Page 1

CANTON INC CONVENIENCE & GROWTH STARK COUNTY, OHIO WINTER/SPRING 2019

GOOD FOR BUSINESS

A R E K E Y AT A K RO N - C A N TO N A I R P O R T

PLUS:

JACKSON AMPHITHEATER Strengthening Stark update UNION METAL SMART LIGHT POLES MAGNET focuses on Stark businesses


The Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce and AultCare

have partnered together to offer a healthcare plan for the small business community through a Multiple Employer Welfare Arrangement (MEWA).

The MEWA was developed to provide additional options and to help control the costs of healthcare benefits. Medically underwritten MEWA rates may provide a less expensive option than a smaller community rated plan obtained under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). This plan is available for small group employers with less than 50 employees.

Product Overview

Eligible Employers

• Small group coverage

• Under 50 eligible employees

• Self-funded plan with fixed monthly payments

• 75% minimum participation requirement

• Groups are not subject to ACA community rating

• 50% minimum employer contribution for single coverage

• Benefits administered by AultCare • AultCare Provider Network

www.aultcare.com/mewa

• Member in good standing with the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce

Benefit Plan Options • 12 plan options » Traditional co-pay plans » Consumer Driven Health Plans/Health Savings Account (HSA) Compatible • Ancillary Product Offerings » Dental Coverage » Vision Coverage

For Chamber Membership information call 330-456-7253. For healthcare or health fund information, contact your independent Broker or your AultCare Representative. All AultCare health plan quote proposals include commission, unless otherwise specified. 3024/18


CANTON INC WINTER/SPRING 2019

Engineers Environmental Consultants Surveyors Safety Consultants

Canton Inc. is an economic development publication produced through a collaboration of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce and The Repository. CANTON REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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OHIO • PENNSYLVANIA COLORADO • WEST VIRGINIA

Dennis P. Saunier President and CEO dennys@cantonchamber.org 330-456-7253 Steven M. Meeks COO stevenm@cantonchamber.org 330-458-2088 Michael P. Gill Vice President for Economic Development, Canton Development Partnership mikeg@cantonchamber.org 330-458-2090 Joanne K. Murray Vice President for Community Events and Sponsorships joannem@cantonchamber.org 330-458-2050 Debbie Busby Director of Membership Development debbieb@cantonchamber.org 330-458-2051

For all your printing, bindery & mailing needs LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED Call today for your free quote! 330.575.5685

Collyn Floyd Director of Marketing and Public Relations collynf@cantonchamber.org 330-458-2071 Kathy D. Irwin Director of Finance and Accounting kathyd@cantonchamber.org 330-456-7253 Stephanie Snow Werren Director of Leadership Stark County stephaniew@leadershipstarkcounty.org 330-458-2093 Barb Bennett Director of Education Initiatives barbb@cantonchamber.org 330-456-7253 Jeff Dafler Director of Public Policy jeffd@cantonchamber.org 330-456-7253


D e HOFF

knows our communities best.

DeHOFF Developments Portage County Forest Ridge

Stark County

CONTENTS

COVER & HERE: Renderings of expansion at Akron-Canton Airport. PROVIDED BY AKRON-CANTON AIRPORT

08

CEO message

11

Stark County Economics

13

Industrial Land & Business Parks

16

CONVENIENCE IS KEY AT AKRON-CANTON AIRPORT

22

Top professors at local colleges & universities

27

MAGNET focuses on Stark businesses

30

Union Metal: Light poles of the future

34

Local wineries; big business

39

Strengthening Stark: A progress update

44

Canton Innovation District gets green light for funding

48

Amphitheater to expand opportunities in Jackson Township

51

Area education, business and economic development resources

58

Parting shot

Expansion plans are already in the works to make airport more flyer-friendly.

Bishop Meadows • The Boroughs Carrington • Carrington Villas Chestnut Ridge • Forest Meadows Greentree • Greenwich Place Nobles Pond • Saint James Place Saint James Place Villas Saratoga Hills • Stonebridge The Sanctuary • Summit Place Saint Ives Villas • Washington Hills Washington Square • Wellington Hills • Wellington Woods

Summit County

Charleston Place • King’s Ridge Paddington Woods • Spring Hill

330-499-8153 dehoff.com


CANTON INC REPOSITORY/GATEHOUSE OHIO James A. Porter Publisher jim.porter@cantonrep.com 330-580-8444 Kelsey Davis Editor, magazine division kelsey.davis@cantonrep.com 330-580-8318

Whetstone Center would be thrilled to

Bob Commings Advertising, magazine division bob.commings@cantonrep.com 330-580-8519

host your upcoming corporate retreat or

CONTRIBUTORS Julie Botos, Kelly Byer, Patricia Faulhaber, Jessica Holbrook, Brian Lisik, Alison Matas, Carolynn Mostyn, Joan Porter, Eric Poston, Ray Stewart

special event! Call us today! 330.933.6725 whetstonecenter.com

2019 Executive Committee

CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Rick McQueen President/CEO, Akron-Canton Airport (Retired) SR. VICE CHAIRMAN Joseph J. Feltes Partner in Charge Canton Office, Buckingham, Doolittle & Burroughs, LLC

8009 Beeson St, Louisville, OH 44641

VICE CHAIRMAN Dr. Jay Gershen President, Northeast Ohio Medical University

Quality paints since 1911

VICE CHAIRMAN Todd J. Hawke Principal GDK and Co-President, Jackson Township Board of Trustees

PAINT COMPANY

VICE CHAIRMAN Geoff Karcher President, The Karcher Group VICE CHAIRMAN John M. Tucker President, Krugliak, Wilkins, Griffiths & Dougherty Co. LPA VICE CHAIRMAN & CORPORATE SECRETARY Amanda Sterling Vice President—Auditing & Transactional Services, TimkenSteel Corporation TREASURER Mark Wright Chief Financial Officer, Aultman Health Foundation IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIRMAN Jim Porter CEO/Publisher, GateHouse Media/The Canton Repository

TOP QUALITY PAINTS AND COATINGS LOCALLY MADE FOR OVER A CENTURY 1329 Harrison Ave SW

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www.harrisonpaint.com

PRESIDENT Dennis P. Saunier President and CEO, Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce Steven M. Meeks Chief Operating Officer, Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce Connie Cerny Recording Secretary, Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce


AD INDEX 02 CONSUMERS BANK

14 SELINSKY FORCE

03 MEWA

15 BUCKINGHAM, DOOLITTLE &

04 RETTEW

04 DOCUMENT CONCEPTS

25 USA QUICKPRINT

04 LEADERSHIP STARK COUNTY

25 GERVASI VINEYARD

05 DEHOFF REALTORS

26 AULTCARE’S PRIMETIME

06 WHETSTONE CONFERENCE

43 PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME

47 SARTA

CENTER

BURROUGHS

06 HARRISON PAINT

50 BELDEN BRICK

07 STARK COUNTY

53 UNIVERSITY OF AKRON

55 MERCY MEDICAL CENTER

SAFETY COUNCIL

09 CANTON REGIONAL CHAMBER

57 PUTMAN PROPERTIES

59 HUNTINGTON BANK

OF COMMERCE

10 AULTCARE

60 CANTON REGIONAL CHAMBER

12 FARMERS NATIONAL BANK

OF COMMERCE

For information about how to advertise in this publication, please contact Bob Commings at bob.commings@cantonrep.com or 330-580-8519. CANTON INC is published by GateHouse Ohio Media, 500 Market Ave. S, Canton, OH 44702, 330-580-8300. CANTON INC is protected by federal copyright law, which gives the publication exclusive rights to reproduce or authorize reproduction of its materials.

CANTON REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

BOARD OF DIRECTORS EMIL ALECUSAN Vice President & CFO Brewster Cheese BRADLEY H. BELDEN Vice President, Administrative Services | The Belden Brick Company

MICHAEL R. GRAEFF T. MATTHEW GREGORY Executive Vice President Gregory Industries, Inc. PAUL HILTZ Interim CEO Mercy Medical Center

RUDOLF BENTLAGE Market Executive Northeast Ohio PMorgan Chase Bank, NA

RICK HULL Regional President Home Savings Bank

GREG BROKAW Sales and Service Manager Consumers National Bank, Jackson-Belden Office

MIKE LEVY Chief Operating Officer/Senior Vice President, Canton Charge

RENATO “REN” CAMACHO President & CEO Akron-Canton Airport

BRADLEY R. McKAIN Division Manager Ohio Refining Division | Marathon Petroleum Company, LP

KIMBERLY DAVENPORT Corporate Director of Human Resources | Shearer’s Snacks

FRANK MONACO Managing Partner Four Fifteen Group

R. ERIC DELLAPINA Head of Commercial Banking Eastern OH Market | KeyBank

MICHAEL MOORE Managing Director, Finance & Controller | FedEx Custom Critical

CHRISTOPHER DiLORETO Superintendent | Jackson Local School District

STEVEN O. PITTMAN Managing Principal - Akron and Canton Offices | CliftonLarsonAllen

MIKE GALLINA Vice President Outreach Services AultCare

TERESA J. PURSES President Stark Education Partnership

RODNEY REASONOVER Chief Executive Officer | Stark County Community Action Agency ROBERT E. ROLAND, ESQ. Managing Partner | Day Ketterer, Ltd. JOSEPH D. SCHAUER Vice President | Schauer Group, Inc. DR. DENISE A. SEACHRIST Dean & Chief Administrative Officer Kent State University at Stark WILLIAM C. SHIVERS President, Greater Akron/Canton & Mahoning Valley Regions | Huntington Bank TRACY STEVENS External Affairs Manager Dominion Energy JOHN M. TUCKER President | Krugliak, Wilkins, Griffiths & Dougherty Co. LPA TERI WILSON Vice President - Tax The Timken Company CATHY WYATT Owner | Carpe Diem Coffee Shops


CEO MESSAGE

CANTON INC

AKRON-CANTON AIRPORT TO KEEP THINGS CONVENIENT

CantonIncMagazine.com

S

08

tark Countians love the convenience and popular destinations that the Akron-Canton Airport (CAK) provides. In August 2018, CAK launched its latest round of improvements by breaking ground on its $34 million gate modernization project. All of CAK’s projects over the last decade have served one primary purpose: to make CAK more convenient for its customers. CAK is already known for its flyer-friendly amenities such as shorter lines, easy parking, free Wi-Fi and more. When the gate modernization project is completed in mid-2020 (weather permitting), the airport will achieve an even greater level of convenience, including bright, airy gate areas, more seating and dining options, covered jet bridges, even a pet relief area. All of these amenities translate to regional growth for the airport, adding up to a half-billion dollar annual economic impact on the region. On page 22 of this issue, we profile six exceptional educators making a difference at Stark County’s colleges and universities. Integral to every academic institution’s success is a faculty committed to its students, and these educators are leading the way. Light poles that provide … internet? Union Metal engineers are redesigning their current light poles to provide both lighting and internet. On page

32, read how a turn-of-the-century company that began in an old broom factory is lighting the way for “smart communities” of the future. Progress continues on the Strengthening Stark initiative, to help turn the tide of the findings in the 2017 report that Stark is getting “smaller, poorer and older.” After completing and analyzing the results of 200 interviews from all sectors of business and the community, the group has identified seven focus areas of impact. Find out where each area currently stands on page 40. Downtown Canton has received the green light to launch an “innovation district”—a 10-block area with access to the fastest internet speed in the world. Cleveland-based Jumpstart, a key partner in the district, has provided a community manager who will offer programming and assistance to entrepreneurs at the district’s downtown headquarters. Read more about the launch on page 46. This issue also explores Jackson Township’s amphitheater development project, Stark County wineries and nonprofit business and engineering consulting organization, MAGNET. We’re honored to begin our eighth year of producing Canton Inc. and sharing stories about the unique business and community strengths of our region. We hope you’ll read on to discover why Canton/Stark County is an exciting place for your company to do business.

Dennis P. Saunier President and CEO Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce

James A. Porter Publisher and CEO The Canton Repository


YOU MATTER. TELL SOMEONE ELSE THEY MATTER TOO. Everyone plays a part. We all have a role. Each of us can MAKE A DIFFERENCE. You do matter — and the best way to have a positive impact is to pay it forward, with each of us helping one another cope, feel better and know that we belong. PASS ON THE POSITIVITY TODAY!

3006/18

© 2018 AultCare. All rights reserved.


CANTON INC ECONOMICS

STARK COUNTY

ECONOMICS

INCOME AND MAJOR COST OF LIVING INDUSTRIES

$47,137

Median home value:

$122,900 Median rent:

$680/MO. Cost of living:

16.4% LOWER than U.S. average

Unemployment rate:

4.6%

(national average is 3.7%)

HOUSEHOLDS Canton population 71,323 Stark County population 373,612 Median resident age 41.8 Age 17 and younger 21.7% Age 18 to 64 59.8% Age 65 and older 18.5% Households 150,385

WORKFORCE Total workforce: 185,600 Average commute: 22 minutes

(NON-FARM)

Education and health services:

19.2%

Manufacturing:

15.6%

Trade, transportation and utilities:

18.8%

Professional and business services:

8.8%

Leisure and hospitality:

11%

Government:

11.7%

PARKS & TRAILS

Other:

14.9% EDUCATION

High school attainment:

90.0%

College attainment:

21.9%

Graduate or professional degree:

7.5%

WEATHER

Average January high:

33 degrees

Alliance Community Hospital Aultman Hospital Canton City Schools City of Canton Diebold/Nixdorf Heinz North America Mercy Medical Center Nickles Bakery Synchrony Financial Stark County government Stark State College Sugardale Foods The Timken Co. TimkenSteel Wal-Mart Stores Inc.

Average July high:

82 degrees

Stark County Park District includes:

8,000 acres of land

100+

miles of walking/bicycling trails and

31

miles of equestrian trails, in addition to the parks maintained by cities and townships

14

parks in addition to the parks maintained by cities and townships SOURCES: U.S. Census Bureau, Ohio Department of Development, NOAA and the National Weather Service, Stark Parks, U.S. Department of Labor (Bureau of Labor Statistics), Forbes.

CantonIncMagazine.com

Median household income:

MAJOR EMPLOYERS

11


CANTON INC BUSINESS PARKS

AKCAN INDUSTRIAL PARK Location: Green, Ohio Acres available: 200 Highway access: I-77 Zoning: Light industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Dan DeHoff, DeHoff Realty, 330-499-8153

CANTON CENTURY PARK Location: Canton, Ohio Acres available: 30 Highway access: I-77/Faircrest at Exit 101 Zoning: Heavy commercial Rail access: No Development contact: Bryce Custer, 330-418-9287

CENTRAL WARNER COMPLEX Location: Canton, Ohio Acres available: 30 Highway access: U.S. Route 30 / I-77 Zoning: Heavy Industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Tim Putman, Putman Properties, 330-495-0600

ALLIANCE COMMERCE PARK Location: Alliance, Ohio Acres available: 75 Highway access: U.S. Route 62 Zoning: Light/heavy industrial Rail access: Yes Development contact: Jim Stout, Coastal Pet Products, 330-821-2218

CANTON INDUSTRIAL PARK - WEST Location: Canton, Ohio Acres available: 12 Highway access: I-77 Zoning: Light Industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Tim Putman, Putman Properties, 330-495-0600

EASTRIDGE COMMERCE PARK Location: Canton, Ohio Acres available: 88 Highway access: U.S. Route 62 Zoning: Light industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Bob DeHoff, DeHoff Development, 330-499-8153

CantonIncMagazine.com

INDUSTRIAL LAND AND BUSINESS PARKS

13


BUSINESS PARKS

CANTON INC

ELM RIDGE INDUSTRIAL PARK Location: Canal Fulton, Ohio Acres available: 16 Highway access: State Route 21 and I-77 Zoning: Light industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Don Schalmo, Schalmo Properties Inc., 330-854-9396

FORD PROPERTY Location: Canton, Ohio Acres available: 75 Highway access: U.S. Route 30 Zoning: Heavy industrial Rail access: Yes Development contact: Rafael Rodriguez, 330-453-5900

HARTVILLE INDUSTRIAL PARK Location: Hartville, Ohio Acres available: 2 Highway access: State Routes 43 and 619 Zoning: Light industrial Rail access: Some potential Development contact: Mayor’s office, village of Hartville, 330-877-9222

MASSILLON ENERGY & TECHNOLOGY PARK Location: Massillon, Ohio Acres available: 465 Highway access: State Route 21 and U.S. Route 30 Zoning: Heavy industrial Rail access: Yes Development contact: Garret Kloots, 330833-6325

NEOCOM INDUSTRIAL PARK Location: Massillon, Ohio Acres available: 100 Highway access: State Route 21 and U.S. Route 30 Zoning: Heavy industrial Rail access: Yes Development contact: Ted Herncane, 330-833-3146

MILLS BUSINESS PARK Location: Canton, Ohio Acres available: 85 Highway access: I-77 Zoning: Light industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Dan DeHoff, Canton Commerce LLC, 330-499-8153

PORT JACKSON Location: Jackson Township, Ohio Acres available: 16 Highway access: I-77 Zoning: Light industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Lisa Gould, Akron-Canton Airport, 330-668-4000

STARK COUNTY FARM Location: Navarre, Ohio Acres available: 300 Highway access: U.S. Route 30 Zoning: Light industrial Rail access: Yes Development contact: Bob DeHoff, DeHoff Development, 330-499-8153

STEIN INDUSTRIAL PARK Location: Canton, Ohio Acres available: 13 Highway access: U.S. Route 30 at State Route 43 Zoning: I2 Heavy Industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Tim Putman, Putman Properties, 330-495-0600

NOVA EAST Location: Massillon, Ohio Acres available: 25 Highway access: U.S. Route 30 Zoning: Light industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Dan Spring, 330-966-8800

Looking for more information, or for details about industrial buildings and service sector properties? Contact Michael P. Gill, vice president for economic development, Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce at 330-458-2090.

Selinsky Force offers unsurpassed customer service and wide-ranging capabilities in industrial construction, plant maintenance, refractory, rigging and hauling, equipment rental and pulverizer services. With our diverse portfolio we can service all of your Industrial, Construction and Oil & Gas needs. 4015 23rd St. SW, Canton, OH 44706 for more information call - 330-477-4527

www.selinskyforce.com


MOVING AND GROWING With offices in Canton, Akron and Cleveland, Buckingham attorneys work in unison with our 800+ business clients on sophisticated M&A and real estate transactions, high-stakes litigation, health law regulatory compliance, as well as strategic business and tax planning. In 2019, we will be supporting clients from our new office building at 4277 Munson Street NW in Canton. As we grow, we will continue to place Buckingham clients at the center of everything we do and deliver best-in-class services. We are honored to remain a deeply-rooted part of the Stark County community.

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bdblaw.com | 330.492.8717 Pro u d to b e part of St ark C ount y’s thri vi ng busi ness com m uni t y.

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COVER STORY CANTON INC

CantonIncMagazine.com

B Y PAT R I C I A F A U L H A B E R | R E N D E R I N G S B Y L E O A D A LY A N D S O L H A R R I S / D AY

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CONVENIENCE I S K E Y AT A K RO N - C A N TO N A I R P O R T


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CANTON INC COVER STORY

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COVER STORY CANTON INC

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F

OR THE PAST DECADE, THE AKRON-CANTON AIRPORT (CAK) HAS BEEN EXPANDING AND MODERNIZING. THE LAST PHASE OF THE “CAK 2018” CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PLAN IS UNDERWAY AND WILL ADD A NEW LEVEL OF CONVENIENCE FOR FLYERS. The current project is a $34 million gate modernization, which broke ground in late August. It will continue through 2020 under the leadership of Ren Camacho,

President and CEO of the Akron-Canton Airport. This next round of improvements will be completed in three phases. The first phase includes utility and drainage work and construction of a 22,900-square-yard concrete aircraft parking apron with 15inch thick concrete areas. The second phase includes construction of new gates and a two-level 41,600-square-foot concourse, similar to the existing second floor gate area. Phase II will be under construction concurrent

with Phase I. The last phase, Phase III, involves the demolition of the old gate complex, which then will allow 7,500 square yards of aircraft parking. This part of the project will happen after Phases I and II are complete in mid-2020. “This is the final installment of a $140 million, 10-year capital improvements plan that began 11 years ago,” said Camacho. “The project is a fundamental base for our next airport improvement plan, which will roll out in spring 2019.”


CANTON INC COVER STORY

He said all aspects of CAK 2018 have been completed to make the airport even more convenient for guests. The convenience factor is one of the draws for airport guests along with shorter lines, a more relaxing facility and many free amenities. Flyers will notice many other improvements with the gate modernization, such as additional bright, open spaces, ample seating, new food and beverage areas, including a sit-down restaurant and grab and go eateries. Free amenities, such as Wi-Fi through-

out, the business lounge, a mother’s room and the kids play area, will find new homes in the expanded concourse along with a new pet relief area. One new update that flyers quickly will notice are the jet bridges at every gate to ensure that passengers can board their aircraft without walking outside in the rain or snow. Maintaining convenience for customers has been key and remains so during the last project. Camacho said, “People using the airport during the next few years won’t be

affected by the construction. We strive for an excellent guest experience even during times of construction, which includes minimizing the impact on our customers.” Steady improvements over the past decade have helped position the airport as a regional airport versus a local airport, with flyers coming from all over northeast Ohio. Last year alone, there were 25 airline flights a day. Plus, 75,000 to 80,000 takeoff and landing services of general aviation aircraft, airlines, private, corporate and military aircraft.

CantonIncMagazine.com

THE CURRENT PROJECT IS A $34 M I L L I O N G AT E M O D E R N I Z AT I O N , WHICH BROKE GROUND IN L AT E A U G U S T. I T WILL CONTINUE THROUGH 2020.

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COVER STORY CANTON INC

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“ T H E L OYA LT Y O F OUR GUESTS IN NORTHEAST OHIO HAS MADE US INTO THE AIRPORT WE ARE T O D A Y. T H E Y S U P P O R T THE AIR SERVICE WE OFFER, AND IN TURN , WE WORK TO C O N T I N U A L LY P R O V I D E THEM WITH THE BEST D E S T I N AT I O N S W E C A N .” —REN CAMACHO


He added, “We know that our business travelers want to go from here to the places they’re conducting business in an easy, efficient manner. The Akron-Canton Airport has 11 nonstop destinations to major business hubs in the United States. Businesses can get anywhere in the world with one quick stop at the Akron-Canton Airport. We make it a priority to listen to our business customers and respond to their requests, from routes to covered parking.” Improvements over the past 11 years include expansion of the parking areas and installation of energy-efficient lighting, expansion of the TSA screening area and the ticket counter. Plus, there was a runway extension, which was the largest of the capital improvement projects. There has been an expansion of aircraft parking and the Customs and Border Pa-

trol facility, and the rescue and firefighting facility was replaced. Plus, a joint project with the City of Green and Summit County for a 180-acre Port Green Industrial Park is ready for businesses to rent. “The loyalty of our guests in Northeast Ohio has made us into the airport we are today. They support the air service we offer, and in turn, we work to continually provide them with the best destinations we can,” Camacho said. He added, “We are fortunate to have a board of trustees that supports our plans for strategic growth and encourages it every step of the way. We see exciting opportunities to position the Akron-Canton Airport for future growth that will delight our guests, plus help move our region toward greater economic prosperity.” CAK currently serves the Northeast Ohio region with nonstop air service to

Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Fort Myers, Houston, New York, Newark, Orlando, Philadelphia, Tampa and Washington D.C. Carriers at the airport include American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Spirit Airlines and United Airlines and offer one-stop access to the world from CAK. “We are always working with our current and potential carriers to retain and attract air service,” said Camacho. “Some ways we do that is providing information about our community that they might not be able to see on their end and meet with them in-person to foster good relationships. We have a lot of things in the works right now, and I’m confident we’ll see growth at CAK again.” To share your business’ air service needs with the Airport, please contact info@akroncantonairport.com.

CantonIncMagazine.com

CANTON INC COVER STORY

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CantonIncMagazine.com

TOP PROFS

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CANTON INC

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY AT STARK


CANTON INC

TOP PROFS

BY CAROLYNN MOSTYN | PHOTOS BY JULIE BOTOS

TOP PROFESSORS AT LOCAL COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES

JEFFREY PELLEGRINO, AULTMAN COLLEGE Among the exceptional educators is Jeffrey Pellegrino, Aultman College professor and program director for foundational education and health science. His favorite context to think about, teach in and experience is the wilderness. He led the way in creating national curriculum for the American Red Cross and Boy Scouts in Wilderness First Aid. “It is a time and place where decisions are critical to keep people safe and to rely on each other when emergencies happen—everyone has a positive contribution to make,” he said. In his survival behaviors lab, Pellegrino and colleagues research the best ways to

meet learners where they are and improve survival of personal, human-made and natural disasters. “As the editor-in-chief of the International Journal of First Aid Education, I see where research and practice is moving in first aid education.” He said it translates to more opportunities for him to learn with Aultman and students from other colleges and universities. His wife, Lisa, and daughters, Grace and Rosa, support his activities as a fire fighter, Red Cross instructor and beyond. JONATHAN MITCHELL, STARK STATE COLLEGE Jonathan Mitchell, associate professor of accounting and finance for Stark State College, received the Distinguished Teaching Award in May. Mitchell, a Stark State alum, has been teaching for 18 years and said, “Being nominated by students, and then winning by vote of my peers, means the world. A validation of years invested in my profession and into people’s lives.”

He worked 10 years in public accounting and four as a controller in the oil and gas industry which he said, was awesome. Along with teaching, he and his wife, Shirley, continue to run a home-based tax business and have church financial responsibility. Mitchell’s family is a blessing. He knew the minute Shirley smiled she was the one. The couple have two children, Kaytlan and Jesse. He compares his close family and church family to Hallmark commercials. “I have a career I love. Seeing the light bulbs come on for students and seeing lives changed is great.” CARRIE SCHWEITZER, KENT STATE UNIVERSITY AT STARK As a geology professor since 2000 at Kent State University at Stark, Carrie Schweitzer said her job is a perfect job. “I have always been interested in teaching and science.” Spending research hours with decapod crustaceans is important as Schweitzer

CantonIncMagazine.com

S

tark County is rich with wellknown colleges and universities, and inside these higher learning institutions, the list of exceptional educators and researchers has grown to include quite a variety of top professors.

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TOP PROFS

CANTON INC

WALSH UNIVERSITY

STARK STATE COLLEGE

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MALONE UNIVERSITY

24

studies the evolution and radiation of shrimp, lobsters and crabs through geologic time. Over the last 20 years, she has discovered and named 200 plus new species. Schweitzer is most proud of a group of students “who are interested in geology and the environment. They constitute an involved group, working the labs, going on field trips and engaging in community service.” She loves reading, hiking and travel. Her mother was an elementary school teacher, and “both of my parents liked the outdoors, which probably influenced my life choices.” RON MENDEL, UNIVERSITY OF MOUNT UNION Serving as program director for exercise science, Ron Mendel has been

UNIVERSITY OF MOUNT UNION

teaching at the University of Mount Union since 2004. His research interests are directly applicable to sport and athletic performance, and currently, he is involved in a project to measure the physiological stress that race car drivers undergo during a race. His recent publications and presentations focus on those stresses imposed on drivers and psychological testing of collegiate soccer players to determine success. His current research focuses on the use of technology and sport analytics to track and evaluate athletes for training and game modifications to improve overall sport performance. He and his wife, Angie, have three children, Courtney, Cameron and Connor. “We are a soccer family, as I have coached high school, and both the boys

AULTMAN COLLEGE

are currently playing in college,” said Mendel. He was proud and humbled to receive Mount Union’s Great Teacher Award. KARYN COLLIE, MALONE UNIVERSITY For Malone University’s Assistant Professor of Biology, Karyn Collie researching “why baby potato beetles eat their siblings’ eggs before they have a chance to hatch” is important. It is her personal research, but her students do behavioral observation projects at the Akron Zoo. It’s Collie’s sixth year at Malone, and her reason for becoming a professor is this: “I had really great professors at a university like Malone when I was an undergraduate. They had a huge professional and personal impact on me.”


She said she wanted to do the same for students––getting them passionate about her field while also being able to serve as a personal mentor. Collie’s most proud accomplishment is taking six undergraduate students to national or international conferences to present their research affording them great opportunities. Collie also developed a Marine Biology minor, Environmental Studies major and Environmental Science and Environments Studies minors at Malone. Along with beetle studies, Collie said she enjoys spending time with people and animals––going to a zoo with students, taking a hike with friends or traveling to new wildlife encounters and experiencing different cultures. ADAM UNDERWOOD, WALSH UNIVERSITY Ten-year Walsh University Professor of Biology, Adam Underwood did not set out to be a professor. At first, it was resource management and forestry, which he decided was not for him. He had dental aspirations following in his father’s footsteps but, “my advisors hinted that I may want to explore biomedical research.” He fell in love with research and teaching. The 2014 Outstanding Educator of the year, Underwood enjoys working with students, “especially in the lab. It creates a family-like environment. As a research adviser, you are constantly mentoring them, teaching them new techniques and professional skills that are going to prepare them for the next step.” Underwood collaborates with fellow professors and researchers to analyze the genome to develop tools used to diagnose and treat disease. These tools will be used for doctors to investigate genetic background to diagnose and establish personalized therapies for a disease. He and his wife, Eileen, and their three children, Cora, Connor and Samuel, spend time enjoying the outdoors and their hobby farm raising animals. These professors go above and beyond to reach and develop their students into the best they can be when they leave these six excellent local colleges and universities.

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MAGNET

MAGNET FOCUSES ON STARK BUSINESSES BY BRIAN LISIK

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through Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce partnership

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MAGNET

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HERE HAS BEEN A PERCEPTION OVER THE LAST DECADE OR TWO THAT M A N U FAC T U R ING IS ON THE DECLINE IN NORTHEAST OHIO. But nothing could be further from the truth if you ask Darlyn McDermott, CLF, regional market leader and growth advisor for MAGNET (Manufacturing Advocacy and Growth Network). “The collective ‘we’ don’t always perceive or understand that, from a career perspective, this is a manufacturing region,” McDermott said. The mission of MAGNET is to foster contin-

ued growth of small to medium sized manufacturing companies. The employees at MAGNET are not your typical consultants. They’re manufacturers. They work closely with your team to create measurable results. For more than three decades, they have helped Northeast Ohio’s manufacturing businesses compete globally while growing locally. High-touch, high-impact consulting is part of their DNA, and they’re here to stay. A 35-year-old Cleveland-based nonprofit business and engineering consulting organization, MAGNET has long had a close relationship with manufacturers in Stark and surrounding counties. Its recently announced partnership with the Canton


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MAGNET

Regional Chamber of Commerce, which includes dedicated MAGNET office space within the Chamber, is described by both organizations as an effort to bring MAGNET resources even closer to area manufacturers. McDermott’s team contracts for consultancy services with companies throughout Stark, Summit, Portage, Medina and Wayne counties, with a growing presence in Tuscarawas, Carroll and Holmes counties. “We have what I call two major ‘buckets’ of service,” McDermott said. “People and machines.” The machine “bucket,” McDermott said, includes automation—from facility layout engineering to accommodate updated technology,

to cyber security—while the “people” bucket of services can include leadership training; attracting, training and retaining employees; researching market opportunities and developing marketing strategies; developing data driven business strategies; and developing, engineering, designing and launching new products. When you partner with MAGNET, you’re working with more than just its 40-person team. You’re instantly connected to the top resources across the region, Ohio and the country. It’s a perfect fit for local manufacturers. MAGNET’s industry-specific engineering, strategic growth and go-to-market expertise help manufacturers achieve excellence in products and processes.

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“WE HAVE WHAT I CALL TWO MAJOR ‘BUCKETS’ OF SERVICE. PEOPLE AND MACHINES.” —Darlyn McDermott

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UNION METAL

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UNION METAL

UNION METAL By Joan Porter

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Light poles of the future

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A FAIRLY NEW PRODUCT, THE POLES INCORPORATE BOTH LIGHTING AND INTERNET SERVICE. UNION METAL ENGINEERS ARE REDESIGNING THEIR CURRENT POLES TO ACCOMMODATE THE BATTERIES AND COOLING SYSTEM NECESSARY FOR THE COMBINATION POLE.

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hey’re everywhere. They are so much a part of the landscape that we barely notice them, but they provide essential services for modern life. They offer us safety by supporting lighting for sidewalks, roadways, school campuses, residential neighborhoods and commercial properties, as well as traffic signals. They add to our entertainment by helping to light stadiums and arenas. They bring electricity into our homes and businesses. They keep us moving while we’re using mass transit. And they keep us connected through our cellphones and computers. They are poles. Union Metal Corporation, now Union Metal Industries Corporation, may have started out in an old broom factory on the northeast side of Canton in 1906

as a manufacturer of fluted steel porch columns, but got into the light pole business with an order for lighting standards instead, something the company had never made before. By World War I, lighting standards had become the company’s major product, and the company continued to add new uses for their poles to their product line. Even during the Great Depression, Union Metal was able to stay in business thanks to a large order in 1931 from Evanston, Illinois, for 4,800 ornamental lighting poles, which were replaced with the same design 50 years later. Today, Union Metal Corporation is an industry leader in nostalgic lighting and traffic poles, among their other products. But Union Metal, located at 1432 Maple Avenue NE, Canton, nearly came to an end in 2017 when the company announced its closing amid financial problems. The business began laying off some of its 340 workers


in December 2017 with plans to fully close the plant in 2018. Enter American Industrial Acquisition Corporation. “We are always looking for companies to buy and turn around. We don’t buy companies to sell them. We buy them to keep them. Employees are valuable,” said Union Metal’s Chief Operating Officer Larry Small, who noted that the turnaround is going faster than he expected. “Our aim is to be Ohio’s turnaround company of the year and the national turnaround company the following year.” By 2021, Small expects to have 225 employees on board, especially if smart poles take off. A fairly new product, the poles incorporate both lighting and internet service. Union Metal engineers are redesigning their current poles to accommodate the batteries and cooling system necessary for the combination pole.

“We are a leading contender in smart poles, because we got into it early,” said Small. “If this smart technology happens, the sky’s the limit.” Dennis Saunier, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, also recognizes that possibilities abound with smart pole technology. One of those possibilities is a working relationship between Union Metal and Johnson Controls and how each could support the other’s agenda. Johnson Controls is developing Canton’s Hall of Fame Village into a smart city. As of this writing, Saunier is not aware if the two companies have discussed collaboration, but he hopes to introduce them soon. If the two companies choose to collaborate, between Union Metal’s poles and Johnson Controls’ technology and knowledge of smart communities, the sky could, indeed, be the limit.

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WINERIES

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Local wineries; b

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t’s almost impossible to feel stressed out sitting on the patio of The Winery at Perennial Vineyards. Nestled on farmland in Tuscarawas Township, not far from Navarre, the rustic winery invites you to grab a glass and maybe a slice of pizza and just relax. “It’s a really awesome place,” said manager Angie Begler. “It’s really kind of rustic. It has old-world charm.” Perennial boasts that it’s Stark County’s oldest winery. Owner Damon Leeman opened Perennial in 2002, before the current trend of bespoke booze. It’s set in a dairy barn that dates back to the mid-1800s that Leeman and his family restored. “The owners have worked really hard at restoring the place and making it a winery,” Begler said. Bright-red doors open into a beautiful tasting room, where guests can order from a menu of wine, cheese plates and handcrafted stonebaked pizzas. Perennial offers counter service, so guests don’t have to worry about being in-

The Winery at Perennial Vineyards

terrupted by servers. People love the pizza, said Begler, adding that Perennial’s slate of offerings, which also includes mixed drinks and beer, sets it apart. “It ended up being quite a lot. Most wineries don’t offer as much,” she said. “Our food is exceptional,” she added. Perennial is an agricultural winery. It grows its own grapes on the working farm—nearly all of the grapes used to make Perennial wine are cultivated and hand-picked on-site. Perennial also does its own bottling and labeling. Essentially everything that goes into making a bottle of wine, happens there at the winery, Begler said. On nice days, guests flock to Perennial’s spacious, pet-friendly patio overlooking the vineyards. It’s not uncommon to catch a glimpse of wildlife. The winery, which is open Thursday through Saturday, also offers live music nearly every night. The musicians always draw a

crowd, Begler said. Perennial also is available for event rentals. Guests can choose from the indoor Grotto—a year-round venue featuring stone and dark-wood accents— and the outdoor pavilion for events during warmer months. Both spaces can accommodate groups of about 80. Perennial also offers a small farmhouse for groups of about 35. Perennial attracts a diverse crowd, from new wine drinkers in their 20s to longtime fans in their 70s. And it fills up fast on the weekends, so make sure to arrive early to grab a good seat. “The atmosphere is the big draw,” she said. “And then you come in and you get good service, good wine and good pizza.” “It’s a beautiful place. It really is,” she added. The Winery at Perennial Vineyards is located at 11877 Poorman Street SW, Navarre. ­—JESSICA HOLBROOK


; big business

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WINERIES

PHOTOS BY JULIE BOTOS

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Gervasi Vineyard which has a tasting bar with at least 15 varieties of wine in stock. Gervasi bottles white, red, port and dessert wines and has 28 wines that carry the Gervasi label and name. That’s expected to expand this fall, however, when Gervasi adds four high-end wines imported from Italy to its repertoire. They’ll be available for purchase by-the-bottle in both restaurants on the property and for tasting at the Crush House. In addition to the winery, there are three restaurants on the Gervasi grounds. “It’s not only award-winning wines and fine quality wines but amazing food,” Cardinale said.

The Bistro, which seats 160 and has private dining rooms for rent, is described as upscale Italian dining. The menu includes pizza, pasta, specialty entrees and family-style plates. Behind the Bistro and overlooking the lake is the Piazza, open May through October when weather permits. Diners can sit at tables on the patio or bring their own lawn chairs. A menu of shareables, pizza, salad and subs is available for pick-up from the hostess station, as is wine and sangria. There’s live music in the evenings and lawn games. Gervasi’s winery facility, the Crush House, also has a restau-

rant with entrees, pasta, sandwiches and appetizers. While there’s a new hotel planned for the vineyard, there already are places to stay overnight. The property has six villas, each with four suites. Guests receive a complimentary Italian-style breakfast, and every suite has a fireplace and a stone walk-in shower. For larger parties, there’s a restored farmhouse that sleeps up to eight people. The property is the original 1830 farmhouse and has four bedrooms and a modernized kitchen. Gervasi Vineyard is located at 1700 55th Street NE in Canton. ­—ALISON MATAS

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ervasi Vineyard keeps growing. Plans were announced last year to build a 24-suite boutique hotel and a distillery at the 55-acre estate, which already boasts several luxury overnight options and restaurants along with its 6-acre vineyard. The hotel, to be called The Casa at Gervasi Vineyard, is expected to open by early 2019. It will have a Tuscan theme and include an exercise facility. Outside will be a courtyard, pond and gardens. Nearby is The Still House at Gervasi Vineyard, a 10,000-squarefoot distillery. Nichole Cardinale, director of sales and marketing for Gervasi, said the building is a coffeehouse during the day and a craft cocktail lounge with live music in the evenings. The inside of the distillery looks like a church, with arched ceilings and lots of open space. It also includes a cigar lounge and has a tapas menu with craft beers on tap. Of course, Gervasi’s specialty is wine, and there are plenty of opportunities to get a behind-the-scenes look at how it gets made. Gervasi’s winery is located inside the Crush House, and free 30-minute public tours are offered each Saturday afternoon. There also are food-and-wine tours and private events available for booking. Sampling is offered at the Crush House,

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Maize Valley Winery & Craft Brewery

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t Maize Valley Winery and Craft Brewery, fall means there’s always something to do. The 750-acre farm east of Hartville celebrates the season from September 15 through October 28 with special events such as a hot-air balloon lift-off and an Oktoberfest weekend, plus its fall standards: an 8-acre corn maze, wagon rides to a pumpkin patch, campfire sites, pumpkin cannon demonstrations and a straw-bale mountain. Scott Mann, manager at the winery and brewery, said Maize Valley isn’t the kind of pumpkin patch where parents watch their kids play. There’s a bunch to do for all ages, plus there’s a ton of food and adult beverages. “You tend to want to spend a day with us,” he said. “We have big-kid fun and little-kid fun.”

Year-round, the winery/brewery offers tours on the second Saturday of every month that include a glass of wine or beer in a take-home glass, along with an opportunity to ask questions of the winemaker and brewmaster. On the third Thursday of every month, Maize Valley hosts its Vintner’s Dinners, which pair homemade wines with five-course meals. Previous dinner themes this year have included tastes of romance, tastes of spring and tastes of the farm. As for wine, Maize Valley offers fruit, red, rosé and white wines, with 25 varieties available for purchase. You can sample the handcrafted wines before you buy in the tasting room on site. The Marlboro Township winery scored big at last spring’s Ohio Wine Competition, snagging the overall best of show

award for its Riesling, and its Big Red Pecker and Apple Pie wines won gold medals. One of the big draws of Maize Valley has been the property’s large covered patio, which offers a view of the grounds and a place to enjoy sandwiches and appetizers. The patio was converted into a year-round room with walls and heating and cooling, but there still are garage doors that open for an outdoor experience. When you visit, you also can go shopping at Maize Valley’s marketplace, which sells Amish meats and cheeses, baked goods, locally grown produce and jams and jellies. The everyday menu in the Tasting Room Cafe at Maize Valley includes appetizers, salads and sandwiches. ­—ALISON MATAS


Newman Creek Cellars

come in 18 varieties, the winery owner said. Those wines— merlot, cabernet sauvignon, chardonnay and more—hold one thing in common. They’re all named in a knightly manner. Think “Black Knight,” “White Knight,” “Sir Lancelot,” “Merlin’s Magic” and “Guinevere’s Delight.” “Most of our wines have a Camelot and King Arthur theme to them,” said Mann. “We wanted to do something different, something unique, so people could come in and have fun with the names and themes of the wine.” “We can seat 35 to 45 peo-

ple in our tasting room, and we’re soon going to have outdoor seating,” said Mann. “We don’t offer food, but folks can bring in their own food or order from local restaurants.” Annual output of the hobby-turned-winery is a little more than 1,000 gallons, adequate for Newman Creek’s customer base and its outside wine catering operations. But, perhaps even more important is the amount of wine produced by wine hobbyists who visit the winery. “We offer an on-premises wine-making program,” said Mann. “Customers can come

and learn to make their own wine. It’s a big hit, especially around the holidays. People make wine to pass out as gifts. And wedding parties come in to make wine for their receptions.” The winery is open yearround. Live music is played at the winery. And, the hall can be rented. For more information, call 330-904-3546. In addition to the Manns, their daughter Kayla Mann helps out at the business. Newman Creek Cellars is located at 28 Charles Avenue SE, Massillon. ­—GARY BROWN

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s is the case with many labors of love, Newman Creek Cellars, which just celebrated its sixth anniversary as a winery, began as a pleasant way to spend leisure time and turned into a thriving business. “It really started out as a hobby—winemaking,” said Bob Mann, who operates the winery in Massillon with his wife, Keelie. “Then we decided to go ahead and form a business plan for a winery.” The Manns, who live in North Lawrence, set up their winery on a small scale at 28 Charles Avenue SE in Massillon, “with the hope of someday having a larger winery in the country.” “We’re hoping within a year and a half of having our new place open and going in Lawrence Township,” said Mann. “It’s going to be bigger, and we’re getting a vineyard started so we will have some of our own grapes to use.” In the meantime, the Manns bring in California “juice” with which they make their wine. And, Mann said, operating in a historic building in downtown Massillon, “we’re happy here in what people call a hidden gem.” “It’s just a nice, quiet, cozy place to meet friends and have a glass of wine or maybe a bottle of wine.” Wines served by the Manns

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Cherry Road Winery

red and Judy Robinson have an understandable rapport with those who stop in at their Cherry Road Winery in Massillon. “We were like a lot of the couples who visit our winery. We used to visit other wineries throughout the state and anywhere else we traveled,” said Judy Robinson. “We thought if we could bring that sort of experience to the west side of Massillon, we wanted to do it.” Fred Robinson makes the wine for the winery, while Judy Robinson handles the business end, she said. Wines are made from mostly California grapes, but the couple has planted a vineyard that in a couple of years will provide the Robinsons’ their “juice.” “He already was making wine at home and the property has been in my family for years,” she explained, noting that atmosphere of the production facility and tasting room is more industrial than many wineries. “We operate in a converted welding

shop,” she explained, noting that the business has been in operation since November of 2016. “We’re one large room, and we’re looking to expand to a patio,” said Robinson, who recalled that she and her husband had planned to build a larger facility around the corner from their location at 27th Street NW. The intersecting street is Cherry Road. Hence the name of the winery. “We were going to build our tasting room on Cherry Road. But, our customers enjoy the location where we’re at, and we kind of listened to our customers. We kept the name. My husband describes it as being ‘just off Cherry Road.’ ” Cherry Road Winery, which doesn’t serve food but encourages visitors to bring their munchies for special occasions, is open to the public Thursday through Saturday, with live music on the latter weekend night. “Depending upon who is playing the music, we recommend reservations on Saturday nights,” Robinson said.

Special events—such as “Trivia Night” with John Kiste—are scheduled on other nights, and groups can rent the winery, as well, Robinson said. In accordance to its “We Love Local” theme, the winery offers wines that are named to remind visitors of Massillon-area history. “Three Bridges,” for example, is a semi-dry red blend named for the Cherry, Lincoln and Tremont viaducts. “Towpath Trail,” named for the bike trail that follows the Ohio & Erie Canal, is a clear, crisp and dry chardonnay—“just like the weather for a great day on the trail,” the winery website says. The Robinsons true to their love for the community, also are great supporters of other area establishments, even mentioning restaurants and other local wineries on its website. “There’s a lot of camaraderie in the wine industry in general,” said Robinson. “All the local wineries support each other. We send customers to them, and they send customers to us.” Cherry Road Winery is located at 1133 27th Street NW, Massillon. ­—GARY BROWN


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STRENGTHENING STARK

STRENGTHENING

STARK A PROGRESS UPDATE BY JOAN PORTER

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STRENGTHENING STARK

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“S 40

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MALLER, OLDER AND POORER” is not what any community wants to hear is in its future. But that is what a 2017 Stark Community Foundation study found to lie ahead for Stark County. The picture painted wasn’t a pretty one. The population not only was declining, it was getting older. The number of businesses in the county not only was decreasing, fewer new ones were being started. With less than 30 percent of Stark residents holding a post-secondary degree, too few would be prepared for the many jobs that will require a degree by 2020. But what could be done to turn the tide for what seemed to be Stark County’s fate of becoming “smaller, older and poorer?” What could be done to make Stark

County’s residents and businesses economically competitive thereby benefiting everyone from an economic lift in the community? “After reviewing data collected from conducting 200 interviews in every aspect of the economy and the community, we looked at the data and picked seven focus areas,” said Hrishue Mahalaha, who, along with Janelle Lee, is consulting on the Strengthening Stark project. Those areas include governance, workforce development, business retention and expansion, business attraction, entrepreneurship and innovation, infrastructure and community engagement. Within each of the areas are a number of initiatives. “Planning was wrapped up in August, and we are working on how to get into full-stride execution mode,” said Mahalaha.

Sixty to 65 percent of the initiatives have or soon will be launched, said both Mahalaha and Lee. GOVERNANCE Strengthening Stark’s governing committee met in November. Among its members are elected officials, businessmen and educators, all with diverse perspectives. All have been involved with economic and workforce development, said Mahalaha. The governing committee will oversee all work done to strengthen Stark and manage funding. There is a built-in kill switch for each aspect of the project, he said. The board will review each project quarterly, offer help where needed, and if the individuals or organizations in charge of the projects do not deliver, that particular project will be killed. “It is critical that Strengthening Stark delivers,” he added.


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STRENGTHENING STARK

OF UTMOST IMPORTANCE IS WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT, SAID RAY HEXAMER, PRESIDENT OF THE STARK ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BOARD. THERE ARE 7,000 JOBS AVAILABLE IN STARK COUNTY AND ONE-THIRD OF THEM REQUIRE A COLLEGE DEGREE, SAID HRISHUE MAHALAHA.

tional institutions is essential. “We are like a dating service,” said Hexamer. Dennis Saunier, president and CEO of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, agreed, noting that the chamber has received a grant to hire a person to link education and business in a way that will be able to identify jobs in the community and the talent needed to fill those jobs. BUSINESS RETENTION AND EXPANSION, ATTRACTING NEW BUSINESSES Keeping businesses in Stark County and attracting new ones is also a focus of Strengthening Stark. In addition to the educational institutions, other organizations and agencies can be useful in providing guidance to businesses. These include MAGNET for manufacturers, the Kent State University at Stark campus’ Small

Business Development Center for small businesses and SCORE, a nonprofit organization that offers guidance and support in a number of business areas, said Saunier. To retain and expand businesses in Stark, “we are targeting industrial clusters,” said Lee. “Businesses in the areas of food, flavoring and processing; petrochemicals; information technology; and metal are our assets. We need to bring the appropriate vendors (for these businesses) here.” ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION The Stark Entrepreneurship Alliance offers assistance in all aspects of creating and expanding a business. It has the resources to help start-ups with technology, capital investments and sales opportunities. Canton City Council established an

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WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT Of utmost importance is workforce development, said Ray Hexamer, president of the Stark Economic Development Board. There are 7,000 jobs available in Stark County and one-third of them require a college degree, said Mahalaha. By developing a workforce within Stark County that can provide the skills needed by both current and future businesses along with offering the amenities young people want in their community, “we could keep Stark County students here,” said Hexamer. Workforce development begins with helping students explore career paths as early as eighth grade and offering high school and university students courses in subjects whose skills and knowledge are or will be needed by businesses. Linking businesses with Stark County’s educa-

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WE NEED TO LET THE COMMUNITY KNOW WHAT WE ARE DOING AND HOW THAT CAN BENEFIT BOTH BUSINESSES AND THE COMMUNITY, SAID BOTH JANELLE LEE AND HRISHUE MAHALAHA.

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innovation district downtown in 2017. The district requires high-speed internet connectivity. Tax abatements are available to support technology businesses. In October, city council, JumpStart Inc. and the Stark Community Foundation gave the district $266,000. The Canton Community Improvement Corporation will give city council’s approved share of $75,000 a year for three years.

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INFRASTRUCTURE Infrastructure is important to both businesses and employees. Businesses need to get materials in and products out. Employees need to get to work. Stark County is fortunate to have an airport, and extending State Route 30 eastward from Canton to Lisbon would be very beneficial, said Saunier. SARTA could provide bus routes to major business hubs in the county. Faster Internet access through broadband

expansion would improve business communications. Site development and promotion would attract businesses, especially those looking for large tracts of land such as is available at the Stark County Farm, bought in 2016 by the Board of Trade for future industrial use. The farm is being made shovel-ready to attract businesses that need land, said Saunier. Additionally, offering entertainment and the arts would entice young people—who want more than a job—to remain in or move into the area. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT We need to let the community know what we are doing and how that can benefit both the business and the community, said both Lee and Mahalaha. Actions that are being taken include working with schools and social agencies to get more people into the workforce, involving the African-American and Latino communi-

ties through the formation of a minority advisory committee, talking with college students about what amenities the community needs to offer to attract them to or keep them in the area, educating students as to what jobs are available in Stark County and connecting businesses and educational institutions to train and educate students in the skills needed for available local jobs. BENEFITS FOR ALL With more people working and earning higher wages, Stark Countians could be more financially stable; businesses they support could thrive and remain in the county, additional businesses could be attracted to the area, and new ones could start up; fewer social services would be needed; and governments would have the tax dollars to provide needed and desired services. It sounds like everyone could be a winner.


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INNOVATION DISTRICT CANTON INC

BY KELLY BYER

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CANTON INNOVATION DISTRICT GETS GREEN LIGHT FOR FUNDING

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INNOVATION DISTRICT CANTON INC

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he city of Canton is funding the creation of the Canton Innovation District with help from the Stark Community Foundation and Cleveland-based JumpStart Inc. The district consists of 12 blocks in downtown Canton and combines infrastructure rehabilitation with high-speed broadband to create a hub of innovation for Stark County entrepreneurs and small business owners. Created in 2017 after the passage of state legislation allowing cities to set up geographical redevelopment and innovation centers, the district requires high-speed internet connectivity and allows for tax abatements that can be used to support technology businesses. The

Canton plan is also the first in the state to set overlapping redevelopment and innovation districts—combining historic building rehab with high-speed broadband and business support resources. The official footprint of the district runs approximately from Second to Sixth streets and Cleveland Avenue NW to Piedmont Avenue NE. The district will receive $266,000 a year in funding—$75,000 of which comes via Canton’s comprehensive development fund, which was created by the city’s income tax increase and is expected to collect $6 million in 2019. The district also will have an advisory board consisting of the mayor, a council member, a technology business representative, a banking representative, a Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce represen-


CANTON INC INNOVATION DISTRICT

The district consists of 12 blocks in downtown Canton and combines infrastructure rehabilitation with high-speed broadband to create a hub of innovation for Stark County entrepreneurs and small business owners. tative, a Stark Community Foundation representative, a Stark Economic Development Board representative and four other members. In addition to financial support for the district, JumpStart also has hired community manager Linda Hale to provide programming and assistance to Stark County entrepreneurs. Hale will meet with entrepreneurs and stakeholders by appointment at the Innovation District Headquarters (309 Court Avenue NW) or at other locations throughout Stark County.

“My position will focus on building the community and serving all entrepreneurs, both tech and non-tech, from within the Canton Innovation District and across Stark County,” Hale said. JumpStart also will staff the district headquarters with an intern and host workshops and other business events for the community. This spring, JumpStart will lead a pitch competition and a 12-week business assistance course for Stark county entrepreneurs and small business owners.

THANKS FOR

THE RIDE OF A LIFETIME! 21 years of supporting SARTA's mission YOU help make it happen. With your help, we provide efficient, affordable and sustainable mobility options for Stark County through Proline, Contracts and Fixed Routes served by over 200 employees. Your support keeps adding up: + 2.4 million rides a year + 160,000 Proline rides a year + 5,000 rides to work a day + 10,000 rides for veterans to the Cleveland VA clinic

Sartaonline.com © 2018 Stark Area Regional Transit Authority. All rights reserved.


AMPHITHEATER CANTON INC

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BY ERIC POSTON | RENDERING PROVIDED BY JACKSON TOWNSHIP

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Amphitheater to expand opportunities in Jackson Township


CANTON INC AMPHITHEATER

“It becomes another fixed asset for when folks come to Jackson Township looking where to raise a family. It adds to the attraction.”

W

hile it may not look like much more than dirt along the north side of Fulton Road just east of North Park now, big plans are in the works. Jackson Township is in the process of constructing an amphitheater, as earth work is underway. Jackson Economic Development Director Randy Gonzalez said the township received two grants totaling more than $1.5 million to put toward the project, which is expected to cost between $2 million and $2.5 million, not counting the earth work. The amphitheater will have a covered stage, which will face Fulton Road, and there will be areas for people to gather. Gonzalez said the project opens endless opportunities, as anything from a concert to a magic show could take place there.

“This is really going to be the center point of the park,” Gonzalez said. He said the library, YMCA and schools will be able to utilize the space too. “It really is a good project for all of us,” Gonzalez said. Jackson Township Administrator Michael Vaccaro said details of the project are still being finalized, and the hope is to bid construction in January or February. Vaccaro said the new amphitheater will bring people to the park setting who normally may not come. “It becomes another fixed asset for when folks come to Jackson Township looking where to raise a family,” Vaccaro said. “It adds to the attraction.” The project is expected to be completed by early 2020, but Vaccaro is holding out hope it could be done sooner.

CantonIncMagazine.com

—MICHAEL VACCARO

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Beauty

STRENGTH

The B el de n B ri ck C om p any p rov i d es m o re c l a y p a v i n g o p t i o n s t h a n a nyon e els e in t h e world. Wi t h t h e w i d es t s el ec t i o n o f c o l o rs , t ex t u res, s ha pes a nd sizes, you c an pi ck t h e pe r fec t p a ver fo r you r p ro jec t . Th e s t ren gt h , dura bilit y a nd fa de - re s i s t ant qu ali t i es o f ou r c l a y p a vers exc eed t h e per forma nce of other p ave rs , an d ou r c o l o r fa s t p a vers w i ll w i t h s t a n d even t he mos t d ema ndi n g cli m at e s .

The Standard of Comparison Since 1885 beldenbrick.com

BeldenBeautyStrengthFullpgAd_CantonIncDec18.indd 1

An ISO 9001 Compliant Quality Management System. An ISO 14001 Compliant Environmental Management System.

11/20/18 10:27 AM


CANTON INC

CONTACT INFO

AREA CONTACT INFO Mayor: Alan C. Andreani Alliance Area Chamber: www.AllianceOhioChamber.org Alliance Area Development Foundation: www.AllianceADF.com City of Alliance: www.CityofAlliance.com

CANAL FULTON

Mayor: Joe Schultz City of Canal Fulton: www.CityofCanalFulton-oh.gov Canal Fulton Chamber: www.CanalFultonChamber.org

CANTON

Mayor: Tom Bernabei City of Canton: www.CantonOhio.gov Canton Regional Chamber: www.CantonChamber.org

HARTVILLE

Mayor: Cynthia Billings Village of Hartville: www.HartvilleOh.com

JACKSON TWP.

Board of Trustees President: Todd J. Hawke Jackson Township: www.jacksontwp.com

LAKE TWP.

Board of Trustees President: John Arnold Lake Township: www.laketwpstarkco.com Lake Township Chamber: www.LakeChamber.com

LOUISVILLE

Mayor: Patricia Fallot City of Louisville: www.LouisvilleOhio.com Louisville Area Chamber: www. LouisvilleOHChamber.com

MINERVA

Mayor: James Waller Village of Minerva: www.ci.minerva.oh.us Minerva Chamber: www.MinervaChamber.org

NORTH CANTON

Mayor: David J. Held City of North Canton: www.NorthCantonOhio.gov North Canton Area Chamber of Commerce: www.NorthCantonChamber.org

PLAIN TWP.

Board of Trustees President: Scott Haws Plain Township: www.PlainTownship.com

MASSILLON

Mayor: Kathy Catazaro-Perry City of Massillon: www.MassillonOhio.com Massillon Area Chamber: www.MassillonohChamber.com Massillon Development Foundation: www.MassillonDevelopment.com

CantonIncMagazine.com

ALLIANCE

51


CONTACT INFO

CANTON INC

NEARBY ATTRACTIONS IN NORTHEAST OHIO Akron Art Museum

24 miles

Akron Zoo

25 miles

Cleveland Browns’ FirstEnergy Stadium

61 miles

Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Brecksville

41 miles

Great Lakes Science Center, Cleveland

60 miles

Hale Farm and Village, Peninsula

34 miles

PlayhouseSquare, Cleveland

60 miles

Progressive Field (home to Cleveland Indians)

60 miles

Quicken Loans Arena (home to Cleveland Cavaliers)

60 miles

Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, Cleveland

60 miles

Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens, Akron

28 miles

Trumpet in the Land, New Philadelphia

30 miles

University Circle museums, Cleveland

58 miles

Warther Museum, Dover

23 miles

LOCAL COLLEGES

CantonIncMagazine.com

AULTMAN COLLEGE OF NURSING AND HEALTH SCIENCES 2600 Sixth St. SW Canton, 44710 www.aultmancollege.edu Phone: 330-363-6347 Fax: 330-580-6654

52

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY AT STARK 6000 Frank Ave. NW North Canton, 44720 www.stark.kent.edu Phone: 330-499-9600

MALONE UNIVERSITY 2600 Cleveland Ave. NW Canton, 44709 www.malone.edu Phone: 800-521-1146

STARK STATE COLLEGE 6200 Frank Ave. NW North Canton, 44720 www.starkstate.edu Phone: 330-494-6170

UNIVERSITY OF MOUNT UNION 1972 Clark Ave. Alliance, 44601 www.mountunion.edu Phone: 800-992-6682

WALSH UNIVERSITY 2020 E. Maple St. North Canton, 44720 www.walsh.edu Phone: 800-362-9846 | 330-490-7090

NORTHEAST OHIO MEDICAL UNIVERSITY 4209 State Rt. 44 Rootstown, 44272 www.neomed.edu Phone: 800-686-2511


EDUCATION, LEADERSHIP, TALENT DEVELOPMENT CANTON REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE The Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce’s Education Department works with businesses, educational institutions, and employment professionals to create partnerships, pathways, and dialog that will help meet employer workforce needs and ensure student success. www.cantonchamber.org, 330-456-7253.

motivated leaders with a lifelong commitment to community trusteeship. www.LeadershipStarkCounty.org, 330-456-7253.

STARK COUNTY EDUCATIONAL SERVICE CENTER The Stark County Educational Service Center is committed to meeting Stark County school district needs by providing quality educational support and services for more than 60,000 diverse, wide-ranging students in Stark County. StarkCountyESC.org, 330-492-8136.

LEADERSHIP STARK COUNTY Leadership Stark County, a department of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, engages and educates Stark County’s community leaders through a range of programs tailored to meet business and community needs. LSC works with community organizations to identify, prepare and position graduates for leadership within these organizations. The result is a core of

STARK EDUCATION PARTNERSHIP The Stark Education Partnership Inc. is a nonprofit education-reform support organization in Stark County, crossing the lines of 17 public school districts. The partnership

The University of Akron produces some of the most sought-after, job–ready graduates in the region. Students in our internship and co-op programs gain valuable work experience with local employers, including Diebold Nixdorf, FirstEnergy Corp., The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, The Timken Company and TimkenSteel. UA offers certificate, associates and bachelor’s degree programs, leading to Ohio’s most in-demand jobs.

For a complete list of majors and to schedule a visit, go to uakron.edu/visit. “I did three co-op rotations while at UA, and I am starting my career

with a top-tier orthopedic medical device company after graduation.” - Cori Fidler, biomedical engineering

collaborates with educators, business and community and civic leaders to create and respond to opportunities that will add substantial and measurable value to education. www.EDPartner.org, 330-452-0829. YSTARK! ystark!, a department of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, is Stark County’s dynamic young professional initiative. The organization works to attract, retain and engage young professionals, ultimately developing an involved and educated workforce for area businesses through programs, networking opportunities and educational engagement. ystark! program highlights include the Twenty under 40! awards and the Fellowship Program with local businesses. www.ystark.org, 330-456-7253.


CONTACT INFO

CANTON INC

CANTON/STARK COUNTY BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT RESOURCES CANTON REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE The Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce is a membership organization of nearly 1,900 businesses dedicated to the advancement of the economic, industrial, professional, cultural and civic welfare of Stark County. Since 1914, the Chamber has worked to advance business and develop community through partnerships, programs, services and events to achieve economic growth for Canton/Stark County. www.CantonChamber.org, 330-456-7253.

CANTON DEVELOPMENT PARTNERSHIP The Canton Development Partnership, a department of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, is a coalition of area development organizations and city government that share an interest in downtown Canton’s continual improvement, revitalization, image and quality of life for its citizens. Partner organizations include the Canton Regional Chamber, Downtown Canton Special Improvement District, Downtown Canton Land Bank, Canton Tomorrow Inc., and the city of Canton. www.DowntownCanton.com, 330-456-7253.

CANTON/STARK COUNTY CONVENTION & VISITORS’ BUREAU Visit Canton, the Stark County Convention & Visitors’ Bureau, is here to assist you in your travels to our area.Whether you are organizing a tour group, a convention or sporting event,Visit Canton has professional staff members ready to assist in your planning.They service the community by attracting tourists, convention and meeting planners and sporting events to the Stark County area and operating the Visitor Information Center. www.VisitCanton.com, 800-552-6051.

CITY OF CANTON Canton is home to well-known national landmarks such as the Pro Football Hall of Fame, the Wm. McKinley Presidential Library & Museum and national monument, and the National First Ladies’ Library and Research Center. Mayor Thomas Bernabei is aggressively pursuing new companies and businesses to the city. Canton has a wide variety of attributes that make the city a smart location for companies of all shapes, sizes and industries, and the city has programs that provide incentives for business location, relocation or expansion. www.CantonOhio.gov, 330-489-3283.

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SHALEDIRECTORIES.COM

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ShaleDirectories.com is an online directory that connects oil and gas industry operators, their employees and families with local business. ShaleDirectories.com provides a comprehensive list of local businesses that can serve the E&P companies and oil-field service companies in the Marcellus and Utica shale region. www. shaledirectories.com.


CANTON INC CONTACT INFO

SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH NETWORK The Small Business Growth Network brings together the resources, organization, infrastructure and content to allow new and existing businesses and non-profit organizations to create, grow and sustain a vibrant community in the Stark, Carroll, Tuscarawas, Holmes and Harrison county region. www.CantonChamber.org, 330-595-4575.

STARK AREA REGIONAL TRANSIT AUTHORITY SARTA provides more than 2.4 million rides a year in Stark County through fixed route and Proline services. Its goal is to ensure that Stark County residents, including employees, students, seniors and disabled individuals, have access to a quality transportation system that is reliable and affordable. www.SARTAOnline.com, 330-47-SARTA.

THANKS TO OUR ADVANTAGE CANTON PARTNERS Thank you to all the members of Advantage Canton, a group of strategic investment partners that support the mission of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce of leading the region in business and community development through collaboration and innovation. Advantage Canton’s economic development program is an investment in creating a stronger local economy which is good for everyone in Stark County.

AultCare

Kenan Advantage Group

The Canton Repository

Aultman

Key Bank

Solmet Technologies

Dominion Energy

MAGNET

Sugardale

Employers Health

Northeast Ohio Medical University

Synchrony

PNC Bank

The Timken Company

FedEx Huntington

The City of Canton

AEP Ohio

Home Savings Bank

M. Conley Company

Brewster Cheese

JP Morgan Chase & Co.

TimkenSteel

Fifth Third Bank

Kent State University at Stark

For information regarding Advantage Canton, contact Michael Gill,VP of Economic Development at 330-458-2090.

Mercy Earns ‘A’ Rating For Patient Safety

MERCY THANKS OUR ENTIRE STAFF FOR PROTECTING PATIENT SAFETY Mercy Medical Center earned an A RATING in The Leapfrog Group’s Fall 2018 Hospital Safety Grade. We thank our staff for their efforts and commitment to the highest safety standards, protecting our patients from harm. Leapfrog uses 28 measures of publicly available hospital safety data to assign grades to more than 2,600 U.S. hospitals twice a year. Mercy Medical Center was one of 855 across the United States awarded an A in the Fall 2018 update of grades.

CantonMercy.org/patient-safety

ME RCY IS T H E BE ST ME DICINE

Safety IS OUR FOCUS

24 /7 365


CONTACT INFO

CANTON INC

STARK COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS The Stark County Association of Realtors®, proudly serving the Realtors®, home-buyers and home sellers of Stark County, strives to enhance the ability and opportunity of its members to conduct their business successfully and ethically, and to promote the preservation of the right to own, use and transfer real property. www.StarkRealtors.com, 330-494-5630.

STARK COUNTY BUILDING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION The Building Industry Association of Stark County is a nonprofit trade association affiliated with the Ohio Home Builders Association and the National Association of Home Builders. Chartered in 1945, the BIA represents and promotes the interests and concerns of the building industry and the community. The organization provides Stark County consumers and businesses with a directory of member builders. www.BIAStark.com, 330-494-5700.

STARK COMMUNITY FOUNDATION Stark Community Foundation has been the community’s trusted partner in giving for nearly 650 individuals, families, businesses and communities that have created funds to impact the lives of others through the most effective philanthropy possible. Since 1963, the foundation has granted more than $136 million to nonprofit organizations. Stark Community Foundation ranks in the top 10 percent of community foundations in the United States today. www.StarkCF.org, 330-454-3426.

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STARK ENTREPRENEURSHIP ALLIANCE

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The Stark Entrepreneurship Alliance is a virtual network to assist startup, early-stage and small/medium-size companies in the Stark County area. Their goal is to be a single point of entry for companies seeking assistance in their formation, growth and sustained viability. www.starkentalliance.com, 330-543-7637.

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT JOBSOHIO

JobsOhio is a private, nonprofit corporation designed to lead Ohio’s job-creation efforts by singularly focusing on attracting and retaining jobs, with an emphasis on strategic industry sectors. JobsOhio is your ambassador. www.Jobs-Ohio.com, 614-224-6446.

MAGNET

MAGNET, the Manufacturing Advocacy and Growth Network, supports, educates and champions manufacturing, with the goal of transforming the region’s economy into a powerful, global player. The organization helps manufacturers adopt innovative techniques, and increase productivity and global access. www.magnetwork.org, 800-669-2267.

BUSINESS RESOURCE NETWORK

The Business Resource Network aggregates resources to bring Stark,Tuscarawas and surrounding county businesses specialized services, funding through grants and loans and staffing options any company can access and use to do business better. www.thebrn.net, 855-669-4726.

SCORE

SCORE is a nonprofit association dedicated to helping small businesses get off the ground, grow and achieve their goals through education and mentorship. Canton.SCORE.org, 330-244-3280.

SBDC

The Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Stark is a fully funded nonprofit organization devoted to helping small businesses grow and individuals start new small businesses through training programs and consultation sessions. www.CantonSBDC.org, 330-244-3290.

MINORITY BUSINESS

The Stark County Minority Business Association fosters development and growth of minority-owned businesses. starkminoritybusiness.org, 330-455-6385.

OHIOMEANSJOBS

OhioMeansJobs, formerly the Employment Source, is northeastern Ohio’s premier workforce development and training center, connecting job seekers with employers by providing numerous resources. omjwork.com, 330-433-9675.

REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUND FOR FUTURE

The Fund for Our Economic Future is a collaboration of philanthropic organizations and individuals that have united to strengthen the economic competitiveness of Northeast Ohio through grantmaking, research and civic engagement. www. FutureFundNEO.org, 216-456-9800.

JUMPSTART, INC.

Jumpstart provides intensive assistance and service to Northeast Ohio entrepreneurs, and selectively invests in the highest-potential companies. www.JumpstartInc.org, 216-363-3400.

TRADE CONSORTIUM

The Northeast Ohio Trade & Economic Consortium is a multicounty regional economic development partnership that works collaboratively in the region with the goal of attracting capital investment and jobs to Northeast Ohio through the administration of Foreign-Trade Zone 181. www.NEOTEC.org, 330-672-4080.

OHIO DEVELOPMENT SERVICES AGENCY

Working with partners across business, state and local governments, academia, and the nonprofit sector, the Ohio Development Services Agency works to attract, create, grow and retain businesses through competitive incentives and targeted investments. www.Development.Ohio.gov, 800-848-1300.

TEAMNEO

TeamNEO serves companies and site consultants by acting as the single point of entry into the 16-county Cleveland Plus region, and then works with counties and communities to ensure seamless attraction into Northeast Ohio. www.ClevelandPlusBusiness.com, 216-363-5400.


CANTON INC CONTACT INFO

STARK COUNTY HUMAN RESOURCES ASSOCIATION

STARK COUNTY SAFETY COUNCIL

STARK COUNTY PORT AUTHORITY

STARK ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BOARD

Whether you are new to the human resources field or have years of experience, Stark County Human Resources Association is a local star ting point for networking, information, professional development and continued suppor t of excellence in human resources. The organization, founded in 1944, is an affiliate of the Society for Human Resource Management. Stark.SHRM.org, 330-451-8670.

The Stark County Por t Authority helps to provide the Greater Stark County area with an economic development tool for new capital investment, job creation and retention. The organization helps create and preser ve jobs through a wide variety of financing, real estate and foreign trade zone programs. www.StarkCoOhio.com, 330-453-5900.

The Canton Regional Chamber, with suppor t from the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation, administers Stark County Safety Council, the No. 1-ranked safety council in the state of Ohio. The safety council provides a forum for safety and health information, education and networking in Stark County, through leadership, innovation, facilitation, programs and suppor t. www.StarkCountySafetyCouncil.org, 330-4567253.

The Stark Economic Development Board is a private, nonprofit corporation created to help local companies grow and expand. In addition, it actively seeks to attract new business investments to Stark County, one of the most economically viable areas in Nor theast Ohio, as well as to advocate for workforce development. www.StarkCoOhio.com, 330-453-5900.

Call our team of professionals for all your real estate needs!

Tim Putman 330-495-0600

Wick Hartung 330-495-0601

Steve Marcelli 330-327-5834

STARK COUNTY REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION

Stark County Regional Planning Commission improves the quality of life in Stark County and its communities through an effective regional forum characterized by communication, collaboration, facilitation and planning assistance. The organization includes metropolitan planning, community development and engineering depar tments. www.Co.Stark.OH.us, 330-451-7389.

INCUBOX

INCUBOX helps companies in the region grow from concept to star t-up to early stage to fullon market expansion. We provide advice and connections to resources, local and regional, connecting students and community-based entrepreneurs to the real world environment. INCUBOX accommodates both physical and vir tual companies of any type including those that have no tech, low tech and high tech. www. mountunion.edu/incubox 330-829-6804.

• Retail • Office • Medical • Industrial • Residential • Investments • Development • Managements • Site Acquisition • 1031 Exchanges

Jim Bednar 330-417-9034

Saylor Putman 330-495-8292

Spencer Hartung 330-936-0276

4065 Fulton Dr. NW, Canton | 330.498.4400 | info@putmanproperties.com | www.putmanproperties.com


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PARTING SHOT

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CANTON INC

PHOTO BY RAY STEWART LIGHT UP DOWNTOWN Canton’s city center glistened for Light Up Downtown on December 6, 2018.


Profile for Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce

Canton Inc. Magazine Spring 2019  

Canton Inc. Magazine Spring 2019  

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