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The paper created EXCLUSIVELY for farm families and rural residents of east central Alberta 8 Pages

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November 9, 2021

C or e y f e b

The fall is an exciting time of year for hunters as they trek out into the great outdoors looking for the perfect spot to set up and watch for game. Whether it be on the side of a grassy slope, tucked in along the treeline of a forest, or overlooking the expanse of a winding river, getting there is half the battle. The land is one of our most valuable commodities and, for farmers and ranchers, their livelihood. We owe it to everyone to treat it as such. All recreational land users are reminded to check first before accessing land. For full details on accessing land for recreational use see inside story on page 6.

Inside...

News Features

Farm supplies, equipment and services, home decor and more!

County welcomes new council. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 It all boils down to access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 County supports curling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

A variety of merchandise and services:

www.camrosebooster.com

Photos by Lori Larsen

Camrose and District Fish and Wildlife Enforcement Services District Officer Lorne Rinkel uses the Alberta Guide to Hunting Regulations 2021 to check the access information with regards to any land in the county.


The COUNTRY BOOSTER, November 9, 2021 – Page 2

211126C0

FOR SALE BY TENDER

TENDERS ARE INVITED for the purchase of the following Land: MERIDIAN 4 RANGE 19 TOWNSHIP 47 SECTION 2 QUARTER NORTH EAST CONTAINING 64.7 HECTARES (160 ACRES) MORE OR LESS EXCEPTING THEREOUT: HECTARES (ACRES) MORE OR LESS A) PLAN 1420184 - SUBDIVISION 6.61 16.33 EXCEPTING THEREOUT ALL MINES AND MINERALS The Land is located in Camrose County, 6 miles east of Camrose on Highway 26, then ¾ mile north on RR 191. The Land is bare farmland, number 2 soil, and consists of approximately 143.67 acres (approximately 140 cultivated). The title to the Land will be subject to any reservations and exceptions stated on the certificate of title, will be subject to all existing registrations stated on the certificate of title, and will be free and clear of all financial encumbrances. The municipal property taxes are paid to the end of 2021. There will be no further adjustments to the purchase price. No warranty or representation whatsoever is given as to the condition of the Land, the fitness of the Land for any purpose, the size of the Land, or the number of cultivated acres. GST will be added to the tender price unless, at the time of closing, the successful tenderer is a GST registrant and has delivered a signed GST indemnity certificate, in form satistactory to Fielding & Company LLP. The owner and the successful tenderer will each pay their own legal fees, and the successful tenderer will be responsible for paying Land Titles Office registration fees. To ensure that the transaction can close on time, the successful tenderer will be required to obtain a title insurance policy at their own expense.

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TENDERS must be in writing, accompanied by a certified cheque or bank draft made payable to Fielding & Company LLP for $10,000.00, sealed in an envelope marked “Weder Tender”, and must be received by Fielding & Company LLP, Barristers and Solicitors, #100, 4918-51 Street, Camrose, Alberta T4V 1S3, on or before 12:00 noon, December 3, 2021. The tenders will not be opened in public. No conditional tenders will be accepted, and the highest or any tender will not necessarily be accepted. The deposits of all unsuccessful tenderers will be returned. The closing date of sale will be 12:00 noon, January 31, 2022, and the successful tenderer must pay the balance of the purchase price on the closing date, plus GST, unless the successful tenderer is a GST registrant and has provided a signed GST indemnity. If a tender is accepted and the successful tenderer does not proceed with the purchase, the deposit will be forfeited. For further information about the Land, phone Ivo or Irma Weder at 250-347-9774. For information about the tender process, phone Ian W. Smith, Q.C. at Fielding & Company LLP, at 780-672-8851.

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COUNTY DEPUTY

Murray Green, Camrose Booster Camrose County declared councillor Carlene Wetthuhn as the Deputy Reeve when County administrator Paul King swore her in at the annual organizational meeting on October 26.


The COUNTRY BOOSTER, November 9, 2021 – Page 3

Busy season ahead for Fish and Wildlife

We see profit sharing. The girls see more time for family fun. This is Rod, Danielle and their girls Isla and Nora. Rod joined Vision few years ago because he liked that they had Agriculture Specialists who come to you. As a third-generation farmer, Rod knows first-hand that financial institutions don’t typically understand the challenges of Ag clients – let alone visit their operations. Rod appreciates that his Vision Ag Specialist does both. It means a little more time for family fun, something Isla and Nora appreciate too.

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By Lori Larsen

Hunting season in and around the province is now in full swing, with general hunting seasons for big game using either a firearm, crossbow or bow and arrow officially open as of November 1. Camrose Fish and Wildlife Enforcement Services (FWES) District Officer Lorne Rinkel indicated he is looking forward to the 202021 season and anticipates there will be a dramatic increase in the number of people hunting. “We are seeing it in our licencing numbers.” He speculated that some of the increases in numbers will be people who have more time on their hands as a result of COVID and are getting outdoors more, and some will be a result of the rising costs of beef. Rinkel also said, with the borders now open, FWES expects to see outfitters and guides back in the area this fall. “They might have reduced bookings because people are still a bit nervous. But in fall 2020, there were no outfitted/guided hunts for non-residents.” He explained that the outfitters and guides consume a lot of FWES time because of the commercialization aspect of guide/outfitters and the amount of requirements, including documents, on guides/outfitters. He added that because guide/outfitters normally send out spotters scouting for game, if they do spot a good-sized mule deer buck or moose, which may likely be on private or leased public land, they will do everything they can to get access to them. “Guides/outfitters must tell private landowners they are a guide/outfitter and are going to take paying clients onto the landowner’s land. If they don’t, they are in violation of the Wildlife Act.” With trespassing remaining one of the main complaints of rural residents, Rinkel wanted to ensure that landowners are aware they do not have to post signs or fence their land in order to be protected under trespassing legislation. “The Petty Trespass Act was amended in 2004 changing the law to state that all recreational land users must first seek permission to access any private or leased public land.”

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Lori Larsen, Camrose Fish and Wildlife Enforcement Service District Officer Lorne Rinkel.

For FWES officers, an increase in hunters often equates to an increase in unlawful hunting. Rinkel said since the beginning of October, the FWES office has investigated five “shot and left wildlife” (four moose and one mule deer buck) cases all occurring within close vicinity of Galahad. “They were shot and left prior to any hunting seasons,” said Rinkel, indicating that evidence would suggest the animals were shot for the pleasure of killing something. “Whoever shot them didn’t even approach the dead animal,” explained Rinkel, noting that there were bullet holes in the animals, no signs of tire or human tracks up to the left animals and no meat or antlers were taken. “In effect, the animals were simply shot then left. “Shot and left in our (FWES) world normally means the animal is shot, the head is removed and the rest of the body is left

behind, which in itself is an offence under the Wildlife Act. We don’t really know what to call this,” said Rinkel. “Yes, the animal was shot and then left, but it is a different motive all together.” He said all five animals were killed within a couple of miles of each other. If this is any indication, the hunting season is already gearing up to keeping FWES officers busy. “I am expecting it will be very busy, and I am going to be going into it alone (in the Camrose District) because our office is once again down to only one officer.” Residents are encouraged to report any suspicious or illegal hunting and fishing activity or dangerous wildlife encounters by telephone to the Report A Poacher (RAP) line at 1-800642-3800 or online ay www. alberta.ca/report-poacher. aspx#jumplinks-2.


The COUNTRY BOOSTER, November 9, 2021 – Page 4

Albertans sent a strong message By Jackie Lovely MLA Camrose Constituency

We kicked off the fall session of the legislature on October 25 and our government is hard at work as we have already tabled several bills. However, in this week’s column, I would like to address a question my office has been receiving since the referendum votes. Now what? It’s a great question. Voters in our province have given a clear and strong mandate to the Alberta Government; they want a Fair Deal in the federation. Over a million voters cast a ballot and nearly 62 per cent want to see the current equalization formula disappear. Over the last 25 years, Albertans have contributed more than $400 billion more to Canada in tax dollars than they have received in federal spending. Albertans make an immense contribution to equalization through federal tax contributions, which are transferred by the federal government to other provinces for programs and services. The current program has many issues, including a formula that requires it to grow automatically with Canada’s economy, even if contributing provinces like Alberta are experiencing immense economic challenges. We are generous people in Alberta who want to help our neighbours. When there are wildfires in other provinces, we are happy to send our firefighters to help, for example. However, what is not fair is Quebec receiving net equalization payments while that province balances its budget, while Alberta had to deal with an economic downturn. What is also frustrating is Quebec standing in the way of the Energy East Pipeline that would deliver ethical and secure energy to that province. They are happy to take our money with one hand and stand in the way of our economy with the other. Between 2014 and 2019 alone, Albertans made a net contribution of more than $100 billion to the federal government through federal taxes that helped build critical infrastructure. Premier Jason Kenney put forward a government motion to ratify the results and Ottawa has an obligation to negotiate with our government. Albertans are united around Premier Kenney and the UCP government to get the fairness we deserve and expect. For a change in the constitution, seven provinces with 50 percent of the population must agree to any new terms. In a recent press conference, Premier Kenney told us Saskatchewan would back Alberta. There is lots work to do, but this government was elected to fight for Albertans, and we will continue to do that. We also asked Albertans if they want to permanently keep daylight savings time and do away with the biannual clock change. This referendum was very close as 50.2 percent of voters decided to keep the system currently in place. In case you missed the news conference, Service Alberta Minister, Nate Glubish stated that the people have made their decision, and the government will not pursue this any further. When our government was elected in 2019, a major commitment was to put more decisions in the hands of the people, and we have done that. On October 27, associate minister of Rural Economic Development Nate Horner held the first of 20 online meetings with rural businesses across various sectors, including business associations, chambers of commerce, Indigenous and Métis-owned businesses, and industry and community leaders, to hear their ideas on how to ensure Albertans from every corner of the province benefit from Alberta’s Recovery Plan. The survey will be open until December 18 and here is the link www.alberta.ca/rural-economic-developmentengagement.aspx. If you have any questions or concerns, contact my office. We are always here for you. You can contact Jackie Lovely, Camrose MLA, at Constituency Office, 104, 4870-51 Street, Camrose, AB T4V 1S1. Tel: 780-672-0000, camrose@assembly. ab.ca or at Legislature Office, 6th Floor, 9820-107 Street, Edmonton, AB, T5K 1E7.

County welcomes new council By Murray Green

For the first time in Camrose County history, the council will have three women helping make decisions. At the annual organizational meeting on October 26, another bit of history was made when Cindy Trautman was named the Reeve, and councillor Carlene Wetthuhn was declared the Deputy Reeve for the next eight months. It was also the first time a female councillor (Trautman) started a second term. Don Simpson was named the Agricultural Service Board chair. Jim Otto and Roy Carlson were added as members at large, along with the rest of council. Councillor Doug Lyseng was named the Municipal Planning Commission chair. Roland Marchand was declared the chair of the Regional Assessment Review board. Members include Reeve Trautman, Deputy Reeve Wetthuhn, Marchand, Diane Szumlas, Peter Bodnar, Angela Lorente, Dawn Pauls, Terry Daykin and Frank Hegholz. All members of council are on the Budget Committee, Planning Commission. John Girvan, Kathleen Tennant, Shelly Mock, Cindy Skjaveland, Brent Thygesen and Blaine Fenske are on the Subdivision and Development Appeal board. Members on the Building and Planning Committee are councillors Carl Bergstrom and Jordon Banack. Emergency Services Committee includes councillors Tina Sroka, Trautman and Banack. Fire Protection Committee includes Trautman, Banack and Wetthuhn. Councillor Lyseng was

named to the Health and Safety Committee. Personnel and Labour Relations Committee includes Reeve Trautman, councillors Don Simpson and Lyseng. Councillors Simpson, Lyseng and Wetthuhn are on the Recreation Committee. Standing Committee to Investigate Complaints includes councillors Sroka, Simpson and the local councillor. Bergstrom was named to the Bashaw Seed Cleaning Plant Committee, Buffalo Lake Intermunicipal Development Plan Committee and Buffalo Lake Management Team Committee. Members at large Jake Vermeer, Nicola Irving, Douglas Orr and Fenske are on the Economic Development Committee, along with councillors Lyseng, Wetthuhn and Reeve Trautman. Battle River Alliance for Economic Development includes councillor Lyseng with Sroka as the alternate. Lyseng and Wetthuhn were named to the CDSS board with Trautman as the alternate. The County representatives on the Camrose and Area Lodge Authority are Lyseng and Sroka. Wetthuhn was declared the councillor on the Camrose Library Board and Parkland Regional Library Board. Trautman will be the alternate for Parkland. Reeve Trautman agreed to continue as the County member on the Camrose Regional Exhibition board. Simpson was named the Camrose Regional Landfill representative. Sroka will be the alternate. Capital Region Southwest Water Services Commission members are Lyseng and Banack.

COUNTY REEVE

The County representatives on the Camrose Intermunicipal Committee are Trautman, Simpson and Lyseng. Wetthuhn, Simpson and Lyseng were declared the members on the City/ County Recreation Committee. Wetthuhn was named to the Go East RTO (Rural Tourism Organization) board. The Highway 12/21 Regional Water Commission will have Bergstrom and Trautman as members, and Lyseng will be alternate. Simpson was named to the Physician Recruitment and Retention committee. Trautman will be the County representative on the West Dried Meat Lake Solid Waste Committee, with Bergstrom as the alternate. Sroka was named to the Asset Management team. Council agreed to have regular meetings the second and fourth Tuesdays of every month at 9:30 a.m. except for July and August, when only one meeting will be held. “I move that Camrose County establish the per diem rates for representatives at large appointed by council to the Subdivision and Development Appeal Board and the Agricultural Service Board at $219.50 for a full day and $109.75 for a half day,” said councillor Banack. “I move that Camrose County council approve the mileage rates based on the reasonable per-kilometer automobile allowance suggested by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) and shall be adjusted annually to reflect CRA rates,” said Bergstrom. The next council meeting will be on November 9 at 9:30 a.m.

Murray Green, Camrose Booster Camrose County Reeve Cindy Trautman was sworn in for her second term to lead council by County administrator Paul King at the organizational meeting on October 26.


The COUNTRY BOOSTER, November 9, 2021 – Page 5

FOR SALE BY TENDER

TENDERS ARE INVITED for the purchase of the following Land: MERIDIAN 4 RANGE 17 TOWNSHIP 45 SECTION 25 ALL THAT PORTION OF THE NORTH EAST QUARTER NOT COVERED BY THE WATERS OF A CERTAIN SURVEYED LAKE, AS SHOWN ON A PLAN OF SURVEY OF THE SAID TOWNSHIP SIGNED AT OTTAWA ON THE 18TH DAY OF AUGUST, A.D. 1884, CONTAINING 53.90 HECTARES (133.25 ACRES) MORE OR LESS EXCEPTING THEREOUT ALL MINES AND MINERALS The Land is located in Camrose County, on the county line with Flagstaff County, approximately 4 miles northwest of Daysland. The Land consists of approximately 131 cultivated acres. The title to the Land will be subject to any reservations and exceptions stated on the certificate of title, will be subject to all existing registrations stated on the certificate of title, and will be free and clear of all financial encumbrances. The municipal property taxes are paid to the end of 2021. There will be no further adjustments to the purchase price. No warranty or representation whatsoever is given as to the condition of the Land, the fitness of the Land for any purpose, the size of the Land, or the number of cultivated acres.

featuring...

GST will be added to the tender price unless, at the time of closing, the successful tenderer is a GST registrant and has delivered a signed GST indemnity certificate, in form satistactory to Fielding & Company LLP. The owner and the successful tenderer will each pay their own legal fees, and the successful tenderer will be responsible for paying Land Titles Office registration fees. To ensure that the transaction can close on time, the successful tenderer will be required to obtain a title insurance policy at their own expense. TENDERS must be in writing, accompanied by a certified cheque or bank draft made payable to Fielding & Company LLP for $10,000.00, sealed in an envelope marked “Rood Tender”, and must be received by Fielding & Company LLP, Barristers and Solicitors, #100, 4918-51 Street, Camrose, Alberta T4V 1S3, on or before 12:00 noon, December 3, 2021. The tenders will not be opened in public. No conditional tenders will be accepted, and the highest or any tender will not necessarily be accepted. The deposits of all unsuccessful tenderers will be returned. The closing date of sale will be 12:00 noon, January 31, 2022, and the successful tenderer must pay the balance of the purchase price on the closing date, plus GST, unless the successful tenderer is a GST registrant and has provided a signed GST indemnity. If a tender is accepted and the successful tenderer does not proceed with the purchase, the deposit will be forfeited.

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For further information about the Land, phone Anna Rood 780-374-2206. For information about the tender process, phone Ian W. Smith, Q.C. at Fielding & Company LLP, at 780-672-8851.

is published for Controlled Distribution By CAMROSE BOOSTER LTD. Blain Fowler, Publisher Circulation 11,639 copies

On November 11, may we remember all who made the ultimate sacrifice for our nation and for our freedom.

Providing coverage to the communities of Camrose (RRs and Boxes only), Ohaton, Edberg, Meeting Creek, Donalda, Bawlf, Kelsey, Rosalind, Daysland, Heisler, Strome, Forestburg, Galahad, Castor (farms), Killam, Sedgewick, Lougheed, Coronation/Brownfield, Alliance, Hardisty, Amisk, Hughenden, Czar, Metiskow, Cadogan, Provost (farms), Armena, Hay Lakes, New Sarepta, Round Hill, Kingman, Tofield, Ryley, Holden, Bruce, Viking, Kinsella, Irma, Wainwright (farms and lock boxes), New Norway, Ferintosh, Bashaw, Bittern Lake, Gwynne, Stettler (farms).

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News email: news@camrosebooster.com Display Ads email: ads@camrosebooster.com Classified Ads email: ads@camrosebooster.com Website: camrosebooster.com

4925-48 Street, Camrose, AB T4V 1L7 The most effective, most economical advertising medium in the Camrose area. The entire contents of THE CAMROSE BOOSTER and THE COUNTRY BOOSTER are protected by copyright and any unauthorized reproduction of it, in whole or in part, without consent in writing, is expressly prohibited.

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Constituency Office: 5019-50 Street, Wetaskiwin, AB T9A 1K1 Phone 780.360.8003 Maskwacis.Wetaskiwin@assembly.ab.ca


The COUNTRY BOOSTER, November 9, 2021 – Page 6

It all boils down to access By Lori Larsen

With hunting season now fully underway, hunters around the province will be looking for that prime location where they can get the most out of their hunt. However, that may not be as easy as it sounds. Camrose and District Fish and Wildlife Enforcement Service (FWES) District Officer Lorne Rinkel commented, “In my opinion, by far, the hardest part of hunting is getting access.” The following information is provided to help educate recreational land users on the different land descriptions and the laws/ regulations regarding access to each.

tigation based off a licence plate number. There is no need for the landowners to approach or go after the trespassers, in fact, we discourage it.” The penalty for trespassing on private land without per mission includes a $600 fine and loss of game (harvested while trespassing), with no hunting licence suspension.

cating “no access/trespassing/hunting”. “If it is privately owned land and touches where the residence (home quarters) is, then that is occupied,” explained Rinkel, adding that virtually all land within the Camrose district falls under the definition of occupied. The penalty for trespassing on occupied land includes a monetary fine,

accessible by all recreational users, most commonly through foot access, all users are reminded that access to public lands is a privilege contingent on respectful use and responsible conduct. “We don’t have a lot of public lands in our county,” noted Rinkel. “However, people still need to be aware that most of that public land is subject to

Private Land

Private land is generally defined as any land that is owned by individuals or corporations other than the government. Access to private land by recreational land users continues to be a topic of conversation between landowners and FWES officers. In 2004, amendments to the Petty Trespass Act prohibited access to private land by recreational land users without first obtaining permission from the landowners or occupier of the private land. “There is no onus on private landowners to post (put signs up) or fence their land,” explained Rinkel. “If it is private, it is private and hunters (or any recreational land users) have to ask–period.” Rinkel said that despite not having to post or fence private land, he still encourages landowners to post their land. “Legitimate hunters will see the ‘No Hunting’ signs and then go ask, but there are some unethical hunters who, if they don’t see signs, may end up entering without permission.” He also advised landowners, where safe and possible to do so, to obtain licence plate numbers from the trespassers’ vehicles. “We can initiate an inves-

Lori Larsen, Camrose Booster Even if private land is not posted or fenced, recreational land users must always get permission to access the land. Occupied land

Occupied lands are defined in the Wildlife Act as: (a) privately owned lands under cultivation or enclosed by a fence of any kind and are not exceeding one section in area on which the owner or occupant actually resides, and, (b) any other privately owned land that is within 1.6 km (1 mile) of the section referred to in clause (a) and that is owned or leased by the same owner or occupant. In accordance with the Wildlife Act Section 38, no person shall hunt wildlife or discharge firearms on or over occupied lands, or enter onto such lands for the purpose of doing so without the consent of the owner or occupant. As is the case with privately owned land, occupied lands described in the Wildlife Act do not need to be posted with signs indi-

seizure of game harvested while trespassing, and a one-year suspension of hunting licence. Rinkel said the main reason penalties for hunting on occupied lands are greater boils down to public safety, reminding hunters that under the Wildlife Act, it is also an offence to discharge a firearm within 183 metres (200 yards) of an occupied dwelling. The Criminal Code has further legislation regarding the general unsafe discharge or use of weapons in any given area, and persons possessing firearms are reminded to ensure they are carrying a valid PAL (Firearms Possession and Acquisition License) or be accompanied by a licensed firearms owner. Public (Crown) lands

While public/Crown lands (land owned by the federal or provincial governments) are generally

lease, generally to graze stock. Even though it is technically public land if it is leased, recreational users are still required by law to contact the leaseholder to ask for permission before entering.” Detailed maps, leaseholder contact information and access conditions to public lands are available through the Recreational Access Mapping tool on the Alberta Environment and Parks website at: recagpublicland.alberta.ca or by telephoning 310-3773. There are also a variety of apps available for download that contain detailed information. Leaseholders may limit or deny access to agricultural leased (public) land if: • the person accessing is not on foot or wishes to camp, • livestock are present, • a crop has not yet been harvested, or

• a fire ban is in effect. If recreational users do not ask permission to access leased land, they can be charged and face penalties up to $500. Disputes over access to public lands are handled by a Public Lands officer. Rinkel fur ther explained that aside from the reasons listed above for denying access to leased lands, the leaseholder can also put conditions on or restrict access on leased (public land) through a Recreational Access Management Plan, which is drafted and submitted to Environment and Parks Public Lands in an effort to manage the land through a lottery system. “There are very few in Alberta. Road allowances can also be used to access public lands, normally public waterbodies. “Road allowances are owned by the municipality, and some are developed (66 feet wide) to accommodate a possible future highway,” explained Rinkel. “Road allowances in and of themselves can be used to access public lands, but they are not always well defined.” As is the case with access to any type of land, users are asked to use respect: pack out all litter and do not damage the land or property, park vehicles so they are not blocking access points, leave gates as they were found, and do not light fires without the landowners’ or lease holders’ permission. Residents are reminded that contacting a FWES officer can be done through the 24/7 Report A Poacher (RAP) line at 1-800-6423800 or online at www. alberta.ca/report-poacher. aspx#jumplinks-3. It should noted because FWES is now housed under Alberta Sheriffs Branch, the call will be dispatched through the Sheriff’s Operational Control Centre, then electronically dispatched to the FWES officer.

Chronic Waste Disease program continues to monitor deadly disease By Lori Larsen

Alberta hunters are reminded of the important role they play in the ongoing annual Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) surveillance program. CWD is a prion (type of protein that can trigger normal proteins in the brain to fold abnormally, causing neurodegenerative disorders) disease that kills members of the deer family, including mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk, and moose, and is fatal for the animal in all cases. There is no known treatment or vaccine for the disease.

Because CWD is difficult to control once established, prevention is key. The CWD program closely monitors the possibility of infected animals through submissions of deer heads for testing by hunters. The 2021-22 CWD program focuses on designated areas along the eastern border and the northern and western perimeter of the CWD-affected area. Submission of deer heads is mandatory in eastern Alberta from Cold Lake south to the United States border and some Wildlife Management

Units (WMU) for mule deer. Voluntary submission is recommended in all other WMUs. Deer heads can be submitted at any of the 24-hour freezers available in eastern Alberta from late October to mid-December. Instructions for submitting and materials are provided at each freezer. Hunters can also submit frozen heads at any of the Fish and Wildlife offices that have regular office hours. For more information on submitting deer heads for CWD testing, check the

2021 Alberta Guide to Hunting Regulations (alberta regulations.ca/2021-AlbertaHunting-Regulations.pdf ), or the Province of Alberta website www.alberta.ca/ chronic-wasting-diseaseinformation-for-hunters. aspx#jumplinks-2. Since 2005, the total number of CWD cases detected in wild deer in Alberta currently sits at 3,585. According to the Province of Alberta website (www.alberta.ca/chronicwasting-disease-overview. aspx#jumplinks-0), currently there is no evidence

that CWD infects livestock or humans. Transmission occurs from deer to deer and, in certain situations, may involve environmental contamination. While Alberta Health accepts the current advice from local and international public health officials that CWD is not known to infect humans, it is recommended that persons should not knowingly consume meat of animals with the disease. Hunters concerned about CWD should contact Alberta Health authorities.


The COUNTRY BOOSTER, November 9, 2021 – Page 7

County supports curling By Murray Green

Camrose County is behind the Meridian Open international curling event held at the Recreation Centre beginning on January 11, 2022. “I move that council authorize sponsorship of the Pinty’s Grand Slam of Curling Meridian Open in the amount of $10,000, with funds to come from grants to organizations in the 2021 budget, as a Category A– Major National/International Event,” said former councillor Trevor Miller. Reeve Cindy Trautman received a request from the Rose City Curling Club for sponsorship of the 2022 Meridian Open. The Rose City Curling Club will be hosting the major curling event in the Encana Arena in the Camrose Recreation Centre from January 11 to 16. “This Meridian Open will be hosting 32 of the topranked curling teams in the world. The top 16 women’s and the top 16 men’s curling teams will be invited to participate in this curling event, and an additional level of interest is that this event will conclude just three weeks before curling commences at the 2022 Winter Olympics,” said Neil Bratrud, local chair of the event. “We anticipate that those teams that are qualified to play in the Olympics in Beijing, China and are ranked in the top 16 by their gender in the world will be present at this event as a final tune up to prepare for those Olympics.” “The complement of curling teams, the event management team and the television production team will require approximately 130 hotel rooms in Camrose, let alone the spectators and other media that will come to Camrose for this event,” Neil added, in a letter to the County. This is the curling club’s seventh arena-based curling event in the Encana Arena since it opened in 2008. “The facility, tremendous volunteer base and the sense of community and the community partnerships help to ensure the success we have been achieving, and firmly establishes Camrose as a very desirable location for major curling events.” For this sponsorship, Camrose County will be eligible for in-ice logos behind the hack at the home and away ends of all four sheets of ice, one rink board sign, a full-page ad in the program, eight ticket packages, two VIP passes, booth display, online recognition and other signage.

FOR SALE BY TENDER TENDERS ARE INVITED for the purchase of the following property located in Flagstaff County County: Parcel 1 MERIDIAN 4 RANGE 12 TOWNSHIP 45 SECTION 13 QUARTER NORTH EAST EXCEPTING THEREOUT ALL MINES AND MINERALS AND THE RIGHT TO WORK SAME AREA: 64.7 HECTARES (160 ACRES) MORE OR LESS * 130 cultivated acres Parcel 2 MERIDIAN 4 RANGE 12 TOWNSHIP 45 SECTION 24 QUARTER SOUTH WEST EXCEPTING THEREOUT ALL MINES AND MINERALS AREA: 64.7 HECTARES (160 ACRES) MORE OR LESS * 70 cultivated acres and 10 acres pasture Parcel 3 MERIDIAN 4 RANGE 12 TOWNSHIP 45 SECTION 24 QUARTER SOUTH EAST EXCEPTING THEREOUT ALL MINES AND MINERALS AREA: 64.7 HECTARES (160 ACRES) MORE OR LESS * 125 cultivated acres Parcel 4 MERIDIAN 4 RANGE 12 TOWNSHIP 45 SECTION 24 QUARTER NORTH EAST EXCEPTING THEREOUT ALL MINES AND MINERALS AREA: 65.2 HECTARES (161 ACRES) MORE OR LESS * 70 cultivated acres and 86 acres pasture Parcel 5 THE SOUTH WEST QUARTER OF SECTION TWENTY ONE (21) TOWNSHIP FORTY FIVE (45) RANGE TWELVE (12) WEST OF THE FOURTH MERIDIAN CONTAING 64.7 HECTARES (160 ACRES) MORE OR LESS EXCEPTING THEREOUT: 0.405 HECTARES (1 ACRE) MORE OR LESS FOR ROAD AS SHOWN ON ROAD PLAN 6589MC EXCEPTING THEREOUT ALL MINES AND MINERALS * 85 cultivated acres Parcel 6 THE SOUTH WEST QUARTER OF SECTION SIXTEEN (16) TOWNSHIP FORTY FIVE (45) RANGE TWELVE (12) WEST OF THE FOURTH MERIDIAN CONTAING 65.2 HECTARES (161 ACRES) MORE OR LESS EXCEPTING THEREOUT: 0.405 HECTARES (1 ACRE) MORE OR LESS FOR ROAD AS SHOWN ON ROAD PLAN 6589MC EXCEPTING THEREOUT ALL MINES AND MINERALS * 130 cultivated acres Parcel 7 THE NORTH WEST QUARTER OF SECTION SIXTEEN (16) TOWNSHIP FORTY FIVE (45) RANGE TWELVE (12) WEST OF THE FOURTH MERIDIAN CONTAING 64.7 HECTARES (160 ACRES) MORE OR LESS EXCEPTING THEREOUT: 0.405 HECTARES (1 ACRE) MORE OR LESS FOR ROAD AS SHOWN ON ROAD PLAN 6589MC EXCEPTING THEREOUT ALL MINES AND MINERALS * 130 cultivated acres

Parcel 8 MERIDIAN 4 RANGE 12 TOWNSHIP 45 SECTION 13 QUARTER NORTH WEST EXCEPTING THEREOUT ALL MINES AND MINERALS AND THE RIGHT TO WORK SAME AREA: 64.7 HECTARES (160 ACRES) MORE OR LESS * 135 cultivated acres Parcel 9 MERIDIAN 4 RANGE 12 TOWNSHIP 45 SECTION 12 QUARTER NORTH WEST EXCEPTING THEREOUT ALL MINES AND MINERALS AREA: 64.7 HECTARES (160 ACRES) MORE OR LESS * 125 acres (old yard site and buildings) Parcel 10 MERIDIAN 4 RANGE 12 TOWNSHIP 45 SECTION 12 QUARTER NORTH EAST EXCEPTING THEREOUT ALL MINES AND MINERALS AREA: 64.7 HECTARES (160 ACRES) MORE OR LESS * 130 cultivated acres Parcel 11 MERIDIAN 4 RANGE 12 TOWNSHIP 45 SECTION 11 QUARTER NORTH WEST EXCEPTING THEREOUT ALL MINES AND MINERALS AREA: 64.7 HECTARES (160 ACRES) MORE OR LESS * 135 cultivated acres Parcel 12 MERIDIAN 4 RANGE 12 TOWNSHIP 45 SECTION 11 QUARTER NORTH EAST EXCEPTING THEREOUT ALL MINES AND MINERALS AREA: 64.7 HECTARES (160 ACRES) MORE OR LESS * 145 cultivated acres Parcel 13 MERIDIAN 4 RANGE 12 TOWNSHIP 45 SECTION 13 QUARTER SOUTH EAST EXCEPTING THEREOUT ALL MINES AND MINERALS AND THE RIGHT TO WORK SAME AREA: 64.7 HECTARES (160 ACRES) MORE OR LESS * 140 culivated acres (old buildings on property) * amount of cultivated acres is estimated only. The titles to the property will be subject to the reservations and exceptions now appearing on the title and free and clear of all encumbrances. GST will be added to the tender price unless the purchaser is a GST registrant at the time of closing. TENDERS must be in writing, accompanied by a certified cheque for 5% of the tender price, sealed in an envelope marked “Dragani Tender” and must be received by Fielding & Company LLP, Barristers and Solicitors, #100, 4918-51 Street, Camrose, Alberta T4V 1S3, on or before 12:00 noon, November 30, 2021. The tender must indicate which parcel or parcels the tenderer is submitting an offer on. Municipal taxes will be adjusted. Surface lease payments, if any, received by the Seller prior to closing will not be adjusted.The closing and adjustment date of sale will be January 31, 2022, and the successful tenderer must pay the balance of the purchase price, plus GST unless the tenderer is a GST registrant, on the closing date, or the deposit will be forfeited. The deposits of all unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them forthwith after the closing of tenders. No conditional tenders will be accepted, and the highest or any tender will not necessarily be accepted. No warranty whatsoever is given as to the condition of the property or as to the fitness of the property for any purpose. For further information about the tender process phone Wayne Throndson, Q.C. at Fielding & Company LLP, 780-672-8851.


The COUNTRY BOOSTER, November 9, 2021 – Page 8

You could win a photograph of your farm! If this is your farm,

The farm appearing in this photograph is located in the Camrose trading area. If you recognize it as yours, come to the Camrose Booster, 4925-48 Street, Camrose. You will be presented with a free 8” x 10” colour enlargement of the photo.

• The Mystery Farm winners for October 5 are are Louis and Deanne Bell of Donalda. • This week’s prize must be claimed by December 7, 2021.

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Tips to keep clubroot down By Autumn Barnes

A new factsheet available at clubroot.ca distills the key practices to mitigate clubroot and maintain profitability. Practices include growing clubroot-resistant (CR) cultivars responsibly on all canola acres. In 2020, only 39 per cent of the canola cultivars grown in the Canadian Prairies were CR, according to Canadian Grain Commission data. While CR will be a standard feature on most canola hybrids by 2025, canola growers should start to use CR and other integrated management strategies immediately. Clubroot is the disease caused by soil-borne spores of the protist and obligate parasite, Plasmodiophora brassicae. Spores spread easily and early infections can be missed for years, while clubroot-susceptible canola multiplies spores to catastrophic levels. Planting CR cultivars before the disease gets established will help slow spore reproduction. Keeping spore concentration low helps maintain yield and protect CR traits. Growers who wait until the disease has taken hold in a field before choosing CR could be stuck with challenging levels of clubroot for a long time. Higher concentrations of P. brassicae spores lead to larger clubroot galls, more risk to yield, more resting spores released back to the soil, and fewer management options. (The goal is to keep spore concentrations low.) Preventing the introduction and spread of P. brassicae spores will prevent the clubroot disease from establishing and spreading. Responsible use of CR cultivars includes an integrated approach to clubroot management, which will help to protect the CR trait. Integrate the following practices to keep spores low and local. Keep spores low

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Rotate crops, maintaining a minimum two-year break between canola (one in three rotation). Scout and examine roots in every canola field during late summer/fall. Pay special attention to high-traffic and high-moisture areas. Soil testing may help identify spores before physical symptoms appear. Control brassica weeds in all crops. Reduce tillage. Minimize soil (and spore) movement within and between fields. Visit clubroot.ca to learn more about the clubroot disease cycle and management, and to see the full fact sheet.