Page 1

midweek edition WEDNESDAY, NOV. 17, 2010

Vol. 101 No. 92 • Established 1908 • East

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Craft fair confidential Hockey is for girls

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Cash crunch threatens aboriginal centre Facility provides refuge for downtown homeless Mike Howell Staff writer

A nonprofit drop-in centre in the Downtown Eastside whose clients include a large number of homeless aboriginal people will close for at least three months in the winter unless it can come up with money to keep its doors open. The Aboriginal Front Door Society at 384 Main St. is operating under a $40,000 city grant that expires at the end of the year, putting the once financially comfortable centre in financial straits. Mona Woodward, executive director of the society, said she anticipates the or-

ganization will receive another grant from the city in April 2011 but has to make up a $25,000 shortfall to remain open for January, February and March 2011. “Those months are crucial for a lot of the homeless people who rely on us to be open,” said Woodward, who became executive director of the society last month. “This is a safe place and provides refuge from the street for a lot of people. I’m a fighter and I want to fight to keep this organization open.” The drop-in centre is located in the heart of the Downtown Eastside, a few steps from Main and Hastings. It’s open Monday to

Friday. Statistics for September show 546 people visited the society’s office that month. Some drop in for coffee and food while others seek referrals to addictions services, housing and medical help. Programs include crisis intervention, computer training and healing circles. The society also works with the Downtown Community Court, which refers some of its clients to the drop-in centre to complete community work as part of a sentence. The centre opened in 2003 under the Vancouver Agreement initiative. See DIRECTOR on page 4

Garibaldi annex granted reprieve East Side school considered for closure in 2007 Naoibh O’Connor Staff writer

Mona Woodward is executive director of the Aboriginal Front Door Society in the Downtown Eastside. photo Dan Toulgoet

Garibaldi annex is safe for at least one more school year after trustees agreed it met growth targets required to keep its doors open. The East Side school at 1025 Slocan St. was threatened with closure in 2007 after struggling with low enrolment. The community around the school objected, prompting the board to give it three years to boost enrolment—it needed to attract at least 36 more new students to the district by this past September or it would be closed by June 2011. The deal pro-

tected the school from the closure process five other East Side schools are now undergoing. Garibaldi was considered a separate case and its immediate future was decided at Monday night’s board meeting. Parent Advisory Council chairman Halford Milne was thrilled to hear the news. “This has been a great success story and the school is open for new student registration,” he said Monday. Garibaldi houses a kindergarten to Grade 4 program, a homelearners program and the Vancouver Learning Network elementary program. See SCHOOL on page 4

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School board chair notes district’s declining enrolment

Continued from page 1 The annex also has relationships with organizations, including Frog Hollow Neighbourhood House, and offers an early childhood drop-in program and computer classes for adults. During the three-year period, the school’s enrolment grew by 43, according to the VSB’s calculations that only count new students to the district. Although Garibaldi is spared from closure for the 2011/12 school year, there’s no guarantee it will survive after that. The district’s overall enrolment has dropped since Garibaldi entered the agreement with the school board. If the district had not committed to the three-year plan, Garibaldi likely would have landed on the school closure short list, senior staff noted in Monday’s report to the board. “As with the schools on the closure consideration list, Garibaldi continues to be a site where enrolment is low and where facility usage is suboptimal,” the report states.

“IT SEEMS UNFAIR THAT THEY WOULD STILL BE FACING THIS POTENTIAL THREAT.” Patti Bacchus

Garibaldi will be assessed as part of annual facility reviews of all schools based on the district’s financial and enrolment concerns. “If we continue to have [empty] space and we continue to have financial pressure it will be an area that is scrutinized to look for possible savings that could be used to minimize the impact of additional funding cuts on education programs,” board chair Patti Bacchus told the Courier Tuesday. “The timing is awful. In the case of Garibaldi, they worked really hard. They did exactly what was agreed upon. Based on that alone, it seems unfair that they would still be facing this potential threat, but it’s the reality of the worsen-

ing financial context and the increasing declines in enrolment. It does create that perfect storm of factors where there’s no way it can be avoided without putting more pressure on some other area of the organization.” Milne would have preferred an indefinite commitment from the district to keep Garibaldi open because uncertainty can affect enrolment—the school lost 15 prospective new students when school closure rumours erupted last spring—but he recognizes the annex is not entitled to be treated differently than other Vancouver schools. “Unfortunately, there are no free passes for any school in this climate of underfunding by the provincial ministry, but we have a great community behind us and a unique and vibrant school that has survived tremendous pressure. So I am pleased. We will continue to grow our school, advocate for it, and to improve it beyond scrutiny,” Milne said. noconnor@vancourier.com Twitter: @Naoibh

PAC chair Halford Milne says Garibaldi annex will continue its photo Dan Toulgoet efforts to grow enrolment.

Director says poor management history hurts fundraising Continued from page 1 In the early years, its budget was bolstered by various financial contributors, including Vancouver Coastal Health, the Hey Way Noqu Healing for Addictions Society and Simon Fraser University’s department of geography. At one time, the society’s budget hovered around $400,000 a year.

In the past few years, the society has gone through several executive directors and has seen its budget dwindle. As a city report described in July 2010, the society “has been facing a number of organizational (staff and board) and financial stability challenges.” Woodward said a history of poor management has made

it difficult for the society to seek funds from sources, including the city. But, she said, the society has recently created an advisory committee with the city, has plans to create a strategic plan and has embarked on a fundraising campaign. “What I’m trying to do is have a new vision of transparency and accountability,” said Woodward, not-

ing the previous executive director was asked to resign. To function properly, the society needs $210,000 a year to operate, $180,000 of which to pay four employees and $30,000 to cover rent, utilities and other operating costs, Woodward said. The society has applied for $180,000 from the city for 2011 but city senior social planner Mario Lee

said he doesn’t recommend a group look to the city to be its sole or main funding provider. “We cannot guarantee to anyone that they are going to have continued funding,” Lee said. “For groups to be sustainable, it’s better for them to have not just one funder on which they rely, but have other funders.” Woodward said she under-

stands the city is limited in its grants budget and that’s why the society has applied for funding from two churches, the United Way, Tides Canada and Heritage Canada. The society will meet with the city this Friday to discuss its request. A longer version of this story appears at vancourier.com. mhowell@vancourier.com

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W E D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

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12th & Cambie

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Walking tall

Mayor Gregor Robertson has apparently had enough of bikes. Well, not exactly. But the cycling-mad mayor is shifting gears, so to speak, from bike lane projects to improving conditions in the city for pedestrians. A separated pedestrian lane, anybody? In a motion that went before council Tuesday, the mayor requested city staff, the Vancouver Police Department and the Vancouver School Board to identify locations and “priority measures for improving pedestrian safety and accessibility in Vancouver.” Robertson wants staff to report back to council in the spring of 2011 and include recommendations on how to improve pedestrian input into the city’s transportation plan. Suggestion: Pedestrian walk signals such as those in Burnaby where a countdown timer appears in that little box at the end of a crosswalk instead of a red flashing hand. Though Vision Vancouver’s bike lane fixation has dominated

Having spent much time and taxpayer money on cycling lanes, Mayor Gregor Robertson has turned his attention to improving the safety of the city’s pedestrians. photo Dan Toulgoet headlines, the mayor says pedestrians are the city’s top transportation priority. He said there are 318,000 “walking trips” every day in the city, with 41 per cent of downtown and West End residents either walking or cycling to work. The city’s goal is to have at least 50 per cent of trips in the city be either by walking, cycling or transit by 2020. The Canada Line and the separated bike lane network, which runs from Chinatown to

Kitsilano, are expected to be a big part of that drive. So far this year, they appear the less dangerous of modes. Five pedestrians have been killed this year after being struck by vehicles. The most recent occurred Nov. 3 in the 1100-block of Station Street where an 85-yearold woman was hit by a car in the morning. A 78-year-old man was killed Oct. 21 after he was clipped by a van at Renfrew and Eton streets.

The accident occurred in the early afternoon. “The safety and accessibility of pedestrian routes is critical to the health and well-being of our citizens,” the mayor wrote in his motion.

Mo better blues

This whole Movember thing is getting out of hand. Now I understand three facial hair-challenged Vision Vancouver city councillors are attempting to

grow lip warmers in support of prostate cancer awareness this month. Kerry Jang, Raymond Louie and George Chow have joined the mayor in an unprecedented competition of whisker growth. Robertson was first to jettison his razor when challenged at city council by a rep of the Movember crusade. No other councillors immediately got on board the moustache train. That’s because, in Jang’s case, he had to get approval from his wife. “That’s how it is in Chinese families—the woman is really in power,” said Jang, during a short break from checking his stubbly progress in the mirror. “My wife said if it was for a good cause, then go for it. But in order for that permission, she had to be given free reign to insult me and make fun of me all she wanted. So I’ve been called slimier than usual, Fu Man Chu last night and this morning she just got up and laughed.” Jang supplied the Courier with recent photos to prove he and his colleagues can grow whiskers. Apparently, he must have sent the wrong photos—the councillors look like they forgot to wipe their lips after sharing a quart of chocolate milk. mhowell@vancourier.com Twitter: @Howellings


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There’s no shortage of people weighing in on school closure. Hundreds of students, parents, staff, activists, past graduates, neighbours and school support workers packed consultation meetings held over the past few weeks. The vast majority, not surprisingly, argued to keep the five East Side schools open. Provincial and federal politicians, including Liberal MLA Kash Heed, again not surprisingly, are also on record opposing school closures. Provincial politicians’ positions on the subject has frustrated board chair Patti Bacchus, a Vision Vancouver trustee, who asked MLAs via Twitter last week how the VSB can address class size and composition concerns, restore special education and ESL services, and improve aboriginal education and libraries, while keeping schools open. Meanwhile, a couple hundred activists took aim at the provincial government last Friday during a noon-hour protest outside Premier Gordon Campbell’s constituency office on West Fourth. Staged by the newly formed APPLE B.C. (Parents

Activists protested outside Premier Gordon Campbell’s constituency office on West Fourth last Friday. photo Dan Toulgoet and Partners to Lobby for Education in B.C.), the demonstrators rallied against school closures and budget cuts and called for more education funding. But not everyone favours keeping schools with low enrolment open. Julianne Doctor, former District Parent Advisory Committee chairwoman, told trustees at the Queen Alexandra consultation meeting that some city neighbourhoods lack schools because the provincial government won’t approve construction of new schools in neighbourhoods such as International Village while existing schools are half empty. Doctor maintains “buildings have no souls, no essence, no matter how much you want to be anthropomorphizing them. It’s people who build community, not bricks. It is more important to have services and supports for our students than to maintain half-full, decrepit buildings.”

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students or greater access to costly technology and top universities available through the priciest private schools. Recently, a press release from Ontario-based Our Kids Media arrived in my inbox to promote a private school expo at the Westin Bayshore, Nov. 28. The expo, featuring representatives from private schools throughout Metro Vancouver and Victoria, as well as boarding schools from as far away as Ontario and New York, includes information on how to choose a school and tips on how to finance a private school education. Hosted by Our Kids Media, the press release quotes Christl Dabu, editor of Our Kids Go to School magazine: “The current state of the public system may frighten some parents but we’re confident there is another option for them. And we’re here to help them find it.” noconnor@vancouver.com Twitter: @Naoibh

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Last month, Citycaucus blogger and NPA-backer Mike Klassen spoke at the McBride annex meeting—he’s the parent of a former McBride annex student. Klassen told trustees he spent years trying to boost its enrolment through online marketing and making the grounds more attractive, to no avail. He blamed the VSB for failing to promote the public system as effectively as private schools promote their programs. Klassen has a point. I called the VSB to ask if elementary schools host open houses prior to kindergarten registration so families can check out prospective schools. I’m told open houses aren’t mandated by the district—it’s up to individual principals. It’s debatable how much impact marketing would have since public schools can’t offer what many private schools provide: religious-centred education, extra support for special needs

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W E D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

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Kash Heed enters debate over Champlain Heights annex

MLA lobbies against elementary school closure Naoibh O’Connor Staff writer

Liberal MLA Kash Heed penned a letter to school board chair Patti Bacchus asking the board to spare Champlain Heights annex from closure. Heed represents the VancouverFraserview constituency where the annex is located. It’s among five East Side elementary schools that may be shut down to deal with the district’s money problems and falling student enrolment. NDP MLAs such as Shane Simpson, Adrian Dix, Jenny Kwan and Mable Elmore, as well as some MPs have opposed closures, but Heed is the only Liberal MLA to publicly weigh in, according to board chair Patti Bacchus. She said the VSB has requested a meeting with new education minister George Abbott, but that hasn’t happened yet. Heed did not return a call from the Courier. A controversial report by the B.C. comptroller general, commissioned by the education ministry last school year, indicated the VSB should look at school closures to

“PARENTS MAY CHOOSE TO SEND THEIR KIDS TO THE NEIGHBOURING SCHOOL DISTRICT.” Kash Heed

deal with its money problems. The education ministry, then under Liberal MLA Vancouver-Fairview Margaret MacDiarmid, cited that finding in a June press release, stating the report confirmed the VSB’s “current financial circumstances could have been avoided had the board appropriately managed its resources.” Among other issues, the ministry pointed to the district’s surplus school space: “Excess space is not being maximized. VSB could achieve up to $5.7 million in annual savings by closing and consolidating schools.” Champlain Heights annex’s enrolment is relatively high—it operates at 85 per cent of its capacity, but there are empty seats

The Champlain Heights annex on Champlain Crescent is among five endangered East Side elementary schools. photo Dan Toulgoet at neighbouring schools. Some parents suggest they’ll switch to a Burnaby school if the annex is closed. Heed’s letter, dated Nov. 8, asks that the VSB give the annex a chance to “continue to serve the community.” “I understand that the VSB has budget constraints and that decisions have to be made. However, according to the financial information presented by the VSB, clos-

ing the Champlain Annex will not generate much benefit to the VSB financially, but will have a negative impact in the community,” Heed wrote. “Also, it would be wrong for the VSB to assume that the students of Champlain Annex will stay in the school district. Parents may choose to send their kids to the neighbouring school district, which is much closer to their homes and the children can

walk to school instead of requiring transportation.” Shane Simpson, who’s campaigned to save Macdonald, another elementary school facing closure, questions the timing of Heed’s statement. “It was Minister MacDiarmid who put the pressure on the school board to close schools. Minister Abbott, her successor, has said nothing about whether he has a different view on the school closure question and Mr. Heed, as an MLA, was absolutely silent during all that time that Minister MacDiarmid was putting pressure on the Vancouver board,” Simpson said. “He stayed silent and now he’s speaking out for the school. Good for him, but still he saw fit to not say a word when the question was whether the Liberal government was doing the right thing.” Simpson acknowledged Champlain Heights Annex supporters have warned they may send their kids to Burnaby, but argued all five schools have compelling reasons to stay open. noconnor@vancourier.com Twitter: @Naoibh

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Central Park

Digging up the dirt on park board and community

WEB POLL NATION Go to www.vancourier.com to vote Are the separated bike lanes still a success now that fall weather has arrived? Last week’s poll question: Should Gordon Campbell stay on as MLA for Vancouver-Point Grey? Yes 22 per cent No 78 per cent This is not a scientific poll.

Mayor Gregor Robertson decided to throw Vision Vancouver Coun. Heather Deal a bone this week. And, to quote her, “It is a good one.” She will handle the pedestrian safety file. It’s part of the city’s new 10-year Transportation Plan. Deal’s role formally began when she seconded a “good news” motion put forward by Robertson at council yesterday after my deadline. Deal already started “doing the media,” as they say, before the motion was tabled. Now that we are in the homestretch, a short year before the next election, Deal needed a little profile boost. (In fact, everyone does, given the massive amount of provincial political clutter already upon us.) You may recall Deal’s effort last summer regarding the new street food vendors; it was disastrous. Even Deal didn’t like the lottery system used to select 17 vendors from among the 800 applicants. None of the carts was ready on time for the August long weekend. And there were stories about lottery winners trying to sell their licences to other vendors. Deal is also the lead on arts and culture, which includes the controversial issue of a new location for the art gallery. She’s had virtually no visibility on this in the past few months. In fact, it seems to have been swept back into the mayor’s office. But pedestrian safety—how can you miss? Never mind the fact that the number of traffic accidents involving pedestrians is on the decline. Pedestrians have been Vancouver’s top transportation priority forever it seems. According to the city, there are 318,000

allengarr walking trips every day in the city, which represent 17 per cent of total trips. Simon Fraser University Urban Studies Professor Anthony Perl has been quoted making the point that pedestrians are the fastest growing share of the transportation mode in the city. But what has city hall done about it lately? It seems the city is all about bicycles, including removing the east sidewalk on the Burrard Bridge from pedestrians and making it exclusively for bikes. Speaking of which, if the city really wants to help pedestrians, they can get the cops to nail those cyclists who insist on using sidewalks. That includes the likes of that unlucky fellow who, according to news reports this past weekend, cycled across a sidewalk and onto a roadway where he ran into an electric powered motorcycle.

Incidentally, I find the cyclists who use sidewalks are frequently likely to be the ones who don’t wear helmets or, a particular favourite of mine, have their helmets dangling from their handlebars. One other point: The city has a bicycle advisory committee but no pedestrian advisory committee. This is odd, given they claim it’s their top transportation priority. But I digress. The fact that pedestrian traffic-related accidents are on the decline is not because motorists or cyclists have become more attentive. Time was, in a previous century and before most of you started shaving, that a Vancouverite travelling on foot could simply think about crossing a street and traffic would come to a grinding halt. Not anymore. Now we have crosswalks that have signs and painted strips ($500 a pop) across the road that frequently are no deterrent to motorists or cyclists. We have crosswalks with flashing orange lights ($60,000 each), which seem to catch traffic’s attention a bit more. And, finally, we have pedestrian-activated stop lights, such as the half dozen or so mounted at almost every corner along Cambie from 12th Avenue to 21st Avenue. Each one of these costs $200,000. What’s interesting about the council motion is that improving the world for pedestrians will involve council, the school board and the cops. That, presumably, means there will be money, education and muscle. But we’ll have to wait until spring for a staff report and the details. agarr@vancourier.com

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EW09

letters

WE D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

opinion FIRING STATISTICS KEPT UNDER WRAPS

Teachers’ union secrecy can’t conceal sad truth How many teachers were fired from the Vancouver school district last school year? Simple question, right? I recently followed that question through a maze of spokespeople and double-speak, with predictable results. More on that in a moment. The Vancouver school district is troubled. Last school year, due to mismanagement and political hackery, the school board produced a $17 million budget deficit. Despite the highest per pupil funding in the Lower Mainland ($8,040 this school year), enrolment figures have dropped precipitously over the past decade as parents opt for private schools or neighbouring school districts. Aboriginal students embody the starkest example of classroom failure. According to the Ministry of Education, last June only 35 per cent of aboriginal Grade 12 students in Vancouver graduated from high school compared to 70 per cent of the general student population. There are many reasons for this demographic gap. Aboriginal communities struggle with high rates of alcohol and drug use. Single-parent families are the norm, teen pregnancies rampant. The family unit has crumbled, and along with it, the structure kids require to perform well at school. But like other problems in Vancouver public schools, the teachers’ union, which places the interests of adults over the interests of children, bears part of the blame. To be fair, the union has done a good job—for teachers. The average teacher salary in Vancouver is $72,170. And that’s fine. Considering the importance of public education, competitive wages are necessary to attract quality people to the profession. Sadly, the union ignores other free market principles and instead employs the dated dictum of seniority—not performance—to determine wage increases and teacher dismissals. Speaking of dismissals. Back to our original question: How many teachers were fired from the Vancouver school district last school year? “We don’t break down stats like that,” said Mykle Ludvigsen, spokesman for the B.C. College of Teachers. “You’d need to talk with the district or maybe the unions.” Fair enough. The British Columbia Teachers’ Federation has lorded over public education in B.C. for nearly 100 years. All 41,000 public school teachers in the province must belong to the BCTF. Nancy Knickerbocker, BCTF spokeswoman, took immediate offense to my query. “Are you also going

letter of the week

markhasiuk to ask how many principals were fired last year? How many reporters were fired last year? It makes me nervous, this kind of a topic. What’s the point?” After a circle-of-logic conversation, Knickerbocker referred me to Vancouver’s union locals—the Vancouver Elementary School Teachers’ Association (VESTA) and the Vancouver Secondary Teachers’ Association (VSTA). VESTA president Chris Harris ignored several interview requests for this column. After repeated attempts, I reached VSTA president Anne Guthrie Warman, who demonstrated Knickerbockeresque enthusiasm. “You can talk to the employer, you can talk to the Vancouver School Board,” said Warman. “I’m sure they’ll be able to fill you in if they want to.” But don’t you guys keep records of teacher firings? “I don’t think we’re going to tell you anything. We don’t talk about that sort of thing to the press.” Why not? “I’m not going to talk to you, Mark. Sorry. Bye bye.” Click. Last stop: the Vancouver School Board. How many teachers were fired from the Vancouver school district last school year? “I need to understand how you’re trying to use the data,” said David Weir, VSB spokesman. In three separate phone conversations over five days, Weir supplied spoonfuls of bureaucratic jargon about the hiring process, TOCs and the fact teachers must fail three evaluations before being fired. But no numbers. I’m preparing a Freedom of Information request. Stay tuned. In our rapidly changing evershrinking world, public education must remain nimble and flexible as economies and industries evolve. If the teachers’ union (and its allies at the Vancouver School Board) is unwilling to disclose basic information about teacher dismissals, how can we expect public education in Vancouver to adapt—in a transparent way—to the needs of students in the 21st century? Can anyone answer that question? mhasiuk@vancourier.com Twitter: @MarkHasiuk

Like other Canadian women, Cpl. Katie Hodges has served in Afghanistan during photo courtesy Paperny Films Inc. the post-9/11 NATO-led mission. To the editor: Re: “Sister soldier,” Oct. 29. In my opinion, a mother can best serve her country by bringing up her children to become literate, productive, civil citizens. Priceless. Personal fulfillment can’t justify a mother risking her life in a foreign war. Mothers taking up arms should only be acceptable if the country is under attack and we no longer have enough men to defend it. Women and men are equal under the law but that does not mean they are in-

terchangeable. If it were up to generals, women—mothers, in particular—would not serve in the armed forces abroad and certainly not in combat. However, civilian bosses set defense policy, therefore it’s up to government to say “no” to political correctness gone overboard. Should the government be sued for barring women from combat and lose, the Charter’s “notwithstanding” clause could not be invoked in a more worthwhile case. Joe Bako, Vancouver

Laneway housing process favours developers

To the editor: Re: “City forges ahead with laneway housing,” Nov. 12. I was very surprised to read Allen Garr’s article on laneway housing where he appears to put the interests of developers front and centre, with little regard for the interests of Vancouver residents. Garr conveniently stereotyped the earnest complaints put forward to city council by numerous residents of 4600 block West 11th Avenue as “NIMBY” issues. However, had Mr. Garr taken the time to more deeply investigate the legitimate concerns relating to this important issue, which is essentially the re-zoning of the entire city of Vancouver, he may have developed better insight to write a more balanced article. In the report presented to city council pertaining

to the first 100 laneway houses constructed in Vancouver, 61 of the laneway houses built involved the demolition of the original home and the construction of a much larger house with the addition of a lane house. On 4600 block West 11th, we have three cases of property redevelopment and two additional lane houses under construction with absentee landlords. There may be more because there is no process in place for limiting the number per block and no process for obtaining neighbourhood input. Clearly the developers will come, build and leave, and those of us left behind, the residents who pay city taxes, are left with our new two-storey structures equipped with inadequately sized parking spaces. Marie Kerchum, Vancouver

To the editor: If the city were truly interested in the options of homeowners, they would have selected a permit process for laneway homes that required notification of the affected neighbours. Instead, they deliberately selected an option that would present them with the least opposition to their dream— more permit fees. The whole basis of this plan is how to bring in new funds to the city so they do not have to aggressively look for any drastic reductions in spending. The cheery plan they selected potentially ruins the lives and home values of 150 homeowners. One of the homeowners I know who has a laneway house beside them went to anger counselling to deal with it. That owner, by the way, worked for the city as a middle manager. Bruce Adams, Vancouver

Fox News bashers display ignorance and bias To the editor: Re: “Hasiuk turns Courier into Fox News,” Nov. 12. I find it odd that so many Canadians like to use Fox News in comparison to reporting or editorializing that they don’t agree with. I would suggest that Courier letter writer Peter Whelan doesn’t even watch

Fox News, but uses it in denigration because it’s fashionable, cheap and easy. I think MSNBC or CNN use the same tactics that people accuse Fox of, not to mention our own cable news outlets, CBC and CTV. Joseph Planta, Vancouver

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editor@vancourier.com Letters to the editor (1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver V6J 1R2, fax 738-2154 or e-mail editor@vancourier.com) may be edited by the Courier for reasons of legality, taste, brevity and clarity. To be considered for publication, they must be typed, signed and include the writer’s full name (no initials), home address, and telephone number (neither of which will be published), so authorship may be verified.


EW10

T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R W E D N E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 7 , 2 0 1 0

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Courier considers Newsmaker of the Year Editor’s Desk with Barry Link

Three years ago, based on a suggestion from reporter and 12th and Cambie scribe Mike Howell, we inaugurated the Courier’s annual Newsmaker of the Year. Our editorial team picked what we considered the most significant local story from 2007 and featured it on the front cover. Our choice was Homelessness, which by that year had festered into Vancouver’s biggest social embarrassment. (It still is.) We also canvassed several dozen influential figures in the city’s civic life, both high and low, and asked them for their choices for Newsmaker and published their responses. We’ve picked Newsmakers for each year since. In 2008, which saw Vancouverites go to the polls in provincial, federal and civic elections, we selected The Voter. In 2009, we chose the Olympics, which had transformed Vancouver even before the Games had officially started. This year, we’re choosing a Newsmaker of the Year again, and we’ve narrowed the choices down to five finalists: * the Olympics * the bicycle * school closures * tower developments * the Wu beating Once again, we’re canvassing several dozen notable Vancouverites and asking them which of these five choices they’d pick for Newsmaker of the Year 2010 and why. We’ll publish their responses, and our ultimate choice, in our Dec. 10 issue. We’re also asking you which of the five finalists you’d choose for our Readers’ Newsmaker Poll. From Nov. 22 to Dec. 3, we’ll dedicate our online poll to the five Newsmaker choices. Watch this space for more details or see vancourier.com starting next Monday. Next week, I’ll start discussing why each of the five finalists would make a worthy Newsmaker of the Year. Fiction contest The judging for our annual Fiction Contest is complete, and the winners have been notified. We’ll publish the three winning entries in successive Friday editions beginning Nov. 26. Thanks to everyone who entered, and keep the beef jerky dry. Twitter top 10 As of this writing, 5,262 people follow @VanCourierNews on Twitter. We post a link to our Twitter account for every story we put online on our website at vancourier. com. Each week, using the excellent Hoot-

The Courier selected the Olympics as Newsmaker of the Year for 2009. photo Dan Toulgoet suite application, we generate what the top 10 Courier posts on Twitter were for that week to find out what stories our Twitter followers care about. For the week of Nov. 7 to 14, our Twitter friends cared about housing as they vaulted news that tenants would soon be moving into Olympic Village social housing to the number one spot on our weekly list. The housing theme continued with laneway housing. Garden-themed stories accounted for two stories, civic electoral politics for two and education for one. The revived Rob Feenie came in with a strong second place showing. Here’s the list of the top 10 posts and the authors of the stories. 1. Tenants to move into Olympic Village social housing by year’s end, Cheryl Rossi 2. Feenie finds form at Cactus Club, Tim Pawsey 3. City forges ahead on laneway housing, Allen Garr 4. Adanac community garden divides neighbours, Sandra Thomas 5. Page Three: Top 10 Courier stories on Twitter, Nov. 1-7, Barry Link 6. Central Park: NPA candidates, Sandra Thomas 7. Banana jackets help plants survive, Anne Marrison 8. Vancouver parents have APPLE for education minister, Naoibh O’Connor 9. Kudos & Kvetches: Textual healing, Team K&K 10. 12th and Cambie: Poll perspective, Mike Howell Links to these stories can be found on my Page Three blog at vancourier.com. blink@vancourier.com

KUDOS & KVETCHES DAILY: the blog

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vancourier.com


WE D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

EW11

opinion

‘Shift’ redistributes tax burden

Property tax policy often misunderstood Soapbox

Opinion from readers Ed des Roches and Bob Laurie Guest columnists

It is clearly time to take politics out of taxation discussions, something Tom Sandborn fails to do in his Nov. 9 column “City’s tax burden policy could be the new HST.” Unfortunately, most property tax policy is mired in detail, complexity, and as a result, difficult to understand—but easy to condemn. Mr. Sandborn’s article and many like it are short-sighted, overly simplistic, factually incorrect, and ignore some important fundamentals. In Vancouver, our elected political leaders have openly recognized the historical unfairness and imbalance between residential and business property taxes. Past and current councils have supported a gradual correction with an annual tax shift between property classes. This is smart policy. At considerable political risk, Mayor Gregor Robertson and the majority of city councillors have taken a principled stand which will clearly benefit all Vancouverites. Important facts we all need to remember about Vancouver property taxes: The “shift” is not a grant or a tax freeze on business taxes. The shift is an effort to redistribute taxes broadly between property classes. It is a gradual shift of one per cent of the total property tax bill paid by all commercial property owners. Let’s keep this in perspective. A one per cent shift of the tax burden was $5.68 million in 2010. Even with the shift, city budget increases meant that property taxes still went up for most commercial properties. Property tax is not taxing

a business’s profit. Most business owners are renters! Property tax has absolutely nothing to do with income of the corner grocery, your favourite coffee shop or credit union. Property tax is based on the value of the property owned by a commercial property owner, just like it is for a residential property owner. Property tax inequity has reached a serious imbalance. Commercial property owners who represent eight per cent of Vancouver’s property tax base are paying 50 per cent of the property taxes. For every dollar of city services consumed, businesses pay $2.42 and residential taxpayers pay 56 cents. This means residents are receiving city services at almost half their actual cost. Economic sustainability is as important as social and environmental sustainability. We can’t have the “greenest city” in the world without a strong economy and growing commercial tax base, which underwrites necessary social programming. This means healthy, vibrant and growing employers who keep jobs in our city close to where we live. Fundamentally, the tax shift is all about jobs and economic sustainability in the future. We have a growing population and a younger population that needs employment opportunities in our city, not an hour commute elsewhere. All taxpayers share a common concern—spending and value. Residential and business taxpayers pay more taxes resulting from annual increases in city spending. Is the spending justified? As taxpayers, are we getting the best value for our tax dollar? Discussion and debate on the merits and impact of municipal tax policy changes and city spending should be encouraged, but without the rhetoric and emotion. Ed des Roches and Bob Laurie are co-chairs of the Vancouver Fair Tax Coalition.

Got something to say about an issue in Vancouver? Get on your soapbox and become a Courier guest columnist. Send submissions (700-725 words) to editor@vancourier.com. Sorry, no handwritten submissions allowed. Guest columns may be edited for content and length.

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EW12

T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R W E D N E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 7 , 2 0 1 0

news

Film documents Clean Bin Project

Roommates abstain from packaged inessentials Cheryl Rossi Staff writer

Grant Baldwin and Jenny Rustemeyer tried to create zero waste with their Clean Bin Project.

submitted photo

N OT I C E O F P U B L I C H E A R I N G U B C L A N D U S E P L A N A M E N D M E N TS

The University of British Columbia’s Public Hearing Committee will hold a Public Hearing respecting proposed amendments to the Land Use Plan for UBC’s Vancouver Campus. The Public Hearing is being held in accordance with Part 10-2010 of the Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act.

Date: Tuesday, November 30, 2010 Time: 6 p.m. Place: Ponderosa Centre, 2071 West Mall, Vancouver, BC

Proposed amendments affect the UBC Vancouver campus lands, as shown in Map A.

The proposed amendments and relevant background material may be inspected at the offices of Campus and Community Planning, 2210 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Monday to Friday, except statutory holidays, from November 15 to November 30, 2010.

The proposed Land Use Plan amendments include, but are not limited to: • Increasing housing choice and affordability through adjustments to residential and commercial floorspace, building height and unit caps; • Retention of the UBC Farm by changing the land use designation for the UBC Farm from “Future Housing Reserve” to “Green Academic”; • Transferring housing density from UBC Farm, University Square, Thunderbird Future Housing Area and Totem Field to the eastern side of Acadia, East Mall South, and Wesbrook South/Wesbrook Place; and • Regularizing land uses to better align with the university’s academic mission and vision. This includes defining the “Academic”, “Green Academic”, “Village Centre Academic” and “Neighbourhood Housing” land use designations and the designation of Gage South as an “area under review”. All persons who believe they may be affected by the above proposal will be afforded an opportunity to be heard in person and/or by written submission.

For further information, contact: Campus and Community Planning 2210 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4 604-220-8831 Stefani.lu@ubc.ca www.planning.ubc.ca Please note, no refreshments or food will be provided at the hearing.

MAP A: LANDS SUBJECT TO LAND USE PLAN AMENDMENTS

Pacific Spirit Regional Park

Walter Gage Road Student Union Blvd

University Endowment Lands

University Boulevard

Toronto Road

Acadia Road

Thunderbird Boulevard

Wesbrook Mall

East Mall

Main Mall

Agronomy Road

Should you have any concerns or comments you wish to communicate to the Committee in advance of the Public Hearing, you can write to: Committee Clerk for the Public Hearing, c/o Campus and Community Planning, 2210 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4 or public.hearing.clerk@ubc.ca. To be considered, advanced submissions must be received by noon on Tuesday, November 30.

Old Mar

Stadium Road

e ine Driv

West 16th Avenue

M SW e arin e Driv

Fr as er Ri ve r

Submissions can also be made directly to the Committee Clerk until the end of the Public Hearing. Written submissions received prior to or submitted during the Public Hearing will be included as part of the official public record by the Committee Clerk. Submissions received after the conclusion of the Public Hearing will not be considered by the Public Hearing Committee or the UBC Board of Governors.

Chancellor Boulevard

ine Drive

NW Mar

West Mall

A speakers list will be available for the public to sign at the entrance of the Public Hearing venue approximately 30 minutes prior to the start of the Public Hearing. Speakers will be asked to come forward in the order of the speakers list and will be allowed up to five minutes to address the Public Hearing Committee regarding the proposed amendments.

The Procedural Rules for the Public Hearing are available for inspection at the offices of Campus and Community Planning or by contacting the office as noted below.

Legend UBC's Vancouver campus lands

Pacific Spirit Regional Park

Q-tips, potato chips and new clothes. These are the items three KensingtonCedar Cottage roommates missed most when they decided not to buy anything inessential or packaged for a year. “Grant loves Q-tips and we ran out of Q-tips during the year. If we’d find one around the house it was like gold,” said his girlfriend, Jenny Rustemeyer. Rustemeyer and Grant Baldwin cycled from Vancouver to Mexico in 2007. When they returned home after months of carrying everything they needed on their bikes, they realized they owned too much stuff. The final straw came when Baldwin bought a digital camera and it took him 10 minutes to unpack each plastic-wrapped component. So on July 1, 2008, they and their then roommate Rhyannon O’Heron pledged to buy only essential items and to create zero waste, in what they dubbed their Clean Bin Project. Rustemeyer started a blog and Baldwin, a videographer and music producer, started filming the rivalry to create the least waste between him and Rustemeyer. The Clean Bin Project: A Documentary Film has screened at two local showings and additional screenings in the Lower Mainland are expected in the new year. The housemates removed the garbage cans from every room but the kitchen, set up a recycling centre with a bin dedicated to each of them and composted their food scraps. They carried their own containers and bags to the grocery store. They bought food in bulk, shopped at a farmers market and purchased meat and cheese from delis or butchers. The quality of the food they ate increased along with the cost, so they just ate less of the pricier fare. Bulk tofu was available only at a couple of locations, which made buying their favoured source of protein difficult.

“THE THING IS, WE ALL HAVE SO MANY CLOTHES.” Jenny Rustemeyer

They couldn’t buy crackers, individually wrapped granola bars and much desired potato chips, which aren’t sold in bulk. Rustemeyer, who works full-time for an environmental planning company, made her own toothpaste, deodorant and laundry powder. They gave experiences, including cooking classes, as gifts and asked friends and family to return the favour. Declining free product samples pained Baldwin. And insisting they didn’t want a napkin, toothpick, plastic cutlery or a straw when eating out proved awkward. “You can’t summarize quickly to get the reason across to somebody why you’re doing it because it’s not the social norm to avoid waste yet. We came up with that we had plastic allergies,” Baldwin said. Rustemeyer, who’s 32, felt stressed sometimes thinking she had nothing to wear. “The thing is, we all have so many clothes,” Rustemeyer said. She isn’t sure how much money they saved. “We saved time in some ways because we didn’t go to the mall and we didn’t spend time cruising the Internet for things we might want to buy,” she said. A huge lump of leftover pink icing sat in O’Heron’s bin at the end of the year. The bins for Rustemeyer and Baldwin weighed about four pounds each. “The average person in Metro Vancouver generates about 750 pounds of garbage in a year,” Rustemeyer said. “So we generated what the average person does in two days.” The couple continues to consume conscientiously. “We treat ourselves to plastic packaged things occasionally,” said Rustemeyer, ”but I think I’ve taken my garbage out once [in] two and a half months.” crossi@vancourier.com


WE D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

EW13

news

Five per cent deposit approved for 18 applicants

Condo development courts lower income buyers Cheryl Rossi

Staff writer

Buying a condominium in Vancouver was a “pipe dream” for Chris Fozard. But the 29-yearold geologist just bought his first home at 60 West Cordova. “It just makes a lot of sense when you’re paying the same amount of money for renting that you would be in a mortgage,” he said. “The opportunity came up and I just leapt on it.” Fozard bought a 530-squarefoot one-bedroom for $260,000. Developer Westbank expects the building to open in the spring of 2012. Westbank, with the help of Vancity credit union and Henriquez Partners Architects, is constructing 108 condominiums in a 10storey building on the same block as the Army and Navy. Of the 96 units to be sold at market rates, Michael Braun of Westbank said Nov. 15 that only two remained unsold. Prices ranged from $219,900 for a one-bedroom up to $380,900 for a two bedroom. PHS Community Services and Habitat for Humanity are managing the

“THE OPPORTUNITY CAME UP AND I JUST LEAPT ON IT.” Chris Fozard

sale of the other 12 units at lowerthan-market rates. The developer is saving money on the project by providing white appliances rather than stainless steel, shared laundry and hookups for washers and dryers in each suite. The 60 W Cordova project is meant to be a prototype for more affordable condo developments. Vancity sold Westbank the repossessed land and Westbank agreed to develop what’s now a parking lot for “significantly” lower profits, says Braun. He said Westbank and Vancity are looking for another site to erect similar housing. To make another such project work “requires less greed,” on the part of those who construct it, according to architect Gregory Henriquez, along with easier mortgages from Vancity and parking stall relaxations from the city.

Developer Westbank expects the building on 60 West Cordova to open in spring 2012. submitted artist rendering Braun said only 15 parking spots are being provided for residents and the stalls have attracted little demand. First dibs on the suites were given to those who live, work or volunteer in the area.

Westbank requested a 10 per cent deposit from buyers but Vancity approved those who couldn’t afford that amount for five per cent down. Ryan McKinley, mortgage development manager with Vancity, said “a few” individu-

als who purchased one-bedroom units earn less than $40,000 a year. Of the 18 applications he has pre-approved for a five per cent deposit so far, 90 per cent are for first-time homeowners, he added. “There’s a couple that both work at the Salvation Army, that live next to 60 West Cordova, and they’ve been waiting for something like this for awhile, and there’s another individual who works at the Covenant House who’s been waiting for this,” McKinley said. Covenants on land titles will require owners to live in the units and restrict them from quickly reselling them. Fozard, who recently returned to university, says he was earning an average of $65,000 to $70,000 a year in mining and he nearly depleted his savings to put $26,000 down. He pays $1,000 a month in rent to share a two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment in Fairview. He expects his mortgage payments to be $1,000 to $1,200 a month and for his strata fee to be $200 to $250. crossi@vancourier.com


E14

T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R W E D N E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 7 , 2 0 1 0

news Casino crime

Will a proposed mega casino for downtown bring crime with it? Vision Vancouver Coun. Geoff Meggs said an answer to that question will become clearer when the Vancouver Police Department submits its opinions in a city report on the proposed casino attached to B.C. Place. “We haven’t heard too much from the police on that, but that will certainly be a big part of the report,” Meggs said. “It’s always a concern. I think it would be naïve to think there isn’t crime around gaming.”

Since casinos began to open in the past decade in the Lower Mainland, crime associated to some of the venues has included shootings, loan sharking, robberies, extortion and at least one homicide. Last week, the Vancouver Police Department held a news conference to announce the arrest of three men alleged to have robbed a Vancouver resident who had been gambling at River Rock in Richmond. The three suspects were allegedly going to rob another person on another night until a VPD emergency response

team intercepted the men, who reside in Burnaby. Daniel Sheng Long Hoong, 20, William Wei Lun Hoong, 18, and Yan Wang, 30, are facing several firearm charges. Insp. Les Yeo, who is in charge of the operation investigations section, described the “followhome robbery” as rare in Vancouver, although the VPD continues to investigate robberies in May and June where customers of the River Rock were robbed in Vancouver. In both cases, the suspects were driving a dark-coloured SUV that had a flashing blue light, possibly

to give the impression they were police officers. In June 2006, the VPD investigated a similar robbery when a customer of the Edgewater Casino at the Plaza of Nations was followed home and hit over the head with a pipe and slashed across his abdomen and back. He spent five days in hospital. In February 2004, the VPD issued a public appeal to victims who may have been threatened, extorted or physically assaulted by loan shark Betty Tung Sze Yan of Richmond. In 2009, Yan was found shot dead inside a Mer-

cedes-Benz in Richmond. Yeo declined to comment on whether the VPD had concerns about the proposed mega casino for Vancouver, which was announced by Premier Gordon Campbell in March. Yeo said the VPD’s planning and audit section will review the proposal. The $450 million project calls for two hotels and a 1,500 slot casino. If approved, it would likely be the biggest gaming facility in the province. —Mike Howell mhowell@vancourier.com Twitter: @Howellings

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WE D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

EW15

news

Planned downtown complex will include 1,500 slot machines

Anti-casino crusader puzzled by public disinterest Mike Howell

Staff writer

You can hear the exasperation in Bill Chu’s voice. After years of unsuccessfully fighting city council and others in the Lower Mainland to keep casinos out of municipalities, Chu is frustrated at the lack of public outcry against a Las Vegasstyle resort casino planned for downtown that could be the largest in B.C. “If people were as mad about this as they are about the [harmonized sales tax], then we might see a difference,” said Chu, coordinator of the Multicultural Coalition Against Gambling Expansion. “Personally, I spent 10 years fighting casinos. Our energy is spent and somebody else has to step up and do something. This is not the

duty of a few citizens.” In March, Premier Gordon Campbell announced a new 68,000-square-foot entertainment complex attached to B.C. Place that will include two hotels, a casino with up to 150 games tables and 1,500 slot machines, restaurants, a theatre and cabaret. The proposal, however, first has to be approved by Vancouver city council, which will decide whether the property is an appropriate use for such a complex and whether gambling should be expanded in the city. Before the end of the year, council is expected to refer the proposal to a public hearing in 2011. Until then, Vision Vancouver Coun. Geoff Meggs said he won’t decide whether the $450 million project should go ahead. “I’m not going to com-

Bill Chu

Coun. Geoff Meggs

ment on whether I favour it or don’t favour it until I’ve heard all the information from people,” said Meggs, who noted the lack of mobilization by anti-gambling proponents against the proposal. “What I’m struck by is how quiet that whole business is. I don’t see any heat on it. It could come but it hasn’t started yet.” Meggs suggested the lack

of interest could be related to people not understanding the magnitude of the project. As he pointed out, a new casino would be more than double the size of the Edgewater Casino at the Plaza of Nations, which will relocate to the proposed complex. Edgewater has 65 games tables and 493 slots. Las Vegas-based Paragon Gaming Inc. owns Edgewa-

ter, having bought it from local owners Len Libin and Gary Jackson in September 2006 for $43 million. The deal made Paragon the first foreign owner of a casino in B.C. Hastings Racecourse, which is operated by Great Canadian Casino, is home to the only other casino in the city and has 600 slots. More than five years ago, previous councils approved slot machines at both casinos, despite pushback from community groups and a minority of councillors. Chu believes the current council, which includes politicians who voted for slot machines, will approve the mega casino proposal. The fact that profits from developing the land slated for the complex will be used to pay for the $458-million retractable roof being built on B.C. Place is more evidence the proposal is

a done deal, Chu said. Chu has argued that slot machines and adding games tables would create gambling addicts and attract criminals such as gangsters and loan sharks, who have been active in Richmond. The Vancouver Police Department announced Nov. 8 that three men were arrested in connection with a robbery of a Vancouver customer of the River Rock Casino in Richmond. “We’ve seen one council after another not choosing to listen to the people, but listening to the casino proponents,” Chu said. “It has now become government for the casino and by the casino. The resistance from us has obviously not been working too well.” mhowell@vancourier.com Twitter: @Howellings

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A Lot of Talking about Walking

F

rom November 17 to 19, 2010 the Walk21 International Conference on Walking and Liveable Communities XI and the 23rd International Cooperation on Theories and Concepts in Traffic Safety (ICTCT) conference will be taking place in the City of The Hague. The conference Cedric Hughes will “showcase best practices for promoting and supporting walking and sojourning, including the recent four year European Cooperation in the field of Scientific and Technical Research (COST) Action 358 project on Pedestrians’ Quality Needs.” The conference will also showcase the final report of the ‘Working Group on Pedestrian Safety, Urban Space and Health’ of the Joint Transport Research Centre, a structure of the International Transport Forum, a strategic think tank for the transport sector. Annually, the International Transport Forum “brings together Ministers from over 50 countries, along with leading decision-makers and actors from the private sector, civil society and research, to address transport issues of strategic importance.” Linked to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the Forum’s goal is to “help shape the transport policy agenda, and ensure that it contributes to economic growth, environmental protection, social inclusion and the preservation of human life and well-being.” Canada has been a member of the Forum since 1975. The Walk21 conference has five major themes: 1. Sustaining safe walking: Creating safe, accessible and sustainable conditions for walking and sojourning in public space. 2. Evaluating the impact of investment in walking: Defining success, benchmarking and measuring the value of money spent on walking projects. 3. Walking supporting prosperity: The relationship between where people choose to walk and the vitality of the economy.

4. Sharing space with cyclists: Managing a harmonious coexistence between cyclists and walkers, and 5. Safe, healthy, attractive and accessible environments are a community right: Creating a culture where people choose to walk and communiBarrister & Solicitor ties will thrive. Two of the workshop speakers are from the City of Vancouver. In Transforming Streets for Vibrant Businesses, Krisztina Kassay will speak on ‘Beyond street festivals: creating successful temporary pedestrian spaces in the midst of North American car culture – the Vancouver experiment’. In Walking and culture and the culture of Walking, Sandra James will speak on ‘Advocacy, citizenry and the Olympics—the transformation of walking in Vancouver’. There is lots of talking about the broad subject of pedestrians and roads and other road users. Given that we are all pedestrians, it hardly seems possible that it has come to this —that, as the Walk21 International Charter for Walking puts it we need a stated vision to “create a world where people decide to and are able to walk as a way to travel, to be healthy and to relax, a world where authorities, organizations and individuals have recognized the value of walking, make a commitment to healthy, efficient and sustainable communities; and worked together to overcome the physical, social and institutional barriers which often limit peoples’ option to walk.” Walk21 is online at www.walk21.com. Canada Walks, a Walk21 inspired initiative promoting walkable communities and active transportation in Canada can be found online at www.canadawalks. com.

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Laneway houses under construction in the 4600 block of West 11th Avenue have angered neighbours, but the city’s policy on the issue remains unchanged. photo Dan Toulgoet

Laneway housing divides city council Cheryl Rossi

Staff writer

The city’s policies for laneway housing remain unchanged as of council’s Nov. 2 meeting. The Vision-dominated council asked staff to study how to make one-storey laneway homes more viable, and to consider a discretionary approach to one-and-a-half storey homes. Eighty-three per cent of the laneway homes approved as of July are one-and-ahalf storeys high with traditional pitched roofs. COPE Coun. Ellen Woodsworth had called for a four-month moratorium on new laneway homes so concerns expressed by the public could be addressed, but her bid for a breather was rejected. Nearly 200 laneway homes have been approved by the city in the last year. Residents have complained to the city about seeing big laneway houses go up and not learning they were approved for their neighbourhood until builders broke ground. NPA Coun. Suzanne Anton had wanted staff to consider allowing laneway houses to be only one storey, instead of up to 20 feet tall, or six feet taller than garages. “If they all looked more like garages and fit into the landscape in the same way that garages have formerly fit into the landscape, I don’t think people would have cared at all,” she said. Brent Toderian, the city’s director of planning, said owners building laneway homes tell the city the second half storey is critical to make units livable. But Anton doesn’t buy it. “You can get 500 square feet on a single storey on a 33-foot lot,” she said. “A 500square foot unit makes a fairly reasonable one-bedroom unit. It makes it more suitable for elderly people, people with any kind of disability.” Staff will explore allowing single-storey laneway homes to extend a few feet into backyards. “We don’t want to go too far in that di-

“IT MAKES IT MORE SUITABLE FOR ELDERLY PEOPLE, PEOPLE WITH ANY KIND OF DISABILITY.” Coun. Suzanne Anton

rection because it’s very important to us to keep the backyard for both livability reasons and urban agricultural reasons,” Toderian said. Staff will also report back to council about the pros and cons of making oneand-a-half storey laneway homes a discretionary approval. “On the one hand, it would give slightly more design review,” Toderian said. “On the other hand, it could add significantly to the process and thus the cost for laneway housing and that’s been a constant balance we’ve wanted to strike.” Staff will consider reducing the maximum unit size of 750 square feet, which doesn’t include garage and storage space. Staff will also consider delaying the requirement of sewer separation for laneway homes until the principal house is redeveloped. The city required separate sewers to avoid overflows, but delaying the requirement could save homeowners $6,000 to $8,000 in city fees and even more in excavation, piping and landscaping costs. Toderian maintains most Vancouverites are pleased the city has allowed the housing option, which can’t be strata-titled or sold. “It’s a rental supply option. It creates a much more adaptable and nimble singlefamily housing form and we constantly hear stories about how it adds flexibility to peoples’ lives from a mortgage helper perspective or a caregiver perspective or an aging member of the family perspective,” he said. Staff will report back to council on the height and size of laneway homes next year. They’ll also report in 2012 after final inspections on 150 units are complete. crossi@vancourier.com


W E D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

ADVERTORIAL

The Port is bringing 2,000 square metres of park improvements to the North Shore. To make rail operations more efficient, Port Metro Vancouver and its partners are building a new rail bridge over Lynn Creek. And while they’re at it, they’re upgrading the nearby Harbourview Park to make it more enjoyable for everyone. The project represents a unique collaboration between government and industry to improve land in the community, while enabling growth in international trade.

The goal of the park improvements is to preserve and enhance the historical, recreational and natural resources of Harbourview Park. In other words, making a good park even better. Among the planned improvements are a revamped parking lot, a new lookout with a seating area, and the restoring of native trees and shrubs.

1

3

4

1. Lookout with seating 2. Native restoration planting 3. Timber fence 4. Trail

Staying on the rails.

Sharp & Diamond

The new rail bridge is important too. Rail is already considered the most fuel efficient method of transportation for bulk commodities. This project supports the use of longer trains, making rail operations even more efficient. A side benefit is, by accommodating longer trains, there will be less noise from having to break trains into smaller blocks of rail cars.

Stacked timber fence: This fence will provide a safety barrier between the river and the trail, while native seeding will help to redevelop the river’s edge.

Sharp & Diamond

For the first time, visitors will be able to walk along the entire length of Lynn Creek.

Native plant restoration: Invasive plant species will be removed and replaced with native tree and shrub species. Any areas that have been disturbed will also be restored with native seeding.

Long walks along the creek.

A part of your community.

Sharp & Diamond

Perhaps the most exciting of the new additions to the park is the pedestrian walkway being built under the new rail bridge. The walkway will connect the trails in Harbourview Park to the rest of the Lynn Creek trail system, which means that for the first time, visitors will be able to walk along the entire length of Lynn Creek. That’s great news for dog walkers, joggers and anyone else who enjoys a stroll alongside the creek.

2

Sharp & Diamond

Getting a better Harbourview.

Harbourview Park’s trail will be extended northwards so visitors can access the shores of Lynn Creek wherever possible.

To learn about the Port’s other community initiatives, visit port metrovancouver.com.

As a neighbour to 16 different municipalities, Port Metro Vancouver is committed to running operations responsibly and sustainably. Creating a new walkway in a newly improved Harbourview Park is just one of the ways the Port is giving back to the communities in which it operates.

EW17


EW18

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This offer available at our pharmacies in British Columbia only. Superbucks™ rewards are provided by host supermarket to redeem for merchandise in-store excluding prescriptions, tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets and any other products which are provincially regulated. Redemption is also excluded at all third party operations (post office, drycleaners, gas bar, etc.). Superbucks™ rewards are issued only for individual customer in-store prescription purchases (excludes healthcare and other facilities). 4% Superbucks™ rewards are calculated as 4% of the total value of the prescription, with a minimum value of $1.00 and up to a maximum value of $99.99 per coupon. Offer expires Friday, December 31, 2010.

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WE D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

EW19

garden

Ideas include tools, gloves, gift bucket

Practical gifts a gardener’s delight annemarrison When gardeners are given a Christmas gift that’s beautiful and practical they can count themselves lucky. Metal or wooden obelisks, for instance, are lovely in themselves and enlarge garden space by making vertical plantings possible. Some areas have artisans that make fascinating things out of wrought iron. In a North Vancouver garden, I saw a gate made by a metal artist from old garden tools on an iron-rail base. Gardeners who have few places for climbing plants are quick to welcome an arch or a trellis that’s good-looking by itself in winter and in summer can be a home for beautiful vines. Wooden birdhouses are found in craft fairs as well as some garden centres. These funky little structures are an eye-catching and useful addition to any garden—provided they have clean-out access and a hole of a size that neighbourhood bird species will accept. A bird feeder is another gift possibility. Few are pretty but the feathered clients they attract put on an ever-changing show. Still, squirrels are a huge feeder problem although squirrel resistant feeders can be found at Lee Valley Tools and online. Unfortunately, nothing protects feeders from bears. In bear country, feeders should be put outside only when bears are hibernating and brought in before they wake up. Birdbaths are pretty and useful. Concrete animals are not useful, but they do create year-round structure that’s enhanced if they become moss-covered. But you do need to know your gardener. My sister has a rabbitplagued garden and her

sense of humor would be severely tested if she received a concrete rabbit. For small-space gardeners, ornamental pots for houseplants or gardens are easily found. Matching pots in small, medium or large sizes add design possibilities to the gift. On the practical side, trowels usually get a never-fail welcome especially since different tasks need different shapes. The business end can be wide, narrow, shallow, deeply indented or pointed. All are valuable, including longhandled trowels that make planting easier for aging backs. Like trowels, gardening gloves tend to go missing and gloves for the dominant hand eventually selfdestruct. Botanus offers a Dig This glove that’s very sturdy being reinforced with leather at the fingers. It’s quite flexible and strapped at the wrist.

A BIRD FEEDER IS ANOTHER GIFT POSSIBILITY. FEW ARE PRETTY BUT THE FEATHERED CLIENTS THEY ATTRACT PUT ON AN EVERCHANGING SHOW. STILL, SQUIRRELS ARE A HUGE FEEDER PROBLEM The Lee Valley Foxgloves are lighter and excellent for subtle fingering work. Both types of gloves block soil particles and are machine washable. But people with a large and varied garden could also use leather rose (or bramble) gloves, long, rubber pond gloves and rugged absolutely thornproof gloves. For winter gardening, a wool beret or tie-on ski hat can keep light rain off the head for long periods. Cowichan wool toques are especially useful for warmth and rain resistance.

New gardeners might like a varied gift basket of small items. Besides gloves and trowels, it might include hand cream, magnifying glass (to identify tiny pests), a mister (or-

namental if possible), Velcro plant ties, copper slug tape and perhaps some tiny tools for houseplant gardening or seedlings. A garden magazine might be an especially nice touch.

The gift basket could always be a gift bucket. Gardeners use buckets in many ways: weeding, harvesting, storing soil amendments and transporting several tools at

once to the action zone. Like compost, one never has enough buckets. Anne Marrison is happy to answer garden questions. Send them to her via amarrison@shaw.ca.

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Personal shopping only. All merchandise sold “as is” and all sales are final. No exchanges, returns or adjustments on previously purchased merchandise; savings offers cannot be combined. No dealers; we reserve the right to limit quantities. Prices do not include home delivery. Although we strive for accuracy, unintentional errors may occur. We reserve the right to correct an error. ‘Reg’, ‘Was’ and ‘Sears selling price’ refers to the Sears Catalogue or Retail store price current at the time of merchandise receipt. Advertised items are available at Burnaby Outlet. Merchandise selection varies by store. Sears® is a registered Trademark of Sears, licensed for use in Canada. MasterCard® is a registered Trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated. Offers exclude 195xxx items. IN-STORE SEARS CATALOGUE LOCATION TO SERVE YOU! Sale priced merchandise may not be as illustrated.

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W E D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

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Call 310 -MYTV (6988) or visit telus.com/optik or your nearest TELUS authorized dealer. *Offers available until December 31, 2010, to new clients who have not signed up for Optik TV and Optik High Speed in the past 90 days. Free HD PVR rental offer available on a 3 year term; current rental rates will apply thereafter. A cancellation fee applies for early termination of the service agreement and will be $10 multiplied by the number of months remaining in the term. Free Xbox 360 offer available on a 2 or 3 year term. Manufacturer’s suggested retail price of the Xbox 360 is $299.99. A cancellation fee of $13 multiplied by the number of months remaining in the term applies to early cancellation of a service agreement. Minimum system requirements apply. Final eligibility for the services will be determined by a TELUS representative at the point of installation. TELUS, the TELUS logo, Optik, Optik TV, Optik High Speed and the future is friendly are trademarks of TELUS Corporation, used under licence. Xbox 360 is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and other countries. © 2010 TELUS.

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Picture perfect president Ross Hill and vice president Marcella Munro generated over $100,000 at the Contemporary Art Gallery Gala.

Marking Joe Fortes 25th anniversary, owners Dottie and Bud Kanke fronted the Slurp & Swirl celebration benefitting B.C. Firefighter’s Burn Fund.

Fred Feeling amorous, Slurp & Swirl emcee CityTV’s Dawn Chubai planted one on Joe Fortes maitre d’ Frenchy. A reported $50,000 was raised for Firefighter’s Burn Fund.

UNLEESHED

Rockin’ for Research Gala chair Mary Jane Devine with her husband Mike Cyr raised $1 million for Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

Rockin’ out: Started by local rock band Loverboy when guitarist Paul Dean’s son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, the 11th annual Rockin’ for Research Gala fronted by four-time chair Mary Jane Devine welcomed 600 wellheeled guests to the Hyatt Regency. Living up to its Night of a Million Wishes theme, gala-goers emptied their pockets to the tune of $1 million. Flower Power: The Lower Mainland chapter of the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation hosted its 10th 65 Roses Gala emceed by Gloria Macarenko and presented by Canaccord Financial. At the event chaired by Jackie Bevis and Leony Pinsky, 400 guests enjoyed an evening of dining, dancing and fundraising held at the Pan Pacific Hotel. The event raised a record breaking $380,000 to find a cure. Since its inception, the gala has raised over $1.5 million for cystic fibrosis research. An amorous affair: Marking Joe Fortes’ silver anniversary, owners Dottie and Bud Kanke celebrated the Seafood and Chophouse’s milestone with their eighth annual Slurp & Swirl soiree, a wine and oyster celebration benefitting the B.C. Firefighters Burn Fund. A fireman’s dinner for eight generated the night’s highest bid of $8,000 adding to the reported $50,000 raised. Hear Fred Monday morning on CBC Radio One’s The Early Edition AM690 and 88.1FM; email Fred at yvrflee@hotmail.com; follow Fred on Twitter: @FredAboutTown.

A fine feathered Shannon Heth and artist George Vergette attended the CAG gala dinner and art auction held at the Vancouver Club.

At the 65 Red Roses Gala, Luca Piccolo of Holy Cross Elementary helped collect a record-breaking $380,000 for CF researcher James Zlotnik and others.

Keynote Joyce Groote, flanked by founders David Mossman and Maya Kanigan, fronted Women in Leadership Foundation’s SuperWomen and Friends fete.

Mayor Gregor Robertson proclaimed November We Care Red Ribbon Month throughout the city, culminating in the Red Ribbon Gala Nov. 30 at MOV.


STYLEreport

WE D N E SD AY, N O V E M B E R 1 7 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

EW23

SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

NOVEMBER 2010

PARTY GIRL by Helen Peterson photos by Manon Paradis

The dress is back. You say it never left? Well, now it’s knocking down doors with abandon. A plain black dress with a few rhinestones is fine, too. Oh, you wore that last year? And the year before? Get out of the staid and tried and true this year. Infuse some colour, some layers, beautiful pleats and fabrics and depth. Need inspiration? Local fashion designer Malene Grotrian is hosting an “Open Studio Day” on Tuesday, Nov. 23, from 11 am to 7 pm at #910-207 West Hastings St. (The Malene Grotrian Studio Boutique). Drop by anytime throughout the day; she’ll be featuring designer shoes, clutches, jewellery, clothing and a few more surprises! Go to www.malenegrotrian. com for details. RIGHT: FITTED DRESSES ACCENTUATE EVERY BEAUTIFUL CURVE. LET YOUR KIM KARDASHIAN SIDE OUT WITH THIS TEXTURED SKIMMER BY GROTRIAN. FAR RIGHT: GROTRIAN’S RICH TAFFETA NUMBER, ADORNED WITH A KICK OF BRIGHT RED FOOTWEAR, MAKES A GRAND ENTRANCE THIS SEASON. PHOTOS: RUNWAY SHOW AT FMA FASHION WEEK, VANCOUVER.

HOLIDAY DAZZLE compiled by Helen Peterson

With a holiday calendar jampacked with social obligations and last minute party invites, men and women can feel frazzled trying to get from one event to the next looking their dazzling best in a hurry. “No one likes to be rushed,” says Peter Papapetrou, style expert for News Canada. Preparing your holiday wardrobe is THE FESTIVE SEASON IS OFTEN YOUR ONE CHANCE ANNUALLY TO SHINE. DRESS IT UP - GEMSTONE BRIGHTS MAKE THE CITY GIRL DAZZLE. PHOTO: STOCK IMAGE.

like finding the right foundation, says Papapetrou. “I recommend stocking up on the basics, like a white button down shirt, well-tailored blazers and classic trousers for both men and women. “There are quick solutions to help jazz up a look with maximum impact and minimum stress, by keeping a few staple items at the office or in the car so you’re ready to go on the fly,” he says. For women, adding a bold accessory or an animal print scarf will add flare to any outfit. But for a night on the town or for attending a lavish party or ball, visit your local mall or street

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STYLEreport

LIGHT ON THE POCKETBOOK, BUT NOT ON POCKETS – A CORD TOGGLE BUTTON JACKET FROM REITMANS (WWW.REITMANS.COM).

OUTWARD BOUND by Helen Peterson

Covering up for the winter can come in all forms for the woman on the go. From a light sweater to a hoodie, and from a faux-fur bomber to a long, tailored wool coat, and every step in between – baby, it’s cold outside, but you needn’t be. Check out these stylish coats and jackets and blazers for a taste of what’s in store this season.

SNUGGLE UP IN THE FURRY HOODED, FULLY LINED, WOOL AND NYLON HEDDA PARKA ($334) FROM ALLISON WONDERLAND.

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WE D N E SD AY, N O V E M B E R 1 7 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

EW25

STYLEreport

HOLIDAY MAKEUP TIPS & TRICKS

With holiday shopping, parties, and activities, chances are you will receive ongoing exposure to eyes everywhere. If you’re wanting to look fabulous for the holidays but just don’t have the time for heavy maintenance, here are some simple makeup tips and ideas to update your look and add some pizzazz to the festivities.

considered more trendy than traditional. The trick is to not overdo it. Put on one coat of brown/black mascara, followed by the colour of your choice. For your lips, use lip liner similar to the colour of your lips or lipstick. Plump up your lips by adding some lip-gloss over your lipstick to make them look fuller.

Start with Skin Care

Use Bronzing Powder

The base for your makeup is your skin, so don’t neglect the basic routines required to keep it in tiptop shape. For normal skin, wash your face twice a day and always remove your make up before you go to bed. The air is dry in the winter so use some light moisturizer underneath your makeup and at night. To avoid blemishes, don’t use heavy foundation that will clog your pores and try to keep your stress level to a minimum.

Put on Your Best Face

Traditional earth tones look great for both blondes and brunettes,

but the holidays are time for fun and colour. Choose elegant cream and frosted eye shadows to play up your eyes. Consider a darker blue hue for a “smoky” effect that will look great in pictures. Eyeliner pencils come in just about any colour you can imagine. Coordinate the colour with your eye shadow and apply evenly underneath your eyelashes. Mascara in navy blue and purple are

For the finishing touch, add some colour to your face and give it a holiday glow. After applying your foundation and pressed powder, dust some bronzing powder over your nose, cheeks and forehead. Carefully blend in the makeup and you will have a natural “sunkissed” look. If you’re wearing an off-the-shoulder style or spaghetti straps, rub some body lotion with shimmer on your arms and shoulders. The light will reflect off of the glitter and add a sexy, appealing touch.

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STYLEreport

GET CONNECTED

Linked In, Facebook, Twitter. These social networking sites are familiar to most people. But did you know that there is a hugely successful online social marketing site that connected women long before Facebook and it’s still expanding to this day? Pamela Chatry, managing director of eWomen Network (Vancouver Metro and Coquitlam) tells us that 10 years ago a dynamic woman named Sandra Yancey from Dallas, Texas had an exciting business idea. She created the very first online community for professional and businesswomen. The website was named www.ewomennetwork.com, and as its vision stated, it would become ‘the number one resource for connecting and promoting women in North America’. Yancey realized that women need to

build relationships face-to-face. They need to see one another, laugh together and support one another. Hence, the local chapters of eWomen Network were born, and in-person networking events were created to complement the online community. So, how does it work? Chatry explains that eWomen Network constantly evaluates and identifies what women need for success, and then finds opportunities to provide it. There is now a publishing alliance, a radio show, a keynote speakers’ bureau, educational tele-calls, free coaching services and a huge annual conference. And the Vancouver chapter is at 200 members, and growing exponentially. On a local scale, members can take advantage of the multiple networking meetings, and follow-up with the women they meet, and build quality alliances. Membership also means becoming part

of a vast database of women. The website is the most visited businesswomen’s network on the Internet today.

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STARS at Astral Reflections vancourier.com …get caught in our web


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1. For his latest exhibition, The Fifth Season, visual artist Brent Ray Fraser messes with Mother Nature as he transforms the Eastwood Onley Gallery (2075 Alberta St.) into “a supernatural atmosphere transcendent of our four seasons.” The show runs Nov. 19 to 27 with an opening reception Nov. 18, 6 to 10 p.m.

2. Produced and hosted by local impresario Sara Bynoe, Say Wha?! Readings of Deliciously Rotten Writing features comedic performers reciting excerpts from some of “the most cringe-worthy, awful and painfully earnest writing in print.” This month’s edition spreads the irony Nov. 17, 8 to 10 p.m. at Cottage Bistro (4470 Main St.) More info at sarabynoe.com. 3. Well-travelled local singer, songwriter and bicycling enthusiast Jeremy Fisher rolls into St. James Hall Nov. 17 in support of his latest folk-pop offering, Flood. Emily Brown opens. Tickets at Zulu and Redcat Records.

4. The Arts Club Theatre Company reheats that old holiday chestnut It’s A Wonderful Life, based on Frank Capra’s classic film, for a hefty serving of seasonal cheer and angel-assisted transformation Nov. 18 to Jan. 2 at the Granville Island Stage. More info at artsclub.com.

kudos & kvetches Follow the leader

Slightly less tumultuous than the Courier’s meniscus-torn hockey pool, the search for B.C.’s next premier is exciting in its own, equally celibate way. Who will take over the beleaguered Liberal Party now that Gordon Campbell has dragged it down into the HST-tainted muck? Will the NDP soon follow and push its own less-thanenticing leader out the door? Can B.C. politics get any more dysfunctional? Do I dare eat a peach? To the dismay of many, Surrey Mayor Dianne Watts recently announced she is not interested in taking the reins from Premier Campbell, citing the HST, commitments to the City of Surrey and a desire to spend more time with her family, especially considering the hours it takes each day for her to feather her hair in a way that’s both Surrey-friendly and strangely fetching. Former bespectacled finance minister Carole Taylor’s name keeps getting bandied about as a possible successor, but will her new job as SFU’s chancellor, not to mention the rivers of drool gushing from goo-goo-eyed male political columnists, be too much of an impediment? Blair Lekstrom, the Liberal MLA for Peace River

North who quit his cabinet post in the summer over the HST, says he’ll likely announce later this week whether he’ll run for the party leadership. What a tease. That said, the name Blair—much like Ethan, Darren or Tiffany—doesn’t exactly strike us as official sounding enough to be taken seriously. Other possible successors include Health Minister Kevin Falcon (cool last name, but lame dad-in-the-midst-of-a-midlife-crisis spiky hairdo), Finance Minister Colin Hansen (friendly and gentle in an uncle-with-a-tea-fetish kind of way, but inextricably tied to the HST) and Solicitor General Rich Coleman whose fleshy, pelicanlike gullet mesmerizes us something fierce, but not necessarily in a good way. Of course, we realize these are all superficial reasons for dismissing prospective leaders of B.C., but politics is sadly an increasingly superficial arena, where voters tend to be attracted to the personality of a party’s leader rather than the platform of the party the leader represents. Which is why we’re not going to count out the possibility of one day soon enjoying the muffled, possibly drunk victory speech of Premier Quatchi. After all, it can’t get much worse.

Long and winding download

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arts & entertainment

Picks of the week

WE D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

Good news, Beatles fans who lack the wherewithal to leave the house, purchase a CD and burn it onto their computer: You can now purchase songs and albums by the Fab Four on iTunes. After years of legal wrangling, iTunes creator Apple Inc. finally reached an agreement with the Beatles’ recording label, EMI, and its management company, Apple Corps Ltd., to sell the band’s songs via the online music store. All 13 of the Beatles’ remastered albums are now available through iTunes. Customers can also purchase the band’s past masters and greatest hits collections, as well as download the band’s entire catalogue in one behemoth Beatles Box Set, which includes a 41-minute movie of the Beatles first U.S. concert, Live at the Washington Coliseum, 1964, for a cool $149. However, as diehard Beatles fans have discovered, when they play a digital download of the Beatles’ “Revolution 9” backwards, you can no longer hear the words “Paul is Dead” in the background. Instead it now sounds more like “Paul is rolling in money because you’re buying the same music all over again.”


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10 q u e s t i o n s

Tragically Hip fan helps usher in dance company’s 25th season

Ballet B.C. dancer debriefs Having survived its share of rough waters in recent years, a buoyant Ballet B.C. sets sail for its 25th season with Songs of a Wayfarer and other works Nov. 18 to 20 at Queen Elizabeth Theatre. On board for his second season, dancer Peter Smida talked to the Courier about Ballet B.C.’s next 25 years, dancing in black boxer briefs and how he’s “too young” to know anything about Spandau Ballet.

1.

Does performing in Ballet B.C.’s opening show of the season, its 25th no less, fill you with more anxiety than a regular show?

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I’d have to say that I feel the same as I would at this point before any show. I think of every performance as being equally important as the next. That’s not to say I’m not excited about these shows though! I’m also not usually one to get nervous before getting on stage—I actually think that’s where I’m most comfortable.

2.

What are some common misconceptions people have about ballet dancers?

This is a funny question. I mean, obviously there are all those stereotypical ideas people might have about dancers, some of which are pretty hilarious, but it’s really hard for me to take them seriously. I guess I’m usually too busy watching hockey or Star Trek to put on my tutu when I get home.

3.

In the promo pictures I’ve seen of you, you’re wearing what appears to be just a pair of boxer briefs. Is catching a cold much of a work hazard?

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You’ll have to ask Emily Molnar [Ballet B.C.’s artistic director] about those shorts, ha ha! But really, it is scary when someone in the company gets a cold, because it’s only a matter of time before it spreads to everyone. It always happens and it sucks.

4.

You were born and raised in Kingston, Ontario. Does that automatically make you a Tragically Hip fan?

I love the Hip! The house I grew up in was actually right down the street from Rob Baker’s and Johnny Fay’s houses. I also played volleyball in high school with Rob’s nephew. Who doesn’t love “The Killer Whale Tank”?!

coming up next:

• Checklist for Health: An easy to follow guideline helps seniors, with assistance from their supportive families, to keep on top of their health concerns. Diabetes tips for the holidays. • Home Safe: Tips for safety in and around the home.

For some reason, dancer Peter Smida says catching a cold is an occupational hazard at Ballet B.C.

5.

Can one perform ballet to the Tragically Hip? You know, I believe you can find dance in anything… how to approach it would have to take some thought though.

6.

Athletes often have strict routines prior to a game. Do dancers have similar rituals?

I don’t have anything too out of the ordinary. I make sure I have enough to eat and that I’m hydrated (chocolate milk is key!). I am very specific with my use of time before a show though. Although it’s not planned, I always seem to do everything in the same order as well: Eat, chill out, warm-up, makeup, costume, feel the stage, and go.

7.

What do you do for fun and relaxation?

I love taking time to cook a big breakfast on the weekend, watching movies, walking around the city and taking photographs. I have a couple of model kits I want to get started on as well. My dad and I used to build models when I was younger and I’m trying to get back in to it.

8.

Besides a band from the ’80s, what exactly is Spandau Ballet?

Ballet performed in an old German prison? I actually don’t know Spandau Ballet as a band. I think I’m a little young. I’ll look them up on iTunes and let you know what I think another time.

9.

Out of the chicken dance, the Lambada and the Macarena, which have you performed in your private life and which is the most difficult?

The chicken dance and the Macarena I know well. I’ll have to go with the Lambada, because I haven’t tried it yet, but I think I should some day.

10. What’s the key to Ballet B.C.’s continuing for another 25 years?

I think it’s a combination of two things. Producing and bringing in great, exciting, innovative work, and building an audience to show it to. The existing work that we’re bringing to Vancouver is high in demand all over the world and we’re also a place now where renowned and emerging choreographers can create. It’s such an exciting time for us now and we really want to show the city what we’re doing. —Michael Kissinger mkissinger@vancourier.com

FESTIVE EDITION • Gift of Space: Got a closet that needs to be made

more efficient? A ‘flex space’ in your condo that might make a great office kiosk? Our experts show you how to increase efficiency and and increase storage capacity, for a great gift to yourself!

• Home Tour: A sneal peek at the most gorgeous holiday home decor you can imagine

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WE D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

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theatre

chancentre.com

The Chan Centre Presents

SIMA SAMAR INAUGURAL CHAIRPERSON OF THE AFGHANISTAN INDEPENDENT HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION

Peter Jorgensen and Jennifer Lines share a touching moment in Mimi: A Poisoner’s Comedy.

Killer comedy heats up Firehall Mimi: A Poisoner’s Comedy

At the Firehall Arts Centre until Nov. 20 Tickets: 604.689.0926 firehallartscentre.ca Reviewed by Jo Ledingham

Oh, what a wickedly lovely tangle of satin sheets, petticoats, pantaloons, lace cuffs and breeches. Boobs a-popping, bottoms waggling. It’s a frolicking foursome that has, as one of them confesses, “A most unusual arrangement.” Katrina Dunn directs for Touchstone Theatre this musical spoof on Parisian amorality in 17th-century Paris. Written by Torontonians Allen Cole, Melody A. Johnson and Rick Roberts, Mimi premiered last season at Tarragon Theatre to raves; if the Vancouver opening night response is any indication, everyone will be raving about it here, too. Jennifer Lines is Mimi. Say no more. She’s ravishingly sexy in gowns created by Farnaz Khaki-Sadigh and, in Act 2, a towering black, bouffant, ringletted wig by Christine Hackman. Lines is a songbird, too, and with her outstanding comedic skill drives Torçeaux, a limbless, homeless, starving man (Greg Armstrong-Morris) crazy when, as Mimi, she sings on and on about “Pigeon Pie” instead of just letting him scarf it down. “Don’t ask me why I’m selfish/A clam will always be a shellfish,” Mimi sings, trying to explain her wicked ways. Ste. Croix (Peter Jorgensen) falls for married Mimi and, shades of Sweeney Todd, people start dying around them. Serial killer Marie-Madeleine-Marguerite d’Aubray, Marquise de Brinvilliers did, apparently, exist (1630-1676) and she did come to a bad end. But Mimi is a word-playing, scalawagging romp with an abundance of funny lines like “What’s a Frenchman without food?” one character asks. “A Belgian?” replies another. Donald Adams, Armstrong-Morris, Linda Quibell and Sanders Whiting play everyone else in Mimi. Whiting shines as Mimi’s husband and Louis XIV (in an outrageous frothy wig, pink cheeks, cupid mouth); Armstrong-Morris is as Italian as pizza as the Italian prisoner; and Adams is at his best as Mimi’s disapproving papa. Quibell matches Lines as a show-stealer: great voice, terrific style and a death

scene to die for. Energetic and skillful musical direction and piano accompaniment by Steven Greenfield. Elegant set design by David Roberts, lit by Gillian Wolpert. Mimi is so hot, it threatens to burn the Firehall down.

Trudeau Stories

At Presentation House (no more performances) It’s not often that a theatrical performance stirs the green-eyed monster in me, but who amongst the admirers of Pierre Elliott Trudeau wouldn’t have given his/her right arm to spend time with the late, visionary prime minister. And not just time but quality time: canoeing, hiking, sliding like kids down icy streets of Old Montreal or sipping brandy and talking about nature, theatre and poetry in his beautiful Ernest Cormier-designed home. All this writer/ performer Brooke Johnson really did. As a 23-year-old, Johnson (in borrowed gown and shoes two sizes too big and stuffed with toilet paper) met Trudeau (suave and elegant in tuxedo) in 1985 at a National Theatre School gala fundraiser where she was a second-year student. She caught his fancy and when, that very night, he suggested “a walk in the country sometime,” she was flummoxed but took the phone number he offered her. Days later Johnson did phone and leave a message: “What country?” Soon, after an awkward letter telling him she was not interested in a romance, an extraordinary friendship began. Johnson portrays her younger self as naïve and overwhelmed by Trudeau’s interest in her. She squirms in her chair while the 66-year-old Trudeau, whom she seems to channel with his seemingly world-weary, drawn-out speech pattern (“Welllll, I don’t knowwww”) and his famous shrug, sits coolly composed. The picture she paints, eventually, is of an always-curious, shy and lonely man. It’s an extremely intimate, lovingly crafted portrayal without a smidgen from Johnson of “look at me and what I did” in it. Directed by Allyson McMackon for this Ruby Slippers Theatre/ Presentation House Theatre co-pro, Trudeau Stories offers a different and captivating piece of the puzzle that was Trudeau. —JL joled@telus.net

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Holiday craft fairs bring handmade decor, jewelry, toys to the masses State of the Arts

with Cheryl Rossi The festive season is in full swing—craft fair season, that is. Here are some markets to keep you busy and out of malls. • Nov. 17 to 21: Find clothes, accessories, jewelry, soaps, candles, Christmas décor, objects made from pottery, glass and wood, food, toys and crowds at the 37th annual Circle Craft Christmas Market, which includes exhibitors from across the country at the Vancouver Convention Centre. Admission $6 to $12. Children under 12 free. circlecraft.net. • Nov. 18 to 21: Enter a winter wonderland in a grand old mansion for the 38th annual Christmas at Hycroft. Find Christmas-themed items and homemade edibles. Santa will be available for photos Saturday and Sunday. Tickets include a tour of the heritage house and a chance to win the mansion for a day. Strollers aren’t allowed in the main building at 1489 McRae Ave. near Granville and 16th. uwcvancouver.ca. • Nov. 19 to 21: Find fashion, accessories, art, jewelry, baby items and home décor at Make It! at the Croatian Cultural Centre, 3250 Commercial Dr. Admission $5. makeitproductions.com. • Nov. 19 to 21: Check out 70 vendors at the 27th annual Brittannia Christmas Craft Fair. The event includes a book sale, a kids activity area, a concession and live bands from the Britannia HUB. Admission $2. Children under 12 free. All proceeds go to after-school pro-

Shoppers will find hand-printed cards, toys, jewelry and fashions made by 55 designers from across the Lower Mainland at the Got Craft? Holiday Show Dec. 5 at the Royal Canadian Legion, 2205 Commercial Dr. grams in the Britannia HUB. The fair runs Nov. 19, 3 to 8 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Britannia secondary, gyms A and B, 1001 Cotton Dr. • Nov. 20: The Harvest Round Up: Craft Fair and Community Market will feature homemade edibles, sweaters, gift baskets, jewelry and aboriginal arts and crafts at South Vancouver Neighbourhood House, 6470 Victoria Dr. at East 49th Avenue. It runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Admission free. • Nov. 20: Aberthau Mansion Annual Holiday Craft Fair runs at 4397 West Second Ave. at Trimble. 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission free. • Nov. 20 and 21: Find jewelry and fashion accessories by local designers at Fab Fair. Heritage Hall, 3102 Main St., from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission $2. fabfair.ca. • Nov. 20 to 21: 60 tables will display handmade gifts and crafts that suit all budgets at the West End Community Centre Holiday Craft Fair. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 870 Denman St. Admission free. • Nov. 24 to Dec. 24: A tradi-

tional outdoor German Christmas market will heat up the plaza of the Queen Elizabeth Theatre. It will feature crafts from Germany and Canada, activities and mulled wine. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Admission $2 to $5. Children under seven free. Vancouverchristmasmarket.com. • Nov. 27: The Dunbar Community Centre Association is hosting more than 140 local vendors at its juried craft fair that includes jewelry and woodwork. It includes childminding with free children’s crafts, a snack bar, prizes drawn every 15 minutes and an ATM in the lobby. The fair runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 4747 Dunbar St. Admission $3, children under 12 free. • Nov. 27 and 28, Dec. 4 and 5: The Portobello West Fashion and Art Market runs at the Rocky Mountaineer Station, 1755 Cottrell St. from noon to 6 p.m. Admission $2. portobellowest.com. • Nov. 27 and 28: Urban Artisans sell their creations at the Roundhouse Community Centre, 181 Roundhouse Mews from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission $1.

roundhouse.ca. • Nov. 27 and 28, Dec. 18 and 19: The popular Women’s Winter Faire happens at Heritage Hall from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admissions is a suggested donation of $3 to $5. Soundsandfuries.com. • Nov. 28: Blim Monthly Community Market runs at the Chinese Cultural Centre, 50 East Pender St. from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. with oodles of jewelry by local designers, vintage clothes, baking and fine art. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission by donation. blim.ca. • Dec. 3 and 4: Jewelry, books, zines, handcrafted décor and more warm up the Western Front with the annual Toque market at 303 East Eighth Ave. Friday 6 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. front.bc.ca. • Dec. 4: Socially conscious crafts by local artists and organizations will be sold at Crafts for a Cause at Rhizome Café, 317 East Broadway, 6 to 10 p.m. • Dec. 4: The Aberthau Potters of the West Point Grey Community Centre will sell the works of

St. Chad's Church Christmas Fair

more than 40 potters at Aberthau Mansion. One-quarter of sales support the community centre. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. • Dec. 4 and 5: The Deck the Hall Xmas Craft Fair decks Heritage Hall from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission $3 to $5. • Dec. 5: The Got Craft? Holiday Show sees shoppers queue down the stairs and out the door to see ceramics, silk-screened cloth, plush toys and jewelry made by 55 designers from across the Lower Mainland. Got Craft? Runs at the Royal Canadian Legion, 2205 Commercial Dr. from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. It isn’t wheelchair accessible. Admission $3. gotcraft.com. • Dec. 9 to 12: The One of a Kind Show fills the Vancouver Convention Centre Thursday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. oneofakindshow.com. • Dec. 11: The Holiday Farmers Market runs 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Croatian Cultural Centre, 3250 Commercial Dr. www.eatlocal.org. • Dec. 11 and 12: The Shiny Fuzzy Muddy Show includes fuzzy felt, ceramics, jewelry, mixed media paintings and cute vinyl bags at Heritage Hall. Saturday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. shinyfuzzymuddy.com. • Dec. 12: Craftacular 5, Mr. Winter’s Beard of Funtimes and Crafts happens at Little Mountain Gallery, 195 East 26th Ave. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. • Dec. 17: The Nice Balls Xmas Sale happens at Little Mountain Gallery. Friday 3:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. crossi@vancourier.com

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WE D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

Olympics spur growth of girls hockey Megan Stewart

Staff writer

Jaylynn Henry was in kindergarten when she told her mother she wanted to play hockey. “She wanted to be a goalie,” said her mother, Jennifer Thornton. “She was four or five.” Henry, 17, remembers being a few years older, but both mother and daughter agree it was the performance of Canada’s national women’s hockey team at the Olympics that instilled her childhood desire to play. Women played hockey at the Winter Games for the first time 12 years ago at the 1998 Nagano Olympics. Henry was four that February when Canada came second to the U.S. She was eight when the Canadians won gold at Salt Lake in 2002 and she was playing hockey in a girls’ league of the Pacific Coast Amateur Hockey Association during the two consecutive Winter Games when Canada won Olympic gold, including in Vancouver this year. Henry is part of the changing face of hockey in the Lower Mainland. Across Canada, more than 80,000 girls and women play hockey with organized leagues, 10 times more than 20 years ago. Every four-year cycle with a Winter Games on the calendar, Thornton knows what to expect. As the director of female hockey for the Pacific region of Hockey B.C., she credits the Olympics as one of the main reasons hockey is in the hearts and minds of Canadian girls. “The little girls, they fall in love with Olympic hockey. It’s a big influence,” Thornton says. “They wear their red and white jerseys. Now they have red mittens.” Those young athletes are benefiting from new role models as well as increased funding and a diminishing stigma. Last week, the Hockey Hall of Fame inducted two women for the first time in its 77-year history. “You prove yourself your whole life in women’s hockey, that’s what it was like for our generation,” former U.S. national team captain Cammi Granato, who now calls Vancouver home, said after she and Canadian hockey star Angela James were named to the sport’s hallowed hall in Toronto. Today’s younger generations still have something to prove, but they’ve got examples to follow. “I’m not going to play in the NHL, but now I think of the Olympics,” said Taryn Kapusianyk, 12,

sports & recreation

Wickenheiser International Women’s Hockey Festival begins this week

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Twelve-year-old Colette McIsaac, who plays for the Vancouver Angels in a Pee Wee rep league, aims to be as good a hockey player as Canadian Olympian Hayley Wickenheiser. photo Dan Toulgoet who played on boys’ teams with the Vancouver Thunderbird Minor Hockey Association for four years before joining the growing Vancouver girls league. She plays left defence for Vancouver’s only girls rep team, the Vancouver Angels. Her shirt reads, “You wish you played like a girl.” During an Angels weekend practice at the Killarney community ice rink, volunteer coaches, including two from the UBC Thunderbirds women’s team, ran drills as a dozen parents watched from the heated bleachers. Among the parents was Peter Yee, Vancouver girls ice hockey league president, and Laura Yip, team manager for the Angels. Yee’s daughter Jaime and Yip’s daughter Taylor were five when they started skating with seven- and eight-yearold girls because there was no younger age league they could join in Vancouver. Now for the second year, there is a tyke division for skaters six years and under. “For boys, if you don’t play by age eight, you’re might not be going anywhere,” said Yip. Only three girls on the Angels roster have played since they were eight. It’s the second year the Vancouver girls ice hockey association has had enough players to dress a

rep team and next year the league will add its first bantam rep team as peewee players age. The league grew by more than half this season, expanding by 60 new recruits to total 163 players in the months immediately after the 2010 Winter Olympics and Canada’s gold medal at home. Each four years of an Olympic cycle, league administrators say they notice a sharp increase in new players. But they still struggle with the sense their daughters receive fewer opportunities than boys the same age. Although girls’ leagues are growing and boys’ recruitment is stable from year to year, the overall number of boys and men playing hockey remains significantly higher. Public ice time is at a premium at Vancouver rinks, and more rep teams in the boys leagues mean prioritized access and time. Men’s professional hockey fills airwaves 10 months of the year while women’s international hockey gets a few mentions in the media during major but intermittent tournaments. The Angels have an ally in their corner, and not an unexpected one. If earlier generations wanted for role models, women are now the reason other girls, teens and women are lacing up. This week, the Angels will com-

pete among 400 other athletes at the Wickenheiser International Women’s Hockey Festival in Burnaby. Established this year by national team captain Hayley Wickenheiser, the Samsung-sponsored tournament hosts youth, teen and adult competition as well as skill building and workshops for athletes, coaches and parents. Wickenheiser was a teenager when she first donned the maple leaf at the 1998 Nagano Games. Canada lost to Cammi Granato’s U.S. squad, but Wickenheiser returned to win three Olympic gold and six world championships for Canada. In hockey families with girls who play, Wickenheiser is a household name. “It’s great that we’ll have a chance to see her,” said Vancouver Angel Colette McIsaac. “I want to be as successful as her. I want girls to look up to me.” McIsaac practices in a red jersey labelled “Just For Girls,” which she and other Angels teammates picked up during a training clinic with members from the women’s national team. The jersey shows the scrawled markings of Canada’s elite hockey players. You only wish you played like a girl, indeed. mstewart@vancourier.com Twitter: @MHStewart

Seniors Safe Tea Seniors Appreciation Day Thursday, November 18th Starting at Noon Tea, coffee & goodies

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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R W E D N E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 7 , 2 0 1 0

sports & recreation

Jock and Jill

with Megan Stewart

Wickenheiser wisdom

“There’s a saying in hockey,” begins Hayley Wickenheiser before taking to the ice for a 15-0 win over Finland at the Four Nations Cup in Newfoundland: “Safe is death.” The captain of the women’s national hockey team who has taken that mantra to three consecutive Olympic gold medals and six world championships will be setting an example for girls, teens and women at an inaugural hockey festival this week at Burnaby 8 Rinks. The all-ages international tournament—the Wickenheiser International Women’s Hockey Festival—will include workshops on nutrition, mental preparation and leadership. In a recent autobiography, Gold Medal Diary, Wickenheiser chronicles the year leading up to the 2010 Winter Games and winning gold over the arch rival U.S. team. She is not a coach, but she is a leader who wears the “C” on her Team Canada jersey. She defines her own personal Olympic achievement: “The legacy of all this is that over a hundred thousand girls will be playing the game of hockey in 2010.” A role model and household hockey name, Wickenheiser scolds the press for asking the

In her recent autobiography Gold Medal Diary, Hayley Wickenheiser chronicles photo John Mahoney/Postmedia News the year leading up to the 2010 Winter Games. same repetitive questions about the lopsided development of women’s hockey on this continent over the rest of the globe. She expects more of the Canadian media in particular, given the attention granted to professional men’s hockey in this country. She writes that she’d ideally like to work with the International Ice Hockey Federation to support women’s hockey. But first, still with the national team and a star forward with the University of Calgary Dinos where she’s finishing a science degree, Wickenheiser is developing the game at home. She’s sharing her skill, insight and knowl-

edge with emerging and ambitious competitors, including the lessons she’s gleaned through years of international play. About “safe being death,” she says this: “The hardest thing for an athlete is to go outside their comfort zone and take risks or take chances—sometimes you need to do that. It’s OK to make mistakes. I really believe in taking chances and going for it. Whatever you decide to do, whatever decisions that you make, have the confidence that you made the right decision. That’s really hard for every athlete but particularly young athletes.” But can it be taught?

“It can be fostered in the right environment but ultimately it does have to come from within. No one is going to, at the end of the day, give you your confidence. You have to have it within yourself and develop that through dayto-day habits and preparation.” One form of psychological preparation is imagining failure to cope with loss. Wickenheiser emphasizes the value of visualizing success but also failure. She was selected to the national team at 15 and when she competed at the Nagano Games in 1998 as a 19-year-old, she said she was mentally illequipped to handle the loss in the gold-medal game. As second best, silver was bittersweet. Accepting that winning isn’t everything is freeing, she says. For budding leaders, she advises: “Be yourself.” As captain or an assistant or even an unheralded leader, “Be yourself and don’t try to be more than you are or different than you are. That’s the number one thing.” Learning to trust yourself is followed by learning to trust your teammates. Finally, however, performance on the ice is paramount. She leads by example, aiming to develop and keep good habits that enhance her teammates’ confidence in their own abilities and skill. “Lead by example and make sure your play on the ice is taken care of. That’s the most important thing.” For information on the hockey festival, visit wickhockey.com. mstewart@vancourier.com

BC Cancer Agency

Community Cancer Forum A free public forum for all members of the community Sponsored by the Provincial Health Services Authority

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When a loved one has cancer, family and friends become partners on a journey through care and treatment. Cancer patients, supporters and caregivers are invited to learn how to better navigate this journey at the BC Cancer Agency’s Community Cancer Forum. Learn about brain-fog, nutrition, moving forward after treatment, empowering the mind, body and spirit, and complementary therapies, and visit displays from the BC Cancer Agency and its community partners.

Saturday, November 27, 2010 9:30 am to 3:30 pm

Westin Bayshore Vancouver 1601 Bayshore Drive For more information: 1.800.663.3333 ext. 674626 or conference@bccancer.bc.ca www.bccancer.bc.ca/communitycancerforum Featuring a special presentation

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WE D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

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sports and recreation

Screen displays skier’s speed, altitude and location

Snow goggles come with tiny LCD display

Megan Stewart Staff writer

and multinational corporations and U.S., Canadian and European militaries. But the goggles today are designed for the slopes. Transcend, which uses Zeal lenses and retails for $429 and $539, is potentially useful as a training device for downhill racers, but Eisenhardt says the goggles were not designed for the exclusive use by athletes. “Of course the competitive athlete will find this a great training tool but that’s not why we crated it. This is for everybody.” Darren Bennett was one of 40 people who travelled with Eisenhardt to Mount Hood in Oregon to test the final prototype in August. A lifelong skier familiar with the backcountry, Bennett said using the goggles was effortless and even became playful as he and others compared stats and speed. He was unsure of the product before taking it to the alpine

LANGDON MILLS The evolution of design

NO LONGER AT

Recon Instruments CEO Dan Eisenhardt wears a set of GPS-equipped goggles. photo Dan Toulgoet

Help us prevent kids from making bad choices.

Yaletown tech firm Recon Instruments is putting a new spin on the phrase “heads up.” The young company and its Denmark-born CEO Dan Eisenhardt are responsible for a pair of snow goggles that could change action sports and the way recreational and competitive athletes relate to their environment. A skier can gaze at the run ahead while reading a stopwatch, a GPS locator and an odometer, as if the head-mounted display inside the lens of the goggles was the dashboard of a car. “This is to enhance your experience on the mountain,” said Eisenhardt. Recon’s first model, called Transcend, looks like any other pair of goggles worn on the slopes. But this unique technology is the first to tell the skier his speed, altitude and location. A miniscule LCD display inside the bottom curve of the right side of the goggles also displays the total and vertical distances of a run, the temperature and the time. The metrics of each run are stored and can be uploaded to a computer. Skiers can revisit their runs and share the details with others on the Recon website and though social media. But it doesn’t have a camera—yet. Last week, Recon Instruments received a prestigious innovation prize in consumer electronics when the International CES technology tradeshow gave Transcend the 2011 Design and Engineering Award. Recon will display the goggles at the annual CES show in Las Vegas, Nevada in January. The firm is now fielding calls from global industry

zone, but Bennett praised its simple advantages and unobtrusive display. “Not that it’s hard to check your watch, but now you don’t have to take off your gloves to check.” The real-time readings also give him a clear sense of where he is moving in space and time, not just a static point on a snowy incline. Eisenhardt explains that a skier’s path is measured in a three-dimensional space, not merely a linear vertical drop or the kilometres between start and finish. “We acknowledge that our customers work on big inclines,” he said. A former competitive long-distance swimmer, Eisenhardt first conceived of goggles that could be used in the pool. Endurance swimming is about pace, controlling the heart rate and monitoring time splits— often against a large analog clock somewhere on the pool deck. “You were just trying to get your breath at every break and you didn’t really have much concentration to find the clock and you might have some fog inside your glasses...” he remembers. “It was too much time and effort trying to find out these different metrics instead of concentrating on your stroke.” A mechanical engineer by training, Eisenhardt, 35, came to Vancouver four years ago as an MBA student for an exchange semester at UBC. He pitched his idea to immediate interest and eventually began testing prototypes on campus. As Recon grows, the goal is to measure sport-specific analytics to customize the head-mounted display to action sports, including those that happen on snow, water, air and land. Eisenhardt calls it “plug and play.” Twitter: @MHStewart

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1010

Announcements

ATTENTION RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL SURVIVORS! If you received the CEP (Common Experience Payment), you may be eligible for further cash compensation. To see if you qualify, phone toll free 1-877-988-1145 now. Free service! CRIMINAL RECORD? Canadian pardon seals record. American waiver allows legal entry. Why risk employment, business, travel, licensing, deportation? All CANADIAN / AMERICAN Work & Travel Visa’s. 604-282-6668 or 1-800-347-2540

1085

Lost & Found

FOUND MOTORCYLE HELMET, Davie & Bidwell, Nov 8. Call 604-565-5151

1170

Obituaries

LOST GOLD Ring. (round crown) Sat. Nov 6, Kerrisdale Area. Family Ring. Reward. 604-738-4731 LOST KEYS and fob on red wrist band, KITSILANO Sun Nov 7/10. REWARD. 604-928-4316

Accounting

P. VILLAGRA req’s F/T Bookkeeper. Courses in acc. or bkg combined with sev. yrs of exp. in Nafta Provisions req . Spanish Lang. a must due to targeted clientele. $17.50/hr. E-res: taxexperts@pvtax.com

1220

Career Services/ Job Search Unemployed? Feeling stuck?

FREE Job Search Support for People with Disabilities and/or Chronic Health Conditions The EDGE Program IAM CARES Society 604 -731- 8504 info@iamcares.ca

1240

General Employment

F/T WEB Developer at Marqui Solutions Inc. Develop Website architecture. Design the appearance, layout and flow of the Website. $22/hr. 40 hr/wk. Completion of college & 3yr+ exp. in web design field req’d. #300-1201 W. Pender St, Van. CV email: hr.marqui@gmail.com or Fax 604-682-7394

1240

General Employment

General Employment

EXP. Construction Cleaner Must be capable of cleaning high windows (25ft), floor waxing, etc. Call Steven 604-338-8102

BC ONE CALL

‘‘Call Before You Dig’’ CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE

Our company’s goal is prevention of damage to under-ground facilities. We provide a safe and easy way for contractors, homeowners and the digging community to have underground lines identified before they dig. If full or part-time employment as one of our team of professional CSR’s is of interest to you, this is a request for your resume. You will possess excellent key boarding, communication and spelling skills, pay special attention to detail and enjoy dealing with the public. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted. Resumes will be retained for future consideration.

Operations Manager BC ONE CALL #222 - 4259 Canada Way Burnaby, BC V5G 1H1 (Attn: CSR Position)

Fax:

604-451-7983

Email: info@bconecall.bc.ca

PLANNING A WEDDING? Vancouver Fall 2010 BAKER - George Ernest Henry After a full life well lived, George died October 8, 2010 at the age of 94. He leaves his wife of 65 years, Rita, and his five children, Ken (Pam McCorquodale), Doug (Gail Hunt), Louise, Jenine (Mahe), and Gerry. He also leaves 11 grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. George liked baseball, scotch, camping and the outdoors, European history, old time fiddle music, winemaking, and dancing probably in that order. And he loved his family. Despite losing his father and his step-father by the age of 12, he somehow knew how to be an excellent dad. Raised on the homestead in Saskatchewan and deprived of any formal education after grade eight, he supported and encouraged his children to receive a combined 85 years of education. George was a selfreliant man and gave much more than he took. He built his own house by hand and lived in it for 60 years. He was a profoundly honest man, incapable of telling a lie. In common with his generation, George understood duty and commitment: he finished every task he ever started and, as a member and officer of his union, pressed all his working life for workers’ rights. He worked for social justice before it had a name. George understood that it is the responsibility of each of us to make the world a better place. His standard advice was always 'make yourself useful' Whenever his children thanked him for his help, his reply was 'just do the same for your kid’s' Our special thanks go to George’s caregivers: Virnith, Gecelyn, Nelly, and Marlene whose tender and affectionate care and attention were a comfort to him and to his family.

1240

Bridal Showcase 180 W. Georgia St., Vancouver

For your complimentary tickets please call Jane at 604.922.0612

Acme Analytical Laboratories (Vancouver), a premier BC mining laboratory, is looking to fill various Laboratory Assistant positions in Vancouver. Must be able to handle up to 40 lbs as some heavy manual labor may be required. Experience in a lab environment an asset but training will be provided. Starting wage of approximately $12 (combination of base hourly rate and daily production bonus). Detailed descriptions of the various positions are available on Acme’s website:

1240

General Employment

EVALUATOR NEEDED! Join our rapidly growing team of evaluator for department stores. Advancement opportunities, great pay, Lots of opportunities & incentives. www.oceanicsolution.com for quick and free sign-up. HEAVY EQUIPMENT PARTS/ SERVICE TECHNICIANS. Brandt Tractor has exciting positions available in many communities throughout Canada including: Edmonton, Fort McMurray, Fort Nelson, Fort Saint John, Grande Prairie, Regina and Saskatoon. Find out about our exciting career opportunities at www.brandttractor.com. Call 306-791-5979. Email resume indicating position title & location: hr@brandttractor.com. Fax 306-791-5986.

1310

Some great kids aged 12 to 18 who need a stable, caring home for a few months. If you’ve been looking for a home-based opportunity to do meaningful, fulfilling work. Qualified applicants receive training, support and monthly remuneration. Funding is available for modifications to better equip your home. A child at risk is waiting for an open door. Make it yours. Call 604-708-2628 www.plea.ca

North Shore Auto Parts

requires ★ Experienced Inside Sales/ Counter Person for full-time position Jobber experience an asset. We offer a competitive salary. Please email resume to: johnd@northshoreparts.com Personal Trainer Certification Earn up to $70/hr as a Personal Trainer. Government Financial Aid may be avail. 604-930-8377 See our ad in todays paper under Education.

1270

FREE

Register online at www.bridalshowcase.ca

SPONSOR TABLES STILL AVAILABLE Call 604.612.1096 or email BonnieAnneKim@gmail.com

Trades/Technical

MARITIME DRILLING SCHOOLS

entry-level training for land and offshore oilrigs. Excellent wages, benefits and opportunities to travel the world. Nov 29th-Dec 18th and Jan 3rd-Jan 22, 2011. Contact: 1-866-807-3960 www.mdslimited.ca

www.acmelab.com

Interested parties should submit resume and cover letter by email as instructed on the website.

251-4473

www.sprottshaw.com

Office Personnel

OFFICE ASSISTANT

required part time, for Real Estate Consultant in the 25th/Arbutus area. Efficient computer skills (Word, Excel) and familiarity with office procedures essential. Please send resume to: anne-francis@hotmail.com

EDUCATION

Sunday, November 21, 2010 Doors Open: 3:30 pm Show Begins: 4:30 pm

• Door Prizes • Special Displays • Gift Bags • Fashion Show featuring: Isabelle’s Bridal

LABORATORY ASSISTANT

Call our East Vancouver Campus

(604)

A division of Postmedia Network Inc.

TRUTH IN ''EMPLOYMENT'' ADVERTISING Postmedia Community Publishing makes every effort to ensure you are responding to a reputable and legitimate job opportunity. If you suspect that an ad to which you have responded is misleading, here are some hints to remember. Legitimate employers do not ask for money as part of the application process; do not send money; do not give any credit card information; or call a 900 number in order to respond to an employment ad. Job opportunity ads are salary based and do not require an investment. If you have responded to an ad which you believe to be misleading please call the Better Business Bureau at 604-682-2711, Monday to Friday, 9am - 3pm or email inquiries@bbbvan.org and they will investigate.

Education continued on next page


EW36

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010

GARAGE SALES

2075 2010

3508

Furniture

3507

Appliances

Cats

MIELE STEAM OVEN as new, ht17.75 x wd23.38 inches. Health eating. $2000. 604-261-1817

LIKE NEW! Fridge Stove Washer Dryer

K- FAIRHAVEN THRIFT SALE 2720 E. 48th Ave (at Vivian St)

Sat NOV 20 th 9am - 11:30am

Career Services/ Job Search

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION is rated #2 for at-home jobs. Train from home with the only industry approved school in Canada. Contact CanScribe today! 1-800-466-1535. www.canscribe.com. info@canscribe.com. POWERBOATS IN SUMMER, Snowmobiles in Winter, ATV’s in between! GPRC Fairview Campus, Alberta. Learn to repair small engines, recreational vehicles. Apprenticeship opportunity. Oncampus residences. 1-888-999-7882; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview. PUT POWER into your career! As a Fairview Power Engineer. Oncampus boiler lab. 4th Class-Part A 3rd Class. Affordable residences. GPRC Fairview Campus. 1-888-999-7882; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview.

1410

Education

FOODSAFE 1 DAY COURSES – ONLY $62 BEST VALUE GUARANTEED Classes Every Sat, Sun & Monday Taught by Certified Public Health Inspectors ADVANCE Hospitality Education BC’s #1 Foodsafe Choice

$

Warranty & Delivery Available

Richmond WHOLESALERS WAREHOUSE Moving & Clearance Sale Open to public Mon to Sat 11am - 5 pm 2300 Simpson Rd. Richmond, 604-270-1050 $1items, gift items, electronics, food items & MUCH MORE !!

EDUCATION 1403

200 100 $ 150 $ 100

$

1410

Education

CUBA -

Spanish Studies in Cuba (Havana), $2,600.00 Can. for 4 wks. Hotel with breakfast and dinner, tuition fee. (Air fare not included). 250-478-0494 ssic@telus.net FOODSAFE 1 DAY COURSES Guaranteed best value! Six Metro Vancouver Locations: Vancouver • Burnaby • Surrey • Richmond • Coquitlam • Maple Ridge All our Instructors are also working local Health Inspectors! Classes held each week & weekend! Course materials available in 6 languages. Same-day Certification. Visit our website at www.foodsafe-courses.com or call 604-272-7213 ADVANCE Hospitality Education – B.C.’s #1 Choice for Foodsafe & WorldHost Training. POWERBOATS IN SUMMER, Snowmobiles in Winter, ATV’s in between! GPRC Fairview Campus, Alberta. Learn to repair small engines, recreational vehicles. Apprenticeship opportunity. On-campus residences. 1-888-999-7882; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview.

Personal Trainer Certification

Earn up to $70/hr as a Personal Trainer. Government Financial Aid may be available. 604-930-8377 Hilltop Academy

www.advance-education.com

604-272-7213

1420

Tutoring Services

ENGLISH, Grades 8 - 12, by experienced professional. West side. 604-274-6234

604.306.5134 2035

Burial Plots

FOREST LAWN Memorial Park Burnaby, single plot, asking $9,800 obo. Call 604-987-2948

2060

For Sale Miscellaneous

Act Fast! Won’t Last! $$ GREAT DEALS !! $$

LADIES SHOES & HEELS! Look fabulous in all real designer shoes/heels such as Juicy Couture, ALDO, Spring and Guess! All shoes are size 8, barely worn and in like new condition. Serious buyers only, for more info please contact: 604-880-0822 CAN’T GET UP YOUR Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift. Call 1-866-981-6591 CAN’T GET UP YOUR Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift. Call 1-866-981-6591. FREE CATALOGUE HALFORD’S LEATHER, Beads, Tanned Furs, Craft Kits. Butcher Supplies & Equipment, Animal Control Products, Free Shipping (some restrictions) www.halfordsmailorder.com /1-800-353-7864/ order@halfordsmailorder.com HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best Price, Best Quality. All Shapes & Colors Available. Call 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.ca

2070

Fuel

TOP KNOT FIREWOOD est 1981 Dry Alder, Birch & Maple. Pick up or delivered. Rod 604-985-7193

www.FirewoodDeliveryVancouver.com Adler / Birch / Maple • Delivered ✫ 604-328-9722 ✫

2075

Furniture

MOVING SALE: Dinette suite - 36' glass top and 4 solid iron, rattan back and padded chairs - paid $1000 asking $300 obo. 2 patio loungers - sturdy iron bases and brown pads - $50 for both. Broil King Crown 40 BBQ - w/ side burner - has broken wheel sacrifice at $50. Sofa - Barrymore - green upholstery - $750.00 firm, Loveseat - Ethan Allen- only 3 yrs old - same colour as sofa - $1200 Wing chair and ottoman - beige $35. Can send photos. Jim or Esther (604) 952-0661

JOBS, JOBS, JOBS! Go to http://classified.van.net to click on the latest and greatest employment opportunities throughout the Lower Mainland.

MOVING soon MUST sell! Thomasville Mystique Dining Ste, 6ft table x 45in & 2 inserts, Hutch w/glass & lights 6ft x 19in, 8 chairs, $2500. Sony Trinitron TV 36in & cabinet $100. Sony TV 12x12in, $50. 4 Drawer black filing cabinet $30. All OBO. 778-552-5557

2095

BUILDING SALE... “ROCK BOTTOM PRICES!” 25X30 $5449. 30X40 $7850. 32X60 $12,300. 32X80 $17,800. 35X60 $14,200. 40X70 $14,770. 40X100 $24,600. 46X140 $36,990. OTHERS. Front endwall optional. Pioneer MANUFACTURERS DIRECT 1-800-668-5422. NEW NORWOOD SAWMILLS LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mills boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cyclesawing increases efficiency up to 40%. www.NorwoodSawmills.com/ 400OT - FREE Information: 1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT STEEL BUILDINGS PRICED TO CLEAR - Incredible end-ofseason factory discounts on various models/sizes. Plus FREE DELIVERY to most areas. CALL FOR CLEARANCE QUOTE AND BROCHURE - 1-800-668-5111 ext. 170

2120

Sports Equipment

FOUR BIKE bike rack with 2 inch car hitch insert.604 731-0606 LADIES FULL-SIZE golf bag and pull cart. 604 731-0606 NORTHERN LIGHTS single weight stack weight machine; includes protective floor mat. (Purchaser to dismantle and move.) $400.00604 731-0606

GOLDEN LAB x Husky pups, 8 wks old, green eyes, parents onsite. $450. Al 604-834-4300 GOLDEN RETRIEVER Pups ready to go, first shots, email pics available. $650. 250-674-0091

604-724-7652

3508

MALTESE X 2 - 4 lbs full grown non shedding, quiet 2 males. 1st shot, dewormed $600. 604-392-7372

Dogs

ALL SMALL breed pups local & non shedding $350+. 604-590-3727 www.puppiesfishcritters.com

SAMOYED PUPPIES CH dam. adorable, health guar. microchip, shots. $800 360-945-2080

YORKIE OR Yorkie X Maltese Toy size, local, 604-590-3727 www.puppiesfishcritters.com BERNESE MOUNTAIN Dog Pups, vet ✔ 1st shots, dewormed. $950. Chwk. 1-604-794-3561

3540

Pet Services

MOBILE PROF Small Dog Groom up to 18 lbs Lower Mainland 19 yrs exp. loriben@shaw.ca 1-604-556-2496 BLK LAB pups family raised ready Dec 11. Will hold for X-Mas, vet checked $600. 604-991-4158 PET HOTEL @YVR FREE daycare or Overnight stay for first time clients! Call now 604-238-PETS www.jetpetresort.com

BLUE HEELER / Staffordshire Terrier puppies. Born Sep 1. 4 left. Farm / family raised - very friendly. $400.00. 604-798-9577

3545

Pets - Other

BLACK LAB pups vet checked dewormed 1st shots $350.00 family raised 604-793-9369

Childcare Available

An overseas live-in Nanny for 2010 placement. 604-682-4688

BOXER - CKC Registered flashy fawn male boxers. Champion Dam, Top Lines. Mom is pictured at boxerdog.ca/jewel $1200.00 604 596 2090 or 604 614 0952 or 604 792 9003

Call Today

604-630-3300

BOXERS, CKC reg. show champion lines, 9 flashy brindle males, 2 reverse, chip, wormed & shots, ready Nov 12. 604-987-0020 CHIHUAHUA X pug male Ready to go, shots & vet checked $550. 604-702-1960 or 604-316-2136

4005

CHOCOLATE LAB PUPS pure bred, english style, CKC reg’d, dewormed, 1st shots. Ready now. $850. Call Glenn 604-230-5136

PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 weekly Mailing Brochures from home. 100% Legit! Income is guaranteed! No experience required. Enroll Today! www.national-workers.com

Legal Services

DIAL-A-LAW OFFERS general information on a variety of topics on law in BC. 604-687-4680 (Lower Mainland) or 1.800.565.5297 (Outside LM); www.dialalaw.org (audio available). GUARANTEED RECORD Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, Affordable. Our A+ BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT \TRAVEL & FREEDOM. Call for your FREE INFORMATION BOOKLET. 1-8-NOW-PARDON (1 866 972 7366). www.PardonServicesCanada.com LAWYER REFERRAL Service matches people with legal concerns to a lawyer in their area. Participating lawyers offer a 30 minute consultation for $25 plus tax. Regular fees follow once both parties agree to proceed with services. 604-687-3221 (Lower Mainland) or 1.800.663.1919 (Outside LM).

5070

Money to Loan

Get Cash Today!

Use your vehicle as collateral Borrow up to $10,000!

A NON Surgical beauty treatment avail. Acupuncture for facial rejuvenation or lift. Dr. Wendy, 20 yrs exp. with cosmetics. #150 - 5780 Cambie St. 604-600-5658

4051

Registered Massage Services

3482 Main St. Van 604-376-1686

4060 Foster homes urgently req’d for rescued, abandoned & neglected dogs. Many breeds. www. abetterlifedogrescue.com

JACK RUSSELL female pups, & 2 adults, smooth coat, dewormed. shots, Chwk 604-794-3229

Furniture

Any 27” TV$50,Nite only $25! Any Size★SPECIAL★ Mattress $99, Headboards Tables $50, Mattresses $99, Headboards $49, Dressers $99, Dressers $100,Sofa Beds $200, Banquet Chairs $15, Sofabeds $199, Minibars Desks $49, Lamps $20, TV’s $30, Armoires$39, $100, Drapes $30 Lamps $19, Dining $29,more! Framed Art, Mini-bars $40Chairs ...and much And much more... HUGE selection! 250 Terminal Ave @ Main St, Vancouver Visit ★Anizco★ Liquidators Hours: Mon to Fri 9-5 +Sat 10-2 Visit ★ANIZCO ★Liquidators 604-682-2528 250 Terminal Ave, Vancouver www.anizco.com 604-682-2528 Hours: Mon-Fri: 9-5, Sat: 10-2 www.anizco.com

BE YOUR OWN BOSS with Great Canadian Dollar Store. New franchise opportunities in your area. Call 1-877-388-0123 ext. 229 or visit our website: www.dollarstores.com today.

Acupuncture

$45/hr. $109 Head to toe pkg. $78/2hrs Body + Facial or Waxing pkg. Brazilian Waxing from $35

http://classified.van.net

★ FURNITURE FRENZY ★ Fall Liquidation up to 70% off Just arrived from the PACIFIC PALISADES HOTEL

#1 JANITORIAL FRANCHISE Customers, (Office Cleaning), Training and support. Financing. www.coverall.com 604-434-7744 info@coverallbc.com

604-777-5046

Metaphysical

LOVE! MONEY! LIFE! #1 Psychics! 1-877-478-4410 CreditCards/Deposit $3.19/min 18+ 1-900-783-3800 www.mysticalconnections.ca

CONNECTING COMMUNITIES

From the City to the Valley

Business Opps/ Franchises

Real Car Cash Loans

GOLD LABRADOR Retriever’ Pups, 2 male, 1 female, ready now. $850. Sry, 604-593-1532

ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

Financial Services

DROWNING IN DEBTS? Let us help. We have over 20 years experience helping Canadians just like you. Contact us for a free consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or toll-free 1-877-556-3500.

5060

SWEDISH BODY MASSAGE & WAXING

3015

5035

5040

★CATS & KITTENS★ FOR ADOPTION !

Lumber/Building Supplies

★ BOOK NOW!★

ITALIAN SOFA BED, cream & brown, confortable and warm. Asking $200. Call 604-251-7461

2075

Adjustable Sealy Queen Bed with frame Frame rests on 4 wheels with breaks and comes with a head board mount. The head and foot part can be adjusted separately from each other and each part has a massage feature, easily controlled via included remote control. The bed comes with Primu dreamer memory foam mattress in a Tempurpedic breathable/waterproof mattress cover. The bed has never been in contact with smoke, pets and has no damage (spillage, burns etc.). Similar models sell for $5000, paid $3800 6 months ago. Willing to part for $2900obo. Call 778-384-1210

Dogs

LAB PUPS CKC Reg’d Yellows & Blacks Good Temp. Shots & Tattooed. $750. 604-377-0820

5035

Financial Services

$500$ LOAN SERVICE, by phone, no credit refused, quick and easy, payable over 6 or 12 installments. Toll Free: 1-877-776-1660 www.moneyprovider.com IF YOU own a home or real estate, ALPINE CREDITS will lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is NOT an issue. 1.800.587.2161

Cut Your Debt by up to 70% DEBT Forgiveness Program

LAB PUPS, yellow, m/f, shots, dewormed, vet checked, $500. family raised Call 604-701-1587

Avoid Bankruptcy, Stops Creditor Calls. Much lower Payments at 0% Interest. We work for You, not Your Creditors.

Call 1-866-690-3328 www.4pillars.ca

5505

Legal/Public Notices

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS Notice is hereby given that Creditors and others, having claims against the Estate of STEVE SNIDER, aka ISTVAN (STEVE) ZSNIDERSITS, aka STEVE SHIDER, Deceased, formerly of Vancouver, B.C., who died on March 19, 2010 in Vancouver, BC, are hereby required to send the particulars thereof to the undersigned Executor c/o Kornfeld & Company, Barristers & Solicitors, 310-698 Seymour Street, Vancouver, BC, V6B 3K6 on or before December 24, 2010, after which date the estate’s assets will be distributed, having regard only to the claims that have been received. A.C. Kornfeld, Executor

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS Re: The estate of Ernest John Burchell also known as Ernest J. Burchell, Ernest Burchell and E.J. Burchell, deceased, formerly of 5181 Wales Street, Vancouver BC V5T 3M5 Creditors and others having claims against the Estate are hereby notified under section 38 of the Trustee Act that particulars of their claims should be sent to the VANCOUVER CITY SAVINGS CREDIT UNION, Attention: Hamlata Dayal at 183 Terminal Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V6B 5R8 on or before December 22, 2010, after which date the Executor will distribute the estate among the parties entitled to it, having regard to the claims of which the Executor then has notice. Vancouver City Savings Credit Union, Executor, Peterson Stark Scott, Solicitors

cont. on page 38


WEDNESDAY, N O V E M B E R 1 7 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

EW37

SUDOKU Fun By The Numbers

Catering/ Bartending

1620

1655

Fairs/Bazaars

1655

Fairs/Bazaars

1655

Tel : 604 (688) 4482

COTTAGE CHRISTMAS.. Sat. Nov. 20. 10am-4pm Kanata Co-op @ 7155 Blake St.

FAB FAIR

info@vancouvercatering.com

Collingwood Neighbourhood House

1655

Fairs/Bazaars

Christmas Bazaar

November 19 & 20 10 am - 3 pm Baking, Gifts, Raffle, Cappuccino & More… Villa Carital 3050 Penticton St. Van

Sat. Dec 4 • 11am - 5pm th

free admission featuring arts & crafts by local artisans

SATURDAY, NOV. 27 9AM - 2PM

BRITANNIA CHRISTMAS CRAFT FAIR

305 West 41st Avenue

(2 blocks east of Cambie

FRIDAY,Nov. NOVEMBER (3PM – 8PM) Fri., 19th19TH • 3pm – 8pm SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH (10AM – 5PM) Sat., Nov. 20th • 10am – 5pm SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21ST (10AM – 5PM) Sun., Nov. 21st • 10am – 5pm

Sat., Nov. 27 • 10am - 5pm Over 140 Vendors

Tel: (604) 713-8273 713-8273 Tel: (604) (604) 713-8273 Email: britanniacraftfair@live.ca britanniacraftfair@live.ca Email: Email:

Admission: $3 Under 12 Free

britanniacraftfair@live.ca

Snack Bar • Child-Minding • Entertainment • Prizes

Mark your calendar!

HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR

DUNBAR COMMUNITY CENTRE 4747 Dunbar St. (at West 31st)

604-222-6060

Sat. Dec. 4th. 10am - 4pm

Kensington Community Centre 5175 Dumfries St. Vancouver (Near 33rd & Knight St) 604-718-6201 Door Prizes & Food! Free Admission and Free Parking!

24 th 20th

Annual Annual

DELBROOK CHRISTMAS CRAFT FAIR

SATURDAY SUNDAY SATURDAY &&SUNDAY 10AM-4PM 10AM–4PM NOV 18 & &21 19,• DEC. DEC 4 2& & 53 NOV. 20 •• 101 EW CRAFTERS 101 N CRAFTERS EAND ACH D AY! ARTISANS •• CCONCESSION ONCESSION •• CFREE HILDCARE CHILD CARE PRIZES •• DDOOR OOR PRIZES

45 Outstanding Craft Vendors Heritage Hall

3102 Main St. at 15th Ave. $2 Admission, Kids free!

Delbrook DelbrookCommunity RecCentre Recreation Centre 600 North Van 600West WestQueens, Queens. N.Van. 604-987-PLAY 987-PLAY

BAZAAR & UKRAINIAN FOOD FAIR Silent Auction,Raffles • Christmas Crafts Ukrainian Buffet at 5pm and 7pm SATURDAY, NOV 27TH from 11AM – 8PM

St.Mary’s Ukrainian Catholic Centre 3150 Ash St. at 16th Ave. Vancouver Free Admission and Parking. Info: Parish 604-879-5830

$2 Admission, Kids free!

CHRISTMAS BAZAAR, LUNCH, TEA & BAKE SALE

★★★★

Saturday, Nov. 27 10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Local North Shore Chef

Oakridge Lutheran Church 585 West 41st Ave. Supported by Faith Life Insurance

Ann Kirsebom

Will be launching Gourmet products with Grand Marnier & Callebaut Chocolate!! At Circle Craft Nov. 17-21st! Don’t miss out on these Limited Edition Gourmet Gifts for the season.

GERMAN CANADIAN BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF B.C. Christmas Bazaar and

Amazing Auction

Saturday, Nov. 20th, 2010 12 noon to 4:00 pm at The German Canadian Care Home 2010 Harrison Drive, Vancouver

1675

(corner of Victoria Dr. & SE Marine Dr.)

Holiday Helper

BOOK YOUR SANTA PHOTO SESSION NOW! Santa is visiting Intuition Photography on Granville Island Nov 27 & 28 - Dec 4 & 5. Avoid the mall line-ups! Call Janine at 604-563-5084 or visit our website: www.intuitionphoto.com

10th Annual

Nikkei Place Craft & Bake Fair Saturday, Nov. 20th Sunday, Nov. 21st 10 am - 3 pm

ACROSS

Handmade Japanese Crafts, Ceramics, Jewelry, Cards, Soap, Home Baking and much, much more.

6688 Southoaks Crescent

Sat. Nov. 20 • 9:30am - 4:00pm West Point Grey Community Centre 4397 West 2nd Ave. Vancouver

604.257.8140

Admission and parking free!

1655

Fairs/Bazaars

St. Philip’s Church Christmas Fayre Saturday, Nov. 27 • 12:00-3:00pm Silent Auction, Handcrafted Gifts, Home Baking, Attic Treasures, Christmas Gifts, Books, Tea Room. Fun for the whole family!

3737 West 27th Ave. • 604-224-3238 You are warmly invited to our annual

Children’s

Christmas Fair

Mark Your Calendar!

Holiday Craft Fair

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a Sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

Heritage Hall

Burnaby 604-777-7000

ADMISSION $1.00 CHILDREN UNDER 12 FREE

Here's How It Works:

3102 Main St. at 15th Ave.

(corner of Kingsway & Sperling)

Deck The Hall Craft Fair Sat. Dec 4 • Sun. Dec 5 11:00am - 5:00pm

45 Local Designers

(2 blks south of Joyce Skytrain station)

27th Annual

Britannia Secondary School – Gyms A&B Britannia A&B BritanniaSecondary SecondarySchool School – – Gyms Gyms A&B 1001 Cotton Drive, Vancouver, B.C. V5L 3T4 1001 CottonDrive, Drive,Vancouver Vancouver, B.C. V5L 3T4 1001 Cotton

Sat. Nov 20 • Sun. Nov 21 11:00am - 5:00pm

5288 Joyce Street, Vancouver

ANNUAL CHRISTMAS MARKET SQUARE

BRITANNIA COMMUNITY EDUCATION PRESENTS

Jewelry & Fashion Accessory Sale

Craft Fair

Oakridge United Church

Fairs/Bazaars

HUGE CRAFT Fair ! Killarney Comm. Centre 6260 Killarney St. Sat. Nov 20 - 10 -3 pm Over 65 tables! Admission is FREE infor. call 604.718.8201

Just Right Catering For all your entertaining needs private & corporate since 1983.

Like puzzles? Then you'll love Sudoku. This mind-bending puzzle will have you hooked from the moment you square off, so sharpen your pencil and put your Sudoku savvy to the test!

&Marketplace

at the

Vancouver Waldorf School Sat Nov 20

10am-3pm Info: www.vws.ca (604) 985-7435 reception@vws.ca

2725 St Christophers Road, North Vancouver

1. Therapeutic resort 4. Kilometers per hour 7. Women’s undergarment 10. Afflicts 12. Geological times 14. House title (abbr.) 15. Hints 17. Type genus of the Ranidae 18. Tool handle 19. About blood 20. Muscat is the capital 21. 7th Hindu month 22. Our star 23. Wife of Saturn

DOWN

1. Meistersinger author Hans 2. 3 car + collision 3 One who has a degree 4. Lamp fuel 5. A baby carriage 6. Grimm brothers birthplace 7. Capital after Rio 8. Plant for purifying a crude substance 9. Appositeness 11. 3rd largest rorqual 13. Dropped below the surface 16. Nova ______, province 18. Most common CA avocado 24. Bird call used by birders

25. A European Soviet 27. Women’s briefs 30. Islands 31. No. French river 32. Tax collector 33. Author Ernest’s moniker 39. Distant 40. Cr_____logy: police studies 41. Smart _____: annoyingly clever 44. Bar-rooms 47. New Army enlistee 50. Can be cut or cabochon

51. Tributary of the Rhine 53. Not Mama 54. Actor ___ Malek 56. Metrical foot 58. Long nerve fiber 59. Tehran is the capital 60. Advertising awards 61. Go for and obtain 62. Withered and dry 63. Small social insects 64. Point midway between E and SE 65. Comedian Ceasar 66. Young women’s association

26. Rhode Island 28. Small sleep 29. Slang for big trucks 33. Axes for cattle slaughter 34. Short account of an incident 35. Formed a mental picture 36. World’s longest river 37. About gnome 38. Romance 39. Total cloth purchased 42. North Sea fishing unit of measurement 43. Kings unit 45. Supplying a moniker 46. Wooden shoes

48. Goddess of the rainbow 49. Vetches grown for forage 52. Kittiwake genus 55. Ancient city in Syria 57. Winglike structure

Promote your Craft Fairs, Christmas Events and Services ...and because we like Christmas as much as you do we are offering

6 ads for the price of 3

in Christmas Corner till December 25.

Ads continued Call 604-630-3300 and book today. on next page


EW38

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010

HOME SERVICES

cont. from page 36

5505

Legal/Public Notices

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS Notice if hereby given that creditors and others having claims against the following estate: GORDON DOUGLAS CAIRNS, formerly of 470 West 22nd Avenue Vancouver BC V5Y 2G5, Deceased, who died on April 13th, 2010, and to anyone knowing the whereabouts of Patrick Gordon Cairns also known as Patrick Gordon Brown, and Stephen Michael Cairns also known as Stephen Michael Brown, are hereby required to send full particulars thereof to the undersigned Executors, c/o Kenneth B. Krag, 228 - 8055 Anderson Road, Richmond, B. C. V6Y 1S2, on or before the 31st day of March, 2011, after which date the Executor will distribute the said Estate among the parties entitled thereto, having regard to the claims that have been received. Richard James Beardsley and Carol Ayako Beardsley, Executors.

Notice is hereby given that a public lien sale of the described personal property will be held at 11:00am on November 30, 2010. The property is stored at at Storage-Mart Self Storage, 1311 E. Kent Ave. N. Vancouver, BC. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: Units were found to contain misc. bags, misc. boxes, misc. furniture, misc. beddings, misc. tools, and misc. collectables. NAME UNIT Brian Donelly 4346 Jean Carbonneau 2117 Nelson Toro 2017 Leanne Moses 2133 Robert Palmer 2114

7005

Body Work

Real Estate Services

★A RENT TO OWN! ★ If you have a small down payment, I have a nice home for you! Less then perfect credit OK. Call Kim 604-628-6598

6007

BUSINESSES FOR SALE

ESTABLISHED TOW TRUCK BUSINESS FOR SALE due to health problem. Great cash base business especially in bad & snowy weather. $10,000 $12,000 income per mth. For info 604-729-1003 or after 4:30pm & weekends 778-839-9762

6020

Houses - Sale

6020-01

Real Estate

uSELLaHOME.com

● DIFFICULTY SELLING?●

Expired Listing No Equity High Pymts?

We Will Take Over Your Payment Until We Sell Your Property. No Fees.

Call Kristen today (604) 786 - 4663

www.HomeBuyingCenter.ca

❏WE BUY HOMES❏

Any Price, Any Condition Any Location. No Fees! No Risk !

Concrete

ASPHALT & CONCRETE REMOVAL /JACK HAMMERING Call Tobias 604 782-4322

**RELIEVE ROAD RAGE**

CLEANING SERVICE. Reas rates, specializing in homes. Guar work. Refs avail. 604-715-4706

Concrete Specialist. Driveways, sidewalks, exposed aggregate & patios. Santino 604.254.5551

ENVIRO MAID INSURED and BONDED. Residential. Available on a regular basis. Excellent refs. Free est. $20 p/hr. 604-685-1344

CONCRETE SPECIALIST, patio sidewalk, driveway, exposed aggregate reas rate 604-764-2726

EXP’D. HOUSECLEANER Reasonable Rates! Reliable! 604-771-2978

L & L CONCRETE. All types: Stamped, Repairs, Pressure Wash, Seal Larry 778-882-0098

604-739-3998

7010

Personals

DATING SERVICE. Long-Term/ Short-Term Relationships, FREE CALLS. 1-877-297-9883. Exchange voice messages, voice mailboxes. 1-888-534-6984. Live adult casual conversations-1on1, 1-866-311-9640, Meet on chatlines. Local Single Ladies.1-877804-5381. (18+). FREE TO TRY. LOVE * MONEY * LIFE. #1 Psychics! 1-877-478-4410 $3.19 min. 18+ 1-900-783-3800 NOW HIRING GAY PHONE Chat. FREE TRIAL. 1-877-501-1012 Talk to or meet desirable guys in your area anytime, 24/7. Where private, confidential fantasies come true! 1-877-501-1012 18+. GENTLEMEN! Attractive discreet, European lady is available for company 604-451-0175

One call does it all...

H.C. Office / House Cleaning Quality & Experience. Bonded & Insured. 604-725-0856

QUALITY CLEANING. Exc refs. Res/com. Move in/out. Carpets + pressure wash’g. 778-895-3522

DRAINAGE, SEWER & WATER ASPHALT & CONCRETE REM. Call Tobias 604 782-4322

8060

Concrete

CONCRETE SPECIALIST Sidewalk, Driveway, Patio Exposed Aggregate, remove & replacing

Reasonable rates. 35 yrs. exp. For free estimates call Mario

CONCRETE & ASPHALT

6020

Houses - Sale

6020-26

6030

LMD Ltd. 604-540-6567

A. FOUNDATIONS, Retaining walls, Stairs, Driveways, Sidewalks. Any concrete project. We also do block, & stone work. Free ests. Call Basile 604-690-3316

Out Of Town Property

LAND OF Orchards, Vineyards & Tides in Nova Scotia’s beautiful Annapolis Valley. Live! Work! Bring Business! Free Brochure Website: www.kingsrda.ca Email: mmacdonald@kingsrda.ca - Toll-free: 1-888-865-4647. LARGE ARIZONA BUILDING LOTS Full acres & more! Starting at $89/mo, $0 down - 0 Interest. Guaranteed Owner Financing! NO CREDIT CHECK! Close to Tucson Int’l Airport. Recorded Message 1-800-631-8164 code 4040 or www.SunsitesLandRush.com

Recreation Property

TIMESHARE CANCEL. Were you misled when you purchased a Timeshare? Get out NOW with contract cancellation! STOP paying Mortgage and Maintenance! 100% Money back Guaranteed. 1-888-816-7128, X-6868 or 702-527-6868

Need a New Place?

www.HomeBuyingCenter.ca

Find it in the Classifieds

8075

Drywall

*Drywall * Taping * Texture * Stucco*Painting * Steel stud framing Quality Home 604-725-8925 VICTORIA DRYWALL LTD. 25 yrs exp. Reno’s & New Constr. Call Bruno ★ 604-313-2763

8080

Electrical

#1 A-CERTIFIED Lic. Electrician. New or old wiring. Reasonable rates. Lic #11967. 604-879-9394

6505

Apartments & Condos

1 BR + den 750 sf, Mountain view, u/g prkg, insuite w/d, d/w, nr shops & transit, ns, np, seniors 55+, W. King Edward, $1340/mo Quiet Complex. 604-737-1125

6505-11

North Van Apt. Rentals

2BD+DEN/2BA, VISTA Place, Over 1000 sq ft. SW facing fabulous view, soaker tub, stainless steel appl, huge balcony, 1 parking and storage. Pet ok w/deposit. December 1st. 778-968-4464

6508

Apt/Condos

1 BR, Kerrisdale, newly reno’d, 750sf, 5 appls incld wd, large patio, ug prkg, heat incld, ns, avail Dec 1, $1200, 604-732-3989

2 BR, 2 Baths, nr Granville Mrkt area, new, huge private deck w/downtown view, top line appls, np, ns, refs. $2195,604-328-0606

8087

#1167 LIC Bonded. BBB, lrg & sm jobs, expert trouble shooter, WCB, low rates, 24/7. 617-1774.

A Lic’d. Electrician #30582. Rewiring & Reno, Appliance/Plumbing. Rotor Rooter & Hydro Pressure Jetting Service, 604-255-9026 - 778-998-9026 Free Estimates / 24 Hr Service LIC ELECTRIC. Comm & Res. Bonded. Reas Rates. Free Est. Professional Work. 604 719-8603

Excavating

# 1 BACKHOE, EXCAVATOR & BOBCAT

one mini, drainage, landscaping, stump / rock / cement / oil tank removal. Water / sewer line, 24 hours Call 341-4446 or 254-6865

EXCAVATOR • BACKHOE DUMP TRUCK

8090

Fencing/Gates

S&S LANDSCAPING & FENCING

West Coast Cedar Installations Fencing & Decking EST 1991

604-270-2358, Cell: 604-788-6458

Flooring/ Refinishing

ALL ABOUT FLOORS Hardwood, Laminate. Free Estimates. Call Mo 778-789-4333 ANYTHING IN WOOD Hardwood flrs, install, refinishing. Non-toxic finishes. 604-782-8275

Artistry of Hardwood Floors

Refinish, sanding, install, dustless Prof & Quality work 604-219-6944

6508

Apt/Condos

1450 WEST GEORGIA ST.

VAN 2 BR, 2bath Executive condo D/T. $2245. Call Quay Pacific Property Mgmt at 604-570-2786 Quoting code H70

rentals@capreit.net www.caprent.com

FALL SPECIALS

• Roofing & Roof Repairs • Moss Control, Removal & Prevention 25 year Warranteed Leaf & Needle Guard

CALL NOW for 20% OFF WCB – Fully Insured 100% Money Back Guarantee

604-340-7189

6535

Homestay

ROOMS AVAIL for Student, meals incl. Knight/Fraser, Nr bus, skytrain and amens. n/s n/p, $950/mo. Call 604-322-1937

6540

Full Seamless Gutter Installation/Repairs Soffits All jobs Guaranteed. Fully insured/WCB covered Will beat any competitors price

JIM’S HOME SERVICES

• ExteriorCLEANING Experts • & Safe Stairs GUTTER REPAIRS • Roofing • Painting • Gutters

604•831•0303

185 W 45 Ave. Oakridge. 5Br 4.5 bath, yard maintained by owner, 3000sf, lease, ns, np, now $3200. Eric 604-723-7368 Prop Mngt

BEAUTIFUL APTS. 1 & 2 BR avail. Rates from $800. Call 604-327-9419.

2 BR bungalow, Dunbar, all appls, newly reno’d throughout, $2100+utils, small dog ok, ns, suit prof. couple, 604-224-5213

BURNABY CENTRE

5 BR, 3 up & 2 down, 3 levels character home, 2 bath, sun rm, storage, Clark & 1st, np, lease, avail now, $2600, 604-720-9268

Metrotown Area - Bby

Updated Studio & 1 BR Apts. Rental Incentives Offered. Rent includes heat and hot water.

CALL (604) 438-4544 leasing@burnabycentre.com

SENIOR SENIOR RATES RATES 25 20 YRS. YRS. SERVICE SERVICE

ALLIANCE GUTTER cleaning, windows by hand/power washing 15 yrs exp. Call Steven

604-723-2526

DYNAMIC GUTTERS & Exteriors. Full seamless gutters. Installation repairs & soffits. All jobs guaranteed. Fully insured, bonded, WCB. Will beat any competitors price. 604-439-9417

6540

DEC 1 Newly renovated 4bdrm 11/2 bath uppr flr,5 appl, garage, deck, $2250/mth+60%util. n/s. pets considered. 604-880-0161

Edgemont Gutters. Sales & Install 5’’ continuous gutter, minor repairs, cleaning. 604-420-4800 Professional Powerwash Gutters cleaned & repaired Since 1984, 604-339-0949 True Gutters & Exteriors Cleaning, Repairs & Installs Insured • Warranty • 20 yrs exp Free Estimates 604-544-5080

8130

Handyperson

AaronR CONST Repairs & Renos, small repairs welcome. Insured, WCB, Licensed. 604-318-4390 aaronrconstruction.com BEST PRICE! Bath, kitchen, plumbing, flooring, painting, etc. Call Mic, 604-725-3127 DAHIPP CONTRACTING Handyman Services Baths, Kitchens, etc 604.817.0718 SEMI RETIRED HANDYMAN avail - small renos, repairs, fences, carpentry, etc. 604-321-2868

Heating

Lorenzo & Son Plumbing & Heating (604) 312-6311 Local Licensed Plumbers & Gas Fitters

8150

Kitchens/Baths

Houses - Rent

Counter Tops, Custom Cabinets & Refacing NO HST til end of Dec • In business 50 years

604-879-9191 Superior Cove Tops & Cabinets #3 - 8652 Joffre Ave, Burnaby BATHTUB REGLAZING - from $325 • refinish old bathtubs • 4 hr dry time •5 year warr. • BBB rated A. 604-597-1171 mrtubman.ca

vancourier.com

6602

Suites/Partial Houses

★RENT TO OWN! ★ If you have a small down payment, I have a nice home for you! Less then perfect credit OK. Call Kim 604-628-6598

1 BR newly reno’d, bsmt suite, 2700 Block of E 7th Ave. ns, np, $700 + share utils. avail Dec 1. 604-254-7797

STOP RENTING-RENT TO OWN ● No Qualification - Low Down ● CHILLIWACK - 9557 Williams, 3 bdrm, 1 bath, cozy HOUSE on 49x171’ lot, excellent investment property in heart of town..... $888/M SURREY- 6297 134 St. Solid 7 Bdrm HOUSE w/3 bdrm suite on 1/4 acre lot with views... $1,688/M WHITE ROCK - 15532 Madrona Dr 3 bdrm, HOUSE, quiet st, huge yard, dble garage, 2 yr old roof....$1,388/M

2 BDR BSMNT Suite, $990 Upper Deer Lake, seprate entrnce, share W/D, incl heat, cbl, elec intrnt, NS/NP, new reno,cls trnst, schl, mall, ref reqrd, 604 432-7526

www.HomeBuyingCenter.ca

6590 204- 5725 Agronomy Rd. UBC 2 br corner, 2 bath, 900sf, granite, balc. lease, ns, np, $2400, now, Eric 604-723-7368 Prop Mngt

Gutters

604-439-9417

Call (604)812-3718 or (604)786-4663

Houses - Rent

8125

8140

Power Washing • Roofing • •Concrete, Power Washing Deck&&Fence HomeRepairs Waterproofing •• Deck

DOWNTOWN VAN Luxury 2 BR 2 baths in highrise, all appls, prkg, view. Now. $2500. 778-865-6696

RENTALS 604-669-4185

@

YOUR HOME GUTTER SERVICES

Factory Direct Cedar Fence Panel for Sale & Installation 8291 No.5 Rd Richmond Call 604-275-3158

MOVE-IN BONUS

Heart of Downtown, easy transit access. Large gym, laundry on every floor, dishwashers in all suites, in/outdoor parking.

Gutters

Call Ron 604.377.1345 MINI-EXCAVATOR: Lot grading and levelling, concrete removal and demolition. 604-306-8599

INSTALLATION REFINISHING, Sanding. Free est, great prices. Satisfaction guar. 604-518-7508

1 & 2 bedrooms starting from $1230

8125

• Gutter Installation Cleaning & Repairs

YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 service call. Insured. Lic # 89402. Fast same day service guaranteed. We love small jobs! 604-568-1899

GEORGIAN TOWERS

ANGEL GLASS, Comm/Residential, store fronts, windows & doors, custom shower & tub enclosures, patio doors, mirrors etc. 2837 Kingsway, Vancouver. 604-603-9655

Vancouver Division Since 1985

Estimates are Fast & Free 40 Years Servicing the Industry

Century Hardwood Floors ★Hardwood flr refinishing ★Repairs ★ Staining ★ Free Estimate. Contact 604-376-7224

Apt/Condos

Glass Mirrors

All Phases of Residential Site Work

QUALIFIED RESIDENTIAL & Commercial Electrical Contractor. Cert. 92294.. Nick 778-237-2132

6508

8120

WWW.CATSFORHIRE.COM

8105

RENTALS

1602-3438 Vanness St. 1 Br, balc. 580sf, mtn & city view, Joyce Stn. lease, np, ns, $1200, Dec 1, Eric 604-723-7368 Prop Mngt

Find one in the Classifieds To advertise call 604-630-3300

Mia Casa − Drain Tile/Sewer Line Water Line Repairs / Replacement & Cleaning. Vince 604-941-6060, Al 604-783-3142

A. LIC. ELECTRICIAN #19807 Semi-retired wants small jobs only. 604-689-1747, pgr 604-686-2319

Lots & Acreage

BUILDING LOT, New West. 33’ x 130’. $75,000 in services paid! No HST! 4,240 total sq. feet. Priced to sell! $318,888. 604-726-0677

6065

• Removal & Replace • Free Disposal • Free Estimates • Quality Guaranteed • Fully Insured • Commercial / Residential

North Vancouver

YOU MUST see this Apt. in a prime position in Lower Lonsdale. 2 Br, 2 Baths In Suite wd, Gas fp, 6 Appls. Price $425,000 for 974sf. Phone: 604-988-6192

Drainage

Crown Roofing & Drainage Residental Div. Roofing installations & repairs. 604-327-3086

253-0049

604-630-3300

8073

PRIVATE CLEANER Mon - Sat, • Houses • Apartments • Offices • 20 yrs experience. 604-669-9255

(604) 812-3718 OR (604) 786-4663

www.bcforeclosures.com 5 BR home from $19,000 down $1,800/mo. 604-538-8888, Alain @ Sutton WC Realty W. Rock

8060

A.S.B.A ENTERPRISE Comm/ Res, Free Est, $20/hr incls supplies, Insured, 604-723-0162

6050 $99 can sell your home 574-5243 Chilliwack Promontory 1880sf 2br 2.5ba home, stunning view $379K 392-6065 id5266 Delta Price Reduced studio condo, 19+ complex, pool, park, $99,900 597-8361 id4714 Maple Ridge spotless 947sf 1br condo above snrs cent 55+ $219,900 466-1882 id5262 New Westminster Open House Sun 2-4, 301, 505-9th St, immaculate 620sf 1br top fl condo $147,900 778-231-1926 id5251 Sry Sullivan Mews ground lvl 1200sf 2br 2ba tnhse, 55+complex $220K 834-6935 id5136 Sry E Newton 1 acre lot with 2600sf 6br 2.5ba bungalow $479,900 778-549-2056 id5198 Sry Fleetwood 2865sf 5br 3ba home w/suite, 9901sf lot $569,900 715-4048 id5255 Sry Newton Investor Alert, 2 homes on 3/4 acre lot, subdivide? $700K 596-6572 id5260 S. Surrey 1700sf 2 or 3br 2.5ba exec gated townhome, 19+ $434,900 809-5974 id5265 Vanc Price Reduced updated 1900sf 4br 2ba w/suite $699,900 778-549-6858 id5258

Cleaning

Chinese Full bodywork, gentle or deep tissue 15 yr exp’d Mon-Sat Call 604-329-8218. SE Burnaby

REAL ESTATE 6005

8055

Rooms

1 BR, bright, unfurn, laundry, private entrance, n/s, n/p, fridge & microwave. $450 incl utils Avail immed. Call: 604-707-0393

6602

2 BR, large, Dunbar & 40th, very bright garden level, all appls, heat & light, $1150, self-contained, 6 sky-lights, ns, np, 604-266-1953

Suites/Partial Houses

1 BR bsmt ste, clean, ldry 1 day/ wk, no smoking, no smoking in or outside, np Marpole $900 incl

DUNBAR, 2 Bdrms, garden level suite, 5 appl, close to UBC, shops, on bus routes, $1100 incl util, avail immed 604-671-1664 or 604-224-7085

6605

Townhouses Rent

2 refs req’d. Immed 604-326-0372

BRAND NEW, 1 bdrm, $800. Hardwood flrs, new appls, own alarm & entrance. 59th/Ontario, nr Langara & transit, ns, np, avail now, 604-261-4633.. 880-9613

FURNISHED ONE BDRM townhouse on SEASIDE walk, False Creek, Granville Isld. $1500/mon Dec 1st. Min rental period 2 mon. max 6 months. 604-736-7291


WEDNESDAY, N O V E M B E R 1 7 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

HOME SERVICES 8155

Landscaping

HEDGE REMOVAL, stump grinding, excavator, concrete removal, etc Steve 604-724-3670

8160

Lawn & Garden

Fall Services

SAME DAY SERVICE “More than just mowing!”

Yard Clean-ups • Hedges Pruning • Gutters • Aeration Lawn Mowing Christmas Lights Rubbish Removal Free Estimates

310-JIMS (5467) www.jimsmowing.ca Book a job at: www.jimsmowing.ca

LAWNS • GARDENS • TREES • SHRUBS EST.1994

Residential, Strata, Commercial

Gardens Designed, Installed, Maintained Trees/Hedges Installed, Pruned, Removed Retaining Walls, Patios, Pathways

604-737-0170

8185

Moving & Storage

AJK MOVING LTD.

Moving. Storage. Deliveries Local & Long Distance MOVERS.... Residential. Commercial. Industrial. Truck for Clean-ups

Experienced Movers ~ 2 Men $50 ~ • Includes all Taxes • Licenced & Insured • Professional Piano Movers

604-708-8850

FLYING SCOTSMAN

MOVING Formerly known as Popeyes Moving

604-377-2503

www.popeyesmovingbc.com

TwoGuysWithATruck.ca Moving, Storage, Free EST 604-628-7136. Visa, OK

WILDWOOD LANDSCAPING Hedge Trimmimg & Tree Pruning & Hedge Removal Fall Clean Up Chaffer Control & Lawn Restoration. Comm/Strata/Res Aerating & Power Raking. Free Estimates. 604-893-5745 ASK ABOUT OUR $159 GARDEN CLEANUP SPECIAL 43 yrs exp. 604-726-0166 EXP. GARDENER. Fall clean ups, leaf removal, weeding, pruning, new soil Ron 604-202-2176 EXPERT PRUNING Cert Arb Ornamental & fruit trees, shrubs,etc Colin Malcolm 604-618-9741 JAPANESE GARDENER Landscape & maintenance, clean-ups, trimming. Reas, free est, 25 yrs exp 604-986-8126 Ny Ton Gardening Tree cutting & topping, yard cleanup, trimming, hedging, 604-782-5288 Rakes & Ladders.. Lawns, trees, gardens, shrubs. Certified, Ins. & WCB, 604-737-0170 T. TRAN -604-723-2468, Tree Pruning, hedging, weeding, leaf cleanup, gutters, etc. Reliable. YARD CLEAN-UP, lawns cut & lawn aeration, hedge trim, rubbish removal, gutters. 604-773-0075

8175

Masonry

MASONRY REPAIRS •Stone Walls •Bricks •Chimneys & more. George • 604-365-7672 NORTHLAND MASONRY. Rock, slate, brick, granite, pavers. 20 yrs exp on the N. Shore. No job to small.. Will 604-805-1582

8185

Moving & Storage

AFFORDABLE MOVING 1 to 3 Men

1, 3, 5, 7 or 10 Ton $ From

45 We accept Visa, Mastercard & Interac Licenced & Insured Local & Long Distance

FREE ESTIMATES Seniors Discount

604-537-4140 www.affordablemoversbc.com

Renovations Big or Small. Water Lines without Digging Broken Water Mains & Sewer Mains. Hot Water Tanks, Plugged Drains, Toilets, Tubs, Leaky Faucets & Broken Pipes, Irrigation Sprinkler Systems. 24 / 7 Emergency Service Fully Licenced & WCB.

604-729-3864

8193

• Oil Tank Removal • Work complies with city bylaws BC Mainland • Always fair & reasonable rates • Excellent references

Tried & True Since 1902

• BBB • RCABC • GAF/ELK Master Elite Contractor • Residential Roofing • Liability Coverage and WCB • Designated Project Managers • Homes & Strata • Third Party Inspection Installations & Repairs Call 604-327-3086 for a free estimate •• 24 Hr Emergency Service Quote code 2010 for a 5% discount www.crownresidentialroofing.com

8225

Power Washing

POWER WASH, Gutters, Fall clean up, junk removal, Free Est. Great rates! call 778-320-3441

Renovations & Home Improvement

• • • •

Licensed, Insured & Bonded Lic. Plumbers & Gas Fitters Over 20 years Experience Custom Renovations to Small Repairs

Certified Plumber & Gas Fitter * Reno’s & Repairs 24 hrs/day * Furnaces * Boilers * Hot Water Heating * Reasonable Rates * Hot Water Tanks

604-731-2443 CERT PLUMBER- Lic/Ins Exp- Reno’s - Repairs - Hot water Tanks. Shaun 604.727.9326

10% Off with this Ad! Aman’s Plumbing Service, Lic. Gas Fitter, Reas. Rates. 778-895-2005

drytech.ca RENOVATIONS 22-BUILD (222-8453) Showroom: 1230 West 75th Ave.

FERREIRA HOME IMPROVEMENTS Additions ★ Renovations Concrete Forming ★ Decks Garages ★ Bathrooms Ceramic Tile ★ Drywall Hardwood Flooring ''Satisfaction Guaranteed''

NORM, 604-466-9733 Cell: 604-841-1855

LUCKY METAL WORKS Fence & Gates Stainless Steel Door Window & Door Replacement Patio Covers & Sunrooms Andy: 604-719-8689 #158-11782 River Rd., RMD

Serving West Side since 1987

STORMWORKS

● Oil Tank Removal ● Recommended ● Insured ● Reasonable Rates

604-724-3670

8195

Painting/ Wallpaper

D&M PAINTING

Interior/Exterior Specialist Many Years Experience Fully Insured Top Quality, Quick Work Free Estimate

604-724-3832

PRIMO PAINTING

★ 3 Licensed Plumbers ★ 66 years of exp. 604-830-6617 www.oceansidemechanical.com COMPLETE PLUMBING and Rooter Services 7 Days per Week 604-731-8875

PLUMBERS

Water Lines (without digging) Sewer Lines (without digging) Install. Drain tiles. 604-739-2000

Lorenzo & Son Plumbing & Heating (604) 312-6311 Local Licensed Plumbers & Gas Fitters

You Want It We’ve Got It

Find Whatever You’re Looking for in the Classifieds.

Interior & Exterior

RENOS • REPAIRS

Free Est./Written Guarantee

No Hassle Quick Work Insured /WCB Andrew’s Painting & Wallpaper 25yrs exp. WCB/Ins. Refs Free est off seas. rates 604-785-5651

D & M RENOVATIONS, Flooring, tiling, finishing. Fully Insured. Top quality, quick work 604-724-3832 BATH/KITCHEN Renos, decks, fencing, home repairs. Home Improvment Centre. 604-240-9081

McNabb Roofing • TAR & GRAVEL •TORCH-ON MEMBRANE •FIBREGLASS / ASPHALT SHINGLES, GUTTER & DOWNPIPE CLEANING 35 years experience

POINT GREY LTD. ROOFING Established 1946 All Types of Roofing, Re-Roofing & Repairs

604-379-2641

10% off ALIN Maintenance •Roof •Chimney •Skylight Repairs •All Leak Problems! 604-319-2229

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midweek edition WEDNESDAY, NOV. 17, 2010

Vol. 101 No. 92 • Established 1908 • West

30

Craft fair confidential Hockey is for girls

31

Cash crunch threatens aboriginal centre Facility provides refuge for downtown homeless Mike Howell Staff writer

A nonprofit drop-in centre in the Downtown Eastside whose clients include a large number of homeless aboriginal people will close for at least three months in the winter unless it can come up with money to keep its doors open. The Aboriginal Front Door Society at 384 Main St. is operating under a $40,000 city grant that expires at the end of the year, putting the once financially comfortable centre in financial straits. Mona Woodward, executive director of the society, said she anticipates the or-

ganization will receive another grant from the city in April 2011 but has to make up a $25,000 shortfall to remain open for January, February and March 2011. “Those months are crucial for a lot of the homeless people who rely on us to be open,” said Woodward, who became executive director of the society last month. “This is a safe place and provides refuge from the street for a lot of people. I’m a fighter and I want to fight to keep this organization open.” The drop-in centre is located in the heart of the Downtown Eastside, a few steps from Main and Hastings. It’s open Monday to

Friday. Statistics for September show 546 people visited the society’s office that month. Some drop in for coffee and food while others seek referrals to addictions services, housing and medical help. Programs include crisis intervention, computer training and healing circles. The society also works with the Downtown Community Court, which refers some of its clients to the drop-in centre to complete community work as part of a sentence. The centre opened in 2003 under the Vancouver Agreement initiative. See DIRECTOR on page 4

Garibaldi annex granted reprieve East Side school considered for closure in 2007 Naoibh O’Connor Staff writer

Mona Woodward is executive director of the Aboriginal Front Door Society in the Downtown Eastside. photo Dan Toulgoet

Garibaldi annex is safe for at least one more school year after trustees agreed it met growth targets required to keep its doors open. The East Side school at 1025 Slocan St. was threatened with closure in 2007 after struggling with low enrolment. The community around the school objected, prompting the board to give it three years to boost enrolment—it needed to attract at least 36 more new students to the district by this past September or it would be closed by June 2011. The deal pro-

tected the school from the closure process five other East Side schools are now undergoing. Garibaldi was considered a separate case and its immediate future was decided at Monday night’s board meeting. Parent Advisory Council chairman Halford Milne was thrilled to hear the news. “This has been a great success story and the school is open for new student registration,” he said Monday. Garibaldi houses a kindergarten to Grade 4 program, a homelearners program and the Vancouver Learning Network elementary program. See SCHOOL on page 4

YOUR SOURCE FOR LOCAL NEWS, SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT! WWW.VANCOURIER.COM


W02

T HE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R W E D N E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 7 , 2 0 1 0


W E D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

W05

news

12th & Cambie

with Mike Howell

Walking tall

Mayor Gregor Robertson has apparently had enough of bikes. Well, not exactly. But the cycling-mad mayor is shifting gears, so to speak, from bike lane projects to improving conditions in the city for pedestrians. A separated pedestrian lane, anybody? In a motion that went before council Tuesday, the mayor requested city staff, the Vancouver Police Department and the Vancouver School Board to identify locations and “priority measures for improving pedestrian safety and accessibility in Vancouver.” Robertson wants staff to report back to council in the spring of 2011 and include recommendations on how to improve pedestrian input into the city’s transportation plan. Suggestion: Pedestrian walk signals such as those in Burnaby where a countdown timer appears in that little box at the end of a crosswalk instead of a red flashing hand. Though Vision Vancouver’s bike lane fixation has dominated

Having spent much time and taxpayer money on cycling lanes, Mayor Gregor Robertson has turned his attention to improving the safety of the city’s pedestrians. photo Dan Toulgoet headlines, the mayor says pedestrians are the city’s top transportation priority. He said there are 318,000 “walking trips” every day in the city, with 41 per cent of downtown and West End residents either walking or cycling to work. The city’s goal is to have at least 50 per cent of trips in the city be either by walking, cycling or transit by 2020. The Canada Line and the separated bike lane network, which runs from Chinatown to

Kitsilano, are expected to be a big part of that drive. So far this year, they appear the less dangerous of modes. Five pedestrians have been killed this year after being struck by vehicles. The most recent occurred Nov. 3 in the 1100-block of Station Street where an 85-yearold woman was hit by a car in the morning. A 78-year-old man was killed Oct. 21 after he was clipped by a van at Renfrew and Eton streets.

The accident occurred in the early afternoon. “The safety and accessibility of pedestrian routes is critical to the health and well-being of our citizens,” the mayor wrote in his motion.

Mo better blues

This whole Movember thing is getting out of hand. Now I understand three facial hair-challenged Vision Vancouver city councillors are attempting to

OPEN HOUSE – Thursday, Nov. 18 – 9:30 to 11 am RSVP 604.736.5575 ext. 222

pg 5 final (colour westside only)

Fraser Academy is the Lower Mainland’s only fully accredited day school dedicated to helping students in grades 1-12 with dyslexia and other languagebased learning disabilities achieve their potential. All dyslexic children and youth deserve an education in a setting where they can learn and prosper—a place like Fraser Academy. Our students receive a comprehensive education that features interactive classrooms, multi-dimensional programming, assistive technologies, wireless Mac Labs, small class sizes, field trips, leadership training, community service, plus daily one-to-one lessons with certified O-G instructors and specialist teachers in fine arts, applied arts and PE. The result? An all-encompassing experience for students, who gain the confidence and tools they need for future success. This includes academic success: 85% of our graduates move on to college and university.

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grow lip warmers in support of prostate cancer awareness this month. Kerry Jang, Raymond Louie and George Chow have joined the mayor in an unprecedented competition of whisker growth. Robertson was first to jettison his razor when challenged at city council by a rep of the Movember crusade. No other councillors immediately got on board the moustache train. That’s because, in Jang’s case, he had to get approval from his wife. “That’s how it is in Chinese families—the woman is really in power,” said Jang, during a short break from checking his stubbly progress in the mirror. “My wife said if it was for a good cause, then go for it. But in order for that permission, she had to be given free reign to insult me and make fun of me all she wanted. So I’ve been called slimier than usual, Fu Man Chu last night and this morning she just got up and laughed.” Jang supplied the Courier with recent photos to prove he and his colleagues can grow whiskers. Apparently, he must have sent the wrong photos—the councillors look like they forgot to wipe their lips after sharing a quart of chocolate milk. mhowell@vancourier.com Twitter: @Howellings


W E D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

W07

news

Kash Heed enters debate over Champlain Heights annex

MLA lobbies against elementary school closure Naoibh O’Connor Staff writer

Liberal MLA Kash Heed penned a letter to school board chair Patti Bacchus asking the board to spare Champlain Heights annex from closure. Heed represents the VancouverFraserview constituency where the annex is located. It’s among five East Side elementary schools that may be shut down to deal with the district’s money problems and falling student enrolment. NDP MLAs such as Shane Simpson, Adrian Dix, Jenny Kwan and Mable Elmore, as well as some MPs have opposed closures, but Heed is the only Liberal MLA to publicly weigh in, according to board chair Patti Bacchus. She said the VSB has requested a meeting with new education minister George Abbott, but that hasn’t happened yet. Heed did not return a call from the Courier. A controversial report by the B.C. comptroller general, commissioned by the education ministry last school year, indicated the VSB should look at school closures to

www.holeys.com

“PARENTS MAY CHOOSE TO SEND THEIR KIDS TO THE NEIGHBOURING SCHOOL DISTRICT.” Kash Heed

deal with its money problems. The education ministry, then under Liberal MLA Vancouver-Fairview Margaret MacDiarmid, cited that finding in a June press release, stating the report confirmed the VSB’s “current financial circumstances could have been avoided had the board appropriately managed its resources.” Among other issues, the ministry pointed to the district’s surplus school space: “Excess space is not being maximized. VSB could achieve up to $5.7 million in annual savings by closing and consolidating schools.” Champlain Heights annex’s enrolment is relatively high—it operates at 85 per cent of its capacity, but there are empty seats

The Champlain Heights annex on Champlain Crescent is among five endangered East Side elementary schools. photo Dan Toulgoet at neighbouring schools. Some parents suggest they’ll switch to a Burnaby school if the annex is closed. Heed’s letter, dated Nov. 8, asks that the VSB give the annex a chance to “continue to serve the community.” “I understand that the VSB has budget constraints and that decisions have to be made. However, according to the financial information presented by the VSB, clos-

ing the Champlain Annex will not generate much benefit to the VSB financially, but will have a negative impact in the community,” Heed wrote. “Also, it would be wrong for the VSB to assume that the students of Champlain Annex will stay in the school district. Parents may choose to send their kids to the neighbouring school district, which is much closer to their homes and the children can

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walk to school instead of requiring transportation.” Shane Simpson, who’s campaigned to save Macdonald, another elementary school facing closure, questions the timing of Heed’s statement. “It was Minister MacDiarmid who put the pressure on the school board to close schools. Minister Abbott, her successor, has said nothing about whether he has a different view on the school closure question and Mr. Heed, as an MLA, was absolutely silent during all that time that Minister MacDiarmid was putting pressure on the Vancouver board,” Simpson said. “He stayed silent and now he’s speaking out for the school. Good for him, but still he saw fit to not say a word when the question was whether the Liberal government was doing the right thing.” Simpson acknowledged Champlain Heights Annex supporters have warned they may send their kids to Burnaby, but argued all five schools have compelling reasons to stay open. noconnor@vancourier.com Twitter: @Naoibh

Critters Flip Flop

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W14

T HE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R W E D N E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 7 , 2 0 1 0

news Casino crime

Will a proposed mega casino for downtown bring crime with it? Vision Vancouver Coun. Geoff Meggs said an answer to that question will become clearer when the Vancouver Police Department submits its opinions in a city report on the proposed casino attached to B.C. Place. “We haven’t heard too much from the police on that, but that will certainly be a big part of the report,” Meggs said. “It’s always a concern. I think it would be naïve to think there isn’t crime around gaming.”

Since casinos began to open in the past decade in the Lower Mainland, crime associated to some of the venues has included shootings, loan sharking, robberies, extortion and at least one homicide. Last week, the Vancouver Police Department held a news conference to announce the arrest of three men alleged to have robbed a Vancouver resident who had been gambling at River Rock in Richmond. The three suspects were allegedly going to rob another person on another night until a VPD emergency response

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team intercepted the men, who reside in Burnaby. Daniel Sheng Long Hoong, 20, William Wei Lun Hoong, 18, and Yan Wang, 30, are facing several firearm charges. Insp. Les Yeo, who is in charge of the operation investigations section, described the “followhome robbery” as rare in Vancouver, although the VPD continues to investigate robberies in May and June where customers of the River Rock were robbed in Vancouver. In both cases, the suspects were driving a dark-coloured SUV that had a flashing blue light, possibly

to give the impression they were police officers. In June 2006, the VPD investigated a similar robbery when a customer of the Edgewater Casino at the Plaza of Nations was followed home and hit over the head with a pipe and slashed across his abdomen and back. He spent five days in hospital. In February 2004, the VPD issued a public appeal to victims who may have been threatened, extorted or physically assaulted by loan shark Betty Tung Sze Yan of Richmond. In 2009, Yan was found shot dead inside a Mer-

cedes-Benz in Richmond. Yeo declined to comment on whether the VPD had concerns about the proposed mega casino for Vancouver, which was announced by Premier Gordon Campbell in March. Yeo said the VPD’s planning and audit section will review the proposal. The $450 million project calls for two hotels and a 1,500 slot casino. If approved, it would likely be the biggest gaming facility in the province. —Mike Howell mhowell@vancourier.com Twitter: @Howellings

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T HE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R W E D N E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 7 , 2 0 1 0

news

Laneway houses under construction in the 4600 block of West 11th Avenue have angered neighbours, but the city’s policy on the issue remains unchanged. photo Dan Toulgoet

Laneway housing divides city council Cheryl Rossi Staff writer

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W16

You can find our guide and all our Winter program offerings at the community centre or at www.kitscc.com The Guide is also available at:

VPL Kitsilano Branch • IGA 228 West Broadway • Choices on 16th Avenue

The city’s policies for laneway housing remain unchanged as of council’s Nov. 2 meeting. The Vision-dominated council asked staff to study how to make one-storey laneway homes more viable, and to consider a discretionary approach to one-and-a-half storey homes. Eighty-three per cent of the laneway homes approved as of July are one-and-ahalf storeys high with traditional pitched roofs. COPE Coun. Ellen Woodsworth had called for a four-month moratorium on new laneway homes so concerns expressed by the public could be addressed, but her bid for a breather was rejected. Nearly 200 laneway homes have been approved by the city in the last year. Residents have complained to the city about seeing big laneway houses go up and not learning they were approved for their neighbourhood until builders broke ground. NPA Coun. Suzanne Anton had wanted staff to consider allowing laneway houses to be only one storey, instead of up to 20 feet tall, or six feet taller than garages. “If they all looked more like garages and fit into the landscape in the same way that garages have formerly fit into the landscape, I don’t think people would have cared at all,” she said. Brent Toderian, the city’s director of planning, said owners building laneway homes tell the city the second half storey is critical to make units livable. But Anton doesn’t buy it. “You can get 500 square feet on a single storey on a 33-foot lot,” she said. “A 500square foot unit makes a fairly reasonable one-bedroom unit. It makes it more suitable for elderly people, people with any kind of disability.” Staff will explore allowing single-storey laneway homes to extend a few feet into backyards. “We don’t want to go too far in that di-

“IT MAKES IT MORE SUITABLE FOR ELDERLY PEOPLE, PEOPLE WITH ANY KIND OF DISABILITY.” Coun. Suzanne Anton

rection because it’s very important to us to keep the backyard for both livability reasons and urban agricultural reasons,” Toderian said. Staff will also report back to council about the pros and cons of making oneand-a-half storey laneway homes a discretionary approval. “On the one hand, it would give slightly more design review,” Toderian said. “On the other hand, it could add significantly to the process and thus the cost for laneway housing and that’s been a constant balance we’ve wanted to strike.” Staff will consider reducing the maximum unit size of 750 square feet, which doesn’t include garage and storage space. Staff will also consider delaying the requirement of sewer separation for laneway homes until the principal house is redeveloped. The city required separate sewers to avoid overflows, but delaying the requirement could save homeowners $6,000 to $8,000 in city fees and even more in excavation, piping and landscaping costs. Toderian maintains most Vancouverites are pleased the city has allowed the housing option, which can’t be strata-titled or sold. “It’s a rental supply option. It creates a much more adaptable and nimble singlefamily housing form and we constantly hear stories about how it adds flexibility to peoples’ lives from a mortgage helper perspective or a caregiver perspective or an aging member of the family perspective,” he said. Staff will report back to council on the height and size of laneway homes next year. They’ll also report in 2012 after final inspections on 150 units are complete. crossi@vancourier.com


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T HE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R W E D N E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 7 , 2 0 1 0

Westside

Awards of Distinction Now in its seventh year, the Westside Awards of Distinction has become known for being a prestigious event, bringing together and celebrating the achievements of local businesses. The sell-out event, which attracts a wide variety of nominations, saw a huge rise in applications last year and already looks set to be the largest event yet for 2010. With a superb venue, VIP guests and an impressive program for the evening, the night will undoubtedly rival any other event in the business calendar and must not be missed. Winning an award can bring significant prestige, media coverage, a boost for sales and marketing and staff morale. It is also invaluable for gaining a higher profile in the local community and provides a fantastic networking opportunity. First-time nominee Pamela Chatry is thrilled to have been chosen as a nominee in the category of Business Person of the Year. “It’s exciting to have been

nominated by my peers, and to know that I have made an impact by supporting the businesswomen of Vancouver, through our E-Women’s Network,” she says. (See details on page EW 26.)

ment or outstanding business growth • has consistently provided exceptional service and customer care

• has shown long term vision and growth for the community

Restaurant of the Year

• has demonstrated outstanding business development and excellence • has shown great innovation and clear vision • has exemplified expertise, dedication and performance * This individual will have been in business for a maximum of 2 years

Awards will be presented to an eligible business, organization or person that has made an exemplary contribution in one of the following categories:

• has provided an exceptional dining experience • has demonstrated excellent service and outstanding business practices • has offered unique ambiance and atmosphere

Community Spirit

Business Person of the Year

Award Criteria

• has provided extraordinary contribution to the Westside community spirit, image and identity • has promoted itself, through business activities, as a good, safe place to live, work and invest • has contributed to the community above and beyond the normal call of business

Retailer of the Year

• has demonstrated expertise and dedication in their field or area • has realized a noteworthy achieve-

• has shown exceptional vision and expertise • has demonstrated consistent performance and dedication • has served as a wonderful role model for business development and excellence

Business of the Year

• has made an outstanding contribution in the combined areas of overall business success • has been a notable member of the business community

New Entrepreneur of the Year

Green Business of the Year (new for 2010)

• has taken a leadership role or have substantial involvement in initiatives that have a positive impact on green living, sustainable best practices, energy conservation and environmental benefit. Best of luck to all the nominees on Thursday night! Articles supplied by Kitsilano Chamber of Commerce

Premier Homecare Services – Vancouver

We are honoured to be nominated for Community Spirit. It inspires us to keep doing our best!

Premier Homecare Services would like to thank the public and all our community partners for their ongoing support, in helping us reach the final three nominees for New Entrepreneur of the Year!

• Post Surgery Care • Respite Care • Homemaking • Companionship • Personal Care • Overnight Care and much more

For 36 years, Kisilano Neighbourhood House has been the hub of the Westside. It’s a place where all ages from toddlers to seniors come together to enjoy programs and services that make this area a good place to live and do business. www.kitshouse.org 604-736-3588 2325 West 7th Ave, Vancouver

604.636.1902 www.premierhomecareservices.com

Thank You for Nominating Us: New Entrepreneur of the Year & Green Business of the Year

*100% Organic Produce * Local BC and Natural Meat and Seafood * Full Service Deli & Cafe *Health and Wellness Department *100% BC Owned and Operated * Free ground-level parking 1978 West Broadway + Maple | Vancouver, BC | V6J 1Z2 Tel: 604.568.3079 |www.greensmarket.ca


W E D N E SD AY, N O V E M B E R 1 7 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

Retailer of the Year

2010 Finalists

Mountain Equipment Co-op www.mec.ca Founded in Vancouver in 1971 by six climbers, Mountain Equipment Co-op (MEC) has grown to become Canada’s largest retail co-operative. Michael McBride Menswear. www.michaelmcbride.ca Michael had long seen a need for a quality menswear store in the village of Point Grey on the city’s Westside. Hills of Kerrisdale – www.hillsofkerrisdale.com Hills of Kerrisdale is an 8,000 square-foot store carrying a wide range of clothing, shoes and accessories catering to modern families and style conscious teens.

Restaurant of the Year

The Boathouse www.boathouserestaurants.ca Overlooking the hottest beach in Vancouver – The Boathouse on Kits Beach is the perfect spot for year round patio dining, or in the bar and restaurant for the best view. Bistro Pastis. www.bistropastis.com A convivial atmosphere, enhanced by the cozy fireplace, invites diners to linger awhile. Pastis is as close as you can get to Paris without a plane ticket. La Quercia – www.laquercia.ca La Quercia offers a casual setting, with professional service and exceptional Italian dishes. Ingredients are sourced locally and organic where possible for the daily fresh sheet.

New Entrepreneur of the Year

Darelle Mitchell (Preston Mobility) - www.prestonmobility.com Darelle Mitchell is a 13 year wireless industry veteran, focusing on business-to-business partnerships for the past decade.

Eric MacDonald (Premier Homecare Services). - www. PremierHomecareServices.com Premier Homecare Services provides Vancouver seniors with affordable, personalized in-home care, allowing them to remain healthy at home.

Kitsilano Neighbourhood House www.kitshouse.org Kitsilano Neighbourhood House is a volunteer-driven community services organization that has been serving the Westside community for over 36 years.

Pamela Chatry www.ewomennetwork.com Pamela Chatry, Personal Business Manager and Managing Director of eWomen Network Vancouver, is a highly respected advisor within the small business community.

Green Business of the Year

Jay Ono - www.vtsl.com Jay Ono has worked in the Vancouver entertainment industry since 1982. His experience includes producing, directing, teaching, and performing.

Rocky Mountain Flatbread Co. www.rockymountainflatbread.ca Suzanne and Dominic Fielden partnered with their corporate chef Oliver Zulauf to create a delicious and healthy pizza using lots of local and organic produce. Molson Coors Canada www.molsoncoorscanada.com Since 2004, Molson Coors Canada has reduced their water and electricity use by 29% and their natural gas use by 26%.

Community Spirit of the Year

Bard on the Beach Shakespeare Festival - www.bardonthebeach.org Bard on the Beach Shakespeare Festival was established in 1990 and is a fully professional, not-for-profit theatre company. The Festival takes place from June through September. Sharon Townsend/South Granville Business Improvement Association - www.southgranville.org In 1999, the South Granville Business Improvement Association (SGBIA) was established to improve economic conditions for property owners and business tenants on South Granville.

A Champion for Women & their Business

Business Person of the Year

Greens Organic + Natural Market - www.greensmarket.ca Greens Organic + Natural Market was founded by two UBC graduates. It is committed to zero-waste, buying local where possible and offering organic and natural foods. Greens Organic + Natural Market - www.greensmarket.ca

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Pamela Chatry

Business Planning, Strategy & Action Finalist for Entrepreneur of the Year

My passion is supporting and connecting women in business

ph. 604.685.9136 pamelachatry.com

Ed DesRoches - www.plum.ca Ed DesRoches has been in the retail business since 1978. PLUM has gained a reputation for quality, locally designed and manufactured fashions.

Business of the Year

Qi Integrated Health www.qiintegratedhealth.com Qi Integrated Health, Centre for Modern Healing, is a multidisciplinary health clinic located in Kitsilano’s medical district on West Broadway. Qi was founded in 2006 by Kiem Schutter. Nurse Next Door www.nursenextdoor.com Nurse Next Door services hundreds of clients around Vancouver and thousands across Canada. Founded in 2001, it now has 38 franchise locations. New Look Business Centre www.newlookltd.com New Look Business Centre, in operation since 1988, offers full-service executive office space rentals and business solutions. New Look is managed by owner Nina Ewald.

NOT ALL WIRELESS DEALERS ARE CREATED EQUAL “Workforce Productivity” “Cost Savings” “Return on Investment” You don’t typically hear these phrases from your wireless dealer. Why? Because they’re not focused on business. Preston Mobility is different. We’re focused on customizing solutions to help you run your business in the most efficient and cost effective way possible. Get a Free Business Consultation sales@prestonmobility.com or 604-604-629-8526 www.prestonmobility.com

Congratulations to all the Finalists Community Spirit

Bard on the Beach Shakespeare Festival, Sharon Townsend – South Granville BIA, Kitsilano Neighbourhood House

Retailer of the Year

Mountain Equipment Co-op, Michael McBride Menswear, Hills of Kerrisdale

2010 Westside Business Awards

The Chamber also wishes to thank the Westside Business Awards of Distinction 2010 event sponsors.

Restaurant of the Year

Boathouse, Bistro Pastis, La Quercia

Business Person of the Year

Pamela Chatry, Jay Ono, Ed DesRoches

Business of the Year

Qi Integrated Health, Nurse Next Door, New Look Business Centre

New Entrepreneur of the Year

Darelle Mitchell – Preston Mobility Inc., Eric MacDonald – Premier Home Care Service, Greens Organic + Natural Market

Green Business of the Year

Greens Organic + Natural Market, Molson Coors Canada, Rocky Mountain Flatbread Co.

Awards Dinner

Thursday, November 18, 2010 • 6pm – 10pm To register go to www.kitsilanochamber.com


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T HE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R W E D N E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 7 , 2 0 1 0

2011

stars of vancouver OFFICIAL BALLOT

vote local in the 11th Annual “Best of ” Readers Poll…&

win

west side neighbourhood edition

circle your neighbourhood

Kerrisdale Dunbar Kitsilano Marpole South Granville Granville Island False Creek Cambie West Point Grey West 10th Live theatre company___________________________________ Local cinema__________________________________________ Pub __________________________________________________ Bakery _________________________________________________ Burger house __________________________________________ Cheap eats ___________________________________________ Coffee bar ____________________________________________ Ethnic food _____________________________________________ Fish & Chips ___________________________________________ Haute cuisine __________________________________________ Sushi bar _____________________________________________ College/University __________________________________ Financial institution __________________________________ Health / Fitness Club ________________________________ Private school ______________________________________ Seniors residence ____________________________________ Spa ________________________________________________ U-Brew (Wine or Beer) ________________________________ Video store __________________________________________ Yoga / Pilates ________________________________________

Appliance store _____________________________________ Art Gallery ________________________________________ Bike Shop _________________________________________ Bookstore __________________________________________ Consignment/Vintage _________________________________ Florist ______________________________________________ Furniture store ________________________________________ Gardening centre ______________________________________ Grocery store _______________________________________ Health food store____________________________________ Jewellery store_________________________________________ Kids’ clothing ________________________________________ Kitchenware __________________________________________ Pet store ____________________________________________ Produce store _______________________________________ Shoe store__________________________________________ Shopping mall _______________________________________ Sporting goods______________________________________ Womens’ clothing ____________________________________

Name______________________________________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________________________________ Postal Code ___________________________ Phone _______________________________________________________

TO BE ENTERED INTO OUR GRAND PRIZE DRAW,

please drop off or mail your ballot to: Readers’ Choice, The Vancouver Courier, 1574 West 6th Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1R2. Ballots must be pages from the newspaper (no photocopies or faxes). Deadline for entries and Grand Prize Draw: December 6, 2010. Winner will be notified by phone. Reader Poll results will be published Friday, January 28, 2011.

It’s time again to make yourself heard! Here’s your chance to share your tried and true favourite places in your neighbourhood. We’ve gathered together a total of 40 categories for you to give us your opinions on everything from appliance dealers to video stores. You play, we’ll pay! Please specify what neighbourhood you live in and fill in the entry form. Send in your entry form and you will automatically be entered in our fabulous draw for a chance to win a Courier Gift Basket.

Vancouver Courier November 17 2010  

Vancouver Courier November 17 2010

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