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Queen Margaret’s School Reading, Writing & Riding

EDUCATION FOR HORSE

OPTIONS LOVERS

THE MARKETPLACE Canada’s Horse Industry At Your Fingertips

SPECIAL FEATURES

Pit Ponies Ghosts of the Coal Mines

Horses With Jobs

WORKING EQUINES OF THE 21ST CENTURY n n n n n

Logging Towing Outrider Packing Pulling

n n n n n

Therapy Rodeo Pickup Police Mount Carriage Horse Marine Harvest

How To...

Take a Great Conformation Photo n Shorten a Mane with Scissors n Train an Unruly Mane n Blanket Based on Need n Spot Signs of Sugar Sensitivity n Prevent a Mineral Imbalance n

PM #40009439

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DISPLAY UNTIL AUGUST 31, 2017

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HORSE INDUSTRY

A Triage of Canada’s Equine Insurance Horse Industry What Does the Future Hold?

Cold Comfort

Understand Your Policy’s Fine Print

Horse Care in Winter-Long Turnout


CANADA’S HORSE INDUSTRY AT YOUR FINGERTIPS A SPECIAL ISSUE OF

CONTENTS

12 PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK/CALLIPSO • 28 PHOTO: CANSTOCK/DANIELPFISTER • 84 PHOTO COURTESY OF APRIL RAY-PETERSON

28 INSIDE 10 Editor’s Desk 82 How To Horsekeeping

12

Step-by-step instructions and guidelines to help you improve your horse management skills.

94 The Marketplace

Your comprehensive source for products, services, breeds, stallions, and more.

99 Industry Hoofbeat • Odysseo by Cavalia: A unique theatrical experience • Horse3: Head-Heart-Hooves • Manitoba Horse Council Honours Exceptional Members

84

102 Index to Advertisers CONNECT TO THE HORSE INDUSTRY

FEATURES

HORSE HEALTH 28 Cold Comfort

Domestic horse care and the long, cold Canadian winter

88 How to Blanket Based on Need

Is going under cover the right choice for your horse?

90 How to Recognize Signs of Sugar Sensitivity

Learn to spot the symptoms of insulin resistance and equine metabolic disease.

92 How To Prevent an Iron-Copper-Zinc Imbalance

Why the balance of minerals is important, and the implications of iron overload. www.HORSEJournals.com

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A SPECIAL ISSUE OF

36 FEATURES

HORSE INDUSTRY 12 A Triage of Canada’s Horse Industry

The present, the future, and how do we get there from here?

22 Equine Insurance: The Fine Print

Understanding your coverage, why insurers deny claims, and what to do if your claim is denied.

36 Horses With Jobs Horse Help Wanted!

Ten 21st century jobs showcasing our hardworking horse friends.

58 Pit Ponies: Ghosts of the Coal Mines Horses and ponies lived and died in one of the world’s most hostile and dangerous working environments. 8

Canada’s Equine Guide 2017

SPECIAL FEATURES

22

74 Queen Margaret’s School Where the bond between horse and rider forges a pathway to success.

78-81 An Education in Equines

Opportunities to broaden your knowledge or turn your passion into a career with horses.

82 How to Take a Great Conformation Photo The no-stress guide to taking that perfect conformation photo.

58

84 How to Shorten a Mane with Scissors A tidy, short, thin mane… without pulling? Yes you can!

86 How to Train a Mane

Step-by-step guide to training “the mane with a mind of its own.”

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CANADA’S HORSE INDUSTRY AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

22 PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK/PETER TITMUSS • 36 PHOTO COURTESY OF KENNET HORSE BOAT COMPANY • 58 PHOTO COURTESY BIG PIT NATIONAL COAL MUSEUM, BLAENAFON, WALES • 74 PHOTO: HAYLEY PICARD

CONTENTS

CANADA’S HORSE INDUSTRY AT YOUR FINGERTIPS


HORSE INDUSTRY

The Changing Face of

Canada’s Horse Industry Where do we go from here…? By Margaret Evans

S

even years ago, the 2010 Canadian Horse Industry Profile Study was undertaken by Equestrian Canada (formerly Equine Canada). The mandate was to define the state of the industry in 2010, the issues that could direct its future, and to determine how prepared it was to meet the challenges that could influence its sustainability, growth, markets and management. A summary of the information gathered in the summer of 2010 and presented in the Study is listed below: • There were 963,500 horses in Canada owned by 226,500 households, resident on 145,000 properties.

• The horse industry contribution to Canada’s economy was pegged at more than $19.6 billion annually, supporting more than 154,000 jobs in Canada. • The industry investment in horses, tack, equipment and improvements was estimated at $29 billion.

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Canada’s Equine Guide 2017

CANADA’S HORSE INDUSTRY AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

PHOTO: ISTOCK/LOSHADENOK

• Approximately 855,000 people were active in the horse industry, comprised of 59 percent adults and 41 percent children.


• Selling prices of horses was down significantly, attributed to increased imports from the US for processing and the economic recession. • Annual foal production had decreased 50 percent between 2003 and 2010, while costs of horse-keeping increased more than 70 percent. • The number of horse-owning households increased by 79,000 between 2003 and 2010. Expansion was attributed to increased participation from the babyboomer generation. • Horse owners were aging, with median age increasing to the 50 — 59 year-old range, and 24 percent of horse owners were 60 years of age or older. • Entry level participation was down by approximately 50 percent. A key priority identified for long-term industry sustainability and growth was attracting new participation and revitalizing the customer base. The results were aptly described by Akaash Maharaj, former CEO of EC: “Our report confirms the enormous — but too often underestimated — contribution made by Canadian equestrians to our country’s economy and quality of life.” The Study was published in 2011 and the statistics took some by surprise, while others nodded in affirmation that the results matched their instincts. In the 2012 edition of this Guide, we summarized and discussed the results of the 2010 Study.

horse abuse, and concerns about fewer people getting involved in riding. This article will share these results with our readers. “Although hay costs are cyclical in Alberta there has been a noticeable trend upward in feed costs over the past five years,” says Les Oakes, President, Alberta Equestrian Federation. “This along with boarding fee increases, [and] increased vet and farrier costs, have made an already expensive sport become costlier for the average person to participate in. Fuel prices are up in Canada, therefore, it is more expensive to travel to shows. And, although my comment is based on anecdotal evidence, I have noticed boarders making fewer trips out to the barns where their horse resides. Although the AEF’s membership numbers are up substantially over the past five years, I do believe that this is a result of the AEF focusing on membership growth, not a growth in the number of people who

participate in equestrian events or recreational use of equines. The average age of participants in the equine world has continued to increase with over 17 percent of the AEF’s membership over the age of 56 years old in 2016.” Perhaps, too, the approach to enjoying horses has changed. “It seems as time has passed that horses are now viewed as either a commodity or expense, and less of a partner in sport,” says Mark Halliwell with Richmond Stables, BC. “There will always be an aspect of buying and selling, breeding and trading, but now competitive horses are being loaned out on paid leases once their principal job is completed, and income is derived from this. In the past, horses that weren’t being used to their full potential just needed a job to do, and if there was a rider willing to take that horse on, then everyone was happy. Now it seems horses are being used to their full potential well beyond their years, expected to make an

When introducing children to the world of horses, parents should ensure that their child’s coach is certified and competent so riding experiences are safe and positive.

Now, seven years on, where does the industry stand and to what extent have the concerns of the 2010 survey’s participants materialized? In many ways, the aftermath of the economic recession of 2008-2009 accelerated the changes in Canada’s horse industry. In the absence of an updated nation-wide study to identify and measure the ensuing changes and their effects, this magazine conducted reader and business surveys in late 2016, and also contacted a number of key members of the horse industry across Canada. Our research was intended to identify the top issues facing the equine industry today, and gather additional perspectives and detail relating to major issues and concerns. The answers were understandably many and varied depending on each respondent’s specific focus and participation, but top-of-mind concerns included costs (from buying a horse to owning land, board, feed, vet, farrier, coaching, show fees, and travel), training, breeding, horse health, horse welfare,

PHOTO: CANSTOCK/RTBILDER

Looking Ahead

CONNECT TO THE HORSE INDUSTRY

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HORSE INDUSTRY

EQUINE INSURANCE Understanding the Fine Print of your Policy By Karen L. Weslowski Lawyer, Miller Thomson LLP, Vancouver, BC

A

ll horse owners and riders know that equine activities can be

dangerous. Despite best efforts to stay safe around horses, accidents happen. When an accident occurs, insurance coverage may be available to respond to the injury or property damage. However, determining whether there is insurance coverage in a particular situation is frequently unclear due to the technical nature of policy language. People are often confused or angry when an insurer denies coverage for claims which, on their face, seem to be clearly covered by insurance. This article aims to help you understand the insurance coverage most commonly available for personal injury and property damage arising from equine-related accidents, why insurers may deny claims, and what to do if your claim is denied.

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Canada’s Equine Guide 2017

CANADA’S HORSE INDUSTRY AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

EQUINE ASSOCIATION COVERAGE

Many Canadian equine associations provide automatic insurance coverage to their members as a result of membership in the association. Some of these associations include Alberta Equestrian Federation, Canadian Pony Club, Equine Association of Yukon, Horse Council of British Columbia, Island Horse Council, New Brunswick Equestrian Association, and Saskatchewan Horse Federation. This is not an exhaustive list; there may be other associations providing automatic insurance coverage upon membership. When joining an equine association, you should ask what kind of insurance coverage is available. If there is no coverage through the association, you will likely need to obtain insurance from another source. If you have insurance prior to joining an equine association, it is generally a term of the equine association’s insurance policy that your other insurance will be “primary” and the equine association insurance policy will be “excess.” This means that if a claim is made, your other insurance will be called upon first to pay the


Official Insurance Provider of Equestrian Canada

A Leading Canadian Provider of Insurance Products tailored to the Equine Industry Horse Mortality Plans Offering: • Full Mortality • Waiver of Depreciation • Medical and Surgical • Disability • Agreed Value / Guaranteed Renewal • Comprehensive Personal Liability • $10,000 Equus Line Clause • Lease Fee Protection Plan, for Leased Horses

PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK/PETER TITMUSS

Commercial General Liability Plans For:

claim. The equine association insurance will only have to pay if the other insurance is insufficient to pay the entirety of the claim.

INSURANCE AVAILABLE THROUGH EQUINE ASSOCIATION COVERAGE

The types of insurance coverage commonly available through an equine association are as follows:

Liability Insurance Liability insurance provides coverage for claims against you by third parties for property damage or personal injury arising out of the ownership or use of a horse, or arising out of your participation in most equine-related activities. The limit of this coverage is usually $5,000,000. Not all claims for property damage or personal injury will be covered. Most equine association insurance excludes coverage in the following circumstances: • The riding of a member’s horse by any person who is not a member in good standing of an equine association or who is not an equine

• Riding Facilities / Academies • Boarding Stables • Coaches / Riding Instructors • Horse Shows / Events

• Farriers • Associations / Clubs • Clinics • Charity Events

The Henry Equestrian Insurance Plan is offered throughout Canada. To obtain a quote contact the office nearest to your location. ALBERTA AgPro Insurance Brokers

ONTARIO – AURORA, Head Office Henry Equestrian Insurance Brokers Ltd.

1-780-638-1557

1-800-565-4321 • hep@hep.ca www.hep.ca

www.agproinsurance.com

ONTARIO – BELLEVILLE McDougall Insurance & Financial

Dr. Maurice Stewart – mstewart@agpro-insurance.com Amanda Stannard – astannard@agpro-insurance.com

BRITISH COLUMBIA Westland Insurance

1-800-361-0941 ext. 1246

1-800-899-3093 ext. 138 • 778-545-2126

Brenda Erickson – berickson@westland-insurance.com EquineInsuranceSpecialist@Westland-Insurance.com

www.westland-insurance.com

Scott Zurrer – szurrer@mcdougallinsurance.com

www.mcdougallinsurance.com

QUEBEC Leclerc Assurances Et Services Financiers

MANITOBA Oldfield Kirby Esau Inc.

1-800-567-0927

Kelly Fawcett-Neufeld – kfawcett@oldfieldkirby.com

SASKATCHEWAN Chaben McPherson Agencies Ltd.

serviceshep@leclercassurances.com

1-877-653-4357 ext. 326 • 204-943-1446 www.oldfieldkirby.com

MARITIME PROVINCES Brooklyn Insurance Agency

1-800-735-4614 • 902-757-0269

Sherri Greenough caib – sherri.greenough@huestis.ca

www.huestis.ca

www.leclercassurances.com

306-244-3020 Fax: 306-665-2667

Doug Chaben, Hugh Sutherland & Joanne Lipinksi chabenmcpherson@sasktel.net

www.chabenmcphersonag.saskbrokers.com

UNDERWRITTEN BY AVIVA ELITE INSURANCE COMPANY

CONNECT TO THE HORSE INDUSTRY

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COLD COMFORT

Domestic Horses and the Long, Cold

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Canada’s Equine Guide 2017

CANADA’S HORSE INDUSTRY AT YOUR FINGERTIPS


Canadian Winter

To better understand how our modern domestic horses cope with winter, let’s first take a look back across the ages at the way the horse has evolved.

By Lynda M. Vanden Elzen

PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK/KIRK GIESLER

Equine Evolution and Domestication by Humans Since the evolution of the modern equus three to four million years ago, wild horses have been present on almost all of Earth’s continents. The story of the modern horse’s evolution began in the grasslands of North America, and then spread over the Bering land bridge into modern day Siberia. At the end of the Pleistocene epoch, about 10,000 years ago, horses as well as other large mammalian species died out in North and South America for unknown reasons. Horses were reintroduced to the Americas in the sixteenth century with the arrival of Spanish explorers. Since horses were first domesticated around 6,000 years ago, they have been interbred with other domestic horses to create the more than 300 different breeds that exist worldwide today. It is believed that early domesticated horses were crossed with wild stock from many different regions, due to the genetic diversity that exists in modern horses. It must be pointed out, however, that with one known exception — the Przewalski’s horse — truly wild horses, or horses with no domestic ancestors, no longer exist. Instead, the “wild” horses that live today are the feral descendants of domesticated horses who either escaped or were turned loose from domestic herds. Thus, in general, natural selection was replaced for the most part by artificial selection once horses became domesticated by humans, and horses no longer evolved naturally to survive various climates without human assistance. Instead, they were bred by humans to serve specific purposes in differing climates. There are some notable exceptions to this, such as the Yakutian horse of Siberia that evolved from Mongolian stock over only 800 years to survive temperatures of minus 70 degrees C. While it is true that the horse breeds developed by humans in various geographical locations tend to be suited to thrive in the climates present in those locations, for the past 6,000 years most horse breeds have survived under the care of humans. We cannot expect a desert horse to survive in Siberia without human intervention any more than we can expect a horse adapted to the climate in Siberia to thrive in an African desert by himself. While it is true that feral horses do survive without human intervention, on average their lives are much shorter than those of domestic horses. CONNECT TO THE HORSE INDUSTRY

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HORSES WITH JOBS

HORSE HELP WANTED! By Margaret Evans Down through the ages, horses have served as mankind’s most important ally. Initially, some 55,000 years ago, they were nothing more than a source of food — forced off cliffs or being chased into areas where they could be clubbed to death. But something amazing happened when the horse was domesticated around 3500 BC. When mankind harnessed the mobility, power, and speed of the horse, the world began to quickly change. With horses, people had a more efficient means to travel, explore, hunt, farm, pack, trade, and engage in warfare. They could journey by horse to barter, socialize with others, and share ideas, language, and knowledge. They used horses in competition, sport, recreation, and as status symbols. Horses became valued for the variety of different roles they played at every level of society, and as they helped shape civilization, their history became inextricably woven into the story of mankind. Horses remain integral to the lives and livelihoods of hundreds of millions of people around the world. Today, as they have always done, horses serve in a multitude of roles, using their unique abilities to perform their jobs faithfully as competitors, companions, and workmates. They pull barges, beer wagons, ploughs, and carriages. They harvest logs from the forest, crops from the fields, and plants from the sea. They carry tourists along the trails, and deliver adventurers to remote areas of the back country. No amount of automation can replace a good working ranch or rodeo horse. They race for our entertainment, and help keep their racing colleagues calm and focused. They perform, entertain and compete for us in shows, ceremonies and exhibitions. On city streets as ambassadors for police departments, they help serve, protect, and manage crowd control. And to children and adults with disabilities they provide therapy, achievement and empowerment. In Third World countries, over 100 million horses, donkeys, and mules work as the trucks, taxis and tractors to support the needs of 600 million people for whose existence they are essential. To illustrate the enduring relationship between horse and man, this feature highlights ten 21st century jobs that showcase our hardworking horse friends and their loyal service.

10 Twenty-First

Century

HORSE

JOBS

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Canada’s Equine Guide 2017

These hard-working Belgian geldings are Axle and Bobby, both 10 years old. PHOTO COURTESY OF TRIPLE D DRAFT HORSES

CANADA’S HORSE INDUSTRY AT YOUR FINGERTIPS


Logging Horses JOB DESCRIPTION: Draft horses skid logs out of the forest, allowing for selective harvesting of timber and minimizing damage to the environment. Horses and oxen have been used to haul logs since preindustrial times. Much of it was small scale harvesting, but it was hard and hazardous work. Unstable and snagged trees, falling branches, and loose material were the “widow makers� of a rapidly growing but dangerous industry. But as settlers arrived in Canada, more land had to be cleared for homebuilding, farming, and travel. Ultimately, horses and oxen were replaced with machinery and logging trucks. continues on page 38 CONNECT TO THE HORSE INDUSTRY

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HORSES WITH JOBS

Ghosts of the Coal Mines

PHOTO COURTESY BIG PIT NATIONAL COAL MUSEUM, BLAENAFON, WALES

PIT PONIES AND HORSES

A Welsh miner and pit pony.

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Canada’s Equine Guide 2017

By Margaret Evans

CANADA’S HORSE INDUSTRY AT YOUR FINGERTIPS


T

“The first records of ponies being worked in mines was in the north of England around 1750,” says Wendy Priest, Horse Keeper Supervisor at The National Coal Mining Museum for England. “Horses were used on a large scale after the 1842 Mines Act that abolished the underground employment of boys under 10 and all females. “People who visit the Museum are under the impression that Shetland ponies were mainly used as pit ponies. In fact, all sizes were used, from Shetlands to Shires. In different parts of the country, the width of coal seams varied considerably. Thick coal seams meant high [ceiling] roadways. Large ponies and horses could be found working in these mines. Small ponies such as Welsh ponies and Shetlands [in England] worked in small seams with low tops. Many scraped their heads as they worked as the roadways were so low. Welsh mines commonly used larger Welsh cobs, around 15 hands.” In ex-miner Ceri Thompson’s book Harnessed: Colliery Horses in Wales, he documents the widespread use of small Shire horses in the main roadways in the mines. Animals larger than ponies were used because the drams held up to a ton and a half of material compared to the smaller half-ton tubs in most English coalfields. Horses and ponies were integral workers in coal mines, not only in England and Wales, but in Canada and the United States. Nova Scotia was the dominant area of the coal industry in Canada,

and the earliest coal mines in the late 1700s were on Cape Breton Island and at Pictou in Nova Scotia. On Vancouver Island, coal was systematically mined from the mid1800s onward. After the arrival of the railroad toward the end of the 1800s, coal was mined in the interior of British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan. Coal is not found in either Ontario or Quebec, the areas destined to become Canada’s industrial heartland. A paper titled Coal Mining in Canada: A Historical and Comparative Overview written by Delphin Muise of Carleton University and Robert McIntosh of the National Archives of Canada in 1996, describes how horses were introduced for coal haulage in Nova Scotia when increased productivity overtook existing haulage systems. “A first step in removing this bottleneck was the introduction of animals to haul coal underground. Horses had been used underground to pull tubs laden with coal in British collieries since the late 18th century. The GMA [General Mining Association], priding itself on adopting the most advanced mining practices, introduced horse haulage underground shortly after its arrival in Nova Scotia.” At first, they pulled skips, sled-like vehicles pulled over wooden roads made of logs. Gradually the skip was replaced with a wooden coal tub bolted to an iron frame and fitted with a wheeled undercarriage that ran on rails. By 1871, several miles of

Miners often took two packs of lunch or ‘snap,’ one for the pony and one for himself.

PHOTO COURTESY BIG PIT NATIONAL COAL MUSEUM, BLAENAFON, WALES

he human race has long had a love affair with coal. Coal is a fossil fuel that started forming in the Carboniferous Period 359 million to 299 million years ago during the Paleozoic Era. Stone and Bronze Age flint axes have been found embedded in coal, evidence that people were using it for fuel long before the Roman invasion. In the 13th century, coal seams were found along shorelines of northern England, and settlers dug them up then followed them inland under cliffs or hills, the earliest beginnings of drift mining. But with the Industrial Revolution in the 19th century, coal mining exploded, providing fuel for steam engines, transportation, and home heating. In the early years, men, women and children worked the mines until laws were enacted to protect females. As productivity improved and underground haulage needs increased, horses and ponies filled the need.

Robbie was the last horse working in the mines in Wales. He retired in 1999 from Pant-y-Gaseg Mine which, in translation, means ‘Horse’s Hollow.’

Taller horses would become injured by scraping their heads or backs on the low-ceilinged roadways. CONNECT TO THE HORSE INDUSTRY

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CANADA’S HORSE INDUSTRY AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

PAGES 94-98

Clubs—Associations ALBERTA EQUESTRIAN FEDERATION

Bed & Bale Guided Horseback Trail Riding Yellowhead Hwy #16 & Bighorn Hwy #40 North CONVENIENT STOP-OVER ALONG ATHABASCA RIVER

Box 6054, Hinton, AB T7R 1X4 780-865-4760 • oldentrance@yahoo.com www.oldentrance.ab.ca

Suite 100, 251 Midpark Blvd SE Calgary, AB, T2X 1S3 www.albertaequestrian.com info@albertaequestrian.com Fax: 403-252-5260 Phone: 403-253-4411 1-877-463-6233

EQUINE ASSOCIATION OF YUKON PO Box 30011 Whitehorse, YT, Y1A 5M2 www.equineyukon.weebly.com equineyukon@gmail.com

EQUESTRIAN CANADA

Reserve Your Seat! 10 minutes to 10 days • Lake Louise, AB Paul & Sue Peyto • 1-888-858-3388

TimberlineTours.ca

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Canada’s Equine Guide 2017

308 Legget Drive, Suite 100 Ottawa, ON, K2K 1Y6 www.equinecanada.ca inquiries@equestrian.ca Fax: 613-248-3484 Phone: 613-287-1515 1-866-282-8395

Some of my best leading men have been dogs and horses. — ELIZABETH TAYLOR

FÉDÉRATION ÉQUESTRE DU QUÉBEC 4545, av. Pierre-De Coubertin Montréal, QC, H1V 0B2 www.feq.qc.ca infocheval@feq.qc.ca Phone: 514-252-3053 1-866-575-0515

HORSE COUNCIL OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 27336 Fraser Hwy. Aldergrove, BC, V4W 3N5 www.hcbc.ca reception@hcbc.ca Fax: 604-856-4302 Phone: 604-856-4304 1-800-345-8055

MANITOBA HORSE COUNCIL 145 Pacific Avenue Winnipeg, MB, R3B 2Z6

www.manitobahorsecouncil.ca mhc.exec@sportmanitoba.ca Fax: 204-925-5703 Phone: 204-925-5719

Visit the Marketplace at HORSEJournals.com/marketplace

PHOTO: ISTOCK/MARIA ITINA

MARKETPLACE


NEW BRUNSWICK EQUESTRIAN ASSOCIATION 900 Hanwell Road, Unit 13 Fredericton, NB, E3B 6A2 www.nbea.ca horses@nbnet.nb.ca Fax: 506-454-2363 Phone: 506-454-2353

NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR EQUESTRIAN ASSOCIATION PO Box 372, Station C St. John’s, NL, A1C 5J9 www.equestriannl.ca president@equestriannl.ca

NOVA SCOTIA EQUESTRIAN FEDERATION

5516 Spring Garden Road Halifax, NS, B3J 1G6 www.horsenovascotia.ca nsefmembership@sportnovascotia.ca Fax: 902-425-5606 Phone: 902-425-5450

ONTARIO EQUESTRIAN FEDERATION 1 West Pearce Street, Suite 201 Richmond Hill, ON, L4B 3K3 www.horse.on.ca horse@horse.on.ca Fax: 905-709-1867 Phone: 905-709-6545 1-877-441-7112

PEI HORSE COUNCIL

40 Enman Crescent, Charlottetown, PE, C1E 1E6 www.islandhorsecouncil.ca office@islandhorsecouncil.ca

SASKATCHEWAN HORSE FEDERATION

2205 Victoria Avenue Regina, SK, S4P 0S4 www.saskhorse.ca averilparsons@saskhorse.ca Fax: 306-525-4041 Phone: 306-780-9449

Coaches-Clinicians ELAINE BANFIELD EQUINE

FEI dressage rider, trainer, clinician and M Level dressage Judge. Teach all levels of English and Western riding and Western dressage. Phone or text: 204-771-9130

MARKETPLACE

Clubs—Associations cont.

Equestrian Centres & Boarding ASMARA STABLES

Armstrong, BC Boarding, indoor and outdoor arenas, grass jumping ring, Arabian horses for sale. asmarawg@telus.net 250-546-6004

MASON BLUFF FARM

Sechelt, BC Boarding-Training-Lessons. Quality horses for sale. Jeanine Ellingham — Equine Canada Coach III Eventing. Certified CanTRA I Coach for Therapeutic Riding. Jeanine Ellingham jbcbean@gmail.com 604-885-2489

FARM • FEED • TACK

Toll Free: 888-792-0678 Phone: 604-792-0678 Fax: 604-792-0169

46255 Chilliwack Central Rd.

TURNING POINT RANCH & APIARY

Horses ‘n Honey! Pritchard, BC Full care, customized feeding, individual attention, 40+ years of experience. Ideal for winter layups, rest, recuperation or retirement. Honey Sales. www.turningpointranch.ca horse@turningpointnranch.ca 250-577-3526

Feed OTTER CO-OP AT PITT MEADOWS

12343 Harris Road, Pitt Meadows, BC, V3Y 2J5 pitmeadows@otter-coop.com Phone: 604-465-5651 Fax: 604-465-0718

Holidays on Horseback OUTPOST AT WARDEN ROCK

Banff, Alberta Stagecoach and horseback holidays in Banff National Park’s Rocky Mountains. Alberta’s best riding vacation, bar none. www.outpostatwardenrock.com info@outpostatwrdenrock.com 877-762-2767 403-762-2767

Chilliwack, BC

Cowboy’s Logic PHOTO: CANSTOCK/ALPTRAUM

Be sure to taste your words before you spit them out.

FERRIS FENCING Bayco Complete Electric Systems HorseRail Products

30 Years Serving the Horse Industry info@ferrisfencing.com • 1-800-665-3307

www.ferrisfencing.com

Hoof Care HIGH COUNTRY HORSESHOES LTD. 102-20381 62nd Ave. Langley, BC Tack, hoof care, farrier supplies. Distributor of Farrier’s Formula. hchorseshoes@gmail.com Fax: 604-530-1775 Phone: 604-530-0761

See Display Ad Index on page 102

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Special Double Issue of Canadian Horse Journal