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OPINION: JCUSD 100 board making tough decision: Page A4 NEWS: New arrivals in 2013: Page A5

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JERSEY COUNTY

JERSEYVILLE, IL 62052

INSIDE NEWS

JCH welcomes first baby of the year. See page A3

FRIENDS & NEIGHBORS

Mya's 1st birthday. See page A5

NEWS

SPORTS

School board reviews five-year plan for financial solvency

FREEZING

AND FLAKING

Bob CROSSEN Jersey County Journal The Jersey Community Unit School District 100 board reviewed a five-year plan meant to recover the district’s finances while also reducing its deficit. Superintendent Lori Hopkins presented the proposal during a special board meeting Jan. 6, which around 15 visitors attended along with the full board. “This is not the plan that is extremely egregious when we’re talking about 40 to 44 kids in a classroom. This is the plan that is not in the best interest of kids, but is doable,” Hopkins said. The proposal, which will go before the board during its next regular meeting Jan. 15, would require the district to purchase $5 million in working cash bonds that would be used over the course of five years. Since 2002, the district

“This is not the plan that is extremely egregious when we’re talking about 40 to 44 kids in a classroom. This is the plan that is not in the best interest of kids, but is doable.” JCUSD Superintendent has cut 71 employees from the district, and also closed three outlying schools – Delhi, Fieldon and Dow elementary schools. The students were consolidated into buildings in Grafton and Jerseyville, and the move saved the district more than $1 million. But due to state cuts to school funding in Illinois, the district was unable to capitalize on the savings. Proposed cuts and savings The first year of the proposal would reduce district expenditures by $1.3 million, cutting roughly 24 employees of the district. Up to seven of those employees would retire and the district would absorb the positions. (See, board, a2)

Robert Lyons/Jersey County Jounral

A cloud of snow blows from Josh Tonsor's shovel Monday morning as he clears out the driveway at his Jerseyville residence. Several inches of snow fell on the county Sunday, followed by temperatures below zero on Monday.

WEATHER

Snow, cold hamper daily routines in county by this commissioner,” Jerseyville street commissioner Andy Macias said. “We, the street department, appreciate everyone’s patience with getting their streets plowed, it does take time.” Jersey County Sheriff Mark Kallal said his office had responded to 13 reports of vehicles stuck or slid off the road between 6 a.m. Sunday and 9 a.m. Monday. He said one of his department’s vehicles got stuck while trying to help free another motorist. Kallal said people should stay off the roads when the weather gets as bad as it got early this week. “People, regardless of what the weather’s doing or what they’re told, they’re going to get out and try it,” the sheriff said. “With the temperatures going down, our concern is hypothermia.”

By ROBERT LYONS Jersey County Journal Several inches of snow followed by intense cold caused major disruptions to start the week. Schools, businesses, traffic and even the Jerseyville Post Office were hampered by the inclement weather. According to weather.com, Jerseyville received just less than seven inches of snow Sunday, which was followed by subzero temperatures on Monday. City, township and state snow removal crews were busy beginning early Sunday through at least Tuesday removing snow from the roads. “In addition to the street department, the water and sewer, and parks and recreation departments also assist in all snow removal needs for the city and it is greatly appreciated

Panthers eyeing MVC success.

The Jerseyville Post Office was open Monday, but did not deliver mail because it did not arrive on the truck from St. Louis, according to post office supervisor Pam Kirby who has been with USPS for 18 years. “That was a first for me,” Kirby said. “Everything’s back to normal now, but our truck was still late [Tuesday].” Kirby said rural route customers must clear the area around their mailbox before normal delivery will resume. Jerseyville Police Chief Brad Blackorby said the conditions did not result in much extra work for his officers. “Everyone is being halfway safe, I think,” Blackorby said. Still, slick roads covered in ice and snow (See, cold, a2)

Goetten plans on getting to the bottom of leaked letter

See page C8

ONLINE

By ROBERT LYONS Jersey County Journal Jersey County’s state’s attorney plans to investigate for as long as it takes to determine the source of a confidential letter leaked to the public. A letter from the county’s workman’s compensation and liability insurance provider containing confidential information related to current and former county employees has found its way to members of the public. State’s Attorney Ben Goetten said the letter had to have been leaked by a county board member,

Visit us on the web at

jerseycountyjournal.com

TOP STORIES ONLINE Week of Jan. 1 - 7

1) County website coming along, may debut in about a month 2) TreeHouse receives another injured bobcat 3) Jersey repeats as Classic champion 4) Southwestern second, Lady Panthers fight hard at JCHS tourney 5) Man dies in Fieldon tractor rollover

as no one else had access to it. “When the chairman makes it clear that this information was to remain confidential, and a board member completely ignores that request, it creates an environment of distrust,” Goetten said. “Whoever was responsible for the release of the letter obviously has zero concern about the financial wellbeing of our county and is more interested in serving their own agenda.” The distrust caused by the leak, according to Goetten, exists among board members and from the public. (See, letter, a2)

Concealed carry applications rolling in to Illinois State Police

INDEX Court. . . . . . . . . . . . . B2 News . . . . . . . . . A2, A3, B2 Obituaries . . . . . . . . C2 Editorial . . . . . . . . . . A4 Our Town . . . . . . . . . A6 Public Notice . . . . . . D1 Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . C6 OBITUARIES:

CARRICO, GILLILEND, KOCHANSKI, MOHR, PHILLIPS, SCOGGINS, SIMPKINS, STREET, SYNDER, YAEGER.

jerseycountyjournal .com Michael R. Weaver/Jersey County Journal

© 2014 Jersey County Journal

VOL. 12, NO. 2 - 75¢

JANUARY 8, 2014

Lori Hopkins Scheffel and Co. merges with J.W. Boyle. See page B2

JOURNAL

HAPPY NEW YEAR! Balloons fall over a packed Mulligan's West Wednesday morning as partygoers celebrate the New Year in Jerseyville. michaelrweaver.com C

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BY ROBERT LYONS Jersey County Journal More than 4,000 online applications for a concealed carry permit were received by Illinois State Police in the first 24 hours of availability, including 33 in Jersey County. The online application system went live to the public on Sunday and saw an onslaught of activity. Local sheriffs are being kept in the loop as to which of their county’s residents are applying for the right to carry a firearm. Concealed carry gives permitted individuals the right to carry a loaded firearm in public. Jersey County Sheriff Mark Kallal welcomes the right for citizens to carry a gun, but said that right comes with accountability. “They’re taking on a big responsibility by carrying one,” Kallal said. “You need to realize that guns are for one thing and one thing only, and that’s to save your life.” Bob Jones, a certified concealed carry instructor in Jerseyville, has been training individuals since October. As of the

beginning of January, 60 participants – including two from Greene County and one from Calhoun County – had taken and passed his classes. He said he’s had a mixed bag of participants varying between ex-military and private individuals. “I’ve had two women who are worried about their personal safety because

“There may be a few snafus, but I think for the most part [the ISP] have done their best to cover all the bases.”

Mark Kallal Jersey County Sheriff

of where they go to work,” Jones said. “They want to carry a gun with them just in case, because they’ve been confronted before.” (See, aPPlicationS, a2)


Wednesday, Jnauary 8, 2014

Letter

(Continued from A1) Goetten said he’s been told at least a dozen people have received a copy of the letter. “We have received an overwhelming response from citizens wanting something done,” the state’s attorney said. “Other board members have also requested we take action in that it reflects poorly upon the entire board, especially if litigation results due to its release.” Goetten said he’s hoping the person responsible for distributing the letter will step up and take responsibility. If not, he’s planning to interview each board member. “The purpose of this investigation is administrative in nature and is being conducted at the direction of the chairman, whose responsibility it is to ensure the board runs efficiently and effectively for the people of Jersey County,” Goetten said. “That efficiency and effectiveness has been hindered by the actions of a rogue board member who’s decided to take matters into their own hands.” The motive for releasing the letter to the public, Goetten suspects, was to promote transparency – a concept the state’s attorney said he values. However, side-stepping the code of conduct each board

teacher and have the same value of programs.” Physical education would also be condensed as the individual teachers from kindergarten through seventh grade would be required to provide physical education to their students. Special education would also see changes as the full inclusion – teaching special education students in classes alongside their peers – would be reduced, meaning special education students would be in classes with other special education students. With cuts to the number of teachers in the district, class sizes could grow considerably. Hopkins said the district has strived toward keeping class sizes near or below the state average to provide the best possible education for District 100 students. Board worries about community impact If the five-year plan which includes the purchase of $5 million in working cash bonds does not get approved, the cuts could increase class sizes to an average of 40 students per classroom. Board member Stan Kary said he would not like to see such large class sizes because students’ grades would begin to suffer. As students’ grades begin to suffer, motivation to attend school drops, and without extra curricular activities – athletics, drama, etc. – motivating students to achieve academically, average daily attendance (ADA) would fall. Hopkins said ADA is one of the measures used to indicate how much money the district receives from the state in the form of general state aid (GSA). During the past three years, GSA has been prorated by the state, meaning the state has withheld funding it owes to school districts. Last year, the proration was 89 percent, meaning the district didn’t receive 11 percent of the funding it was owed. Board member Bill Yamnitz worried the cuts to extra curricular programs would have a negative impact on students. He recalled his daughter’s involvement in chorus, noting high school would not have been the same for her without it. “Is there going to be an exodus of students into surrounding school districts?” Yamnitz said. “How’s that going to affect your total dollars coming in when you lose 15 percent of your students?” Hopkins said cutting programs would be the first step toward district desecration. As programs are cut, fewer people will attend the school, and as fewer people attend the school, the district will receive less money. Without revenue, reinstating some of the programs would not be possible. But Hopkins said the problems would stretch into the community, as well. Without home sporting events, fewer people would visit Jersey County where they could potentially spend money at local businesses, and the local economy would suffer as a result. “You’re talking about increased unemployment rates, loss of business revenues, crime increases, loss of educational value, housing value decrease and debility begins,” Hopkins said. Hopkins said she will schedule a finance committee meeting late this week to review the five-year plan. The finance committee is composed of numerous business leaders in the community, including farmers, bank presidents and invested community members who reside in the district. The board will discuss the proposal and take action on it during its next regular meeting Jan. 15.

member took an oath to abide by to achieve that goal is not worth the price, he said. “What the public needs to understand is that an individual board member has no power to act unilaterally,” Goetten said. “Board members need to understand that without their fellow board members they carry no authority, and that’s why trust amongst members is so important in bodies such as our board.” The Attorney General’s office gave an opinion that the leak was not a violation of the Open Meetings Act, and that the law has not been broken. But, a temporary restraining order applied for by Goetten Monday against each board member could make talking about the letter during open session of a board meeting a criminal offense. The state’s attorney has also drafted a resolution regarding public comment which he plans to present to the board at the Jan. 14 meeting. Aside from establishing time limits, the rules narrow the topic of public comments to matters listed on that night’s meeting agenda and also prohibit board members from engaging in dialogue with those making comments.

NEWS

Jerseyville, Illinois

Man dies in Fieldon tractor rollover Staff report Jersey County Journal A Wood River man was found dead Friday night on property he owns in rural Fieldon. According to the Jersey County Sheriff’s Department, a tractor driven by Gregory P. Shewmake, 53, overturned into a ravine, causing fatal injuries. Sheriff Mark Kallal said the victim’s wife reported Shewmake missing earlier in the evening. The sheriff said Shewmake may have been looking for firewood at the time of the accident. “They were having problems

Cold

(Continued from A1) were enough to close several of the city’s businesses early on Sunday, and the cold kept some from opening on Monday. Walgreens, Casey’s General Store, McDonald’s and Hardee’s are a few of the Jerseyville

with the fireplace,” Kallal said. “She said, ‘I thought he went out to the shed and about two hours later I went looking for him and he wasn’t out there and realized he was on the tractor.’” The wife notified a neighbor who followed the tractor’s tracks on an ATV and discovered the accident. Shewmake was pronounced dead at 12:55 a.m. on Saturday by Jersey County Coroner Larry Alexander. Emergency personnel responded from Rosedale Fire Department, Jersey Community Hospital and the Jersey County Sheriff’s Department.

businesses which modified their hours due to the weather. Jersey and Southwestern schools were scheduled to be back in session from Christmas break, but were closed through Wednesday.

Applications (Continued from A1) After 16 hours of training, which includes eight hours of shooting, qualified individuals may apply for the concealed carry permit. But, to expedite the process they first must be fingerprinted at an approved provider. Jones said the nearest location to be fingerprinted is in Glen Carbon. Kallal, however, said his office may offer fingerprinting in the future, if he decides to navigate the red tape laid out by the state. “It’s a potential revenue source, but it’s also a potential headache,” he said. Once an application is received, the ISP has between 90 and 120 days to issue the permit or reject the applicant. Kallal said he’s confident primarily only responsible gun owners will receive the permits. “There may be a few snafus, but I think for the most part [the ISP] have done their best to cover all the bases,” Kallal said.

Submitted photo

RINGING Within 30 days of receiving an application, a county’s sheriff can object to particular individuals receiving the permit. Even believing concealed carry permit holders are law abiding citizens, Kallal believes the amount of required instruction is insufficient. “I don’t think the training they’re getting is enough. I think they need to train, train, train,” he said. “We need to train more than what we do.” Shortly after concealed carry was signed into law in July 2013, state officials estimated nearly 400,000 applications would be received in the first year. Jones said he expects now that the application is available, more people will begin the process to obtain a permit. “There’s going to be a big movement of people coming in,” Jones said. The permit costs $150 and is valid for five years.

IN THE

NEW YEAR

AT

JNRC

Marie Stone of Jerseyville Nursing and rehabilitation Center rang in the New Year with blowing horns, poppin' poppers and having refreshments.

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Rummage sale: Sellers wanted Do you have a lot of unwanted items around the house? Start spring cleaning early this year and organize it for this huge indoor sale on Saturday, March 8 from 8 a.m.2 p.m. Join Jerseyville Parks and Recreation Department (JPRD) as a seller or bargain hunter as it holds this community rummage sale at the Susnig Center, located at 401 Mound Street, Jerseyville. For $25, sellers get an eight-foot by two-and-a-half foot table to display as many items that can fit on or under the table. JPRD will place ads in the local papers, display signs, plus post on numerous social media sites prior to the event. Food, drinks, bake goods, commercial products, weapons, etc. are not permitted at the sale. JPRD reserves the right to refuse any item for sale that is inappropriate. Space is limited, so reserve your spot soon! Bargain hunters will not want to miss this sale! Admission will only be one dollar! Concessions items will be available for purchase through JPRD. For more information or to learn how to register as a seller, please

War Memorial bricks available The Jersey County War Memorial, which is located on the courthouse lawn in Jerseyville, has undergone some major changes over the past few years with the laying of memory bricks being one of the memorial’s biggest changes. To purchase a brick for the memorial, send a check for $50 to the Jersey County Recorder’s office, 200 N. Lafayette, Jerseyville, IL 62052, and designate that it is for a memorial brick. Also include the person’s name, rank and which war they served in and which branch of the military they served in. Each time, a copy of an honorable discharge of DD214 must be provided.

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(Continued from A1) “We are going to have to sell working cash bonds,” Hopkins said, noting the plan would be different if the bonds were not purchased. “Currently with a $2.7 million deficit, in order to balance the budget in a year we would have to cut anywhere from 55 to 58 teachers, eliminate athletics, vocational and fine arts.” Additional cuts include aides and other personnel who are rehired to their positions each year. Hopkins said the district would not rehire some of those individuals as a way to cut from its budget. The remaining positions would be reductions in force (RIF), meaning tenured teachers in the district would lose their jobs based on seniority and other factors. The district would have to pay unemployment benefits to those teachers for up to two years, totaling $300,000 to $400,000 per year depending on which employees were laid off, Hopkins added. The superintendent said purchasing bonds is the only way it can make it out of the deficit while still providing services important to student attendance. Consequences of refusing working cash proposal If the district does not purchase bonds, it will have to cut more than 50 teachers from its payroll along with a complete slash to the athletic, theater and fine arts programs, meaning there would no longer be football, basketball, drama productions, chorus, band or art among other extracurricular programs, without strong private funding or cash out-of-pocket from sponsors. By purchasing working cash bonds, Hopkins said the district can remove the stipends for programs throughout the district, but keep the programs running, albeit on the private funding and fundraisers run by the individual programs. Athletic teams would be limited to two paid paid coaches. Any displaced coaches can still coach for the team, she said, but the individuals would have to volunteer their time and energy. Hopkins said tennis could possibly be eliminated entirely, depending on circumstances surrounding the budget. Other programs for which sponsors are given a stipend from the district such as poms or drama – there are many others – would no longer receive the stipend. Hopkins said if the programs were to continue without the district’s stipend, funding would have to come from the teacher – who would also volunteer time – or from outside sources. Impact on classrooms and students The proposal also has serious implications for students from grades kindergarten through seventh grade as children would not transfer from room to room throughout the day, but rather would have a single teacher educating them. Students in middle school relocate from room to room during passing periods to attend classes with teachers who specialize in certain areas, but with the five-year plan, teachers would be required to teach all general education to their individual classes. Students would still continue attending the school they attend now. With those changes, band and chorus would be consolidated at the middle school. The high school band teacher would provide fewer classes at the high school to provide a limited scope of music to students in junior high and high school. “So, you’re knocking out classes at the high school and condensing middle school band,” Hopkins said. “You can’t have a high school band program without a middle school program, but you can’t cut a

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Board

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

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A2


NEWS

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

A3

Jerseyville, Illinois

Winnelson receives JCBA Business of the Month award BY BoB Crossen Jersey County Journal The Jersey County Business Association awarded a local wholesale plumbing business, Jerseyville Winnelson Plumbing Supply, Business of the Month for January. The company, which started in 1996, serves local contractors and plumbers by providing parts needed to build homes or repair plumbing systems. William “Bo” Bowen, president of the Jerseyville Winnelson Company, said receiving the Business of the Month title makes him feel validated in how he treats his customers and the community. “Hopefully it’s a reflection on the way we service our customers and take care of people who come in here,” Bowen said. The president said the company is part of WinWholesale Inc. Although corporate helps with some of the business side, Bowen said he keeps the business focused on the local community.

He said he tries to benefit the community outside the business’ walls, as well. “We try to be a part of the community. If we need to support a fundraiser or something like that, a lot of times we try and do that to be a contributing part of the community,” Bowen said. “Any chance we get to help out in the community, we try and take that seriously.” Winnelson Plumbing Supply is also involved with Cub Scout Pack 3059. Bowen said he saw a need for a wholesale plumbing business in Jerseyville when he first invested in opening the company. Having spent some of his childhood growing up in Jerseyville, he said he was happy to return to the area. Without the wholesale shop in Jerseyville, he said local contractors would have to travel much further for the services Winnelson provides. Bowen said the company also delivers parts to the contractor’s sites so the workers can keep up production rather than spend time traveling to get a certain part. In addition to its wholesale offerings, Winnelson also has a showroom to display poten-

tial finished products to its consumers. Bowen said the company prides itself on selling high quality items that not only look nice, but last a long time. But Winnelson also promotes its own little community. Bowen said a lot of the same people come into the store on a regular basis, so he – along with the other employees – have made more personal relationships with each customer than large retail stores would. He said the camaraderie he feels with the other employees and with the customers is one of his favorite aspects of the job. “Meeting people, dealing with our customers and getting to know them,” Bowen said of what brings him the most pleasure in his job. “It’s fun when you get to know people and they’re not just one more sale of the day.” He said he takes pride in helping his customers do a great job, too. Jerseyville Winnelson Plumbing Supply is located at 525 Baughman Drive in Jerseyville where it employs three people, and the company can be reached by calling (618) 498-6255.

City renews lease of farm land, increases revenue By roBert LYons Jersey County Journal The city of Jerseyville unanimously approved renewing a lease of 75 acres of city owned land with Parker Farms during Tuesday night’s council meeting. Commissioner of Public Property Glen Ketchum said the city will receive $25 more per acre in the new three-year lease. The city will receive $21,000 per year, paid in two $10,500 installments. “We increased it from $275 per acre to $300 per acre,” Ketchum said. “There’s 75 acres, 70 acres are tillable.”

The city council also unanimously approved the annual lime sludge report Tuesday. The report outlines the quantity and costs of lime and sludge removal from the city’s water plant. In 2013, the cost was $45,589.64, the highest cost since 2005. City Engineer Bob Kincade said when figuring in the increases in both tonnage of waste and cost per ton for removal, the city is operating very efficiently. “The guys have done an excellent job keeping the costs under control for hauling this waste product from the water plant,” Kincade said. The waste product is spread as a

fertilizer product in area fields. “It’s quite a process,” Public Health and Safety Commissioner Billy Russell said. “If anyone ever goes out into the bottoms there near Hardin and sees us out there spreading it, the guys work hard to get it spread out on to the fields. I appreciate their efforts.” Also at Tuesday’s meeting, the council presented awards to three city employees embarking on retirement. Mark Embley was honored for 33 years at the Jerseyville Fire Department; Debra Hotz was recognized for her 32 years as a Jerseyville Police Department dispatcher; and Roger “Bruce” Bland

was recognized for his 23 years at the Jerseyville Water and Sewer Department. In other action, the council: • Approved the attendance of a water operator at the Illinois Rural Water Association convention in Effingham February 18-19. • Approved the assignment of the cable franchise, which has undergone a name change from Cass Communications to NewWave Communications. • Approved the minutes of the previous meeting. • Approved payment of the bills.

Submitted photo

NEW YEAR’S

BABY AT

JCH

Kari and Cris Miller of Chesterfield rang in the new Year with the birth of Lyric robert Miller, the first baby of 2014 born at Jersey Community Hospital. Back, left to right, Kathy MourningLPn, Kristen sievers-rn, Pam VanMeter-rn-oB Manager. Lyric was born thursday, Jan. 2, 2014 at 2:54 a.m. He weighed 7 lbs. 7 oz., and was 19 inches long. the Millers received donations from Jersey Community Hospital, Jersey Community Hospital obstetric Department, Jersey Community Hospital Auxiliary, JCH Wellness Center, Great Clips, IMo’s Pizza, Farmers state Bank, First Mid-America Credit Union, Prescription shop, Lula Bells, Village Inn, Jerseyville United Methodist Church, super Wash, Pratt Family and Brenda schreiber.

Smoke Free Illinois Act celebrates 6th anniversary

Submitted photo

First and second grade champs, the Prescription shop players, smile for the camera and include, left to right, Laura Lei Hewitt, Jaiden thaxton, Bayle Jones, Katlyn springer, nevaeh Hoots, eliva Flowers, Lyric Cobb and Coach sarah springer.

Submitted photo

third and fourth grade champs, Medford oil Company players, display their medals proudly and include, front, left to right, rebecca Henson, Callie McAdams, Laina Bennett and Anna Bartels. Back, left to right, Assistant Coach rich McAdams, Marissa Cox, Maddy Flowers, Allison Bowker, Hannah Henson, Mallory Darr and Head Coach Jamie Henson. All third and fourth grade players are from Carrollton.

Submitted photo

Fifth and sixth grade champs, WeBe Ink players, pose with their medals and include front, left to right, Jenna reynolds, Layna Mullink, emma reynolds, Kennedy ruyle and Katelyn Willenburg. Back, left to right, Coach robyn Klingler, Lucy Powell, Ava Uhles, Madison Gilmore, Libby Meuth and Madalyn Koster. All fifth and sixth grade players are from Carrollton.

JPRD Girls’ Basketball season complete Jerseyville Parks and Recreation Department (JPRD) hosted the championship games for the girls’ basketball season on Friday, Dec. 20 at the Susnig Center. In the first and second grade division, The Prescription Shop edged out Illini Medical Associates with a score of 18-14. In the third and fourth grade division, Medford Oil Company beat Tonsor Custom Awards and Decals with a score

of 6-2. In the fifth and sixth grade division, WeBE Ink defeated The Scheffel Companies with a final score of 20-16. The league was comprised of a total of 18 teams with approximately 170 players. For more information on future programs, please visit jerseyville-il.us/ParkRec/forms. htm, call the JPRD office at (618) 498-2222 or email jerseyvilleparkandrec@gtec.com.

This month is the celebration of the Smoke-Free Illinois Act (SFIA) which began six years ago on Jan. 1, 2008. There are currently 26 states in the United States with comprehensive smoke-free laws. Illinois was the 13th state to have a comprehensive smoke-free law which prohibits smoking in all indoor workplaces and public places. This includes bars/taverns, restaurants, private clubs, theaters, museums, schools, casinos and other enclosed public places. Smoking is also prohibited within 15 feet of entrances and exits, windows that open and ventilation intakes. By prohibiting smoking in these places, most people avoid being exposed to any secondhand smoke. This law ensures that most Illinois workers will have an environment safe from secondhand smoke. According to the Smoke-Free Illinois website, secondhand smoke is, “a mixture of the smoke given off by the burning end of tobacco products and the smoke exhaled from the lungs by smokers that contains a complex mixture of chemicals, many which are known to cause cancer.” Secondhand smoke contains more than 50 cancer-causing chemicals. In a 2006 report by U.S. Surgeon General, it is estimated that secondhand smoke kills at least 50,000 people a year in the United States who do not smoke, including about 2,000 people in Illinois. Children exposed to secondhand smoke may have an increased risk of serious respiratory problems such as asthma and respiratory tract infections, sudden infant death syndrome, low-birth-weight in infants. Secondhand smoke causes coronary heart disease, lung cancer, stroke, pneumonia and bronchitis in healthy nonsmoking adults. Everyone deserves to breathe clean indoor air. To avoid secondhand smoke, you can follow these tips: 1. don’t allow smoking in your home. If your partner smokes, encourage him or her to quit and if you have guests, ask them to smoke outside. 2. Visit restaurants and other businesses that enforce no-smoking policies. 3. Don’t allow anyone to smoke in your vehicle. 4. Choose smoke-free care facilities for children and other love ones. 5. If someone is smoking around you and you must share the same space, move as far away from them as possible. Before the SFIA, there were declines in mortality for heart disease and lung cancer. These declines in mortality continued after the SFIA was enacted. The heart disease mortality rate has declined from 453.5 per 100,000 in 2003 to 347.3 per 100,000 in 2009. The lung cancer mortality rate has declined from 103.9 per 100,000 in 2003 to 94.8 per 100,000 in 2009. Tobacco use costs the nation 200 billion annually in direct medical cost and lost productivity. Since the Smoke-Free Illinois Act went into effect, there has been a decrease in tobacco-related hospitalizations and healthcare costs, according to Smoke-Free Illinois. More than 30,200 heart disease hospitalizations among residents of Illinois are estimated to have been prevented

because of the Smoke Free Illinois Act. This has an estimated savings of $1.8 billion in hospital costs. There has also been a decline in the amount of smoking in Illinois since the SFIA went into effect. In 2003, 23.6 percent of Illinois residents smoked. The smoking rate in 2012 was 18.6 percent. The decline was most noticeable beginning in 2008 which was 21.3 percent. In Jersey County, the rate of smoking in 2009 was 22.8 percent. The number of people who called into the Illinois Tobacco Quitline continues to increase. There were 99,200 calls

in 2013. Smoking bans also have had a large effect on smoking in homes. In 2005, the percentage of smoking never allowed in home was 73 percent. In 2011, this increased to 82.3 percent. There must be “No Smoking” signs or the international “No Smoking” symbol which has a burning cigarette enclosed in a red circle with a red bar across it, it also has to be clearly posted in each public place and place of employment where smoking is prohibited by the owner, operator, manager, or any other person in charge of that place.

The sign must be placed at every entrance. All ashtrays should also be removed from any area where smoking is prohibited by this Act. Reporting a violation can be done by calling the Jersey County Health Department at 498-9565 or Illinois Department of Public Health at 1-866-973-4646 or by visiting www. smoke-free.illinois.gov. For information on quitting tobacco, contact the Illinois Tobacco Quitline at 866-QUIT-YES or 1-866-784-8937. For additional information please contact the Jersey County Health Department.

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Wednesday, January 8, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Jerseyville, Illinois

Our VIEWS

The Jersey County Journal is published weekly by Campbell Publishing Company, Inc., Bruce Campbell, president. Phone (618) 498-1234 E-mail: circulation@ campbellpublications.net

School district plans bold steps to remain afloat

Publisher and Editor: Julie Boren

The Issue: Funding a quality education system Our View: Tough decisions being made admidst tough financial climate

publisher@campbellpublications.net

Regional Editor: Robert Lyons

T

hese days it seems everyone is being asked to do more with less.

The five-year plan discussed by the Jersey School District’s board of education Monday night focused more on cutbacks and modes for survival than on painting a rosy picture of the district’s future. For several years now waning state funding has threatened the financial solvency of the district. Still, the state continues to hand down unfunded mandates, which further hinder the mission of districts across the state. Now, more than any other time in recent years, however, Jersey Community Unit School District No. 100 leaders are facing the mounting problems head-on. They are anticipating the likelihood that the state’s shortcomings will continue on into the future. After all, there hasn’t been any sign the state’s finances are about to turnaround. Jobs will likely be lost, programs may be cut. No doubt the overall product will suffer. But, that doesn’t mean the quality of what remains has to be any less. The plan presented by the district’s superintendent, Lori Hopkins, maintains a quality over quantity approach. Board members were in agreement cuts and cutbacks are necessary, but the hard part comes when they have to decide which offerings and employees will get the ax and which will remain. Feelings are going to be hurt. Lives may be altered. But, the mission must be to maintain the highest standards, for the children in the district’s sake. Hopefully, by committing to providing top-notch services, as these children move into adulthood they will be prepared to help keep the district, community and maybe even state on the right track. It may be hard for many to recognize how and why the district ended up in the mess it is in. But, it was through no fault of its own. The board members, teachers and administrators have done their best to shield the students from the mounting financial struggles. However, the results of the state’s prorated, late payments are about to be seen by everyone.

This Week's

ONLINE POLL Share your answer at jerseycountyjournal.com How did you handle the recent bout of snowy, icy roads?

Q:

A) Stayed in where it’s warm. B) Took it slow. C) Slid into a ditch/got stuck. D) Flipped on the four-wheel drive.

Results of last week's poll

jcjnews@campbellpublications.net

Assistant Regional Editor Sue Heitzig sheitzig@campbellpublications.net

General Manager and Advertising Director: Nichole Liehr nliehr@campbellpublications.net

Sports Editor: Sam Elliott selliott@campbellpublications.net

Reporters: Bob Crossen bcrossen@campbellpublications.net

A) Ready to go B) Not quite yet, but almost C) I'll still be wrapping Christmas morning This poll is not scientific and reflects the opinion of those who chose to respond

Your VIEWS Volunteers make a big difference TO THE EDITOR: I’m taking a moment to reflect on the past year and my heart is touched as I think about the amount of volunteers that make a difference in just my little part of the world. I am so thankful for those that give from their heart and wanting nothing in return. Those that go to health care/nursing facilities with the intention of making someone happy or add something to someone’s else’s day. They have always shared with me how much they receive in return. Volunteers, thanking me for "allowing them" to come to Willow Rose Rehab & Health Care and share, what a priceless treasure! So thank you, and you know who you are....those that have come to Willow Rose in Jerseyville to give of your time and talents - you have made A DIFFERENCE! You have visited, passed refreshments at a party, played in a band, sang with your church or school choir, assisted or

A bout letters to

the editor

hosted a bingo game, read to some someone, gave communion, did a church service or mass, rosary, Bible study, or prayed with someone, brought animals for us to enjoy, donated a puzzle, magazines, cards, snacks, bingo prizes, brought a Brownie/ Girl Scout troop/Boy Scout group to visit, donated a computer, a TV, helped with a service project, played games with our residents, have been a teacher that has brought your kids to interact with our residents, etc, etc, etc. You ALL make a difference in our world! Volunteers go beyond a schedule, they personally care about those around them and are challenged to go above and beyond to lighten burdens for the heavy hearted, as ours have for me! Thank you for the JOY you have brought to us at Willow Rose Rehab & Health Care in Jerseyville! We are forever grateful! CAROLYN SHORT Activity Director Willow Rose Rehab & Health Care Jerseyville, Ill.

The Jersey County Journal welcomes letters to the editor on topics of community interest. Letters should be no more than 300 words long and must be accompanied by the original signature, address and daytime telephone number of the writer. No personal attacks will be printed. Letters should be addressed to the editor and not to an individual. We reserve the right to edit for brevity and fairness and to withhold letters that are determined to be libelous or untrue.

Carmen Ensinger

Focus S

orry folks, but I really don’t want to hear about New Year resolutions, I only wish that people would put a little more focus in their daily lives. Yes, I am tired of hearing about giving up fast food, or going to the gym more often so those 20 pounds can melt off. When in all actuality, within a month’s time, I see them gorging down a Big Mac and a large fry; and the excuses about forgetting workout clothes gets old, too. Why bother? Senseless waste of time, just set goals and focus on the task. I wish that people would focus on daily tasks like driving. The left lane on the highway is used as a passing lane! We cannot utilize that lane for what it is intended because someone decides to be inconsiderate or day dreaming. Now that the speed limit has increased to 70 mph, this should be really interesting. Just pray there is no road rage. Focus people. I won’t mention the establishment, but as I was helping someone into a handicap restroom I noticed the toilet paper dispenser was completely on the opposite far wall where the handle bar should be. Good thing I reminded the person to get their toilet paper before they sat down. I can only imagine how many people just assume it is placed right and don’t think about it. They sit down and cannot reach it! Sorry, but that contractor needs a do over. I hate that because I am still correcting construction problems in my home after all these years. Just focus. A topic that really bothers me, which I witnessed on one of our

coldest nights, is focus on your pets. If you brought them home then you have a responsibility and a focus for that animal. They freeze and get extremely cold just like we do. I get very upset when I see them left outside in this miserable weather when you have a warm home and even a garage that they can at least go into and get out of the cold. I call that selfish and sadistic. You know who you are! If you have an establishment that caters to the public in a bar setting, and wonder WHY your patronage has dwindled down considerably then it’s time to focus. WHY? A possibility that you still allow smoking and are too lazy to do anything about it is why the loyalty has ceased. People don’t like smelling like an ashtray! Get a clue. Very unhealthy and by the way, it is the law. I bet if you focus on this, you would probably see an increase in revenue. Lastly, and this may be a touchy subject for some but not for me. I am proud to say I am a spiritual person, a Christian, a believer. Whatever term you want me to use, yes, I believe in God. Some don’t know this about me but I was born and raised Catholic and went to Catholic school. So now you have a clue that I have had extensive religion and worship. Over the years my interest grew in different faiths. As I became of age and was able to make decisions on my own I enjoyed visiting other faiths. I tried Episcopal, Southern Baptist, and Pentecostal denominations. I was intrigued with the Episcopal, joined the youth group, and changed my faith. My total focus then was

censinger@campbellpublications.net

the Church. We grow older and life’s events change us and our focus changes, too. I began to wonder again into different faiths and beliefs, tried Guest other churches, but always a Column believer. I still BY LORI read my Bible every morning DUNSE and pray. I try to do good things daily for people and hope that I am not judged. I have an open mind to religion and this brings me to my point. Please focus on your own beliefs and don’t worry about what others believe. I have very good friends that believe and some that don’t but I cannot judge their way of thinking so I do NOT shove it down their throat! I know quite a bit about scripture but I never push it on anyone. It bothers me when people first discover Christ and they want to teach you and everyone they come in contact with. Guess what? I am so proud that you discovered your faith but please focus on that and not judge others. I have my own beliefs and no one can change that but me, and of course, the good Lord above. My New Year rant is over. I at least have one per year and it feels good to let it out! Have a blessed 2014 and wishing you all much prosperity. ––––––––––––––––––––––––– Lori Dunse is a guest columnist for the Jersey County Journal.

About me and my guitar…

Are your Christmas preparations in order? 66% 0% 33%

EDITORIAL

M

usic has provided some of the most rewarding experiences of my life. In the fall of 2013 I celebrated the 50th anniversary of the day I took up guitar playing. My first guitar was a Harmony that I got at Halpin Music early in 1964. I learned folk songs with some of my classmates at school in Ohio. We listened to popular folk groups on vinyl records, and most of the musicians were pictured with guitars having a unique logo on top. I never could read the wording clearly, but it looked like a capital R. No one in our school had that kind of guitar. We had instructional books showing where to place one’s fingers for the chords. These books were published by Mel Bay. I found out that Mel himself owned a guitar store in Kirkwood, Mo. On Dec. 31, 1965 my mother drove me to Kirkwood to look for a better guitar. I had been saving money for a long time. Mel greeted us and looked at me for about two seconds. Then he went into a closet and pulled out a guitar case that was tattered. The guitar inside had the logo on it that I was familiar with from the records. It wasn’t an “R” at all. It read “C.F. Martin.” I played it nervously for a minute or two and eagerly nodded yes. My mother wrote the check for $195. I was 16 years old, and had my first Martin Rosewood 00-21NY. Guitars came to America with the first Europeans as early as the 16th century. C. F. Martin emigrated here from Germany in 1833. America has long been a producer of great guitars with more than a hundred different companies producing thousands of designs. A person who makes guitars is called a luthier. It takes an appren-

tice luthier years to acquire the skill to make instruments by hand. Depending on how fancy the guitar, a luthier needs anywhere from three weeks to two months to make one. There are three main goals: attractiveness, good tone, and playability. Guitars that combine these three essentials are expensive. Over the years the effort to lower the cost of a good guitar has led even the great companies to outsource and mass-produce some of their instruments. Cheaper guitars have always made sacrifices somewhere in essentials. They may look pretty good, but they do not sound fine. In addition they are hard to play, creating frustrating obstacles for beginners. Today there are versions of the classic American guitars made in Mexico, Japan, and China. In these countries there are many fine luthiers, but still many instruments show poor workmanship. There is a worldwide shortage of fine wood suitable for instrument making. Cheaper wood results in inferior sound quality. Finding a good foreign-made guitar is a challenge, but a shrewd and knowledgeable player can sometimes find a gem. A few years later Mother came to my rescue again. I wanted to trade my Martin for a Rickenbacker 12 string. She offered to buy the Martin for my asking price, and my younger brothers learned to play on that fine Martin. In the mid-‘70s I was living in Chicago. I bought three Martin guitars there in a five-year period. One was almost identical to Mom’s 00-16, but in mint condition. Another was a vintage 1929 Martin 00-18 made of mahogany. There is a tragic note to this

story. During Guest the ‘90s the Column guitar bought from Mel Bay BY WAYNE was burned SCHELL up in a house fire, and the mint condition Martin I bought in Chicago was stolen from inside St. Francis Church. In the year 2000 I took the 1929 Martin to a vintage guitar dealer in Nashville. Good guitars tend to appreciate in value. I traded mine for a new Rosewood Martin 00-21 “Golden Era.” I got 10 times what I originally paid for the 1929 Martin. I call my 00-21 guitar, “Bridget,” and she is the best guitar I have ever had. Over these 50 years learning the guitar has informed how I think about teaching and learning. I understand the importance of student motivation in education. Learning guitar has provided me with a template for my teaching career. As Jersey County faces the difficult years ahead, it will be important for our community to remember something I learned through music. We benefit and prosper most when our educational experiences are those of the highest quality. As in the world of guitars, high quality education cannot be obtained on the cheap. The best thing is almost never the cheapest thing. We must be willing to make the investment in high quality. This quality might cost more in the beginning, but it will prove to be the most enduring and beneficial option in the long run. ––––––––––––––––––––––––– Wayne Schell is an attendance mentor with JCUSD 100 and a guest columnist for the Jersey County Journal.

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Postmaster: Send address changes to: Jersey County Journal, P.O. Box 407, Jerseyville, IL 62052. The Jersey County Journal is published for the whole of Jersey County. Any worthwhile program that will benefit the county will be backed by the Jersey County Journal. Jersey County Journal will always be the number one information source about the people, events, and issues of Jersey County, Illinois. We serve the Jersey County community and lead in the efforts to make it a better place to live and work. Letters to Editor policy: The Jersey County Journal welcomes letters to the editor. They must be signed, include your address and a daytime phone number. Letters without an individual’s signature will not be published. The Jersey County Journal will accept only letters to the editor that are written in good taste. Libelous remarks will not be published. The editor reserves the right to make the decision of acceptance. Letters may be edited for clarity, brevity and fairness. Opinions expressed in columns are those of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views of this newspaper.

“Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.” ~ Thomas Jefferson, 1787

2011

How to reach us: By Phone: 618-498-1234 By Fax: 630-206-0320 By Mail: 832 S. State St. P.O. Box 407 Jerseyville, IL 62052 By E-mail: jcjnews@campbell publications.net

Words to live by:

Letters to the editor can be emailed to jcjnews@campbellpublications.net

“Yesterday’s home runs don’t win today’s games.”

- Babe Ruth


FRIENDS & NEIGHBORS

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

New arrivals in 2013 Roger Elvis Pace III Jan. 11, 2013 Roger Pace Jr. and Luvinia Walz Brayden Dean Muntz Jan. 15, 2013 Jason and Crystal Muntz Aailyah Marie Vancil Jan. 29, 2013 Ryan and Stephanie Vancil Ethan Andrew Maupin Jan. 29, 2013 Jonathan and Rachel Maupin Charles James Hill Jan. 30, 2013 Matthew and Ashley Hill Wyatt James LeMarr Jan. 30, 2013 Brandan and Melissa LaMarr Ridge Clay Feb. 4, 2013 Jeremy and Emily Clay Aiden Robert Wittman Feb. 6, 2013 Matthew and Danielle Wittman Janie Marie Hagen Feb. 6, 2013 Eric and Sarah Hagen Bentley Kendrick Huber Feb. 7, 2013 Calab Huber and Kelsey Bartlett Sawyer Landon Wock Feb. 8, 2013 Marc and Danielle Wock Cooper Adam Ray Carson Gregory Ray Feb. 16, 2013 Jason and Jessie Ray

Joshua Pagel and Carol Pagel Cody Mark William Guymon April 12, 2013 Matthew Guymon and Nikki Guymon Liam Lynn Hazelwood April 14, 2013 Bill and Amy Hazelwood Ryan Aaron Wunderlin April 19, 2013 Aaron and Emily Wunderlin Eva Joann Herring April 24, 2013 Matt and Rachel Herring Colton Barrett Marshall April 26, 2013 Chris and Annette Marshall Peyton Jane Stone May 6, 2013 Justin Stone and Kayla Reef Beatrice Lee Krueger May 13, 2013 Kris Krueger and Shannon Blackorby Eve Irene Spencer May 14, 2013 Mark and Julia Spencer Kellan Ross Woolsey May 17, 2013 Adam and Marisa Woolsey Addelyn Jean Sherrill May 17, 2013 Matt and Lindsey Sherrill Tank Turner Tucker May 23, 2013 Wayne Tucker and Connie Dirksmeyer

Dominic Michael Sibley Feb. 17, 2013 Josh and Kendra Sibley

Claire Catherine Young May 23, 2013 Matthew Young and Rebecca Young

Landon Paul Brown Feb. 17, 2013 Danielle Brown

Carson Jase Hutchens May 23, 2013 Steven and Amie Hutchens

Stevie Kathryn Wilson Feb. 21, 2013 Stephen Wilson and Lindsay Griffin

Jase Wayne Lott May 25, 2013 Kyle Lott and Heather Long

Nora Jane Maness Feb. 25, 2013 Drew and Hannah Maness Hayden Lukis Hewitt Feb. 26, 2013 Heather Funk Braxtyn Evan Wellenreiter Feb. 27, 2013 Alvin and Jamie Wellenreiter Zoey Nicole Atteberry Feb. 28, 2013 Travis Atteberry and Ashley Jones Carson David Hayes Feb. 28, 2013 Joshua and Tara Hayes Kaleigh Roxann Strohbeck Feb. 28, 2013 Mark and Kristen Strohbeck Tate Ryan Valstad March 1, 2013 Derek and Elizabeth Valstad Ellie Faith Franklin March 4, 2013 Leslie and James Franklin II Khloey Elizabeth Turner March 4, 2013 Dave and Kolette Turner Jr. Reagan Sophia Grindstaff Jordan Loretta Grindstaff March 12, 2013 David and Amanda Grindstaff Keilee Jo Darlene Hardwick March 13, 2013 Aaron Hardwick and Korina Hewitt Mayson James Steinacher March 14, 2013 Matt Steinacher and Ashley Wittman Tripp Curtis-Allen Hill March 19, 2013 Shawn Hill and Morgan Bartholomew Kendall Rae Reppenhagen March 19, 2013 Nathan Reppenhagen and Nichole Plunkett Lydia Ann Kanallakan March 21, 2013 John and Amy Kanallakan Gavin Rhys Essner March 25, 2013 Scott and Sarah Essner Haley Ann Gray March 28, 2013 Jacob and Emily Gray Mason James Neunaber April 2, 2013 Brad and Susan Neunaber Jessica Lynn Crain April 7, 2013 Anthony and Taylor Crain Sophia Ann Pagel April 9, 2013

Abel Jay Huff May 29, 2013 Jeremy Huff and Amanda Needs Hadley Renee Shaw June 7, 2013 Justin and Heather Shaw Abilene Marie Bray June 11, 2013 Keith and Johanna Bray Mable Nicole Pohlman June 11, 2013 Chris and Avnie Pohlman Julia Iovinelli June 12, 2013 John and Jackie Iovinelli Maci Lynn Roberts June 13, 2013 Christopher and Brandy Roberts Trenten Tyler Edward Sawyer June 14, 2013 Mathew Sawyer and Renae Molohon Haylie Irene DeWitt Hunter Thomas DeWitt June 19, 2013 Anthony and Stacey DeWitt Kate Marie Robeen June 26, 2013 Phil and Amy Robeen Madelynn Elizabeth Baze June 26, 2013 Andy and Shanon Baze Brynn Lucille Dunsing June 30, 2013 Brian and Christa Bridgewater Hadley Jo Stice July 5, 2013 Brent and Julie Stice Brayden Lee Young July 9, 2013 Kevin and Sunshine Young Braden James Myers July 17, 2013 Amber Milburg and Jacob Myers Kinslee Alana Snyders July 22, 2013 Ashley Anderson and Jary Snyders Joseph Paul Heitzman July 31, 2013 Matthew Heitzman Jr. and Andrea Dehner Isaac Joseph Wilson July 31, 2013 Kevin and Sarah Wilson Ariel Rayne Richardson Aug. 1, 2013 Timothy and Jerri Richardson Fallyn Rae Lamb Aug. 1, 2013 Thad and Rachel Lamb Emma Paige Moran Aug. 2, 2013 Joe Moran and Kaylee Sanders Remington Jean Wadlow

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

A5

Jerseyville, Illinois

DAR announces Good STADIUM Citizen recipients

Midnight showing Thursday night!

Aug. 5, 2013 Michael and Shannon Wadlow

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Horror

“PARANORMAL ACTIVITY: THE MARKED ONES” Rated R (84 min.)

Bentley Blaze Bogard Aug. 16, 2013 Adam Bogard and Samantha Stoops Charleigh Sue Clendenen Aug. 16, 2013 Cory and Kate Clendenen Juliet Marie Frazier Aug. 17, 2013 Brent and Noelle Frazier Clayton John Jackson Daugherty Aug. 19, 2013 Christine and Daniel Daugherty Jr. Myles Andrew Schroeder Aug. 24, 2013 Steve and Carol Schroeder Quincy Lynn Crotchett Aug. 27, 2013 Seth and Erin Crotchett Weston Roy Flowers Sept. 4, 2013 Roy and Megan Flowers Anabel Marie Rojas Sept. 5, 2013 Luis and Cara Rojas Vince Elliott Ingram Sept. 5, 2013 Garrett and Mary Ingram

JOShua JORdEn Dr. Silas Hamilton Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution announce the 2013-2014 DAR Good Citizens. Members of the senior class, these students best exemplify the qualities of dependability, service, leadership and patriotism. The winners are: Lily Tepen, Jersey Community High School, daughter of Lori and Kevin Tepen of Jerseyville. She plans to major in pre-med/chemistry at University of Missouri, Columbia. Joshua Jorden, Southwestern High School, son of Tina and Jeffrey Jorden of Brighton. He is interested in civil engineering and will attend either Lewis and Clark or SIUE. Haley Rose, Brussels High School, daughter of Susan and Steve Rose of Golden Eagle. She plans to attend Maryville University to major in occupa-

Birthday

Matthew Kelly Kuhaulani Smith Jr. Chloe Marie Sue Smith Sept. 8, 2013 Matthew Smith and Beth Wiles Jarod Dean Gwin Sept. 20, 2013 Candace Green Charlie William Blackorby Oct. 3, 2013 Nick and Robin Blackorby Stella Ann Bechtold Oct. 9, 2013 Scott Bechtold and Jamie Bechtold Kara Kay Heitzig Oct. 15, 2013 Jeremy and Pamela Heitzig Oliver Adam Vetter Nov. 1, 2013 Adam and Amber Vetter Emersyn Lucielle Watkins Nov. 11, 2013 Emily Watkins Remington James Norris Nov. 11, 2013 Amber Long and Cody Norris Brenden Michael Schroeder Nov. 13, 2013 Curt and Courtney Schroeder Emmalee Tristan Grasle Nov. 13, 2013 Matthew and Jessica Grasle Oliver Troy Soehnlin Nov. 19, 2013 Josh and Robin Soehnlin Grayson Lane Grogan Nov. 23, 2013 C.J. Grogan and Miranda Kennedy Isabelle Minerva Smith Nov. 25, 2013 Paul Smith and Jessica Morgan Nolan Andrew Strang Dec. 5, 2013 Kevin and Rebecca Strang Clayton James Gerson Dec. 5, 2013 Adam and Suzi Gerson Owen Eugene Springman Dec. 16, 2013 Patrick Springman and Callie Dowland Tyler James Meyer Dec. 14, 2013 Brad Meyer and Heather Jolly Georgia Lee Jones Dec. 18, 2013 Joshua Jones and Kyra Vancil Anistyn Marie Faith Robeen Dec. 23, 2013 Andy Robeen and Ashley Fulmer Carissa Rae Sinclaiar Dec. 23, 2013 Brandon and Savannah Sinclair Riley Magilene Tinker Dec. 31, 2013 Anthony Tinker and Fawn Kitsmiller

Mya’s 1st birthday

Mya Wittlee Green, daughter of Danny and Amy Green of Jerseyville, celebrated her 1st birthday Dec. 20 with a winter “one”derland party. Mya has an older sibling, Madison, 3.

Births Riley Magilene Tinker Anthony Tinker and Fawn Kitsmiller of Jerseyville welcome a daughter, Riley Magilene Tinker, 7 lb. 3 oz., 9:06 a.m. Dec. 31, 2013, Jersey Community Hospital, Jerseyville. Elder siblings are Emily, 8, Jordyn, 6, and Samuel, 3. Grandparents are Tallauan Todd, Robert Hawkins and Steve Talley.

LiLy TEpEn tional therapy. Joseph Baalman, Calhoun High School, son of Michelle and Matt Baalman of Hardin. He has applied to Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, and plans to major in aerospace engineering. Brennan Hurley, Carlinville High School, son of Kimberly and David Hurley of Carlinville. He plans to attend Greenville College to pursue either organizational leadership or business administration. Derreck Tiburzi, Gillespie High School, son of Susan and Dennis Tiburzi of Benld. He plans to major in sports management or medicine. The students will receive their awards at the 48 annual Student Award’s night, March 10, at First Presbyterian Church, Jerseyville at 6:30 p.m. Guest speaker will be Rev. Don Stribling, pastor of Jerseyville First Presbyterian Church.

Jersey County Journal

jcjnews@campbellpublications.net

JERSEYVILLE, IL

The children of Marguerite Peters are inviting family and friends to help celebrate her 90th birthday. The celebration is being held at the First Presbyterian Church of Hardin on Saturday, Jan. 11 from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Her children include Sheila (Jim) Wilkie of Brighton, Brenda (Brian) Schreiber of Oakdale, Minn., and Curt (Cheri) Peters of Hardin. She has eight grandchildren and six greatgrandchildren. The family requests no gifts. Birthday cards can be sent to Marguerite at R.R. 1, Box 363B, Hardin, IL 62047 if you cannot come to the birthday party.

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Prizes! TRIVIA NIGHT Saturday, January 18, 2014 g!

50/50 Drawin

Game starts at 7:00 p.m. -

Grafton American Legion Banquet Hall • 14258 Senic Hill Drive Grafton, IL 62037

Limited Space Available

Register Early for $100/teams of 8 or $120 at the door. Pre-register with Susan (618)-786-3525 Please no outside beverages, snacks are welcome.Popcorn will be provided. Sponsored by: Whalen-Hill Post 648 Ladies Auxilary

“The One” Advertising Opportunity You Don’t Want to Miss

A

To learn more or to reserve your ad space, contact your sales rep or call 618.498.1234 today.

CONTACT Jack Kallal: jkallal@campbellpublications.net Julie Nash: jnash@campbellpublications.net

A Special Section From:

832 S. State Jerseyville, IL 62052 Phone: (618) 498-1234 Fax: (630) 206-0367

ADMISSION PRICES Adults - $6.00 Children (12 and under) - $5.00 Matinees (All ages) - $5.00 3-D Movies Additional - $2.00

Celebrating 90

Owen Eugene Springman Patrick Springman and Callie Dowland of Jerseyville welcome a son, Owen Eugene Springman, 6 lb. 4 oz., 7:20 p.m. Dec. 16, 2013, St. Anthony’s Hospital, Alton. Grandparents are Ronnie and Candy Dowland of Greenfield and Pat and Kathy Springman of Brighton. Great-grandparents are Jeanne Springman of Brighton and Evelyn Ingram of Alton. Lyric Robert Miller Kari and Cris Miller of Chesterfield welcome a on, Lyric Robert Miller, 7 lb. 7 oz., 2:54 a.m. Jan. 2, 2014, Jersey Community Hospital, Jerseyville. Grandparents are Judith and Brian Bartels of Fosterburg, Robert and Cynthia Miller of Carlinville and Ric and Sheila Robinson of Ohio. Greatgrandparents are Mark Miller of Carlinville, Clara Miller of Bethalto and Judy McDannold of Tennessee.

SHOWTIMES Friday - 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 Saturday - 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 Sunday - 2:00, 4:30, 7:00 Mon. thru Thus. - 4:30, 7:00

Calhoun News-Herald GREENE PRAIRIE PRESS JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

s wedding budgets continue to rise, the business opportunities for the wedding industry continue to grow. In fact, the average U.S. wedding costs over $28,000 while Canadian couples spend more than $23,000 tying the knot. As brides in our area begin planning their wedding budgets, make sure you are on their lists with advertising in our popular Weddings section. With targeted distribution to an audience of over 15,000 local households, this highly anticipated section is a resource brides will turn to again and again for ideas, inspiration and purchasing decisions.

Friday, January 10, is the last day to reserve your advertising space in Weddings. This special section will be delivered in print Thursday, January 15.

To advertise, call Jack or Julie at 618-498-1234.


A6

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

What’S HAPPENING

Saturday, Jan. 11: Retirement party for Ken Schell who is retiring from JCUSD 100. Party is at the KC Hall from 6 to 10 p.m. Everyone welcome to attend.

Saturday, Jan. 11: Elsah Community Contra Dance from 7 –10 p.m. at Farley’s Music Hall in Elsah. Live music by the Roger Netherton and Rich Egan, Calling by Karen Jackson. Sunday, Jan. 12: Knights of Columbus invites everyone to an all-you-can-eat breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday, Jan. 13: Jersey County Against Drugs coalition meeting at 1:30 p.m. at the Jersey County Health Department.

Wednesday, Jan. 15: The Mayor’s Committee for Senior Activities invites Grafton seniors to free lunch and bingo at the Grafton Methodist Church Hall at 12 noon.

JERSEYVILLE NURSING & REHABILITATION CENTER

County Health Department offering cholesterol and blood sugar testing by appointment. Call 4989565, ext. 301.

HOME OF MANY FIRSTS

Saturday, Jan. 25: Democrat Trivia Night at the KC Hall in Jerseyville. Doors open at 6 p.m.; games begin at 7 p.m. Prizes to be awarded and silent basket auction. For more information call Sandy Hefner at 498-2715.

Thursday, Jan. 16: Jersey County HCE program, “Preparing for a Nursing Home Visit,” at 1:30 p.m. at Jerseyville Manor. Call Elizabeth Schwab at 639-4192 by Monday, Jan. 13 to register.

OUR TOWN

Jerseyville, Illinois

Saturday, Feb. 1: The Kiwanis Club of Jerseyville Annual Trivia Night at the KC Hall. Doors open at 6 p.m.; games begin at 6:30 p.m. Prizes to be awarded. Bring your own snacks. Soda provided. Call Jake Slusser at (618) 9464063 to register or for more information.

Saturday, Jan. 18: A.L.A. Whalen-Hill Post 648 Grafton Trivia Night, Call Susie at 7863525 for information and reservations. Snacks welcome, no outside beverages.

Journal NOTES Rehab Wi 00 South We ONLY are 5-Star Rated by Medicare...AGAIN! Jersey County’s 5-Star Rehab Center

Thursday, Jan. 23: Jersey

SEE FOR YOURSELF @ www.Medicare.gov/nursinghomecompare

Outpatient Rehab, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech/Language, Pathology

JCHD assisting with health insurance, Medicaid applications Jersey County Department has Counselors available questions and help for health insurance

Health In-Person to answer you apply or Illinois

Medicaid through the Illinois Health Marketplace, Get Covered Illinois, at Jersey County Health Department, 1307 State Hwy 109, Jerseyville

The deadline to apply is March 31. Please call (618) 498-9565 ext. 302 with questions or to schedule an appointment.

Kid's Bash to support Jerseyville Little League Parents can take the night off and let their child spend a fun-filled night at the Friday Kid’s Bash with Jerseyville Parks and Recreation Department (JPRD). The special event will be held on Friday, Jan. 10 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Susnig Center, located at 401 Mound Street, Jerseyville. The event is open to all residents and non-residents 3rd-7th graders. Price is $10 in advance (by Jan. 9) and $15 at the door per child. A portion of the proceeds will benefit Jerseyville Little League. There

will be music, sports, snacks and most importantly FUN! Popcorn, soda and water will be included in the admission price, while supplies last. Additional concession goodies will be available for purchase. Kids will not want to miss out on this fun

jcjnews@campbellpublications.net

Individual Shower Rooms • HD Television with Satellite • Wireless Internet Access

Other Amenities Include: We are 5-Star Rated by Medicare...AGAIN!

event, so register now! For more information or to learn how to register, please visit http:// Parlor Area with Fireplace• Cozy, Intimate www.jerseyville-il.us/ParkRec/ SEE @ www.Medicare.gov/nursinghomecompare forms.htm, call JPRDFOR at (618)YOURSELF 4982222 or email jerseyvilleparkandrec@gtec.com. Only 10% of all Skilled Nursing Facilities in the State of Illinois achieve the Medicare 5-Star rating.

Dining

Services Offered

Sam Campbell

These Star ratings are based on a variety of factors and our recent Zero Deficiency Survey, along with our Quality Measures and Staffing comprise the final result...

Adaptive Equipment Cognitive Skills NW Rehab Assessment Retraining Jerseyville Nursing and Rehab is the ONLY Provides: On Angel’s Wings you were taken away, Facility in Jersey County. Home Safety Evaluation Communication Medicare rated 5-Star But in our hearts you will always stay. & Training Enhancement/Aphasia We will hear your whisper in the tallest trees, Physical Therapy, Feel your love in the gentle breeze. Wheelchair Evaluation Vital-Stim And when we find we miss you the most, Occupational For Swallowing Inside our beautiful memories Jersey County’s ONLY 5-Star Rehab Center Electrical Stimulation we will hold you close. Hand Therapy Therapy, You are an angel watching over us Ultra Sound with the comfort and blessings you bring, thehomeswithheart.com Dexterity/Coordination You embrace our hearts and hold them close, Speech/Language Balance Training/Fall Forever on Angel’s Wings ! Training Protection We love you bigger than the sky ! Pathology Neurologic Rehab

Jersey County Journal 832 S. State Jerseyville, IL 62052 Phone: (618) 498-1234 Fax: (630) 206-0367

Private & Semi Private Suites Feature:

8/15/92 - 1/13/13

Mom & Greg Alyssa Joel Kirsten Mumsy & Popsy Gamby & Haggie Gpa & Gma Angel Gpa Kenny Family & Friends Until we see you again...

Mobility/Gait Training

Thank you for reading the Jersey County Journal

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NEWS

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

B1

Jerseyville, Illinois

Claus and Paws visit Jerseyville Manor Open House

Submitted photo

Delivered

Santa, Mrs. Claus, their elf and therapy dogs visited Jerseyville Manor’s Open House on Sunday, Dec. 22. Lorene Corrigan was one of the many residents who enjoyed their visit.

RIGHT YOU

to Looking to sell your

1952 CHEVY Submitted photo

Santa and Mrs. Claus pose with Lucille Hamblen.

Bel Air? Classification 100

The People’s Marketplace.

Celebrate the new year with a great subscription rate! Don’t miss out on news, views and features you won’t find anywhere else.

Call today to subscribe!

618-498-1234 *Offer expires 1/31/14.

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Jersey County Journal 832 S. State St., Jerseyville IL, 62052 • 618-498-1234 jerseycountyjournal.com

Draw your favorite winter scene

Kids ages pre-K through 4th grade are invited to draw a picture of their favorite winter scene in the snowglobe above. There will be two catergories, Pre-K - 1st grade, and 2nd - 4th grade. One winner will be chosen in each catergory. Random submissions, along with the winning submissions, will be printed in the Jan. 29, edition of the Jersey County Journal. The deadline for submissions is Wednesday, Jan. 22, and a winner will be chosen on Jan. 24.

Please print the following information and return with the finished submission

Name:____________________________ Grade: __________ Town:______________Phone Number: __________________ Submissions can be dropped off at 832 S. State Street, or mailed to Jersey County Journal, P.O. Box 407, Jerseyville, IL 62052, Attn: Coloring. Submissions can also be scanned as a .jpg file and emailed to contests@campbellpublications.net


B2

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Jersey County police and traffic

The following police reports were filed between Dec. 30 and Jan. 3. These reports are public information and are obtained from the Jersey County Circuit Clerk’s office. All individuals listed have been arrested and charged, or cited in the case of traffic violations. All are innocent until proven guilty. The following individuals were charged with felonies: Hodgkiss, Leah M., dob 4-2396, burglary and retail theft/display merchandise. Huff, Adam E., dob 10-25-89, theft control intent prior. Seib, Adam D., dob 8-28-89, 2 counts forgery/make/alter document. Hill, Kathryn C., dob 11-25-89, 2 counts forgery/make/alter document. Talley, Darren M., dob 7-1-85, forgery/make/alter document and theft control intent person. Vega, Victoria L., dob 2-17-95, 2 counts possession amount controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of cannabis less than 2.5 grams. Antrobus, Zachary T., dob 5-1191, possession of meth and transportation of alcohol/passenger. McAdams, Adrienna E., dob 9-14-95, residential burglary, theft control intent, criminal trespass building and theft/stolen/intent. Seib, Adam D., dob 8-28-89, possession amount controlled substance and possession hypo/syringe/ needles. Ridenour, Denzil W. Jr., dob 2-24-69, aggravated DUI/3 and aggravated DUI/3+. The following individuals were charged with misdemeanors: Hill, Kathryn C., dob 11-25-89, theft control intent. Skinner, Cody D., dob 8-28-92, violate order or protection and possession of cannabis less than 2.5 grams. Enochs, Patrick M., dob 2-16-92, resisting a peace officer/corrections employee/firefighter. Powers, Kenneth N., dob 8-2982, bad checks/obtain control property. Baird, Mary Kathleen, dob 3-2157, possession of a bobcat. Robinson, Jacob Allen, dob 10-18-93, possession/hypo/syringe/

Roberts, Stanley E., dob 12-1147, registration expired. Brewer, Eron, dob 8-20-82, operating an uninsured vehicle. Nelson, Ian Spencer, dob 5-2094, driving 21-25 mph above the limit. Rathgeb, Ronald D., dob 12-348, driving 15-20 mph above the limit. McCoy, Daniel K., dob 6-22-54, operating an uninsured vehicle and registration expired. Von Nida, Jacob D., dob 1-18-91, operating an uninsured vehicle. Brunaugh, Katie B., dob 10-5-78, fail to reduce speed. Taylor, Nita B., dob 5-29-69, operating an uninsured vehicle. Scoggins, Cheryl A., dob 10-1467, operating an uninsured vehicle. Austin, Chad L., dob 2-13-79, operating an uninsured vehicle. Johnsey, Warner E. Jr., dob 6-2380, operating an uninsured vehicle. Bay, Steven J., dob 2-27-68, driving 15-20 mph above the limit. Hart, Darin J. R., dob 4-24-65, leaving the scene and fail to reduce speed. Arnett, Nichole L., dob 11-8-84, driving 15-20 mph above the limit and transportation of alcohol/driver. Hurst, Ashley R., dob 3-21-84, driving on suspended license and operating an uninsured vehicle. Vega, Victoria L., dob 2-17-95, improper traffic lane usage. Beauchamp, Stephen M., dob 4-24-80, driving 11-14 mph above the limit. Doerr, Stephanie N., dob 2-2483, registration expired. Armstead, Jeffrey A., dob 12-1756, operating an uninsured vehicle. McCalla, Michael J., dob 1-6-89, operating an uninsured vehicle. Khammanivong, Heather N., dob 6-20-88, operating an uninsured vehicle. Marshall, Denzil L., dob 12-1250, driving 15-20 mph above the limit. Cook, Thomas G., dob 8-13-48, driving 15-20 mph above the limit. Schroeder, Angela K., dob 10-2067, driving 21-25 mph above the limit. Weaver, Eura M., dob 10-3-27, fail to reduce speed.

needles. Arnett, Nichole L., dob 11-884, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of cannabis less than 2.5 grams. The following individuals were charged with ordinance violations: Blumenberg, Zachary T., dob 9-28-85, public intoxication. Cook, Zachary, dob 7-11-95, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of cannabis. Cox, Dakota M., dob 3-21-95, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of cannabis. Rowling, Richard B., dob 1-6-63, harassment by telephone. The following individuals were charged with driving under the influence: Enochs, Patrick M., dob 2-6-92. Vega, Victoria L., dob 2-17-95. The following individuals were issued traffic citations: Skinner, Cody D., dob 8-28-92, unlicensed. Ball, Justin L., dob 8-6-94, driving 11-14 mph above the limit. Hartley, Mandy L., dob 3-21-79, seat belt/passenger. Becker, Dana M., dob 6-6-82, unlicensed, no valid registration and operating an uninsured vehicle. Cope, Kelyn R., dob10-3-95, operating an uninsured vehicle. Enochs, Patrick M., dob 2-6-92, squealing/screeching tires and head/ tail/sidelight. Thompson, Stephen K., dob 6-587, operating an uninsured vehicle and registration expired. Kleinheider, Dennis G., dob 4-13-50, driving 15-20 mph above the limit. Siemer, Andrew J., dob 8-20-87, driving 15-20 mph above the limit. Coughlin, Darren C., dob 12-3166, driving 21-25 mph above the limit. Smerz, Charles A., dob 4-30-83, registration expired. Rode, Justin L., dob 1-6-87, operating an uninsured vehicle. Pillman, Chelsea R., dob 7-2791, driving 15-20 mph above the limit. Cook, Zachary A., dob 7-11-95, driving 11-14 mph above the limit. Summers, Damon P., dob 6-1493, driving 21-25 mph above the limit.

ISP announce Roadside Safety Check to be conducted the Influence (DUI). Alcohol and drug impairment is a significant factor in nearly 40 percent of all fatal motor vehicle crashes in Illinois. RSCs are designed to keep our roads safe by taking dangerous DUI offenders off the road. This project is funded through the Illinois Department of Transportation, Division of Traffic Safety.

Scheffel & Company merges with J.W. Boyle The Illinois accounting firms of Scheffel & Company, PC and J.W. Boyle & Co., LTD are pleased to announce its Jan. 1 merger with the formation of Scheffel Boyle. Both premier accounting firms have long established metro St. Louis presences with commitment to client services, as well as heavily niched service areas. The full service accounting, audit, tax, business and financial consulting firm will now have approximately 90 professionals. The merger will solidify Scheffel Boyle as the largest locally owned accounting firm in Southwestern Illinois and one of the largest accounting firms in the St. Louis metropolitan area. Scheffel Boyle will continue to have locations in Alton, Edwardsville, Belleville, Highland, Columbia, Jerseyville and Carrollton. Submitted photo “Scheffel & Company collabo- From left, Mark Glueck, principal of J.W. Boyle; Kim Loy, principal of rated with J.W. Boyle in the past Scheffel & Company; Dennis Ulrich, managing principal of Scheffel and found their exemplary work & Company. and dedication to clients to be similar to our standards. As with our ent’s accounting and tax needs, but will offer their clients 149 comfirm, Boyle provides tax, audit and understands their business. We are bined years of professional service consulting services to closely held able to provide valuable financial acumen. Scheffel Boyle will maintain its businesses and individuals, partic- and operational ideas. By merging ularly with construction, financial our practice with a firm with the status as the only St. Louis area cerinstitutions, and governments.” strength and excellent reputation tified public accounting firm that is said Dennis Ulrich, managing of Scheffel & Company, we will a member of the BDO Seidman principal of Scheffel & Company. enhance our service with more Alliance, a nationwide association “Combining our reach, resources, depth of staff and greater resources of independently owned local and and knowledge can only elevate while continuing to give our cli- regional accounting, tax, consultents individual attention and fresh ing and service firms with similar the work we do for our clients.” client service goals. Mark Glueck, principal of business insight.” Established in 1955 and 1924 For additional information J.W. Boyle added, “Our firm has always prided itself as profession- respectively, Scheffel & Company, about Scheffel Boyle see www. als who not only satisfy our cli- PC and J.W. Boyle & CO., LTD scheffelboyle.com.

JRPD celebrates the holidays Jerseyville Parks and Recreation Department (JPRD) hosted 24 participants for the Christmas Vacation trip held Friday, Dec. 27. The group traveled to St. Louis to see the matinee of “Elf: The Musical” at the Fabulous Fox Theatre. The group then enjoyed a family-style fried chicken dinner with all the fixings at Castelli’s Restaurant at 255. Before the day ended, the bus journeyed through Rock Spring Park to see the beautiful holiday lights. The department offers day trips every month, which are always open to both residents and non-residents. For more information or to learn how to register for future day trips, please visit http://www.jerseyvilleil.us/ParkRec/forms.htm, call JPRD at 618.498.2222 or email jerseyvilleparkandrec@gtec.com.

Submitted photo

The JPRD group smiles for the camera in front of Castelli’s Restaurant at 255. Front, left to right, LaVeeda and Robert James, Richard and Earlene Miller, Wilbert Sackman, Julie Giberson, Lynda Ray, Linda Sievers, Carolyn Sievers, Pat Riechman, Averyl Mueller, Cynthia Mueller, Deborah Crone and Marlene Johns. Middle row, left to right, Barbara Sackman, Andy and Therese Macias, Sylvia Hayward and Paul Riechman. Back row, left to right, Kathy Sullivan, Marie Mangrum, Judy Blackburn and Lois Meredith.

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The Illinois State Police (ISP), District 18, will conduct a Roadside Safety Check (RSC) during the month of January. The ISP has zero tolerance for impaired driving in Illinois. Officers working this detail will be watchful for drivers who are operating vehicles in an unsafe manner, driving with a suspended or revoked driver’s license, transporting open alcoholic beverages, or Driving Under

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Jerseyville, Illinois


SPECIAL

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Farming alone doesn’t always pay the bills By carmen ensinger Campbell Publications

It’s sad to say, but the days of the good old family farm where three and four generations worked the land to raise their family is all but gone. Oh, the farms are still there and so are the families, but more and more those families are having to seek out other income to survive as the land can no longer provide for their family on its own. Bob Reif of rural Carrollton is just one example of a longtime farming family who has had to diversify just to keep doing what they love. Reif is a sixth generation farmer whose family currently farms 600 tillable acres. He has been farming since he was old enough to go with his grandpa, Frank Reif, on the tractor. Reif graduated from University of Illinois in 1978 with a degree in Agricultural Economics and Farm Management and began working on the family farm along with his father and brother and raising his family. “It was just a different time back then,” Reif said. “My family and I could live on $1,500 a month, but you just can’t do that these days. A family has rent, utilities, car payments, insurance payments, etc. You are not going to see the small family farm of 160 acres that is going to be able to sustain a family like you used to because the margins just aren’t there. Instead of paying 15 cents a gallon for gas you are paying $3.” Reif supplements his farming income with a full-time job at DOT Foods, a job he began back in 1999 when the bottom fellow out of the hog market. “My brother Rodney and I had been running 250 sows on the farm and the hog market crashed,” Reif said. “You

were selling hogs for less than it cost you to produce them, so we had to figure out something else to put groceries on the table.” He began driving a truck part time for DOT Foods, and his brother,

“There is no way a farm this size could support my family and my brother’s, let alone my son’s when they got out of school.”

Bob Reif Carrollton Farmer Rodney, became a road commissioner to supplement his family’s income. This part-time job would become fulltime in 2003. “By 2003 my kids were starting to go to college. so I had tuition bills to pay because I wanted them to get their education,” Reif said. “When I sat down and penciled it out I had run 75,000 miles the year before working only part-time, so if I went to full-time I would get health insurance, which I had to pay for myself before that, paid holidays, paid vacations and got into their profit sharing and 401K retirement plan.” As much as he loved farming, it was an opportunity he just couldn’t pass up. “It was getting more and more difficult to support a family on the family farm because the expenses of just living are so much higher than they used to be,” he said. “There is no way a farm this size could support my family and my brother’s, let alone my son’s when

they got out of school.” But this is not to say the family is not still operating the family farm. Reif, his brother and his three sons all continue to operate the family farm along with holding down full-time jobs. “If a family has enough help, you can hold down a second job and still manage to get the crops in and out,” Reif said. “I couldn’t do this if the boys weren’t able to jump in and help the way they do. My son, Tim, drives for DOT Foods too, but when he is home on the weekends he and I will come out here and work long hours on the weekend getting the crops out. My other son, David, who is a teacher, comes down to help also and my other son, Greg, is here pretty much all of the time. We may get almost as many crops out on a Friday and Saturday as other farmers get out during the week because there are more of us so we can run the equipment longer hours.” In the 1980s much of the farm land was bought up by huge corporations who now rent out the land. “The price of land is so high right now that the land cannot pay for itself,” Reif said. “An acre of land in Greene County is going anywhere from $5,500 to $6,000 an acre on average, with some selling for as much as $7,000 an acre. T,he guys that are buying the land are investing money they have sitting in the bank drawing zero interest or they are using money from other land they already own to pay for it. Your average farmer is not going to be able to pay $6,000 an acre for it and make it pay for itself.” Reif said he doesn’t envision things changing anytime soon. “We would all quit everything else we are doing and just farm if we could, but the economics just aren’t there right now for our family,” he said. “The old saying, ‘you can take the boy off the farm but you can’t take the farm out of the boy’ – that is so true.”

american red cross offers tips for many dangerous winter weather conditions Reminder Comes With Forecast of Record Low Temperatures

As snow and bitter cold temperatures usher in 2014, the American Red Cross Greater St. Louis Region wants to remind residents to stay safe. “With any forecast of inclement weather, it’s important to be prepared. Know what you should do, and what items to have on hand, before the weather hits,” said Cindy Erickson, Regional CEO of the Red Cross. “But, it doesn’t stop there. Knowing what to do during the storm and how to recover are just as essential.” With a forecast of extreme temperatures, high winds and heavy snow for much of the Midwest, the Red Cross is prepared to respond. The organization is working with local partners to support warming shelters and respond to emergencies as they arise. The Red Cross recommends having the following items on hand in a convenient spot: n At least a 3-day supply of water (one gallon per person per day) and non-perishable food; n A flashlight, battery-powered NOAA Weather Radio and extra batteries; n A well-stocked first aid kit; n A 7-day supply of medications and medical items; and n Supplies for babies and pets. COLD SAFETY TIPS n Stay inside if possible. If you must

go out, wear layers of lightweight clothing to stay warm. Gloves and a hat will help prevent losing body heat. n Minimize travel. If travel is necessary, allow plenty of time to get to your destination and keep emergency supplies in the vehicle. These include a blanket, food, water, winter coat and accessories, flashlight, first aid kit and vehicle powered phone charger. n Winterize your vehicle and keep the gas tank full. A full tank will keep the fuel line from freezing. n After the storm, be extremely careful if you have to shovel snow. It is physically strenuous work, so take frequent breaks and stay hydrated. n Seek medical attention immediately if you have symptoms of hypothermia, including confusion, dizziness, exhaustion and severe shivering. n Watch for symptoms of frostbite, including numbness, flushed gray, white, blue or yellow skin discoloration, numbness, or waxy feeling skin. n Don’t forget your pets – bring them indoors. If they can’t come inside, make sure they have enough shelter to keep them warm and that they can get to unfrozen water. n Avoid frozen pipes - run water, even at a trickle, to help prevent them from freezing. Open the kitchen and bathroom cabinet doors to allow warmer air to circulate around the plumbing - be sure to move any harmful cleaners and household chemicals out of the reach of children. Keep the garage doors

closed if there are water lines in the garage. n Keep the thermostat at the same temperature day and night. Your heating bill may be a little higher, but you could avoid a more costly repair job if your pipes freeze and burst. SPACE HEATERS, FIREPLACES AND GENERATORS Heating systems are running at full force and many people are resorting to other sources to keep their homes warm. To avoid fire danger, you should remember the following: n Never use a stove or oven to heat your home. n If you are using a space heater, place it on a level, hard surface and keep anything flammable at least three feet away – things such as paper, clothing, bedding, curtains or rugs. Turn off space heaters and make sure fireplace embers are out before leaving the room or going to bed. n If you are using a fireplace, use a glass or metal fire screen large enough to catch sparks and rolling logs. n Use generators correctly – never operate a generator inside the home, including in the basement or garage. n Don’t hook a generator up to the home’s wiring. The safest thing to do is to connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator. Erickson reminds everyone: “Check in on your neighbors – especially those requiring special assistance and those living alone.”

iDnr extends controlled pheasant hunting season

The Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) has announced that the controlled pheasant hunting season has been extended at Eldon Hazlet State Recreation Area in Clinton County, the Jim Edgar Panther Creek State Fish and Wildlife Area in Cass County, and Wayne Fitzgerrell State Recreation Area in Franklin and Jefferson counties. Three days - Friday, Jan.10 through Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014 – have been added to the seasons at Eldon Hazlet and Wayne Fitzgerrell. Four days – Thursday, Jan.16 through Sunday, Jan. 19 – have been added to the season at Jim Edgar Panther Creek. Hunters are encouraged to use the online Controlled Pheasant Hunting Reservation System at http://www.dnr.illinois.gov to secure permits for these additional hunting opportunities. Reserved

permits ensure hunters will have the opportunity to hunt. Standby permits are also available at the site, although standby hunting opportunities may be limited. To access the reservation system: 1. Access the “Hunting/Trapping” drop down list from the toolbar on the IDNR Home Page 2. Then click on “Upland Game” 3. Then click on “Controlled Pheasant Areas” under the “Quick Links” heading Hunters are reminded that the daily permit fee for controlled pheasant hunting is $30 for resident hunters and $35 for nonresident hunters. The daily permit fee applies to each hunter. Reserved Permits are paid for via credit card during the application process. Completing a permit reservation online can be accomplished as late as twenty-four hours before

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an available hunt date and takes less than five minutes. Standby hunters pay daily permit fees at the site hunter check station on the hunt date. Standby hunters need to be prepared to pay permit fees with cash. Hunters without computers are encouraged to gain access to the controlled pheasant hunting online reservation system by checking with family or friends with internet access or by using a computer at their local public library.

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Jerseyville, Illinois

Farmers identify regulations as biggest threat to long-term profitability for third straight year Delegates and attendees at the 2013 Illinois Farm Bureau Annual Meeting rated government overregulation as the biggest threat to the profitability of Illinois agriculture in the next 10 years. The answer was in response to a survey of 278 delegates, alternates and other Farm Bureau members attending the meeting Dec. 7-10 in Chicago. “Once again, our members have identified government over-regulation as their biggest concern for their long-term profitability and longevity,” said newly-elected IFB President Rich Guebert. “And it’s certainly a concern that isn’t unfounded. As we move forward this year, our leadership team will be looking for ways to work with our elected representatives and government agencies to help ensure our members will be able to continue to farm efficiently and profitably, without unnecessary rules and regulations from the government.” Forty percent of respondents who answered the open-ended question named regulations, governmental entities and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as the biggest threat to profitability. This was the third consecutive year that regulations were the most-often cited response to the question.

Respondents also mentioned the following issues as potential threats to their profitability in the next decade: a combination of higher input costs and lower grain/livestock prices (32 percent); cash rents/land prices (5 percent); and lack of export demand for US-grown commodities (5 percent). When asked about their corn planting intentions for next year, nearly 82 percent who answered the question indicated their corn acreage would increase or remain the same. Nearly 51 percent of corn and soybean growers said they deliver their products directly or indirectly to the ethanol or soy biodiesel market. And 32 percent of respondents said that from a policy standpoint, the Renewable Fuel Standard has the greatest impact on their profitability. That’s nearly double the number (18.1 percent) who said the farm program has the greatest impact. When asked if they purchased crop insurance in 2013, 88.5 percent of respondents said they did so. A nearly identical number — 88.1 percent — said they plan to purchase it in 2014. The survey also gauged Farm Bureau members’ opinions on where IFB should prioritize its efforts in the next year. Completion of the farm bill

was the number-one response, followed by contesting unnecessary regulations and maintaining ethanol policy. Additionally, 71 percent said they strongly agreed with the need for farm organizations to increase non-farm consumers’ understanding of Illinois farming practices, while nearly 58 percent said they strongly agreed that consumers’ support of farming is important to the long-term success of Illinois farmers. “This is the third consecutive year we’ve done this survey and the results are always very telling,” Guebert said. “As the new president of the organization, the results will really help me and the rest of the leadership team decide which issues are most important to our members and should be pursued.” The Illinois Farm Bureau is a member of the American Farm Bureau Federation, a national organization of farmers and ranchers. Founded in 1916, IFB is a non-profit, membership organization directed by farmers who join through their county Farm Bureau. IFB has a total membership of more than 400,000 and a voting membership of more than 82,000. IFB represents three out of four Illinois farmers.

mississippi river F & W area 3rd Quarter waterfowl report The weather after last year’s overly warm season has brought this season to a screeching halt. Warm weather forecasted for this week may help change some of that but the majority of the ducks are in warmer climes. Most areas are down to two blinds or so still hunting each day. As of Dec. 9 the following data applies: Batchtown has harvested 4,599 ducks even with the long-term average. They have harvested 37.8 percent mallards, 6.9 percent gadwall, 13.6 percent green wing teal, 10.3 percent ringneck, 8.8 percent bluebills and the rest were under 5 percent. The bird per man average is 1.49 Calhoun Point has currently had its 8th best year on record. Calhoun Point has harvested 2,577 ducks which is 68 percent over their long-term average. They have harvested 51 percent mallards, 14 percent gadwall, 5 percent green wing teal, and 12 percent wood ducks, the rest were under 5 percent. The bird per man average is 1.24 The Glades has currently had its 8th best year on record. The Glades has harvested 2,681 ducks, 66 percent over their long term average. They have harvested 46 percent mallards, 16 percent gadwall, 10 percent Green wing teal, and 10 percent Wood duck, the rest were under 5 percent. The bird per man average is 1.31. Godar has harvested 4,038 ducks down 34 percent over their longterm average. They have harvested 49 percent mallards, 9.9 percent gadwall, 13 percent green wing teal, and 6.4 percent ringneck, the rest were under 5 percent. The bird per man average is 1.72. Stump Lake has harvested 3,892 ducks which is 23.5 percent over the long-term average. They have harvested 48 percent mallards, 13.7 percent gadwall, 5.2 percent pintail, 9.4 percent green wing teal, and 7.5 percent wood duck and the rest were under 5 percent. The bird per man average is 1.30. MRA totals for check station areas 17,787 ducks which is 30.3 percent over the long-term average. They have harvested 46 percent mallards, 12 percent gadwall, 11 percent green wing teal, 6 percent ringneck, and 7 percent wood duck, the rest were under 5 percent. The bird per man average is 1.41.

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View photos on the web jerseycountyjournal.com


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Wednesday, January 8, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Jerseyville, Illinois

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2003 Ford Windstar Van Green, 3.8L V6 .................................... $4,495 2002 Dodge Caravan Blue, 3.3L V6 ............................................. $4,395 2000 Pontiac Grand Prix GTP, 4 Dr, Silver, 3.8L V6 .................. $4,295 2001 Toyota Solara 2 Dr, Blue, V6 ................................................ $4,295 1994 Ford F150 PU Red, 5.0L, V8 ................................................. $3,995 2005 Mercury Montego, 4 Dr, Gray, 3.0L, V6 ............................ $3,995 2001 Ford Windstar 4 Dr, Blue, 3.8L, V6 ..................................... $3,995 2001 Dodge Dakota PU Red, 5.2L V8 ........................................ $3,995 2002 Chevrolet Venture 4 Dr, Tan, 3.4L V6 .............................. $3,995 2003 Ford Windstar 4 Dr, Van, White, 3.8L V6 .......................... $3,995 2001 Nissan Altima 4 Dr, Silver, 2.4L Cyl .................................... $3,995 2004 Ford F150 PU 2 Dr, White, 4.2L V6 ..................................... $3,895 1994 Ford F150 PU Maroon, 5.0L V8 ........................................... $3,895 2004 Ford F150 PU Red, 4.2L V6 .................................................. $3,895 2001 Chevrolet Venture Van, Tan, 3.4L V6 ................................ $3,895 2000 Dodge Intrepid 4 Dr, Red, 2.7L V6 ..................................... $3,795 1999 Pontiac Grand Am 2 Dr, White, 3.4L, V6 .......................... $3,695 2003 Ford Taurus 4 Dr, Tan, 3.0L V6 ............................................. $3,695 2003 Ford Taurus SES 4 Dr, Green, 3.0L V6 ............................... $3,695 2001 Pontiac Montana 4 Dr, Blue, 3.4L V6 ................................ $3,495 1994 Mitsubishi 3000 GT 2 Dr, Black, 3.0L, V6 ......................... $3,495 1993 Ford F150 Ext. Cab PU, Silver & Gray, 5.8L V8 ............... $3,395 2003 Ford Taurus 4 Dr, Green, 2.4L V6 ........................................ $3,395 2004 Cadillac Deville 4 Dr, Silver, 4.6L V8 ................................. $3,298 2002 Pontiac Aztek 4Dr, Blue, Awd, 3.4L, V6 ............................ $3,295 1999 Chevrolet Malibu 4Dr, Silver, 2.4L 4 Cyl .......................... $3,295 1999 Ford Taurus Green, 3.0L V6 ................................................. $3,295 1995 Chevrolet Suburban 4 Dr, Green, 5.2L V8....................... $3,295 1999 Chevy Cavalier 4 Dr, Gold, 2.2L 4 Cyl ............................... $3,195 1998 Lincoln Continental, 4 Dr, Beige, 4.6L, V8 ...................... $2,995 1998 Ford Explorer, 4x4, 4 Dr, Green, 4.0L, V6 ......................... $2,995 2000 Pontiac Montana, 4 Dr, Maroon, 3.4L, V6 ....................... $2,995 1997 Ford Taurus 4 Dr, Gold, 3.0L V6 .......................................... $2,995 2002 Chevrolet Malibu 4 Dr Gold 3.1L V6................................. $2,995 2000 Chevy Malibu 4Dr, Brown, 3.1L V6 .................................... $2,995 2000 Pontiac Montana 4Dr, Maroon, 3.4L V6 ........................... $2,995 1998 Ford Explorer 4Dr, Green, 4x4, 4.0L V6 ............................ $2,995 1998 Ford Windstar 3 Dr, White, 3.0L V6 ................................... $2,795 1997 Ford Expedition 4Dr, White, 4x4, 4.6L V8 ........................ $2,495 2000 Daewood Nubira 4Dr, Maroon, 2.0L, 4 Cyl...................... $2,495 1997 Dodge Intrepid 4 Dr, Dk Blue, 3.5L V6 ............................. $2,495 1992 Buick Century 4 Dr, Blue, 3.3L V6 ...................................... $2,395 1998 Ford Taurus 4 Dr, Gold, 3.0L, V6 ......................................... $2,295 1995 Chevrolet Corsica 4Dr, Blue, 2.2 4 Cyl .............................. $1,995 1994 Dodge Ram 1500 PU, Red, 5.2L, V8................................... $1,995 1995 Dodge Ram 1500 PU, Red, 5.9, V8 ..................................... $1,995 1990 Dodge D150 PU, White, 5.2L, V8 ........................................ $1,495 1988 Ford F250 PU, Gray, 5.8L V8................................................. $1,395 1992 Acura Vigor 4 Dr, Gray, 5 Speed, V6 .................................. $1,195 1995 Pont. Grand Prix 2 Dr, Red, 3.1L, V6 ..................................... $1,195

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1499 South State Street, Jerseyville, IL 62052 Daytime # (618)498-4028


Wednesday, January 8, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

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Jerseyville, Illinois

Battling through blizzard-like conditions

Bob Crossen/Jersey County Journal Andy Macias for the Journal

Street department foreman John Miles clears snow from the roadway Sunday on State Street in Jerseyville.

Jarred Dunn, left, and Leah Schwandt, right, walk their dogs, Hunter, a pitbull mix on the left, and Sadie, a Siberian huskey on the right, in the snow Wednesday morning in Jerseyville. They said the dogs have a lot of energy to burn by walking and if they don't release some energy outside, the two get riled up indoors.

Robert Lyons/Jersey County Journal

Dean Long, of Long Paving, dumps a load of snow onto mounting pile on Exchange Street Tuesday in Jerseyville.

Submitted photo Andy Macias for the Journal

Robert Lyons/Jersey County Journal

Daren Howland, street department mechanic, makes an adjustment Sunday to one of the city of Jerseyville's snow plows.

Kathy Arnold takes her two dogs, Phoophy and Rascal, for a walk Tuesday afternoon on a snow-covered sidewalk in Jerseyville.

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Bundled up to fight the cold and the wind, Floyd Alexander plowed snow around his neighborhood to help those who had difficulty shoveling the large snow piles.


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Wednesday, January 8, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

OBITUARIES

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JERSEYVILLE TOWN HALL MEETING

Mildred Yaeger

E. Neil Carrico

Mildred E. Yaeger, 83, of Jerseyville died at 4:30 a.m. Monday, Jan. 6, 2014 at Jerseyville Nursing and Rehab. She was born in Milford, Ind., on May 4, 1930, the daughter of the late Earnest and Ruth (Pifley) Zimmerman. She married Arthur “Red” Yaeger on July 2, 1946. He preceded her in death on July 6, 1983. Mildred was a bartender for the Alton Motor Boat Club and worked at the Harms A & W Root Beer in Alton. She was active with the VFW Ladies Auxiliary, the Hope Center in Cottage Hills, and Worden Methodist Church. She also loved playing Bingo. She is survived by her son, Jim (Bonnie) Yaeger of Godfrey; a daughter, Nancy (Danny) Trask of Jerseyville; four grandchildren, Jason (Mandy) Terpening, Kristen (David) Gardener, Lauri (Brian) Waters, and Rishan and her son, Sam Towse ; numerous greatgrandchildren and great-great grandchildren; one brother, Ray Zimmerman of Alton; along with several nieces and nephews. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by two brothers, Richard and Harley Zimmerman; and one sister, Francis Patchet. Visitation will be from 10 a.m. until service at 12 p.m. Friday, Jan. 10 at Elias, Kallal, and Schaaf Funeral Home in Godfrey with Pastor Don Long officiating. Burial will follow at Valhalla Memorial Park in Godfrey. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Community Hope Center of Cottage Hills or the Jerseyville Nursing and Rehab. Elias, Kallal and Schaaf Funeral Home in Godfrey is in charge of arrangements. Online condolences and guest book may be found at www.eliaskallalandschaaf.com

Everett Neil Carrico, 93, of Jerseyville died at 11:05 a.m. Friday, Jan. 3, 2014, at Jerseyville Nursing and Rehab Center in Jerseyville. Born June 14, 1920, in rural Kane, he was the eldest child of Everett Sylvester and Olive Inez (Hetzel) Carrico. He was a 1938 graduate of Carrollton High School, and attended the Chicago Art Institute before moving to Hardin. Mr. Carrico married the former Betty Jean (Rastello) Carrico on Sept. 17, 1943, in Hardin, and she survives in Carrollton. The couple later divorced. They are the parents of one daughter, Sue Ellen (Carrico) Houseman of Carrollton. Later, Mr. Carrico married the former Arbedella Kallal and she survives in Jerseyville. In 1947, Mr. Carrico moved to Carrollton where he owned and operated Carrico’s Music Store and Carrico’s Variety Store until 1958. He was very active in the Democratic party, running for the Illinois State Senate in 1970. For many years, he was an accomplished sign painter and real estate broker at Carrico Agency in Carrollton, having sold real estate for over 50 years, retiring in 2012. He loved to fish, play golf and go pheasant hunting in South Dakota. Mr. Carrico was a member of First Baptist Church in Jerseyville, a former charter member of the Carrollton Community Chorus, and 70-year-member of the Kane Masonic Lodge. Other survivors include one grandson, Dustin James Houseman of Troy; one sister, Ethel Hartnett of Sarasota, Fla.; one stepdaughter, Laura (Whitehead) Rider of Alton; three great-grandchildren, Jordyn Lynn Houseman of Carlinville, Logan and Addison Wood of Godfrey (along with their mother, Corisa Wood); two nieces, Debbie (husband Steve) Trochuck of Jerseyville, and Dana (husband Clayton) Hildred of Decatur; two nephews, Neil (wife Bev) Schofield of Alton and Douglas (wife Kathy) Carrico of Kane; mother-in-law, Josie Kallal of Jerseyville; two brothers-in-law and four sisters-inlaw, Donna Carrico, Jacob “Jack” and wife Sharlene Kallal, Nadene and husband Duane Fink, all of Jerseyville, and JoAnn Lyles of St. Louis. Mr. Carrico was preceded in death by his parents; one brother, Daniel “Danny” Carrico; one nephew, Richard L. Schofield Jr.; a grandson, Greg Wood; and three brothers-in-law and one sister-inlaw, Richard Schofield Sr., Charles Hartnett and Valentine and Rosie (Rastello) Kallal. Visitation was from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 8, at AirsmanHires Funeral Home in Carrollton, with Masonic rites at 1 p.m. by the Stuart E. Pierson Lodge No. 50, AF & AM. Funeral services followed Masonic rites with the Rev. Ed Haun, former pastor of First Baptist Church in Jerseyville, officiating. Interment followed in Kane Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the Logan and Addison Wood Trust Fund or to Blessing Hospice. Condolences may be left online at www.airsman-hires.com.

Christy Mohr Christy Mohr, 55, of Jerseyville died Monday, Jan. 6, 2014 at St. Louis University Hospital in St. Louis, Mo. Arrangements are pending at Crawford Funeral Home in Jerseyville.

M. Beverly Morrison-Phillips M. Beverly Morrison-Phillips, 71, of Alton died at 8:10 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014 at her home. She was born Aug. 5, 1942, in Alton, daughter of the late Lawrence and Marjorie (Harmon) Morrison. She retired from Illinois Public Aid and was a school teacher in the Alton School District. Survivors include a daughter, Margie Phillips of Alton and fiancé, Larry LaBrot; sons, Don and Donna Phillips of Fieldon and David L. and Lisa Phillips of Jerseyville; three grandchildren; one great-grandchild; sisters, Janet and Richard Gilworth of Jerseyville, Barbara Scott of Kirkwood, Mo., Carol and Tom Vogel of St. Louis, Mo., Karen and Pat Heitzig of Alton, and Patty and Bob Wetzel of Tennessee; sisters-inlaw, Joyce Morrison of Fieldon and Beverly Morrison of Taylorville; and a brother-in-law, Gene Parsell of Jerseyville. She was preceded in death by her parents; brothers, Lawrence Gary Morrison and George Morrison; a sister, Connie Parsell; and a brother-inlaw, Sam Scott. Visitation was from 10 a.m. until time of funeral services at noon Wednesday, Jan. 8, at Alexander and Gubser Funeral Home in Jerseyville. The Rev. Larry Hayes officiated. Burial will take place in Gunterman Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be given to the Gunterman Cemetery.

Kenneth Gilliland Sr. Kenneth G. Gilliland Sr., 89, of Grafton died Sunday, Dec. 29, 2013 at his residence. He was born Dec. 25, 1924. Graveside service was at 10 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 4, at Scenic Hill Cemetery in Grafton. Crawford Funeral Home in Jerseyville was in charge of the arrangements.

Stephen Kochanski Stephen Peter Kochanski, age 58, died suddenly on Jan. 1, 2014. Beloved husband of Carol (nee Hensler), loving stepfather of Jennifer (Jay) White, proud “PaPa” of Jack; dear brother of Tony, Jr. (Mitzie), Don (Rose,) Theresa (Jim) Davidson, Robert, Jerry (Rachel), and Kathy (Bill) Anderson, and nieces and nephews who loved him very much. Funeral services were handled by Stygar Family of Funeral Services in Cottleville, Mo.

Ruth Ann Schudel Ina Mary Scoggins Ina Mary Thompson Scoggins, Simpkins 88, of Jerseyville died at 11:50 p.m. Ruth Ann (Schudel) Simpkins, 74, of Kirkwood, Mo., former Calhoun County resident, died at 6:38 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014 at the Bethesda Dilworth Hospice Care in Webster Groves, Mo. She was born in Alton on Dec. 10, 1939, one of two daughters born to the late Walter L. “Pat” and Margaret (Byrd) Schudel. Ruth and her sister, Patsy, had a wonderful childhood growing up south of Hamburg near aunts, uncles and cousins, along with their parents on the family farm. She attended Oak Grove School, a one-room schoolhouse, and graduated with the Class of 1957 from Hardin High School. She received her Bachelor of Science degree in Education from Western Illinois University in Macomb in 1960. Professionally, she taught Home Economics at Bowen High School, where she met a science teacher named Jon Simpkins. The two married on Aug. 7, 1966 at the First Presbyterian Church in Hardin, and his death occurred on July 27, 1986. Following the birth of her children, Ruth raised her children in Princeton, Ill., where she was employed for many years as a bookkeeper at Citizens Bank. Later in life, she became a sorority house mother at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. She loved and nurtured her children, and was delighted that each of them have earned a college degree. Her purpose in life was her devotion to her children. Some of her favorite activities included homemaking, shopping, antiquing, gardening, sewing, cooking, watching football games, caring for her cat, and adoring her precious grandchildren. Surviving are her children and their spouses, Patrick Simpkins of Plainfield, Kirk and Amy Simpkins of Webster Groves, Mo., Erich and Karen Simpkins of Collierville, Tenn., and Elizabeth Ann “Betsy” Simpkins of Kirkwood, Mo.; four grandchildren, Margaret Grace, Mary Alice, Jon Grayson, and Anna Claire; along with her beloved sister and brother-in-law, Margaret Jo “Patsy” and William Halemeyer of Fieldon; and three nieces, Annette, Jane and Sarah. Visitation was held from 9 a.m. until time of funeral services at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 7 at the Hardin Presbyterian Church with the Rev. Paul D. Frazier officiating. She was laid to rest alongside her parents at the Dayton Cemetery in rural Eldred. In lieu of any flowers and plants, the family would prefer memorials to the First Presbyterian Church in Hardin. A luncheon will be served at the church immediately following the graveside services, and all relatives and friends are welcome. Crawford Funeral Home in Jerseyville is in charge of the arrangements.

Monday, Jan. 6, 2014 at Jerseyville Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. She was born in Hillview on May 30, 1925, one of 11 children born to the late Elmore and Melissa (Shaw) Smith. She first married Louis Thompson on May 12, 1945 in Springfield, and together they had three children and just celebrated their ninth wedding anniversary when he died on May 18, 1954. She then married Lumie Scoggins and Feb. 2, 1967 in Jerseyville, and they shared 32 years together before his death on March 11, 1999. Surviving are a son and daughter-in-law, Gary and Shirley Thompson of Jerseyville; two daughters and a son-in-law, Mary Lane and her companion, Johnny Scoggins of Medora, and Rita and Robert Wilson of Jerseyville; eight grandchildren, Angela Pannell of Jerseyville and Robert Pannell of Cedar Hill, Mo., whom she raised; Tamra Taylor of Jerseyville, Louis Thompson of Wood River, Guadalupe Pannell of Jerseyville, Mellisa Cullum of California, Heather Cummings of Bunker Hill, and Chad Austin of Jerseyville; 22 great-grandchildren; nine greatgreat grandchildren; and a sister, Alma Stipp of Granite City. In addition to her parents and husbands, she was preceded in death by a son-in-law, LeRoy A. Lane on June 2, 2004; two sisters, Mae Alexander and Hannah Long; and seven brothers, Rufford, Troy, Matthew, Collin, Lloyd, Ivan, and an infant brother, George. Visitation will be from 4 p.m. until time of funeral services at 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 9 at Crawford Funeral Home in Jerseyville. Jeffrey Vogelzang and Nathan Pedigo will officiate. She will be laid to rest alongside her first husband at the Joe Brunk Cemetery in Rochester. Memorials may be given to the Jerseyville Public Library.

Card of thanks

Words cannot express my gratitude to those who have remembered me during my recuperation from an early December car accident and the untimely death of my mother, Joyce Michelich on December 17. It has been a very difficult time but the cards, visits and phone calls have helped tremendously. To those who listen to me on WJBM, I hope to return very soon. The Jersey County community embraced me when I moved here in 1996 and has continued to do so since then. I appreciate each and every one of you. Jill Boomer

Meet Erika Harold

Republican Candidate for Congress

Miss America 2003, Lawyer, Constitutional Conservative Hear Erika’s vision for strengthening our district and talk to her about her views on key issues. WE D N E S DAY, JAN UARY 15

6-7 PM Meet Erika and enjoy light

refreshments

7-8 PM Open questions from the

community

Jersey County Courthouse

For more information contact the campaign at: erikaforcongress@gmail.com erikaharold.com • 877-598-9735 Paid for by Erika for Congress

Thank You! FROM THE

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Thank you to everyone for your donations to Coats for Kids. Your donations will help children in need stay warm this winter.

Sign up for our NEW Freida Street Freida Mae Street, 71, of Shipman and formerly of Cottage Hills, died at 3:56 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 28, 2013 in Shipman at the home of her son and daughterin-law. She was born on Dec. 9, 1942, in Greene County, the only child born to the late James Jefferson and Stella (Vickroy) Lair. She and her husband, Franklin D. Street, shared many years together and raised their family in their home in Cottage Hills. Surviving are two daughters and a son-in-law, Renee Robinson of Alton and Michelle and Michael Lane of Mesa, Ariz.; two sons and daughters-in-law, Franklin and Angela Street Jr. of Meadowbrook and Jeff and Wanda Street of Shipman; along with six grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents and her husband, Franklin Street in 1999. Graveside services were conducted at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 31 at the Valhalla Memorial Gardens in Godfrey, with the Rev. Jon Sander officiating. Crawford Funeral Home in Jerseyville was in charge of those arrangements.

News Update emails Go to jerseycountyjournal.com to join us.

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Wednesday, January 8, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Jerseyville, Illinois

C3

WHAT'S HAPPENING AROUND

Serving the Tri-County Area Flooring Needs For 40 Years! 1672 South State Street Jerseyville, IL 62052 618-639-9858


Wednesday, January 8, 2014

caMPbell PublicaTions

C LASSI FI E DS The People’s Marketplace

Reaching 75,000 Readers Each Week! P.O. Box 367, Hardin, IL 62047 Ph: 618-576-2345 Fax: 618-576-2245

E-Mail: cnhnews@campbellpublications.net

Monday & Tuesday 9 a.m. - 4 p.m., Friday 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

P.O. Box 70, Pittsfield, IL 62363 Ph: 217-285-2345 Fax: 630-206-0320 E-Mail: ppnews@campbellpublications.net 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Friday

GREENE PRAIRIE PRESS

Scott County Times

Mon., Tues. & Fri.: 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Ph: 217-742-3313 • Fax: 630-206-0320 E-Mail: sctnews@campbellpublications.net Monday 9 a.m. - noon; Friday 9 - 11 a.m.

P.O. Box 265, Carrollton, IL 62016 Ph: 217-942-9100 Fax: 630-206-0367 E-Mail: gppnews@campbellpublications.net

JERSEY

COUNTY

832 South State, Jerseyville, IL. 62052 Ph: 618-498-1234 • Fax: 630-206-0367 E-mail: jcjnews@campbellpublications.net

8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Friday

P.O. Box 138, Winchester, IL 62694

• • • • • •

100 Automotive * 200 Business* 210 Church Services 220 Collectibles* 300 Farm Market* 400 For Rent* A: Calhoun County B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County F: Miscellaneous • 500 For Sale* • 600 Help Wanted* • 610 Hobby Shop/Handicrafts*

The Weekly Messenger

Pleasant Hill, IL 62366 Ph: 217-285-2345 • Fax: 630-206-0320 E-Mail: wmnews@campbellpublications.net

*Certain classifications of ads appearing in The People’s Marketplace also appear on www.pikepress.com on the Internet at no additional charge.

400d foR ReNT Pike county

900A No TReSPASSINg calhoun county

Two BedRoom mobile home in rural Pittsfield. Griggsville school district. No smoking. No inside pets. Deposit required. 217-8332015. 1.8

No TReSPASSINg On Jack and Mary Jeaen Aderton properety in Hardin. 5.1.14

THe TRAdINg PoST 501 E. Prairie St., Jerseyville, IL. Open Monday - Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Over 7,000 sq. ft. of clean furniture, appliances, sporting goods and tools. Plus 2000 smalls @ $2.00 or less! We buy full or partial estates/households of GOOD, CLEAN furniture and appliances. Why buy new when "slightly used" will do? For more information, call: 618-639-4569. TFN colmAN'S coUNTRy cAmPeRS 2013's on sale. Big discounts. Sales, service, parts, propane. #2 Fun St. Hartford, IL 62048. 618254-1180. www.colmanscampers.com. TFN If yoU Need PARTS for your mowers and tillers, Dorsey's Hardware and Western Auto have a large selection of belts and parts service and new equipment sales available. Winchester. 217-742-9241. TF 2012 moBIle Home STImUlUS PAckAge: up to $25,000 for your trade in. Discounts for land owners. Financing available. Prequalify by phone 314-5627459. tf SellBeST, 110 W. Quincy St., Griggsville: Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Quality Used Furniture & AppliancesWashers, Dryers, Freezers, Fridges, Microwave, Electric Stoves, Twin, Full, Queen Beds, New Mattress Sets, Bedroom Furniture, Tables & Chairs, Upholstered Furniture, Tools, T.V.s, Stereos. Everything for the home and you! Call 217-2422252.TF dIAmoNd TRAIleR saleswe buy used campers new campers & toy haulers by Keystone RV Co. Pre-owned campers; RV parts & service. We also stock a large selection of RV accessories for all your camping needs. Located at 1117 N. Old Rt. 66, Litchfield. 217-324-2452, www.diamondtrailer.com. TFJCJ

2 BR HoUSe for rent No smoking No pets. Security deposit required. 217-2854502. TF 1 ANd 2 BR apartments available. No smoking. No pets. Security deposit required. 217-285-4502 TF

900c No TReSPASSINg Jersey county

offIce SPAce Prime location. Ample parking. West Washington St., Pittsfield. Call 217-285-2848 or 217285-5925. 2.12 Newly Remodeled office space on the square in Pittsfield. For more information, call 217-473-8811. TF 2 BedRoom trailer for rent in Pittsfield. Call 217-2854674, leave message, or call 217-491-0088. TF 2 ANd 3 BR mobile homes for rent in Griggsville. Lyndle Ellis. 217-833-2107. 1.30

doN'T PAy high heating bills eliminate them with an outdoor wood furnace from Central Boiler Call Today. 217-236-3022.TF SHePPARd elecTRoNIcS 1402 Lakeview Heights, Pittsfield, IL. 217-285-2893. Cell: 217-248-1188. LG TV sales and service. 3D and smart TVs, Blu Ray DVD players,32-55" TVs. Metal detectors, new & used, very good prices, Whites and Garrets. New and used CB's & antennas, Uniden Police scanners also for sale. FREE DVD OR SOUNDBAR WITH tf EACH TV ABOVE 32".

AlSey BAPTIST cHURcH is looking for a pastor. If you feel God is leading you to us, please call Chuck at 217370-4264 for more information or send resume to ABC; POB 175; Alsey, IL 62610. God Bless. 1.8

300 fARm mARkeT JoHN deeRe 7810 175 hp, 1997, 2268 hours, kept in shed, front wheel drive, 16 speed power quad, 3SCV, 18.4x38 radial duals, 12 front weights, excellent condition. $72,500. 217-3580-1334. 1.15 BUSH Hog 2715 Rotary Mower, excellent condition, kept in shed. $9,250. 217358-1334. 1.15 dmI ecolI TIgeR 527B Yield till system, 14' wide, 2 gangs disks, 1 gang shanks on back, excellent condition, rarely used, kept in shed. 217-358-1334. 1.15

SeARcHINg foR prime farmland to lease for turkey hunting rights. Any size acreage considered. We are not an outfitter and only leasing for our own personal use. Ref. available. 937-2140460. 3.26.14 lookINg To leASe hunting ground. Short term or long term. 618-550-9406.

TF

femAle BoRe goATS for sale and pigme goats for sale. 217-734-1811. TF

400A foR ReNT calhoun county 3 BR 2 bath house. Full basement, in the country outside of Kampsville, IL. No pets: Call 217-370-7310. 1.22 APARTmeNT foR rent. Call Matt 618-576-2766 or 618576-2449. TFCNH commeRcIAl BUIldINg for rent. Hardin, IL. Call (618)498-1234 and ask for Business Department. TF

HoUSe foR SAle: 4 Excellent starter home for a single person or a couple in a small rural community with excellent neighbors. 918 square feet cozy home is situated on a large lot. If interested, please call 1-217-242-7262. tf

Home foR SAle: Winchester, 229 N. Walnut St. 3 BR/1 Bath Single family. 1,728 sq. ft. Nice lot. Lease or cash. $500 down or 223 per month. 877-5190180. 1.29

wANTed: HelPeR for a DORS client in Pittsfield. Must be dependable, nonsmoker, with reliable transportation and be willing to start right away if hired. 217-491-0383. 1.8

1500 yARd SAleS

2.27.14

deeR HUNTeRS: Rent Pittsfield country home away from home. 3 BR, sleeps 6+, fully furnished, move-in ready. 573-549-2530. Cell: 636-358-6994. TF

PoST Hole Farm Star auger, 3 point connect, 12" diameter, 4' long, excellent condition, $425. 217-3581334. 1.15 6 BRANd New John Deere front weights for a John Deere tractor. 6-66 1/2 steels posts for sale. 217-734-1811.

lARge, New beautiful home near Summer Hill for sale with 19 1/2, acres, a finished basement, pond, in-ground pool, attached and detached garage with living quarters in the back of it, pull barn and much, much more. Please call 217-473-8811 for more information. tf

700 loST/foUNd foUNd: Female pup (4-5 mos. old); reddish in color; 10-12 inches tall, no collar. Possible cross between Retriever and lab. Friendly and clean, would like to be home for New Years! Call David or Charlotte Hamilton. 217-285-6117. TF

900A No TReSPASSINg calhoun county

ABSolUTely No TReSPASSINg on the property of Lloyd and Debbie DeSherlia in Batchtown. Violators will be prosecuted. 8.7.14 No TReSPASSINg on Marty Aderton property in Hardin. 7.14.14

Need exTRA cash? Sell your used items in The People's Marketplace Classifieds. One phone call puts your ad in six newspapers....a total circulation of almost 22,000 readers! Plus your ad will be put online for FREE!

individual or entity. All advertisements are accepted and published by the newspaper upon the representation that the agency and/or advertiser will indemnify and hold harmless the newspaper from any loss or expense, including the cost of defense and any settlement and/or judgment resulting from claims based upon the contents of any advertisement, including claims or suits for defamation, libel, violation of right of privacy, plagiarism or copyright infringement. All advertisements created by the newspaper are not considered a “work made for hire” and the newspaper retains the copyright to all advertisements created by the newspaper for the advertiser. The advertisement may not be reproduced without the written permission of the newspaper. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination, in the sale, rental or financing of housing. In addition, the Illinois Human Rights Act prohibits discrimination based on age, ancestry, marital status, or unfavorable discharge. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which violates the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call the Chicago area Fair Housing Alliance toll free at 1-800-659-OPEN.

CLASSIFICATIONS

• 615 Hunting • 620 Kids For Hire • 700 Lost/Found • 710 Meeting Reminders • 800 Miscellaneous* • 900 No Trespassing A: Calhoun County B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County • 1000 Pets* • 1100 Real Estate* A: Calhoun County B: Greene County

• • • • •

C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County 1200 Services* 1300 Wanted* 1310 Web Sites* 1400 Work Wanted 1500 Yard Sales A: Calhoun County B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County

TUESDAY, JAN. 21, 2014 @ 10 A.M.

Hardin, IL

Call (618) 498-1234 and ask for Business Department

Worrell-Leka Land Services, LLC 2240 W. Morton Jacksonville, IL 62650

SATURDAY, JAN. 25, 2014 @ 10 A.M.

FOR RENT STORAGE BUILDING

3x3

WINCHESTER

No TReSPASSINg on any and all land owned by Double Creek Farms, Inc. TF

1300 wANTed

615 HUNTINg

Contact Darrell Moore (217) 473-5486 darrellm@worrell-leka.com

900d No TReSPASSINg Pike county

1100e ReAl eSTATe Scott county

600 HelP wANTed

Potential for Climate Controlled Storage Units 1 Currently used as Storage Unit

PRIvATe PRoPeRTy No hunting or trespassing on any property owned by the Charles Rothe family in Jerseyville, Illinois, in Jersey County. Violators will be prosecuted. 12.19.14

1100d ReAl eSTATe Pike county

500 foR SAle

Business Opportunity In Winchester

CALL (217) 285-2345 TO ADVERTISE WITH US!

200 BUSINeSS

No TReSPASSINg no hunting on property owned by Martha Knight (also known as Marty Aderton), Lincoln Valley Road, Hardin. 11.11.14

THE PEOPLE'S MARKETPLACE

1986 dodge Ram 1/2 ton, short bed pickup, 2 wheel drive, V-8 Automatic. Daily driver. 217-285-5116. 1.15

INFORMATION

Commercial Building for rent

Commercial Buildings For Sale

Great Auctions Start Here! The People's Marketplace Classifieds

100 AUTo

GENERAL

DEADLINES: Classified ads, Monday 3:30 p.m. (For placement and for cancellation.) CLASSIFIED RATES: First insertion, 25¢ per word, minimum $6. Consecutive repeat insertion, 15¢ per word, minimum $5. Prepayment is required. Any change in original ad will be considered start of a new ad. Blind Ad, $4 service charge, plus postage if replies are to be mailed. Yard Sales, $6 up to 20 words. No Trespassing notice, one year, up to 20 words, $60. ADVERTISING POLICY The following are policies of: Calhoun News-Herald, Greene Prairie Press, Jersey County Journal, Pike Press, Scott County Times and The Weekly Messenger: We are not responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of display and classified advertising. One free insertion will be allowed for a classified ad with a significant mistake. Please let us know immediately. The newspaper reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement submitted for publication. All classified ads are payable in advance. Proper identification is required of persons placing ads. A F.O.I.D. card will be asked for when selling a firearm. No exceptions will be allowed. Newspaper reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including the right to do so after the ad has been accepted for publication but before publication occurs. The advertiser’s sole remedy for such refusal shall be the refund of the funds paid to purchase the ad. Advertisements are accepted by the newspaper upon the representation that the agency and/or advertiser is authorized to publish the contents and subject matter of the advertisement and that it is not libelous or does not infringe on the privacy of any

4 x 3.5

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CALHOUN NEWS-HERALD

The PeoPle’s MarkeTPlace classifieds

CALL 618-498-1234

Ask for Jane

THE BIGGEST MALL 73%

of adults regularly/occasionally shop by reading newspaper advertising inserts.

I L L I N O I S C L A S S I F I E D A D60% V EwithRtheTnewspaper. ISING NETWORK of adults prefer that advertising inserts be delivered

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ADVERTISING SERVICES Need to place your ad in more than 300 newspapers throughout Illinois? Call Illinois Press Advertising Service 217-241-1700 or visit www.illinoispress.org

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CAREER/EDUCATION AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE BECOME AN AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECH. FAA APPROVED TRAINING. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL AIM 800-481-8312.

of adults prefer to receive coupons in newspaper inserts, more than all other media combined.

of adults used a newspaper insert in the past month. 67% clipped and saved a coupon 59% used it to compare prices 52% saved an insert until they visited a store 43% used a special ad, sale or promotion to make an unplanned purchase of adults report using newspaper inserts the same or more often than a few years ago. 71% usually check inserts to see what is on sale 67% make a point to look at inserts when in the market for what is being sold 66% say inserts make it easier to comparison shop 61% say inserts are part of their weekly routine 61% say inserts save time and money

4.4 days

is the average time a newspaper insert is saved. Scarborough Research 2008 How America Shops and Spends/ MORI Research 2009

Newspaper advertising. A destination, not a distraction.

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Campbell publiCations

the people’s marketplaCe Classifieds

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE AUCTION

Friday, Jan. 24, 2014 • 12 NOON • 1320 sf Home • 2/3 BR, DR, LR, K • Large LR Addition • 3 y.o. Central A/C • Hardy Wood Burning Furnace

222 W. CRANE ST. PITTSFIELD, IL • GFA Furnace • Small Utility Basement • 18x20 Metal Carport • ~80x160’ Lot • Big Open Backyard!

Large, SetInofaFloor-model Power Wood Construction What anComplete Opportunity! great central location on theWorking south endTools of town, near schools Tools Concrete Toolsand & Forms Misc.this Construction Material all amenities, is a wonderful Home! Visit Large, Com’06 Rendezvous car, 1 y.o. front load W&D & other personal property sell Saturday, January 25 at the JDL Facility! Terms- 10% down, 30 days to close. Property sells as-is. Please contact Brian to view this great home prior to the auction! Attorney- Tom Henderson 115 E. Washington Pittsfield, IL 217-285-9676 Large, Complete Set of Floor-model Power Wood Working Tools Construction Tools Concrete Tools & Forms Misc. Construction Material Visit Large, ComCurless Auction – Brian Curless Auctioneer • 217-242-1665

GARY & JUDY WALKER

IL Lic. #440.000013 www.curlessauction.com

ONE PHONE CALL, SIX NEWSPAPERS, THE PEOPLE'S MARKETPLACE! STORAGE SPACE FOR RENT

January 9-12 ST. LOUIS

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300 Vehicles

Hardin, IL

Call (618) 498-1234 and ask for Business Department

w

Class A Motorhomes Class C Mini-Motorhomes 5th Wheels • Travel Trailers Toy Haulers • Pop-Ups Camper Vans Parts, Products & More!

info: stlrv.com

ABSOLUTE REAL ESTATE AUCTION

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 7TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT GREENE COUNTY CARROLLTON, ILLINOIS Bank of America, N.A., Plaintiff, vs.

13 CH 15

Tiffany J. Whitehead a/k/a Tiffany J. Hamby, Thomas F. Bearce, Tammy L. BearceMatt Hamby, John Doe, Current Spouse or Civil Union Partner, if any, of Tiffany J. Whitehead a/k/a Tiffany J. Hamby, Unknown Owners, Generally, and Non-Record Claimants, Defendants. NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on 11/13/2013, the Sheriff of Greene County will on 02/03/2014 at the hour of 11:00 a.m. at the Greene County Courthouse 519 N. Main Street Carrollton, IL 62016, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 03-92-23-121-002 COMMON ADDRESS:150 Church Street, Carrollton, IL 62016

IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 7TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTYJERSEYVILLE, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, VS

12 CH 45

LINDA J. BRAINERD; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS ; Defendants, 23426 WEST COUNTY JERSEYVILLE, IL 62052

ROAD

NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on November 4, 2013, JERSEY COUNTY SHERIFF in JERSEY County, Illinois, will on February 10, 2014, in Courtroom A of the Jersey County Courthouse, 201 W. Pearl Street, Jerseyville, IL, at 9:00 A.M., sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of JERSEY, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: TAX NO. 04-215-009-50 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 23426 WEST COUNTY ROAD JERSEYVILLE, IL 62052 Description of Improvements: ONE STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH ATTACHED TWO CAR GARAGE The Judgment amount was $119,083.57. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24

The improvement on the property consists of: single family residence. Sale terms: Ten percent (10%) of the purchase price due by cash or certified funds at the time of the sale and the balance due within (2) two business or the following Tuesday. The property offered for sale is subject to real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff and in “as is” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. The property will NOT be open for inspection. No refunds. The judgment $88,742.25.

amount

was

at

Friday, Jan. 31, 2014 • 12 NOON 524 LIBERTY ST. PITTSFIELD, IL • 2 or 3 Bedroom Home • Large Kitchen/DR/LR Area • Hardwood Cabinetry • Bath/Shower/Utility • Central A/C & BB Electric Heat! • 200 Amp Service • New Water Heater! • Good Crawl Space • 1-Car Attached garage

A Great Opportunity! This great home is perfect for a new owner to move right in. It sits on a large lot down the secluded dead-end Liberty Street in Pittsfield. A fantastic home, come take a look!

Personal property sells Saturday January 25 at the JDL Facility! Terms- HOME SELLS ABSOLUTE, to the highest bidder! 10% down, 30 days to close. Curless Auction 217-242-1665 Property sells as-is. Please contact Brian to– view this great home prior to the auction! Attorney- William Lowry 130 S. Madison Pittsfield, IL 217-285-4822 www.curlessauction.com

LYNDA J. CROWDER- SELLER

For information call Plaintiff’s Attorney, Kluever & Platt, LLC, 65 East Wacker Place, Suite 2300, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 201-6679. I580965 1.8.14, 1.15, 1.22

hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g) (4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1213354 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I580518 12.25.13, 1.1.14, 1.8

• New Overhead Door • Large Open Backyard!

Curless Auction – Brian Curless Auctioneer • 217-242-1665 IL Lic. #440.000013 www.curlessauction.com IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT GREENE COUNTY - CARROLLTON, ILLINOIS Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for the Certificateholders of The First Franklin Mortgage Loan Trust 2005-ff8, Mortgage Pass- Through Certificates, Series 2005-FF8 Vs.

12 CH 00016

Luke M. Goodall a/k/a Luke Goodall; et. al. DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 10/19/2012, the Sheriff of Greene County, Illinois will on 2/19/14 at the hour of 9:15AM at Greene County Courthouse, 519 North Main Street Carrollton, IL 62984, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of Greene and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 08-22-13-435-003 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 332 E. Patterson Street Roodhouse, IL 62082 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court.

If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT inspection and Plaintiff representation as to the the property. Prospective admonished to check the verify all information.

be open for makes no condition of bidders are Court file to

IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-28118. I582431 1.8.14, 1.15, 1.22

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 7TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY JERSEYVILLE, ILLINOIS The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York, as trustee for the Certificateholders CWABS, Inc., Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-14 PLAINTIFF Vs.

11 CH 00084

Howard E. Chappell; et. al. DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 4/9/2012, the Sheriff of Jersey County, Illinois will on 2/19/14 at the hour of 8:15AM at Jersey County Courthouse, 201 West Pearl Jerseyville, IL 62052, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of Jersey and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 11-136-004-00 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 34998 W. Locust Street Medora, IL 62063 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium

and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 7949876. Please refer to file number 14-11-37670. I582260 1.8.14, 1.15, 1.22


JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

SPORTS

C6

Key league games ahead If Mother Nature ever lets up, we've got some important high school basketball games to get to. All this snow and ice causes headaches for everyone. Athletic directors are left scrambling to find The Sam Antics By Sam Elliott open dates to make up postponed games. Coaches are left scrambling to keep their players sharp despite not playing a game for two weeks. Your friendly neighborhood sports reporters are left scrambling to write witty columns in lieu of actual events to cover. Thanks to snow, ice and ridiculously low temperatures making driving dangerous, the Jersey Community and Southwestern High School basketball teams have combined to play just one game since the calendar changed to 2014. But once they all get back into action, we've got key conference matchups to look forward to. The Southwestern Piasa Birds were the lucky squad actually able to hit the hardcourt recently, but that was as far as the Birds' luck extended as they had to go on the road to face a Greenfield-Northwestern team in the midst of one its greatest seasons ever. The Tigers moved to 13-0 after edging Southwestern in a 58-43 decision Friday in Palmyra, pulling ahead by double digits

in the second quarter for a 33-21 halftime lead the Piasa Birds couldn't skrink. Sophomore Tyler Rose scored 13 points and senior Ethan Gallaher added 10 to lead Southwestern, which is 5-8 overall and 1-1 in the South Central Conference. Tuesday's league matchup with Greenville was postponed, but the Birds hope to resume play with a non-conference outing against East Alton-Wood River at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Southwestern High School. They'll resume SCC play against Carlinville at 7:30 p.m. Tueaday at Southwestern. At Jersey Community High School, the Panthers have hopes of a Mississippi Valley Conference championship — if they can ever get to playing Civic Memorial, that is. Jersey's matchup with CM in Bethalto was postponed for the second time this season Tuesday. The teams planned to face off Wednesday, but results were not available at press time. The Panthers — 8-3 overall and 1-0 in the MVC entering the CM tilt — continue a key stretch of four-straight league games at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Highland High School. A date with Triad follows at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in Troy. Jersey is already the lone MVC team without a loss within league play, but winning their next handful of conference games could go a long way in positioning the Panthers for their first MVC title in more than a decade. The wait for a league crown hasn't been

Critchfield runner-up at Lincoln Tourney Jersey Community High School sophomore Brandon Critchfield collected his third top-two finish in as many tournaments this season to lead the Panthers wrestlers at the Lincoln Tournament that ended Thursday, Dec. 26, at Lincoln High School. Critchfield, the 120-pound champion at Civic Memorial and runner-up at Springfield, improved his record this season to 13-2 en route to a runner-up finish in Lincoln. Jersey junior Nick Howell finished fifth at 285 pounds and classmate Jordan McQuaid added a sixth-place finish at 220 pounds for the Panthers. Critchfield collected wins against Centennial's Arnie Lack in his opening match and against Chicago Lane's Ciaran McCarthy in the 120-pound quarterfinals. He won a 6-1 decision against Bloomington's Tyler Wilkinson in a semifinal matchup before meeting Belleville Althoff's Jarrid Braunagel in the championship match. Braunagel edged out a 7-2 decision in the title bout to improve to 14-0. In the latest rankings updated Tuesday, IllinoisMatmen.com has Critchfield as the No. 12 Class 2A wrestler in the state at 120 pounds. Howell's fifth-place finish in Lincoln came after the junior bounced back from a loss to the

as long for the Southwestern Lady Piasa Birds — they won the SCC West title in the 2010-11 season, back when the conference had two divisions — but they're in the hunt for a championship this season. The 14-1 Lady Birds are 3-0 in the SCC. Greenville is the only other team without a loss in league play. The teams were suppossed to play Tuesday, but that contest — of course — was postponed. Two weeks removed from its previous game, Southwestern hosts EA-WR at 6 p.m. Saturday before visiting Carlinville for a return to SCC action at 7:30 p.m. Monday. The JCHS Lady Panthers have made the most progress through conference play of area teams so far this season. Halfway through their MVC slate, the 7-6 overall Lady Panthers are 2-3 within the league. They had one nonconference outing against Greenfield-NW Monday postponed, but will be back in action at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Carlinville. And hey, maybe all this snow will melt as conference action heats up for area teams. Here's to hoping, right? selliott@campbellpublications.net Mike Weaver/Jersey County Journal

Jersey junior Jacob Varble makes a move near the basket earlier this season at Southwestern High School. The Panthers are 8-3 overall this season and 1-0 within the Mississippi Valley Conference entering a stretch of four-straight league games. michaelrweaver.com

eventual 285-pound champion to finish fifth and improve his record to 8-7 this season. Howell opened his Lincoln Tournament run with a win via pin in 1 minute, 55 seconds, agaisnt Pekin's Mason Harper before being pinned by eventual champion Jeff Brown of Belleville East in the quarterfinals. In the backdraw, Howell pinned Centennial's Dylan Huddleston in 1:19 and won a 5-0 match against Marengo's Dylan Turner. Howell was edged 3-2 by eventual third-place finisher Rodney Baker of Belleville Althoff, but finished fifth after Canton's Marshall Guerra was disqualified from the fifth-place match. McQuaid improved his record to 11-8 this season following his sixth-place finish in the 220-pound bracket at Lincoln. He beat Tinley's Aaron Iverson 7-3 and pinned Chicago Lane's Sebastian Golba in 54 seconds in the 220-pound quarterfinals, but McQuaid ended up in sixth after being pinned in his final three matches in Lincoln. The Panthers' wrestling season continues with a three-team match against Auburn and Hillsboro at 6 p.m. Thursday at Auburn High School. Jersey follows that outing with matches against Mount Olive and Carrollton at 6 p.m. Tuesday at Mount Olive High School.

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Wednesday, January 8, 2014 Jerseyville, Illinois


PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE

No. 13-P-47

No. 13-P-50

OF VELMA WHEELER, DECEASED

OF EDNA J. MEUTH, DECEASED

VS

CLAIM NOTICE

Notice is given of the death of VELMA WHEELER, of Jersey County, Illinois, who died on the 11th day of October, 2013. Letters of Office were issued on November 19, 2013, to MARGIE WEBB whose attorney is Wittman and Lorton, P.C., 123 W. Pearl St., P.O. Box 190, Jerseyville, Illinois 62052.

Notice is given of the death of EDNA J. MEUTH, of Jersey County, Illinois, who died on the 31st day of October, 2013. Letters of Office were issued on December 6, 2013, to MICHAEL MEUTH and JEAN GILMAN whose attorney is Wittman and Lorton, P.C., 123 W. Pearl St., P.O. Box 190, Jerseyville, Illinois 62052.

The estate will be administered without court supervision unless, under Section 28-4 of the estates Act (755 ILCS 5/28-4), any interested person terminates independent administration at any time by mailing or delivering a petition to terminate to the Clerk.

The estate will be administered without court supervision unless, under Section 28-4 of the estates Act (755 ILCS 5/28-4), any interested person terminates independent administration at any time by mailing or delivering a petition to terminate to the Clerk.

Claims against the estate may be filed in the office of the clerk of the Circuit Court of the Seventh Judicial Circuit, 201 West Pearl, Jersey County Courthouse, Jerseyville, Illinois, 62052, or with the representative or both on or before May 1, 2014, and any claim not filed within that period is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the clerk must be mailed or delivered to the representative and to the attorney within ten (10) days after it has been filed.

Claims against the estate may be filed in the office of the clerk of the Circuit Court of the Seventh Judicial Circuit, 201 West Pearl, Jersey County Courthouse, Jerseyville, Illinois, 62052, or with the representative or both on or before May 15, 2014, and any claim not filed within that period is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the clerk must be mailed or delivered to the representative and to the attorney within ten (10) days after it has been filed.

Wittman and Lorton, P.C. Attorney at Law 123 W. Pearl St. P.O. Box 190 Jerseyville, IL 62052.

Wittman and Lorton, P.C. Attorney at Law 123 W. Pearl St. P.O. Box 190 Jerseyville, IL 62052.

12.25.13, 1.1.14, 1.8

12.25.13, 1.1.14, 1.8

The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York, as trustee for the Certificateholders CWABS, Inc., AssetBacked Certificates, Series 2006-14 PLAINTIFF Vs.

11 CH 00084

Howard E. Chappell; et. al. DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 4/9/2012, the Sheriff of Jersey County, Illinois will on 2/19/14 at the hour of 8:15AM at Jersey County Courthouse, 201 West Pearl Jerseyville, IL 62052, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of Jersey and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: A TRACT OF LAND BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 9 NORTH, RANGE 10 WEST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, JERSEY COUNTY, ILLINOIS; THENCE NORTH 100 FEET; THENCE WEST 500 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 400 FEET; THENCE EAST 500 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALL SITUATED IN JERSEY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN 11-136-004-00 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 34998 W. Locust Street Medora, IL 62063 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale

without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-37670. I582260

12 CH 45

LINDA J. BRAINERD; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS ; Defendants, 23426 WEST COUNTY JERSEYVILLE, IL 62052

ROAD

NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on November 4, 2013, JERSEY COUNTY SHERIFF in JERSEY County, Illinois, will on February 10, 2014, in Courtroom A of the Jersey County Courthouse, 201 W. Pearl Street, Jerseyville, IL, at 9:00 A.M., sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of JERSEY, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: THE SOUTH HALF OF LOT 9 IN NELSON MILLER SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION IN THE EAST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 8 NORTH, RANGE 11 WEST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, SUBJECT TO RESTRICTIONS DATED APRIL 14, 1971 AND RECORDED MARCH 14, 1972 IN CABINET A, DRAWER 10, NO. 2705, WITH PRIVILEGE OF AND SUBJECT TO EASEMENTS, RESERVATIONS, RIGHT OF WAY GRANTS, EXCEPTIONS, COVENANTS, AGREEMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS OF RECORD, JERSEY COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

KNOWN AS: 23426 WEST COUNTY ROAD JERSEYVILLE, IL 62052 Description of Improvements: ONE STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH ATTACHED TWO CAR GARAGE The Judgment amount was $119,083.57. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g) (4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1213354 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I580518

TAX NO. 04-215-009-50 COMMONLY

STORAGE SPACE FOR RENT

Call (618) 498-1234 and ask for Business Department

Call (618) 498-1234 and ask for Business Department

D1

Jerseyville, Illinois

12.25.13, 1.1.14, 1.8

TRI-COUNTY REAL ESTATE TOUR FOR SALE BY OWNER 320 Ninth Street, Carrollton 2 bedroom home, with large living room, dining area, utility room and central air. Home has large backyard, plus a one car detached garage and is on a quiet street. Price $55,000.

For more information call 1-618-498-4281

FARM LAND FOR SALE Carol Reese and Joyce Robinson, Successor Co-Trustees of the Leo and Marguerite Burns Revocable Trust will offer for sale on February 1, 2014, at 10:00 a.m.. at the Knights of Colombus Hall, 307 N. State St., Jerseyville, IL 62052, 141 acres more or less. Property is located in Ruyle Township, Jersey County, Illinois. For a brochure setting out details regarding the land and sale conducted by Auctioneer Michael Prough (License #440-000322) contact the Attorneys for the Trust, Wittman & Lorton P.C., 123 W. Pearl St., Jerseyville, IL. Phone 618-498-2167 PRIVATE ABSOLUTE AUCTION SALE 311 ACRES M/L OF PRODUCTIVE FARM AND RECEATIONAL LAND

NOTICE OF REVIEW AND OPPORTUNITY FOR PUBLIC HEARING AND WRITTEN COMMENT In accordance with the requirements of the Illinois Health Facilities Planning Act, notice is given of receipt to discontinue a category of service at an existing acute care hospital. Project 13-077, Jersey Community Hospital, Jerseyville. Applicant: Jersey Community Hospital District. The applicant proposes to discontinue its 6-bed Obstetrics service on the campus of its acute care hospital, located at 400 Maple Summit Road, Jerseyville. Project cost: $0. The application contained a Safety Net Impact Statement and was declared complete on December 31, 2013. A copy of the application may be viewed at the Illinois Health Facilities and Services Review Board Office, at the address below. To obtain a copy of an application, please call the office for details and copying fees, at the number listed below. Consideration by the State Board has been tentatively scheduled for the April 22, 2014 State Board Meeting. Any person wanting a public hearing on the proposed project must submit a written request for a hearing to: Mike Constantino, Supervisor, Project Review Section Illinois Health Facilities and Services Review Board 525 West Jefferson Street (2nd Floor) Springfield, Illinois 62761 (217) 782-3516 (TTY# 800-547-0466 for hearing impaired only) Requests for hearings must be received by this Agency no later than January 15, 2014. Any person wanting to submit written comments on this project must submit these comments by April 2, 2014. The State Board will post its findings in a State Board Staff Report, and the report will be made available via the internet on April 8, 2014. The public may submit written responses in support of or in opposition to the findings of the Illinois Health Facilities and Services Review Board. The public will have until 9:00 am, April 14, 2014. The internet address used to access this report is: www.hfsrb.illinois.gov

Employment Opportunity Join our growing team at a community focused bank. Our mission is to provide customers unsurpassed service, and to provide an outstanding environment for our employees to succeed personally and professionally. Applications for PART-TIME are now available at our Hull, Winchester, White Hall and Jerseyville locations: Contact us: hr@farmersstate.com

1.8.14, 1.15, 1.22

Commercial Building for rent Hardin, IL

IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 7TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY-JERSEYVILLE, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff,

CLAIM NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 7TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY - JERSEYVILLE, ILLINOIS

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

108 East Adams, Pittsfield IL 63363 217-285-5585

An Equal Opportunity Employer

GENERAL INFORMATION

Hardin, IL

832 South State St., P.O. Box 407, Jerseyville, IL 62052 Ph: 618-498-1234 Fax: 1-630-206-0320 Submit your news: jcjnews@campbellpublications.net Advertising information: jkallal@campbellpublications.net OFFIce hOurS: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday-Friday. AdvertISIng POLIcy: We are not responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of display and classified advertising. Please let us know immediately upon publication of any errors. Responsibility is limited to the cost the space error occupies in the ad. All transactions under $50 must be paid in advance. Proper identification of the person placing the ad is required. The Jersey County Journal reserves the right to reject or edit any advertisement submitted for publication. deAdLIneS: Society-weddings, birthdays, anniversaries, engagements, Noon Monday; Classified ads, 3p.m. Monday; Display advertising, 5p.m. Monday. We reserve

the right to reject any photo that will not reproduce clearly. PhOtOS And rePrIntS: 5x7-$9.00; 8x10-$10.00. Copies: 81/2 x 11: 20¢ per copy; 8 1/2 x 14 to 11 x 17: 25¢ per copy. AdvertISIng rAte: $11.66 per column inch. example: 1 column by 3 inches would be 3 col. inches x $11.66 = $34.98 For more information about display rates, quantity discounts and insert rates, contact the Jersey County Journal advertising department at 618-498-1234. cArdS OF thAnKS, MeMOrIALS: $7.95 minimum; 25¢ per word after 65 words, prepaid. tO MAIL A SIngLe ISSue: $4

Part of Sections 22, 27, and 28 in T 13 N, R 10 W, 3rd PM, Morgan County, IL Langdon Road, southeast of Murrayville, Illinois Sold in 2 tracts or as a whole n Tract 1 – 150 acres m/l, 129.4 tillable m/l , PI 130 (est. ave.) south of Langdon Road n Tract 2 – 160 acres m/l,108.5 tillable m/l, PI 101 (est. ave.) north of Langdon Road Woodlands with excellent whitetail deer and turkey hunting and ponds Rural water available on Whitlock Road on the east end of Tract 1 SALE to be completed during the month of February 2014, by telephone and email, closing in March 2014. This is an absolute sale if minimum bids are tendered by February 7, 2014. All bidders submitting a required minimum bid(s) will be contacted. Go to www.buyafarm.us for sale information, minimum required bids, and bid forms, or to recieve a packet, arrange an inspection, make an offer, or questions, contact: William H. Strang, Attorney at Law Strang & Parish, Ltd., 108 North Lafayette Street, Jerseyville, IL 62052 Phone: (618) 498-6821 Fax: (618) 498-2488 Email: wmstrang@gtec.com

HELP WANTED HVAC Service Technician 2 years experience, EPA certified, competitive pay & benefits. Send resume to: King Air Conditioning & Heating 401 Pearl St, Godfrey, IL or e-mail to: kingair7574@sbcglobal.net

LOCK INTO A NEW CAREER IN MANUFACTURING STABLE FAMILY OWNED BUSINESS IN O’FALLON, MO OFFERS EXCELLENT BENEFITS. $13.00/hr Days M-F 7:00am-3:30pm $14.00/hr Nights M-F 3:30pm-12:00am - Seeking Career Minded Individuals to Produce High Quality Commercial Refrigeration Equipment - Company Provides on-the-job Training SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES: • Will have to be 18 years of age • Drug free, conditioned for physical work & capable of lifting 60lbs. WG/3.12

Apply: www.job-ad-line.com or call call(636-281-2065) (636-281-2062) Apply: www.job-ad-line.com or Company paid pre-employment drug screen/physical required EOE.

www.jerseycountyjournal.com


REAL ESTATE

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

D2

Jerseyville, Illinois

TRI-COUNTY REAL ESTATE TOUR HOUSE CENTER PLUS JERSEYVILLEC21.COM

Roberta Wallace

Karen Bertman

Sue Beach

Charlene Morgan

Molly Farmer

618-535-5820

618-535-6044

618-946-4618

217-851-1663 Bob Jones

Managing Broker

Broker

Broker

Broker

Kim Frazer

Connie Hayes

Nikki Guymon

618-535-0071 Brad Stockstill

618-535-2262

618-535-6784

618-946-1999

618-535-4628

Broker

Broker

Broker

Broker

JERSEYVILLE OFFICE

730 S. State St. Suite A, Jerseyville, IL 62052 618-498-2321 c21hcp@gtec.com

Broker

Broker/Owner

618-498-2321

CARROLLTON OFFICE

SCAN THIS CODE WITH YOUR SMARTPHONE TO GO TO OUR WEBSITE

500 N. Main St., Carrollton, IL 62016 217-942-5182

NEW LISTING 5.12 ACRES

25554 Quail Chase Rd., Hettick

$169,900

Custom home with 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, Custom Amish cabinets, open floor plan, master suite. Outbuildings X 3, 2 large decks, private location. GEO thermal home. Kim Frazer 618-535-2262

518 Short St., Jerseyville

303 Lott St., Jerseyville

$45,000 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

$49,900 Kim Frazer 618-535-2262

600 E Exchange St., Jerseyville $52,500 Kim Frazer 618-535-2262 Sue Beach 618-946-4618

520 3rd St., Carrollton

604 Osage St., Jerseyville

205 Palmer St., Brighton

1003 Spruce St., Jerseyville

103 Roberts St., Jerseyville

$59,000 Bob Jones 618-498-2321

$59,500 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

501 Easton Ave., Jerseyville

602 Cross Ave., Jerseyville

$79,900 Kim Frazer 618-535-2262

$80,000 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

NEW LISTING $69,900

264 E Railroad St., Shipman

Great potential for investment or retail. Located on Highway 16 East, Shipman. Great visibility. Call Today! Kim Frazer 618-535-2262

$61,500 Molly Farmer 217-851-1663

$75,000 Roberta Wallace 618-535-5820

$77,500 Kim Frazer 618-535-2262

2 ACRES

1 ACRE 803 Franklin Ave., Jerseyville

909 N. Liberty St., Jerseyville

28867 Victory School Rd., Jerseyville

34203 Catfish Ct., Brighton

506 N Harrison, Jerseyville

RR 1 Box 120, White Hall

RR 601 Box 84, Kane

$89,500 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

$93,900 Roberta Wallace 618-535-5820

$95,000 Roberta Wallace 618-535-5820

$107,500 Connie Hayes 618-535-6784

$109,000 Connie Hayes 618-535-6784

$118,000 Molly Farmer 217-851-1663

$119,500 Kim Frazer 618-535-2262

1 ACRE

1307 Beaty Mound Rd. Jerseyville $120,000 Connie Hayes 618-535-6784

Just Reduced

.75 ACRE 1210 Locke St., Jerseyville

26087 Bethany Church Rd., Kane $123,000 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

$129,000 Connie Hayes 618-535-6784

101 Westview Dr., White Hall

129 Rosewood Dr., Jerseyville

26025 Airport Rd., Dow

1003 W Westlake Dr., Jerseyville

$136,500 Charlene Morgan 618-535-0071

$139,000 Kim Frazer 618-535-2262

$139,900 Kim Frazer 618-535-2262

$148,500 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

Jersey County

1 ACRE

28 ACRES

2 HOMES

38 Oakwood Pl., Jerseyville

24 Oakwood Pl., Jerseyville

31700 Irish Ln., Brighton

26603 Spruce Ct., Godfrey

20403 State Hwy 109, Jerseyville

2442 Seminary Rd., Brighton

$168,500 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

$168,500 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

$174,000 Kim Frazer 618-535-2262

$225,000 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

$225,000 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

7 Acre lake

$595,000 Charlene Morgan 618-535-0071

Call Stan Groppel for a showing. 618-535-4137

Brown Realtors

2205 S. State Route #157 Edwardsville, IL 62025 618-656-2278 www.brownrealtors.com

MODERN REALTY, LLC RESIDENTIAL

FARM

COMMERCIAL

110 s. state st., Jerseyville 62052 • office: 618-639-6399 fax: 618-639-6398

www.modern-realty.net

909 West Spruce, Jerseyville

1025 West Hickory, Jerseyville 2 Bed, 1 bath, on corner lot, with 3 car attached garage. Call Stacey Wock

3 bed, 1 bath, large lot, detached garage. Call Roger Scheffel.

$55,000

$100,000

603 Lucien, Jerseyville

4 Bedroom, 2 bath home with full basement with 2 car attached garage. Nice home with large lot edge of town country living with city amenities. Priced for quick sell. Call Angie Goforth.

$148,000

210 Sheridan, Jerseyville 2-3 bedroom, 2 bath home, loaded with charm. 2 full lots, 2 car garage and separate workshop. Also space for your Big RV or 5th wheel trailer. Call Roger Scheffel

$125,000

1003 Mulberry, Jerseyville

2 bed, 2 bath, just remodeled, and move-in ready. Has fenced back yard and shed. Call Stacey Wock.

$65,000

!

SOLD 29121 Ivy Lane, Jerseyville

3 bed, 3 bath, 3.57 acres, located 10 minutes South of town. Lots of updates, small pond and out buildings. Call Stacey Wock.

$93,500

607 E. Fairgrounds, Jerseyville 2 Bed, 1 Bath on a large corner lot. Nice little starter or investment property.

$26,000

401 E. Fairground, Jerseyville This stately home offers 4 bed, 5 baths, lots of updates, on 5 acres with a beautiful lake.This is a must see property. Motivated Seller! Call Roger Scheffel

$199,000

Freedom Lane, Jerseyville

Luxurious Senior Living - new construction. 2 or 3 bedroom available, 2 car attached garage. Reasonable association fees include lawn care and grounds maintenance, snow removal.

Starting at $167,000

309 Andrew, Jerseyville

3 Bedroom, 3 bath home on corner lot with 2 car attached garage. Priced for quick sell. Call Angie Goforth.

$84,900

Jerseyville, ONO Donuts

Business opportunity. After many successful years, the owners say it’s time to slow down. Sale includes everything needed to carry on operation in this high traffic leased location. Seller will even provide training for new owner. Call Roger Scheffel

$80,000

906 High, Jerseyville

28153 Prosper Ln., Jerseyville

3 Bed, 1 Bath. This is clean move-in ready home on a corner lot. Lots of fresh paint and new kitchen flooring. Call Roger Scheffel

3 bed 2 bath manufactured home. Property has 2 outbuildings and sets on 3 acres in the Delhi area. Call Stacey Wock.

Rt. 67, Kane

Nutwood Country Store Rt. 100, Nutwood, IL.

$75,000

Home on 1.16 acres: 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath with approx. 1600 sq. ft. in Jerseyville School District. Big 2 car detached garage with workshop and other out buildings. Has new septic. Call Angie Goforth.

$98,500

!

ING PEND

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27439 Owl Branch Rd., Jerseyville #4217486 $105,000 Very Nice, Well Maintained Home on nearly 1 acre, 5 minutes from town. Motivated Sellers!!

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$65,000

Be your own boss.This turn key business has everything you need to continue day to day operations of a complete deli/grocery store. Call Angie Goforth

$64,500

LAND

• 18 acres all tillable Eastern Jersey County. Brighton Delhi Road.

Liberty Ridge Rd., Otterville

112 acres West of Otterville, hunting cabin, income from leases, and CPR contract, also has harvestable timber. Otter Creek borders property, excellent hunting property. Call Angie Goforth.

52 acres +/- 29 tillable

North Eastern Jersey Township. Has 3+ acre lake, great deer & turkey hunting with good farm income as well. Call Angie Goforth.

$392,000

$300,000

114 N. State, Jerseyville

Commercial Building. Good income potential. Downstair’s presently rented (retail). Upstairs potential living space. Call Roger Scheffel

$40,000

• 5 acre building lot, just West of Brighton, deed restrictions, lot would allow 16589 Cimarron Dr., Jerseyville walkout, beautiful shared lake. 3.17 acres with 2 bedrooms, 1970 Mobile Home, pond in the rear of the property Call Angie Goforth.

$26,900

ROGER SCHEFFEL

ANGIE GOFORTH

STACEY WOCK

618-535-5017

618-535-5356

618-535-0235

Managing Broker

Broker/Agent

landman160@gmail.com

tdbajg@hotmail.com

Broker/Agent

sswock@gmail.com

• 20 M/L Acres Brighton, big lake, Highway 111 frontage, tract has couple of amazing building sites.

• Jerseyville, 50 +/- acres with 20 tillable, Hwy 67 South of Jerseyville. Mix of pasture and tillable with hwy frontage.

• Fieldon, 60 acres timber/crp mix, several good home sites. 2 springs, excellent recreational property.

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REAL ESTATE

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Jerseyville, Illinois

TRI-COUNTY REAL ESTATE TOUR

D3

PROPERTY PROFESSIONALS

LIST WITH A LEADER

MEET TWO OF THE HARDEST WORKING REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS IN THE AREA Wendi Mielke, Managing Broker/Owner E-PRO, SFR, SRES, GRI (618) 786-2036 113 Main St., Grafton, IL 62037

Elaine Rhodes, Managing Broker/Owner SFR, SRES, GRI Midwest Div. LLC (618) 578-8772 5411 Godfrey Road, Godfrey, IL 62035

14271 Rowling Ridge Grafton 5 Acres

18327 Hwy 96 Rockport 2 Acres

125 N. Sixth St. Carrollton Better than new!

209 Acton, Wood River $109,000

643 N 1st St., Wood River $99,900

814 Douglas St., Alton $147,900

11 Acres N. Calhoun Approved Short sale!

406 Water St. Grafton $99,900

6 Acres Hwy 100 Hardin RIVERFRONT!

309 Bachman Ln., Godfrey $114,900

104 Cheney, Jerseyville $96,900

2504 Hardy St., Alton $99,900

SOLD 00 Michael Hollow, Michael

SOLD 107 Cherry St., Grafton

SOLD 21204 Woodlawn Park, Brighton

SOLD 399 Jennings, Wood River

SOLD 14180 Fieldon Hollow Rd., Fieldon

SOLD

14 Main, Grafton

SOLD 424 E. Clinton, Grafton

107 Jefferson, Kampsville

SOLD 17004 Liberty Ridge, Grafton

SOLD RR 1 Kampsville w/ 8.5 ACRES

SOLD

119 N. Market, Grafton

SOLD 110 W. Clinton St., Grafton

SOLD 18857 Powerline Rd., Grafton

SOLD

14679 Willow, Grafton

SOLD 37 Michael Hollow, Michael

SOLD 1009 W. Pine, Jerseyville

SOLD 111 E. Main, Grafton

SOLD 606 N. Broadway, Kampsville

SOLD 4 Cross County Ct., Jerseyville

SOLD 21740 W. State HWY 16, Jerseyville

SOLD

5805 Vollmer Ln., Godfrey

SOLD 480 Springfield St., Grafton

1301 W. Main Grafton - SOLD Lots 1 & 2 Cedar St Grafton - SOLD 23362 Berry Rd. Elsah - SOLD 20450 State HWY 3 Grafton - SOLD

INTERVIEW US WHEN YOU’RE READY TO BUY OR SELL!

SOLD 00 Oldenburg Rd., East Alton

SOLD 134 Old Ferry Road, Brussels

SOLD 408 Snedeker, Jerseyville

SOLD 500 E Fairground, Jerseyville

SOLD 749 E Woodland, East Alton

SOLD 1405 Madison, Gillespie

SOLD 1709 Liberty, Alton

SOLD 2425 Gayle, Alton

SOLD 4790 Rt 16, Shipman

SOLD 19 Ruth Ann Dr., Godfrey

SOLD 205 W Delmar, Alton

SOLD 413 Main St., Medora

SOLD 511 Central, Roxana

SOLD 813 College, Alton

SOLD 1501 S Rodgers, Alton

SOLD 2300 Benton, Granite City

SOLD 2502 Hardy, Alton

SOLD 6402 Florida, Godfrey

SOLD 67 Providence Rd., Carrollton

SOLD 309 Hill, Jerseyville

SOLD 417 Oak, East Alton

SOLD 661 E Warren, Bunker Hill

SOLD 825 Willoway, East Alton

SOLD 1504 19th, Highland

SOLD 2416 Kohler, Alton

SOLD 2519 Sanford, Alton

SOLD 6404 Godfrey Road, Godfrey

GETTING YOU MOVING IS OUR BUSINESS

www.theilpros.com SELLING IN CALHOUN, GREENE, JERSEY, MADISON, MACOUPIN & S. PIKE COUNTIES • SELLING IN CALHOUN, GREENE, JERSEY, MADISON, MACOUPIN & S. PIKE COUNTIES • SELLING IN CALHOUN, GREENE, JERSEY, MADISON, MACOUPIN & S. PIKE COUNTIES C

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SELLING IN CALHOUN, GREENE, JERSEY, MADISON, MACOUPIN & S. PIKE COUNTIES • SELLING IN CALHOUN, GREENE, JERSEY, MADISON, MACOUPIN & S. PIKE COUNTIES • SELLING IN CALHOUN, GREENE, JERSEY, MADISON, MACOUPIN & S. PIKE COUNTIES • SELLING IN CALHOUN, GREENE, JERSEY, MADISON, MACOUPIN & S. PIKE COUNTIES • SELLING IN CALHOUN, GREENE, JERSEY, MADISON, MACOUPIN & S. PIKE

SELLING IN CALHOUN, GREENE, JERSEY, MADISON, MACOUPIN & S. PIKE COUNTIES • SELLING IN CALHOUN, GREENE, JERSEY, MADISON, MACOUPIN & S. PIKE COUNTIES • SELLING IN CALHOUN, GREENE, JERSEY, MADISON, MACOUPIN & S. PIKE COUNTIES • SELLING IN CALHOUN, GREENE, JERSEY, MADISON, MACOUPIN & S. PIKE COUNTIES • SELLING IN CALHOUN, GREENE, JERSEY, MADISON, MACOUPIN & S. PIKE

SELLING IN CALHOUN, GREENE, JERSEY, MADISON, MACOUPIN & S. PIKE COUNTIES • SELLING IN CALHOUN, GREENE, JERSEY, MADISON, MACOUPIN & S. PIKE COUNTIES • SELLING IN CALHOUN, GREENE, JERSEY, MADISON, MACOUPIN & S. PIKE COUNTIES


D4

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Jerseyville, Illinois

outdoor exercise is still possible when temperatures drop When colder weather sets in, some people abandon their outdoor fitness routines for the comfort of indoor gyms and home exercise equipment. However, walking in the winter and even jogging, when practical, are not limited to the warmer months of the year. Outdoor conditions can be a bit treacherous, so safety and common sense should always prevail. n Footwear While winter walking is a good way to warm up and get in a workout, it requires different footwear than regular walking shoes. The correct footwear will provide support, warmth and traction for traversing various conditions. Start by choosing footwear that is warm. Certain boots and booties will have a lining that improves heat retention. Wear warm socks and waterproof or water-resistant shoes. They will protect against wet, chilled feet if you come across slushy puddles along the way. Although wet feet might be merely an inconvenience other times of the year, in very cold temperatures, a cold and wet body can be susceptible to hypothermia and even frostbite. Look for shoes that have a midheight ankle. This height offers support and stability to the ankles when walking on uneven surfaces, such as snow-covered paths. Also, should your foot slip on slick pavement, a taller shoe will protect the ankle against sprains or fractures. Additionally, choose a shoe or boot that has a thick but not too heavy sole for better traction on icy areas. n Wardrobe Layering is essential when

exercising outdoors in cold weather. You want to ensure that you will be warm enough, but not too warm that you begin to sweat and run the risk of hypothermia later on. Dress so that you feel chilled when stepping outdoors, not toasty warm. As your body warms up with the exercise, it will reach a comfortable temperature. A windbreaker is good for blocking chilly, winter winds. Choose a jacket that will move with your body and not impede walking stride or jogging ability. Tights or yoga pants that wick moisture away will insulate your legs, and a fleece vest can help keep your body's core warm when it is particularly cold outside. n Safety Winter conditions may lead to snowblindness or reduced visibility for drivers. If you will be walking on roads, dress for visibility. Avoid colors that will blend in with snowy surroundings and opt for bright flashes of color that make you more visible, particularly at dawn, dusk and night. Whenever possible, do your outdoor exercising when the sun is up. You'll benefit from the moodboosting properties of the sun and will have added warmth and visibility. Furthermore, spending time in the outdoor sun enables your body to produce vitamin D, which helps maintain healthy bones. Spending time outdoors can stave off winter doldrums and cabin fever. Exercise with a buddy, who can help you if you slip or fall on icy surfaces. Walking or running with a partner also is a great way to remain motivated. If you feel very unstable walking

File Photo

There is no need to pack away exercise clothing for the winter season. With the right equipment and knowhow, winter lovers can still spend adequate time outdoors once the mercury drops.

on slippery roads and pathways, you may want to invest in winter cleats or crampons that can be attached to the underside of your shoes. These devices offer superior traction. n Off-roading If you want to pack in a more powerful winter workout, you can think about walking through the snow rather than around it. According to

fitness experts at Weight Watchers International, walking in packed snow increases the calories burned by 60 percent compared to walking on a paved road. Walking in soft snow triples the calories burned compared to walking at the same speed on a treadmill. In addition, the added resistance of the snow can firm and tone muscles.

Wellness Center starts weight loss challenge Jan. 9

BoB Crossen Campbell Publications Common New Year’s resolutions involve health and fitness, and the Jersey Community Hospital Wellness Center will be helping that cause with a community weight loss challenge for members and non-members of the center. Jen Lyles, fitness coordinator, said the program is popular this time of year, netting around 75 to 100 participants. She said all the people who take part form a community of motivation to keep each other striving for their weight loss goals. “We build a community and have a lot of camaraderie which definitely helps,” Lyles said. “I find when we do our group meetings and our fitness and nutrition education, it’s a great time to meet other people. People will even share email addresses or they share recipes.” The weight loss program costs $25 for eight weeks for both members and non-members, and those who do not have a membership to the Wellness Center can receive a membership for the duration of the weight loss program at a cost of $109. Participants of the challenge are required to weigh in at the beginning of the challenge and at the end. Lyles said there will be optional weigh-ins in the middle of the program as well, but she said with pre-

vious programs, constant weigh-ins became discouraging for some. She said previous programs required people weigh in every week, and if somebody believed they could not win, the individual would drop the program entirely. Lyles said the Wellness Center attempted to alleviate that discouragement as its aim is to encourage healthy lifestyles for the community. Lyles said the monetary investment is a strong motivator for many of the participants who will have two group sessions with trainers to ask questions about nutrition and

exercise for the program. The fitness coordinator said the participants are largely on their own when it comes to exercising and the routines they’ll follow. “They’re on their own because we believe there is no one-sizefits-all program to give people,” Lyles said, noting the question and answer sessions about nutrition and exercise will aid those new to the program. The male and the female who lose the highest percentage of body weight will win a cash prize, the value of which is dependent on the number of people who register for

the program. Similar weight loss programs will be provided throughout the year to keep participants motivated to stay healthy. Those interested in joining the program can contact the JCH Wellness Center at (618) 498-3500 for more information and to register. The first weigh in is Jan. 9 from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. or Jan. 10 from 5 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Purchase snow shoes or crosscountry skis and poles to facilitate walking in the snow. For those who want to forego structured exercise, simply having fun in the snow, by trekking up a mountain when sledding or having a snowball fight with the kids, is a great way to exercise outdoors in the winter.

How to reduce your risk for diabetes

Millions of people across the globe suffer from diabetes, a term used to describe a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood pressure resulting from the body's cells not responding properly to insulin and/or inadequate insulin production. According to researchers at Australia's Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, if the spread of type 2 diabetes continues at its current rate, there will be roughly 439 million adults with diabetes across the globe in the year 2030. Though some cases of diabetes cannot be prevented, a healthy lifestyle can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. n Shed those extra pounds. Being overweight increases your risk for a host of ailments, including type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke. According to the American Diabetes Association, losing as little as 10 to 15 pounds can make a significant difference for people looking to reduce their risks of developing type 2 diabetes. n Adopting a healthy diet is another way to lose weight and maintain that weight loss. Men and women who need to lose a significant amount of weight may want to work with a dietitian and/or nutritionist to create a meal plan that is likely to produce the best results and address any vitamin or nutrient deficiencies they might have. n Avoid refined carbohydrates. Studies have shown that diets rich in refined carbohydrates increase a person's risk of developing diabetes, while additional studies have shown that diets rich in whole grains protect the body against diabetes.

WINTER IS IN FULL SWING!

ETHAN VANDERSAND, R.PH. ALLISON VANDERSAND, R.PH. 400a W. Carpenter St., Jerseyville, IL • 618-498-6461 M-F: 9:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. • Sat: 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. www.medicineshoppe.com/1046

Winter is a time of good spirits, generous portions of hot chocolate, & gorgeous blankets of snow covering the ground. Unfortunately, Winter is also the season of runny noses and persistent coughs. Luckily the friendly staff at the Medicine Shoppe® is here to help you find the right treatment for cold and flu symptoms. We offer a full range of over-the-counter items-from cough syrup & nasal decongestant to lip balm & tissues-to help survive the winter months. Enjoy the splendors of the season but don’t leave your health out in the cold.

The Medicine Shoppe® proudly offers Flu vaccinations throughout the fall & winter.

JCJ 1.8.14  

JCJ 1.8.14

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