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Scott County Times

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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2019

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Times NEWS WHS Curtains in disrepair. See page A2

Coultas, Hoots named Illinois State Scholars. See page A3

SPORTS Winchester seventh grade girls are regional champs. See page A3

Cox, Howard lead Wildcats to win. See page A7

WINCHESTER, IL 62694

Winchester looks at pool options “Everything from the pool not being By CARMEN ENSINGER open this coming season to a substanScott County Times tial change in the scope of work.” Winchester City Council met in Benton said if the city planned on special session Monday, Nov. 2 with having the pool open this year, the its engineers, Benton and Associates, minimum that would have to be done to discuss possible options to make was to the filtration system because the pool renovations become a reality. the old system has already been Last month, five bidders bid on the demolished. project that includes a new bath house “What Greg suggested in our preand filter house, and the low bidder liminary conversations is that we was still $195,000 over the estimated could build an entirely different filtrabudget. tion configuration,” Benton said. “It The city received a wouldn’t be as dura$335,000 grant from ble as what we have the Illinois Department “If we make included in our bid of Natural Resources document so far, how(IDNR) through their enough ever.” Open Spaces Land, changes in the Another option to Acquisition and trim costs is to reduce Development program. scope of the the size of the bathIt was a matching grant project...there er load from 200 to meaning the city was 100, meaning no more prepared to put up an is a chance than 100 persons could additional $335,000. occupy the facility at A meeting was held some of the one time. on Nov. 21 after the bidders might “The building in the bids were opened and bid document is slightMayor Rex McIntire be interested in ly bigger than your said this meeting is a looking at the existing building,” follow up. Hillis said. “The new “That meeting was project again.” one provides for a fambasically to explain ily restroom area and how the bids came in,” has a larger manager Rex McIntire he said. “Having to and concession area. Winchester Mayor come up with an addiWe could take those tional $195,000 for the out and save a little.” low bid is just not feasible for us at Benton said overall the bathhouse this time. That is why we are having construction cost was the one that was this meeting – to explore options on much larger than they had anticipated. how we can possibly trim costs with“One option to reduce cost at the out trimming too much of what we bathhouse was to use different conwant to do.” struction materials,” Benton said. “We Representing Benton and Associates bid the project using concrete blocks, were Reg Benton and Greg Hillis. which is the most durable, but there “We talked about some different are other materials that could be conscenarios, all of which aren’t as pre- sidered such as a wood frame with ferred as what we bid,” Benton said. vinyl siding with fiberglass inside.”

Carmen Ensinger/Scott County Times

Benton and Associates Representative Greg Hillis uses a blueprint to show the Winchester City Council some of the possible changes than can be made to reduce the cost of the pool renovation project, which came in $195,000 over budget.

Benton said changing the overall footprint of the bathhouse by eliminating the family restroom would change the scope of the project and require it to be rebid. Another choice that could save some money would be to do the filtration improvements different than what was shown in the original plans. “You could build a small building and put the filtration equipment in there and open the pool for use this year and then turn the rest of it over to the contractor after the season ends for the rest of the improvements,” Benton said. “Those changes are not simple and they are not done everyday so I think you would have to consult your attorney to see if it needs to be rebid.” Benton said the city might have

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Submitted photo

POINTS

Coach Ryan Sichting presents the game ball to Cole Howard following the championship game at the Beardstown Tournament last Saturday. Howard scored 21 points in the championship game, surpassing the 1,000-point mark for his career. He now has 1,001 points as of November 30, 2019.

Scott County Times Obituaries listed in this issue: Pennell

better luck if they would rebid the project. “If we make enough changes in the scope of the project and perhaps change the time period of completing it, there is a chance some of the bidders might be interested in looking at the project again,” he said. “The time frame for using the grant funds is two years so we have until May 6, 2021 to expend all of those funds.” McIntire asked just how much savings the city could realize on the project with those changes. “If you look at the construction time and modify the materials along with modifying the filter building and bathhouse, all of those could add up (See, POOL, A2)

Scott County Commissioners begin new year Dec. 2

FRIDAY, DEC. 6

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VOLUME NO. 152 NUMBER 49

WEEKEND WEATHER High

Serving our readers for more than 151 years

By CARMEN ENSINGER Scott County Times The Scott County Commissioners began their new year Monday with a reorganization of the board with things staying just as they are now. Bob Schafer will remain as Chairman of the Board and Dan Hatcher will remain Vice Chairman for the coming year. Shafer announced that there were 44 patients currently residing in the nursing home with five of those being Medicare A patients. They currently have $12,032.11 in their operating fund There will be a Christmas meal on Dec. 12 for the residents and their families and a gift exchange on Dec. 19. There were two transfers of funds – one within the Sheriff’s Department and one from the Contingency Fund. The amount of $2,500 was transferred from supplies with-

in the Sheriff’s Department line items to the Contractual Services Fund to pay for repairs to the squad car and finish up some bills. A total of $47.80 was transferred from the Contingency Fund to the Printing and Publishing Fund to pay for the printing of notice of the budget in the newspaper. Retha Anders was appointed to a three-year term on the Scott County Board of Health effective Dec. 2 and running until Nov. 30, 2022. In regards to the ambulance service requesting a Special Service Area being created for the purpose of levying a tax to pay for the ambulance service, a public hearing will be held on Jan. 8. “We are in the process of getting notice out to all of the parcel owners about the hearing,” Shafer said. “After the hearing, those opposing the proposed Special Service Area have 60 days to get names on a petition to stop it.”

Blankenship named Superintendent of the Year By CARMEN ENSINGER Scott County Times Dr. Kevin Blankenship, dual superintendent of Scott-Morgan CUSD #2 and Winchester CUSD #1, has been named 2020 Illinois Superintendent of the Year by the Illinois Association of School Administrators (IASA). The award was presented Saturday, Nov. 23 during the Joint Annual Conference in Chicago co-sponsored by the Illinois Association of School Boards (IASB), the Illinois Association of School Business Officials (IASBO) and IASA. Nominees are judged on the following criteria: leadership for learning, communication, professionalism and community involvement “I am extremely honored and privileged to serve as superintendent of two tremendous school districts,” Blankenship said. “I think, for me, its more about what the communities of Winchester and Bluffs are doing to better prepare their kids for the future.”

After being nominated, Blankenship had to submit documentation to the IASA which is then reviewed by a Blue Ribbon Committee. “I was notified the first week of October that I had been selected,” Blankenship said. “They then came to both Bluffs and Winchester and did the interviews.” Blankenship has been an educator for the past 26 years and has been superintendent at Bluffs for the past eight years. Earlier this year, he also assumed the duties as superintendent at Winchester making him one of only two shared unit superintendents in the state. Dr. Kevin Bowman, who has been superintendent at Greenfield for many years, assumed the duties as superintendent at Northwestern this year as well. Blankenship typically spends the morning in one district and the afternoon in the other. So far it is working out very well. “Dr. Blankenship was the right choice to lead our district forward,” Winchester School Board Member Trista Freeman said. “He’s been

great as far as communication with the board as well as maintaining visibility at both districts.” While he has not been at the helm at Winchester long enough to make any significant impact, the impact he has made at Bluffs has been significant. During his eight years there he has: Overhauled technology infrastructure to support a 1:1 initiative, where students in grades 5-12 take home the devices. All third and fourth graders have Chromebooks at school and students in grades K-2 use iPads at school. The average ACT score increased by 25 percent in five years after he was hired. Bluffs Elementary and Junior High schools underwent major renovations that better support student learning. Fostered countless hours of professional development for teachers and staff. Maintained a top quality education for students by leading the district in the passage of a property tax referendum that increased local funding and avoided reductions in

Submitted photo

Illinois Association of School Administrators President and Pikeland School Superintendent Paula Hawley gives Kevin Blankenship the Illinois Superintendent of the Year Award in Chicago on Nov. 23. Blankenship serves as a dual superintendent in both Bluffs and Winchester school districts.

staff and programs. Bluffs School Board President Gary Westermeyer said Blankenship has brought stability to the district with his leadership skills. “During a period of finan-

cial uncertainty, Kevin’s financial oversight and budgeting ability kept our district in great financial health,” Westermeyer said. “In addi(See, BLANKENSHIP, A2)


A2

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Blankenship

WHS Curtains in disrepair By DAVID CAMPHOUSE Scott County Times After fifteen years of plays, musicals, dance recitals, freshman orientations, school assemblies, lip sync battles, and countless other programs and events, the stage curtains at Winchester High School are showing major wear and tear. The stage itself is a beautiful, classic piece of WHS history, constructed as part of the original high school building in 1921. However, according to Drama Club director Samantha Killebrew. the trimmings of the stage — the curtains — are beyond repair and need to be replaced. “We’re slowly building up a nest egg to replace the curtains,” Killebrew said. “We’re about halfway to our goal.” Killebrew indicated that money has been raised through tickets to high school drama productions and

other fundraising activities, including a raffle at the Drama Club’s latest production, Alice in Wonderland. A recent inspection of the curtains and rigging system highlighted many areas of concern. Several sash cords and floor pulleys need to be replaced in the rigging system. The backstage curtains are tattered and shredded with holes in many places and safety pins holding sections together. The chains used to weight the curtains at the hems are showing in several places. Any drama kid or dancer who has performed on the WHS stage can tell you how important curtains are to a production. There’s nothing like the feeling of hiding in the wings, behind the curtains waiting to make your big entrance. Now the performers not only have to remember their lines or their dance moves, but they also have to be careful not to trip over a stray piece of fab-

NEWS/OPINION

Winchester, Illinois

(Continued from A1) tion, his desire to get our district into current times propelled us into a technological one-to-one initiative, which has paid rich dividends to our students.” Dr. Brent Clark, executive director of IASA, described Blankenship as a tremendous leader who works tirelessly to improve the educational environment for students. “Kevin is a tremendous worker,” Clark said. “He’s smart. He’s perceptive, and he will do whatever is necessary to get the job done correctly. That’s Kevin. He will outwork almost anyone else around him.” Blankenship currently serves on the IASA Board of Directors (Two Rivers

ric, get their hand caught in a hole, or get stuck by a popped open safety pin. In the 2018-2019 school year, the two drama club productions saw around thirty students each participate in the cast and crew. This year, in addition to learning lines, rehearsing blocking, doing homework, and participating in their other activities, drama club students will also fundraise for new curtains, estimated to cost around $16,000. Please consider supporting these students by attending future productions, purchasing items from their fundraisers, or even sending a donation to the school. If you have questions about the drama club or the curtains, please contact Mr. Vortman or Ms. Killebrew by calling 217-742-3151. “We’re hoping to get it done this year, ideally in time for the spring production,” Killebrew said.

Region) and is one of a handful of superintendents in Illinois who is also a certified police officer. He is a board member for the Bluffs Education Foundation, Village of Bluffs TIF Joint Committee and is a founding board member of Morgan-Scott Creating Entrepreneurial Opportunities program.(CEO). Blankenship received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Southern Illinois University Carbondale, his Chief School Business Official Certification from the University of Illinois Springfield and Doctorate in Educational Leadership from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. He and his wife, Julie, have two daughters.

Outdoor Truths: Gary Miller

REMEMBER ONE PERSON IS NOT

There’s one four-letter word I think everyone uses. Well, there’s at least one four letter word everyone uses. And we probably use it every day. It’s the word busy. Ask any person who has a job and somewhere in the middle of a normal conversation, he or she will mention how busy they are. Even those who have retired will tell you they are busier now than when they were working a regular job. With all of this busyness, it seems to get harder and harder for me to find the time to get in a tree stand for even a few hours. In fact, I mentioned to one young man how it seems for me to really get into hunting; I have to leave for a few days, otherwise, my mind is roaming to all of the things I need to be, or should be, or ought to be, or, you get the idea. It seems with all of my

BUSIER THAN ANOTHER

daily responsibilities, to leave for only a half day, puts me too far behind to catch up by the end of the week (Whenever that is.) There is no doubt time neither stops nor slows down for anyone, no matter what excuse we have. Right now, is a perfect example. In my area, the secondary rut is about to take place. This might be my favorite part of the hunting season. But by now, I have become so busy (there’s that word) I may have to miss crucial days being in the woods. Now before you put down this article, let me quickly tell you what I hate about the busyness excuse. It’s the same thing you hate and the reason you were close to burning this week’s edition of Outdoor Truths. We hate people who think they are so busy they should get a pass for not doing cer-

tain things. Or another way to put it, we hate people who think they are busier than everyone else. We hate it because we know the truth, and it’s this: We all have 24 hours in each day. No more. No less. We all have families to care for, jobs to work at, and bills to pay. I mean, you do know this, don’t you? Or are you the one who leans to heavily on the “busy” excuse? Please don’t be that person. Please don’t use that excuse for not accomplishing some of the things you’ve dreamed about or doing some of things you know you should do. And please don’t use it for a reason to neglect your spiritual life. Let me tell you why. The people who accomplish more than we do are not afforded more time during each week. And neither are they afforded fewer respon-

sibilities. They simply manage time instead of letting time manage them. They live, for the most part, proactive and not reactive. They don’t have fewer interruptions than the rest of us. Instead they buffer them in. The only way you will ever accomplish that one thing you want to do and that one thing you need to do, is if you begin by rejecting the busyness excuse. ––––––––––––––––––– Q Gary has three books that are compilations of the articles he has written for nearly 15 years. He also speaks at game dinners and men’s groups for churches and associations. You can contact him at gary@outdoortruths.org.

Pool (Continued from A1) and help bring the cost down,” Hillis said. “I think if you make those kinds of changes it could have the potential of saving around $50,000. I think it is going to take a collection of choices to accomplish the savings of $200,000.” The one item that Benton thinks the city should not put off is installing a new liner in the pool. “We believe putting in a new liner now so you don’t need to replace it in three years is still the right choice,” he said. “We have always intended to put a plan for construction together that will not require a lot of maintenance over the next 20 years. We want to provide a safe facility for people to come swim at along with one that meets all the code requirements.” Alderman Bill Jacquot asked what the additional cost would be for rebidding the project. “You would have the additional cost of bidding the project twice,”

he said. “Plus, you are going to have some additional costs with the electrical feed line from the bathhouse to the new filtration facilities. By us doing it that way I’m speculating that you will have to bring that up to code because it doesn’t meet the code now.” The OSLAD grant had a cap of $400,000 so McIntire asked if the city could possibly approach the IDNR and ask for more money. “We can’t afford to do this project at these prices so is there anyway we can get up to the $400,000 threshold,” McIntire asked. “Also, if the grant money is not used can we send it back and do something on our own. And, if we don’t use the IDNR money, do we have to use the certified contractors to do the project or can we use our own guys?” Benton said there was not way getting around using certified contractors on the project. “The swimming pool code in place now says at least 25 percent of the

work has to be done by an Illinois Department of Public Health prequalified contractor,” he said. “It’s difficult to know who is and who isn’t prequalified but the people who bid were qualified and you still have to have a construction permit from the IDPH.” McIntire had one more question for Benton’s representatives. “I don’t want to sound like a village here, but how did we screw the estimate up this bad,” he asked. Hillis said he really didn’t know. “We came up with an estimate based on past projects plus we checked the national cost guides before making the estimate,” he said. “The filter building did grow in size and so did the bathhouse but the main increase in dollars showed up in the bathhouse – that is where a lot of the work is. I really feel terrible about this.” More discussion will be held at the regular city council meeting on Wednesday, Dec. 4.

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2019


LOCALS/NEWS/SPORTS/PUBLIC NOTICE/CLASSIFIEDS

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

A3

Winchester, Illinois

WINCHESTER

NOTICE OF APPLICATION

BY IRENE TREECE 217-371-1386

Submitted photo

Coultas, Hoots named Illinois State Scholars Winchester’s Hunter Coultas and Isabella Hoots have been named 2020-21 Illinois State Scholars by the Illinois Student Assistance Commission. Illinois State Scholars are high school seniors in the class of 2020 who have shown superior academic potential. The award is based on college entrance exam scores and grade point average. By earning the title of Illinois State Scholar, these students are placed in the top 10 percent of all students in the state of Illinois.

Illinois harvest running behind schedule

By PETER HANCOCK Capitol News Illinois As the month of December arrived, many Illinois farmers were still working to harvest their corn and soybeans — the state’s two largest field crops — and agriculture officials are anticipating one of the smallest harvests in recent years. As of Nov. 24, only about 88 percent of corn acres in Illinois had been harvested, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, down from 100 percent at the same time last year. Soybean harvesting was 95 percent complete, down from 99 percent a year ago. That delay is the result of historic rainfall in the spring that drenched many parts of the state, preventing farmers from getting seeds into the ground in some cases until as late as June. Officials at the Illinois Department of Agriculture say the final, official numbers for the 2019 growing season won’t be known until early January. But Rodney Weinzierl, executive director of the Illinois Corn Growers Association, said all indicators point to a below-average year. “Our acres of corn this year was the lowest we’ve had probably since the late 1980s,� Weinzierl said in a phone interview. “Just because of that corn that was prevented from being planted, just because of such wet conditions.� Weinzierl said Illinois farmers planted about 1.1 million fewer acres of corn this year, compared to a normal year, and there was also a big drop-off in soybean

acres. “So it’s just something that we’ve not experienced before,� he said. In addition to fewer acres planted, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is projecting that each acre will produce less this year than in the recent past – about 179 bushels per acre this year, down from 210 bushels in 2018, which was a record for Illinois. Last year, Illinois harvested roughly 11 million acres of corn, according to USDA estimates. Those acres yielded about 2.7 billion bushels which, at an average price of $3.62 per bushel, generated $8.2 billion in farm income. Soybean farmers harvested 10.5 million acres, producing nearly 667 million bushels. At $8.74 per bushel, that generated about $6.3 billion in income. Most farmers who left acres unplanted this year had insurance coverage, but those policies only cover farmers for their input costs such as the seeds and fertilizers that went unused. They do not cover farmers for the loss of income or the cost of land for farmers who lease acreage from other landowners. “So farmers that rent ground would still have an overall loss,� Weinzierl said. “But it’s like any other insurance, it’s meant to kind of allow you to be able to farm again next year.� A spokeswoman for the Illinois Department of Agriculture said final numbers for the 2019 growing season are due to be released Jan. 10. A separate report will be released in February detailing the state’s first year of legal hemp production.

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Hello Scott County Thanksgiving is over, left overs are almost all gone and things can get back to normal for a couple of weeks then more excitement when Christmas rolls around. I am ready for the parade and Santa Claus to make his appearance on the fire truck. Prayer to the families that had house fires close to the holidays. It makes for a serious upset and sadness for the family when these things happen. Congratulations to the Winchester girls on their win. It is great that Winchester takes such a great interest in their sports. I admire every-

one involved they put forth a lot of effort and certainly support the athletes. I pray every family member visiting over the holiday made it home safe and without any weather related incidents. Last Week`s Trivia - -The standard household telephone is a surprisingly simple device that sends and receives sound over great distances. Tele is a Greek word meaning ‘far away’ and phone meaning ‘voice’. When a person speaks into a phone the sound waves hit a diaphragm making it vibrate at various speeds, depending on the air pressure created by

the person`s voice. Behind the diaphragm is a small cup filled with tiny grains of carbon. the sound waves change the resistance of the grains and modulate an electrical current flowing through the microphone.This electrical current then carries the sound to the person on the telephone of the other person. Next Week`s Trivia - -What is The Difference Between a Hill and a Mountain?

ALSEY BY PEGGY STURGEON CLEMONS, 742-3822

lyn Heitinger on December 3- Neil Dirks and Andrew Moosey on December 4Ann Janes, Jimmy Joiner and Caitlyn Christine Renner on December 5- Kevin Garrett on December 6- Patti Brown on December 7. Judy and Josh Cannon and Peggy Clemons enjoyed Sunday lunch at Main Street in White Hall. Royal Neighbors Chapter 3190 members Linda Mueller, Peggy Clemons, Patty Brown, Janet Ingram, Judy and Josh Cannon played bingo on Monday night with residents at Scott County Nursing Center. There were 18 players and all recieved treats. Barrow Baptist Church held their monthly ladies luncheon on Tuesday. It was hosted by Peggy Clemons and Judy Cannon. Present to enjoy lunch, Christian fellowship, and games of bingo were Janet Ingram, Claudia

Hello from Alsey. A little break in the weather, more like November weather than January. Ok with me. Remember our men and women in uniform and the leaders of our country in your prayers. Others on our prayer list include, Harold Jefferson, Connie Sturgeon, Keith Jefferson, Janice Day, Don Jefferson, Elma Redmon, Edna Layne, Jennifer Alred, Dean Howard, Bob Hoots, Jean Simmons, Bill McNeece, Angie Schoondyke, David Wells, Phil Griffen, Judy Cannon, Karla Cannon, Dan Seely, Lanise Kirk, Bernard Evans family, Gracie Fearneyhough, Norma Jean McPherson, Tyrah Timmerman. Happy birthday to Zayah Kingery and Sharon Lambe on December 1- Angie Slagle and Sandy Main on December 2- Alice Mitchell, Morgan Wells, and Grac-

Winchester seventh grade girls regional champs By KENT COULTAS Scott County Times Three players combined to score 28 points as Winchester beat Brown County 46-14 Nov. 27 in the championship game of the Liberty IESA 7-2A girls’ basketball regional. Winchester (22-3) plays Calhoun (13-3) at the Greenfield sectional Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. The winner advances to the IESA 7-2A State tournament Dec. 7 at Paris. Brylee Lawson scored 12 points to lead the Wolverines. Adrienne Kaufmann and Braylee

Littig each scored eight points. Jaeden Reardon scored five points, and Vickie McGee scored four. Kylie Clayton and Ashlyn Likes each scored three points. Sofie Grubb scored two points, and Raegan Brown scored one. Winchester beat Western 40-17 Nov. 26 in the regional semifinals. Lawson scored 15 points to lead Winchester, and Reardon scored 10. Clayton scored six points, and Kaufmann scored five. McGee scored four points, and Hallee Lawson scored two.

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Fearneyhough, Elsie Gibbs, Dorothy Benton, Mary McElfresh and Connie Fair. The next luncheon will be December 17- all ladies are welcome. Royal Neighbors Chapter 3190 members furnished cupcakes, brownies, and assisted Grace Baptist Church and Sandridge Baptist Church in serving 120 students free lunches on Monday. RA members present were Judy Cannon, Pat Brown, and Beth Clevenger. Thats all folks. Have a good week. Be a friend to someone in need this week. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING On Tuesday December 10, 2019 at 6:15 PM, the Board of Education will conduct a hearing for the purpose of receiving public comment and questions regarding the District’s application for a Waiver of School Code Section 1017. This waiver would allow the District to post the Annual Statement of Affairs on the District website and make paper copies available from WKH 'LVWULFW 2I¿FH LQVWHDG RI publishing in a newspaper. This would allow the District to save over $700 per year. This hearing will take place DW WKH %RDUG 2I¿FH ORFDWHG at 149 South Elm Street, Winchester IL. Following the hearing, the Board will conduct its regular meeting. The reasoning for the waiver request is an attempt to divert funds from publication costs to instructional costs. If you have questions about this hearing, please call 742-3175. 12.4

STATE OF ILLINOIS COUNTY OF SCOTT SS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WINCHESTER, SCOTT COUNTY, ILLINOIS Public notice is hereby given that, on November 25, 2019,ÂżOHGP\SHWLWLRQLQVDLG FRXUW SUD\LQJ IRU WKH FKDQJH RI P\ QDPH IURP .$7+< %(77,6 WR WKDW RI .$7+< )($51(<+28*+ SXUVXDQW to the statute in such case PDGHDQGSURYLGHG 'DWHG DW -DFNVRQYLOOH ,OOLnois, this WKGD\RI1RYHPber /s/ Kathy Bettis .$7+<%(77,6 $WWRUQH\VIRU3HWLWLRQHU 7KRPVRQ0F1HHO\ &UHZV3& 5LFKDUG.&UHZV&RXQVHO 226 West State Street 32%R[ -DFNVRQYLOOH,OOLQRLV 7HOHSKRQH   )D[   (PDLOULFN#WKRPVRQODZQHW 

STATE OF ILLINOIS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT SCOTT COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BERNARD L. EVANS, Deceased. NO. 19-P-19 CLAIM NOTICE Notice is hereby given of the death of Bernard L. Evans of Winchester, Scott County, ,OOLQRLV  /HWWHUV RI 2IÂżFH were issued on November 21, 2019, to Mark Leonard, 4209 Foxboro Trail, Arlington, Texas 76001, as Independent Executor, whose attorney is John D. Coonrod, 44 East Side Square, Winchester, Illinois 62694. &ODLPV PD\ EH ÂżOHG RQ RU before May 27, 2020. Any FODLP QRW ÂżOHG RQ RU EHIRUH that date is barred, except that claim of a creditor who KDV EHHQ QRWLÂżHG E\ PDLO RU delivery of notice shall be barred on said date or three months from the date of such mailing or delivery, whichever LV ODWHU  &ODLPV PD\ EH ÂżOHG LQ WKH 2IÂżFH RI WKH &OHUN RI said Court at the Scott County Courthouse, Winchester, Illinois 62694, with the Independent Executor, or both. Dated this 21st day of November, 2019. Mark Leonard, Independent Executor of the Estate of Bernard L. Evans, Deceased By: /s/ John D. Coonrod his attorney John D. Coonrod Attorney for Independent Executor P.O. Box 197 Winchester, IL 62694 Telephone: (217) 742-3455 11.27, 12.4, 12.11

FISCAL/OFFICE MANAGER NEEDED Scott County Health Department is looking for a Fiscal/ OfďŹ ce Manager. Your duties would include basic payroll and bills every other week, compiling time sheets, writing grants, GATA, budgets for grants and the county, keeping track of all money in each grant, monthly and yearly reports, and other duties as assigned. Must work well with the public. Send a resume to Scott County Health Department, PO Box 115, Winchester, IL 62694 or Fax to 217-742-8304.


A4

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Assembly of God Church

Glasgow Baptist Church

27 West Cherry Street Pastor Cindy Colbert 217-742-3311 Sunday School â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9:30 am Morning Worship â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10:30 am Everyone welcome

217-473-4110 Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer & Bible Study - 6 p.m. Office open 3rd Wednesday of each month from 2:30-5:30 p.m.

Alsey Baptist Church Sunday School-9:30 a.m. Worship Service-10:30 a.m. Youth Group-7 p.m. on Wednesday Grades 6th-12th Pastor Jeff Daak

Bloomfield Baptist Church

Grace Baptist Church Terry Beauchamp- Pastor 224-326-4551 Corner of Cherry and Maple Winchester, IL 62694 Sunday Services 9:30 a.m. and worship 10:30 a.m.

Pastor Mark Norris 217-473-1967

Manchester Baptist Church

Bluffs Baptist Church

404 East Street Manchester, IL 62663 Pastor Shawn at 217-587-2761

112 S. Rodgers St. P.O. Box 231 Bluffs, IL 62621

Christ Lutheran Church 125 W. Jefferson 217-742-3919 Rev. Richard Harre, Vacancy Pastor Sunday, December 8: Divine Service, 10:30a.m. Wednesday, December 11: Confirmation Classes at Trinity Lutheran Church, Bluffs: 2nd Year - 2:30p.m. 3rd Year - 4:15p.m. 1st Year - 5:30p.m.

Cornerstone Baptist Church 226 Cornerstone Drive Winchester, IL 62694 Church Phone: 217-742-8000 Pastor Ted Rhoades: 217-742-5841

First Baptist Church of Winchester Pastor Bill Baughman Church: 217-742-3480 Email: fbcwinchester@gmail.com Website: fbcwinchester.com Office hours: Monday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thursday 8 a.m. - 12 p.m.

First Christian Church 20 N. Main 8JODIFTUFS *-t fccwin@irtc.net Pastor Alan Bradish First Sunday Fellowship with coffee and donuts 9 a.m. Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sunday School during service Sunday Worship 10 a.m. Bible Study 2nd-5th Sundays 9:15 (while interest continues)

Freedom Family Worship Center 428 N. Commercial, Winchester 217-883-3763 Pastor Gary Wells (Non-Denominational) Morning Worship 10 am Children's Sunday School during Service Country Gospel (Potluck 1st and 3rd Sundays) Come Expecting a Blessing! Everyone Welcome

IF YOU WOULD LIKE YOUR CHURCH NEWS LISTED PLEASE CALL US! 742-3313

New Song Ministries 1465 Exeter Road Bluffs Pastor David VanGiesen 217-754-3718 Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m. Childrens Church - 10 a.m. Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study - 6:30 p.m.

Pleasant Hill Baptist Church Route 106 - One mile south of Alsey Pastor Eric Kirgan 217-742-3202 Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship 6 p.m. Everyone Always Welcome

St. Markâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Catholic Church Winchester, IL

Winchester United Methodist Church at Work! 20 N. Walnut Rev. Robin R. Lyons: 217-742-3610 Email: winchesterumc@frontier.com Parsonage: 217-742-3320 This Weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Opportunities   Wednesday, December 4, 2019 9:30 a.m. Christmas Coffee by our Caring Team 6-7 p.m. Scouts 7 p.m. Choir Rehearsal Thursday, December 5, 2019 10 a.m. Thursday Bible Study Saturday, December 7, 2019 7 a.m. - 10 a.m. Kiwanis Pancake breakfast in Sibert Hall 2 p.m. WUMC Choir Sing at Old Museum School Museum Noon - Scout Christmas Party in Sibert Hall Sunday, December 8, 2019 - 2nd Sunday of Advent 8:15 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 9 a.m. Worship 10:05 a.m. Sunday School 5:30 p.m. Advent Bible Study with Pam and Larry in Sibert Hall

Make plans to attend the church of your choice today! Sandridge Baptist Church

Barrow Baptist Church Gerald Day, Pastor

New Beginnings Church 742-3459

Bloomfield Baptist Church

Winchester United Methodist Church Rev. Robin Lyons Church: (217) 742-3610 Home: (217) 742-3320

Friendship Primitive Baptist Church Pleasant Hill Baptist Church Eric Kirgan, Pastor Manchester Baptist Church (217) 587-2761 or 4211

OBITUARIES/CHURCH/NEWS

Obituaries Ruth Pennell Ruth Unile Vinson Pennell, 95, of Manchester passed away early Tuesday morning, December 3, 2019 at her home. She was born March 28, 1924 in Marion the daughter of Harry and Miriam Gambill Vinson. She married Maynard Gayle Pennell on June 9, 1947 in Jacksonville and he preceded her in death on July 16, 2002. She is survived by one son, Jay Pennell of Manchester; one daughter, Janet (Rick) Roberts of Winchester; 3 granddaughters, Angela (Marshall) Blodgett of Las Vegas, NV, Nicole (Josh) Gilmore of Lafayette,

IN and Jayla (Jason) Likes of Winchester; 8 great-grandchildren. Matthias, Maverick and Maddox Blodgett, Stella and Shelby Gilmore and Ashlyn, Jaysa and Jaylei Likes. Mrs. Pennell graduated from Jacksonville High School. She was employed as a receptionist and switchboard operator at Nesco during World War II. Following her marriage, she moved to Manchester and worked alongside her husband on the family farm. She was a member of the Manchester United Methodist Church where she very active in

church activities. She was also a member of the Jacksonville Junior Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club and the Thursday Club. Mrs. Pennell was a correspondent for the Scott County Times and an election judge for many years. She enjoyed photography, reading and spending time with all the grandchildren. A graveside service will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, December 5, 2019 at Memorial Lawn Cemetery. Memorials are suggested to the Manchester United Methodist Church, Chaddock in Quincy or The Baby Fold. Williamson Funeral

Home in Jacksonville is in charge of the arrangements. Condolences may be left online at www.airsmanhires.com.

good GROWING Keeping you growing with good ideas sUniversity of Illinois Extension

Parsnips is an underrated vegetable I love parsnips. But have you ever bought parsnips at a grocery store? Let me share my experience. At the checkout lane, the cashier always has a befuddled look when parsnips are up for scanning. A look that I know all too well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh, those are parsnips,â&#x20AC;? I tell the cashier. Satisfied the cashier enters the code and scans the root vegetable, usually adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hmm, looks like white carrots.â&#x20AC;? Suddenly the horticulture educator within me comes out. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Actually, they are closely related. They are both in the carrot family. They even taste similar, but parsnips have more of a sweet, nutty flavor.â&#x20AC;? I continue on explaining how I prefer to substitute celery with parsnips and it is a completely underrated vegetable. At some point I feel the eyes of everyone waiting behind, as I have broken grocery store rule number oneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make checkout last longer than it should. The cashier is being nice, but they are paid to be nice and probably donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care that parsnips are better than celery, which they obviously are, but I grab my groceries and leave the store. In addition to being a great vegetable, parsnips are also incredibly easy to grow. It is basically like growing carrots, where the hardest part is soil preparation and seed germination.

Parsnips are typically grown from seed and can be considered a very long season crop. Part of this is due to the fact parsnips take a long time to germinate â&#x20AC;&#x201D; over three weeks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and if the soil is crusted over, the seedlings will not emerge. You will need to sow parsnip seed in early spring when soil temperatures are ideally above 50 degrees. I have used low tunnels to warm the soil and get a jumpstart on the growing season. In the past, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve sowed parsnips as early as mid-March. Parsnips can germinate in cool soils, as low as 35 degrees Fahrenheit. However, your germination rate will not be very good. My parsnips grow in 10-inch raised beds to give them deep soil for developing a large root. If you grow in a flat garden, you need deep well-drained soils. This may require amending the soil based on your specific garden conditions. Like carrots, parsnips need even moisture to germinate. This means light frequent irrigation. Not so much water that the ground is saturated, but enough to keep the top layer of soil moist that contains the seeds. My garden has a drip irrigation system on a timer that takes a lot of guesswork out of watering and is something I credit for getting good germination of my parsnips. Keep the parsnips watered and fertilize if a soil test

reveals you have a nutrient deficiency. There is not much insect pest pressure, and the plants form a dense enough canopy that weeds have been a rare issue in my garden. Harvest once the roots reach oneinch in diameter, I prefer to wait until after the first fall frost as this will make the roots sweeter. Like carrots, you can mulch over the parsnips and hold them through the winter in the ground, digging them up when you need them on days above freezing. Harvest the last of the parsnips before any new growth resumes in the spring as they will turn fibrous and bitterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; kind of like celery. So, if you are enjoying delicious, savory Thanksgiving stuffing only to bite into a stringy piece of celery, consider parsnips as a substitute. I know I will be reaching for parsnips over celery when making my post-Thanksgiving turkey soup. Time to go to the grocery store. Good Growing Tip of the Week: Parsnips are related to the wild parsnip, a plant that can cause blister-like sores when a person gets the sap on their skin on a sunny day. The cultivated parsnip does not cause such severe reactions, but some people do still get rashes when working with the plants. Wear long-sleeves and gloves to avoid skin irritation when working with parsnips.

Email us anytime! For NEWSsSCTNEWS CAMPBELLPUBLICATIONSNET

For SPORTSsSCTSPORTS CAMPBELLPUBLICATIONSNET For ADVERTISING sNLIEHR CAMPBELLPUBLICATIONSNET

For SCHOOL, LOCALS OR ANYTHING ELSE sSCTNEWS CAMPBELLPUBLICATIONSNET

Monday, December 9, 2019 11:45 a.m. Free Lunch Monday @ FBC â&#x20AC;&#x201C; St. Mark Catholic Church 6:15 p.m. Finance Team 7 p.m. Ad Council

Alsey Baptist Church Jeff Daak, Pastor

Cornerstone Baptist Church 742-5841

Winchester, Illinois

St. Markâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church 742-5224 Winchester Assembly of God Pastor Cindy Colbert 217-742-3311 Glasgow Baptist Church (217) 742-3680

Scott County Times

Preparing for Christmas Manchester Methodist Church Rev. Robin Lyons 217-742-3320 First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) First Baptist Church Church: (217) 742-3480 East Union Baptist Church Grace Baptist Church Terry Beauchamp Christ Lutheran Church 742-3919 Church of the New Song Church 217-754-3617

T

Pat Van DeVelde Peak Insurance Agency 16 S. Hill, 742-3316 First National Bank of Winchester 26 W. Cherry 742-3134

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Therefore keep watch, because you do not know on what day your Lord will come.â&#x20AC;? Matthew 24:42 NIV

he season of Advent is upon us. Advent is a season of hopeful watching and eager expectation, when Christians await the coming of their savior, Jesus Christ. Granted, most children are probably more excited about the coming of Santa Claus. And this is also the season when many of us go out shopping, spend too much money and go into such deep debt that it takes us most of the next year to pay it off. Perhaps we should return to the original and most profound meaning of Advent, which is preparing for the coming of God as man, who came to show us how to live more decently with our fellow humans. The mantra of advent is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come, Lord Jesus.â&#x20AC;? Invite Jesus into your hearts and your homes this year as you prepare for Christmas. You can do this by taking some quiet time to pray and reflect on Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love for us in sending his son. Even if you plan to go out amid the hustle and bustle, or to shop until you drop, this quiet time of prayer and reflection will help you stay balanced and grounded. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Christopher Simon

These religious messages are published each week in the Scott County Times as a service to our churches and are sponsored by the listed business firms.


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%*UHHQH&RXQW\ &-HUVH\&RXQW\ '3LNH&RXQW\ (6FRWW&RXQW\ Â&#x2021;3HWV Â&#x2021;5HDO(VWDWH  $&DOKRXQ&RXQW\ %*UHHQH&RXQW\ &-HUVH\&RXQW\ '3LNH&RXQW\ (6FRWW&RXQW\ Â&#x2021;6HUYLFHV  Â&#x2021;:DQWHG  Â&#x2021;:HE6LWHV Â&#x2021;:RUN:DQWHG Â&#x2021;<DUG6DOHV $&DOKRXQ&RXQW\ %*UHHQH&RXQW\ &-HUVH\&RXQW\ '3LNH&RXQW\ (6FRWW&RXQW\

GENERAL INFORMATION '($'/,1(6 Classified ads, Monday 3:30 p.m. (For placement and for cancellation.) &/$66,),('5$7(6)LUVWLQVHUWLRQ, 25¢ per word, minimum $6. &RQVHFXWLYH UHSHDW LQVHUWLRQ, 15¢ per word, minimum $5. Prepayment is required. Any change in original ad will be considered start of a new ad. %OLQG$G, $4 service charge, plus postage if replies are to be mailed. <DUG6DOHV $6 up to 20 words. 1R7UHVSDVVLQJ QRWLFH, one year, up to 20 words, $60. $'9(57,6,1*32/,&< 7KHIROORZLQJDUHSROLFLHVRI&DOKRXQ1HZV+HUDOG*UHHQH3UDLULH 3UHVV-HUVH\&RXQW\-RXUQDO3LNH3UHVVDQG6FRWW&RXQW\7LPHV We are not responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of display and classified advertising. One free insertion will be allowed for a classified ad with a significant mistake. Please let us know immediately. The newspaper reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement submitted for publication. Yard Sale and Work Wanted ads are payable in advance. Proper identification is required of persons placing ads. A F.O.I.D. card will be asked for when selling a firearm. No exceptions will be allowed. Newspaper reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including the right to do so after the ad has been accepted for publication but before publication occurs. The advertiserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sole remedy for such refusal shall be the refund of the funds paid to purchase the ad. Advertisements are accepted by the newspaper upon the representation that the agency and/or advertiser is authorized to publish the contents and subject matter of the advertisement and that it is not libelous or does not infringe on the privacy of any individual or entity. All advertisements are accepted and published by the newspaper

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AUCTIONS MACHINERY CONSIGNMENT AUCTION

->Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;`>Ă&#x17E;]Ă&#x160; iV°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x160;>°Â&#x201C;°

at Western Illinois Fairgrounds - Griggsville, Ill. >Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;>VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;VĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;6iÂ&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;VÂ?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160; ÂľĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;°Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;it Call or email bcurless@irtc.net with consignments! Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°VĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Â?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;>Ă&#x2022;VĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ÂŁĂ&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;{Ă&#x201C;Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x2C6;x

BROWN COUNTY, ILLINOIS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17 AT 1:00 P.M. AUCTION VENUE: THE K OF C HALL | QUINCY ROAD | MT. STERLING, IL 62353

OFFICE SPACE. Prime location. Ample parking. West Washington St., Pittsfield. Call 217285-2848, 217-285-5925 or 217-653-0212. TFN TWO BEDROOM mobile home for rent in country. Griggsville school district. 217-8332015. 12.18.19 FOR RENT in Griggsville: Efficiency upstairs apartment. Suitable for one. Low utilities, reasonable rent. No pets. Lyndle Ellis. 217-8332107. 1.1.20

500 FOR SALE

53Âą

900D NO TRESPASSING Pike County

400 FOR RENT

MAYFAIR FARMS ground North of Highway 10 East of Nebo is private property. Trespassing is forbidden. Violators will be prosecuted. 1.2.20

NO TRESPASSING and no hunting of any kind, is permitted on any property owned by Double Creek Farms. Can be prosecuted. NO TRESPASSING or hunting allowed on my land in Pearl and Spring Creek township owned by Timothy Brinkmann. Violators will be prosecuted. 10.21.20

1200

tfn

12.11.19

900A NO TRESPASSING Calhoun County NO TRESPASSING or hunting allowed on the land in Batchtown owned by Steve and Cindy Meszaros. Violators will be prosecuted. 8.5.20 NO TRESPASSING or hunting allowed on the land in Batchtown owned by Marcy Klockenkemper, Judy Lamer, Jeremy Russell, Bonnie Stepanek and Cindy Mezzos. Violators will be prosecuted. 8.5.20

Dec. 4

12.19.19

SERVICES BLACK OIL seed, sunflower see or bird feed. 30 cents a pound. Call (217) 430-2881. tfn RADIANT TUBE heater. 130,000 BTU, natural FREE ESTIMATES! Local Pike County Tree gas or can convert to propane and is 50 ft. Service with many years experience that do all sorts of tree jobs (removal, trimming, with long. $600. Call 217-285-4859. 12.4.19 or without clean-up) with the very best rates around. Text 217-320-8438 or 217-204-1154 600 or call 217-320-8390 or 217-320-8438. HELP WANTED CRACK YOUR pecans. 40 cents a pound. THE VILLAGE of Nebo is taking applications Call (217) 430-2881. tfn for the position of treasurer. Pays $700/month. Resumes can be sent to: Thomas Williams, Mayor of Nebo, PO Box 191, Nebo, IL 62355.

This Day In History Q 1783: Gen. George Washington said farewell to his officers at Fraunces Tavern in New York. Q1812 - Peter Gaillard patented the power mower. Q 1942 - U.S. bombers attacked the Italian mainland for the first time during World War II. Q 1977 - Jean-Bedel Bokassa, ruler of the Central African Empire, crowned himself emperor in a ceremony believed to have cost more than $100 million. He was deposed 2 years later.

ACRES

(SUBJECT TO SURVEY)

Selling in 4 Tracts

DETAILS, MAPS AND PHOTOS ONLINE!

www.SullivanAuctioneers.com Farm is located approximately 4 miles southeast of Mt. Sterling, IL in Sections 34 & 35, T1Sâ&#x20AC;˘R3W, Mount Sterling Township, Brown County, IL. Tract 1 includes a home. Tracts 2 - 4 represent possible new home sites, tillable/CRP income along with timber/wildlife habitat.

THE LATE ALLEN PETRI & MARY PETRI FARM Mary Petri â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Seller | Joyce Bowman â&#x20AC;&#x201C; POA REPRESENTING ATTORNEY: JOHN B. LEONARD 132 E MAIN ST. | MT STERLING, IL 62353 | PH: (217) 773-3814

SULLIVAN AUCTIONEERS, LLC â&#x20AC;˘ TOLL FREE (844) 847-2161 www.SullivanAuctioneers.com â&#x20AC;˘ IL Lic. #444000107

Brown County, Illinois TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17TH AT 11:00 A.M. AUCTION VENUE: Knights of Columbus Hall â&#x20AC;˘ Mt. Sterling, IL

475Âą ACRES (Subject to Survey)

Q1986 - Both U.S. houses of Congress moved to establish special committees to conduct their own investigations of the Iran-Contra affair.

Selling in

4 TRACTS

Farm is located southeast of Mt. Sterling, IL via Hwy. 24 and just south of the small town of Cooperstown and is located in Sections 27 & 28 of Cooperstown Township. Over 300 acres currently in row crop production with additional hay & pasture ground. This farm also has excellent wildlife habitat with large wooded draws and creeks.

DETAILS, MAPS & PHOTOS ONLINE @:

www.SullivanAuctioneers.com

DONALD COLCLASURE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SELLER REPRESENTING ATTORNEY: William M. McCleery & Jeffrey L. Terry Schmiedeskamp Robertson Neu & Mitchell LLP 525 Jersey St. â&#x20AC;˘ Quincy, IL â&#x20AC;˘ Ph: 217-223-3030 SULLIVAN AUCTIONEERS, LLC â&#x20AC;˘ TOLL FREE (844) 847-2161 www.SullivanAuctioneers.com â&#x20AC;˘ IL Lic. #444000107

PIKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27 AT 10:00 A.M. AUCTION VENUE: CROSSROADS CENTER 125 W JEFFERSON STREET | PITTSFIELD, IL 62363

256Âą

ACRES Open House

SAT., DEC. 7 â&#x20AC;˘ 10 AM - 12 NOON

5 Tracts

THE DEAN FARM IS LOCATED IN SECTION 25, HADLEY TOWNSHIP AND SECTION 19, NEW SALEM TOWNSHIP, PIKE COUNTY, IL.

 PRODUCTIVE TILLABLE FARMLAND!  HUNTING/RECREATIONAL TRACTS!  COUNTRY HOME & ACREAGE! Norman and Anna Mae Dean Trusts Everett Dean - Trustee REPRESENTING ATTORNEY: William L. Siebers Scholz, Loos, Palmer, Siebers & Duesterhuas LLP 625 Vermont St. | Quincy, IL 62301 | Ph (217) 223-3444 AUCTION MANAGER: JOHN BORROWMAN (217) 430-0645

SULLIVAN AUCTIONEERS, LLC â&#x20AC;˘ TOLL FREE (844) 847-2161 www.SullivanAuctioneers.com â&#x20AC;˘ IL Lic. #444000107

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A6

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Winchester, Illinois

NEWS

Photos courtesy of Getty Images

FAMILY FEATURES

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SPORTS

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

A7

Winchester, Illinois

Cox, Howard lead Wildcats to win

By KENT COULTAS Scott County Times Gabe Cox and Cole Howard combined to score 44 points to lead West Central to a 72-53 win Nov. 30 over Augusta Southeastern in the championship game of the Beardstown Thanksgiving Tournament. Cox and Howard were both selected to the all-tournament team. Howard also scored his 1,000th career points in the game. West Central led 23-22 at halftime, and Southeastern scored early in the third quarter to take a 24-23 lead. The game was tied 29-all before the Cougars scored 11 straight points to take the lead for good. Cox scored before Drew Evans grabbed an offensive rebound and scored and also made a threepoint basket. Howard scored consecutive baskets, and the Cougars led 41-29 with 2:26 remaining in the quarter. Southeastern scored seven straight points to get within four points. Cox made two free throws with 24 seconds remaining, and West Central led 42-36 after three quarters. Andrew Kaufmann scored off an assist from Howard to start the fourth quarter. Cox scored after Howard made a steal, and Howard scored after Cox made a steal to extend West Centralâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lead to 48-36 with 7:16 remaining in the game. Southeastern never got closer than nine points during the remainder of the game. Howard scored off an assist from Cox with 1:12 for his 1,000th career point. West Central went 26-for-33 from the free throw line in the game and was 10-for-12 from the free throw line in the fourth quarter. Cox scored 13 points and went 5-for-5 from the free throw line in the quarter. Evans made a three-point basket to start the game as the Cougars scored the first nine points. Howard made six straight free throws, and West Central led 9-0. Southeastern made two three-point baskets and narrowed the margin to 13-12 after one quarter. Ryan Moore made one of two free throws in the second quarter to give the Cougars a 20-15 lead. Southeastern, however, scored seven straight points and take a 22-20 lead. Howard made one of two free throws, and Cox made two to

give West Central a 23-22 lead at halftime. Cox scored 23 points and had nine rebounds, six assists and six steals to lead the Cougars. Howard scored 21 points and had six rebounds and four assists. Evans scored 10 points and had seven rebounds. Kaufmann scored six points. Moore and Wes Hughes each scored five points. Noah Smith scored two points. Cox scored 29 points to lead West Central to a 75-60 win over Beardstown Nov. 25 in the first night of the tournament. Beardstown made a threepoint basket to start the game, but the Cougars scored the next eight points. They never trailed again. Cox scored and found Howard in transition for the dunk. Howard scored two more time to give the Cougars an 8-3 lead. West Central led 12-7 before the scoring seven straight points. Cox scored, Brayden Little made a three-point basket and Howard scored to give the Cougars a 19-7 lead after one quarter. Beardstown got within 27-19 in the second quarter, but Moore scored five points and Cox

scored three in the final 2 minutes to give West Central a 35-25 lead at halftime. The Cougars led 49-41 before the Cougars scored the last eight points of the third quarter. Cox made one of two free throws, and Moore grabbed an offensive rebound and scored. Hughes made a three-point basket, and Howard finished the quarter with a dunk to give the Cougars a 57-41 lead. West Central led by as many as 21 points, 67-46, in the fourth quarter after Kaufmann scored with 5:03 remaining in the game. Howard scored 18 points for the Cougars, and Moore scored 11. Hughes scored six points. Evans and Kaufmann each scored four points. Little scored three points. Four players scored in double figures as West Central beat Mendon Unity 78-45 Nov. 26. West Central led just 14-13 after one quarter and trailed 18-16 early in the second. The Cougars scored eight straight points as Howard, Evans and Cox each scored and Howard finished the run with a steal and layup to give West Central a

24-18 lead. West Central finished the first half on a 29-8 run and led 45-26 at halftime. Howard scored 19 points to lead West Central, and Cox scored 18. Evans and Moore each scored 10 points. Hughes and

scored four points. Little scored three points.

NEW LISTINGS

Scott County, Illinois 10 Acres | $45,000

Pike County, Illinois 162 Acres | $631,800

REDUCED!

Jeannette Buhlig/Scott County Times

Drew Evans attempts a shot from three point range during the Cougarsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; basketball game last week against Beardstown at the Beardstown Tournament.

Jeannette Buhlig/Scott County Times

Gabe Cox goes up for two during the Cougarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball game against Beardstown at the Beardstown Tournament last week.

Smith each scored five points. Kaufmann and Ethan Slagle each

Pike County, Illinois 79 Acres | $399,500

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Pike County, Illinois 171 Acres

Pike County, Illinois 255 Acres

Pike County, Illinois 60 Acres

Scott County, Illinois 30 Acres

Jeannette Buhlig/Scott County Times

Gabe Cox and Cole Howard jump for the rebound at the Beardstown Tournament last week in Beardstown.

Calhoun County, Illinois 52.64 Acres

ADAM FENCIK Submitted photo

Members of the West Central Cougar basketball team are front row, left to right: Manager Shawn Brown, Brayden Little, Lathan Barnett, Gabe Cox, Wes Hughes, Payton Hartley and manager Justin Gallowan. Back row: Coaches Bill Jacquot, Travis Sievers, Drew Evans. Ryan Moore, Andrew Kaufmann, Noah Smith, Ethan Slagle, Cole Howard and Coaches Brady Slagle and Ryan Sichting.

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PITTSFIELD: 524 N. Orchard St: Very nice ranch style home with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths ( additional Âź bath in partial ďŹ nished basement), custom made kitchen cabinets with soft close doors, dining room, one car garage and so much more. Take a look! REDUCED to $104,900 NEW LISTING: PITTSFIELD: 917 W. Jefferson St. Spacious 2 bedroom ranch with large dining room, tons of kitchen cabinets, kitchen island, big dining room, nice bathroom, vinyl siding, large back yard and so much more. $75,000 BARRY: 611 Tremont St: 2 story home on corner lot near school. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, storage shed/workshop, shaded lot, and a new furnace. $32,500 BARRY: 1174 Rodgers St: 2 story home with 4 bedrooms, nice kitchen with SS appliances, central air, wrap around front porch, and a nice 2 car garage. $74,900 DETROIT: 201 Main St: 1.5 story home on corner lot. 5 bedrooms, 2 baths and a whole house outside wood furnace. $29,900 PITTSFIELD: 1700 Lakeview Heights: ž acre lot with utilities. $9,000 GRIGGSVILLE: 416 N. Union St. Immaculate 2 bedroom ranch home on a huge corner lot. Nice landscaping, covered patio and deck, family room and bath in the basement, 2 car attached garage and a single detached garage. NICE! $115,000 GRIGGSVILLE: 316 N. Chandler St: Neat 2 bedroom ranch home with very usable basement, partial hardwood ďŹ&#x201A;oors, enclosed rear porch, central air, and a big 2 car garage with a heated workshop. $65,000 GRIGGSVILLE: 503 S. Federal St: This newly remodeled ranch home on a huge lot will qualify for a no money down USDA loan. 2 bedrooms with a 3rd in the basement, central air, new ďŹ&#x201A;ooring, nice deck and a storage shed. $79,500 GRIGGSVILLE: 114 E. Franklin St: Spacious 3 bedroom manufactured home with a full partially ďŹ nished basement. Has central air, nice kitchen cabinets, oversized 2 car garage, and A large treed yard. $85,000 GRIGGSVILLE: 615 E. Quincy St: 3-4 bedroom with a covered rear patio and a larger storage shed and at the edge of town. $16,500 GRIGGSVILLE: 210 S. Corey St. 1.5 story with 2 baths, central air, attached oversized 2 car garage and more. $93,000 PITTSFIELD: 320 S. Illinois St. Completely remodeled brick and vinyl ranch with large living room, central air, and kitchen appliances. PITTSFIELD: 309 W. Adams St: 4 bedroom home near downtown with vinyl siding, nice front porch, shaded lot and a large storage building. $48,000 ROCKPORT (just outside of New Hartford) Neat 2 bedroom country home with 5 ACRES! Has a 12 x 20 garage, a 30 x 40 metal building, newer roof, windows, septic, central air and much more. Only $79,900 PITTSFIELD: 127 N. West Street. DING 1.5 story home with central air. E4Nbedoom, P GRIGGSVILLE: 114 S. Stanford St. A great starter home with 2 bedrooms, newer roof, ďŹ&#x201A;ooring, paint, windows, and more. Just $44,000 PERRY: 305 S. Congress St: This bi-level home has an open ďŹ&#x201A;oor plan with a large kitchen, dining and living area, a family room and bedroom in the lower level. All of this at a reduced price of $42,000 QUINCY: 1605 Elm St. 2 story brick home with new roof, 4 bedrooms, and a 2 car garage. $44,900 PITTSFIELD: 162 acres NW of PittsďŹ eld: G2/3 tillable with the balance in PENDIN timer.

SOLD SOLD

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A8

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Winchester, Illinois

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