when she fell down the stairs in her Capitol Hill home, suffering fatal injuries. She died on October 27 at age 72. Her friends and family were shocked and stunned to lose this amazing person so suddenly. Her significant contributions to our community enlightened many lives, including mine. According to the HSW, Cindy became a historian relatively late in life, but she quickly made up for any lost time. A native of upstate New York, she had earned her B.A. in political science from Wellesley College in 1964. She came to Washington to work as a copy editor for a political think tank. Cindy and her late husband, John Janke, a well-respected realtor, moved to Capitol Hill in 1969 and raised two children, Johnny and Jenny. She was active as a parent and PTA volunteer at Brent Elementary, among other aspects of com-

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by Peter McCall

munity involvement. In 1972, she went to work for the Capitol Hill interior design firm C. Dudley Brown & Associates, specializing in period interiors and historic preservation. This work deepened her interest in period design and social history. As an independent historian, she became curator of the Kiplinger Washington Collection and collections manager for the HSW. As a curator, she consulted on exhibitions for the US Capitol Historical Society, the Heurich House Foundation and the Franklin School Coalition, among others. In 2000, Cindy received an M.A. in museum studies from George Washington University. She was also a volunteer for Capitol Hill Restoration Society’s annual House Tour. The tour was a CH highlight and she attended almost every one, saving all the guides. Cindy befriended and collaborated with the late Capitol Hill historian Ruth Ann Overbeck.

She presented Overbeck Memorial Lectures on such topics as the Civil War, Capitol Hill breweries and the 18th century landowner William Prout, whose property included much of our Capitol Hill Historic District. She had conducted extensive research on the Civil War-era Old Naval Hospital, now Hill Center, where I heard her Civil War lecture. Cindy found time to lead Capitol Hill walking tours, especially around historic Congressional Cemetery and John Philip Sousa’s neighborhood. She also taught as an adjunct professor at GWU and wrote numerous articles and essays on White House, Capitol Hill and DC history. Cindy served on several nonprofit organizations’ boards, including the HSW, the Kiplinger Foundation, the Annual DC Historical Studies Conference Committee, the Association of Oldest Inhabitants, the Association to Preserve Historic Congressional Cemetery and the Victorian Society’s local chapter, which she co-founded. Shortly before her death, Cindy had completed work as co-curator on the HSW’s current exhibition, “For The Record: The Art of Lily Spandorf,” on view at the new George Washington University Museum/Textile Museum on 21st Street NW. It highlights the work of the Austrian-born watercolorist and journalist Lily Spandorf, who illustrated colorful scenes and landmarks of Washington’s recent past. A memorial service is planned for January 16 at 11 am at Christ Church. The family suggests that memorial donations be sent to the Old Naval Hospital Foundation to support the Hill Center Preservation Fund or to the Historical Society of Washington, DC. She will be interred next to John P. Janke at another of her community interests, the historic Congressional Cemetery. u


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{real estate}

Changing Hands Changing hands is a list of most residential sales in the District of Columbia from the previous month. A feature of every issue, this list, based on the MRIS, is provided courtesy of Don Denton, manager of the Coldwell Banker office on Capitol Hill. The list includes address, sales price and number of bedrooms. NEIGHBORHOOD

CLOSE PRICE

BR

$970,000 $925,000 $891,500 $800,000 $679,000 $608,500

5 4 4 4 4 4

FEE SIMPLE 16TH STREET HEIGHTS 1532 VARNUM ST NW 5204 13TH ST NW 1339 GALLATIN ST NW 1210 MADISON ST NW 4612 15TH ST NW 1315 KENNEDY ST NW

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY PARK 4505 YUMA ST NW 4943 BUTTERWOR TH PL NW 4305 WARREN ST NW 4337 ELLICOTT ST NW 4950 BRANDYWINE ST NW 4216 VAN NESS ST NW 4724 ALTON PL NW 4404 HARRISON ST NW 4623 BUTTERWORTH PL NW 5021 45TH ST NW 4913 48TH ST NW 4419 HARRISON ST NW 4533 VERPLANCK PL NW 5107 45TH ST NW

ANACOSTIA

1603 18TH ST SE 1906 17TH ST SE 1321 VALLEY PL SE 2254 MOUNT VIEW PL SE 1323 W ST SE

BARRY FARMS 1417 BANGOR ST SE 1207 TALBERT ST SE 1215 TALBERT ST SE 2607 12TH PL SE

BERKLEY

4522 FOXHALL CRES NW

BLOOMINGDALE

2121 FLAGLER PL NW 2319 NORTH CAPITOL ST NE 43 RANDOLPH PL NW 2323 1st NW 2028 FLAGLER PL NW 119 SEATON PL NW

BRENTWOOD 1606 W ST NE 2241 13TH ST NE

BRIGHTWOOD

616 OGLETHORPE ST NW 914 SHERIDAN ST NW 6805 5TH ST NW 434 PEABODY ST NW 5713 4TH ST NW 509 QUACKENBOS ST NW

$1,720,000 $1,447,000 $1,237,000 $1,220,000 $1,188,000 $1,175,000 $1,125,000 $965,000 $925,000 $881,000 $825,000 $825,000 $809,000 $775,000

5 5 4 5 4 6 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3

$425,000 $289,000 $185,000 $170,000 $169,000

8 3 4 4 2

$323,250 $150,000 $100,000 $70,000

2 3 3 2

$1,749,000

4

$1,100,000 $799,000 $780,000 $778,000 $755,000 $600,000

4 4 3 5 3 3

$417,000 $307,700

4 3

$785,000 $765,000 $688,000 $650,000 $648,000 $645,000

4 7 4 4 4 4

5930 4TH ST NW 323 PEABODY ST NW 1367 RITTENHOUSE ST NW 6735 16TH ST NW 6501 PINEY BRANCH RD NW 5707 3RD PL NW 729 TEWKESBURY PL NW 6430 8TH ST NW 707 SOMERSET PL NW 6323 9TH ST NW 6617 GEORGIA AVE NW 814 FERN PL NW 5819 7TH ST NW

BROOKLAND

1011 IRVING ST NE 1709 JACKSON ST NE 1024 PERRY ST NE 1714 NEWTON ST NE 216 CHANNING ST NE 2809 5TH ST NE 1504 NEWTON ST NE 46 RHODE ISLAND AVE NE 1356 GIRARD ST NE 4726 10TH ST NE 31 MICHIGAN AVE NE 4100 18TH PL NE 712 FARRAGUT PL NE 1311 IRVING ST NE 32 CRITTENDEN ST NE 12 BUCHANAN ST NE

BURLEITH 3612 S ST NW 3520 S ST NW

CAPITOL HILL

504 EAST CAPITOL ST NE 622-624 NORTH CAROLINA AVE SE 647 SOUTH CAROLINA AVE SE

$625,000 $614,900 $599,000 $580,000 $550,000 $495,000 $480,000 $472,000 $470,000 $465,000 $455,000 $399,900 $370,000

4 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 6

$873,000 $820,000 $781,000 $655,000 $649,000 $609,000 $602,000 $460,750 $455,000 $443,370 $437,000 $399,950 $398,250 $385,000 $361,000 $334,750

5 4 3 3 4 3 5 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 3

$1,712,500 $860,000

5 3

$2,500,000 $1,600,000 $1,510,000

4 7 3

212 6TH ST SE 124 11TH ST NE 706 15TH ST SE 207 3RD ST NE 216 10TH ST SE 710 A ST SE 1132 PARK ST NE 234 10TH ST NE 503 3RD ST SE 501 6TH ST SE 627 C ST NE 227 8TH ST NE 1322 MARYLAND AVE NE 1713 D ST SE 663 SOUTH CAROLINA AVE SE 112 KENTUCKY AVE SE 631 LEXINGTON PL NE 920 MARYLAND AVE NE 803 MARYLAND AVE NE 311 11TH ST SE 1527 D ST NE 23 6TH ST NE 326 15TH ST NE 401 D ST SE 411 7TH ST SE 503 TENNESSEE AVE NE 1247 K ST SE 328 D ST SE 1603 MASSACHUSETTS AVE SE 1532 NORTH CAROLINA AVE NE 921 4TH ST NE

CHEVY CHASE

3730 OLIVER ST NW 5342 42ND ST NW 5430 CHEVY CHASE PKWY NW 3971 HARRISON ST NW 3268 ARCADIA PL NW 3027 OREGON KNOLLS DR NW 3318 STEPHENSON PL NW

$1,495,000 $1,445,000 $1,150,000 $1,129,000 $1,105,000 $1,100,000 $1,050,000 $1,006,600 $995,000 $967,550 $955,000 $937,179 $907,000 $878,500 $850,000 $830,000 $830,000 $779,000 $726,000 $714,900 $710,000 $701,000 $685,214 $650,000 $630,000 $630,000 $585,000 $585,000 $530,000 $480,000 $843,921

5 4 4 6 4 6 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 2 2 3 2 3 2 2 3 3 2 2 2 3

$1,585,000 $1,560,000 $1,415,000 $1,361,000 $1,150,000 $1,045,000 $1,000,000

5 6 5 5 4 3 5

January 2016 H 79


{real estate}

5303 29TH ST NW 3428 OLIVER ST NW 3638 JENIFER ST NW 6220 31ST ST NW 2830 RITTENHOUSE ST NW 6132 32ND PL NW 6331 31ST ST NW 6151 31ST ST NW 3408 RITTENHOUSE ST NW

$975,000 $944,000 $902,500 $901,000 $850,000 $829,000 $800,000 $775,000 $775,000

5 3 3 4 5 3 3 3 3

CHILLUM 6427 2ND PL NW 5508 1ST ST NE 6001 3RD ST NW 29 LONGFELLOW ST NW

$599,000 $560,000 $440,000 $432,400

CLEVELAND PARK 3515 LOWELL ST NW 3020 MACOMB ST NW 3308 35TH ST NW 3849 MACOMB ST NW 2923 MACOMB ST NW 2939 MACOMB ST NW

$2,750,000 $2,505,000 $1,957,500 $1,661,000 $1,250,000 $1,150,000

COLONIAL VILLAGE 1622 MYRTLE ST NW 7927 ORCHID ST NW 1901 PARKSIDE DR NW

$860,000 $832,000 $830,000

COLUMBIA HEIGHTS 1500 COLUMBIA RD NW 1312 IRVING ST NW 3644 NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE NW 3613 NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE NW 1408 SPRING RD NW 3304 PARK PL NW 914 SPRING RD NW 746 PRINCETON PL NW 511 IRVING ST NW 1011 KENYON ST NW 1239 KENYON ST NW 756 FAIRMONT ST NW 1352 NEWTON ST NW 426 IRVING ST NW 1021 OTIS PL NW 775 KENYON ST NW 4023 13TH ST NW 2907 GEORGIA AVE NW 711 IRVING ST NW 662 COLUMBIA RD NW 518 COLUMBIA RD NW

$975,000 $962,000 $880,000 $820,000 $785,000 $738,000 $734,500 $720,000 $705,500 $650,000 $650,000 $648,000 $630,000 $625,000 $605,250 $590,000 $569,000 $560,000 $540,000 $530,000 $480,125

CONGRESS HEIGHTS 1000 CONGRESS ST SE 3964 2ND ST SW 136 WILMINGTON PL SE 149 UPSAL ST SE 89 DARRINGTON ST SW 807 HR DR SE 508 FOXHALL PL SE 4005 4TH ST SE 130 YUMA ST SE 410 ORANGE ST SE 110 BRANDYWINE PL SW 1136 BARNABY TER SE 3969 1ST ST SW 3834 1ST ST SE 714 CONGRESS ST SE

$401,750 $378,900 $367,000 $335,000 $280,000 $279,900 $270,000 $270,000 $227,000 $220,000 $215,000 $180,000 $151,100 $130,000 $79,800

CRESTWOOD 4331 BLAGDEN AVE NW 4811 BLAGDEN AVE NW 1617 ALLISON ST NW

80 H Hillrag.com

$1,199,998 $902,000 $810,000

3 3 3 3 7 4 5 4 4 3 3 5 4 7 4 5 6 4 4 3 4 4 3 4 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 4 5 3 4 3 3 3 2 4 3 3 2 3 3 3 3

DEANWOOD 4925 LEE ST NE 327 57TH ST NE 146 57TH ST SE 5656 A ST SE 5524 HUNT PL NE 811 44TH ST NE 272 DIVISION AVE NE 5103 JAY ST NE 6114 BANKS PL NE 5225 BANKS PL NE 4005 CLAY PL NE 4269 BROOKS ST NE 327 DIVISION AVE NE 908 PORTER CT NE 5010 AMES ST NE 4202 GAULT PL NE 4219 HAYES ST NE 518 59TH ST NE 5040 JUST ST NE 1031 46TH ST NE 204 44TH ST NE

$429,000 $349,000 $332,000 $330,000 $325,000 $310,000 $307,900 $278,500 $273,000 $249,900 $240,900 $232,500 $218,500 $216,000 $160,000 $155,000 $155,000 $130,987 $128,000 $117,600 $105,555

DUPONT CIRCLE 1615 19TH ST NW 1530 T ST NW

$1,496,000 $1,310,000

ECKINGTON 35 RANDOLPH PL NW 67 S ST NW 205 V ST NE

$945,000 $900,000 $250,000

FOGGY BOTTOM 2503 I ST NW 2528 I ST NW 828 25TH ST NW

$1,311,000 $725,000 $720,000

FOREST HILLS 2806 CHESTERFIELD PL NW

$4,000,000

FORT DUPONT PARK

4 3 5 3 3 2 2 2 6

2937 FORT BAKER DR SE 2201 31ST PL SE 725 32ND ST SE 1112 BRANCH AVE SE

$464,000 $442,000 $348,000 $208,500

KALORAMA 2208 Q ST NW

$2,025,000

3119 ARIZONA AVE NW 5026 KLINGLE ST NW 5010 GARFIELD ST NW 2951 ARIZONA AVE NW 5155 MACARTHUR BLVD NW

$1,750,000 $1,289,000 $1,180,000 $944,000 $600,000

LEDROIT PARK 75 V ST NW 319 T ST NW 5 ADAMS ST NW 73 W ST NW 338 U ST NW

$1,010,000 $968,000 $950,000 $805,000 $686,000

LILY PONDS 4216 LANE PL NE 1120 42ND ST NE 3331 DIX ST NE 1116 42ND ST NE 1613 OLIVE ST NE 1615 OLIVE ST NE 3346 ALDEN PL NE

$460,000 $369,000 $232,000 $200,000 $182,500 $182,500 $100,000

1408 FLORIDA AVE NW

$799,900

MARSHALL HEIGHTS 5310 BASS PL SE

$419,000

MICHIGAN PARK 4108 19TH ST NE 4016 21ST ST NE

$429,000 $370,000

GARFIELD

NAVY YARD

GEORGETOWN

NORTH CLEVELAND PARK

2913 28TH ST NW

3406 R ST NW 1505 28TH ST NW 1609 34TH ST NW 3414 P ST NW 3104 N ST NW 3213 VOLTA PL NW 3342 PROSPECT ST NW 1540 34TH ST NW 3504 T ST NW 3219 CHERRY HILL LN NW

$1,220,000 $2,475,000 $1,855,000 $1,500,000 $1,400,000 $1,350,000 $1,300,000 $1,222,500 $985,000 $884,500 $790,000

GLOVER PARK 2444 TUNLAW RD NW 2414 TUNLAW RD NW

$1,165,000 $741,175

3109 BEECH ST NW

$715,000

HILL CREST 3806 SUITLAND RD SE

$550,000

3 4 3 2 2 2 3 5 2 3 2 4 3 3 3

6 5 3 5 5 2 4 4 4 3 3 5 3 2 3 4 4 2

LOGAN

MOUNT PLEASANT

$335,000 $320,000 $265,000 $260,000 $230,000 $225,000 $180,000

3 4 3 2

KENT

3 3 2 3 3 2 3

417 BURBANK ST SE 738 RIDGE RD SE 4615 H ST SE 4645 H ST SE 1118 CHAPLIN ST SE 377 CHAPLIN ST SE 4626 H ST SE

HAWTHORNE 7 5 5

3 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 2 3 3 5 3 3 3 3 2 4 3 3 2

1614 HOBART ST NW 1803 NEWTON ST NW 1719 NEWTON ST NW

$1,270,000 $1,150,000 $858,000

MOUNT VERNON SQUARE 1120 5TH ST NW 328 K ST SE

3609 ALBEMARLE ST NW 3805 WARREN ST NW 3726 WARREN ST NW

$1,237,500 $1,140,000 $1,720,000 $1,160,000 $1,020,000

OBSERVATORY CIRCLE 2817 38TH ST NW

$1,200,000

OLD CITY #1 620 6TH ST NE 210 11TH ST SE 317 13TH ST SE 1921 D ST NE 520 10TH ST NE 317 G ST NE 528 4TH ST NE 1401 F ST NE 261 TENNESSEE AVE NE 245 16TH ST SE 1507 D ST NE 1710 A ST SE

$1,400,000 $1,200,000 $1,008,500 $903,700 $890,000 $825,000 $805,000 $740,000 $737,000 $730,000 $701,000 $692,500

3 5 3 3 4 5 4 4 4 6 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 4 2 3 3 4 3 4 3


HEAR YE HEAR YE

NEW HOUSES

NEW YEAR SEE!

1209 WALTER ST SE 309 K ST SE 205 13TH ST NE 1020 5TH ST NE 206 16TH ST SE 1601 D NE 1657 KRAMER ST NE 542 24TH ST NE 1415 F ST NE 1633 GALES ST NE 337 18TH PL NE 711 16TH ST NE

$682,500 $632,545 $625,000 $621,000 $600,000 $533,800 $485,000 $465,000 $440,000 $420,000 $399,900 $399,000

OLD CITY #2 2134 12TH ST NW 1202 W ST NW 1527 12TH ST NW 1617 8TH ST NW 418 WARNER ST NW 915 W ST NW 227 BATES ST NW 41 BATES ST NW

$1,245,000 $990,000 $890,000 $835,000 $780,000 $769,000 $617,000 $583,500

2 2 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 2 4 2 4 3 5 3 3 2 0 4

G IN ! M N CO OO S

507 14th Street SE 2BR/1.5BA Just steps from Potomac metro, Jenkins Row and countless new Pennsylvania Avenue developments! Featuring, open living and dining with hearth, custombuilt kitchen overlooking perfectly planned brick and slate private patio. On the upper level, BIG bedrooms and walk-in closets with updated bath!

G IN ! M N O O C O S

1222 D Street NE 2BR/2.5BA

PALISADES 5414 GALENA PL NW 5006 V ST NW

$1,225,000 $876,000

PETWORTH 4505 NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE NW 4138 7TH ST NW 249 ROCK CREEK CHURCH RD NW 734 VARNUM ST NW 4814 KANSAS AVE NW 411 QUINCY ST NW 626 INGRAHAM ST NW 4814 5TH ST NW 725 SHEPHERD ST NW 421 DELAFIELD PL NW 5231 KANSAS AVE NW 4707 9TH ST NW 14 SHERMAN CIR NW 214 JEFFERSON ST NW 305 ROCK CREEK CHURCH RD NW 114 JEFFERSON ST NW 5314 8TH ST NW

$837,500 $774,900 $732,325 $725,000 $699,000 $697,500 $677,000 $675,000 $675,000 $599,900 $574,000 $482,000 $476,278 $450,000 $430,000 $400,000 $342,825

RANDLE HEIGHTS 3421 25TH ST SE 3430 21ST ST SE 3423 24TH ST SE 3534 21ST SE

$259,000 $253,000 $229,500 $152,000

RIGGS PARK 5603 CHILLUM PL NE 631 JEFFERSON ST NE

$360,000 $315,000

3 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 4 3 3 6 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 3 3 3

G IN ! M N CO OO S

At the crossroads of city convenience and the peaceful tree-lined, brick paved blocks of Capitol Hill you’ll find this updated row house with historic features and modern amenities. Come visit SOON!

G IN ! M N CO OO S

Perfectly placed between Lincoln Park and H Street - wide open main level leads to flexible kitchen space and central dining area with deck and private yard backing up to accessible alley. On the upper level, you’ll find a DRAMATIC master suite with built-ins and a large bedroom and 2nd bath and bedroom level laundry!

G

CO

M

IN

!

5018 Illinois Ave NW 4BR/3.5BA Not far to Georgia shops and eats, circle parks and seats - this WIDE renovated porch front boasts nearly 2,500 sf across three levels of open spaces, HUGE kitchen, complete with new finishes, windows, and systems all less than TWO years young! Come get your BIG family house on the peaceful tree lined blocks of Sherman Circle and start off your 2016 on the right foot!

1217 Independence Avenue SE 3BR/3.5BA 1 block to THE PARK! preserved marble and chestnut hearth, original newel post, hardwood floors, original carpentry details and built-ins throughout, PLUS expanded brick footprint to bring this row home to over 2,800 SF with private brick patio beyond. Don’t miss this BIG piece of Victorian history!

N

O

SO

324 Kentucky Avenue SE 2BR/1.5BA

!

LD

SO

706 15th Street NE 4BR/3.5BA $1,150,000 A New Hill Classic is BORN -- Brand New Construction built to standards second to NONE! 20 ft wide with tall ceilings, open layout, central stairs, and kitchen to stay home for! Giant owners’ suite and lower rec and guest zone. The best of clean modern and timeless - EVERY detail considered and well-crafted of marble, oak, steel to last a lifetime.

SHAW 930 FRENCH ST NW 1405 NEW JERSEY AVE NW

$920,100 $895,000

SHEPHERD PARK 7733 16TH ST NW

$965,000

SPRING VALLEY 4730 QUEBEC ST NW 5041 UPTON ST NW 4834 VAN NESS ST NW 4629 TILDEN ST NW

$1,588,000 $1,499,000 $1,320,000 $749,000

TAKOMA PARK 31 UNDERWOOD PL NW 7313 BLAIR RD NW 6556 CAPITOL ST NW

$331,000 $731,000 $386,000

4 4 5 5 5 4 2 3 6 3

January 2016 H 81


{real estate}

TRINIDAD 1319 WEST VIRGINIA AVE NE 1641 WEST VIRGINIA AVE NE 1513 NEAL ST NE 1190 MORSE ST NE 1645 TRINIDAD AVE NE 1525 OATES ST NE 1161 MORSE ST NE 1273 PENN ST NE 1221 STAPLES ST NE 1507 QUEEN ST NE 756 18TH ST NE 1125 16TH ST NE 1240 16TH ST NE 1635 L ST NE 1778 LYMAN PL NE 1850 L ST NE 1268 OWEN PL NE 1830 H ST NE 1955 H ST NE

$699,000 $600,000 $569,000 $537,500 $525,000 $520,000 $517,000 $502,000 $450,000 $407,000 $400,000 $400,000 $399,900 $344,000 $303,150 $290,000 $280,250 $269,000 $199,500

TRUXTON CIRCLE 29 Q ST NW

$899,000

U STREET 2234 12TH PL NW

$735,000

WAKEFIELD 4526 36TH ST NW 4533 38TH ST NW

$1,350,000 $830,000

WESLEY HEIGHTS 4345 HAWTHORNE ST NW 2917 45TH ST NW 3211 FOXHALL RD NW 4269 EMBASSY PARK DR NW

$2,407,500 $2,050,000 $1,400,000 $859,000

WOODRIDGE 2928 CARLTON AVE NE 3005 20TH ST NE 3210 CENTRAL AVE NE 3050 MONROE ST NE 3810 22ND ST NE 1548 DOUGLAS ST NE 2411 RANDOLPH ST NE 2122 RAND PL NE 3015 S DAKOTA AVE NE 1512 EVARTS ST NE

$819,000 $730,000 $700,000 $624,900 $510,000 $455,000 $390,000 $325,000 $285,000 $225,000

3 5 4 3 4 3 4 3 1 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 2 4 2 5 3 4 6 5 3 6 5 4 3 3 4 3 5 3 3

YARDS/BALLPARK

1229 CARROLLSBURG PL SW $685,000 3

CONDO 14TH STREET CORRIDOR 1412 CHAPIN ST NW #202 1412 CHAPIN ST NW #106 1412 CHAPIN ST NW #2 1412 CHAPIN ST NW #5

$630,000 $598,900 $444,000 $398,900

16TH STREET HEIGHTS 5885 COLORADO AVE NW #104

$246,170

ADAMS MORGAN 2301 CHAMPLAIN ST NW #208 2363 CHAMPLAIN ST NW #27 1701 KALORAMA RD NW #301 2630 ADAMS MILL RD NW #5 1855 CALVERT ST NW #LL02 2550 17TH ST NW #207 1811 WYOMING AVE NW #T1

82 H Hillrag.com

$1,011,000 $619,000 $579,000 $560,000 $425,000 $424,900 $342,000

2 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1

2200 17TH ST NW #214 1855 CALVERT ST NW #203

$1,214,215 $457,000

BARRY FARMS 2500 SAYLES PL SE #3

$430,000

2 2 3

BERKLEY 4617 MACARTHUR BLVD NW #B

$620,000

BLOOMINGDALE 52 QUINCY PL NW #305

$330,000

BRIGHTWOOD 343 CEDAR ST NW #306

$395,000

BROOKLAND 3033 HAWTHORNE DR NE #3033 20 HAWTHORNE CT NE #20 3022 GENTAIN CT NE #3022 400 EVARTS ST NE #406 3725 12TH ST NE #106

$325,000 $318,000 $290,000 $219,000 $215,000

CAPITOL HILL 963 14TH ST SE 1398 K ST SE 1354 C ST SE #A 410 5TH ST NE #31 1620 MASSACHUSETTS AVE SE #4 1620 MASSACHUSETTS AVE SE #3 1813 EAST CAPITOL ST SE #2 1636 MASSACHUSETTS AVE SE #2 520 E ST NE #303 626 INDEPENDENCE AVE SE #301 1620 MASSACHUSETTS AVE SE #1 1209 G ST SE #12 317 10TH ST NE #12 1513 CONSTITUTION AVE NE #1 305 C ST NE #202 1304 F ST NE #2 1619 CONSTITUTION AVE NE #3 1311 K ST SE #3 1211 G ST SE #7

$799,999 $799,999 $699,990 $620,000 $610,000 $575,000 $569,900 $550,000 $475,000 $437,145 $410,000 $389,000 $360,000 $339,000 $335,000 $749,900 $620,000 $550,000 $349,000

CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS 3901 CATHEDRAL AVE NW #611

$200,000

2 1 2 3 2 2 1 1 3 3 3 2 2 2 3 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 3 3 2 1 1

CENTRAL 912 F ST NW #905 1010 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #505 631 D ST NW #131 1150 K ST NW #402 2510 M ST NW #2510 1409 21ST ST NW #2D 1150 25TH ST NW 631 D ST NW #429 1330 NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE NW #925 1320 21ST ST NW #103 616 E ST NW #304 1330 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #424 1260 21ST ST NW #610

$2,750,000 $595,900 $575,000 $529,500 $509,000 $489,000 $465,000 $443,500 $425,000 $369,000 $364,000 $318,000 $204,000

CHEVY CHASE 4301 MILITARY RD NW #702 4750 41ST ST NW #TH-5 4801 WISCONSIN AVE NW #506 5402 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #205 5315 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #407

$1,640,000 $1,200,000 $273,540 $270,000 $197,500

CLEVELAND PARK 3921 LANGLEY CT NW #A565 3870 RODMAN ST NW #D220 3960 LANGLEY CT NW #D622 3450NW 39TH ST NW #A685

$656,250 $435,000 $430,000 $429,900

5 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 2 0

3100 WISCONSIN AVE NW #402 2737 DEVONSHIRE PL NW #222 3511 39TH ST NW #C489 3701 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #803 3616 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #104

$416,000 $375,000 $335,000 $252,500 $240,000

COLUMBIA HEIGHTS 1422 EUCLID ST NW #PH - 4 834 LAMONT ST NW #B 2827 15TH ST NW #302 2750 14TH ST NW #501 1307 CLIFTON ST NW #41 1466 HARVARD ST NW #TH2 1103 PARK RD NW #4 1217 PARK RD NW #2 1390 KENYON ST NW #325 1020 MONROE ST NW #208 2650 15TH ST NW #2 1360 KENYON ST NW ##B 1464 HARVARD ST NW #4 3205 GEORGIA AVE NW #102 3205 GEORGIA AVE NW #207 1350 RANDOLPH ST NW #3 1421 COLUMBIA RD NW #306 1527 PARK RD NW #301 1415 CHAPIN ST NW #106 1514 NEWTON ST NW #B2 718 PARK RD NW #4 3500 13TH ST NW #507 1401 COLUMBIA RD NW #219 2639 15TH ST NW #1 1439 EUCLID ST NW #104 907 EUCLID ST NW #102 1441 EUCLID ST NW #107

$799,000 $650,000 $629,000 $620,000 $615,000 $600,000 $589,750 $580,000 $555,000 $543,000 $480,000 $480,000 $460,000 $460,000 $459,900 $459,000 $406,500 $395,000 $380,000 $375,000 $347,500 $330,000 $325,000 $299,900 $185,000 $338,500 $316,000

CONGRESS HEIGHTS 3866 9TH ST SE #102 14 HALLEY PL SE #103

$62,000 $44,500

DEANWOOD 4929 FOOTE ST NE #4

$100,000

1 1 1 1 0 3 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 0 1 1 2 1 1

DUPONT 1704 T ST NW #302 2114 N ST NW #42 1325 18TH ST NW #401 1401 17TH ST NW #710 1730 NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE NW #2 1734 R ST NW #2 1736 18TH ST NW #404 1520 O ST NW #207 1520 16TH ST NW #202 2012 O ST NW #21 1920 S ST NW #701 1260 21ST ST NW #402

$690,000 $560,000 $445,000 $415,000 $511,675 $950,000 $679,900 $600,000 $564,500 $395,000 $349,555 $309,555

ECKINGTON 1823 N CAPITOL ST NE #B 340 ADAMS ST NE #204 2004 3RD ST NE #201

$550,000 $524,650 $270,626

FOGGY BOTTOM

$480,000 $285,000 $685,000

2 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 3 2 1

2 3 1 1 1

1001 26TH ST NW #506 1010 25TH ST NW #102 1164 25TH ST NW #1164

3 2 2 2

GARFIELD

FOREST HILLS 2939 VAN NESS ST NW #1216

2737 DEVONSHIRE PL NW #414 2725 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #702 2829 CONNECTICUT AVE NW #I13

$261,000 $699,999 $522,500 $30,000

2 1 3 1 2 2 0


GEORGETOWN

3150 SOUTH ST NW #PH1D 3299 K ST NW #504 3042 R ST NW #3 2500 Q ST NW #240

GLOVER PARK

3921 FULTON ST NW #6 3921 FULTON ST NW #5 3918 W ST NW #6 3918 W ST NW #4 2606 TUNLAW RD NW #4 2325 42ND ST NW #310

HILL CREST

2022 FORT DAVIS ST SE #A 3822 V ST SE #11

KALORAMA

2012 KALORAMA RD NW #8 2014 KALORAMA RD NW #8 2416 19TH ST NW #32 2129 FLORIDA AVE NW #201 1822 VERNON ST NW #305 2123 CALIFORNIA ST NW #A2 2456 20TH ST NW #405 2410 20TH ST NW #306 2310 ASHMEAD PL NW #104 1801 WYOMING AVE NW #3

LILY PONDS

3712 GRANT PL NE #3712

LOGAN

1411 N ST NW #4 1310 12TH ST NW #7 1413 11TH ST NW #B 1441 RHODE ISLAND AVE NW #910 1413 T ST NW #206 2125 14TH ST NW #913 1401 Q ST NW #202 1301 RHODE ISLAND AVE NW #4 1420 N ST NW #801 1201 O ST NW #1A 1312 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #707 1239 VERMONT AVE NW #205 1239 VERMONT AVE NW #408 1117 10TH ST NW #401

MOUNT PLEASANT

1670 BEEKMAN PL NW #D 1612 BELMONT ST NW #B 1613 HARVARD ST NW #302 1613 HARVARD ST NW #116 2633 ADAMS MILL RD NW #B3

MT VERNON TRIANGLE

910 M ST NW #125 301 MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW #904 460 NEW YORK AVE NW #1001 460 NEW YORK AVE NW #601 440 L ST NW #309 910 M ST NW #610

NAVY YARD

1025 1ST ST SE #1011

NOMA

16 O ST NW #16-A

OBSERVATORY CIRCLE 2501 WISCONSIN AVE NW #4 2111 WISCONSIN AVE NW #PH-3

$4,975,000 $950,000 $589,000 $359,000

4 2 2 1

$592,000 $445,000 $399,000 $349,000 $290,000 $274,500

2 2 1 1 1 1

$95,000 $8,000

2 0

$1,175,000 $1,113,000 $915,000 $710,000 $435,000 $395,000 $392,000 $370,000 $279,000 $440,000

3 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1

$213,100

3

$1,289,000 $699,000 $586,000 $559,000 $380,000 $920,000 $960,000 $785,000 $440,000 $437,500 $429,900 $419,000 $399,999 $639,000

2 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 2

$760,500 $629,900 $624,000 $500,000 $201,250

2 2 2 2 0

$555,000 $399,999 $529,900 $475,000 $435,000 $648,500

1 1 1 1 1 2

$595,000

1

$531,500

2

$845,000 $655,000

2 2

2016

WARM WISHES FOR A JOYOUS NEW YEAR!

Hub Krack 202.550.2111

Pam Kristof 202.253.2550

Licensed in DC, MD & VA

RESIDENTIAL SALES AND LISTINGS COMMERCIAL LEASING AND SALES

Real Estate

Management Full service property management offering monthly/quarterly reports, budgeting, funds management & special accounts, delinquent notice & collections, building inspections, project & maintenance bidding, project planning, contract monitoring, renting/leasing & tenant screening, and more. Se habla espanol.

734 Seventh Street, SE

Office: 202.547.2707 Fax: 202.547.1977 joeltruittmanagement.com

January 2016 H 83


Buying or selling your home on the Hill? Let me help you put together a strategy for success in the New Year! As a long-time Hill denizen, I know where to find the best value if you’re looking, or get the best value if you’re showing.

Ann Robertson

Your “House on the Hill� agent 202-986-3132 ann@wasingerco.com DC Broker Mega Realty (703) 642-6342 Licensed agent in DC and Virginia

2801 NEW MEXICO AVE NW #1020 2801NW NEW MEXICO AVE NW #1221 3925 FULTON ST NW #4 2111 WISCONSIN AVE NW #123 4100 CATHEDRAL AVE NW #511

$635,000 $620,000 $595,000 $439,000 $435,000

OLD CITY #1 1405 A ST NE 2000 D ST NE #4 2000 D ST NE #6 2000 D ST NE #2 401 13TH ST NE #206 1391 PENNSYLVANIA AVE SE #448 1520 INDEPENDENCE AVE SE #301 1441 A ST NE #1441 837 4TH ST NE #1 637 3RD ST NE #102 1445 CHURCH ST NW #34

$539,900 $439,000 $434,000 $427,500 $389,000 $385,000 $380,000 $380,000 $375,000 $324,999 $925,000

OLD CITY #2

Looking to Buy or Sell on the Hill? I want to be Your Agent!

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it is health that is real wealth and not pieces of gold and silver. mahatma gandhi

NEW YEAR SPECIAL January 2016 H 87


Heard on the Hill

I

love January. While the post-holiday letdown is still a real thing and I miss the sparkly lights and merriment, I find that the older I get the more I relish the wintry quiet. I cherish the reprieve from socializing and the permission to stay home, putter, and wear slippers all day. Of course the return of Downton Abbey may also have something to do with this, so given that this coming season is its last I may be less thrilled with January in 2017. Part of the post-holiday ritual for many is a renewed vow to focus on improving personal health, fitness, diet, and stress management. For those who work in the fitness industry January is the busy season. Classes are filled to bursting, and just try getting a treadmill at 6 p.m. I have found that yoga is the best way for me to maintain any semblance of health and fitness. The ancient system of breathing and exercise has become a booming business, and the Hill now boasts many studios devoted to sharing the prac-

by Jen DeMayo tice. It wasn’t that long ago I would drive across town searching for a studio to call home. Now I feel privileged to have so many wonderful options. The greatest thing about yoga is that it is for everybody. It is not solely for the young, the lithe, and the Lululemon-clad. There are styles that are active and challenging for those who need the burn, and there are slower and more meditative styles for those who prefer chill. Visit our local Barefoot Bootcamp. Photo: Mallory Benedict studios and you will find a diverse group of bodies all along the yoga spectrum. From the New Year’s Yogalution, an individual goal-setting group awe-inspiring one-armed handstandthat offers support and prizes along the way. Founder Sherers (not me) to those for whom the ri Ta is also offering a longer-term conscious-eating worktoes may forever be out of reach (ocshop that can help you change the way you look at food. casionally me) the Hill is home to yoRegister at beherenowyogadc.com/. gis of all stripes. It may take a bit of exCapitol Hill Yoga (641 Pennsylvania Ave. SE) is addploring to find a style that works for ing classes this year and making class times more conyour body and temperament, but with sistent across the schedule. It is continuing the popular all our local options you are bound to Yoga Hour classes. Owner Betsy Poos said the studio will find your yoga. be introducing two brand new classes in the new year. Let’s see what is happening in the Yoga Inversions is for those who want to get upside down yoga world this winter. a bit and Yin Yoga is for deep meditation and relaxation. Those new to yoga may want to try the six-week Yoga Basics series which begins in January, and others can build Yoga News upon their knowledge at many new workshops including Be Here Now Yoga (411 Eighth St. the deliciously rejuvenating yet relaxing Restorative Yoga. SE) is one of the newest studios on the Go to capitolhillyoga.com to view the complete schedule. Hill. It offers a diverse array of classes Breathing Space Yoga (1123 Pennsylvania Ave. SE) and teachers and it welcomes beginhas staked out the kids-and-family-yoga niche for the Hill ners. The Dharma style some teachand offers classes for crawlers through teens. Classes iners offer has a classical yoga tilt with a clude age appropriate poses and movement games, breath focus on breathing and the occasionexercises, and relaxation. The early childhood and four al chant. You can take the Yoga 101 years+ family classes allow families to connect to each othWorkshop on Jan. 17 to get a hang of er while learning skills to enhance a healthy lifestyle. The some of the poses and terminology. For studio also offers grownup classes in yoga and Pilates which those ready to kick start the year, try the

Gain a new perspective at Capitol Hill Yoga. Photo: Leslie Mansour

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are available to all levels of practitioners. Check out the schedule at breathingspacedc.com. East Side Yoga (518 10th St. NE) has added massage therapy to its offerings. Susan Van Note is offering massage and prenatal and craniosacral therapy to weary Hill bodies. The studio will be offering new intensive classes as well as a fourweek series focused on the core. I am most excited about the new Sunday afternoon Bollywood classes. Described as Indian Zumba, these classes turn Elizabeth Mahon ready to demonstrate her the wildly popular cinematcookie technique for WUSA Channel 9 ic dancing into a fun, fitnessfocused class. Learn more at we get the presidential candidates to www.eastsideyogadc.com. do that before the next debate? While I like to check out other studios, I am a fan of Yoga District’s Keep an Eye on ... H Street Studio (526 H St. NE). It Elizabeth Mahon. By day she is a Hill is a small studio above a nail salon, nanny caring for a toddler. At night but the warm and welcoming space she bakes. And bakes. More fantastihosts a variety of classes all day long, cally, she decorates. She is the steady seven days a week. Yoga District is a hand and creative mind behind Discitywide network of lower-cost studios trict Baking Co., which has rapidly with a long list of teachers, so there is become the must-have cookie at the bound to be a style for you. cool kids’ parties. Now take a moment, breathe in Elizabeth began her compafor a count of four, and gently hold ny just over a year ago. She bakes for four, and then exhale for four, and delicious sugar cookies in all kinds then tell me you don’t feel better. Can of shapes. The real magic happens

Moms use the wall for balance during a Prenatal Yoga stretch at Breathing Space

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when she grabs her bags of royal icing to decorate. Sure, I bake and I have tried decorating cookies, so I know how hard it is even to draw a straight line. Our girl makes Day of the Dead skulls, ornate wreaths, and tiny toy soldiers in seconds. In the videos she posts on her Instagram feed you can see how easy she makes it seem. If you aren’t yet on Instagram, she’s a great reason to join. (Well her and Taylor Swift. Two millennials bound for world domination.) You may have caught the segment she shot for WUSA Channel 9 for Christmas Day. She decorated up a storm while wearing an apron from Hill’s Kitchen. (Hill pride!) The new year is bound to be a bright one for her as she launches her new website districtbakingco.com/ and tries to keep up with the demand. Let’s hope her new year also includes some sleep!

Crime Stats ANC 6B Commissioner Denise Krepp wants information about arrest and prosecution rates for the Metropolitan Police Department since 2010. The Department of Justice (DOJ) is charging her $1,000 to find that information. To raise that money quickly she held a bake sale on Dec. 13 that garnered over $1,800, including $350 from Dangerously Delicious Pies. Krepp represents an area of Hill East that saw a number of high-profile crimes in the summer and fall, and she has grown increasingly frustrated with the city’s response. It can take quite a while for the DOJ to come back with the information she has requested. She plans on reaching out to other parts of the city to push for prosecution data. “Ward 6 isn’t the only ward that is facing rising crimes rates,” she explains. “There have been 155 homicides this year in DC, many of them in Wards 7 and 8. These homicides are being committed by repeat offenders, and instead of freely sharing information about the prosecution of these offenders the Department of Justice is making residents pay for it.” She continues, “We need to work together as a city to put pressure on the Department of Justice to prosecute the homicides, rapes, assaults, carjackings, and thefts that are occurring in the city and to share information about these prosecutions with residents.”

Two Rivers PCS Files Complaint Two Rivers Public Charter School has filed a complaint against protesters who have been targeting a Planned Parenthood facility being built next door to the school’s Fourth Street NE campus. The school does not have an opinion about the organization and has focused its energy on the well-being of the children and families who make up the school population. The protesters clearly have a unique interpretation of what it means to care for children. Some of them seem to have no problem following three-year-olds and telling them about the babies being killed next door. Wisely the school has asked parents not to engage with them, but I am sure it is difficult with posters of fetuses being waved in their faces. I need to check my Bible, but I don’t think Jesus intentionally freaked out toddlers to prove a point the children could not possibly comprehend. The school has named five individuals in their complaint, one of whom was sentenced to five years in jail for possessing a pipe bomb and planning to bomb a clinic. The complaint asks that the protesters stay a reasonable distance from the school during school days and refrain from harassing the families. The protesters have followed families on their way to school, even after the school used an alternative entrance. They waved signs with graphic images and have blocked the dropoff lane, which on a good day will challenge the most blissed out yogi. The Two Rivers parents must be Zen-Yogi-Jedis to be able to withstand that kind of craziness at 8:20 in the morning. The school has already given students the day off for the Jan. 22 anniversary of the Roe vs. Wade decision, which typically draws thousands of protesters to the city. The school chose not to comment for this story. I hope the school can soon allow the kids to play on the playground and have outdoor PE and recess without fear. Free speech is important but so is freedom from harassment and terror. As a former Two Rivers parent I say, Om Shanti, my friends.

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Jen DeMayo has been a waitress, an actor, and a puppeteer. No matter what, her obituary headline will say she was the founder of Moms on the Hill. Contact Jen at jendemayo@gmail.com. u

January 2016 H 91


Getting Fit After Kids

A

by Pattie Cinelli

fter a baby is born, a woman’s Randi Moore instructs a Postnatal life is turned upside down. Pilates at Breathing Space She becomes an expert at juggling all the demands of her new role as mom. Not only does she have to cope with the trauma of giving birth but she also has to care for the baby, the house, the husband, the job, and her own physical and psychological well-being. Often it is herself whom she neglects. Several programs, studios, and gyms on Capitol Hill are offering classes that make it easier for moms to exercise. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) promotes exercise as the key factor in the health of new moms. It suggests 20 to 30 minutes of exercise a day but points out that even 10 minutes of exercise benefits the body. The benefits are far-reaching. According to the Mayo Clinic, exercise after birth can restore muscle strength and tone, condition abdominals, relieve stress, a community of moms to support each other and boost energy, improve mood, assist with help women get out of the house. We do a lot weight loss, and create social interaction and psymore than just exercise. We make new friends, chological well-being. But you have to figure out create a social circle, and address issues unique a way to make it a priority. to new moms such as preventing and recovering Attorney Michelle Cain exercised regularfrom postpartum depression.” ly before she became pregnant. But during her Without classes to teach and attend, exerpregnancy she stopped most of what she did. cise would be the first thing off her list. “The oth“It was my first baby and I didn’t know how to er night when I was up with Alex and didn’t get a work out safely,” said Cain. “Now I know better. lot of sleep, I would have skipped exercise. But I If I had kept up my routine I would have felt a couldn’t. I had people waiting for me. After class lot better.” I felt 100 percent better and I had more energy.” After she delivered her son Alex, Cain tried Stroller Stride classes focus on exercises working out at home. She found it difficult. that tone up muscles that mothers need such as “How do I exercise when he’s always on me?” shoulder, upper back, and core. Babies stay in the She searched the Internet for postnatal classes stroller. “We power walk and do strength trainand found Fit4Moms. “Before I went to the first ing with resistance bands. We also understand class I knew I wanted to open a franchise on the screaming babies and play games to keep babies Hill. I was 11 weeks postpartum and really out engaged.” For example, a favorite is the “sprint of shape. It was a killer workout and I loved it.” and tickle.” Moms run away from their baby then This past fall Cain opened Stroller Stride sprint back and tickle them. The program also ofclasses on and near Capitol Hill. “I want to build

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Facilities That Offer KidFriendly Classes and/or Have Babysitting Services: Balancegym.com Breathingspacedc.com Capitolhillfit4mom.com Capitolhillyoga.com Resultsthegym.com Vidafitness.com (Yards Park)


Moms planking at the end of Stroller Barre class at Union Market’s Dock 5

fers moms organized play groups and a moms’ night out. “We also have a community service mission. Participation is open to anyone in the community.” Breathing Space Yoga offers two postnatal classes each week – postnatal yoga and postnatal Pilates. Owner Jennifer Mueller explained, “Our postnatal fitness classes focus on strength- and flexibility-building exercises for moms to do alongside their newborn-to-pre-crawling infants. Once babies are mobile they can join our staff in the playroom during the Pilates class. Both yoga and Pilates make wonderful postpartum recovery exercises because of their focus on body awareness, core rehabilitation, and posture.” For parents interested in an activity to engage their little ones, Breathing Space also offers a blend of baby play and postnatal appropriate yoga in Baby & Me Yoga. A new Baby Yoga and Play series on the weekend is more focused on engaging with baby and is appropriate for both parents to attend. Al-

Moms working their arms out at the Stroller Strides Grand Opening Class at Canal Park.

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though activities in these classes are for baby, parents will do gentle stretching, breathing, and relaxation. Capitol Hill Yoga also has a yoga hour for active new moms and their pre-crawling babies, moms-to-be, dads, caregivers, and friends. The class offers a balance of fun, strength, flexibility, and relaxation in a safe and supportive environment. Balance Gym at 214 D St. SE (the former Washington Sports Club) offers a Mommy Boot Camp. Instructor Tami Twyman was a fitness instructor before becoming pregnant. After having her baby she didn’t have child care. “I needed to figure out how to make money, bring my baby with me, and still get a workout.” She created a one-hour class that focuses on core strength, flexibility, and balance. At Results Gym or Vida at Yards Park moms can use babysitting services while they work out. At Results moms can bring children to the only gymnastics classes for kids in DC. Instructor Meera Shanti holds classes for children from two and a half years through 13. “I make it both fun and challenging for the kids. We develop fine motor skills, memory, discipline, and coordination,” said Shanti. When kids are tumbling, moms can take a class or hit the weight room.

Making Fitness a Priority There weren’t many exercise options for postnatal mothers on Capitol Hill 14 years ago, recalled Carolina Lopez, CFO and associate editor of the Hill Rag. “The only place I could take my baby was Results Gym.”


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yoga, massage, & more She took classes but it was hard to stay with a routine. “I had to schedule exercise on my calendar. I had to make it a priority.” Determined to stay the course, Lopez made an agreement with her husband that Saturday was her time to work out. She relied on friends and neighbors for babysitting, found workout buddies for accountability, and searched for kid-friendly places. “Once you have kids you have so many excuses not to work out.” Lopez’s second child, Luciana, is now six years old. Both Luciana and Nicholas have been positively influenced by their mother’s tenacity to stay in shape. They love to work out and are competitive in sports. “Once my husband and children understood the importance that exercise plays in my mental, emotional, and physical well-being, they supported me.” Lopez struggled with the guilt of putting her exercise needs first. “But when I do I am a better person for my family, in my job, and I function better in daily life.” Lopez acknowledged that being consistent is difficult. “When I am trying to get back on track it helps me to surround myself with people who are motivating, who value exercise as you do.” There may be many things in life we can look back on with regret, but as Lopez wisely said, “I have never said I regret exercising. I always feel better.”

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Pattie Cinelli is a personal trainer and group exercise instructor who partners with people who want to change their lifestyle to be more fit, more flexible, and stronger. She has been writing the health/ fitness column for more than 25 years. Please contact Pattie at fitness@pattiecinelli.com. u

January 2016 H 95


Pickleball Pops Up at Sherwood The Tennis-Like Sport Continues to Grow in DC article and photos by Christine Rushton

A game of pickleball challenges new players to the game at the recreation center Dec. 17.

Karyn Baiorunos serves the ball.

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ace up a pair of gym shoes, DC. She said DC was the last region of pull on some sweat pants or the 50 states to pick up the game, and its shorts and head over to the grown from a game for retirees to a game Sherwood Recreation Center for all ages. for a weekly pick up game of Games are typically played in doupickleball. From 1 to 3 p.m. Thursday on bles and last about 15 minutes. Players win the 600 block of 10th Street NE, players of points when serving, which they do underall ages and ability levels can join in on a hand, and they score to 11. Players start game hosted by DC Department of Parks behind the seven-foot line back from the and Recreation (DPR) for free. 34-inch tall net. Each holds a short woodOn a rainy Thursday in December, en paddle racquet and they hit balls simipickleball regulars met on the Sherwood lar to a wiffle ball. Light touch helps congym floor for a chance to learn a new sport. trol ball direction. One woman struggled to master the under“It’s a game of hit it smart, not hard,” hand serve, so player Karyn Baiorunos ofWhite said. fered pointers. She started playing a year Anyone can pick up the game, she ago in Northern Virginia and now volunadded. The strategy and net resemble those teers at DC’s games. of tennis, but the smaller court makes play DPR director Keith Anderson stopped easier on the joints. by to see the new addition to DPR’s activScott Parker, lead volunteer for all ities and declared he wished he’d worn DC DPR activities, helped start pickleball sweats to join in the game. He said DPR in DC during the spring of 2014 at the 31st offers the game at three locations. All the annual DPR Senior Games. It took anothpickleball programs are at capacity. er year and another successful show at the “Pickleball has taken DPR by storm,” Anderson said. “It’s popular with folks from eight to 80.” People spent the session on that Thursday laughing and sharing skills with each other. No one expressed aggravation with their own playing or others. But then pickleball is aboutis defintiely a low-stress Pickleball players take time to learn the game at the Sherwood Recreation Center on Dec. 17. game, said Helen White, mid-Atlantic region district ambassador for the USA 2015 Games for organizers to secure seaPickleball Association (USAPA). sonal weekly games for three communities. “It’s like golf without the frustration,” But they still need help getting the she said. “It’s fun — it’s fun fitness.” word out to the local community who are White started playing the game four unfamiliar with the game. years ago. She introduced it to more than Pickleball started in 1965 in Seattle as 100 areas and over 1,000 people, includa cross of badminton, tennis and table tening in Falls Church, Va., Vienna, Va., and nis. The USAPA now organizes games and


(Left to right) Jeri Ingram, DC DCPR director of tennis; Scott Parker, DC DCPR lead volunteer coordinator; player Kathleen Grant; Keith Anderson, DC DPR director; Helen White, district ambassador for USAPA; and player Karyn Baiorunos at a Sherwood Recreation Center pickleball game Dec. 17.

tournaments in all 50 states. “It’s great exercise and competitive in a fun way,” Parker said. Children’s programs commanded much of the recreation centers’ time during the summer months, so DPR started the first pickleball season in September, Parker said. Winter session started in December and runs through May 10. Right now they serve predominantly retirees, seniors and mother’s at home, but hope to offer evening and weekend hours in the future to attract younger players, too. They play with about 40-45 regulars across all three sites.. DPR funds the games and buys all of the necessary equipment. Community members need to only bring their athletic shoes and clothes. And experienced pickleball players oftn help out as needed, said White. DRP plans to expand pickleball into Ward 3 for the spring season, said Jeri Ingram, DPR director of tennis and racquet sports. With only six indoor tennis courts and 142 total in-

door and outdoor courts, the city must balance demand for several racquet sports. Pickleball is being offered in the mid-afternoon time slot because basketball and tennis already claimed the coveted evening and weekend times. But she hopes to incorporate more pickleball in the next few years as it appeals to all ages. “Tennis players who weren’t able to get around the court as well as well as they used to have gravitated to pickleball,” she said. “We’re excited we are able to offer an affordable sport and activity for our community,” Anderson said. DPR hosts pickleball games at the Sherwood Recreation Center, from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Tuesdays at the King Greenleaf Recreation Center on the 200 block of N Street SW and from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesdays at the Emery Recreation Center on the 5700 block of Georgia Avenue NW. To join, go to www.dpr. dc.gov. Registration is free. u

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Fulfilling Your Healthy Resolutions Begins by Knowing Your Numbers by Lara Atella

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ost of us have health related goals we’d like to achieve in this New Year. According to the Nielsen 2015 survey, health and fitness held the top two spots for New Year’s Resolutions last year and, by all indications, will continue to top the NYR lists. Despite the popularity of these health-related resolutions for the New Year, most of us fail to keep them. Perhaps that is why we find ourselves returning to the same resolutions year after year. The good news is we have more resources now than ever to make smarter health resolutions--resolutions we can use to learn more about our health, and resolutions that we can keep. So how do we increase our chances of success this year? As with any goal we make for ourselves, we have to start off with a strategy for success. The goal must be well defined so we know where we are going and how far we have to get there. If not, we find ourselves struggling, making excuses, or worse, falling back into old habits and avoiding our goals all together. Because these resolutions are often qualitative—e.g., shed weight, exercise more, etc.—they don’t provide us with concrete, quantifiable goals.

Health is More than One Number It can be problematic, however, when we become too specific by focusing on one specific number/measure (often body weight or waist size), while overlooking our overall health picture. If we track a variety of health measures over time we can discover trends in our overall health and understand how

all of these pieces can fit together to create a more comprehensive awareness of our health and well-being. For example many people find weight to be an easy gauge to measure and track. When weight decreases, most of us think we are healthier. But we may lose weight due to unhealthy reasons—e.g., stress, improper eating, sickness, or excessive dieting. In these cases, the weight loss is not an indicator of a healthier you. In fact, you may be storing more fat and wasting muscle. Your health may have deteriorated instead of improved. So it is better to track a variety of health measures to understand the bigger picture and

realtionships of various aspects of your health. Similar to weight, Body Mass Index (BMI) is a fast and easy measure to track. BMI is most effective as a screening tool for overweight and obese populations, but it is not diagnostic. BMI is calculated by a ratio of weight to height. It assumes an average amount of muscle for your height. BMI is not always a helpful indicator on its own, as it does not measure the actual percentage of muscle or fat on your body. Devices that can compute fat and muscle percentages based on a variety of specific composition variables are more helpful. Fortunately, it has never been easier to get specific and accurate health and fitness numbers and understand how these numbers relate. There are now many tools available—e.g., gadgets, apps, wearable devices, and other online resources to help us gather our health information and understand how these health measures correlate and provide a clearer and more accurate health narrative. Equipped with this knowledge, we can design a more effective health/fitness program that will allow us to fullfill our 2016 goals.

Numbers That Create a More Accurate Picture So, what numbers do we need to know? This will vary depending

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Please call Monique Waldron 202-905-8612 for additional information. on your specific health needs and desires for improvement, but in addition to your height and weight, there are many important numbers you can measure and track on your own. Some examples are blood pressure, lean body mass, heart rate, metabolic rate and daily caloric expenditure, body mass index (BMI,) body fat, waist measurement, and hip to waist ratio. You can purchase blood pressure monitors and body composition monitors with scales online or at most drug stores. But for the best accuracy on body composition you may want to have your measurements taken professionally at a clinic, hospital or other facility that conducts body composition analyses with trained staff and on reliable equipment. The lab at The Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington provides a variety of tests and packages for fitness testing and body composition analyses. Hot Yoga Capitol Hill also conducts fitness assessments and body composition analyses to members and the community. Once you have these valuable numbers, you can set empirical, quantifiable goals by

comparing your numbers to established standards to make sure your goals will (at minimum) move you away from any high-risk group in which you might find yourself (any alarming numbers should be discussed with your doctor). Here are some charts/tables that will help you interpret your numbers when compared to national/international recommendations. When you know your numbers, you improve the accuracy of your health knowledge. When you have tools to track and interpret these numbers, you can fi nd relationships and come up with a more comprehensive health picture and narrative. You may need to revise and restart your New Year’s Resolutions, but the year has just begun. It is not too late to improve your odds for success in 2016 and beyond! Lara Atella is a Yoga Instructor and manager at Hot Yoga Capitol Hill, 410 H St., NE u

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The District Vet Canine and Feline New Year’s Resolutions by Dan Teich, DVM Get More Exercise We could all use more exercise, unless of course you run your dog several miles per day. Dogs that have more exercise tend to be healthier, have joints that last longer, and behave better when left alone. The side benefit is an increase to your own stamina and health. And for our feline friends, play with toys at least 20 minutes per day. Jumping, running, and any vigorous exercise for your cat is beneficial. Make it fun!

Have Your Annual Physical Examination You should see the doctor every year, and so should your dog and cat. Your veterinarian is trained in performing physical examinations and seeing problems before they become evident. Early detection and treatment for many diseases and conditions can save your pet’s life and increase quality of being.

Learn a New Trick Every Few Months If you sit and only watch television, your brain starts to slow and age more quickly. Several studies have shown the same is true with your pet’s brain. Use it or lose it. Teaching your dog or cat new tricks will stimulate brain activity and have health benefits for both the brain and the whole body. All dogs – and even cats – should be taught to sit, stay, and come. Try paw-shaking for both and other tricks too. Also try using food puzzle toys. Make your dog or cat think and stay engaged.

Walk the Dog More Often Dogs should be walked at least four times per day. When they hold their urine for long periods of time it increases the likelihood of bladder infections and other problems. For your feline friends, be certain the litter box is always clean. Scoop daily and change the entire contents of the box weekly.

Brush Your Pet’s Teeth “You want me to brush the dog and cat’s teeth?” Yes. As with humans, good dental hygiene is essential in pets. Tartar build-up leads to bacteria in the bloodstream and can shorten life and quality of life. At your pet’s annual physical exam, your veterinarian will inspect his or her teeth. If needed, your veterinarian will recommend a sedated den-

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tal cleaning with X-rays of the teeth. Having bad teeth will cause problems beyond bad breath. Start the year with a minty smile.

Explore a New Place Every Week This is more for dog. Get out and walk somewhere new once per week. Change the routine. I’m certain your dog has checked every tree for pee-mail; give him or her some new surroundings. Walk along the George Washington Trail, explore the C&O Canal in Georgetown, greet visitors on the National Mall. New environments are stimulating for both you and the dog. And for cats, introduce new boxes or cat trees on occasion. They too like to explore.

Be Consistent with Feeding Amounts When doctors ask clients how much they feed their pets, we usually get the reply, “about a cup.” The problem is, what is your cup? Is it a standard measuring cup or is it whatever vessel you have available at the time? Use the same exact cup or scoop for all feedings. This is so that if we recommend feeding more or less, it is easy to do. And you can keep feeding consistent between family members.

Microchip and ID Tags In the past we have discussed microchips. If your pet does not have one, the new year is a great time to resolve to have your pet chipped. It is also the perfect time to check that the address and phone number on file with the microchip registry is current. The best way to ensure a lost pet makes its way home is a current, active microchip.

Consider Fostering a Pet Have space at home to help a homeless pet? Consider fostering through a local rescue organization. City Dogs Rescue, Washington Humane Society, Lucky Dog Rescue, and a host of other rescues could use your help. What greater way start to the new year than to help save a life! From all of us at District Veterinary Hospital, have a healthy, safe, prosperous, and love-filled New Year. Dan Teich, DVM, is at District Veterinary Hospital, 3748 10th St. NE, Washington, DC 20017; 202-827-1230 and desk@districtvet.com. u


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{arts & dining}

Dining Notes by Celeste McCall Easy Healthy Shopping Want a simple way to stick to your New Year’s resolution to eat more healthfully? Check out Relay Foods, an online grocery which provides local, organic, and sustainable foods, recipes and meal planning. By partnering with local farmers and other producers, Relay provides higher profits for the people who actually grow and make your food. Relay Foods was founded in Charlottesville, Virginia in 2009 by Zach Buckner, an engineer and then father of three (now four). While driving around picking up last minute items for his growing family, Zach realized how inefficient and time consuming our shopping system is. So, he contacted local food producers and hatched Relay Foods, hoping to create an easier way to buy healthy food for his family without sacrificing quality time at home. Buckner expanded his business to Richmond a few years later, and eventually began serving the Washington/Baltimore/Annapolis area, including Capitol Hill. Here’s how Relay Foods works: Using your home computer, iPad, tablet or smart phone, go to www.relayfoods.com, and the site will walk you through the process by displaying Relay’s wide assortment of nutritious, moderately priced groceries, how to place your order, pay and where to pick it up. The Hill and nearby NoMa have convenient pick-up spots; Relay also delivers. For more information, hours and

Relay foods offers pickup convenient locations. Photo: Relay Foods

Marlee makes a home delivery for Relay Foods. Photo: Relay Foods

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Smoked salmon hash is a brunch favorite at Ben’s Ten01. Photo: Celeste McCall

April was our competent and personable server at Ten01. Photo: Celeste McCall.

pick-up locations, visit the website.

New Home Las Placitas has a new home. After reigning at 517 Eighth St. SE for a quarter century before closing to make room for Matchbox’s expansion, the homey Tex-Mex/Salvadoran restaurant has reopened down the street. Sporting a menu similar to the original’s, Las Placitas is open daily for lunch and dinner. The new address is 1100 Eighth St. SE; call 202-543-3700.

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Lotsa Pasta As winter settles in, we seek warming, comfort foods. And what could be more soothing than dinner created from fresh pasta? You’ll find that and more at Eastern Market Grocery, located in the middle of Eastern Market. Created by Salvadoran-born Jorge Canales in 1993, the shop carries about 15 kinds of ravioli (including gnocchi and tortellini) and more than 15 flat pastas. Best sellers: four-cheese ravioli and egg fettuccine. Other options are pumpkin tortellini, lobster/sherry ravioli, beet/butternut squash/ goat cheese, ravioli and squid ink fettuccine. Prices range from about $5.35 to $16.99 per pound. The fresh pastas arrive daily from La Pasta, in Silver Spring. Boxed (dried) noodles are also available. Jorge’s freshly made sauces include marinara, puttanesca, artichoke lemon pesto, pink vodka. There’s more, on and behind the wide counter: coffee beans, extra virgin olive oils, balsamic vinegars, polenta, boquerones (white anchovies), pates, marinated mozzarella, Pomi chopped tomatoes and oceans of olives. Canales, 55, lives in Falls Church with his wife Norma Canales, a teacher in Virginia. Eastern Market is closed Monday; call 202-544-2112 or emaileasternmarketgrocery@hotmail.com.

Ben’s Upstairs Jorge Canales displays some of his fresh pastas. Photo: Celeste McCall

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Ben’s Ten01, upstairs from the Atlas District’s Ben’s Chili Bowl, arrived last fall. Much like


Ben’s Next Door (located by the original U Street Ben’s), Ten01 offers a more varied menu than its downhome parent eatery. There’s also a full bar and heated rooftop. We had brunch up there recently, enjoying the panoramic view of H Street NE, as an empty streetcar rumbled by. Executive Chef R.I. Boyd’s brunch menu is a jazzed-up version of downstairs Ben’s. Bloody Marys are dynamite, rich and tomatoey with just enough zip. Peter chose the half-smoke Benedict, a twist on Ben’s signature sausage, topped with two poached eggs, cornbread, spinach and root vegetables and potato sticks, all topped with barbecue Hollandaise. I went for the smoked salmon hash, escorted by roasted grains, kale, beet puree, and Hollandaise verde. (Other brunch options include the cauliflower omelette and baked cheddar grits.) Our tab came to $56, including tax and tip. Our server was a pleasant and capable young woman named April. Brunch goes Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ben’s is located at 1001 H St. NE (upper levels); for more information and complete hours call 202-733-2405 or visit www. TEN01H.com.

New Lab Last month, Union Market launched a “retail-plus” concept shop, called Lab 1270. Sprawled catty-corner from Union Market, the space provides a lively venue for local retailers and artisans. We stopped at the Lab recently. After sampling refreshing Craft Kombacha sparkling tea, we browsed displays of colorful textiles and antique Moroccan carpets by Caryn Cramer; handmade “low country” jewelry from Charleston, South Carolina; funky clothing and even a motorcycle/bike workshop. Other activities slated for this winter are pop-up dinners and yoga sessions. Located at continued on page 106

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{arts and dining}

continued from page 105

1270 Fifth St. NE, Lab 1270 is open Sunday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information visit unionmarketdc.com.

Fair Deals

J

ohn Uselton, founder of New Columbia Distillers with his father-in-law Michael Lowe, took time out of his decidedly crazy schedule to discuss the inspiration behind their young DC distillery and the first of their many fine products, Green Hat Gin. The journey they followed to craft-spirit success was undeniably due to their incredible dedication, long hours, and very hard work. But, as it’s all come together, the inspiration behind Green Hat Gin seems effortless.

This Was Not Plan A “John and Michael come to their passion for craft distilling by wearing many hats in the restaurant and liquor business – not to mention the military and legal worlds. From Houston to Boston to Washington, John has worked in all capacities of front-ofhouse restaurant work – from humble busboy to award-winning bar-tender to savvy manager. Michael spent a couple of years on a Navy submarine and a few more at private DC law firms. He retired from the law in 2008, bought himself several cocktail books and started investigating the art and science of distilling.”

“After a few years of retirement, Michael wanted to do something else. I was working in Schneider’s of Capitol Hill and was witnessing the explosion of craft spirits.”

The Timing Was Right… The Location Was Even Better “DC was getting the first new breweries in 50 years and we liked gin and felt we should be the one to do it. We both lived here and being the first distillery in Rockville, just does not have the same ring as first in DC.” “Starting out making a white spirit is a good idea for a distillery, quick turnaround. We are not excited for Vodka or white whiskey, we like gin!” “The Man in the Green Hat is a perfect combination of history, a good story, and being DC-centric.”

It’s a Very Social Job “I like the day to day production, and doing events, and meeting people who like our gin, and helping people acquire a taste for gin.” “We are talking about the next gin, but this summer was very busy for us with new products. Since the Spring we have released Navy Strength, Summer Cup, Eau de Brau, Rose vermouth and white vermouth.”

(Just One of) John’s Recent Favorite Cocktails • Bee Thousand is our variation on a Bee’s Knees. • 1.5 ounces chamomile-infused Green Hat Gin • 0.5 ounce rosemary honey syrup • 0.5 ounce lemon juice • Shake, fine strain, and garnish with chamomile flower. You can find New Columbia’s Green Hat Gins, and Lilia too, at Schneider’s of Capitol Hill at Third Street and Massachusetts Avenue NE. u

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The holidays are over, but Bourbon Coffee (formerly Pound), 621 Pennsylvania Ave. SE, will still be selling beautiful fair trade items from Rwanda. At the Hill outlet, walls are festooned with colorful baskets, handwoven in Africa. Bourbon is open daily; call 202-8364799 orwww.bourboncoffee.com.

Late Nite Fare Here’s something warming for these long winter nights: Hank’s Oyster Bar, 633 Pennsylvania Ave. SE, has implemented an evening bar menu, ideal for after-theFolger Theatre sustenance. Every day from 7 p.m. ‘til closing, you can nosh on oysters-on-the half shall; ceviche (calamari, scallops, shrimp); crispy fish tacos, hush puppies, mac-and-cheese, Buffalo wings and more. The deal is good only at the bar. From 10 p.m. on, the raw bar is half price. Call 202-733-1971 or visitwww. hanksoysterbar.com.

Sushi Power On a sunny, unseasonably warm winter day, I needed a sushi fix. Nana Thai stopped offering sushi last month, so I headed for Young Chow Fusion Asian, 312 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Settled at the bar sipping warm sake, I ordered a sushi special. For $12.95, the lunchtime deal includes salad or soup (I chose hot and sour, chock full of chicken and just enough firepower), and a beautifully decorated sushi and sashimi plate. The cucumber garnish was so pretty I took it home. The assorted specials are available Monday-Friday from 11 to 2:30 p.m. Call 202-544-3030.

Beer Here (next year) This is far in the future, but time does fly. At the Ward 6 Brickie Awards at Eastern Market last month, Peter wandered by a beer display. Naturally, he quaffed a sample. The tasty brewski was crafted by the National Capital Brewing Company, a future reincarnation of the historic brewery of that same name, which once operated at 14th and D streets SE. (However, that name has not been used since the Volstead Act imposed Prohibition on the National’s Capital in 1917.) Don’t rush over to the brewery; it’s not slated to arrive—at an address near Union Market—until 2017. Ironically, that will be Prohibition’s 100th anniversary. u


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{arts and dining}

At the Movies

Holiday Movies: A Look at Some Significant End-of-Year Films by Mike Canning

H

ollywood typically brings out two kinds of Christmas movies: 1) the big-budget crowd-pleaser aimed at the holiday crowds of teens and families and 2) the earnest, serious film that producers and studios hope will receive critical attention during the end-of-year awards season, which begins with collective critics’ awards and ends with the Academy Awards. Call it “Bucks vs. Trophies” (both of which mean more revenue, of course). Since this column has traditionally eschewed reviews of the most obvious Hollywood pap, I will concentrate on highlighting upcoming pictures that might fall into the “award” category, potentially thoughtful or intelligent fare that might make your

ized account of the Michael Lewis 2010 bestseller about how a few outlier fund managers bucked the trend of the 2006-07 housing bubble by betting that the fervent real estate market would tank. The script, co-writSteve Carell (center left) looks at Ryan Gosling (center right) in ten and directed by Adam McKay, “The Big Short” from Paramount Pictures and Regency Enterfocuses on four financial players – prises. Photo: Jaap Buitendijk; © 2015 Paramount Pictures; all played by Christian Bale, Ryan Gosrights reserved. ling, Steve Carell, and Brad Pitt – and how they bet against the trends. The as a novelist and investigative reporter. The drama trick was to make the intricate and tedious machimay be inherent; the test for Smith is to incarnate nations of major finance into genuine drama and the Nigerian Omalu. entertainment: guys jabbering in offices while winc“The Danish Girl” is yet another example of a ing at computer screens. It can be done. “Margin drama taken from life. This one features a married Call” of 2011 turned the trick couple of painters from Denmark, Einar and Greof making a fictional financial ta Wegener. The husband goes to his feminine side meltdown into riveting cinebig time and begins to favor dressing and acting as ma. McKay, a long-time coma woman, an early example of transgender behavedy writer for “Saturday Night ior when it was deemed demented (the story begins Live” and a collaborator of in 1926). Made by English director Tom Hooper Will Farrell, had never made (“The King’s Speech”), the film stars Eddie Reda film on such a serious topic, mayne and Alicia Vikander as the Wegeners and but here he proves that he can presents an earnest, sympathetic view of the young stretch by tweaking drama with man’s dilemma and his wife’s steady loyalty (rathtelling humorous moments. er like Redmayne and Felicity Jones in last year’s Also based on a true sto“The Theory of Everything”). “The Theory” won ry, “Concussion” stars Will Smith as a Pittsburgh neuropathologist, Bennet Omalu, who begins investigatRooney Mara (left) and Cate Blanchett star in “Carol.” © 2015 The Weining the effects of constein Company; all rights reserved. stant head-ringing vimovie dollar better spent. Current examples of the olence on professional football players, latter currently in cinemas are the splendid tandem concluding that the activity creates brain of “Spotlight” and “Brooklyn,” both already in retrauma and shortens lives. The movie lease and likely to contend for nominations (see “At heightens the drama by having one lone the Movies” in the November Hill Rag). All of the alarmed physician, armed with the truth, films mentioned below will have release dates durbattling the corporate biggies of the Naing December or early January, making them eligitional Football League, loath to admit that ble for sundry screen prizes. their gravy train runs over damaged souls. Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard star in “MacAmong films based on true stories, one much The film is directed by Peter Landesman, a beth.” © 2015 The Weinstein Company; all rights reserved. anticipated is “The Big Short,” a mostly fictionalfilmmaker who comes from a background

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Redmayne an Oscar for Best Lead Actor; the test will be to see if he can impress Academy voters again this season in sensuous drag. Finally there is “The Revenant,” directed by Alejandro Gonzalez Iñárritu, fresh off his Oscar triumph last February for “Birdman.” Not one to repeat himself, the flamboyant Mexican has this time adapted a true story about an early 19th-century frontiersman and hunter, Hugh Glass (Leonardo DiCaprio), into an epic revenge western, where Glass, presumed dead after a bear attack, revives to doggedly pursue the man who would have him killed (Tom Hardy). This means a tough slog through the Canadian frontier in the dead of winter. The film hints a bit of the classic John Ford western “The Searchers,” but be assured it is much darker, dirtier, and colder. Literature forms the basis for a couple other intriguing holiday offerings. Yet again Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” has been filmed, this time with the versatile Michael Fassbender as the doomed Scotsman and French actress Marion Cotillard as his bloodthirsty lady. A relative newcomer, Aussie director Justin Kurzel, helms the picture, which, given current tastes and Kurzel’s taste for grim subjects, will likely be ultra-violent and laden with blood packets and clots of Scottish soil. Word is, too, that the plot and text have been tweaked some, though most of the Bard’s language remains intact. For an utterly different literary take, there is the Todd Haynes picture “Carol,” based on a Patricia Highsmith novel about a forbidden affair between a haughty, but troubled, society dame (Cate Blanchett in the title role) and a department store clerk (Rooney Mara) in the New York of the early 1950s. Director Haynes has assayed this territory before in his throwback masterpiece “Far from Heaven” (2002), so you can be assured that he gets the period couture, décor, and furnishings just right. You can also count on just

the right bearing from Blanchett, with just the right makeup and wardrobe to go with her moneyed character. The only question is whether the chemistry really works between the worldly Blanchett and the youthful Mara (best known for her feisty portrayal of “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo”). Dipping into rare material for current movies is the British film “45 Years,” a chamber piece for two with long-time English stars Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay, as the Mercers, an older couple living comfortably, and a little boringly, in a provincial British town getting ready to celebrate their 45 years of marriage. A letter to the husband brings to light past events that test their union and lead the wife to question her relationship with her husband. Expect nothing flashy here – rather the opposite of the Macbeths! – but superb, Brit-style, understated acting of gesture, visage, and hidden motivations longing to surface. One major documentary surfaces this December, Michael Moore’s latest, “Where to Invade Next,” a heavily ironic reference to recent American military adventures, which Moore mocks by visiting (personally “invading”) countries that could teach bellicose America some lessons about political and economic life. Thus he checks out Italy for workers’ rights and strong unions, France for gourmet school lunch programs, Slovenia for free college tuition, etc. He also muses on whether women in positions of power would make for better governance overall. This sounds like a picture that is strictly for the Moore fans and his heart-on-sleeve liberalism. Hill resident Mike Canning has written on movies for the Hill Rag since 1993 and is a member of the Washington Area Film Critics Association. He is the author of “Hollywood on the Potomac: How the Movies View Washington, DC.” His reviews and writings on film can be found online at www.mikesflix.com. u

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Kim Bursic

he landscapes appear “abstract,” lost. Sometimes not.” but there is a physical presKimberly Bursic has a BFA from the ence. It’s like a residual of seeUniversity of the Arts in Philadelphia and ing, combined with the echoes an MFA from Washington State University. of words that once gave definiBoth degrees are in printmaking, and she tion to a place or time. It’s a picture of memospent several years as a professional etching ries that are lost in detail but still live and are printer. As a painter Kim has left the world kept safe in a mental cove – the place where of black and white, but paints as a printer, memories thin down to make room for others. layering one subtle color over another, exKim Bursic allows the eye to see those ploring each new tint and tone. The drivmemories restored to “now.” Each work can be a “portrait of a location suspended in a moment of great change.” In “Passing Showers” clouds shift in the atmosphere like thoughts that come to be seen and pose for the artist. “Portrait of a Cloud,” inspired by Voyager’s trip through the solar system, could be a Da Vinci design for the heavens. Houses show up a lot in Kim’s work – life seeks shelter. In “Song of the House” clusters of thoughts, giant red balloons, generated by the mother of two small children hover in the sky above and vie for immediacy, a virtual portrait of motherhood. In others, rain escapes the sky, and stars can drip and become drops. Water moves beneath its deep, apparent stillness. References are obscured, then gone, Untitled: Song of a House, acrylic on canvas, by Kim Bursic. Photo: Greg Staley and you drift. “Sometimes it’s okay being ing force of her work is “diligence,” the dedication to painting, her idea of forever reaching for a level of maturity that goes beyond seeing to smelling, hearing, and tasting the residuals of life, and the echoes of words.

Jim Magner’s Thoughts on Art

Passing Showers, acrylic on canvas. Photo: Greg Staley

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You don’t think of diligence as subject matter. It’s not something that you can look at and try to paint. It’s not on the color wheel and it is

by Jim Magner

artandthecity

Artist Portrait:

not a technique or a “signature style.” But it is something. It is not just being meticulous or careful or even watchful. And it goes beyond persistence. Sure, you need those things in almost any job, and certainly as a parent. And sure, you need those things for creativity, but there is still more: a mysterious need to understand an abstract idea or an undefined quality and then follow it to a realization: a picture, or a melody, a poem, a novel, or a dance. Not everyone has that quality of diligence. If you just copy what someone else has painted or repeat someone else’s words instead of finding that little nugget of newness, or the identity of a sensation by searching for it, then you simply produce without creating. Actually, I didn’t really think of it that way until I talked about art with Kim Bursic. She said her whole approach to painting is one of diligence, hard work, but more than content, style, or technique. It’s like looking at the inside of a message. Finding the certainty of it. Struggling to understand it. Still, diligence itself is an idea that I couldn’t quite put my finger on. Is it plodding? What about sudden insights or the explosions of notions and possibilities worth taking a detour? I’ve always felt that creativity doesn’t work by the clock. It’s something that can clobber you when least expected. But maybe diligence is always there. Perhaps it’s something the mind isn’t even aware of. Always searching for an insight.

At the Museums

Sculpture of the Hellenistic World National Gallery of Art - West Building Sixth St. and Constitution Ave. NW Until March 20

“Power and Pathos: Bronze Sculpture of the Hellenistic World” brings approximately 50 of the finest surviving bronze sculptures from the Hellenistic period, late fourth century B.C. to first century A.D. They are “wonderfully lifelike” but none is more compelling than the bronze and gold horse head, “The Medici Ric-


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“Bulfinch: Memories and Fairytales” Capitol Hill Art League 545 Seventh St. SE Jan. 16-Feb. 27 Opening: Saturday, Jan. 16, 5-7 pm

Anatomy of a Cloud, acrylic on wood, by Kim Bursic. Photo: Greg Staley

cardi Horse,” of circa 350 B.C. Don’t miss it. www. nga.gov

Original Stamp Artwork National Postal Museum 2 Massachusetts Ave. NE Until March 13, 2017 You may not often go to the Smithsonian’s National Postal Museum for art, but “New York City: A Portrait through Stamp Art” is a good reason. It includes 30 pieces of original artwork commissioned by the U.S. Postal Service for stamp production. The principal subject is “a vibrant and colorful portrait of New York City.” New York has had more city-related stamps than other place, except maybe Washington and Hollywood. postalmuseum.si.edu

At the Galleries Hill Center Galleries - Old Naval Hospital 921 Pennsylvania. Ave. SE Jan. 7-Feb. 28 Opening: Wednesday, Jan. 13, 6-8 pm This is a big show juried by the Capitol Hill Art League. You will find almost 70 works by 35 terrific artists in a wide range of media and techniques, including Kim Bursic, Tara Hamilton, Lynn Mehta, and Bob Fuller.

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Hannah Sternberg found an old manuscript of her second novel, “Bulfinch,” and sent pieces of it to artists throughout the world, “challenging them to transform the pages into multimedia works exploring the themes of memory and revision.” The exhibit includes professional and amateur artists as well as a strong representation of local DC artists. This is “a unique and whimsical look at the nexus between storytelling and the visual arts.” www.chaw.org

Member show - Touchstone Gallery 901 New York Ave. NW Jan. 8-31 Opening: Friday, Jan. 8, 6:00-8:30 pm The annual “Touchstone Gallery Member Artists Group Show” fills the two main galleries, A and B. Gallery C features “Before They Are Gone” by Leslie Johnston. It’s a mixed-media installation of 2,500 ceramic art pieces depicting the average number of African elephants killed per month. www.touchstonegallery.com

“At Large” - Foundry Gallery 2118 Eighth St. NW Jan. 6-31 Opening: Saturday, Jan. 9, 5-8 pm Foundry artists exhibiting large works in the collective’s new industrial gallery include Ju Yun, Patrick Murphy, Craig Moran, Katherine Blakeslee, Rebecca Jones, Charlene Neild, and Jay Peterzell. Good stuff.

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Capitol Hill artist and writer Jim Magner can be reached at Artandthecity05@aol.com. His awardwinning book, “A Haunting Beauty,” can be acquired through www.ahauntingbeauty.com. u

You still have time to see this excellent show. Jan

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{arts and dining}

the

LITERARY HILL

A Compendium of Readers, Writers, Books, & Events

by Karen Lyon Skeletons in Her Closet

A Willing Spirit

“Be careful when you go shaking those family trees,” her aunt Evelyn warned her. “You never know what you’ll find.” But Karen Branan’s reportorial instincts wouldn’t let it lie. She had to find out the truth about a lynching that took place in her hometown of Hamilton, Ga., in 1912, when a woman and three men were hanged by a mob of men. Were any of her relatives involved? Did her great-grandfather, who was sheriff at the time, do anything to stop it? “The Family Tree: A Lynching in Georgia, a Legacy of Secrets, and My Search for the Truth” is the result of years of soul-searching research into her ancestral history. By extension, it is also the political and cultural story of that region of the South where “ancient resentments” have simmered for generations. She unearths a legacy of miscegenation, passive acceptance of gross injustices, fear-mongering, mob rule, sexual predation, and blatant racism. Branan is forthright about the effect this has had on her. “Beyond forcing me to acknowledge the darkness in my family history,” she writes, “this process has also pushed me to confront my own inherited prejudice. These things lodge themselves in the cells and sit there, reverberating far into the future.” Branan digs through archives, tracks down newspaper accounts, and draws on the memories of elders to arrive at, if not a resolution, at least an acceptance. “I discovered a murderous heritage, as well as a biracial heritage I had never known,” she writes. Difficult as it is, she believes in facing facts. It is only by acknowledging “the truth about our families’ and our region’s histories,” she writes, that our descendants – including her biracial granddaughter – can help “to build a nation and a world where all humans can be free.” Karen Branan has been a journalist for almost 50 years. Her work has appeared in a variety of magazines and newspapers as well as on television. She will read from and sign copies of “The Family Tree” at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 400 I St. SW, 202-484-7700, Jan. 24, from 3 to 5 p.m.

“I almost lost my head. Literally,” begins Diane Wilson Onwuchekwa’s inspirational memoir. She was on her way to dinner with a friend in 2010 when a driver hit them head-on. She awoke a day later with 78 broken bones, rods in her legs, and “stitches that ran from my pelvis, down my leg, and wrapped around the bottom of my foot.” She also learned that she’d been nearly decapitated. “Teachable Moments: Spirituality and Medicine,” written with Sharon Ewell Foster, is not only the story of Onwuchekwa’s ordeal and recovery, but it is also a plea to the medical profession. “As a per-

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A local journalist finds truth and treachery in her family history.

be life-threatening.” And who better to impart a lesson than someone who has learned it the hard way? A Hampton University alumna, Diane Wilson Onwuchekwa is executive director of Step Grad Step, an organization dedicated to lowering dropout rates. Reach her at tmoments8@gmail.com.

They Roam Around Around Around The three main characters in “Always the Wanderer,” George Koors’ debut novel, never meet. Instead, in what the author calls a “braided trilogy,” their stories twine around each other as they navigate their separate sojourns in the Middle East. Patrick arrives from Dublin to work in data mining and processing for OIL ETC. He “had always contemplated moving abroad in order to reinvent himself,” but finds himself roaming through souks and museums reflectHill author George Koors’ first novel follows the fortunes of three wanderers.

Badly injured in a car accident, a memoirist discovers “Teachable Moments.”

son who spent seven months in hospitals and rehabilitation centers,” she writes, “I can speak personally of the importance of spiritual care to my recovery.” She encourages doctors and other caretakers to get over their discomfort with the subject and talk with patients about their spiritual health. “I am more than stitches and screws and bolts,” she writes. “I am a whole person. While my body needed great physical care, my spirit often needed propping up.” As a living testament to the power of “ancient faith, timeless love and friendship,” Onwuchekwa is eager to share her “Teachable Moment” with others. “Waiting until a crisis to work on one’s spiritual fitness is not only unwise,” she cautions, “it could


ing on his own repressed state. “His passions were deadened,” he thinks, “and he felt a kind of tingling in his chest whenever a normal person would get emotional.” James comes to Saudi Arabia work as a teacher. He is African-American and gay in a country where homosexuality is outlawed. “It is not healthy,” reflects his worried mother back in St. Louis, “to be illegal anywhere on this earth.” Largely indifferent to the world around him, he is a passive observer who “could not be moved to support a cause good or bad.” Elizabeth teaches English to local women and is married to an oil man whose primary goal is amassing money. They live in a “mini America” compound where everything is “alright … as long as you don’t go past the walls.” As she meanders through the HyperPanda grocery store, she contemplates leaving her husband and starting a new life. Through stream of consciousness, Koors’ characters ruminate about cultural differences and privilege, sex and love, and their own alienation as they wander through a dusty foreign land, in search of themselves but not always sure of what they want to find. A St. Louis native, George Koors lives on Capitol Hill. “Always the Wanderer” is his first book. Follow him on Twitter @gbk7288.

On the Hill in January The Capitol Hill Arts Workshop presents

“Bulfinch: Memories and Fairytales,” an art show based on the manuscript for Hannah Sternberg’s young adult novel. Opening reception on Jan. 16, 5-7 p.m., gallery hours 9:30 a.m.-9 p.m. (Monday-Thursday), 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. (Friday), and 9 a.m.-2 p.m. (Saturday). 545 Seventh St. NE, 202-547-6839, or www.chaw.org. The Smithsonian Associates offer “Great Irish Dramatists,” in three sessions, Jan. 7-12, 6:45 p.m.; “Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Road,” Jan. 12, 6:45 p.m.; and “A Midwinter’s Day at the Folger,” tour and performance, Feb. 27, 10 a.m., www.smithsonianassociates.org. The Hill Center and PEN/Faulkner present short-story writer Kseniya Melnink, author of “Snow in May,” in conversation with Lisa Page at Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE, Jan. 21, 7 p.m. Free but reserve tickets at www.hillcenterdc.org or 202-549-4172.

BookFest 2016 The 2016 Literary Hill BookFest – our homegrown showcase for writers who live on or write about Capitol Hill – is scheduled for Sunday, May 1, in the North Hall of Eastern Market. For more information, or to volunteer, find us at www.literaryhillbookfest.org. Follow us on Twitter and “like” us on Facebook too. Be sure to watch this space for further details! u

Mark your calendars for the 2016 Literary Hill BookFest on Sunday, May 1, at Eastern Market.

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A romantic thriller set in Washington, D.C. A riveting, erotic, spine-tingling thriller with chilling imagery, graphic depictions, and remarkable insights into the sexual psychopath. AVAILABLE AT LULU.COM

THE POETIC HILL Teddy Rycroft says that music has always been his passion. He used to fear pursuing other art forms that might detract from it, but after studying poetry at school, he was delighted to find that, rather than taking away from his music, poetry enhanced his understanding of it – “just as learning a new language gives one a new perspective on his native tongue.” The poem below comes from a small collection he wrote in college, “as my understanding of poetry has grown into something substantial, something to carry its own weight and push me to continue forward.” He lives on Capitol Hill. If you would like to have your poem considered for publication, please send it to klyon@literaryhillbookfest.org. (There is no remuneration.) u

El Paso

Gordo calls me over to draw on his driveway with chalk beside his father’s monster truck. Inside his dogs run around and bark. When the ice cream truck comes, we line up like waiting room patients bouncing from side to side, the black asphalt singeing our bare feet. Gordo’s sister is quiet, his mother is quiet; I think his father beats them. His father brings out his lawn chair and watches my mother wash our car. I remember the sun setting on the right as if part of a daily parade across our block. The red and orange and yellow would fade into purple and blue as the cool desert wind would blow, the crickets humming a quiet melody. Once my father found a scorpion in the bathroom and killed it with his brown leather sandal.

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MIDCITY

FA G O N C O M M U N I T Y G U I D E

COM I NG FE B RUARY 2016 SP ECIAL ISSU E

C O M P R E H E N S I V E B LAC K H I STO RY M O NTH CALE N DAR H I G H LI G HTI N G TH E MANY E V E NTS AN D C U LTU RAL P R O G RAM M I N G HAP P E N I N G I N AN D AR O U N D D.C. ARTI C LE S I N R E C O G N ITI O N O F TH E R I C H H I STO RY AN D AC C O M P LI S H M E NTS O F B LAC K AM E R I CAN S Interested in advertising, contact sales today. 202.543.8300 Carolina x12 Kira x16 Andrew x19 Laura x22 Publication Date: HillRag 1/30 | East of the River & MidCityDC 2/6

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Marmalade by Claire Parsons Company What is marmalade? Can it be cherry, figs, mint, upside down, together or inside out? Marmalade is a delicious, sensory performance about meeting, mixing and blending. Mira and Viktor taste and feel in poetic movements and circus actions in an exquisite and visual experience where the audience is invited to join in the experience. Marmalade looks at the world through body, eye, feeling and taste in a room with fluffy skirts, soft circus and Fellini music. Perfect for two to six-year olds, the show runs Jan. 21 to 24. Thursday and Friday, performances at 10 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. Saturday performances at 10 a.m., 11:30 a.m. and 3:30 a.m. Sunday performances at 11:30 a.m. and 3:30 a.m. Tickets are $9. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. atlasarts.org.

{kids & family} N O T E B O O K by Kathleen Donner Weekly Cartoon Skate at the Canal Park Ice Rink Every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., kids can skate with cartoon characters at the Canal Park Ice Rink. The rink is open daily and offers private skating lessons for children and adults. Ice skating rink hours are as follows: Monday and Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m.; Wednesday through Friday, noon to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Admission is $9 for adults and $8 for children, seniors, and military. Skate rental is $4. The rink also has daily programming and events: Tuesdays, two admissions for the price of one, 4 to 6 p.m.; Thursdays, college students with ID save $2; Fridays, Rock & Skate featuring DJ, 7 to 9 p.m.; and Saturdays, Cartoon Skate, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Canal Park Ice Rink is at Second and M Streets. SE, one block from the Navy Yard/Ballpark Metro (New Jersey Ave. Exit). More information can be found at canalparkdc.org/ice-rink/public-skating. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Black History Story Time at Rosedale Library On Tuesday, Jan. 19 at 4:30 p.m., enjoy poems, songs, and stories written by or about famous African Americans in this special Black History story time. The narratives focus on Martin Luther King, Jr., but also include poets such as Nikki Grimes and Langston Hughes. Appropriate for children ages three through seven. Rosedale Neighborhood Library is at 1701 Gales St. NE. 202-727-5012. dclibrary.org/rosedale. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SWNA Scholarships

Claire Parsons Company last summer at Summer Stage. Photo: Alan Roche

The Scholarship Fund of the Southwest Neighborhood Assembly (SWNA) seeks students for spring of 2016 scholarships. Funds are available to any resident in the 20024 zip code wishing to pursue or pursuing, any course of study at an accredited undergraduate college or post-secondary technical institution. The scholarship committee reviews the applications and conducts verification checks. Applicants are judged on a number of factors including acceptance to col-

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REGI STER N O W 222 8TH St. NE

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Nordic Winter Wonderland at the Phillips

Happy New Year from Capital Community News!

EST.

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1976

On Saturday, Jan. 30f from 1 to 4 p.m., embark on a family-friendly art adventure to celebrate the delights of the Nordic Winter. Stay warm inside the galleries and enjoy traditional art projects, stories, films, and performances from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Recommended for ages four and up. $12; free for children 18 and under. Reservations required at phillipscollection.org/events. The Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. phillipscollection.org. Alfred Sisley, Snow at Louveciennes, 1874. Oil on canvas, 22 x 18 in. Acquired 1923. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC

lege or university, scholastic achievements, financial need, letters of recommendation from teachers or school administrators, community involvement and presentation. Those interested in applying should complete the online early interest form at swdc.org/swna/task-forces/youth-task-force.

NSO Kids’ Events Time to make some music! On Saturday, Jan. 9, join musicians from the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) for an instrument “petting zoo” at 1 p.m. followed by a family concert at 2 p.m. Children and parents can try the instruments that they’ll


The only full service toddler/preschool Montessori program on Capitol Hill Rolling Admissions Ages 24 months to 5 years old

see played on stage. Smithsonian American Art Museum at Eighth and F Streets NW. americanart.si.edu. Alternatively on the same date at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., join NSO artists in dissecting the pieces and parts of music and instruments. Watch, listen, and lend a hand as guest musicians, Paul Fadoul on marimba and Zara Lawler on fl ute, build music from the ground up. For ages four and up. A free Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo” will be held in the Hall of States one hour before the performances. $20. kennedy-center.org. ------------------------------------------------------------------------

Fully licensed by the DC Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) for over 13 years!

J.O. Wilson PTA Summer Camp Fair The J.O. Wilson Elementary School Parent Teachers Association (PTA) is hosting a Summer Camp Fair at the school on Thursday, Jan. 21 from 6 to 8 p.m. They have invited over 30 summer camp vendors. J.O. Wilson Elementary School is located at 660 K St. NE. ---------------------------------------------------------------------

I Have A Dream Story Time On Saturday, Jan. 16 at 10:30 a.m., The Children’s Department of the Northeast library celebrates the birth of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. with an “I Have A Dream” story time. Families are invited to listen to stories and sing songs about accepting and celebrating differences, working together, friendship and dreaming big. Afterward, children can make an inspirational craft. Northeast Neighborhood Library is located at 330 Seventh St. NE. 202-6980058. dclibrary.org/northeast.

We follow strict guidelines and procedures with regard to safety, security, comfort, and health of our children.

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Summer Camp 2016!

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Water days Children’s environment for imagination and adventure. Week long themed activities Managed and run by our licensed, accredited teachers (not camp counselors) Weekly enrollment Affordable options

Schedule an Observation! 703.945.0408 Capitol Hill Campus: 1325 Maryland Ave NE, Washington, DC 20002 www.nestars.net • northeaststarsmontessori.nes@gmail.com Like us on Facebook | Northeast Stars Montessori January 2016 H 119


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Ever hear a fish tale? Well, this one is true! Join biologists at the Aquatic Resources Education Center (AREC) in Anacostia Park, for Fish Tales; a nature based story hour for two to four-year-old children and their parents and guardians. On Jan. 9 and 23; Feb. 6 and 30; Mar. 5 and 19 from 10 to 11 a.m., AREC staff biologists will read stories about aquatic animals and lead corresponding craft activities for DC’s youngest naturalists. Stories will focus on the aquatic wildlife in our city and include close encounters with the education center’s resident fish, frogs, turtles and more. To register for Fish Tales Story Hour, email doee.arec@dc.gov and indicate the number of participants you are bringing. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SE Library’s Kids’ Club Every Tuesday at 4 p.m., come to Southeast Library for different activities: games, crafts, science experiments and more. For ages five to 12, in the Basement Program Room. Southeast Neighborhood Library at 403 Seventh St. SE. 202-698-3377. dclibrary. org/southeast. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MLK Story Time for Pre-Schoolers On Wednesday, Jan. 13 at 10 a.m., enjoy stories, activities, and crafts about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at the National Archives. This program is designed especially for three to five year olds and accompanying adults. National Archives, 700 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. archives.gov. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Play Your Favorite Video Games On Saturday, Jan. 16 from 1 to 7 p.m., MAGFest, American University’s Game Lab and SAAM present an indie arcade at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Play some of your favorite video games. Participate in game building workshops. Try new indie games— courtesy of the International Game Developers Association’s Indie Arcade: Coast to Coast competition. Classic arcade games include Asteroids, Pac-Man, Tron, Star Wars, Arkanoid, Donkey Kong, and more. Smith-

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sonian American Art Museum, Eighth and F Streets. NW. americanart.si.edu. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

DC United After School Merges with DC Scores The DC United Foundation has merged its programing with DC Scores, a local nonprofit that provides after-school programs in the DC Public and Public Charter schools. Going forward, due to the partnership, after-school programming will be the same at Jefferson Junior High and Amidon Elementary Schools. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Poetry Extravaganza with Sistah Joy On Saturday, Jan. 16 at 1 p.m., honor the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at the 20th Annual Poetry Extravaganza with Sistah Joy and Collective Voices. This family-friendly event features live poetry, drumming, dancing, youth performances and much more. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-727-0321. dclibrary.org/mlk. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Library of Congress Summer Internships The Library of Congress seeks applicants for its 2016 Junior Fellows Summer Internship Program. This is a 10-week paid fellowship for undergraduate and graduate students. For a stipend of $3,000, Junior Fellows work full-time with Library specialists and curators from May 31 through Aug. 5, 2016 to inventory, describe and explore collection holdings and to assist with digital-preservation outreach activities throughout the Library. Apply online only at usajobs.gov, keyword: Junior Fellows through midnight on Friday, Jan. 22. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Air and Space Open House On Saturday, Jan. 30 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., get a behind-the-scenes look at historic artifacts, documents, and works of art that are not on public display at Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center. See what it takes to collect, preserve, and restore them. Meet curators, conservators, archivists and other specialists. Participate in activities, special tours and on-stage presentations. In the case of inclement weath-


Your Opportunity Begins Here Graduation and 100% College Acceptance

er, this event may be canceled and will not be rescheduled. For information on the status of this event, call 703-572-4118. Steven F. UdvarHazy Center is located at 14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway, Chantilly, VA. airandspace.si.edu. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Chinese New Year Family Festival On Saturday, Jan. 30 from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., the Smithsonian American Art Museum celebrates the 2016 Lunar New Year. “Awaken the lion” and ring in the year of the monkey with fun craft activities, traditional performances, artists and demonstrations. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Eighth and F Streets NW. americanart.si.edu. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Engineering Family Day On Saturday, Feb. 27 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Discover how professional engineers turn ideas into reality and do some engineering and problem solving of your own at the National Building Museum. The museum celebrates Engineers’ Week from Feb. 21 to 27 with a free, hands-on, fun-filled festival. Explore thermodynamics, electricity, aerodynamics, and more with engineers at more than 25 activities and demonstrations made especially for kids. The National Building Museum is located at 401 F St. NW. nbm.org. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mouse in House Adapted from the book by Elizabeth Spires, “Mouse in House” reveals an unlikely friendship between a mouse and reclusive 19th-century poet Emily Dickinson. The mouse’s life changes forever when a gust of wind blows one of Emily’s poems her way. Moved by Emily’s evocative words that capture her own feelings, the mouse becomes deter-

mined to be a poet herself. Background visuals by media artist Bryan Leister are animations designed from Dickinson’s actual home furnishings. “Mouse in House” runs on Saturdays, Jan. 16, 23 and 30 at 3 p.m. at Theatre on the Run, 3700 South Four Mile Run Dr., Arlington, VA. Tickets are $15 at door, $10 in advance and $10 for children 17 and under. Admission includes free hot dogs. Order tickets online at janefranklin.com/performances/tickets. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Wake Up, Brother Bear! Wake Up, Brother Bear follows Brother and Sister Bear as they experience a full year of glorious seasons. Together they see a waterfall melt, meet a butterfly, chase an elusive fish and skate on an icy pond. Children are invited to join the action with a small bag of props that help actors Jack Novak and Anna Jackson bring this story to life. Accompanying live music is provided by cellist Katie Chambers. Wake Up, Brother Bear, best for ages one to five, runs in Imagination Stage’s Christopher and Dana Reeve Studio Theatre, Bethesda, through Jan. 31. Performances are Saturdays-Sundays at 10 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. Tickets are $14, with a $5 lap seat for children under 12 months. Tickets may be purchased online at imaginationstage.org, 301280-1660, or at the box office. Imagine Stage is located at 4908 Auburn Ave., Bethesda, MD. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------Have an item for the Kids and Family Note Book? Email bulletinboard@ hillrag.com. u

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{kids and family}

School Notes

by Susan Braun Johnson

Maury Elementary The Buzz on Pollinators Under the tutelage of master beekeepers Toni Burnham and Barry Hayman of DC Beekeepers, 2nd and 3rd grade students are engaged in an intensive ten-week unit on the relationship between honeybees and the plants they pollinate. The course began with an examination of dried bees and the parts of a flower. The kids compared a man-made hive used by beekeepers with those found in nature. They learned about beekeeping equipment discovering that honey and wax come from this source. They tasted raw pollen and made their own beeswax candles. They also learned that, unlike wasps, honeybees rarely sting people and, if they do, they die. Sadly, honeybee populations are declining world-wide due to loss of habitat, monoculture, mass-pesticide use and diseases which are all killing bees faster than beekeepers can grow them. This has consequences, not just for candle and honey lovers, but anyone growing food crops that depend on honeybees for pollination. Maury students made posters to show how they think we can save the bees.

What comes next? When spring arrives, students will build a hive, make native pollinator nests and seed balls and harvest their own honey.

Open Houses There will be two special opportunities to visit the school on Monday, Jan. 11 at 10:30 a.m. and 6:45 p.m. Current Maury parents will lead tours of the school, to be followed by Q&A with the principal. Maury Elementary is located at 1250 Constitution Ave. NE. For more information, call: 202-6983838 or visit mauryelementary.com. Elizabeth Nelson u

Miner Elementary The Miner Community Feasts November and December were festive food months at Miner. The Parent-Teacher Organization’s (PTO) Family Support Committee gathered more than 25 turkeys for distribution to school families in need during the holidays. The school’s Boy and Girl Scout Troops collected more than 200 pounds of food. Additionally, the 3rd and 4th graders hosted Thanksgiving Dinners in the classrooms complete with balanced meal planning and food prep lessons.

Learning to Break a Sweat Congratulations to Miner’s soccer team for closing out a winning season! Part of the DC Scores program, Miner students combine literacy and soccer. They played in 10 soccer matches and participated in the District-wide Poetry Slam. Additionally, the Miner Mathletes added new members this fall. Led by the school’s 3rd grade teacher Ms. Sarah Jensen, a former NCAA Division-I cross-country runner from Brigham Young University, the Mathletes participated in math-enrichment and cross-countryrunning activities,

On The Go

A Maury student examines the parts of a flower.

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Miner students continued learning outside the classroom. The 3rd graders visited Mount Vernon. The 4th graders make a trip to Imagination Stage. The pre-K students visited the National Christmas Tree,

Miner 3rd graders visit Mount Vernon as part of Live it, Learn it!

The Pathway of Peace and the new Wegman’s Wonderplace exhibit at the Smithsonian Museum of American History.

Toy Drive a Success The Miner PTO Family Support Committee held a holiday toy drive for Miner families in need. Dozens of toys were purchased, collected, and distributed just in time for Christmas!

Miner PTO Wraps Up Fall Fundraising Drive The Miner PTO hosted its first ever fall fundraising drive. It raised nearly $6,000 in donations in just three weeks’ time. The PTO is planning a number of spring fundraising activities including a yard sale. Miner is located at 601 15th St. NE. Information can be found at www.minerelementary.org. Holly Harper u

Payne Elementary Spreading Holiday Cheer “The best way to spread cheer is singing loud for all to hear,” says Payne music teacher Reginald Golden. The School Choir has done just that! The 4th and 5th grade choir was invited to join the Howard University Gospel Choir. Together they sang several songs spreading cheer to thousands of people who attended the Safeway Feast of Sharing. This annual


APPLICATIONS BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE 2016-2017 SCHOOL YEAR Apply for admissions at: www.myschooldc.org or call (202) 888-6336

Pre-K 3 through 4th grade

Building a strong foundation for learning

Open Houses on the following Thursdays, 9:30 am-10:30 am*:

January 21 & 28 . February 18 & 25 March 17 & 24 . April 21 & 28 *You must register for these sessions by calling (202) 726-1843. For the 2016-2017 school year Bridges PCS will be in our new location:

100 Gallatin St. NE, Washington, DC 20011.

www.bridgespcs.org 1250 Taylor Street, NW, Washington, DC 20011 p: 202.545.0515 Accredited by Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools. Voted one of the Best Preschools in DC, City Paper Readers Poll 2013 -2015!

January 2016 H 123


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their magical seeming migration. Exhibit topics included: Monarch eggs, caterpillars, chrysalis, butterflies, milkweed, life cycles and migration. 2nd grade students broke into small groups during the semester to study and research each of these topics. They presented what they learned over several museum days using multi-media exhibits. The project was inspired by several caterpillar eggs that Ms. Scofield brought into the classroom at the beginning of the year. The class watched them hatch into caterpillars and then turn into butter- Dr. Tania teaches The Brilliant Club members the art of backing flies. Students became so fascinated by the lifecy- up opinions with research to help them navigate their year-long IB project. Photo: O. Morgan cle and migration of the butterflies that Ms. Scofield Payne Choir sings with the Howard U Gospel Choir. let them research and explore the species. Their redid a tremendous amount of work. Under the dievent is organized by the Safeway Foundation. Volsearch included a trip to the Museum of Natural rection of Principal Young and Ms. Watson, school unteers prepare a delicious turkey lunch for elderly History, as well as gathering butterfly information staff and students diligently worked as though it was and other needy District residents at the Walter E. inside the classroom and at home. already an authorized IB school. So questions and Washington Convention Center on the Wednesday During the museum days, 2nd graders anproblems prior to the authorization visit were easbefore Thanksgiving. 4,000 attendees including the swered questions such as: How many eggs do monily addressed. The IBO visitors made their recommayor and city councilmembers heard The Payne archs lay? About 200 to 400 is the answer. How far mendation for Eliot-Hine’s IB authorization withElementary School Choir. is do they migrate? Over 3,000 miles is correct. How out hesitation. “They (the choir) sounded wonderful!” said many eyes do the butterflies have? They have six. As an authorized IB World School, Eliotthe guests. The singing Payne Wildcats beamed And what do Monarchs eat? They eat milkweed. Hine will continue to push a rigorous and supportwith pride. School within School is located at 920 F St. ive classroom experience for students, while proPayne Elementary School is located at 1445 NE. Call 202-727-7377 or visit www.schoolwithinmoting global mindfulness emphasized by the IB C St. SE. Follow Payne: Facebook: PayneES; Inschool.org for more information. Learner Profile. Students will demonstrate knowlstagram: PayneDCPS; Twitter: @paynedcps @ Allison Klein u edge by taking action through research and compayneprincipal. munity-based projects, such as the year-long project Rachel Walker, Eliot Hine Middle School that 8th graders must complete in order to graduate. Teacher of the Deaf u Congratulations: Eliot-Hine is IB! To learn more about IBMYP at Eliot-Hine, Cheers to Eliot-Hine please contact Ms. Watson at dana.watson@dc.gov. School Within for their huge accomTo learn more about the global program, please visa School plishment in becoming it ibo.org/myp. SWS Hosts Monarch a fully-accredited and Eliot-Hine wishes to extend their most sincere Museum authorized Internationthanks to the community who has helped bring this Students at SWS visited al Baccalaureate (IB) major accomplishment to fruition. a museum in DecemWorld School! Prinber to learn about Moncipal Young received Upcoming EH Events arch Butterflies, but they word from The Hague Jan. 12, Buddy Day, 9 - 11:30 a.m. and Feb. 9, didn’t head to the Smithmonths before a verdict Buddy Day, 9 - 11:30 a.m. Feb. 17, Open House, sonian. They went to see was expected. It came 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. and 6 – 7 p.m. RSVP at bit. the 2nd graders at their quickly because Eliotly/1OruWEJ. All welcome. own school! Hine had virtually no Eliot-Hine IB Middle School is located at 1830 Alysia Scofield’s changes prior to authoConstitution Ave. NE. Call: 202-939-5380 for more 2nd grade class created rization. Eliot-Hine is info. Follow Eliot Hine @EliotHine; FB Eliot-Hine. its own “Monarch Muone of only two DCPS Parent Heather Schoell u seum” and invited each middle school officially class to come through to authorized to offer this Capitol Hill Cluster School visit the seven studentcurriculum. The Wiz led exhibits to learn Dana Watson, Cluster students rocked their performance of “The about the butterflies and SWS Students learn about Monarch butterflies. EH’s IB Coordinator, Wiz” musical on Dec. 11 and 12. With a color-

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525 SCHOOL ST SW WA S H I N G T O N D C , 2 0 0 2 4

enthusiastic. Peabody’s preK-4 students took a walking trip to the Botanic Garden with Watkins 1st graders on Dec. 11. They enjoyed the seasonal toy trains exhibit. Peabody students also celebrated the holiday season with pajama day in December enjoying snacks and snuggling with their families. Cluster students perform The Wiz.

ful background set, students from all three campuses sang and danced on stage. Peabody students sang to Ease On Down the Road alongside lead performing characters and Watkins 5th graders played the tormenting crows. It was a great school community performance.

Nikki Grimes Visits Award-winning author and poet Nikki Grimes visited all three Cluster campuses on Dec. 10. She shared her poems and passion for writing. The Open Book Foundation provided free copies of her award-winning novel, “Bronx Masquerade,” for students. The Capitol Hill Community Foundation and the Capitol Hill Cluster PTA made the visit possible. The Cluster’s “Reading Takes You Out of this World” school-wide reading incentive program also kicked off in December and will run through March 2, which is Dr. Seuss’ birthday. This year’s goal is one million minutes of reading across the school.

Peabody Early Childhood School On Dec. 2, a dynamic musical duo from the Kennedy Center, Elizabeth Pulju-Owen and Karen Lowry-Tucker, performed for Peabody students. Costumes, lively musical selections, animals and musical styles ranging from Bach to Ragtime, all came together to make an interactive performance that left students excited and

Watkins Elementary School FoodPrints at Watkins gave students hands-on experience with growing, harvesting, cooking, and eating fresh, healthy foods. Students made cornbread, kale salad, apple beet carrot salad, sweet potato quesadillas with kale, and more. 2nd graders especially love the winter sessions. It is “better than dessert,” they say referring to the program as “vegetable heaven.” In December, Watkins students performed in winter musicals including the “Snow Biz.” Students enjoyed specials classes in Art with printmaking using FoodPrints inspired themes and Islamic tile art, and cup stacking in gym classes. Watkins 3rd graders traveled to the Warner Theatre to see the Washington Ballet’s The Nutcracker. The students enjoyed the costumes, dancing, and colorful scenes.

Washington Global Public Charter School is a tuition-free middle school (6th, 7th and 8th) open to all students in Washington, DC. We offer a robust international and research-based academic program to develop globally competitive students who are ready for college and careers. Our program includes projectbased learning, small learning communities and classes, technology instruction, arts, and foreign language classes in Spanish and Chinese. We strive for all of our students to be healthy and active through our nutrition, physical education, and athletic programs. We also serve as a community school that promotes local engagement and service-learning for our students.

WHAT MAKES WASHINGTON GLOBAL UNIQUE: • Chromebooks for Each Student • College Preparatory International Curriculum • Intensive Foreign Language Courses (including intensive classes for bilingual students)

• Free Before and After Care • Free Extracurricular Activities • Competitive Sports • Free Tutoring • Comprehensive Special Education Support

Come Join Us at Our Open House for 2016-2017 Enrollment! December 16,2015 | 6-7 pm RSVP with Yezica Diaz at ydiaz@washingtonglobal.org or call 202-796-2415

Stuart-Hobson Middle School Stuart-Hobson hosted the Washington Wizards Fitness Friday in November. Students participated in a yoga session where they learned calmness and wellness techniques. Wizards Mascot “G Man” also joined the fun. Stuart-Hobson students are also being introduced to Hour of Code. Along with students around the world, they are learning about coding in various computer languages, apps, websites, and 3D models. Teachers hope the program will spark their interest in technology so that they become the

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The Washington Wizards hosted their November Fitness Friday at Stuart-Hobson Middle School. Students engaged in an hour of yoga. November 20, 2015. Photo: Monumental Sports & Entertainment/ Washington Wizards.

creators of technology they use. The Capitol Hill Cluster School can be found at www. capitolhillclusterschool.org. Visit to see weekly updates for all three campuses. Peabody is located at 425 C St. NE. Watkins is located at 420 12th St. SE. Stuart-Hobson is located at 410 E St. NE. Bernetta Reese and Katharine Kaplan u

St. Peter School Christmas Concert and Gallery Walk - Blessed Traditions One of the many celebrated traditions at St. Peter’s is the schoolwide evening Christmas concert at St. Peter’s Church. Students don coat and tie or holiday dresses, process through a packed church singing Christmas carols for friends and family. The next morning at school arrival time, parents join the school community for a gallery walk and coffee. They see displays of student work and bulletin boards checking out the amazing art students have produced. This year, St. Peter’s Haiti Stewardship Committee discussed how it is integrating its mission work in the life of St. Pe-

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ter School and its sister school in Notre Dame d’Altagrace parish in Cap Haitian.

Student Families Support Greg Gannon Food Drive! The St. Peter School community filled over 100 boxes of food with more than 7,200 food items for the Fr. McKenna Center at Gonzaga College High School! Families fanned out across Capitol Hill, dropping off empty grocery bags. They collected the bags now filled with non-perishable items a few days later. Students were thrilled when Ned Hogan and Michael Johnson from the Fr. McKenna Center came to school Mass to recognize their community outreach and donations. Thanks to the students and parent volunteers who helped sort and pack the food. Thanks to Capitol Hill neighbors for their generosity!

CYO Basketball Well Underway! The St. Peter Panthers have hit the courts hard preparing for this year’s basketball season. Fielding girls and boys rookie, junior varsity and varsity basketball teams, the Panthers are fortunate to be coached by a group of teachers, parent and parish volunteers –

many of whom played college ball. They are looking forward to a great season! St. Peter School can be found at 422 Third St. SE. For more info call 202-5441618, or visit www.stpeterschooldc.org. Sally Aman u

Capitol Hill Day School CHDS Community Conversation on Racial Literacy: Jan 14 Everyone is welcome to attend the Capitol Hill Day School (CHDS) Community Conversation on Racial Literacy, Jan. 14 at 6:30 p.m. The event features Dr. Howard Stevenson, who will discuss ways to promote racial literacy in schools. Dr. Stevenson is the Constance Clayton Professor of Urban Education, Professor of Africana Studies, and former Chair of the Applied Psychology and Human Development Division in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. Please RSVP to Kristin Pillay at kpillay@chds.org.

Early Childhood Project-Based Learning The three Early Childhood classes are wrapping up their respective studies of rocks and

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learned about how the organization helps people in the community.

Save the Date! Don’t miss CHDS 6th graders in their Jan. 29 performance of Oliver! at Christ Church on Capitol Hill. Capitol Hill Day School is located at 210 South Carolina Ave. SE. For more information call 202-386-9919. CHDS Early Childhood exploration of geodes. Photo: Amy Rothschild

minerals, building and construction, and farms. The children showcased their learning with a Rock and Mineral Museum, student-made blueprints, and an in-class farm. The farm included a chicken coop, corn field, orchard, silo, corrals, and a goat obstacle course!

CHDS Sports Come out and cheer for the CHDS varsity and junior varsity basketball teams as they face off against their rivals: Alexandria Country Day, Edlin, Burgundy Farm, Brown, Congressional, Gesher, and Green Hedges.

CHDS Giving Tree For over 30 years, CHDS early childhood and 6th grade students have chosen a Giving Tree at Butler Orchard. Brought back to the school, it is decorated with hats, gloves, and mittens. In December, 6th graders delivered the donations to So Others Might Eat, where they met with staff and

Jane Angarola u

DC International School Learning outside the classroom! DC International School (DCI) understands that students need balance between work and play in order to excel in the classroom. This year, DCI teachers and staff have been working hard to combine the two in fun clubs, activities and trips. In December, the theater class went to “Kiss Me Kate.” The Kung Fu Club went to the UMD Wasu Games. The debate club won second place in a citywide tournament. Student ambassadors volunteered their time at EdFEST. Art students learned about digital media and technical tools at ARTLAB+. The after school program participants volunteered at Yu Ying PCS and the Washington Animal League. DCI teachers work hard to incorporate all of these activities into classroom lessons for a truly interdisciplinary middle school experience. The school’s IB curriculum is inquiry-led with integrative learning. Attend an info session on the following dates at 6 p.m.: Jan. 12, Feb.1, March 8, and April 6. Follow DCI on Twitter (@DCISchool) and Facebook (facebook.com/dcinternationalschool) for daily updates! Or visitdcinternationalschool.org. Lauren Games u

Blyth-Templeton Academy Cultural Competence Blyth-Templeton Academy students have been exploring personal and global culture both in and out of the classroom. The students held round-table Students volunteer at the Washington Animal Rescue League.

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Blythe Students at the Art Museum of the Americas.

discussions identifying both elements of culture that can be easily observed and those not immediately obvious. Powerful conversations about cultural acceptance and understanding took place. Students in grades 9 through 12 are studying the historical and cultural aspects of various groups of people and the intersection of politics, religion, language and legislation. The lessons are facilitated by off-campus experiences. Students conducted research on US legislation at the National Archives. They examined the Freer Gallery of Art’s exhibit on Silk Road Luxuries from China. They investigated the depiction of culture in artwork at the Art Museum of the Americas. Blyth-Templeton Academy is located at 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. For more information call 202-847-0779 or visit www.blythtempleton.org. Humanities Teacher and Director of Student Jennifer Rivers u


Friends Community School Progressive Quaker Education Kindergarten - Grade 8 Experience the Joy of an Extraordinary Education! Friends Community School Photo Caption: Zengo Rosenthal, a Capitol Hill resident and 4th grade student at Friends Community School helps to prepare a meal for homeless families served by A Simple House.

Working to Serve Others Friends Community School (FCS) families and staff have joined together to form In Service to Others. Founded by Donald Richardson, a much-loved teacher at the school, this organization offers resources to people who need material help. It provides opportunities to work on service projects. Most recently, families and staff gathered at the school to cook meals for A Simple House, an organization that serves homeless people in Washington. “In serving others, we lay a foundation of humility and gratitude that our students can draw on

throughout their lives. Children are like the embers and we adults have the match to ignite a fire and let it spread. We may not see the fruits until a decade from now, but we are planting the seed,� says Richardson.

Open Houses FCS will host admissions open houses at the school from 9 to11 a.m. on Jan. 9 and 14. For more information about the school and its admissions process, contact Connie Belfiore, Director of Admissions and Outreach, at connie@friendscommunityschool.org; or call 301-4412100 x129. FCS is located at 5901 Westchester Park Drive, College Park, MD. For more information, visit www.friendscommunityschool.org.

OPEN HOUSES

9:00 a.m. sharp - 11:00 a.m.

Saturday, January 9 Thursday, January 14 Application Deadline: Jan. 15

5901 Westchester Park Drive, College Park, MD 20740 Tel: 301.441.2100 www.friendscommunityschool.org Only 15-20 minutes up the Baltimore-Washington Parkway!

Eric Rosenthal u Have a story for School Notes, email Editor Sue Johnson at johnsongypsies@hotmail.com. u

Zengo Rosenthal, a Capitol Hill resident and 4th grade student at Friends Community School helps to prepare a meal for homeless families served by A Simple House.

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{home & garden} hill gardener

P

by Cheryl Corson, RLA, ASLA

recisely because it defies the season, greenhouse gardening is a pure sensory delight that a growing number of urban dwellers are opting for as their garden amenity of choice. Why own a greenhouse? Anyone who has visited the U.S. Botanic Garden’s glass house in January knows how good it feels to smell the warm, moist air, feel the sunlight filtered through lush green leaves, smell the tropical orchids, and hear the gentle sounds of water fountains. There are many horticultural reasons to add a 50 to 100 square-foot greenhouse to your yard, your deck, or even your rooftop. You can extend the growing season for herbs and edibles and get a jump on starting spring seedlings. Eating fresh salad you’ve picked yourself in February is a delight. I’ve done it, I know. If you’ve got a horticultural specialty, a greenhouse can be your cactus, succulent, or orchid clubhouse. It can be a place to share your love of gardening with your children. The elderly can garden easily in a greenhouse, either sitting or standing. Electronically overstimulated people of all ages can find peace in this quintessentially analog environment. It’s a safe and contained personal space – a true sanctuary. And besides, it’s not too hot, not too humid, and mosquito-free. I love walking out of the house into the cold, and entering my 85-degree greenhouse where I might knit or take a catnap in the sun. Humans have always attempted to control their horticultural environment. Reclusive poet Emily Dickinson had a greenhouse built onto the south side of her family’s Massachusetts home. Even Matt Damon, in “The Martian,” tried his hand at extraterrestrial greenhouse gardening. It’s a universal urge, and thanks to several manufacturers and importers one that may now easily be satisfied for gardeners on almost any budget.

Getting Started Usually the smaller the greenhouse, the easier it will be to find a suitable site. According to “Charley’s Tips” at http://www.charleysgreenhouse.com/index.cfm?page=_tips, your greenhouse should ideally receive six or more hours of winter sun per day. The long side is best angled toward the winter sun. In warmer weather, shade will be needed, either from greenhouse shade cloth or from a nearby tree. Shade cloth is readily available from your greenhouse manufacturer, such as Winter Gardenz (https:// www.wintergardenz.com/store/p21/Shade_Cover_Kits.html), or mail ordered from a company like FarmTek (http://www.farmtek.com/farm/ supplies/ExternalPageView?pageKey=EXTE RNAL_PAGE_3001). I have had several Capitol Hill clients install shade cloth in summer above their garden pergolas, bringing down temperatures 15 degrees even without any overhead plants. My own greenhouse is shaded by a nearby oak in summer. When it loses its leaves in winter the greenhouse receives plenty of sun. In urban settings, say on a Capitol Hill corner lot, greenhouses can be three-sided like a leanto, sharing one exterior brick wall. This has the added benefits of wind protection and of daytime heat from the brick radiating out after sundown to moderate cooler nighttime temperatures. Greenhouses are relatively lightweight, so deck installations are no problem. Rooftop greenhouses are also an intriguing option. Just as with a rooftop air-conditioning unit, you would span the width of the roof with two steel I-beams and attach the greenhouse to that frame, thus keeping the weight off the roof surface. If you already have a roof deck, bolt the greenhouse to it. According to Roger Fitness, managing director of Winter Gardenz greenhouses, “It’s helpful to install tile over wooden roof decking to prevent cold air from entering between wooden deck slats

This rooftop greenhouse by Hartley Botanic Inc., still under construction, measures roughly 13 by 20 feet and is the ultimate urban getaway. Photo: Hartley Botanic, Inc.

January 2016 H 131


This drawing of a 6 by 8 foot Winter Gardenz greenhouse shows the glazing panels, sliding door, vent, and ground stakes. Drawing by Winter Gardenz®

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from below.” Fitness advises customers installing his company’s greenhouses on urban rooftops. As always, check with DC’s Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs, http://dcra.dc.gov/ service/get-building-permit, to see if you need a permit. If you live in the historic district also check with the Capitol Hill Restoration Society, http://chrs.org/ history-and-preservation/chhd-map/, before making a purchase. If you’re installing a greenhouse in your backyard, just set it down on level ground (as I did) or stake it at the corners. You can build a pressure-treated wooden frame or a brick frame, or even pour a concrete slab onto which to bolt your greenhouse. An excellent foundation guide may be seen on the Winter Gardenz website, https://www.wintergardenz.com/store/c13/Foundations. html. Obviously your choice would depend on your commitment to both your house and your greenhouse gardening future. In the case of Hartley Botanic, http://www.hartley-botanic.com/, owners often dig brick or stone foundations as these greenhouses are built to last up to 75 years.

Other Design Decisions Once you’ve determined you have a viable site and selected the size, orientation, and attachment method, you must choose a glazing material. Greenhouses come in the traditional glass or in polycarbonate. Polycarbonate has excellent thermal efficiency, is lightweight, and costs less. If made from a reputable source, not of recycled materials, and UV treated on both sides, it should last 15 years. For a good sideby-side comparison between glass and polycarbonate see https://www.wintergardenz.com/glass-vs-poly.html. Other options would be motorized shade, heat, and ventilation systems. I have none of these and enjoyed several years of successful greenhouse growing. However, I do work from home and can monitor and easily adjust my green

house door and vent for variable weather conditions.

Cost You get what you pay for with greenhouses, from a $700 Costco 6 by 8 foot model all the way to the high five figures (or more) for an English made Hartley Botanic glass house, installed by their expert North American crew. Several of these have been built in the DC metro area. Says Hartley Botanic Vice-President Shelley Newman, “You’d be shocked at how many baby boomers are giving these to themselves as presents. Many choose greenhouses instead of swimming pools.” So if you’re settled in for the duration and it’s an option, treat yourself to this greenhouse which is really more like an addition to your living space than a utilitarian amenity. Another option, for somewhere between $2,000 and $4,000, is a polycarbonate greenhouse by Winter Gardenz. Made in the US, it is shipped to you or your local contractor for fairly easy onsite assembly. The gaskets are very durable, more so than those in my Costco model which I’m always poking back into their grooves. The doors, window vents, and shelves are nicer too. Roger Fitness and his staff will be on hand by phone to walk you through installation. This option would be the most reliable and cost effective for beginners.

What to Grow Salad greens and herbs are great for first-time greenhouse gardeners. I’ve also grown radishes and turnips, and have started all my spring flower seeds in my greenhouse. One year I grew wheatgrass, which is fast and beautiful and great to throw in your juicer. Purchase a good soil mix from a local garden center. You don’t need deep soil to grow these plants in a greenhouse.


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After my first year using deep, heavy ceramic pots I switched to shallow plastic trays which were fine for my arugula, spinach, mache, and lettuce. When you water every morning, shallow pots will be easier to manage. Keep a thermometer inside, and know when to open the roof vent and door so your plants don’t overheat. Even in my unheated Costco greenhouse temperatures did not go below freezing when nighttime temperatures dipped below 20 degrees. Greenhouse gardening is a great way to stay in touch with the seasons, especially winter when we are outdoors less often. Let me know if you take the plunge so we can compare notes!

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Cheryl Corson, RLA, ASLA, is a landscape architect and dirt gardener who designed her first Capitol Hill garden in 1998. She enjoys helping homeowners and business and school clients with garden, landscape, and playground projects. See www.cherylcorson.com. u

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OK, I’m going to start a New Year’s Revolution in our backyard – against my wife’s advice that it won’t work! I want to have a raised-bed vegetable garden in the sunny place. She thinks there’s not enough room. How little a space would I need? As little as one square foot could work to grow some nice cut-and-comeagain leaf lettuce, radishes, scallions, even baby carrots. You can grow a tomato plant in a deep container too.

Greetings, Gardeners! Let’s Celebrate the New Year A chief pleasure of gardening is (quietly) to gloat at the failures of other gardeners. Here, then, a brief confessional. Gardeners freely describe their personal gardening failures – anonymously, of course. Enjoy! • I planted a crape myrtle next to our back fence. Over the years, its glorious canopy grew toward the sun, and rather far over into our neighbor’s yard. One day he chopped off all the branches on his side. And that’s perfectly legal. • I thought tulips would come back again the next year; they are perennials, aren’t they? But here in DC they just don’t. Bummer. • I killed a beautiful mature crabapple tree that gave such beauty ev-


Pipes freezing? Is your home cold in winter & hot in summer? 90% of DC Homes are under-insulated!

ery spring. I added earth around its trunk to raise the soil level in that part of the garden. I had no idea that tree roots need air, and that soil level can’t be higher than level with the root flange. I believed the rubber mulch salesman. Hey, it never deteriorates -- that sounded like such good thing. We failed adequately to treasure our shade garden while it existed. We rejoiced when our wonderful neighbor next door removed his giant magnolia. We now realize we failed adequately to anticipate the hours of watering and the huge water bills our roses, peonies, poppies, and lilies require in our new, beautiful but exhausting sunny space. It’s way too hot to sit out there during the summer. We underestimated the brevity of a Daphne Odora’s lifespan. We’ve now had four die suddenly. Apparently they just do that, even under the best of circumstances – soil, light, moisture, and care. I learned the hard way that pruning at the wrong time can cut off all the next year’s blooms. I failed to foster worms. Did not learn for many, many years just how essential worms are to the soil. The false cyprus label said “Nana – dwarf,” from the best nursery. That cyprus is 25 feet and still growing.

Happy New Year, gardeners all! Please note the date change. The next public meeting of the Capitol Hill Garden Club is MONDAY, JANUARY 11, at 7 p.m. Selected members will discuss problems and solutions in their own gardens. Please visit capitolhillgardenclub.org for membership details. Meetings are free and open to all. u

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Happy New Year to All Capital Community News

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CCN staff and friends at the annual Holiday Party at Banana Cafe.


Hill Rag Magazine January 2016  

Our flagship publication delivering all of your news from the Capitol Hill area of Washington, DC

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