Page 1

CANTON INC

GOOD FOR BUSINESS

STARK COUNTY, OHIO FALL 2021

DR. TIMOTHY CRONE Cleveland Clinic Mercy Hospital

+

Meet the new CEOs

CAK DEBUTS NEW AIRLINE

What is the Stark County Manufacturing Workforce Development Partnership?

RICK HAINES Aultman Health Foundation


Why should these Decision Makers invest an hour with you? Tell them by marketing in

metroplex Akron-Canton

MAGAZINE

Call Darlene today at

330.705.9228 MetroPlex Magazine direct mailed to 4,500 decision makers. 50% have the title of Owner, CEO, COO, President, Director or Vice President



D e HOFF

knows our communities best.

CANTON INC FALL 2021 Canton Inc. is an economic development publication produced through a collaboration of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce and The Canton Repository.

CANTON REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Dennis P. Saunier President and CEO dennys@cantonchamber.org 330-456-7253 Steven M. Meeks COO stevenm@cantonchamber.org 330-458-2088 Chris Gumpp Vice President of Events and Developments

DeHOFF Developments Portage County Forest Ridge

Stark County

Bishop Meadows • The Boroughs Carrington • Carrington Villas Carrington West • Chestnut Ridge Forest Meadows Fountains at Edgewood Greentree • Greenwich Place Nobles Pond • Saint James Place Saint James Place Villas Saratoga Hills • Stonebridge The Sanctuary • Summit Place Saint Ives Villas • Washington Hills Washington Square • Wellington Hills Wellington Woods

Summit County

Charleston Place • King’s Ridge Paddington Woods • Spring Hill

chrisg@cantonchamber.org 330-458-2055 Molly Romig Director of Membership mollyr@cantonchamber.org 330-833-4400 Collyn Floyd Vice President of Marketing and Communications collynf@cantonchamber.org 330-458-2071 Kathy D. Irwin Vice President of Finance and Accounting kathyd@cantonchamber.org 330-456-7253 Stephanie Snow Werren Vice President and Director of Leadership Stark County stephaniew@leadershipstarkcounty.org 330-458-2093 Barbara Hammontree Bennett Vice President of Education Initiatives barbb@cantonchamber.org 330-456-7253 Jeff Dafler Vice President of Economic Development & Public Policy jeffd@cantonchamber.org 330-456-7253

330.499.8153 dehoff.com

Kelly Piero Director of ystark! kellyp@ystark.org 330-456-7253


CANTON INC

CONTENTS

CONTENTS 08

CEO message

10

Stark County Economics

11

Industrial Land & Business Parks

14 MEET THE NEW CEOS OF AULTMAN HEALTH FOUNDATION & CLEVELAND CLINIC MERCY HOSPITAL 20

Breeze Airlines offers breath of fresh air to Akron-Canton Airport and entire region

24

What is the Stark County Manufacturing Workforce Development Partnership?

30

Make It Better: A Blueprint for Manufacturing in Northeast Ohio

34

Hall of Fame Village Update: Center For Excellence ready for primetime

40

Home-Grown Tourism: Local markets aid Canton’s recovery

46

One-year check-in with Moving Community Forward

51

Area education, business and economic development resources

58

Parting shot

CantonIncMagazine.com

COVER & HERE: Dr.Timothy Crone of Cleveland Clinic Mercy Hospital and Rick Haines of Aultman Health Foundation. PHOTO COURTESY OF HOSPITALS

05


Quality paints since 1911

CANTON INC REPOSITORY/GANNETT

PAINT COMPANY

Rick Armon Managing Editor rarmon@cantonrep.com 330-580-8310 Kelsey Davis Editor, magazine division kelsey.davis@cantonrep.com 330-580-8318 Darlene Schuring Advertising DSchuring@cantonrep.com 330-705-9228 CONTRIBUTORS Aaron Bennett, Julie Botos, Patricia Faulhaber, Scott Heckel, Brian Lisik, Carolynn Mostyn

2021 Executive Committee

TOP QUALITY PAINTS AND COATINGS LOCALLY MADE FOR OVER A CENTURY 5156 Whipple Ave NW 330-244-8700 www.harrisonpaint.com

CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Joseph J. Feltes Partner in Charge Canton Office Buckingham, Doolittle & Burroughs, LLC SR. VICE CHAIRWOMAN & CORPORATE SECRETARY Amanda Sterling Vice President-Auditing & Transactional Services TimkenSteel Corporation VICE CHAIRMAN Todd J. Hawke Principal GDK and Co-President, Jackson Township Board of Trustees VICE CHAIRMAN Ralph Lee Chief Human Resources Officer Kenan Advantage Group, Inc. VICE CHAIRMAN Joseph D. Schauer President & CEO Schauer Group, Inc. TREASURER Mark Wright Chief Financial Officer, Aultman Health Foundation IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIRMAN Rick McQueen Retired PRESIDENT & CEO Dennis P. Saunier President and CEO, Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Steven M. Meeks Chief Operating Officer, Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce RECORDING SECRETARY Annette Rosenberger Recording Secretary, Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce


CANTON INC AD INDEX

AD INDEX 02 METROPLEX

09 CONSUMERS NATIONAL BANK

03 LOCAL IQ

13 ABOUT MAGAZINE

04 DEHOFF REALTORS

45 YOUNG TRUCK SALES

04 CANTON INC

59 THE SOCIAL AT THE STONEHOUSE

06 HARRISON PAINT

60 CANTON REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

06 E TANK

For information about how to advertise in this publication, please contact Darlene Schuring at DSchuring@CantonRep.com or 330-705-9228. CANTON INC is published by Gannett, 500 Market Ave. S, Canton, OH 44702, 330-580-8300. CANTON INC is protected by federal copyright law, which gives the publication exclusive rights to reproduce or authorize reproduction of its materials.

CANTON REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BRADLEY H. BELDEN The Belden Brick Company

CHRISTOPHER GOFF Employers Health

TERESA J. PURSES Stark Education Partnership (Retired)

RUDOLF “RUDY” BENTLAGE JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA

T. MATTHEW GREGORY Gregory Industries, Inc.

DR. DENISE A. SEACHRIST Kent State University at Stark

GREGORY BROKAW Consumers National Bank, Jackson-Belden Office

RICK HULL Home Savings Bank

WILLIAM C. SHIVERS Huntington Bank

MIKE LEVY Hall of Fame Resort and Entertainment Co.

LEONARD STEVENS Stark County Minority Business Association

JOSEPH LUCKRING PNC Financial Services Group

MARK VANDEGRIFT Innis Maggiore

DANE MAYLE CliftonLarsonAllen LLP

TERI WILSON The Timken Company

KENNY PETERSON Nothing Bundt Cakes

CATHY WYATT Carpe Diem Coffee Shops

JIM PORTER Pro Football Hall of Fame

SCOTT ZURAKOWSKI Krugliak, Wilkins, Griffiths & Dougherty Co., L.P.A.

RENATO “REN” CAMACHO Akron-Canton Airport KIMBERLY DAVENPORT Shearer’s Snacks R. ERIC DELLAPINA KeyBank CHRISTOPHER DILORETO Jackson Local School District MIKE GALLINA AultCare

CantonIncMagazine.com

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

07


CEO MESSAGE

CANTON INC

CONTINUAL PROGRESS IN STARK COUNTY

CantonIncMagazine.com

I

08

t’s hard to believe that this issue wraps up our 10th year of producing Canton Inc. Magazine! Over the past 15 issues, we’ve featured a wide breadth of cover stories focused on regional growth, from energy and air service to downtown redevelopment and desirable destinations. A common theme throughout all of the issues has been progress. Looking back over the past decade, we should be proud at the progress we’ve made across virtually all business sectors of our community. In 2012, our oil and gas opportunity in the Utica shale play was a brand new notion. Now, eastern Ohio is recognized a natural gas leader, with 35% of U.S. natural gas coming from Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. In 2014, we featured our first story on Hall of Fame Village, before there was a new stadium, youth fields or the Constellation Center for Excellence. Now, Hall of Fame Village is gearing up for Phase 3 of construction. In 2018, our summer cover story was on three new upscale apartment complexes in downtown Canton — the Onesto, Bliss Towers and Hercules. Now, each of those complexes is thriving. In this issue, progress continues in the health care sector. Canton/Stark County’s two largest health care providers, Cleveland Clinic Mercy Hospital and Aultman Health Foundation, are under new leadership. In our cover story, you’ll meet their respective new CEOs, Dr. Timothy Crone, a physician and business leader from Cleveland Clinic, and Rick Haines, a 40-year veteran of Aultman Health Foundation. Not only will you learn more about them professionally and personally, I hope you’ll take away (as I did) how fortunate we are to have two exceptional health systems here in Stark County. This issue also features progress in other areas of our community. The Akron-Canton Airport recently welcomed Breeze Airlines, a brand-new, low-cost carrier with nonstop service to Charleston, South Carolina; New Orleans and Tampa. In the manufacturing sector, a group of manufacturers and stakeholders have come together to create the Stark County Manufacturing Workforce Development Partnership, which is focused on getting students and job seekers into manufacturing careers. And MAGNET has unveiled its Blueprint for Manufacturing in Northeast Ohio, a roadmap for making Northeast Ohio a global leader in smart manufacturing. Despite ongoing challenges presented by the pandemic, progress in our tourism sector continues. Work at Hall of Fame Village is moving ahead, and many of our outdoor markets have returned to full capacity. And, finally, diversity in our business community remains a top priority. The Community Moving Forward project just hit its one-year milestone, having already established programs focused on internships, mentorships, supplier diversity and increased business capital for minority businesses. I think you’ll agree that an abundance of progress is being made here in Stark County. Thank you for reading our latest issue of Canton Inc. Magazine.

Dennis P. Saunier President and CEO Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce



ECONOMICS

CANTON INC

STARK COUNTY

ECONOMICS

INCOME AND MAJOR COST OF LIVING INDUSTRIES Median household income:

$52,190

Median home value:

$130,700 Median rent:

$728/MO. Cost of living:

78

(U.S. average is 100) Unemployment rate:

8.8%

(national average is 6.7%)

HOUSEHOLDS

CantonIncMagazine.com

Canton population 70,458 Stark County population 370,606 Median resident age 42 Age 17 and younger 21.3% Age 18 to 64 58.8% Age 65 and older 19.9% Households 152,649

10

WORKFORCE Total workforce: 185,700 Average commute: 22 minutes

(NON-FARM)

Education and health services:

19%

Manufacturing:

16%

Trade, transportation and utilities:

19%

Professional and business services:

9%

Leisure and hospitality:

11%

Government:

12% 15%

EDUCATION

High school attainment:

91%

College attainment:

23%

Graduate or professional degree:

8.4%

WEATHER

33 degrees

Alliance Community Hospital Aultman Hospital Canton City Schools City of Canton Mercy Medical Center Nickles Bakery Republic Steel HeinzKraft Foods Synchrony Financial Stark County government Stark State College Sugardale Foods The Timken Co. TimkenSteel Corp. Wal-Mart Stores Inc.

PARKS & TRAILS

Other:

Average January high:

MAJOR EMPLOYERS

Average July high:

82 degrees

Stark County Park District includes:

8,000 acres of land

100+

miles of walking/bicycling trails and

31

miles of equestrian trails, in addition to the parks maintained by cities and townships

14

parks in addition to the parks maintained by cities and townships SOURCES: U.S. Census Bureau, Ohio Department of Development, NOAA and the National Weather Service, Stark Parks, U.S. Department of Labor (Bureau of Labor Statistics), Forbes.


CANTON INC BUSINESS PARKS

AKCAN INDUSTRIAL PARK Location: Green, Ohio Acres available: 200 Highway access: I-77 Zoning: Light industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Dan DeHoff, DeHoff Development, 330-499-8153

BECK INDUSTRIAL PARK Location: Louisville, Ohio Acres available: 175 Highway access: I-77 Zoning: Heavy industrial Rail access: Yes Development contact: Dan Spring, NAI Spring, 330-497-6249

CANTON INDUSTRIAL PARK - WEST Location: Canton, Ohio Acres available: 12 Highway access: I-77 Zoning: Light Industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Tim Putman, Putman Properties, 330-495-0600

ALLIANCE COMMERCE PARK Location: Alliance, Ohio Acres available: 75 Highway access: U.S. Route 62 Zoning: Light/heavy industrial Rail access: Yes Development contact: Jim Stout, Coastal Pet Products, 330-821-2218

CANTON CENTURY PARK Location: Canton, Ohio Acres available: 30 Highway access: I-77/Faircrest at Exit 101 Zoning: Heavy commercial Rail access: No Development contact: Dan Spring, NAI Spring, 330-966-8800

CENTRAL WARNER COMPLEX Location: Canton, Ohio Acres available: 30 Highway access: U.S. Route 30 / I-77 Zoning: Heavy industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Tim Putman, Putman Properties, 330-495-0600

CantonIncMagazine.com

INDUSTRIAL LAND AND BUSINESS PARKS

11


BIZ PARKS

CANTON INC

EASTRIDGE COMMERCE PARK Location: Canton, Ohio Acres available: 88 Highway access: U.S. Route 62 Zoning: Light industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Dan DeHoff, DeHoff Development, 330-499-8153 ELM RIDGE INDUSTRIAL PARK Location: Canal Fulton, Ohio Acres available: 16 Highway access: State Route 21 and I-77 Zoning: Light industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Don Schalmo, Schalmo Properties Inc., 330-854-9396 FORD PROPERTY Location: Canton, Ohio Acres available: 75 Highway access: U.S. Route 30 Zoning: Heavy industrial Rail access: Yes Development contact: Fonda Williams, 330-438-4307 Incentives available HARTVILLE INDUSTRIAL PARK Location: Hartville, Ohio Acres available: 2 Highway access: State Routes 43 and 619 Zoning: Light industrial Rail access: Some potential Development contact: Mayor’s office, village of Hartville, 330-877-9222

CantonIncMagazine.com

MASSILLON ENERGY & TECHNOLOGY PARK Location: Massillon, Ohio Acres available: 515 Highway access: State Route 21 and U.S. Route 30 Zoning: Heavy industrial Rail access: Yes Development contact: Garret Kloots, 330-833-6325

12

NEOCOM INDUSTRIAL PARK Location: Massillon, Ohio Acres available: 50 Highway access: State Route 21 and U.S. Route 30 Zoning: Heavy industrial Rail access: Yes Development contact: Dan Spring, NAI Spring, 330-966-8800

MILLS BUSINESS PARK Location: Canton, Ohio Acres available: 83.8 Highway access: I-77 Zoning: Light industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Dan DeHoff, DeHoff Development, 330-499-8153

STARK COUNTY FARM Location: Navarre, Ohio Acres available: 300 Highway access: U.S. Route 30 Zoning: Light industrial Rail access: Yes Development contact: Dan DeHoff, DeHoff Development, 330-499-8153

NOVA EAST Location: Massillon, Ohio Acres available: 25 Highway access: U.S. Route 30 Zoning: Light industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Dan Spring, 330-966-8800

PORT JACKSON Location: Jackson Township, Ohio Acres available: 16 Highway access: I-77 Zoning: Light industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Lisa Gould, Akron-Canton Airport, 330-668-4000

STEIN INDUSTRIAL PARK Location: Canton, Ohio Acres available: 13 Highway access: U.S. Route 30 at State Route 43 Zoning: I2 Heavy industrial Rail access: No Development contact: Tim Putman, Putman Properties, 330-495-0600

Looking for more information, or for details about industrial buildings and service sector properties? Contact Jeff Dafler, vice president of economic development & public policy, Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, 330-456-7253.



HOSPITALS

CANTON INC

BY PATRICIA FAULHABER PHOTOS PROVIDED BY HOSPITALS

CantonIncMagazine.com

DR. TIMOTHY CRONE

14

Cleveland Clinic Mercy Hospital

RICK HAINES

Aultman Health Foundation


HOSPITALS

CantonIncMagazine.com

CANTON INC

15


HOSPITALS

CANTON INC

RICK HAINES

CantonIncMagazine.com

Aultman Health Foundation

16


CANTON INC

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR CAREER PATH?

I’ve been working at Aultman for 40 years and have held a wide variety of positions. That has helped me observe and experience a lot of different aspects of the business and develop a comprehensive, well-rounded viewpoint of the organization, which I fully intend to implement in my leadership of Aultman Health Foundation. I was first hired in 1981 as a personnel coordinator, later serving as the director of budgeting, patient accounts and eventually associate vice president of finance. In 1985, I was named associate vice president of AultCare. In 1997, I become the executive vice president of AultCare, and rose to president and CEO of AultCare in 2001. Just this year, I assumed the role of president and CEO of Aultman Health Foundation on July 1.

PLEASE DETAIL YOUR EDUCATION.

I earned my bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Business Administration from Kent State University.

DO YOU LIVE IN STARK COUNTY? WOULD YOU SHARE THE CITY YOU LIVE IN?

I’m a lifelong resident of Northeast Ohio. I grew up in Mantua, a small town in Portage County, and have been a longtime resident of Stark

County. My wife and I currently live in North Canton, Ohio.

WOULD YOU SHARE YOUR FAMILY DETAILS?

I’ve been blessed with a wonderful family that includes children, grandchildren and pets. My wife, Vicki, recently retired from Aultman as senior vice president. We have three sons, Brent, Derrick and Justin, and a daughter, Morgan, all of whom still live in the area. Brent and his wife, Sarah, gave us our grandchild Bryn, who is 6 years old, and Morgan and her husband, Timm, gave us two grandchildren: Raegan, 7, and Hughston, 4. Vicki and I also have a Schnoodle (Schnauzer/Poodle mix), Romeo, who is named after former Cleveland Brown’s head coach Romeo Crennel.

WHAT DREW YOU TO THE POSITION?

It’s an honor for me to assume the role of president and CEO of Aultman Health Foundation. I’m looking forward to building on the legacy of those who led the organization before me, and I feel a sense of responsibility for having Aultman remain independent. I love what the Aultman brand stands for — more than a century and a quarter of leading our community to improved health. Aultman represents stability, trust, continuity and a longstanding commitment to the community we serve, and I look forward to guiding us further down that path in the years to come.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE FUTURE PLANS YOU HAVE FOR THE ORGANIZATION?

Our goal is to continue to stay competitive in a market where mergers and acquisitions are taking place all around us, all while staying true to our mission of leading our community to improved health as an independent health care organization. While we collaborate where we can — and that was especially important over the last year during the pandemic — we also don’t shy away from competition. It

improves our organization and hones our services, and I have confidence that we’ll be able to continue to compete as an independent organization in our market. Looking toward the future, we’re also looking to AultPlan, a new organization, to look at our vertical integration and find new and strategic ways to integrate our valuable resources, such as the different hospitals within Aultman, our physicians, AultCare, Aultman College and more to provide the best services and options to our community. We’re also excited about the Timken Family Cancer Center, which is being built right now on the east side of the main campus. It’s going to be a huge benefit for our community and those seeking cancer care, and we’re looking forward to its opening, which is scheduled for summer of next year. We also want to see our Aultman Deuble Heart and Vascular Hospital continue to grow and prosper. Our robust intensive care program is doing great work with some of our more critical patients, and our talented medical staff is making a huge difference in patients’ lives at all levels of the health care delivery system. I also have to recognize the amazing team of more than 7,000 colleagues across Aultman Health Foundation and how excited I am to work with them throughout the many communities we serve.

SOME FUN FACTS ... WHAT SPORTS OR ACTIVITIES WERE YOU INVOLVED IN DURING HIGH SCHOOL OR COLLEGE?

I grew up playing baseball, basketball and football, but baseball was always my favorite. As a child, I dreamed of taking the mound and pitching for the hometown team, the Cleveland Indians. When I realized that wasn’t likely to happen, I settled for being a lifelong fan of Cleveland sports and other prominent Ohio teams like the Ohio State Buckeyes and Kent State Golden Flashes.

CantonIncMagazine.com

T

he new president and CEO of Aultman Health Foundation, Rick Haines, has been with the organization for 40 years and took the top leadership role on July 1. He’s held a variety of positions within Aultman, which has allowed him a broad view of the organization. Haines said he loves what the Aultman brand stands for and looks forward to leading the health care organization into the future while building on the legacy of the presidents and CEOs who led before him. Meet Rick Haines.

HOSPITALS

17


HOSPITALS

CANTON INC

T

he new president of Cleveland Clinic Mercy Hospital has been preparing for his new role through many years of practicing medicine and refining his business and leadership skills. He has worked in private practice as well as health care systems. He also has practiced academic hospital medicine at the main campus of Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland. Dr. Crone and his wife, Mandy, have been married 26 years. He and his family live in Hinckley in Medina County but have felt the warmth and authenticity of the Stark County community. Meet Timothy Crone, MD MBA.

CantonIncMagazine.com

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR CAREER PATH?

18

Like many leaders at Cleveland Clinic, my career path involved both training and practicing medicine and developing business and leadership skills over time. I started in private practice right after residency, and then joined a health system in Michigan to build an inpatient hospitalist program. My first health care leadership training occurred there through a program with Harvard Business School. From there, I came to the Clinic and practiced academic hospital medicine at the main campus in Cleveland and built or grew hospital medicine programs at several of our regional hospitals. I continued my development as a leader through training programs at Cleveland Clinic, completing an MBA and a strategy fellowship and taking on progressively higher leadership roles. I have held leadership roles in clinical operations, health care data and analytics, and hospital leadership as a chief medical officer. I believe strongly that being a physician-led organization provides an essential element that helps us keep the focus of decision making on people and achieve real excellence.

PLEASE DETAIL YOUR EDUCATION.

BS with Honors in Biochemistry, Michigan State University, 1998

DR. TIMOTHY CRONE Cleveland Clinic Mercy Hospital MD, Michigan State University, 2002 Residency in Internal Medicine, Michigan State University, 2005 Physician Leadership Academy, Harvard Business School, 2009 Healthcare Strategy Fellowship, Cleveland Clinic, 2015 MBA, Ohio University, 2020

WHERE DO YOU LIVE?

We live in Hinckley, in Medina County but have quickly felt the warmth and authenticity of this community. We thank you for the welcome we’ve received here.

WOULD YOU SHARE YOUR FAMILY DETAILS?

My wife, Mandy, and I are celebrating our 26th anniversary this month. We have three children, Emma, Elijah and Micah, and four dogs, Obi (Obi Wan), Isabelle, Sunshine and Winston. Two and a half of them are rescues. It’s a good story.

WHAT DREW YOU TO THE POSITION?

For me, one pathway to a meaningful life is to be a part of something bigger than oneself, and I know of no greater opportunity to do good than exists in health care. The juxtaposition of the full breadth of human experience with cutting edge science and technology creates an environment that can truly change people’s lives. Both those who need care and those

providing it. To be a part of that is enough, but I am drawn to the idea of coaching large teams to be the best they can possibly be. The opportunity to do all of that in and for Canton and Stark County was immensely compelling for me. Our neighbors across the street talk about “celebrating excellence everywhere,” and that mindset is alive and vibrant in Stark County. At Cleveland Clinic, we also know a thing or two about excellence, and I have committed my career to bringing that to this community.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE FUTURE PLANS YOU HAVE FOR THE ORGANIZATION?

One is growth. From the best in modern primary care to sub-specialty services not currently available locally, we will bring Cleveland Clinic expertise and Mercy compassion together to touch as many lives as possible. Another is investment and modernization. Over time, you will see upgrades to the technology and facilities that power what we do at Mercy, along with some specific projects to provide new services. And finally, ongoing investments in our employees and caregivers. We are serious about being the best place to receive health care and the best place to work in healthcare, and we will continue to make meaningful investments in our caregivers.

SOME FUN FACTS ... WHAT SPORTS OR ACTIVITIES WERE YOU INVOLVED IN DURING HIGH SCHOOL OR COLLEGE?

Despite my love-hate relationship with golf, my extracurricular activities were focused elsewhere during school. The majority of my extracurricular time in college was spent on research, where I had an awarded stipend to support three years of lab-based investigation of protein


CANTON INC

HOSPITALS

structure and function. I also tutored math and science, and regularly volunteered at a hospice facility.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PASTIME AND WHY?

Reading history. I play a lot of golf with my son (I’m terrible), and we love to travel as a family, but when I have a few hours of free time, it’s always mostly nonfiction history. From biographies to micro-histories, this is what I do to unwind and recharge. So far this year, I’ve been through two of Susan Wise Bauer’s three-part series, “The History of the Ancient World,” Dan Simmons’ fictionalized account of the Terror and Erebus expedition, and Stephen Hawking’s “A Brief History of Time.” On my nightstand right now is John A. Farrell’s “Richard Nixon: The Life.”

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PLACE TO EAT IN STARK COUNTY?

I’ve been impressed with the food scene in Canton but was really blown away by The Bistro at Gervasi.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PLACE TO VISIT IN STARK COUNTY?

After all the great events this past summer around enshrinement, I’m pretty fired up about the Hall of Fame!

The warmth, dedication and authenticity of the community. This is not just another Rust Belt city. I’ve lived through some of Cleveland’s renaissance, and I see the same signs here. There is a grit and commitment on the part of a large group of folks who are working to address racial injustice, create economic opportunity and further develop a county people are loyal to and proud to live in. Stark County has so many amazing legacies, and people continue to build on these. I see it here at Mercy, as well. We have an amazing group of people who show up here and do a really hard job with grace and empathy day in and day out. It’s an incredible privilege to be a part of this community.

CantonIncMagazine.com

WHAT HAS SURPRISED YOU MOST ABOUT STARK COUNTY SINCE YOU HAVE BEEN THE NEW CEO?

19


AIRPORT

CANTON INC

BREEZE AIRLINES

OFFERS A BREATH OF FRESH AIR TO AKRON-CANTON AIRPORT AND ENTIRE REGION

CantonIncMagazine.com

BY BRIAN LISIK / PHOTOS PROVIDED BY AKRON-CANTON AIRPORT

20


CantonIncMagazine.com

CANTON INC AIRPORT

21


AIRPORT

CANTON INC

CantonIncMagazine.com

A

22

s the airline industry continues its slow but inexorable return to normalcy following the fallout of the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, both Akron-Canton Airport (CAK) officials and community leaders feel the airport’s newest airline partnership has positioned CAK for a leading role in that recovery. “I think we have a tremendous opportunity with the airport and having an airline like Breeze choosing us as a hub in Northeast Ohio,” said Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Dennis Saunier of CAK’s most recent partnership with Breeze Airlines. Air service, Saunier said, is vital to any region for attracting business, retaining business and serving residents. Breeze began servicing three nonstop routes — to Charleston, South Carolina; New Orleans and Tampa — from CAK in June 2021, making CAK one of 16 airports on Breeze’s network. The partnership was made possible through the efforts and financial investment of both CAK and community stakeholders, including area businesses and the Greater Akron and

Canton Regional chambers. The two chambers, Saunier explained, acted primarily as the fundraising arm of the effort, along with a JobsOhio incentive program to reinstate air service to CAK. “We started looking at it as a regional opportunity — particularly since we are now looking at our region as a metroplex,” Saunier said. A JobsOhio Commercial Air Service Restoration grant was first used in late 2020 to entice Delta Airlines to return its Atlanta connection from CAK, which was discontinued during the pandemic. That effort was unsuccessful, but airport officials already were talking to ownership at Moxy — soon to be Breeze — airlines about joining United, American and Spirit at CAK. The committee of chambers, the Stark County Economic Development Board and other community stakeholders were also hard at work, Saunier said. “Within a little over a month, we had raised a sizable amount,” he said. Saunier added that the airport’s pre-pandemic efforts such


as its $37 million gate modernization and expansion project had positioned it perfectly for both attracting the three Breeze routes and more in the future, calling the decision to move ahead with that project at the height of pandemic uncertainty the epitome of entrepreneurship. “(The Breeze addition) gives us an opportunity to build upon that success,” Saunier said. “When you become complacent, you begin to lose control of your destiny.” Renato “Ren” Camacho, president and chief executive officer for CAK, said the loss of four key routes — Atlanta, Houston, La Guardia and Chicago — in the first five months of 2020 dealt a huge blow to the airport. The JobsOhio program, including a $4 match from the state for every dollar raised locally in an 80/20 split up to $10 million, informed a new focus for CAK, Camacho said. “We had to recalibrate where we wanted to go for air service,” he said. “Truthfully, we expanded our scope to not only (try to) restore service, but look for opportunities (with new carriers).” Breeze, Camacho said, fit the bill in a number of ways.

For one, its founder David Neeleman is also the founder of the JetBlue and Azul airlines, and the Breeze partnership presented an opportunity to bring key dual class — leisure and commercial — routes back to CAK. The Breeze business model states that the company seeks to provide nonstop service between underserved routes across the U.S. at affordable fares. The nonstop routes from CAK include a one day per week to Tampa that began June 26, two to three flights per week to New Orleans and four flights per week to Charleston. Camacho said that passenger “enplanements,” counted as the number of people boarding planes, dropped from 830,000 in 2019 to 220,000 in 2020 at CAK. The airport is set to surpass its total 2020 enplanements by August of this year. While leisure travel is still driving the entire airline industry at this point, Camacho said he feels it is inevitable that business travel eventually will return. “I still think at the end of the day, people are going to want to get on a plane, shake a hand — especially in certain types of industries,” he said. “People want to explore.”

AIRPORT

CantonIncMagazine.com

CANTON INC

23


CantonIncMagazine.com

SCMWDP

24

CANTON INC


CANTON INC

SCMWDP

What is the Stark County Manufacturing Workforce Development Partnership? A Q&A WITH BARBARA BENNETT OF THE CANTON REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

CantonIncMagazine.com

BY PATRICIA FAULHABER

25


SCMWDP

CANTON INC

I

CantonIncMagazine.com

n response to challenges related to attracting, hiring, training and retaining a qualified workforce, a core group of manufacturers has taken action by forming the Stark County Manufacturing Workforce Development Partnership (SCMWDP), a collaboration of area manufacturers and stakeholders. Founding member manufacturers include Barbco, Biery Cheese, H-P Products, Koch Knight, Lindsey Precast, The M. K. Morse Company, MT Systems, Ohio Gratings, QuickDraft and Stark Industrial. The partnership officers include James Batchelder from The M.K. Morse Company as president, Thomas Schmidt from Barbco as vice president and executive members Mike Hoffman from Lindsay Precast and Allen Green from H-P Products. The partnership was formed through collective efforts by the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, Stark Economic Development Board (SEDB) and MAGNET. In a recent Q&A interview, Barbara Bennett of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce answered questions about the SCMWDP.

26

Q. WHAT IS THE STARK COUNTY MANUFACTURING WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT PARTNERSHIP? A. The SCMWDP is known as an Industry Sector Partnership, which in this case, consists of manufacturers, education systems, economic development organizations and community organizations from Stark County. Together, these organizations support a single industry and manufacturing workforce issues and initiatives.

Q. HOW IS THE CANTON CHAMBER AND/OR YOURSELF INVOLVED WITH THE SCMWDP? A. I became involved in the concept of Industry Sector Partnerships from case studies from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce (think of the Houston area and the oil and gas industry workforce shortage in the early 2000s), researching what other Ohio communities were doing to address workforce issues and by participating in industry sector partnerships in surrounding counties. My goals this year as the Vice President of Education & Workforce include helping to launch industry sector partnerships in manufacturing, IT/digital, construction and trades, logistics and health care. These are the industries that had the most job openings in Stark County in 2019 or have the potential for good-paying jobs. The Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, MAGNET and SEDB all have a similar goal to support and grow Stark County’s manufacturing industry. Attracting a new generation of manufacturing workforce is a key component. We call the Chamber, MAGNET and SEDB as the neutral intermediaries as we have developed the relationships with the manufacturers, education, workforce and other communitybased organizations as part of our day-to-day workflow and through various volunteer leadership activities in the Stark County community. Q. WHY WAS THE GROUP FORMED? A. The group was formed as it was recognized by individual manufacturers that together there was more


CANTON INC

SCMWDP

“THE GROUP WAS FORMED AS IT WAS RECOGNIZED BY INDIVIDUAL MANUFACTURERS THAT TOGETHER THERE WAS MORE FORCE IN NUMBERS TO HOLISTICALLY INCREASE THE LABOR POOL OF OUR OWN STARK COUNTY TALENT ENTERING MANUFACTURING. ...” force in numbers to holistically increase the labor pool of our own Stark County talent entering manufacturing. Together, manufacturing industry leaders have a better opportunity to align curriculum, influence policy, attract funding for initiatives and market manufacturing as a viable career pathway. Q. WHAT ARE THE GOALS OF THE PARTNERSHIP? A. The industry leaders have identified two priorities which include: Priority 1. Career Navigation: Increase the manufacturing knowledge of career coaches/navigators/guidance counselors who are working with students and job seekers so that they can provide more accurate and compelling information to their clients. Provide comprehensive support for job seekers, students and employees to mitigate barriers to success. Priority 2. Outreach: Build awareness of manufacturing careers and SCMWDP; recruit individuals into manufacturing careers and businesses into SCMWDP membership. Activities completed since March of this year through the intermediaries and the collaborative infrastructure that exists within Stark County include: • SCMWDP intermediaries have informed and encouraged local manufacturing companies to capitalize on TechCred and other state-level funding streams as a means to expand skill sets among their existing manufacturing workers. • SCMWDP intermediaries have informed and en-

couraged local manufacturing companies to capitalize on the pre-apprenticeship program and had ConxusNEO present the program to the employer members. • Participation in Stark Career Connect forum. SCMWDP companies met with “navigators” from workforce partners such as OhioMeansJobs, Goodwill Industries of Greater Cleveland & East Central Ohio, Greater Stark County Urban League and ICAN Housing, who are helping job seekers find careers. These forums not only provide the navigators with a better understanding of each manufacturing company, but they also help dispel misconceptions of the manufacturing industry work environment. • Created the SCMWDP logo and have registered and received permission to use the “Making Ohio” branding package from the Ohio Manufacturers Association. • Engaged an intern to establish a social media presence on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn and other platforms. • Have given greater visibility to the SCMWDP partnership and opportunities for students through events such as Junior Achievement of North Central Ohio’s Virtual Career Exploration Fair, the Black College Hall of Fame Football Classic College and Career Fair, and the upcoming Manufacturing Day. • Presented the opportunity for SCMWDP partners to be summer host employers for high school students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds, which would help promote more diversity in the manufacturing workforce.

CantonIncMagazine.com

—BARBARA BENNETT

27


CantonIncMagazine.com

SCMWDP

28

CANTON INC

• The SCMWDP President, Jim Batchelder, had an op-ed published in The Canton Repository, and also was interviewed by WHBC, promoting the purpose and mission of the SCMWDP. The op-ed also was published in the Canton Regional Chamber’s newsletter, reaching 1,800 members. • Provided communication through the 17 Stark County school superintendents to every graduating senior in the county promoting manufacturing careers and existing job openings using a QR code and temporary web page at CantonChamber.org/manufacturing. • Engaged, endorsed and will coordinate with MAGNET’s “Blueprint for Manufacturing” campaign to win the “hearts and minds” of the community. • Recruited two companies to serve on a local high school’s Engineering Business Advisory Council. • Initiated the creation of a dedicated website which will be found at StarkManufacturing.org. • Filed the organization with Secretary of State and is pursuing a nonprofit status with the IRS. • Received the Ohio Manufacturers Association endorsement for an Industry Sector Partnership.

Q. CAN YOU PROVIDE SOME STATISTICS FOR THE MANUFACTURING LABOR SHORTAGE IN STARK COUNTY? A. There are 550 manufacturing companies in Stark County, representing 26,000 jobs. These are good-paying jobs with an average NE Ohio salary of $72,000, according to 2016 survey from the Ohio Manufacturers Association. According to JobsOhio data, 456 open positions were found in manufacturing as of June 2. We suspect JobsOhio data is not complete, as data from several of the major jobs platforms may be missing. These jobs range from engineering to entry level production workers to administration managers. Q. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE REASONS FOR THE MANUFACTURING LABOR SHORTAGE IN THE AREA? A. Even before the labor shortage of 2021 found in all industries, manufacturing was struggling to attract new talent. There are many reasons, but one that keeps cropping up is that manufacturing has a “bad rap” and image problem of being a dirty and unstable industry. We want the public, and especially the new


CANTON INC SCMWDP

THERE IS A PLACE AND ROLE FOR ALL OF THE STRATEGIC PARTNERS SHOWN ON THE GRAPHIC (BELOW) TO BE ENGAGED WITH THE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY WHEN NEEDED. IF AN ORGANIZATION SUPPORTS WORKFORCE AND THE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY, THEN WE WANT THEM TO BE INVOLVED WITH THE SCMWDP.

Q. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE WAYS THE SCMWDP PLANS TO ADDRESS THE SHORTAGES? A. One of the long-range goals of the SCMWDP is to become more engaged in the school systems, beginning at the middle school level and continuing through high school and higher education. Middle school engagement includes manufacturing camps, career day presentations, field trips for students or instructors, sponsoring robotics clubs and other initiatives. High school engagement includes manufacturing days, learn to earn programs, shadowing, mentoring and other initiatives. Building relationships and marketing manufacturing as a viable career pathway is the long-term objective over the next five years. Short term, manufacturers are making adjustments to wages, benefits, work/life balance and opportunities to advance just like all other industries.

Q.WHO CAN GET INVOLVED WITH THE GROUP? A. There is a place and role for all of the strategic partners shown on the graphic (above) to be engaged with the manufacturing industry when needed. If an organization supports workforce and the manufacturing industry, then we want them to be involved with the SCMWDP. Q. HOW CAN COMPANIES OR INDIVIDUALS JOIN? A. Individual manufacturing companies should contact Barbara Hammontree Bennett at the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce at BarbB@CantonChamber.org or 330-458-2059 in order to be added to the SCMWDP distribution list and the invitation list to the monthly meetings. All manufacturers in Stark County are invited and encouraged to join the membership. The 34 companies that are engaged find great value in the meetings, the results of the initiatives, the augmented relationships with the other manufacturers and the connections made with community and education organizations.

CantonIncMagazine.com

generation of workforce, to recognize that manufacturing in Stark County is NOT the rust belt, but we ARE the technology belt. In addition, manufacturing needs to promote that there are always ways to advance in the workplace. Manufacturing is a great career pathway.

29


CantonIncMagazine.com

MAGNET

30

CANTON INC

MAKE IT BETTER


A Blueprint for Manufacturing in Northeast Ohio

MAGNET

CantonIncMagazine.com

CANTON INC

31


MAGNET

CANTON INC

CantonIncMagazine.com

A 32

roadmap for making Northeast Ohio a global leader in smart manufacturing with the workforce to power it was recently launched. The vision plan, called Make It Better: A Blueprint for Manufacturing in Northeast Ohio, shares success stories and strategies for future growth. “It is a vision for how Northeast Ohio can leave behind the Rust Belt moniker and become the Manufacturing Technology Belt,” says Brandon Cornuke, MAGNET Vice President of Strategy and Startup Services. “The Blueprint focuses on four key areas: Talent, Transformation, Innovation and Leadership. Manufacturing runs

on people, and we need to make sure we have the talent necessary for the technology-focused future of the industry. We need to help our manufacturers transform their factories by using Industry 4.0 technology to compete on a global stage and to advance innovation of new products and services. And leadership within and among regional companies and organizations will get us to our goal.” “While MAGNET created and launched the Blueprint, the future success means that it now must be owned by all of us; it’s a community initiative,” according to Michael O’Donnell, MAGNET Vice President of Operations. “We’re excited that there are companies and organizations


CANTON INC

MAGNET

in Stark County who support the Manufacturing Blueprint, including the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce. That’s the kind of collaboration and leadership we need.” Cornuke points out “One out of every two jobs, from factories to restaurants to banks, depends on manufacturing. The people of Northeast Ohio benefit from the health and well-being of our manufacturing ecosystem, and we’re in a moment of oppor-

tunity for us to focus on ensuring the jobs remain here and we grow through manufacturing.” For a free copy of Make It Better, A Blueprint for Manufacturing in Northeast Ohio, or to get involved, contact Janelle Lee, MAGNET Director of Client Engagement at jlee@Manufacturing Success.org. You may also visit the MAGNET website at ManufacturingSuccess.org or MakeIt BetterOhio.org.

CantonIncMagazine.com

Pictured here are photos from the recent relaunch of the MAGNET Technology and Growth Center located at the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce. This technology center displays industry 4.0 displays and projects, supports the Make It Better, A Blueprint for Manufacturing in Northeast Ohio Campaign and will be a resource and meeting place for local manufacturers.

33


CantonIncMagazine.com

HOF VILLAGE UPDATE

34

CANTON INC


CANTON INC

HOF VILLAGE UPDATE

Center for Excellence ready for prime time BY BRIAN LISIK | PHOTOS BY SCOTT HECKEL / RENDERINGS PROVIDED BY THE HALL OF FAME VILLAGE

CantonIncMagazine.com

HALL OF FAME VILLAGE UPDATE:

35


CantonIncMagazine.com

HOF VILLAGE UPDATE

36

CANTON INC


CANTON INC

HOF VILLAGE UPDATE

CantonIncMagazine.com

W

ith retail tenants expected to begin occupying the Hall of Fame Village Powered by Johnson Controls’ Constellation Center for Excellence building within the next year, HOF Village Executive Vice President for Public Affairs Anne Graffice said the “core and shell” of the building will be completed and visible “rising out of the west end zone” of Tom Benson Hall of Fame stadium by the end of summer. “I am really proud of the work that is coming up out of the ground,” Graffice said. “(Hall of Fame Resort and Entertainment Company President and CEO) Mike Crawford has been wonderful in reframing the project in a way that is doable.” Graffice said the company’s decision to reframe the project in phases has been important from both a construction and public perception perspective. “I completely understand the (public) skepticism,” Graffice said. “Also, when you build everything at the same time, you are not listening to consumer demands (about) how you should grow.” Graffice said the HOF Village team has understood the public’s frustration with “a lot of talk and not much getting done.” But those days, she said, are in the past.

37


CantonIncMagazine.com

HOF VILLAGE UPDATE

38

CANTON INC

With the first phase of the Hall of Fame Village project, including the renovation of Tom Benson Stadium and the installation of youth athletic fields completed, the second phase of the project — led by the Center for Excellence groundbreaking — began in September 2020. The Constellation Center for Excellence is a 75,000-square-foot, mixed-use facility planned to include a variety of sports-centric research and programming, office space and retail pads. Crawford described the center as

an innovative hub and interactive environment for companies and individuals to collaborate to further the sport. Meanwhile, Graffice said, Phase III of the project is in the rendering phase, with an expected $300 million in additional development. “But again, we will be looking at customer reaction (to the first two phases),” she said. Overall, Graffice said future opportunities for multimedia cross marketing of


CANTON INC

HOF VILLAGE UPDATE

“THERE REALLY IS NOTHING LIKE THIS IN THE AREA — A DESTINATION, RESORT, VACATION (LOCATION) — OBVIOUSLY ROOTED IN FOOTBALL, BUT A PLACE PEOPLE COME TO FOR MULTIPLE DAYS.” —Anne Graffice, HOF Village Executive Vice President for Public Affairs

CantonIncMagazine.com

HOF Village — designed as a resort, entertainment and media company centered around professional football — abound. On the ground, Graffice said, the complex is positioned to be a premier vacation destination for the entire Midwest United States. She again noted the importance of having Crawford, who previously developed hotels, theme parks and retail and dining establishments worldwide for Walt Disney Company and Four Seasons Resorts and Hotels. “There really is nothing like this in the area — a destination, resort, vacation (location) — obviously rooted in football, but a place people come to for multiple days,” Graffice said.

39


CantonIncMagazine.com

TOURISM CANTON INC

40

AN AERIAL VIEW OF A RECENT SIDESTREET MKT. PHOTO BY SHAWN WOOD FOR 720 MARKET


CANTON INC TOURISM

HOMEGROWN TOURISM:

BY AARON BENNETT

CantonIncMagazine.com

Local markets aid Canton’s recovery 41


TOURISM CANTON INC

A GROUP OF PEOPLE ENJOYING A RECENT CANTON FARMERS’ MARKET AT CENTENNIAL PLAZA

CantonIncMagazine.com

I 42

T’S JULY 3, 2021, AND IN THE MIDDLE OF A ONCE-VACANT PARKING LOT, RESIDENTS OF CANTON AND SURROUNDING CITIES HAVE GATHERED TO ENJOY MORE THAN 50 DIFFERENT VENDORS AND FOOD TRUCKS. Here, at the Sidestreet Mkt at Oakwood Plaza, a dad buys his family a wood-fired pizza topped with pulled pork. A woman tries on a pineapplepatterned headband. A live band plays upbeat jazz standards, while a girl and her little brother swing their arms in appreciation. This past year, these scenes of normalcy have been hard to come by. Like countless other cities across the United States, the COVID-19 pandemic has hindered

Canton’s economic growth and activity. However, as state officials continue lifting protective health measures, local entrepreneurs and civic leaders believe that Canton’s open markets and cultural attractions will generate local tourism and help jumpstart the city’s recovery. “We are already beginning to see leisure travelers back at pre-pandemic levels,” said Tonja Marshall, executive vice president of marketing and communication at Visit Canton. “We began to see an abrupt uptick in Stark County hotel occupancy in comparison to last year beginning in March (+21.5%) and continuing in April (+149.7%) and May (+98.6%).” Similarly, Lynn and Dave Shimko, co-founders of


CANTON INC TOURISM

WHEN VISITING NEW CITIES, SHOPPING AT THE LOCAL FARMERS’ MARKETS IS A GREAT WAY TO GET TO KNOW THE COMMUNITY, TRY NEW PRODUCTS AND ENJOY SEASONAL FARM GOODS, SPECIFIC TO THAT GROWING AREA. —Jena Grosschmidt, co-founder of Know Your Roots

The caliber of vendors continues to attract local and even state tourism. A survey taken in June 2021 found that 12% of visitors who attended the 720 Market traveled from outside Stark County. THE DRAW OF FRESH PRODUCE AND LOCAL ARTS For Jena Grosschmidt, co-founder of Know Your Roots, a consulting agency specializing in managing farmers’ markets and heirloom growers, the improving COVID-19 conditions have brought increased consumer activity to the Canton and North Canton farmers’ markets. Long touted as an effective way to stimulate local economies by injecting money directly to local growers

CantonIncMagazine.com

some of the most popular open markets in the area — 720 Market and their new Sidestreet Mkt, have seen increased visitor and vendor attendance and interest beginning in May of this year. “In May, people just came out of the woodwork just like they used to do,” Lynn Shimko said. “There was a special kind of freedom and relief in the air.” This feeling has only continued to increase, as more vendors continue to reach out to Lynn and Dave and apply for coveted spots in their markets. Spots for these limited spaces are competitive, but it ultimately raises the quality of the event. In fact, vendors from as far as Cleveland, Columbus and even Dayton are commonplace at the 720 and Sidestreet markets.

43


CantonIncMagazine.com

TOURISM CANTON INC

44

and small businesses, according to Grosschmidt, farmers’ markets represent a great way for locals and out-oftowners alike to explore the community. When visiting new cities, shopping at the local farmers’ markets is a great way to get to know the community, try new products and enjoy seasonal farm goods, specific to that growing area, Grosschmidt said. “Markets also offer access to regional nonprofits, sponsors, entertainment, food trucks and activities that make it a fun destination for travelers, as well as locals.” David Whitehill, the newly appointed CEO of ArtsinStark, a nonprofit organization that fosters opportunities for art in Stark County, is also a big believer in the power of community. Since ArtsinStark developed First Fridays, a monthly celebration of art, music, local businesses and restaurants, the event is drawing more than 10,000 people to downtown Canton. “Anecdotally, we believe these are Stark County residents who might not otherwise come downtown on a Friday evening,” Whitehill said. “They are eating in local restaurants or from local food trucks, they’re stopping into art galleries to build relationships with local artists (and) they’re making purchases at local businesses.” More importantly, however, Whitehill believes that a thriving cultural scene strengthens communities by bringing people together. As the arts and creative sectors also emerge from the pandemic, he is hopeful that Stark County’s reopening will create additional opportunities to strengthen the social fabric of the region. “I’m hopeful that our arts and creative businesses will shift their focus outward by building more meaningful relationships with Stark County communities,” Whitehill said. “Reopening will be an opportunity to send a signal about the role each organization wants to play in the community moving forward.”

“I’M HOPEFUL THAT OUR ARTS AND CREATIVE BUSINESSES WILL SHIFT THEIR FOCUS OUTWARD BY BUILDING MORE MEANINGFUL RELATIONSHIPS WITH STARK COUNTY COMMUNITIES.” —David Whitehill, ArtsinStark CEO

ELEC SIMON’S DRUM CIRCLE AT JUNE’S CANTON FIRST FRIDAY HAD KIDS OF ALL AGES ENJOYING THE MUSIC. PHOTO BY TRICIA OSTERTAG



CantonIncMagazine.com

INTERNSHIP

46

CANTON INC


CANTON INC

INTERNSHIP

ONE-YEAR CHECK-IN WITH

MOVING COMMUNITY FORWARD

CantonIncMagazine.com

By Carolynn Mostyn

47


INTERNSHIP

CANTON INC

CantonIncMagazine.com

e checked in following the one-year anniversary of the Community Moving Forward project designed to help local community minority business owners. The project was formed in the summer of 2020, when there was a lot of unrest in communities across the country after the death of George Floyd. Chief Executive Officer for the Schroer Group, Jerry Schroer, said they are a family-owned business, and at the time, he sent a letter to employees addressing diversity. He said they had never delved into diversity and were not sure how it would be received. It turned out that the letter was well received by employees. “It was an important time to support the Black community.” Schroer also began talking with business owners about a project to help minority businesses in the area. People began getting behind the project, and it snowballed. “We hosted a meeting of 35 individuals, 20 white business leaders and 15 Black business leaders, and we talked about race in a very honest and open dialogue,” he said. They talked about three pillars: business, community and education. Those involved continued to meet through Zoom throughout the pandemic and continue now to meet every two weeks. One intention of the project is to provide internships to help students in a variety of ways. It provides an avenue for students to use what they have learned in the educational setting out in the world of business, while making connections for their futures. The internships are available for high school and college students. These internships also provide help to local businesses to develop their workforces. The Community Moving Forward project has formed 11 committees working in a variety of ways to meet the common goals of the

48


INTERNSHIP

CantonIncMagazine.com

CANTON INC

49


INTERNSHIP

CANTON INC

“IT HAS TO BE A MOVEMENT, NOT A MOMENT.”

CantonIncMagazine.com

—Jerry Schroer, Chief Executive Officer for the Schroer Group

50

project. Schroer said they have a capital committee that works with Huntington and PNC banks that help minority businesses to get capital. “They have great programs,” he said. A fundraising group is committed to raising money, and everything they raise goes to the Stark County Minority Business Association. To date, they have raised more than $100,000. Members of the Community Moving Forward project come from nationally owned businesses, family-owned businesses, colleges and universities, organizations and community leaders. He said they are seeing some wins. “They are not coming as fast as we’d like, but we are seeing wins.” As they work together, Schroer said they are trying to spread out the network, so it is a countywide group not just a Canton group. “We are trying to continue to move the dots, that is our journey.” He said their biggest accomplishment

over the year is “getting people throughout our community of different races to talk to each other about a very tough but very important issue and how do we find solutions.” The group is committed to sustainability. “It has to be a movement, not a moment.” Schroer discussed the fact that many of the minority community would say they have been down this road time and time again, and inevitability, it falls on inaction. Many of them will say that this group (Community Moving Forward) has a different feel and that it has potential. “We are seeing some strong communication. The commitment from the group is truly amazing.” Schroer said in a few words to sum up the intentions of the program is to “make our community a better place for everyone and move our community forward.” If you are interested in participating in the project, call Schroer at 330-498-8100 or 330-498-8200.


CANTON INC CONTACT INFO

Mayor: Alan C. Andreani Alliance Area Chamber: AllianceOhioChamber.org Alliance Area Development Foundation: AllianceADF.com City of Alliance: CityOfAlliance.com

CANAL FULTON

Mayor: Joe Schultz City of Canal Fulton: CityOfCanalFulton-oh.gov Canal Fulton Chamber: CanalFultonChamber.org

CANTON

Mayor: Thomas Bernabei City of Canton: CantonOhio.gov Canton Regional Chamber: CantonChamber.org

HARTVILLE

Mayor: Cynthia Billings Village of Hartville: HartvilleOh.com

JACKSON TWP.

Board of Trustees President: Todd J. Hawke Jackson Township: JacksonTWP.com

LAKE TWP.

Board of Trustees President: John Arnold Lake Township: LakeTWPStarkCo.com Lake Township Chamber: LakeChamber.com

LOUISVILLE

Mayor: Patricia Fallot City of Louisville: LouisvilleOhio.com Louisville Area Chamber: LouisvilleOHChamber.com

MASSILLON

Mayor: Kathy Catazaro-Perry City of Massillon: MassillonOhio.com Massillon Area Chamber: MassillonOhChamber.com Massillon Development Foundation: MassillonDevelopment.com

MINERVA

Mayor: Timothy N. Tarbet Village of Minerva: ci.Minerva.Oh.us Minerva Chamber: MinervaChamber.org

NORTH CANTON

Mayor: Stephan B. Wilder City of North Canton: NorthCantonOhio.gov North Canton Area Chamber of Commerce: NorthCantonChamber.org

PLAIN TWP.

Board of Trustees President: Scott Haws Plain Township: PlainTownship.com

CantonIncMagazine.com

ALLIANCE

51


CONTACT INFO

CANTON INC

NEARBY ATTRACTIONS IN NORTHEAST OHIO Akron Art Museum

24 miles

Akron Zoo

25 miles

Cleveland Browns’ FirstEnergy Stadium

61 miles

Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Brecksville

41 miles

Great Lakes Science Center, Cleveland

60 miles

Hale Farm and Village, Peninsula

34 miles

PlayhouseSquare, Cleveland

60 miles

Progressive Field (home to Cleveland Indians)

60 miles

Quicken Loans Arena (home to Cleveland Cavaliers)

60 miles

Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, Cleveland

60 miles

Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens, Akron

28 miles

Trumpet in the Land, New Philadelphia

30 miles

University Circle museums, Cleveland

58 miles

Warther Museum, Dover

23 miles

LOCAL COLLEGES

CantonIncMagazine.com

AULTMAN COLLEGE OF NURSING AND HEALTH SCIENCES 2600 Sixth St. SW Canton, 44710 AultmanCollege.edu Phone: 330-363-6347 Fax: 330-580-6654

52

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY AT STARK 6000 Frank Ave. NW North Canton, 44720 Stark.Kent.edu Phone: 330-499-9600

MALONE UNIVERSITY 2600 Cleveland Ave. NW Canton, 44709 Malone.edu Phone: 800-521-1146

STARK STATE COLLEGE 6200 Frank Ave. NW North Canton, 44720 StarkState.edu Phone: 330-494-6170

UNIVERSITY OF MOUNT UNION 1972 Clark Ave. Alliance, 44601 MountUnion.edu Phone: 800-992-6682

WALSH UNIVERSITY 2020 E. Maple St. North Canton, 44720 Walsh.edu Phone: 800-362-9846 | 330-490-7090

NORTHEAST OHIO MEDICAL UNIVERSITY 4209 State Rt. 44 Rootstown, 44272 NEOMED.edu Phone: 800-686-2511


CANTON INC CONTACT INFO

EDUCATION, LEADERSHIP, TALENT DEVELOPMENT

/////////////////////////////////////////

LEADERSHIP STARK COUNTY Leadership Stark County, a department of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, engages and educates Stark County’s community leaders through a range of programs tailored to meet business and community needs. LSC works with community organizations to identify, prepare and position graduates for leadership within these organizations. The result is a core of motivated leaders with a lifelong commitment to community trusteeship. LeadershipStarkCounty.org, 330-456-7253.

/////////////////////////////////////////

STARK COUNTY EDUCATIONAL SERVICE CENTER The Stark County Educational Service Center is committed to meeting Stark County school district needs by providing quality educational support and services for more than 60,000 diverse, wide-ranging students in Stark County. StarkCountyESC.org, 330-492-8136.

/////////////////////////////////////////

STARK EDUCATION PARTNERSHIP The Stark Education Partnership Inc. is a nonprofit education-reform support organization in Stark County, crossing the lines of 17 public school districts. The partnership collaborates with educators, business and community and civic leaders to create and respond to opportunities that will add substantial and measurable value to education. EDPartner.org, 330-452-0829.

/////////////////////////////////////////

YSTARK! ystark!, a department of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, is Stark County’s dynamic young professional initiative. The organization works to attract, retain and engage young professionals, ultimately developing an involved and educated work-force for area businesses through programs, networking opportunities and educational engagement. ystark! program highlights include the Twenty under 40! awards. ystark.org, 330-456-7253. CantonIncMagazine.com

CANTON REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE The Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce’s Education Department works with businesses, educational institutions and employment professionals to create partnerships, pathways and dialog that will help meet employer workforce needs and ensure student success. CantonChamber.org, 330-456-7253.

53


CONTACT INFO

CANTON INC

CANTON/STARK COUNTY BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT RESOURCES AKRON-CANTON AIRPORT The Akron-Canton Airport serves nearly one million people each year in Northeast Ohio. CAK offers nonstop service to 11 destinations and just one-stop to the world aboard American, Delta, Spirit and United Airlines. With an economic impact of more than $1 billion a year, the airport lends to economic development and an improved quality of life. Start your next journey at AkronCantonAirport.com.

CANTON REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE The Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce is a membership organization of nearly 1,900 businesses dedicated to the advancement of the economic, industrial, professional, cultural and civic welfare of Stark County. Since 1914, the Chamber has worked to advance business and develop community through partnerships, programs, services and events to achieve economic growth for Canton/Stark County. CantonChamber.org, 330-456-7253.

CANTON/STARK COUNTY CONVENTION & VISITORS’ BUREAU Visit Canton, the Stark County Convention & Visitors’ Bureau, is here to assist you in your travels to our area. Whether you are organizing a tour group, a convention or sporting event, Visit Canton has professional staff members ready to assist in your planning. They service the community by attracting tourists, convention and meeting planners and sporting events

CantonIncMagazine.com

to the Stark County area and operating the

54

Visitor Information Center. VisitCanton.com, 800-552-6051.


CANTON INC

CONTACT INFO

CITY OF CANTON

take advantage of state and local tax incen-

comprehensive list of local businesses that

Canton is home to well-known national land-

tives designed to promote growth in the

can serve the E&P companies and oil-field

marks such as the Pro Football Hall of Fame,

innovation economy. Contact Jeff Dafler, VP

service companies in the Marcellus and

the McKinley Presidential Library & Museum

of Economic Development and Public Policy,

Utica shale region. ShaleDirectories.com.

and national monument, and the National

at 330-456-7253.

First Ladies’ Library and Research Center. Mayor Thomas Bernabei is aggressively pursu-

SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH NETWORK

Canton has a wide variety of attributes that

DOWNTOWN CANTON LAND BANK

make the city a smart location for companies

The Downtown Canton Land Bank (DCLB)

together the resources, organization, in-

ing new companies and businesses to the city.

The Small Business Growth Network brings

of all shapes, sizes and industries, and the

collaborates with public partners, private

frastructure and content to allow new and

city has programs that provide incentives for

developers and property owners to revi-

existing businesses and non-profit organiza-

business location, relocation or expansion.

talize and redevelop properties throughout

tions to create, grow and sustain a vibrant

CantonOhio.gov, 330-489-3283.

downtown Canton. DCLB invests in historic

community in the Stark, Carroll, Tuscarawas,

and economically strategic properties with

Holmes and Harrison county region.

a view toward cultivating a rich and vibrant

CantonChamber.org, 330-595-4575.

CANTON INNOVATION DISTRICT

downtown commercial, retail and entertainment zone, strengthening our region’s

The Innovation District, a 12-block neigh-

urban core. For more information, please

borhood within downtown Canton, serves

contact DCLB President Jeff Dafler at 330-

STARK AREA REGIONAL TRANSIT AUTHORITY

both to cultivate emerging technology

456-7253.

SARTA provides more than 2.4 million rides a year in Stark County through fixed route

entrepreneurs in our region and attract technology-oriented businesses to the

and Proline services. Its goal is to ensure

District. Start-ups benefit from program-

SHALEDIRECTORIES.COM

ming and support offered at the Innovation

ShaleDirectories.com is an online directory

ployees, students, seniors and disabled indi-

District headquarters, while businesses

that connects oil and gas industry opera-

viduals, have access to a quality transporta-

that invest in the revitalization of historic

tors, their employees and families with local

tion system that is reliable and affordable.

buildings located within the District can

business. ShaleDirectories.com provides a

SARTAOnline.com, 330-47-SARTA.

that Stark County residents, including em-

THANKS TO OUR ADVANTAGE CANTON PARTNERS Thank you to all the members of Advantage Canton, a group of strategic investment partners that support the mission of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce of leading the region in business and community development through collaboration and innovation. Advantage Canton’s economic development program is an investment in creating a stronger local economy which is good for everyone in Stark County.

AultCare Aultman Dominion Energy FreshMark Giant Eagle

Huntington MAGNET Mercy Medical Center PNC Bank The Canton Repository

Synchrony The City of Canton The Timken Co.

Biery Cheese

DeHoff Realtors

Black, McCuskey, Souers & Arbaugh

Fifth Third Bank

Kent State University at Stark

Constellation Energy

JP Morgan Chase & Co.

Solmet Technologies

For information regarding Advantage Canton, contact Jeff Dafler,VP of Economic Development & Public Policy, 330-456-7253.

CantonIncMagazine.com

CliftonLarsonAllen

M. Conley Company

55


CONTACT INFO

CANTON INC

STARK COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS The Stark County Association of Realtors®, proudly serving the Realtors®, home-buyers and home

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

sellers of Stark County, strives to enhance the ability

JOBSOHIO

and opportunity of its members to conduct their

JobsOhio is a private, nonprofit corporation designed to lead Ohio’s job-

business successfully and ethically, and to promote

creation efforts by singularly focusing on attracting and retaining jobs, with

the preservation of the right to own, use and

an emphasis on strategic industry sectors. JobsOhio is your ambassador.

transfer real property. StarkRealtors.com, 330-494-

JobsOhio.com, 614-224-6446.

5630.

MAGNET MAGNET, the Manufacturing Advocacy and Growth Network, supports,

STARK COUNTY BUILDING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION

educates and champions manufacturing, with the goal of transforming the region’s economy into a powerful, global player. The organization helps

The Building Industry Association of Stark County

manufacturers adopt innovative techniques, and increase productivity and

is a nonprofit trade association affiliated with the

global access. magnetwork.org, 800-669-2267.

Ohio Home Builders Association and the National Association of Home Builders. Chartered in 1945,

BUSINESS RESOURCE NETWORK

the BIA represents and promotes the interests and

The Business Resource Network aggregates resources to bring

concerns of the building industry and the community.

Stark,Tuscarawas and surrounding county businesses specialized services,

The organization provides Stark County consumers

funding through grants and loans and staffing options any company can

and businesses with a directory of member builders.

access and use to do business better. thebrn.net, 855-669-4726.

BIAStark.com, 330-494-5700.

SCORE SCORE is a nonprofit association dedicated to helping small businesses

STARK COMMUNITY FOUNDATION Stark Community Foundation is the community’s

get off the ground, grow and achieve their goals through education and mentorship. Canton.SCORE.org, 330-244-3280.

trusted partner in giving to nearly 850 individuals, families, businesses and organizations that have

SBDC

created charitable funds to impact the lives of others

The Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Stark

through the most effective philanthropy possible.

is a fully funded nonprofit organization devoted to helping small businesses

The Foundation is committed to serving donor

grow and individuals start new small businesses through training programs

needs and strategically addressing local issues. Since

and consultation sessions. CantonSBDC.org, 330-244-3290.

1963, more than $200 million has been awarded to nonprofits through Stark Community Foundation.

MINORITY BUSINESS

StarkCF.org, 330-454-3426

The Stark County Minority Business Association fosters development and growth of minority-owned businesses. StarkMinorityBusiness.org, 330-3710048.

STARK ENTREPRENEURSHIP ALLIANCE

OhioMeansJobs, formerly the Employment Source, is northeastern Ohio’s

network to assist startup, early-stage and small/

premier workforce development and training center, connecting job seekers

medium-size companies in the Stark County area.

with employers by providing numerous resources. OMJwork.com, 330-433-

Their goal is to be a single point of entry for

9675.

CantonIncMagazine.com

companies seeking assistance in their formation,

56

OHIOMEANSJOBS

The Stark Entrepreneurship Alliance is a virtual

growth and sustained viability. starkentalliance.com, 330-543-7637.


CANTON INC CONTACT INFO

REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUND FOR OUR ECONOMIC FUTURE

communities to ensure seamless attraction into Northeast Ohio. TeamNEO.org, 216-363-

STARK COUNTY SAFETY COUNCIL

The Fund for Our Economic Future is a

5400.

The Canton Regional Chamber, with

collaboration of philanthropic organizations

suppor t from the Ohio Bureau of Workers’

and individuals that have united to strengthen

Compensation, administers Stark County

the economic competitiveness of Nor theast Ohio through grantmaking, research and civic

///////////////////////////////

engagement. TheFundNEO.org, 216-4569800.

///////////////////////////////

JUMPSTART, INC.

Safety Council, the No. 1-ranked safety council in the state of Ohio. The safety council provides a forum for safety

STARK COUNTY HUMAN RESOURCES ASSOCIATION

and health information, education and networking in Stark County, through

Whether you are new to the human

leadership, innovation, facilitation, programs

resources field or have years of experience,

and suppor t. StarkCountySafetyCouncil.org,

Stark County Human Resources

330-456-7253.

Association is a local star ting point for networking, information, professional

///////////////////////////////

Jumpstar t provides intensive assistance and

development and continued suppor t

service to Nor theast Ohio entrepreneurs,

of excellence in human resources. The

and selectively invests in the highest-

organization, founded in 1944, is an affiliate

potential companies. Jumpstar tInc.org,

of the Society for Human Resource

216-363-3400.

Management. Stark.SHRM.org, 330-451-

STARK ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BOARD

8670.

The Stark Economic Development Board is a

///////////////////////////////

OHIO DEVELOPMENT SERVICES AGENCY Working with par tners across business, state and local governments, academia,

private, nonprofit corporation created to help local companies grow and expand. In addition,

///////////////////////////////

it actively seeks to attract new business investments to Stark County, one of the most economically viable areas in Northeast Ohio, as

STARK COUNTY PORT AUTHORITY

well as to advocate for workforce development. StarkCoOhio.com, 330-453-5900.

The Stark County Por t Authority helps to

and the nonprofit sector, the Ohio

provide the Greater Stark County area

Development Services Agency works to

with an economic development tool for

attract, create, grow and retain businesses

new capital investment, job creation and

///////////////////////////////

through competitive incentives and targeted

retention. The organization helps create

investments. Development.Ohio.gov, 800-

and preser ve jobs through a wide variety

848-1300.

of financing, real estate and foreign trade

STARK COUNTY REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION

zone programs. StarkCoOhio.com, 330-

Stark County Regional Planning

453-5900.

Commission improves the quality of life in

///////////////////////////////

Stark County and its communities through an effective regional forum characterized by communication, collaboration, facilitation and planning assistance. The organization

TeamNEO serves companies and site

includes metropolitan planning, community

consultants by acting as the single point of

development and engineering depar tments.

entry into the 16-county Cleveland Plus

StarkCountyOhio.gov, 330-451-7389.

region, and then works with counties and

CantonIncMagazine.com

TEAMNEO

///////////////////////////////

57


58

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME VIA NFL GOLD JACKETS Pro Football Hall of Fame Centennial Class of 2020 and Class of 2021 together on stage at the Canton Memorial Civic Center after receiving their gold jackets, one of the three iconic symbols of induction. (Not pictured is Troy Polamalu.)

CantonIncMagazine.com

PARTING SHOT CANTON INC


62&,$/

$7 7 +( 67 21( + 286 (

Eat, Drink & Be Social! Social is an upscale, neighborhood concept inspired by

fusion cuisine. We specialize in fresh ingredients, spectacular flavors and a sublime dining experience. Social is perfect for a family affair or a night out on the town. Located in a fully-renovated 1800’s historic home, our setting offers a sophisticated experience along with a creative menu that bursts with flavor. Choose from dining fireside, in your private room or al fresco on our newly-constructed patio (opening soon!). Join us in our spectacular Overlook Lounge located on the third floor where you can enjoy panoramic views while sipping on one of our specialty Craft Cocktails. We also offer an extensive wine list for your pleasure. Date night or girls night out, this is the place to be! Our attentive staff looks forward to hosting your gastronomic adventure!

824 Lincoln Way East Massillon, Ohio 44646 (330) 809-0461



Millions discover their favorite reads on issuu every month.

Give your content the digital home it deserves. Get it to any device in seconds.