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Alumni Festival 2013 27 – 29 September Alumni Relations Office


What you need to do

Where you’ll find us

Browse through this brochure and decide which events you want to attend. Please note that further events may have been confirmed since going to print.

The Cambridge Alumni Relations Office (CARO) welcome centre will be open throughout the Alumni Festival. We are very pleased to be based in the atrium of the Alison Richard Building on the Sidgwick Site for the duration of the Festival.

Have a look on our website alumni.cam.ac.uk/festival13 for the very latest details. Book online at alumni.cam.ac.uk/festival13 from 15 July. Alternatively, download the booking form from the website or call us on +44 (0)1223 332288 to be sent a copy of the form, complete and return it. During the Alumni Festival you can also book in person at the welcome centre on the Sidgwick Site. We need to receive your booking before Monday 16 September, and we recommend booking early as many events sell out very quickly. Look forward to coming back to Cambridge!

Booking opens 10.00am Monday 15 July

Booking closes 10.00am Monday 16 September

Please come to the welcome centre on Friday or Saturday morning to collect your Alumni Festival information, tote bag, lunch vouchers and name badge for the weekend; and call in at any time for information or help.

Friday 27 September 9.00am – 5.00pm

Saturday 28 September 8.45am – 6.00pm

Sunday 29 September 9.00am – 3.30pm

The Alison Richard Building is located to the east side of the Law Faculty on the Sidgwick Site and is served by the Citi4 and Uni4 buses which stop on West Road (please see the map on Page 48-49).


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What is Alumni Festival all about?

The Alumni Festival is three days of discovery and intellectual adventure. It’s a chance to think about the world and to hear what some of Cambridge’s leading academics are currently pondering. To be inspired by the transformational ideas created at the University and to reconnect with the magic of this remarkable place. From Friday morning to Sunday afternoon, the Alumni Festival celebrates the power of thought with a packed programme of tours, talks, debates, lectures and events. Listen to speakers drawn from across all six Schools; join alumni from inside the media to discuss the day’s top news stories; get your hands dirty stripping and rebuilding a single cylinder engine and explore the hidden secrets of the University Library. Come for just one event, one full day or for the entire Festival. There are many new events this year, so enjoy browsing through this brochure, and check the website for updates and additions. Cambridge changed you once. Join us this year at the Alumni Festival and let the power of thought change you once more.

Contents Friday 27 September

4

Saturday 28 September

20

Sunday 29 September

36

College information

44

Time to spare?

45

Where to eat

46

Planning your trip

47

Maps

48

How to book

50


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What happens on Friday? The events, talks and tours on Friday take place in locations across Cambridge and enable you to see parts of the city and the University you may never have visited as a student. This year there will be a chance to hear about some of the current work going on within the postdoctoral community – and also to see what’s happening on the new University North West Cambridge site, where many post-docs will be located in the future. The day culminates with Come and Sing in King’s College Chapel – the highlight of the year for many attendees - and with the evening Opening Reception, held at the Fitzwilliam Museum in the imposing Founder’s Building. Enjoy drinks and canapés and the chance to meet other alumni, and wander through the numerous galleries which will be staying open for private exploration.

Location Time Capacity Meeting point & information


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Friday Morning

Treasures of the University Library

Soviet Secret Intelligence: Missing Dimensions

University Library

The Law Faculty, Sidgwick Site

9.30am – 10.30am 10.45am – 11.45am 12.00pm – 1.00pm

9.30am – 10.30am

24 per tour

The Law Faculty, Sidgwick Site

Milstein Seminar Rooms, University Library Guests must be aged 16 and over

View some of the treasures held by one of the world’s greatest research libraries. The tour covers original materials including unique texts from among the vast collection of the medieval Jewish manuscripts discovered in the famed Cairo Genizah, and ancient maps from the Library’s collections.

169

For many years the study of Soviet secret intelligence has been synonymous with the KGB, but there was much more. The other dimensions - the GRU (the Main Intelligence Directorate of the General Staff of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation) and the Special Service (codes and ciphers) - were no less important, and all need to be considered in context to assess the whole. Jonathan Haslam (Trinity 1973) is a Fellow of the British Academy, Professor of the History of International Relations at Cambridge and a Fellow of Corpus Christi College. His last book was Russia’s Cold War.


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Four Centuries of History

College Garden Tour

Cambridge University Press Museum

Sidney Sussex College

10.00am – 11.00am

10.30am – 11.30am

30

30

University Printing House Reception Shaftesbury Road

Porters’ Lodge

Dr Rosalind Grooms, Cambridge University Press Archivist, will give a talk on the Press Museum, which opened in November 2011, and explore the rich life of Cambridge University Press - the oldest publishing house in the world - from 1534 when Henry VIII first granted the Press its letters patent.

Sidney Sussex is a well-kept secret. Located in the very centre of the city, behind a high self-effacing wall, lie the College’s beautiful ancient gardens, explored on this tour with the Head Gardener Trevor Rees.


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Friday Morning

North West Cambridge Development: A Fascinating Journey

Guided Tour

Alison Richard Building, Sidgwick Site

Museum of Classical Archaeology

10.30am – 12.00pm

11.00am – 12.00pm 3.00pm – 4.00pm

110 35 Lecture Theatre SG1/2 Just inside the Museum, on the first floor The North West Cambridge development is the most significant capital project to be undertaken by the University in its 800-year history. Project Director Roger Taylor and colleagues will talk about the fascinating journey to date in creating this ambitious urban extension to Cambridge and what it means for the University.

Lecture Hour

A guided tour of the Cast Gallery which contains copies of all the most famous sculptures from classical antiquity and several others less well known.

Single Cylinder Engine Strip and Rebuild Hopkinson Laboratory Department of Engineering

Department of Pathology

11.00am – 1.00pm

11.00am – 12.00pm

12

100

Main entrance foyer, Department of Engineering

Reception, Department of Pathology

The one hour lecture session will be spilt into two 25 minute talks followed by 10 minutes Q&A. The talks will be: Cancer cells and how to find them: how we developed a cancer screening test, based on our work on minichromosome maintenance proteins, by Professor Nick Coleman (St John’s 1990); and Stripping down science: Could you strip down science to its bare essentials? by Dr Chris Smith.

The Hopkinson Laboratory helps participants to understand how a simple 4 stroke internal combustion engine works by dismantling the engine and looking at each part and its function and assembling back together again, giving the student theoretical and practical fitting experience. Alumni have the chance to participate under the watchful eye of a technician.


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Fukushima Today

Post-doc Poster Showcase

Shell Building, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street

The Law Faculty, Sidgwick Site

11.00am – 12.00pm

11.15am – 12.30pm 2.00pm – 3.15pm

100

340

Reception Area, Shell Building

Lecture Theatre LG19

Bob Skelton, former industry lecturer and biodiesel researcher at Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, offers a basic introduction to fission reactors, the original earthquake in Fukushima and the effect of the tsunami, the escalation of the problem, initial response, current clean-up operations, the long term future of the plant and the implications for nuclear power in Japan and worldwide.

Ever wondered what the life of a post-doc entails? CamSAN, the Cambridge Student Alumni Network, is hosting this new event at which some of Cambridge’s postdoctoral research staff will be showcasing their research posters and explaining about their current research work. Attendees will have the chance to ask questions throughout the session and find out what is happening within the University at a postdoctoral level.

Chinese (Mandarin) Language & Culture

Chiefs and Governors

Language Centre, Downing Place

Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

11.00am – 11.45am

11.30am – 12.30pm 3.00pm – 4.00pm

20 15 per tour Language Centre Reception Reception desk A hands-on taste of the written and spoken Chinese word. Alumni and their guests are invited to join the Language Centre for a hands-on taste of the written and spoken Chinese word.

An opportunity for alumni and guests to tour the stunning new temporary display Chiefs & Governors: Art of Power in Fiji, led by one of the curators at the Museum. Chiefs and Governors examines important aspects of Fijian art and culture and highlights key moments of Fijian pre-colonial and colonial history.


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Friday Afternoon Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology Research Showcase: Global Solutions to Global Problems

Real Tennis Club

Shell Building New Museums Site, Pembroke Street

Cambridge University Real Tennis Club Grange Road

12.00pm – 1.00pm

1.30pm – 2.30pm

50

40

Reception Area, Shell Building

Reception Area

Get a true taste of engaged Cambridge learning outside of the classroom whilst touring around Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology Laboratories. The talented young researchers at the CEB Laboratories will be on hand to give alumni a brief overview of the cutting-edge research projects they are involved in and answer any questions about how this work, tackling highly challenging global problems, is benefiting society as a whole.

View an exhibition match and learn about this fascinating sport which has 600 years of history in Cambridge. You will be able to handle the hand made equipment, see the anatomy of the court, learn the rules and tactics and have the opportunity to hit the ball.


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Life on the Edge: Language and Storytelling in a Cold Place

Institute of Astronomy & Cavendish Astrophysics: Open Day

Alison Richard Building, Sidgwick Site

Institute of Astronomy & Battcock Centre Madingley Rise

1.30pm – 2.30pm

Option One 2.00pm – 2.45pm Tour 2.45pm – 3.15pm Talk

110 Lecture Theatre SG1/2

An introduction to the language, oral traditions and way of life of a group of Inuit living in a remote corner of North-West Greenland, but who are increasingly affected by climate change and a globalising world. Dr Stephen Pax Leonard is a Research Fellow at Trinity Hall and Research Associate at the Scott Polar Research Institute. He was the first linguist to live long-term with the Inugguit who live in the northern most permanently inhabited settlement in the world, and his research has been widely covered on television and radio.

Option Two 2.45pm – 3.15pm Talk 3.15pm – 4.00pm Tour 50 (25 per option) Reception of the Hoyle Building

The Institute of Astronomy and the Cavendish Astrophysics New Battcock Centre for Experimental Astrophysics welcome alumni and guests to the Institute’s Open Day. Consisting of a guided tour followed by a talk or vice versa, attendees will have the opportunity to look at a display to mark the 70th anniversary of the Cambridge University Astronomical Society, meet current researchers and listen to a talk on recent developments in Cosmology and Astrophysics.


12 Friday Afternoon

Cambridge Goes to the Poles

Headhunter: Alfred Haddon in Ireland

The Polar Museum

Department of Archaeology and Anthropology

2.00pm – 2.30pm 2.45pm – 3.15pm 3.30pm – 4.00pm

2.00pm – 3.00pm

12

South Lecture Room

Museum Domes - access via the Lensfield Road main entrance

Take a guided tour through the Library and Museum and hear about past Cambridge students who went to the Polar Regions. Archive material including art work, diaries and letters will help illustrate the lives of these young men who journeyed to some of the most inhospitable place on earth.

Cambridge Mathematics: A Snapshot

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Pioneering anthropologist Alfred Haddon, the founder of the Haddon Library - joined Dublin doctor Charles R. Browne on an anthropological expedition to the west of Ireland in the 1890s. This talk includes the launch of a display, curated by speaker Ciarán Walsh, of the photographs from the expedition.

Mass Spectrometry and the Interactions of Life The Law Faculty, Sidgwick Site 2.00pm – 3.00pm

Centre for Mathematical Sciences 169 2.00pm – 4.30pm The Law Faculty, Sidgwick Site 180 Main Reception

The Centre for Mathematical Sciences will be opening its doors to alumni and guests. Tours of the Centre will be available and posters of work by current PhD students will be on display throughout the afternoon. There will be a lecture entitled ‘Mathematics of Information: the next frontier’.

Being able to visualize the shapes of the various building blocks inside the cell has greatly expanded our understanding of life. Traditionally this is done by X-ray crystallography - but mass spectrometry can provide answers where other solutions can’t. Dr Andrew Holding (St John’s 2005) is a Medical Research Council Career Development Fellow. He is a former participant in the University’s Rising Stars programme.


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Cavendish Laboratory Event

The Conservation of Easel Paintings Studios

Cavendish Laboratory, Bragg Building

Hamilton Kerr Institute

2.00pm – 5.00pm

2.30pm – 3.30pm

100

15

Entrance Foyer, Pippard Lecture Theatre

Main Institute Entrance

Professor Malcolm Longair (Trinity 1963), Emeritus Jacksonian Professor of Natural Philosophy and former head of the Cavendish Laboratory, explores ‘A New History of the Cavendish Laboratory - What Really Happened’; followed by ‘Physics at Work’, an exhibition presented by those at the cutting-edge of research and development showcasing the many uses of physics in everyday life, along with applications of physics in research and industry. Refreshments will be available.

The Hamilton Kerr Institute, housed beside the Cam at Whittlesford, is one of the world’s leading centres for teaching and research in the conservation of easel paintings, and a department of the Fitzwilliam Museum. This visit explores some of the Institute’s fascinating work.

Architectural Icon? And Other History Matters Faculty of History, West Road

Transport: Transport is available for this event at £2.50 per seat. It must be pre-booked. Meet at Lady Mitchell Hall, Sidgwick Site, promptly by 2pm.

A Guided Tour Museum of Cambridge (Formerly the Cambridge and County Folk Museum)

2.30pm – 4.30pm 3.00pm – 4.00pm 70 15 Entrance Foyer Museum Reception Tour this 1968 James Stirling designed building and hear a series of talks on various topics from the current and incoming chairs and undergraduates of the Faculty together with Professor Christopher Clark addressing ‘How the First World War Began’. Alumni will be able to select the sessions they wish to attend. Tea and cakes will conclude the event.

A guided tour of the Museum, offering an insight into the extensive collection which documents 400 years of daily life in Cambridge and the surrounding area.


14 Friday Afternoon

Nature or Nurture? How Much of Language is Innate?

Economic Perspectives

The Law Faculty, Sidgwick Site

Austin Robinson Building, Sidgwick Avenue

3.00pm – 4.00pm

3.00pm – 5.00pm

169

45

The Law Faculty, Sidgwick Site

Austin Robinson Building

Dr Michelle Sheehan discusses the status of language universals and gaps in relation to the nature/nurture debate. Notable gaps, she argues, provide quite strong support for some kind of cognitive bias in language acquisition, particularly when evidence from artificial language acquisition studies is considered. This will be a very interactive talk, and the audience is positively encouraged to interrupt. There will also be a few activities to take part in.

The Economics Faculty will showcase new and emerging research through a series of three minilectures. Prof William Brown will lecture on the transformation of labour relations in contemporary China; Dr Sriya Iyer (Newnham 1991) will speak on the economics of religion and Dr Flavio Toxvaerd will talk about the economics of infectious disease. The event will conclude with a drinks and light snacks reception.

Michelle Sheeham is a Research Associate in the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics, working on the ERC project ‘Rethinking Comparative Syntax’. She is a former participant in the University’s Rising Stars programme.

Lecture and Reception

Instruments of Science Whipple Museum of the History of Science 3.00pm – 3.30pm 3.30pm – 4.00pm 25 Whipple Museum Main Gallery, Reception Point

A guided tour of the Whipple Museum of the History of Science, including the new Globes Gallery.

Classics Faculty 3.30pm – 5.30pm 85 Entrance 1 (The main entrance) - unless unable to climb stairs, in which case, use the lift accessible Entrance 3

Dr Rupert Thompson (Queens’ 1990) will give a lecture entitled ‘Cracking the Linear B Code’. Sixty years ago Michael Ventris and John Chadwick published the evidence that they had deciphered Linear B. How did they do it, and why was it such an important breakthrough? A reception will follow in the Cast Gallery.


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Lecture and Self-guided Tour

Extinction by a Contagious Cancer: A Devil of a Problem

Cambridge Judge Business School

Hughes Hall

4.30pm – 6.00pm

5.30pm – 6.45pm

90

90

Please ask at Reception for directions

Pavilion Room, Hughes Hall

Come and listen to Stefan Scholtes, the Dennis Gillings Professor of Health Management at the Cambridge Judge Business School, giving a lecture on the challenges and opportunities for healthcare management. The lecture will be followed by a selfguided tour of the Business School building, previously the old Addenbrooke’s Hospital, starting in the reception area.

Professor Jim Kaufman, Hughes Hall Fellow and Professor of Comparative Immunogenetics, will be giving a talk on contagious cancers threatening the endangered Tasmanian Devil, with wider ramifications for both conservation and future treatment of cancers in humans.

Tracing Ancestry Using DNA

Virginia Woolf: A Conversation

Murray Edwards College

Clare Hall

4.30pm – 6.00pm

6.00pm – 7.00pm

80

40

Vivien Stewart Room

Dining Hall Please ask at Reception for directions

Have you ever wondered about your deep ancestral roots? Join Dr Peter Forster, Fellow in Population Genetics, to learn how ancestry can be traced using DNA. The lecture will be followed by drinks, and there will be an opportunity to order your own DNA test at a specially discounted price.

Professor Dame Gillian Beer and Dr Trudi Tate (Darwin 1991) will discuss reading Virginia Woolf, with particular attention to the novel To the Lighthouse.


16 Friday Evening

Come & Sing King’s College Chapel A rare opportunity to sing under the fan vaults of King’s Chapel, one of the world’s most renowned choral venues. Come and Sing is your chance to rediscover the joy of singing in a choir – and a unique opportunity to benefit from the tutelage of Stephen Cleobury (St John’s 1967), Director of Music at King’s. For those who would prefer just to listen, this much-loved event is a chance to attend a concert and see the Chapel at night with its screens closed.

Rehearsals

Cost

Brahms German Requiem

Singers £15 With score hire an additional £3

King’s College Chapel

Please let us know in advance if you wish to hire a score.

The soloists are soprano Gabrielle Haigh (Clare 2010) and bass Daniel D’Souza (Kings 2010). They will be accompanied by William Cole (Clare 2010) and Andrew Goldman (Wolfson 2010).

Performance

Please note that the Requiem will be sung in German using the Peters Edition. When booking you will be asked for your voice type (i.e. soprano, alto, tenor, bass) and be able to book a score if you need one. Scores should be picked up at the first rehearsal.

Rehearsal 1 4.30pm – 6.00pm Rehearsal 2 7.45pm – 9.15pm

Please specify voice type when booking (ie soprano, alto, tenor, bass) Audience (Advance booking) Audience (On the door)

King’s College Chapel Performance 9.30pm – 10.30pm (Please do not arrive before 9.15pm) 150 singers, 300 audience Access by the south door of the Chapel

£8 £10

You can book for Come and Sing as a standalone event.


Š Jacqueline Garget


18 Friday Evening

The 2013 Alumni Festival Opening Reception The Fitzwilliam Museum Main Entrance 6.15pm – 8.45pm Join fellow alumni, academics, Alumni Festival speakers and senior staff from across the University and Colleges and start the 2013 Alumni Festival in style at the opening reception.

Guided tour

The Vice-Chancellor will give a short welcome address and share his thoughts on some of the opportunities and challenges currently facing Cambridge.

7.15pm – 7.45pm 8.00pm – 8.30pm

After wine and canapés you’ll be able to explore the Fitzwilliam’s many galleries (exclusively open for the evening) and get a preview of the stunning new survey of 6000 years of African hair combs - from pre-dynastic Egypt to modern-day fist combs associated with the Black Power Movement.

Dr Sally-Ann Ashton (Girton 2007) curator of the Origins of the Afro Comb, will lead an exclusive tour of the new exhibition.

Once again this year, the opening reception will bring together the best of what the Alumni Festival has to offer: academic expertise, a collegiate sociability and an unmatched opportunity to meet new contacts.

Origins of the Afro Comb: 6,000 years of culture, politics and identity

20 per tour

Alumni are welcome to attend - Reception and a tour - Reception only - Tour only You will need to book for each element that you wish to attend.


© Andrew Crowe


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What happens on Saturday? At the heart of the Alumni Festival is the Saturday lecture programme; a day full of more than 30 lectures offering an exclusive insight into some of the University’s most up to date and transformational thinking and research. Speakers are drawn from all six Schools, and the programme represents a dazzling breadth and depth of subject matter. This is your chance not only to catch up on developments in your own subject, but to delve into areas completely new to you – whether you’re a historian intrigued by the impact of neuroscience on society, or an engineer captivated by the romance of Pride and Prejudice. Leading thinkers taking part this year include Professor Simon Baron Cohen, Professor Simon Franklin, Dame Barbara Stocking, Professor James Jackson, Professor Andy Parker, Professor Beverley Glover, Professor Alan Mycroft, Professor Simon Goldhill – and many, many more. All lectures listed on pages 22 to 33 take place on the Sidgwick Site. Details of the exact locations of each lecture will be available on the Alumni Festival website from early September, and at the welcome centre during the Festival. On the day, staff will be available to help direct you and all lectures be clearly signposted across the Sidgwick Site.


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22 Saturday

Lectures 09.30am – 10.30am

How Lord Brownlow Read his Machiavelli: The Italian Books in an English Country House Tourist routes through National Trust country houses rarely pause for long in the library, yet these significant book collections map the social history of reading in crucial ways. Dr Brundin’s recent work on the Italian books at Belton House reveals the impact of foreign travel on cultural life in rural Lincolnshire. Dr Abigail Brundin (Magdalene 1991) is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Italian and a Fellow of St Catharine’s College. She specialises in the literature and culture of renaissance and early modern Italy, and Italian culture in England. Her collaboration with the National Trust includes an exhibition of books in situ at Belton House until November 2013.

Ancient Stone Structures: Vulnerable or Resilient? Historic stone structures have stood for centuries, demonstrating incredible resilience, but are also vulnerable to rare earthquakes and the effects of modern construction. This lecture will consider the source of the remarkable stability of these structures, as well as their safety under extreme loading. Dr Matthew DeJong is a Lecturer in Structural Engineering at Cambridge University and a Fellow of St Catharine’s College. Dr DeJong leads a research group focused on earthquake engineering and the assessment of masonry structures.

The Amazing World of Cells, Molecules ... and Cancer We will follow, in the simplest way, what goes wrong when cells begin to replicate in an abnormal manner - the basic cause of cancers. We will then enter an amazing new world, revealed by astonishing technical advances that are revolutionizing how we think about and treat these fascinating diseases. Dr Robin Hesketh (Selwyn 1978) has been a member of the Department of Biochemistry and a Fellow of Selwyn College for over 30 years. His research is concerned with several areas of cancer, particularly with strategies for anti-angiogenic gene therapy. He has written three textbooks on cancer and a popular science book, Betrayed by Nature.


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Information Technology and Social Change: The First Few Millennia Modern developments have prompted intense reflection on how technological changes affect the ways in which we live, interact, even think. What can we learn from equivalent processes in the past? This lecture considers the implications of information technologies across history, with particular focus on less familiar examples, such as Russia. Professor Simon Franklin (King’s 1972) is Professor of Slavonic Studies, a Fellow of Clare College and currently Head of the School of Arts and Humanities. He has written extensively about the social and cultural dynamics of the technologies of writing and printing, especially in Russia, from the Middle Ages to the present.

New Insights into Famous Tsunamis The tsunamis following the 2004 Sumatra and 2012 Japan earthquakes were the largest for 40 years. They were observed with unprecedented detail, allowing us to see how they are caused and giving us insights into famous historical catastrophes such as the Mediterranean tsunami of AD365 and the orphan tsunami of 1700 in Japan. Professor James Jackson (Queens’ 1973) is the Head of the Department of Earth Sciences, a geologist and seismologist, and works on earthquakes particularly in the Mediterranean, Middle East and Asia. He runs an international partnership of scientists throughout Asia aimed at trying to increase earthquake resilience in vulnerable countries.

The Impact of Neuroscience on Society: The Neuroethics of ‘Smart Drugs’ ‘Smart Drugs’ are needed to treat the cognitive symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, ADHD and schizophrenia. However, there is an increasing lifestyle use of these ‘smart drugs’ such as methylphenidate or modafinil by healthy people. What will be the impact on society of these ‘smart drugs’? Professor Barbara Sahakian (Darwin 1973) is a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences and President of the British Association for Psychopharmacology. She co-invented the CANTAB neuropsychological tests, co-edited The Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics and co-authored Bad Moves. How decision making goes wrong and the ethics of smart drugs.


24 Saturday

Lectures 11.15am – 12.15pm

Does Microdialysis have a Role in Monitoring Immediate Organ Function after Transplantation? Microdialysis is a relatively new way of monitoring acute events within solid organs. Already established in neurosurgery, it has now been applied to solid organ transplantation to monitor pathophysiological responses in the immediate post-transplant period. Mr Gibbs will discuss his own very recent research in this area and possible future applications in transplantation. Paul Gibbs is currently Clinical Director for Transplantation and Senior Lecturer in the University Department of Surgery at Addenbrooke’s Hospital. His clinical and research focus is liver transplantation; in addition he is the Speciality Director for Surgery for the Undergraduate Medical Course.

The Large Hadron Collider Project: The Higgs Boson and Beyond The lecture will discuss the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, the discovery of the Higgs Boson and its importance in our understanding of the world around us. It will also cover the open questions which the project is now working on. Professor Andy Parker is the leader of the High Energy Physics group at the Cavendish. He was educated at Oxford and UCL, and was a staff member at CERN. He has worked on the Large Hadron Collider project since 1989, and is involved in searches for supersymmetry and extra space dimensions.

The Captured Thought: Understanding Other Minds and Other Times Perspective-taking acknowledges that there are multiple versions of the realities we experience both within ourselves and others, past, present and future. In this presentation we argue that seeing determines our ability to navigate the realities we encounter. We also consider how close other animals come to doing this. Professor Nicky Clayton is Professor of Comparative Cognition in the Department of Psychology at Cambridge University and Scientist in Residence at the Rambert Dance Company. Clive Wilkins is a creative writer, fine artist, performer and teacher living in the UK. They share a passion for Argentine Tango.


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26


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Wittgenstein on Religion In his notebooks, both during the First World War and at Cambridge in the 1930s, Wittgenstein tried to offer a conception of religion as a way of expressing ethical value and not as an explanation for physical facts. Professor Potter shall discuss this conception and some of its difficulties. Professor Michael Potter is Professor of Logic in the Faculty of Philosophy and has been a Fellow of Fitzwilliam College since 1989. His books include Reason’s Nearest Kin, Set Theory and its Philosophy and Wittgenstein’s Notes on Logic. His next book, to appear late in 2013, will be a study of Wittgenstein’s views on ethics and religion during the First World War.

The Lessons of the New Deal: Did Obama Learn the Right Ones? In 2009, as in 1933, a charismatic president succeeded a discredited one at a time of economic crisis and with resounding majorities in Congress. Obama explicitly looked at Franklin D Roosevelt’s (FDR) New Deal for policy models. The Democrats gained seats in the mid-term elections; FDR won a landslide re-election in 1936. But Obama lost his commanding majority in the Senate and control of the House in 2010; narrowly re-elected in 2012 but failed to regain control of the House. Why was Obama unable to turn the 2009 economic emergency into a New-Deal style success? Did he learn the right lessons from the New Deal and FDR’s unhappy second term? Professor Tony Badger (Sidney Sussex 1965) has been Paul Mellon Professor of American History at Cambridge University since 1992 and Master of Clare College since 2003. He has written extensively on the New Deal including The New Deal: The Depression Years 1933-1940 and FDR: The First Hundred Days.

The Real Mr Darcy: The Romance of Pride and Prejudice People often say that the real Mr Darcy is Colin Firth in the 1995 BBC adaptation. Professor Todd will look at (and discuss) how Jane Austen’s creation in Pride and Prejudice morphed into this modern character and came to be regarded as the very type of the romantic hero. Professor Janet Todd (Newnham 1961) is emeritus Professor of English Literature at the University of Aberdeen and President of Lucy Cavendish College. She is the author of many books on early women writers including biographies of Aphra Behn, Mary Wollstonecraft, and her two daughters, Fanny and Mary Shelley. Professor Todd is the general editor of the Cambridge edition of Jane Austen.


28 Saturday

Lectures 1.30pm – 2.30pm

Knitting Bones Porous implant surfaces favour bone anchoring. In addition to the capacity to provide space for infiltration by osseous tissue and vasculature, beneficial effects on bone-implant bonding may accrue from fibrous networks which deform in vivo generating internal stresses/strains within the in-growing bone. This design may help resolving the problem of implant loosening. Dr Athina Markaki (Robinson 1997) initiated the concept of exploiting “magnetomechanical actuation” to stimulate bone growth. She received the De Montfort Award at “SET for Britain” 2004 (Supporting Britain’s Younger Scientists, Engineers & Technologists), an Advanced EPSRC Fellowship in 2005 and an ERC Starting Grant in 2010 to carry out work in this area.

Climate Change and the Greenland Ice Sheet Warming of the Arctic is occurring at twice the global average rate with dramatic effects on the Greenland Ice Sheet. This talk will draw upon the latest research in the region, including Dr Willis’s own research investigating the effects of ice sheet melting, lake filling and draining and glacier acceleration. Dr Ian Willis (Emmanuel 1986) is a senior lecturer at the Scott Polar Research Institute, Department of Geography. He is interested in the melting, hydrology and movement of glaciers and ice sheets and how these are being affected by climate change.

Synergizing Skills for Innovations Development The world faces both unprecedented challenges and enormous opportunities from continued population and economic growth in the developing world. This lecture explores how the synergy of fresh thinking from students, academic experimental research and industry professionals can come together to develop world-changing innovations; and how a multidisciplinary team of engineers, architects, economists, planners and bankers aim to tackle the world’s most challenging issues on sustainable urban development, risk and economic inclusion through a market implementation approach. Jose Vallejo (Churchill 1999) is a mechanical engineer and an economist by training with experience in large infrastructure developments and technology microfinance in the developing world. He founded and leads the Ecohouse Initiative, a multidisciplinary team of 200 students, academics and Cambridge alumni working towards developing appropriate innovations for Sustainable Development and is currently completing his PhD at Cambridge University.


29

Cambridge Support for African Research and Scholarship, in Africa There is a strong argument that we have to support African Universities and collaborate with African researchers. This is because strong indigenous African research is needed to combat African health and economic challenges, and this is crucial for solving global problems. This lecture outlines Cambridge’s commitment to supporting African researchers. Professor David Dunne Professor of Parasitology, Extraordinary Fellow at Kings College and Director of the Wellcome Trust Cambridge Centre for Global Health Research, has partnered African colleagues (in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Mali, Gabon and Ghana) to research human parasitic diseases for the last 30 years. He also directs the Cambridge-Africa Programme which (through training/ mentoring) is helping to strengthen research capacity in Africa, and encouraging Cambridge-Africa research collaborations in a range of disciplines.

A Trick of the Light: Flower Structure and Colour The beautiful colours and patterns on flowers have evolved to attract a variety of animal pollinators. Often those patterns are produced by complex combinations of chemical pigments with nanoscale light-influencing structures. The lecture will discuss recent work on the production, function and evolution of floral patterns. Professor Beverley Glover came to Cambridge as a Research Fellow at Queens’ College followed by a Lectureship in the Department of Plant Sciences. In 2013 she took up the Directorship of the Cambridge University Botanic Garden, and the associated Professorship of Plant Systematics and Evolution.

The Rise of the Humanities This lecture challenges the ‘two cultures’ assumptions about the priority of sciences over arts in post-war Britain and argues that humanities subjects have flourished as universities have grown in this country since 1945. But will this trend continue now that students bear the brunt of the costs of their education? Professor Peter Mandler is Professor of Modern Cultural History, Bailey College Lecturer in History at Gonville and Caius College and President of the Royal Historical Society.


30 Saturday

Lectures 3.00pm – 4.00pm

What is Greek Tragedy For? This lecture will look at Greek tragedy in the context of its fifth-century production and ask why ancient tragedy has become so popular on the modern stage in the last twenty years. Professor Simon Goldhill (King’s 1975) is Professor of Greek, Fellow of King’s College and Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is also Director of CRASSH, the Cambridge interdisciplinary research centre. He has lectured and appeared on TV and radio all over the world.

Form Follows Architecture is famous for the dictum of Louis Sullivan that ‘forms follows function’. This lecture will look at current research in architecture and material where form can also follow other criteria. Michael Ramage is a University Senior Lecturer in the Department of Architecture. His specialities include designing and building structural masonry spans using traditional techniques and new materials and he collaborates in a building practice that includes the structural design, analysis, and construction of the tile-vaulted domes. Recent projects are the Pines Calyx in Dover, England, and at Mapungubwe National Park in South Africa.

Dilemmas in Doing Good Dame Barbara Stocking speaks with candour and humour about the challenges of running one of the UK’s best-known and best-respected Non-Government Organisations – Oxfam GB and how to navigate some difficult terrain in order to ‘do good’. Dame Barbara Stocking (New Hall 1969) the incoming head of house at Murray Edwards College, is also one of its most distinguished alumnae. She recently stepped down as Chief Executive of Oxfam GB where she provided leadership within the organisation, including the Oxfam International Confederation, and across the international development sector.


31

What is the Probability of the Sinking of the Titanic? We live in an uncertain world, and a basic familiarity with probability theory can help. Several real-life applications of probability will be discussed, including the Titanic and the bible codes. Probability is also a key tool in modern science, as illustrated with the aid of problems in finance and statistical physics. Professor Geoffrey Grimmett (Churchill 1999) is the Master-elect of Downing College. He arrived in Cambridge in 1992 as the Professor of Mathematical Statistics, after 16 wonderful years in Bristol spent grappling with uncertainly and exploring wild parts of the world. He is an expert in the mathematical theory of disordered physical systems.

Raspberry Pi — Putting Fun Back into Computing Raspberry Pi is a £25 credit-card-sized barebones computer, with one million sales. Learn the what, why and how of its design, how it is helping to transform education (formal and informal) and some entertaining applications. Understand the dangers of functionally closed systems and why open systems are vital for education. Professor Alan Mycroft (King’s 1974) Professor of Computing in Cambridge, studied Mathematics at Cambridge and Computer Science at Edinburgh. His research centres on programming languages, their analysis and translation. Professor Mycroft’s interests span the theory-practice divide, including having co-written the first C compiler (‘Norcroft’) for ARM. He is also a co-founder and trustee of the Raspberry Pi Foundation.

Floating Brains and Consciousness Our brains almost float within our skulls. The mechanisms involved are becoming better understood. When these mechanisms fail a wide spectrum of disorders result ranging from eyesight problems after prolonged space flight, dementia and disorders of consciousness caused by brain slump. Professor John Pickard (St Catharine’s 1964) is Professor of Neurosurgery and Chairman of the Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre (“Sick patients cannot go to the scanner; the scanner must come to the patient”). He leads a multi-disciplinary team dedicated to advancing the care of critically ill patients after brain injury.


32 Saturday

Lectures 4.30pm – 5.30pm

The Bible, Conspiracies - and Marmots: Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH) Showcase Cambridge’s humanities centre CRASSH showcases some of its current research in three 15 minute presentations by Sir Richard Evans, Dr Alison Knight and Christos Lynteris covering the Bible, conspiracies - and marmots. Sir Richard Evans Regius Professor of History and President of Wolfson College, directs the ‘Conspiracy and Democracy’ Leverhulme project at CRASSH. Christos Lynteris and Dr Alison Knight (Corpus Christi 2007) work respectively on the social ecology of pneumonic plague in Inner Asia and on the ‘Bible and Antiquity in Nineteenth-Century Culture’ ERC project, also at CRASSH.

One Becomes Two - How Human Cells Replicate their DNA This lecture will first provide an overview of what we currently know about the regulation of DNA replication in human cells. It will then cover recent work from Dr Krude’s research group that led to the discovery of small RNA molecules as key players in this process. Dr Torsten Krude graduated and obtained his doctorate from the University of Konstanz in Germany. He moved to Cambridge as a post-doctoral researcher to work with Professor Ron Laskey, and after holding a Royal Society University Research Fellowship, he is now a University Lecturer in the Department of Zoology.

Be a Mathematician for an Hour Join Charles Gilderdale to work on some of his favourite mathematical problems from the NRICH collection and discover that everyone can think mathematically. Come prepared to explore, conjecture, explain and generalise. No prior knowledge of mathematics required. Charlie Gilderdale (Jesus 1977) is a member of NRICH, part of the University’s Mathematical Outreach programme. NRICH publishes free mathematics resources designed to challenge, engage and develop the mathematical thinking of students aged 5 to 19. He develops secondary-level activities and works in schools with students and teachers.


33

Nuclear Energy - a Solution to the Energy Crisis, or Part of the Problem? The context for nuclear energy has changed completely in the last ten years. Because of the history of the industry people are sceptical that nuclear will deliver on it promises and deal with its legacy. We consider the prospects and the high level challenges for nuclear energy during the next century. Tony Roulstone (King’s 1969) has wide experience of business and is now the inaugural Course Director for the MPhil in Nuclear Energy taught by the Departments of Engineering, Materials Science and Earth Sciences, with the Judge Business School. During a 20 year career at Rolls-Royce, Tony Roulstone was closely involved in the design of reactor systems and led its nuclear business group. Subsequently, he has advised large companies on business strategy and major IT programmes.

Zero Degrees of Empathy How do we explain human cruelty? The standard explanation is in terms of ‘evil’ but this concept is not really an explanation at all, and certainly not for a scientist. Professor BaronCohen will argue that a more useful explanation is in terms of the erosion of empathy. Neuroscience is isolating the brain’s ‘empathy circuit’, and individual differences in the ‘empathy bell curve’. Both social and biological factors can lead one to lose one’s empathy and empathy is our most valuable natural resource for conflict resolution. Professor Simon Baron-Cohen (Trinity 1994) is Professor of Developmental Psychopathology and Fellow at Trinity College. He is Director of the Autism Research Centre (ARC) in Cambridge. He is the author of Mindblindness (1995), The Essential Difference (2003), Prenatal Testosterone in Mind (2005) and Zero Degrees of Empathy (2011).

Learning to Live with an Impossible Universe Twenty years ago the age of our Universe was not known to better than a factor of two, but today we know its age and expansion history to nearly 1% precision, an achievement recognised with the 2011 Nobel Prize for Physics. There is just one problem: this result is utterly incompatible with physics as currently understood. This lecture will share the latest news on these remarkable observations and ponder the challenges ahead for physics. Professor Robert Kennicutt is Plumian Professor of Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy and Head of the School of the Physical Sciences. His research focusses on observations of galaxies and cosmology. He shared the 2009 Gruber Cosmology Prize for his work on cosmic expansion with the Hubble Space Telescope.


34

Saturday Around the City ‘A la moderne’ Clare’s New Seventeenth Century Library

An Architectural Tour

A Master’s Life

Fellows’ Library, Clare College

The Fitzwilliam Museum

Fitzwilliam College

10.30pm – 11.15pm 11.30pm – 12.15pm

11.15pm – 12.15pm

11.15pm – 12.15pm

28

250

Main Entrance

Auditorium foyer

Join Tim Knox, new Director and Marlay Curator at the Fitzwilliam Museum, on an architectural tour of the Founder’s Building.

What does the Master of a college actually do? This is a question often asked by both current students and alumni, for the role is inextricably grounded in a mythology still peddled in literature, film and the media. Professor Robert Lethbridge (Fitzwilliam 1970) will explore the extent to which the modern expectations placed on a ‘Head of House’ correspond to those of the popular imagination.

15 per tour Porters’ Lodge, Old Court

In 1627 the Duke of Buckingham visited the new library at Clare and declared it to be ‘à la moderne’. Come to see why it was considered so contemporary and view an exhibition of books that were produced in that period.

Tim Knox is the former Director of the Sir John Soanes Museum and Head Curator of the National Trust.


35

Institute of Astronomy & Cavendish Astrophysics Open Day

Faith and History: An Ongoing Debate

Alumni Reunion Drinks

Institute of Astronomy & Battcock Centre, Madingley Rise

Wesley Methodist Church, Christ’s Pieces

Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic Department

3.00pm – 5.30pm

5.00pm – 7.00pm

200

50

Main Entrance on Short Street

ASNC Common Room

1st Option 2.00pm – 2.45pm – 2nd Option 2.45pm – 3.15pm –

2.45pm Tour 3.15pm Talk 3.15pm Talk 4.00pm Tour

50 (25 per option) Reception of the Hoyle Building

The Institute of Astronomy and the Cavendish Astrophysics New Battcock Centre for Experimental Astrophysics welcomes Alumni and their guests to the Institute’s ‘Open Day’. Consisting of a guided tour followed by a talk or vice versa, attendees will have the opportunity to look a display to mark the 70th Anniversary of the Cambridge University Astronomical Society, meet current researchers and listen to a talk on recent developments in Cosmology and Astrophysics.

An exhibition and lecture to mark the Centenary of the opening of Wesley Church, to be delivered by Lord Williams of Oystermouth (Christ’s 1968), Master of Magdalene College, formerly the Archbishop of Canterbury. There will be an extra charge of £12 per person payable by cash/ cheque on the door for this special event. Proceeds will be donated to three charities representing body, mind and spirit: The Nigeria Health Care Project, the Bible Society and Lifecraft.

All alumni are invited to come and hear about the latest research in the Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic Department and also enjoy the opportunity to meet up with fellow students and staff over a drink or two.


36

What happens on Sunday?

Sunday offers a chance for more of the best of Cambridge. Whether it’s the beauty of the city’s gardens, the chance to learn more about some of the extraordinary collections held here, in the museums and galleries – or more brain food in the form of panel discussions and lectures, there will be plenty to delight and inform. Hear Dame Carol Black and Baroness Joan Bakewell discussing what they have encountered when looking to influence Government in this year’s Newnham Conversation; listen to some of the key Cambridge people involved in the success of last year’s London Olympics exploring whether there really will be a lasting legacy from the Games; join Chris Blackhurst of The Independent and a group of media alumni over a cup of coffee to dissect what the papers are saying; or simply enjoy a combination of your favourite things about Cambridge – beautiful buildings and gardens, old and new friends, and a spot of intellectual exercise.

Don’t forget that the welcome centre at the Alison Richard Building on the Sidgwick Site will still be open until 3.30pm today.


38

Sunday College Garden Tour

A Tour of Madingley Hall and a Talk on Continuing Education

Murray Edwards College

Madingley Hall

10.00am – 11.00am

10.00am – 12.00pm

20

50

Porters’ Lodge

Madingley Hall reception

Head Gardener Jo Cobb will give a tour of the College’s beautiful gardens, including the Fellows’ Garden and Rosemary Murray Memorial Garden. Why not also stay and purchase brunch in the Dome dining hall after the tour – rated by students as the most popular brunch in Cambridge!

Now home to the University’s Institute of Continuing Education, Madingley Hall has functioned at various times as a hunting lodge, a family home and a royal residence. Discover the fascinating history of this 16th-century mansion and its beautiful landscaped garden, and learn about the wealth of short and parttime courses for the public now on offer.

Botanic Garden and Sainsbury Laboratory Tour Botanic Garden 10.00am – 12.00pm 120 in groups of 20 Brookside Gate, Botanic Garden

Tour of the Botanic Garden with one of their expert guides, including a brief introductory tour around the Stirling Prize-winning new Sainsbury Laboratory. Alumni taking this tour are welcome to stay for a leisurely look at the Botanic Garden and make use of the café and shop facilities.

Transport: Transport is available for this event at £2:50 per seat. It must be pre-booked. Meet at Lady Mitchell Hall, Sidgwick Site, promptly by 9:20am


39

What the Sunday Papers Say

Newnham Conversation Influencing Government: the Challenges and Opportunities

Trinity Hall

Newnham College

10.30am – 11.30pm

11.00am – 12.00pm

50

90

Graham Storey Room

Porters’ Lodge

Join Chris Blackhurst (Trinity Hall 1979), editor of The Independent and TV reporters Katie Derham (Magdalene 1988) and Giles Dilnot (Jesus 1990) together with Professor Simon Goldhill (King’s 1975), Professor in Greek Literature and Culture and Director of CRASSH for an informal and lively discussion around the top news stories of the day.

Newnham continues its successful annual Newnham Conversation with a discussion on influencing Government.

The 21st Century Clinical School: Meeting Future Challenges in Medicine, Education and Research Alison Richard Building, Sidgwick Site 10.30am – 12.30pm 110 Lecture Theatre SG1/2

Professor Patrick Maxwell, the Regius Professor of Physics and colleagues invite alumni and their guests to hear about the Clinical School in the 21st Century ... an inspiring, challenging and exciting place to be!

Newnham’s new Principal, Professor Dame Carol Black and one of the College’s most eminent alumnae, Baroness Joan Bakewell (Newnham 1951) will examine their careers, the challenges and opportunities they encountered when seeking to influence government and will touch on their personal experience of Newnham along the way.


40

Sunday Tour of the Old Schools and Senate House

College Garden Tour

Old Schools, Trinity Lane

Newnham College

11.00am – 12.30pm 2.30pm – 4.00pm

11.00am – 12.00pm 25

35 Porters’ Lodge West Court, The Old Schools (gate from Trinity Lane)

Timothy Milner (Peterhouse 1985), the University’s part-time Ceremonial Officer and an additional ProProctor for Ceremonial Occasions provides a guided behind-the-scenes tour of the Courts, Combination Room, Council Room and Senate House.

New Hall Art Collection Tour Murray Edwards College 11.00am – 12.00pm 20 Porters’ Lodge

Join us for a tour of the famous New Hall Art Collection, the second largest collection of women’s contemporary art in the world, including works by Maggi Hambling CBE, Dame Paula Rego and Judy Chicago – amongst many more. You can also purchase brunch in the Dome dining hall before or after the tour.

Head Gardener, Tony Arnold, will give a guided tour of some of the most attractive gardens in Cambridge (where walking on the grass is definitely allowed!) and share the secrets of tending them throughout the seasons.


41

Guided Tour

The Grey Friars Project: Finding Richard III

Museum of Classical Archaeology

Alison Richard Building, Sidgwick Site

11.00am – 12.00pm

12:30pm – 1:30pm            

35

110

Just inside the Museum, on the first floor

Lecture Theatre SG1/2

A guided tour of the Cast Gallery which contains copies of all the most famous sculptures from classical antiquity and several others less well known.

When the University of Leicester undertook the Grey Friars project, it was thought that the chances of finding the remains of Richard III were slim to none. Nevertheless, Dr Truri King, was approached to oversee the DNA analysis should the skeletal remains of a ‘good candidate’ for Richard III be found. Dr King will speak about the Grey Friars project, from the early stages of planning the dig, through to the excavation and the results of the various strands of analysis carried out on the remains.

Tour of the Old Library Trinity Hall 11.30am 12.15pm 2.15pm 3.00pm

– 12.10pm – 12.55pm – 2.55pm – 3.40pm

15 Porters’ Lodge

Trinity Hall will open its historic Old Library, dating back to 1590, to alumni and their guests for a tour of the library’s manuscripts and chained books, led by Dominique Ruhlmann, Director of Library Services.

Dr Turi King (Jesus 1993) read Archaeology and Anthropology at Cambridge. She is a lecturer in Genetics and Archaeology at the University of Leicester.


42

Sunday The Open Gate: Paintings by Maurice Cockrill, RA

The Evolution of Education for Educators

Trinity Hall

Donald McIntyre Building, Faculty of Education

12.30pm – 5.00pm

1.00pm – 4.00pm

Drop in event, maximum 30 guests at any one time

50

Porters’ Lodge

As Keeper of the Royal Academy Schools from 2004 to 2011, Maurice Cockrill worked at the heart of the Visual Arts world, and remains one of the most original artists working in Britain today. The serpentine and lyrical curves in the works of this exhibition reveal Cockrill’s preoccupation with organic forms, especially water and the phases of a river.

Doors and Windows of an Ancient College Trinity Hall 12.30pm – 5.00pm Drop in event, maximum 30 guests at any one time Porters’ Lodge

An exhibition of a collection of sepia pen and wash drawings by Colin Hayes (Trinity Hall 1962).

Main reception area (main entrance on Harrison Drive)

“Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself” (Dewey). So how has the academic study of education changed with the times? Explore the awardwinning building before a talk and meeting the staff and students over coffee.

Promenade Concert Fitzwilliam Museum 1.15pm – 2.00pm 50 Gallery 3

A Promenade Concert performance situated in the beautiful original Founder’s Building. Performing this year are Jonathan Fistein (Jesus 1990) who will be playing the cello and Graeme Mitchison, former Fellow of King’s College, who will be playing the piano. Please arrive early as this concert is also open to the general public.


43

What the Pumping Station did for Cambridge

London 2012: ‘A Lasting Legacy’ or just ‘A Really Great Party’?

Cambridge Museum of Technology

Alison Richard Building, Sidgwick Site

2.00pm – 2.45pm 3.00pm – 3.45pm

2.00pm – 3.00pm 110

12 Lecture Theatre SG1/2 Museum shop, entrance from Riverside

A guided tour of Cambridge’s Victorian pumping station and its machinery. Discover how the pumping station, provided the answer to the town’s two environmental problems - rubbish and sewage.

Development of In Vitro Fertilisation

Join British Olympic and Paralympic medallists, athletes and staff Kristen Henson (King’s 1997), Chris Holmes (Kings 1991), Tom James (Trinity Hall 2002), Annamarie Phelps (St John’s 1984) and John Pritchard (Robinson 1983) to relive the magic of 2012 and explore the question of the legacy.

Alumni Tea Party

Department of Physiology Cambridge University Press Bookshop 2.00pm – 3.00pm 3.30pm – 5.00pm 280 100 Physiology Lecture Theatre Main door of 1 Trinity Street A short lecture on the contribution of Bob Edwards, 2010 Nobel Laureate, and others from the Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience to the development of in vitro fertilisation, followed by a panel discussion on the future. Professor Martin Johnson (Christ’s 1963) will lead the event; he was a graduate student in Bob Edwards’ laboratory and represented him at the Nobel ceremony.

Alumni and their guests are invited to the Cambridge University Press Bookshop to enjoy sandwiches, tea and cake, whilst browsing the latest publications and giving alumni the chance to unwind after a hectic Festival. Alumni have exclusive access to the shop for the duration of the tea party and can use their CAMCard discount (20%) on any book purchases.


44

What’s on in your College?

Most Colleges will be holding events for their alumni throughout the Alumni Festival. Such events are very varied - reunion dinners, lectures, musical entertainments, afternoon tea, AGMs and sports matches – why not catch up with your fellow alumni and see the latest developments in your College whilst you are in Cambridge? Information on events being held within the Colleges for members and their guests, together with further information including College accommodation, parking and contact details, can be found on your College website, a full list of which can be found at cam.ac.uk/colleges-and-departments. Please contact your College development and alumni office directly for further information or if you have any specific questions on their planned activities over the Festival period.


45

Time to spare? Explore

Visit

Cambridge on foot by guided tour: discover hidden secrets of the Colleges, the ghostly tales of Cambridge or the University’s world-renowned scientific heritage. Whatever you fancy, there is sure to be a tour for you!

One of the many museums Cambridge has to offer; see www.visitcambridge.org for further information.

www.visitcambridge.org/ official-tours

There are a number of restaurants that offer discounts to CAMCard holders (see P 46). Two such centrally located restaurants are listed below. Please book in advance if possible.

Relax • Enjoy 20% off punting with Scudamore’s with your CAMCard • Stroll through the Colleges using your CAMCard • Use your CAMCard to receive a 15% discount at Heffers bookshop in Trinity Street

Eat in town

The Cambridge Chop House & St Johns Chophouse +44 (0)1223 359506 www.chophouses.co.uk Riverside Brasserie & Twist Bar at Doubletree Hilton +44 (0)1223 259937 www.doubletreecambridge.com The University Centre is open from 9am to 9pm seven days a week www.unicen.cam.ac.uk

Eat on the Sidgwick Site The Alison Richard Café and Sidgwick Buttery offer a range of sandwiches, baguettes and cakes. Alison Richard Café Fri 10.30am – 2.30pm Sat 11.00am – 3.00pm Sun 11.00am – 3.00pm Sidgwick Buttery Fri 08.30am – 4.00pm Sat 9.00am – 4.00pm


46

Where to eat on Saturday During the day

In the evening

Complimentary tea and coffee will be provided in the marquee on the Sidgwick Site throughout Saturday. For those who wish to remain on the Sidgwick Site for the whole day, the best option is to pre-book a packed lunch which will be available to pick up from the marquee.

Take advantage of your CAMCard at:

Enjoy a choice of

The Cambridge ChopHouse

• • • • •

Egg mayonnaise and cress sandwich Honey roasted ham and wholegrain mustard mayonnaise salad sandwich Coronation chicken sandwich Ploughman’s salad with Cheddar, Brie, Stilton, mixed leaf salad, coleslaw and bread roll Homemade seasonal spiced roast butternut squash soup with crusty roll and butter

Each lunch also includes a bottled drink, a piece of homemade cake and a homemade blood orange posset dessert. If you have pre-booked lunch, you will need to collect your lunch voucher from the welcome centre on Friday or on Saturday morning.

Cost £7.95 Other options Sidgwick Buttery open from 9.00am –4.00pm Alison Richard Café open from 11.00am – 3.00pm University Centre open from 9.00am – 9.00pm

Riverside Brasserie Twist Bar & Terrace at Doubletree Hilton

Graffiti Restaurant Alimentum Quinns Irish Pub


47

Planning your trip Accommodation

Parking

Public Transport

Get up to 15% off accommodation at local hotels with your CAMCard

Parking facilities in Cambridge are very restricted and visitors are advised to use public transport.

Buses

Visit www.alumni.cam.ac.uk/ benefits/camcard/accommodation for more details as well as other options available in Cambridge. Further information can also be found at www.visitcambridge.org/ accommodation or obtained by ringing Tourist information: (UK residents) on 08712268006 or (from overseas) on +44 (0)1223 464732. September is a very busy time in Cambridge, so it is advisable to book early. Colleges in particular need to be contacted as far in advance as possible, as they will be accommodating reunion dinners.

Access Most events are wheelchair accessible but some may involve a lot of walking, standing or climbing of stairs. If you are a wheelchair user or have serious mobility issues please contact the Cambridge Alumni Relations Office for further information or visit the website where further details of accessibility are listed for each event.

You can reserve a parking space in advance at the University Park & Cycle facility which is located at the West Cambridge Site, off Clerk Maxwell Road (approx. 30 minutes’ walk from the city centre). Parking is available for £20 from 3:00pm Thursday – Sunday (or part thereof). Please note that it is not compulsory to cycle. The barriers will operate from 8pm to 8am during which time cars can depart but cannot enter the site. Cars can be left overnight. Please visit www.admin.cam.ac.uk/ offices/em/travel/cycle/park.html for further details. If you book parking, a ticket will be sent to you in advance of the Festival for display in your vehicle. Please visit www.cambridge.gov. uk/ccm/navigation/transport-andstreets/car-parks for full details of parking in Cambridge including maps and tariffs.

For information about Park and Ride, see www.parkandride.net/ cambridge Further information about city centre buses can be found on the Stagecoach website: www. stagecoachbus.com. Routes Citi1 and Citi7 run regularly between the city centre and the station and the Citi4 or Uni4 stop on West Road, near the Sidgwick Site. Trains There is a regular express service between London Kings Cross and Cambridge: see www.nationalrail. co.uk for detailed information about all services. The railway station is approximately 1.5miles from the City Centre.


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Cambridge University


50

How to book Booking

For Single Lecture/ Tour bookings

Booking will open at 10.00am on Monday 15 July and will close at 10am on Monday 16 September.

Maximum of two events and not in addition to any other registration type.

Certain events are incredibly popular and some have very strict capacities, so book early to avoid disappointment. All events are subject to availability.

Telephone Bookings +44 (0)1223 766204

There are no booking fees and your options will be confirmed once your booking has been manually checked by CARO.

Whole Festival and Single Day Registration Online Booking Visit our website www.alumni.cam.ac.uk/festival13 Postal Bookings Please download the booking form from our website or contact the Alumni Office to receive a copy by post. Postal bookings will be accepted prior to, but not processed until 15 July and will then be processed in order of receipt. Telephone Bookings Unfortunately we are unable to accept telephone bookings.

During the Festival Visit the welcome centre at the Alison Richard Building on the Sidgwick Site - but places will be limited.

Costs Whole Festival registration (covering all lectures and tours*) £75

Single Lecture/Tour (maximum of two events and not in addition to any other registration type) £15 Parking: Thursday 26 September – Sunday 29 September (See Page 47 for further details) £20 *Events/Transport which incur an additional fee are detailed in the programme.

Cancellations

Whole Festival registration (covering all lectures and tours*) for those who matriculated after 1998 £25

Refunds will ONLY be given if cancellation is received by 5.00pm on Monday 16 September. Please let us know if you will be unable to attend, no matter how late, as there are always people waiting for places.

12 -18 year olds (whole Festival registration for accompanied 12-18 year olds) £20

Whilst every effort is made to carry out the programme as advertised, all events are subject to change or cancellation.

Single Day registration £55


Cambridge Alumni Relations Office (CARO) University of Cambridge 1 Quayside Bridge Street Cambridge CB5 8AB +44 (0)1223 332288 events@alumni.cam.ac.uk www.alumni.cam.ac.uk/festival13 #AlumniFestival

See you next year Alumni Festival 2014 will be held between 26 – 28 September

Alumni Festival 2013  

28 - 29 September

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