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SUMMER 2010

MARIEL HEMINGWAY Gets candid about her life, healthy living, and her new love for Cambria

THE FAMILY KITCHEN Create a kitchen that works for you and your entire family

CLASSIC COCKTAILS Top bartenders reveal their secrets


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Letter from the Publisher We hope you enjoy our second issue of Cambria Style.We have appreciated all the positive comments and feedback from our readers as we continue to create future issues. For you, the reader, whether you are building new, remodeling, or simply in the design process, our aim is to assist you in striving for perfection by providing insight and educating you on the best of what is out there. Zeroing in on the products and professionals that are striving for the same level of quality that you’ve come to trust from the Cambria name. In this issue, we highlight our new friend Mariel Hemingway, whose efforts to live green, be innovative, functional, elegant, and leading edge brought her to Cambria.We also will share with you a variety of stories that give you specific insights into the differing challenges we all deal with when building and remodeling. Teresa Spinner, who used her artistry to make Cambria just what she envisioned. Jane Lockhart, a designer and color maven who shows how crucial designers are when it comes to creating beautiful and functional spaces, with her ingenious use of Cambria in a kitchen remodel. Then it’s what can make for the best in spirits, gadgets, and lots about what’s happening “on the street”… from those who are living Cambria Style in the street. Enjoy!

Marty Davis

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Contents z

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24 LIVING STYLE

The Family Kitchen . . . . . . . . . . . .16 As the kitchen becomes the place where families gather, designers respond with novel approaches to make it all work COVER STORY

A State of Mindfulness . . . . . . . 24 On the Cover Mariel Hemingway relaxing at home in California Photograph by Jeff Katz Hair & Makeup: Kendra Richards for Aim Artists Fashion Stylist: Golriz Moeini

When it comes to getting candid about her life, healthy living, and her new love for Cambria, Mariel Hemingway is an open book RENOVATION STYLE

My Kitchen, My Canvas

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Artist Teresa Spinner channeled all her creative energies into the design of her elegant new kitchen


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Contents

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HOME FOOD

STYLE UPDATE IDEAS

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Mariel’s Peach Slush . . . . . . . .42

Ingenious designers find compelling ways to beautify our homes, simplify our lives, and enhance the routines of daily living. Here’s the latest for your perusal

Mariel Hemingway’s recipe for this summer confection breaks a few rules, but the result is scrumptious

Style Report

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HOME ACCESSORIES STYLE UPDATE COLOR

Colors of Cambria . . . . . . . . . . .10 For an unforgettable kitchen, consider using a rich palette anchored by one of Cambria’s array of stunning countertops

Living in Eco-Style . . . .14 Fashion icon Cheryl Tiegs offers her thoughts on protecting the environment while remaining stylish HOME RENOVATION

Kitchen Complements . . . . . .34 Design maven Jane Lockhart had her hands full in this renovation of an ’80s kitchen HOME MEN’S CLUB

A Spirited Revival

As summer heats up, we present an array of products to pique your fancy LATEST WORD

Word on the Street . . . . . . . . . .46

STYLE UPDATE GREEN LIVING

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Things to Love . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

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Spearheaded by a new generation of mixologists and a tasty array of boutique spirits, the classic cocktail is back with a passion. Raise a glass and enjoy: Cheers!

The latest news and notes about Cambria and the world beyond LAST LOOK

Now and Zen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Up-and-coming interior designer Christopher Kennedy created a stunning kitchen for Cambria’s new Design Center in Palm Desert, California


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StyleReport Ingenious designers find compelling ways to beautify our homes, simplify our lives, and enhance the routines of daily living. Here’s the latest for your perusal. Be Bold—It’s IKEA The designers at IKEA continue to offer cutting edge home accessories at extremely reasonable prices.Who says style has to be expensive? This pendant lamp, which casts decorative patterns on the ceiling and surrounding walls, retails for only $89.99

Jewel Box Bathroom

Wallpaper Revival Wallpaper is back in a very big way and designers are using it in spaces both big and small. For a look at some of the most stylish and beautiful options available, go to www.walnutwallpaper.com. Search by color, by style (every-

thing from art deco to damask to tropical), or by the name of any of the over 30 designers represented. Need advice? The site has design experts available to respond to questions on any of the site’s many products.

“We are seeing the return of jewel-box rooms,”says Karen Beauchamp, creative director at Cole & Son, a British company that has been manufacturing hand printed wallpaper since 1875 (www. cole-and-son.com). “Paper every wall to really surround yourself with pattern and color. Don’t be afraid to be more daring with your paper and patterns. So many people only use wallpaper in a small space, such as their downstairs loo, then they wish they’d used it somewhere else.”We think this loo looks just fine.


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StyleReport

Breaking the Rules This bathroom from Amoroso Design for a home in Burlingame, California, reflects a growing trend towards the use in bathrooms and kitchens of furniture styles once restricted to bedrooms and living rooms. Here a traditional wood table is adapted for use in the bathroom, adding color and warmth to the space. Note the anchoring of the leg in the baseboard (inset) for added stability.

Industrial Cool Consider Cambria To ensure that innovative solutions like this double sink are both functional as well as beautiful, consider using a Cambria surface for the countertop. Colors that would coordinate perfectly in the bathroom style above include (left to right): Carmarthen Brown, Dover, and Whitehall. www.CambriaUSA.com

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Copied from the original 1930's Benjamin industrial pendant.This drop cord fixture follows a simple industrial style with the option of a turn key on/off switch and cloth cord, to accent above tables, bars, and countertops. Premium shade finishes include brass & copper; with nostalgic Edison style light bulbs. www.barnlightelectric.com


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Reflect Light/ Banish Winter Scandinavian design has always been popular in the States, perhaps never more so than today. In addition to the minimalist aesthetic often admired—and imitated—designers have also begun to take more serious note of the typical Scandanavian use of white and pale colors to ward off

the darkness of those long, dark winters. That approach works well here too—so consider light, subtle colors like Benjamin Moore Silvery Blue when formulating your kitchen palette. Your spirits will lift every time you head to the fridge.

Benjamin Moore

Clear Skies This color is part of the Classic Color Collection, whose timeless, elegant offerings guarantee beautiful, usable color all the time, every time. A collection of 1,680 inspired hues that consumers and professionals have enjoyed for years, the Philippe Starck brings his clean colors in this palette are as timeessential aesthetic to his new sinks less as they are contemporary. for Duravit.The central design feature www.benjaminmoore.com is the bowl,with sidewalls that rise out

Starck & Duravit

of a flat surface.A harmony between the rectangular sink and the rounded edges pleases the eye and protects the hands.Made of durable,easy clean,easy care ceramic. www.duravit.us/

An Instant Classic Looking to add some classic style to your table? Consider this Aqua/ Turquoise bowl set from Heath Ceramics, the revered California company that has been crafting products representing the essence of refined yet organic elegance for more than 55 years. www.heathceramics.com

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StyleReport

Classic Modern Can there be a more iconic symbol of modernist design than the Eames Eiffel Chair, designed by the inspired team of Ray and Charles Eames? Created in 1948 as the first industrially manufactured plastic chair, it was an instant hit and the couple’s most enduring creation. As anyone who has sat in one knows quite well, the chairs are also comfortable, with a high, flexible back, a deep seat pocket, and a waterfall seat edge that reduces pressure on the backs of the legs.The chairs have enjoyed a major renaissance of late, becoming the darlings of designers everywhere seeking an elegant, undeniably cool addition to their more modernist interiors.

Eames Within Reach Goodness and Beauty Stefanie Odegard’s stunning collection of carpets, like “Rosalia”(above, part of her “cultural narratives” collection and inspired by a Mexican silk altar frontal) not only add a touch of beauty to your home but also contribute to the betterment of the world. A portion of every sale of Odegard carpets goes to support the Rugmark Foundation and its GoodWeave program, which certifies that any rug or carpet carrying the GoodWeave label was produced entirely without child labor.The Rugmark Foundation works to end child labor and to support educational opportunities for children in India, Nepal, and Pakistan. Ms. Odegard has been on the foundation’s board of directors since 2000. www.odegardinc.com

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Design Within Reach recently created this authentic, fully licensed version of the Eames classic, composed of more ecofriendly polypropylene. www.dwr.com


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On Making Less Trash Everyone is trying to lead a greener lifestyle these days. Happily that doesn’t mean having to give up everything you know and love, nor does the

effort have to bust your wallet. Buying vintage, pre-owned, and refurbished goods means you’re taking less from the Earth and less from your wal-

let; actions as simple as replacing your bottled water habit with a reusable bottle mean you’re one step further on the journey to a greener lifestyle.

Organic Replacements LEFT: Japanese designer Yumiko Sekine uses raw linen

from Lithuania to create the Fog Linen Waffle Towels (2002), which get softer with age and actually become more absorbent with each washing. www.dwr.com Tired of all those plastic baggies filling school or work lunch boxes? This fabric alternative (100% cotton twill) works perfectly for packed lunches, travel snacks, or any other item that needs a secure container. The bags can be machine washed and dried or washed with the dinner dishes and hung to dry for use the next morning. www.plumcreekmercantile.com

Brush Strokes The Iris Hantverk Company produces high-quality household items using techniques that date back to the 19th century. Lovisa Wattman’s Table Brush is suitable for small-scale messes, like post-lunch crumbs or eraser shavings. Nestle the brush into the dustpan and hang it on the wall until the next mini mishap. Made in Sweden. www.fjorn.com/iris-hantverk.html

The Open Plan Part of a trend towards airier, more open kitchens has been a move away from cold, sleek, closed cabinets and towards open cabinets and shelves, like these designed by EmersonMade, that display their contents, offering the opportunity to add color, variety, and warmth to a sometimes less than inviting space. Should you wish to pursue this option, designers strongly recommend creating a

consistent overall look for the open shelves, perhaps using well-coordinated storage options like these bottles, as a means to tie the space together and avoid simply displaying a lot of clutter for all your friends and visitors to see. In other words, although doors may sometimes seem a bit forbidding, make sure you’ve considered your strategy very carefully before opting for open shelves.

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STYLE UPDATE/COLOR

The Colors of

Cambria

THE FEATURED PALETTE

For an unforgettable kitchen, consider using a rich palette anchored by one of Cambria’s array of stunning countertop colors OVER THE YEARS, OUR KITCHENS AND WHAT WE EXPECT OF THEM

SUSSEX

NOTTINGHAM

BENJAMIN MOORE’S WI LMI NGTON TAN

Nottingham (center) contains flecks of many colors that are reflected in other parts of this palette and thereby forms a visual link between the greenish Sussex and the warmer color of Wilmington Tan.

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have changed immeasurably. What was once a rather small, strictly utilitarian workspace a generation or two ago has now grown up and increasingly encompasses additional roles as central gathering place for family and primary entertainment venue for guests. And because of all these added responsibilities, the kitchen of today is expected to not only function well, but to look good while doing it. But how does one approach the creation of a hightraffic, efficient cooking and living space that also combines many different materials—wood, stone, metal, fiber—into one cohesive and elegant design? The answer for many interior designers involves the use of a rich color palette as their foundation. Carol Ahlstrand, a Minneapolis-based interior designer at Advance Design Associates, says this notion of starting with a pre-matched set of richer, complementary colors was the launching pad for her showroom kitchen design seen here. “I wanted to go with an earthy elegance,” she explains. “These richer palettes all tend to utilitize deeper, darker, and more saturated colors.” In preparation, Ahlstrand says she developed three different potential color palettes using different paints and stains, hardware and appliances, as well as solid surfaces. But when it came time to pick a starting point for this model kitchen’s actual design, she chose a Cambria countertop. “As a designer, I like to find my bridge first,” she explains, “that one element that pulls the rest of the space together.” Within the main Cambria countertop she chose as her design inspiration (Nottingham, from the Quarry Collection), she notes that there are three or four other complementary accent colors—some darker and some lighter—that she used as color guides for much of the rest of the kitchen. “For example, the colors I chose for the walls and cabinet stains (Benjamin Moore’s Wilmington Tan and maple Wood-Mode

KITCHEN CREDITS:

Wood Mode cabinets and island, design by Belle Kitchen in International Market Square Minneapolis, MN PAINT: Benjamin Moore Wilmington Tan BACKSPLASH TILE:

California slate 1X1 ceramictileworksmn.com ISLAND COUNTERTOP:

Cambria Sussex with a 5-inch edge PERIMETER COUNTERTOPS:

Cambria Nottingham SINKS AND FAUCETS: Kohler RANGE: Viking


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cabinets in a Matte Candlelight stain with Black Glaze finish) I pulled from the main countertop’s light and dark brown accent colors.” Even the more contemporary and monochromatic color of the island’s countertop (Sussex, from the Desert Collection), can be traced back to the tiny flecks of green/grey in the primary countertop. While emphasizing a rich color palette can be a great way to tie different elements within a kitchen together, it’s important to avoid letting these similar hues from overwhelming the space. One way to do this is to use these same materials in a creative, eyecatching way, like applying a vertical accent arch made of Cambria quartz on the backsplash behind the stove. “Kitchens are usually so linear,” Ahlstrand explains, “so I wanted to also use Cambria to create a different focal point and soften all those lines.” Another way to keep the same color theme but break up its effect on the eye, Ahlstrand notes, is by using different textures.

“For instance, in this kitchen, we used 10-inch-wide repurposed pine flooring,” she explains. “Its rough texture balanced out the sheen from the cabinets and the countertops.” Likewise, differently textured accent elements like the glass tile in the backsplash and wicker baskets in the island’s open-end shelf infused more interest to the kitchen’s visual landscape, all the while remaining within the palette’s color boundaries. Then, to finish off such an important space visually, Ahlstrand recommends finding a contrasting color for things like the kitchen’s cabinet hardware, fixtures, and appliance surfaces. “Stainless steel, pewter, chrome, aged bronze, copper: all of these can add a dash of coolness to what is a strongly saturated and warm space,” she notes. “I think of them as the kitchen’s jewelry, finishing off the space by giving it just a little bit of sparkle and dance.”

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WARM PALETTE

Jewelry

Cabinet door pulls, appliance fascias, and fixtures all constitute what Carol Ahlstrand calls a kitchen’s “jewelry.”

combine with rubbed bronzes, golds + coppers

CAMBRIA

NOTTINGHAM

SUSSEX

Faucets by Kohler (from left) Parq® Polished Chrome finish; Antique Vibrant Brushed Bronze; Fairfax® Oil-Rubbed Bronze TM

HAZELFORD

CHERRYBROOK

PARK GATE

BURNBURY

B E N JA M I N MOORE

BENJAMI N MOORE

Hammered Copper Apron Farmhouse Sink, $1299.00, www.coppersinks.com.

HUNTINGTON BEIGE

CHARLESTON BROWN

Array of cabinet pulls: 1. Top Knobs, $6.50, www.topknobs.com; 2, 4 & 5: Hickory Hardware, $10.49, $13.99, and $15.99, www.hickoryhardware.com; 3.Lews Hardware, $7.50, www.lewshardware.com; 6. Ashley Norton, $34.00, www.ashleynorton.com. All cabinet pulls provided courtesy of The Brass Handle in Minneapolis, MN.

GALVESTON GREY

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TUDOR BROWN

1 3

6 MIDSUMMER NIGHT

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Through the use of clever construction methods, you can achieve an expensive look at an affordable price.

Fabrication Tricks Through the use of clever construction methods, you can achieve an expensive look at an affordable price. For instance, the

island’s butcher blockstyle Cambria quartz countertop lends the kitchen a formidable presence and upscale appeal. But rather than

SUSSEX

pay much more for one solid, 5-inch-thick slab weighing in at over half a ton, Ahlstrand had the fabricators at Cambria mitre together five

pieces—one top and four sides—of one-inchthick quartz roughly in the shape of a shoebox top. This much lighter quartz piece, with seams

only visible at the corners, caps off the island at a fraction of the price, but still gives the appearance of a grand slab of stone.

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STYLE UPDATE/GREEN LIVING

Living in

Eco-style Fashion icon

Cheryl Tiegs offers her thoughts on protecting the environment while remaining stylish

CAMBRIA STYLE: As both a legendary fashion

icon and a longtime advocate for green living, how do you successfully combine those two interests when it comes to forging your own personal style? CT: Well, first off, let me say I don’t think that they’re not compatible. What I tend to focus on these days is avoiding that vicious cycle of consumption, which involves buying and then throwing away a lot of “stuff.” That idea extends into my decorating and fashion sense as well.

CS: Still, some people may remain skeptical, afraid that they’ll have to sacrifice their sense of style in order to be environmentally conscious. What do you say to that notion? CT: Nowadays when it comes to design and per-

sonal style, there are all kinds of environmentally sound choices available, from natural quartz countertops like Cambria to organic fiber fabrics and textiles to furniture and floor-

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ing made from renewable resources. What’s more, many times these products are not only good for the environment, they’re also good for the individual. I’m reminded of all the harsh chemicals used to clean and seal my old Italian tile countertops before I installed Cambria in my kitchen. I had to leave the house for the day when the cleaners came in because the smell was so bad. Likewise, I now have several organic cotton blankets that don’t use all the harsh chemicals and dyes that go into the normal cotton textile manufacturing process. Now when I put my head on the pillow at night, I know I’ve done a good thing. CS: When you wake up in the morning, where does this eco-conscious style sense begin?

It often starts in my own home. I’ve become much more conscious about keeping my clothing for longer periods of time instead of always running out to buy the latest fashion

CT:


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trend. And when I am finished with an item of clothing, I donate it. I also recently bought new checks for my checkbook that use recycled paper and show my support for the Humane Society. These all seem like tiny gestures, but living with an awareness and a sense of environmental responsibility helps me hold myself accountable. CS: Just as with the Cambria countertops and organic cotton blankets you mentioned, a number of other “green” materials, like hemp, cork, and bamboo are now increasingly common. Does that make your eco-style choices easier?

Oh yes, cork and bamboo are great materials for both your home and your wardrobe. It’s so much better to use natural products like that as opposed to, say, putting in some sticky plastic laminate on your kitchen floor. Even products that use materials that may not have been natural or environmentally renewable originally, like plastic water bottles or glossy magazine paper, are now being recycled into worthwhile products like fleece jackets or rugs.

CT:

CS: When thinking about eco-conscious style, how important is it to consider not just the product itself but how and where that product is made and brought to market? CT: Thankfully it’s easier than ever to find out

about those issues these days. In fact, the way in which Cambria products are created, with all of the water used in the manufacturing process being recycled through the plant and all the quartz used in the products being mined in accordance with the strictest environmental standards, was one of the things that attracted me to Cambria in the first place. With the Internet and a bit of persistence, it really is possible now to find out more about what you’re buying and what its environmental impact is. It may require making a change or two around your home, but we all know how worthwhile that effort is. My whole house isn’t fully “green” just yet but, one step at a time, I’m getting there. CS: How critical is it for people to realize that taking a series of small steps eventually does add up to something larger and more positive? CT: Of course we can’t expect people to just tear their houses down and start over in order to be more environmentally sensitive. But I’ve found that taking a host of other smaller but nonetheless important steps can have a genuine impact. For example, I have lots of wonderful sheets and blankets that aren’t necessarily made from environmentally sustainable products or methods, but every time I have to replace one, I now go the organic cotton route. Two years ago for Christmas, I sent out as

gifts these KOR reusable water bottles that don’t have the chemical BPA in them; last year I bought some fabulous hemp T-shirts and gave them out. I’ve found that giving gifts is another way to plant that seed of eco-conscious thought. CS: What’s been the reaction from people when you give them a gift like a hemp T-shirt?

You mean, are they surprised when it feels more like silk than it does a burlap bag? [laughs] There’s no question that people have been excited to discover something new that they haven’t encountered before and I’ve gotten nothing but enthusiasm and happiness in return. I think most people are really excited about finding ways they can help the environment through the style and decorating choices that they make.

CT:

CS: Any final thoughts about eco-style? CT: Buying locally really is a big thing to me. Up until quite recently, that simply meant going down to the farmers market for fresh fruits and vegetables, but now the concept has been extended to include a wide variety of products we use and consume such as wine, clothing, and furniture. It’s not always an option to buy locally, but it’s important to do your research when you’re shopping and win the battles that you can.

Cheryl’s Green Picks

ORGANIC COTTON BEDDING

The luxurious 240-thread count organic cotton bedsheets at Rawganique are naturally hypo-allergenic and made without using any bleaches, dyes, chemicals, or heavy metals in the manufacturing process. They are also guaranteed to have been made without the use of sweatshop labor. $245 for queen set, www.rawganique.com

RECYCLED CHECKS

KOR WATER BOTTLE

These stylish water bottles feature a unique hinged top and are made from BPA-free plastic. In addition to being a personal choice of Cheryl’s, they’ve also been seen satisfying the thirsts of Oprah Winfrey and Gwyneth Paltrow. $29.95, www.korwater.com

At the Check Gallery online store, you can reduce your carbon footprint by choosing checks made from recycled paper and printed with vegetable-based ink. The site also lets you personalize the checks to show your support for other worthy causes, such as the National Wildlife Federation or National Breast Cancer Foundation. $13.95/box, www.checkgallery.com

BAMBOO FLOORING

The bamboo floors at EcoTimber Flooring are three times stronger than red oak, but come from a highly renewable grass plant that is harvested just five to six years after planting. EcoTimber’s products are also plantation-grown—meaning no wild grasslands were sacrificed—and manufactured without potentially harmful chemicals like formaldehyde. From $6 to $8 a square foot, www.ecotimber.com/ ecobamboo-flooring.php

ORGANIC T-SHIRTS

Made from 100% organic cotton, the Women’s Live Simply Pelican T-shirt from Patagonia features original art by Geoff McFetridge that’s printed with easy-on-the-environment PVC- and phthalate-free inks. The shirt is fully recyclable through Patagonia’s Common Threads Recycling Program, which allows consumers to return worn out clothing to stores to be transformed into new garments. $30, www.patagonia.com

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As the kitchen becomes the place where families gather, designers respond with novel approaches to make it all work


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The Family Kitchen BY JILL KIRCHNER SIMPSON

THERE’S NO DISPUTING THAT THE KITCHEN HAS BECOME THE HUB OF

family life: a place to gather and entertain, cook and eat, do homework, even surf the Internet and watch TV. No longer is the stereotypical mom isolated in the kitchen cooking and cleaning while everyone else has fun elsewhere. The kitchen of today may be open to a family or great room, serve as the primary dining space, accommodate multiple cooks, and incorporate a wider variety of appliances than our ancestors ever envisioned. But with the expansion of roles (and square feet) in the modern-day kitchen, ideas about the best and most functional layout need to be adapted as well. Some of the most sacred rules no longer apply. “The infamous work triangle is an outdated concept,” says kitchen designer Sara Busby, Certified Kitchen Designer (CKD), in Elk Rapids, Michigan, a past president of the National Kitchen and Bath Association. Though the sink-refrigerator-stove trinity was once the holy grail of efficient kitchen design, “Now there’s often more than one person cooking; there are more appliances, such as the microwave, and new tasks, such as recycling. There are more kids cooking and helping,” says Busby. “Maybe there are two intersecting triangles, with the sink as a common point, or maybe the triangle isn’t as relevant anymore.”

One thing is certain, however: With more people, activities, and time spent in the kitchen, good layout and design become even more important—to keep everyone out of the cook’s way while still allowing for interaction and open communication. Here are our design experts’ four key areas to address in creating a functional family kitchen.

1.

Island Living

One of the most popular and simplest ways to help zone the kitchen is through the introduction of an island. “The vast majority of people we work with want an island,” says Busby, “and it’s a wonderful solution to help divide areas of activity, but still have the kitchen feel open. It’s more family-friendly than a peninsula, which only has one way in and out and causes congestion.” A well-designed island can provide an extra workstation for additional helpers, and can also encourage kids and guests to congregate on one side, and insulate the cook, and cooking activities, on the other side. How much space do you need in your kitchen to have an island? One of the most important considerations is allowing for ample walk-

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CAMBRIAN BLACK WITH KENSINGTON ISLAND

SIZING THE ISLAND Designer Lyn Peterson, author of Real Life Kitchens, has this advice for minimum clearances around an island

ALLOW AT LEAST:

30-34 inches between the island and cabinetry with no appliances. If you don’t have enough space, you might consider installing shallower cabinets along one wall to create more room. 37 inches minimum between the island and a sink; 39 to 42 inches is ideal.

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In main traffic ways or walls with appliances, allow more space—42 to 48 inches between island and wall. Be sure to allow space to open a refrigerator or dishwasher door and still have room for people to pass by. The NKBA recommends that no traffic patterns cross through the basic work triangle. If you have seating at the island, you’ll

also need to allow space to pull out stools: Jennifer Howard recommends at least 48 inches clearance on the seating side. “The island does not have to be centered in the kitchen,” points out Peterson. It can gravitate closer to the cooking area, creating a narrower aisle, to discourage guests and children from taking that route through the space. “Islands and peninsulas should buffer the cooking zone and segregate it from the noncooks, keeping the hoi polloi on the far side of the island,” she says.


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Establish a kids’ zone that will function whether the children are 3 or 13, where kids and guests can help themselves. Adequate space around the island is critical to allowing easy traffic flow as well as opportunities to sit, relax, and keep the cook company; more and more of today’s new kitchens are open to a living or great room, keeping the kitchen light and airy.

ways and room around the island. The minimum size for a comfortable island is about four feet long and at least two feet deep, so unless your kitchen is at least 8’ x 12’, an island probably isn’t an option, though you might consider a rolling cart on casters or a tall pub table where you can both eat and prep food. In terms of minimum clearances and adequate traffic flow, it depends on the function of the island and the appliances around it. See “Sizing the Island,” opposite, for guidelines. Once you’ve determined the size and location of the island, you can design its function and storage to help reinforce traffic patterns and activity zones. For example, on the outer side of the island, away from the cooking area, place drawers, cabinets or open shelves designed to store kids’ snacks and art and homework supplies. (These ideas can also apply to kitchens without an island.) Kitchen designer Jennifer Howard, of Rye, New York, who is herself a mother of five, likes to establish “a kids’ zone that will function whether the children are 3 or 13, where kids and guests can help themselves so CAMBRIAN BLACK WITH SUSSEX ISLAND they’re not in the work area. Ideally we’ll put in some kind of beverage fridge. Refrigerator drawers are spouse or kids can help wash, peel and chop food, or help with dish expensive; it can just be a 24-inch under-counter mini fridge that rinsing and clean-up. Again, think about the activities that will take holds drinks, yogurts, even popsicles if there’s a freezer compartplace there and plan accordingly. Store or incorporate cutting ment. We’ll add a snack drawer for the Goldfish, pretzels, granola boards, paring knives, or dishwashing supplies near the island sink bars, etc. I put plastic cups and plates; sports bottles, paper plates so everything needed is right at hand. Dishwashers can also often fit and napkins in those cabinets as well. The microwave can also go comfortably into a large island. One appliance that most designers nearby, so when the kids are old enough to make popcorn or heat up agree probably should not go in an island, at least in family kitchens, a snack, they can do it without getting in the way.” Sara Busby likes is the cooktop, because it’s too easy for stray hands to get burned. the Sharp microwave drawer, which is easy to house and access “If it’s a smaller island, with an active family, I won’t put anyfrom an island or base cabinet. thing on the island surface,” says Busby. “That way it has the most A second sink, whether full-size or a bar/prep sink, can help flexibility, to work for dining, food prep, homework,” or a serving make an island more functional as a second workstation, where a buffet for entertaining. CAMBRIA STYLE

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Designers advise keeping seating on the side of the island away from the work area to keep the hoi polloi out of the cook’s way while still comfortably close to the action.

CAERPHILLY GREEN

“…the average family of four opens the refrigerator 68 times a day.”

Finally, many families like to add bar seating at the island if it’s large enough. “Stools are great for young families because kids like to climb up and sit, but baby boomers and older folks are less likely to use them,” finds Busby. Both she and Jennifer Howard recommend placing seating along two sides of a corner if possible, so everyone isn’t “lined up like soldiers, but able to have eye contact,” says Busby. For the most comfortable seating, choose stools with upholstered seats. “You don’t need stools for the whole family,” advises Howard. “Have one for each kid, or have a couple for friends to sip wine and chat while you’re cooking. If you have room for a kitchen table, that’s a much more comfortable place to sit and eat meals.”

2.

Appliance Arrangements

Even though the work triangle may be outmoded, and whether you have an island or not, where you place your appliances in the kitchen is still crucial. “Keep the sink and refrigerator close to each other and out of traffic,” advises designer Lyn Peterson, author of Real Life Kitchens (Clarkson Potter). “The sink is the single most-used element in the kitchen; the average family of four opens the refrigerator 68 times a day! Lesser-

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“Upper cabinets are going away, to allow room for more windows.”

Having storage, drawers with snacks, even a mini-fridge on the open side of the island enables kids and other family members to help themselves without disrupting the flow in the working portion of the kitchen.

COSWELL CREAM

4 COMMON DESIGN MISTAKES Too many upper cabinets. “They’re great for dishes and spices, but not much else,” says Peterson, because they’re shallow. “Better to have a couple floor-toceiling cabinets instead, and more windows. But don’t place floor-toceiling cabinets in the middle of a bank of upper and lower cabinets— they should go at the ends.” Cluttered countertops. Corral small appliances in garages, place

them on a rolling drawer below the counter, or even a pull-out appliance lift (great for heavy mixers), or store the things you don’t use regularly in a pantry or cabinet.

Too much or not enough distance. “If there’s more than 48 inches between the island and the sink or refrigerator, it starts to take more than a couple steps to go back and forth,” says Peterson.

“Not allowing room for the dishwasher, refrigerator or oven door to open and people to pass by,” says Schmidt, “or if the dishwasher is being unloaded, the drawers or doors in the island can’t be opened. Or worst of all, the refrigerator door is placed so it can’t open all the way.” Placing hot and cold appliances near each other—you’re just making each of them work harder.

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“The kitchen itself is becoming a family room.” ASHFORD

used appliances like the oven and cooktop can be placed farther afield.” Sophie Dassesse-Cowles, a Larchmont, New York, mother of three, zoned her kitchen so cooking (cooktop, oven, refrigerator, main sink and microwave) is concentrated at one end, and clean-up (dishwasher, island sink, plates and glasses) is clustered at the other. “That—and a beverage fridge—keep us out of each other’s way,” she says.

3.

Open Flow

In addition to an island, what most families want when renovating or building a new kitchen is openness—which can mean a connection to the family room or great room, so mom or dad can keep an eye on kids watching TV or doing homework on the computer, as well as a feeling of light and airiness. “The kitchen itself is becoming a family room,” says Minnesota designer and stylist Barb Schmidt. It might even have a loveseat or upholstered chairs, a fireplace or TV. “Natural light is important to a feeling of openness and flow,” says Schmidt. “Upper cabinets are going away, to allow room for more windows. Walk-in pantries are one of the most requested features now, to

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reduce the number of cabinets needed for food storage. So instead of dark wood-filled walls, the kitchen now looks more like other rooms in the home.” Some designers are encountering a backlash against total openness to a great room, however, because noise, light and odors tend to travel through the space, and cavernous spaces can lack intimacy. Generous door-ways, half walls or pass-throughs can create a feeling of openness while still providing some separation. In an open room, “proper ventilation and lighting are key,” says Schmidt. “Lighting should be task-oriented and directional, not a huge flood of light everywhere. And there are great new ventilation options that come up out of the counter or hang discreetly from the ceiling.”

4.

Satellite Spaces

SEPARATE SPACES FOR SPECIFIC FUNCTIONS, placed away from the hard-working heart of the kitchen, can also help make kitchens work better for families. For example: A WALK-IN PANTRY provides generous storage in a cost-effective way,


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SAVE YOUR

MONEY: Kitchen designers reveal the amenities that they find aren’t really worth it: Warming drawers. Unless you entertain a lot, or your spouse is always home late, most people tend to warm up food in the microwave if needed.“I’d rather have the cabinet space,”says Barbara Schmidt. Pasta spigots over cooktops. “If a pot of water is too heavy to carry to the stove, then how are you going to dump it out post-boil when it is even heavier?” notes Lyn Peterson. A second dishwasher. “People inadvertently use the wrong one. One husband got so frustrated he got a clip to keep the second one closed,” says Peterson.“Everyday use doesn’t usually require a second dishwasher, and if you’re having a really big party, two dishwashers won’t hold it all anyway,” says Jennifer Howard. A double oven. “People always worry about Thanksgiving—the once-a-year holiday,” says Howard.“I manage fine with a Cuisinart convection/toaster oven for my second oven. Then I show clients how we could use that space more effectively.”

“Walk-in pantries are one of the most requested features now, to reduce the number of cabinets needed for food storage.” because it’s less expensive than building in cabinetry. In addition to dry food and paper-goods storage, a pantry can also serve as a home for large platters and serving pieces, entertaining supplies, less frequently used appliances (such as a mixer, blender, bread maker or panini maker), and recycling. “The pantry shouldn’t have open food in it, though,” advises Howard. “That just invites kids to make a mess, and you end up with open, stale boxes of food and mice. Once the boxes are opened, there needs to be space to store them in the kitchen proper.” A DESK OR COMMUNICATION STATION. A home office in the kitchen tends to be a clutter magnet, but ideally there should be a landing space, either in the mudroom or kitchen, with drawers for

school/office supplies, perhaps a file drawer or baskets for papers in transition, and a bulletin board (or the inside of a cabinet door) to post calendars and school notices. Equally important these days is an ample-sized charging station. Jennifer Howard likes to put this in the mudroom if possible, and place an outlet in each child’s cubby, so she can see at a glance who’s forgotten their cell phone or who’s snuck their iPod up to bed with them. Lyn Peterson espouses the “desklet”—“not a serious desk, more like a message center—a place to check the schedule, albeit an electronic one. Just room for the laptop—not the printer and fax—with perhaps a bulletin board or bookshelves above.” If you need serious workspace, create a separate home office rather than trying to shoehorn it into the kitchen. THE BOTTOM LINE: “There’s so much time spent in the kitchen that if it’s not comfortable and functional, it compromises not only your home but its resale value,” says Barbara Schmidt. By making it open, organizing it around function, and directing traffic flow well, you can create a kitchen that everyone can be in without driving each other crazy. As the cliché goes, “Everyone always ends up in the kitchen,” so why not plan for that and make it a pleasure?

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A State of Mindfulness When it comes to getting candid about her life, healthy living, and her new love for Cambria, Mariel Hemingway is an open book WHEN MARIEL HEMINGWAY SET OUT TO DESIGN A NEW

kitchen, she approached the process in the same way that she approaches every significant decision in her life, with considerable thought and careful study—what the Buddhists might call conscious intentionality. She considered a variety of cabinets, she examined numerous appliances, she looked at an array of flooring options. When it came to the selection of her countertops, she was equally meticulous, studying the pros and cons of every conceivable surface. Eventually she discovered that Cambria, a Minnesota based company, had a product of high-end elegance and profound functionality. “I love to dig into things,” says Mariel, “and the more I learned about Cambria, the more I thought to myself, ‘Why not meet the CEO of Cambria, Marty Davis?’” So, with help from some mutual Minnesota connections, the meeting was arranged and “we hit it off instantly,” Mariel recalls. That initial meeting led to Davis inviting Mariel, and her boyfriend Bobby Williams, to a weekend together with him, his wife, Anne, and their young son Danny, in beautiful southern California. There was hiking, gorgeous scenery, tasty food, stimulating conversation, and of course, maybe most importantly, one of Cambria’s elegant design centers. One day, while the others were soaking in their surroundings, Davis, his wife Anne, and Mariel slipped away for a visit to the Cambria Design Center in Palm Desert. Mariel just had to see, firsthand, the product, colors, and designs of Cambria. After a few hours spent examining the different uses of Cambria, the complete naturalness of the stone itself, and the dozens of colors available, Mariel was awestruck. By the end of the day, she

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simply fell in love with the product; by the end of the weekend the entire gang had become fast friends. “Even though Marty’s sort of this big-business guy, he’s very centered, conscious, aware and really listens and I love that about him,” Mariel says about their new friendship. However, she does acknowledge they don’t see eye to eye on every issue, laughing as she recounts one dinner that the families spent together when Davis showed no compunction about ordering a juicy cheeseburger, with a glass of pasteurized milk for seven-year-old son Danny, while sitting across from an avowed raw food and anti-factory farm girl like herself. “I love that he would go out and eat whatever he wants and not think that I was judging him” she explains. “We just all like to hang out because we’re like-minded people. He has his priorities really straight. He cares about the planet in the same kind of way [that I do] and he also wants to affect a lot of people positively.” Mariel is no less enthusiastic about Davis’s Cambria product. “I wanted to be able to make a great design choice that was beautiful and functional,” she says. “What I loved [about Cambria] was that I could choose from a lot of colors and it is such natural stone. There was one that was a real nautical blue and I thought, ‘Wow, I could also do a bathroom in that color!’ You can mix up really natural looking colors of the quartz and put different colors behind it.” She also came away enormously impressed with the environmental benefits of Cambria. Indeed, for a self-described “mountain girl” whose greatest passion lies in enjoying and preserving the outdoors, Mariel says she was impressed that


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Mariel chose Cambria for her new kitchen because she“wanted to to be able to make a great design choice that was beautiful and functional.�


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in this day and age. Cambria invests heavily in technology to ensure that the company is maximizing the environmental stewardship in all that they do. “Good business practices, long-term economic prosperity, complete environmental stewardship, and integrity are common themes to any well-run business,” says Marty Davis. “My brother Mitch often says, ‘in most instances, the environmentally responsible practice is also the most profitable, long-term.’ The two really go hand in hand over the long term.” What’s more, Mariel says she likes the fact that the product’s environmental benefits continue even after it is installed. “I love that, with Cambria, my new kitchen countertops will be safe enough to be rated as a food preparation surface. I realized that with marble and granite you have to put these petroleum sealants and coatings on them,” she says. “Just knowing that you can physically prepare foods to cook right on it and that there is no detrimental effects is important to me.” Focusing on what is important, being acutely aware of her choices, feeling happy about her place in the world—these are all relatively recent developments for Mariel. “Whatever I do now, like hike a mountain, I’m conscious of breath and I’m conscious of my intention and my thoughts and my movements. It’s kind of like when the Buddhists talk about mindfulness. It’s a moving meditation. Life becomes a constant practice of being present,” she says. Or, as she more simply puts it: “Doing what you’re doing while you’re doing it, that’s what yoga has taught me.” Mariel will be the first to admit that achieving this state of calm equaMariel loved the broad array of beautiful and versatile Cambria colors available nimity has been anything but easy. for her kitchen as well as the product’s many environmental benefits. Starting with the long mountain hikes she favored as a child growing Cambria recycles 100 percent of the water used in its Min- up amidst Idaho’s rugged Sawtooth Range, just miles away nesota factory and that the company has committed to mini- from her iconic grandfather Ernest’s cabin, hers has been a mizing the long-term ecological impact of how it quarries life often lived on the move. When barely a teenager, an unexand mines its quartz. She was also pleased to learn that the pected career in acting skyrocketed her to fame and has since company purchases its quartz primarily from North America served as her passport to far-flung locations around the world. and makes every effort to restore the quarry site after quartz In her mid-twenties, she co-founded a restaurant in New York extraction, even going so far as to stabilize the slopes of waste City with her then husband and later helped him grow it into rock and reclaim the flat surfaces with soil and vegetation. a nationwide franchise, all the while raising two girls (and a The goal is a laudable one and just the kind of initiative to house full of dogs). More recently, Hemingway has set up her which the company is committed. And that the CEO is so own yoga studio, embarked upon a successful writing committed to such environmental stewardship, and that he career—publishing a memoir, a self-help guide, and a cookputs his money where his mouth is, was also most impressive book so far—and launched a burgeoning health food busi-

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“Life becomes a constant practice of being present.”


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ness. And on top of all that, Mariel proudly points out that, at age 48, she just took up rock climbing in order to spend more time with her new boyfriend. Now, after years of worrying, Mariel says that she has become truly comfortable in her own skin. “I’ve guided my life toward a point where it’s not about surviving anymore, it’s about thriving.” Within that latter declaration, though, exists a deeper, more difficult implication about her past, one that is directly tied to the often-troubled legacy of the Hemingway name and her famous grandfather, author of American literary classics like The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, and The Old Man and the Sea, which won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1953. (He also was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1954.) His spare, muscular style became the model for hundreds of literary imitators, none of whom could match the power of his prose or the breadth of his vision. An intrepid outdoorsman, avid adventurer, and prodigious drinker, Hemingway was truly larger than life, representing for a generation of Americans the ultimate “man’s man.” Alas, the man behind the image and the outsized talent was also profoundly troubled, suffering from bouts of dark depression, one of which led him to take his own life in 1961. “I come from this family that has a lot of dysfunction, mental illness, alcoholism, drug addiction, and suicide,” Mariel acknowledges candidly. “I am really grateful that I have this crazy family, though, because I learned so much from them. I wouldn’t be interested in food and health and the environment in the way that I am if it hadn’t been for all the things that I’ve had to go through.” One of those things she had to go through was being thrust into a new, very grown-up role at the tender age of 12. With her older sisters Margaux and Joan increasingly following the family’s well-worn path to addiction and her emotionally distant father unwilling to step up, Mariel found herself the primary caregiver to her mother, Byra Louise, after the latter was diagnosed with cancer. Though her mother initially recovered, the ongoing struggle with both the disease and its debilitating treatments continued for years, taking a toll on both mother and child. The impact of all this upheaval on Mariel was, perhaps, predictable. “I think I spent my childhood holding my breath, scared of what might happen next,” she admits today. “Always asking myself, ‘Who’s going to get sick? Who’s going to explode? Who’s going to the hospital?” If her real life, then, wasn’t that appealing or glamorous, is it any surprise that she might find slipping into a different persona or character that much more attractive? When older sister Margaux, by then a famous model who had been cast as the female lead in the movie Lipstick, also found a role for her then 13-year-old younger sister, Mariel quickly accepted. She soon found that acting filled an important void in her life. “I wanted it and I needed it,” Mariel says now, looking back. “It helped me get out of my head and out of my fears and out of my own life so that I could pretend I was somebody else.” Her film debut in 1976 was widely lauded by critics and

launched an acting career that has spanned more than three decades. But it was her very next appearance on film, in Manhattan, Woody Allen’s 1979 black-and-white paean to New York City, that stands as a performance for the ages. Playing a precocious, world-wise teenager to Allen’s self-absorbed 40year-old schlump, Mariel quietly stole the movie and earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress. “The funny thing is that when I look back at those roles that I played, like in Manhattan, they were very sophisticated girls, but in reality, I was anything but,” Mariel says today. “And what’s really interesting is that I don’t really feel like I need acting anymore. I’ve realized that I like being myself now so I’m not as interested in playing a role. That’s why I’m doing [my cookbook] Mariel’s Kitchen and making Blisscuits. I want people to love themselves too.” Mariel’s belief in the healing power of food, she explains, compelled her to start developing healthy recipes for her then husband Stephen Crisman when he fought his own battle with cancer nearly ten years ago. “I want my Blisscuits to taste good, be presented well, and be able to sell, and then besides all of that they’re sold in recyclable material and the ingredients are really good for you,” she says. “All of it comes from believing that just being conscious when you’re making, eating, and touching your food is powerful enough to change your life.” Mariel’s recently discovered sense of security has produced a burst of new activity. Later this year, she and her boyfriend Bobby, a nutrition expert and explorer, will launch a lifestyle brand based around travel, food, and connecting with the environment. And in yet another new challenge, she is in the midst of co-producing a movie version of A Moveable Feast, her grandfather’s bittersweet memoir of 1920’s Paris that abruptly concludes with the breakup of his marriage to Mariel’s maternal grandmother. Also on Mariel’s docket, of course, is that brand-new Cambria-clad home, to be a prominent part of her new loft inside her yoga studio in Idaho, the state where Mariel and her sisters grew up and where her grandfather ended his life. “It’s in this amazing building that looks up at the mountains. I’m converting part of it into a green loft so I can live there too and the kitchen is going to be the centerpiece,” she explains. “It’s a raw space so I can create whatever I’ve always wanted in a kitchen, which is unbelievable to me. I’ve always had a house that I’ve renovated, but I’ve never created my own. So I’m really super excited about this. I have a Cambria chiseled edge on the mind.” And so she’ll have it: a kitchen of her own, created from raw space where once there was nothing. One can be forgiven for seeing hints of Mariel’s own biography in that transformation. When the work is finished, some six months from now, one imagines her there, amidst the majestic mountains of Idaho, surrounded by reminders of her past but very much focused on her woman of the future… her own woman at last.

... she has become truly comfortable in her own skin.

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“Wherever we’ve lived, we’ve always taken what was there and made it our own.”


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My Kitchen, My Canvas Artist Teresa Spinner channeled all her creative energies into the design of her elegant new kitchen BY REED RICHARDSON

WHEN TERESA AND RICHARD SPINNER DECIDED TO RELOCATE THE

kitchen within their historic 250-year-old New Hampshire house, adding more space and getting more functionality out of their home’s natural gathering area were important goals. But designing a warm, inviting area where children and grandchildren could easily congregate and where visiting friends from Europe could be casually entertained weren’t the only objectives. For Teresa, a classically trained portrait artist, the creation of a new kitchen was also an opportunity to satisfy her painterly sensibilities, affording her yet another canvas on which to combine striking elements of color and detail. “Everywhere in my house I have original paintings and still lifes hanging on the walls,” Teresa explains. “So I’m all about wall space and color, and that was what I was thinking about when we began planning to move the old kitchen.” Such a complicated, in-house relocation project might be a daunting task for some homeowners. The Spinners, however, are no

strangers to tackling home renovations. Thanks to Richard’s career as a network TV executive, the couple spent much of the past few decades hopscotching across the U.S. and Europe, remodeling homes along the way. And still today, the Spinners maintain this itinerant lifestyle, splitting time between Europe, Florida, and New England. “We’ve lived in a lot of places,” explains Teresa. “But wherever we’ve lived, we’ve always taken what was there and made it our own.” This was especially the case with this house, a charming circa.1760 Cape in the tiny village of Sanbornton. Before moving in 18 years ago, they spent six months gutting the home and essentially rebuilding the infrastructure from the frame out. Since then, they had even built two new attached additions to the home—a long, singleroom art studio for her and a roughly 1,000 square-foot office with accompanying fireplace for him—but still hadn’t been able to address the kitchen’s obvious shortcomings. “At this point in our lives we have a lot of family and friends that

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1

2

“I like to use themes more than once in a room or space to make it look like the design was really thought about,” explains Perron.“But I like to put in these elements in an unexpected way.” And in the Spinners’ new kitchen, the wooden shelving unit Perron had custom made and installed over the stove top (2) serves as the way to harmonize many of the disparate parts of the space. 1. The conical rosettes, protruding triglyphs, and ornate cornices on the antique bookcase in the far corner are repeated on the entablature of the shelves over the stovetop. 2. The period-appropriate beadboard found on the inside vertical surfaces of the shelves is also used on the outside vertical surfaces of the island facing the fireplace.

3

3. The antique pewter plates on display in the shelves echo the brushed metallic patina of the kitchen island sink fixtures. 4. The shelving unit’s reddish-brown stain links it with the similarly-colored Shaker table and sideboard found around the corner in the dining area.

come to visit and the old kitchen was really kind of small and broken up from the rest of the house.” Describing herself as a very social person, Teresa says she grew frustrated with having to be squirreled away from her guests in the home’s cramped, galley-style kitchen. But it wasn’t until recently, when her now retired husband agreed to sacrifice his increasingly underutilized office space, that her desire for a larger, more connected kitchen came to fruition. And from the outset, Teresa’s artistic style served as the driving inspiration for the project. “I found this old book in England on color that featured a wonderful set of cabinets painted in this cerulean blue, with just a touch of gold along the edge,” recalls Teresa. “It looked very old and Shakerlike and we just went from there.” That ‘we’ included local designer Maria Perron, from Village House Interiors, who eventually matched the distinctive blue color (Benjamin Moore’s Saratoga Springs) and found a carpenter who could closely replicate the same antique Shaker construction style of the cabinets. “I say that Teresa was in her ‘blue’ period when we did this renovation,” jokes Perron. And while the cabinet’s dusky light blue surfaces are clearly one of the most striking focal points of the new space, Perron points out that the thin traces of golden trim also play a key role. “Those yellow, butterscotch highlights help join the cabinets thematically with the main house,” she explains, complementing the many wooden stained surfaces in the addition’s exposed, postand-beam construction. “As a result, all those blues and the browns go together well.” Likewise, when it came time to choose surfaces for the new kitchen’s counter, island, and adjacent dining area’s banquette, the pair let color and a nod toward period-correct detail drive their decision. As a result, they settled on Cambria quartz surfaces, both because of their architectural similarity to hewed stone, a popular Colonial-

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era construction material, and the wide range of consistent hues. “I wanted a more muted color for the countertops to set off the cabinets and other kitchen details,” explains Teresa, “so the two different Cambria quartz styles I chose were perfect as kind of a background color.” (Park Gate, which was used on the kitchen counter and dining room banquette, and Windsor, which covers the kitchen island, are both from the Quarry Collection.) “With Cambria, I saw what the material was ahead of time and knew it wouldn’t vary in grain or color once it came time to install it. Down in Florida, I have granite and that’s fine, but it’s so much work and it never turns out exactly the way you want it,” Teresa explains, sounding very much like someone who spends her days giving great thought to things like color consistency and the proper composition of every inch on a canvas. “I knew exactly how I wanted to use [Cambria] in the space and I think it worked out perfectly.” Attaining the new kitchen’s open, airy feel—a key goal of the renovation—was achieved mainly by putting the cabinets and appliances solely along the two inside walls of the L-shaped space. This ensured that the space’s dramatic fireplace and many tall windows, which line three sides of the addition, are visible from almost any point in the room. “We have a lovely greenhouse visible out of one side of the room and we can sit and occasionally watch the bears outside through the other set of windows,” Teresa says. “It’s still a rather compact kitchen, but now we have an island and all this extra space from the fireplace around to the dining area that we didn’t before.” To keep a proper balance of old and new, false-front cabinet doors covered the new kitchen’s side-by-side refrigerator, to prevent a giant swath of black or stainless steel color from overwhelming the surrounding cabinetry’s cerulean blue theme. The Spinners did allow for some more readily apparent contemporary touches to be mixed in, though. The choice to reuse the black induction cooktop in the new kitchen, rather than install more period-correct gas burners, is an obviously modern touch, but one that is nonetheless muted by the surrounding countertop’s similarly dark color. “Overall, it’s really a blend of new and old in a really neat way that won’t go out of style,” explains Perron. “We made everything look like it had always been there.” For her part, Teresa couldn’t be more satisfied with how the kitchen relocation turned out, especially when she has a room full of friends and grandchildren scattered about the new space, figures composing a portrait that is anything but a still life. “It’s just a really comfortable space and everybody loves to be in there, which is all that I ever wanted.”

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“I found this old book in England on color that featured a wonderful set of cabinets painted in this cerulean blue, with just a touch of gold along the edge...� PARK GATE


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HOME FRONT/RENOVATION

Kitchen Complements Interior designer Jane Lockhart had her hands full in this renovation of an ’80s kitchen B Y J A N E LO C K H A RT

I’VE ALWAYS SAID THAT NO MATTER HOW WONDERFUL YOUR

house is or how perfectly it’s decorated, if the kitchen isn’t to your liking it will never be the home of your dreams. The kitchen remains the one room in any house not only where friends and family gather but also where the design tone is set for your entire home. Rob and Sandra Knowles thought they had found their dream home. It had a lovely stone fireplace centered in the large open-plan living and dining room, a stunning southern view to the ravine below, and ample space throughout the twolevel ranch-style home. Unfortunately there was one unsatisfying space–the kitchen! Over the years Rob and Sandra had renovated and updated most of their home so that it was bright and contemporary, but the small kitchen had been left behind in the 1980s, which was the last time the space had been renovated. Typical of that era, the kitchen was a separate, enclosed room, complete with the standard “California ceiling” and situated at the front of the house. It featured one large front window, a smaller window over the sink and a side door right in the middle of the kitchen’s outside wall that led to the yard. In addition, the previous renovation of the space, done before

Rob and Sandra owned the house, had resulted in a cramped, divided room with a small eat-in area separated by a tiny Ushaped working space. This was going to be a big challenge for my entire design team. THE PLAN

It was clear that the renovation required some careful planning in order to maximize the existing space, make it highly functional, and define the home’s contemporary style. After a full tear-out of all existing cabinets, flooring, and appliances, the new layout of the kitchen was a key component to making it all work without expanding the size of the room or the location of the existing windows and door. Working with Mill Street Kitchens in Mississauga, Ontario, a plan was drawn up for a modern kitchen design with a large center island featuring a cantilevered breakfast counter, thereby eliminating the need for a dining table. This unique table-height counter wraps around two sides of the island offering seating for four for dining or chatting with the cook. With a sleek, easy to maintain Cambria quartz countertop (Cambrian Black), the island provides a large work surface complete with cooktop.

The creation of an elegant cantilevered breakfast counter, with seating for four along two sides of the island, eliminated the need for a dining table and offered visitors the opportunity to sit and chat with the cook during food preparation.

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All in the Details:

1-2.

3.

1. Previously this kitchen was broken up by a peninsula making it difficult to have more than a few people in the room at one time. The large island, with its tableheight counter that seats four, not only makes cooking and prep more efficient but also seamlessly integrates an eating space into the island without taking away from the chef’s area. 2. The stunning black Cambria quartz countertops are beautiful, durable, and practical. Typically black granite countertops are easily scratched and not always even in pattern, whereas quartz is consistent in color throughout with a hard, smooth, easy-to-maintain surface. 3. The cherry cabinets are classy, with their warm, rich color and beautiful grain. The contemporary flat-paneled door style is timeless and definitely easier to clean and maintain in smaller kitchens full of busy chefs.

“The porcelain floor tiles look like no other material and offer the warmth of wood and the look of cork.” —J.L.

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Trax porcelain ceramic floor tile in color Noce www.cercantile.com/TileSeries


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“Rob and Sandra found the patterns of granite too busy ... and they were concerned about the amount of care and maintenance required by granite, so quartz seemed like a very appealing alternative.” TH E CABI N ETS

Rob and Sandra wanted a modern design, but not a look that was cold and industrial. Materials and color scheme would play a major role in achieving a warm and welcoming space that felt good and enhanced the family’s daily routines. The cabinets were an important feature in this small space. A clean and simple flat panel style was chosen. A more ornate door style with details such as a raised panel would have visually overpowered the room and given it a more traditional look. The sleek natural cherry cabinetry with simple steel hardware is elegant and architectural in look and truly timeless. T H E F LO O R S

In keeping with the kitchen’s clean contemporary styling large rectangular porcelain tiles with the look of burled wood beautifully complement the glossy black countertops. As the main access to the backyard through the side door it was critical that the kitchen flooring be hard-wearing and easy to maintain. Laid in an alternating block pattern, the floor mimics the straight lines of the kitchen layout. T H E CO U N T E RTO P S

The addition of the generous center island created significantly more counter space in the new kitchen. It was imperative that this well-used, hard-working family kitchen have top quality, durable countertops. Both Rob and Sandra found the patterns of granite too busy for their small kitchen and they were concerned about the amount of care and maintenance required by granite, so quartz seemed like a very appealing alternative. A beautiful glossy black Cambria quartz countertop makes a striking statement in contrast to the glowing cherry wood cabinets, resulting in an upscale sophisticated look to the new kitchen that will stay current for years to come.

Choosing Cambria quartz over granite saved the couple and their designer the time it takes to travel to granite depots to search through dozens of slabs for just the right pattern. Time is money! T H E D E CO R AT I V E D E TA I L S

The final design touches are provided by the mini travertine tiled backsplash that adds texture and warm color to the room. Three glass cone-shaped pendent lights suspended over the island illuminate and highlight the beautiful working surface while offering additional warmth and style to the space. Sleek stainless steel appliances and matching stainless handles make this amazing transformation shine, taking this kitchen from dated to dramatic. For Rob and Sandra the new kitchen is the final and most important renovation. It completes the design aesthetic of the main floor and ensures that their ranch-style home has a timeless contemporary feel throughout. It not only changes how this home’s interior looks but also how the family entertains and interacts with family and friends in their home. Like this modern and successful couple, the new kitchen is worthy of a host of compliments; it’s stylish and functional and equipped to withstand the test of time. Interior designer Jane Lockhart is an expert in the world of color and design. She heads her own firm, Jane Lockhart Interior Design Inc. (www.jane lockhart.com) and is the host of Colour Confidential on Canada’s W Network and HGTV in the U.S. Her latest book is Room Recipes: Cooking Up Style With Color.

RECESSED AMBIENT

BRIGHT IDEAS Lighting is one of the most important design elements you can incorporate into the kitchen. Besides improving the kitchen’s functionality, lighting will help define its style and highlight architectural details. A well-lit kitchen will include three types of lighting to ensure that all the functions of the space are properly lit: 1. General Lighting Recessed halogen pot lights installed in the ceiling are the most popular choice today for general lighting as they provide overall illumination and add sparkle to a room. Put general lighting on a separate switch from either task or ambient lighting and put it on a dimmer.

2. Task Lighting Add halogen, fluorescent or LED lighting around the room in strategic areas where you perform specific tasks such as along the countertops with under cabinet lights or over the sink, island, and dining area with pendants or chandeliers. 3. Ambient Lighting Stylish decorative light fixtures such as

TASK

chandeliers and colored glass pendants offer both task and ambient light especially when put on a dimmer switch. They’re designed to cast a lovely glow over the kitchen and soften the look of hard surfaces and angular cabinets.

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HOME FRONT/MEN’S CLUB

A Spirited Revival Spearheaded by a new generation of mixologists and a tasty array of boutique spirits, the classic cocktail is back with a passion. Raise a glass and enjoy: Cheers! B Y M A X B E R RY

YOU WOULDN’T KNOW IT BY LOOKING AT A

drink menu today, but prior to these halcyon days of boutique spirits and organic infusions was a dark age for the cocktail: an age when drinks named for lewd public acts usurped the menu space once reserved for the martini and the Manhattan; an age when we weren’t taking our drinking cues from sophisticated gadabouts like Jay Gatsby—not to mention those slickly sinister ad men on Mad Men—but rather from the oafish fraternity brothers in Animal House. Even James Bond didn’t have the good sense to ask for his martini to be stirred. But then something changed. Some time around the end of the last century, we remembered how to enjoy a well-made drink. And we realized what we’d been missing. Here we present an ode to the cocktail. Raise a glass. “A G L A S S O F CO C K TA I L”

The history of the cocktail is, perhaps appropriately, somewhat difficult to piece together. As a result, today’s cocktail aficionadoes tend to use Occam’s Razor when trying to divine the origins of the drink. “We disprove and eliminate everything we can to see what options are still on the board,” says Charles Joly, chief mixologist at the Chicago lounge The Drawing Room. We do know a couple things for certain. The first use of the word ‘cocktail’ occurred on April 28, 1803, when a New Hampshire paper

called The Farmer’s Cabinet used it in a humor piece: A bon vivant’s faux diary entry makes reference to “a glass of cocktail— excellent for the head.” It was never clear, however, what exactly went into said cocktail. Greater specificity came three years later, in the May 6, 1806 issue of the Hudson, New York, magazine The Balance and Columbian Repository. An editor, responding to a letter from a reader, wrote: “A cocktail is a stimulating liquor composed of spirits of any kind, sugar, water, and bitters—it is vulgarly called a bittered sling and is supposed to be an excellent electioneering potion, inasmuch as it renders the heart stout and bold, at the same time it fuddles the head.” But why call it a cocktail? There are enough theories about that to fuddle one’s head as well. One has it that an American tavern owner kept alcohol in a ceramic rooster. When patrons wanted a round they simply patted its tail. Another claims that cock-tail, a term used for mixed-breed horses, migrated over to the realm of mixed drinks. Like most tales told by a suspiciously sincere and charismatic tippler, half the fun lies in wondering how much of what you’re hearing is true. A TIME OF TRANSITION

The art of the cocktail took a decided step backward after World War II, as Americans, desperate to escape the trauma of that conflict, found nothing quite as desirable as the status quo.

The martini, preferably stirred, not shaken, now can be found in creative incarnations in fine bars everywhere.

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Those of us who are happy about this proliferation of well crafted drinks have DeGroff to thank. “America shifted focus in the fifties,” says Joly. “TV dinners seemed great. Americans developed bland palettes.” This was around the same time that vodka, which would go on to outsell both whiskey and gin in the U.S., began its ascendency, one aided by, of all things, Prohibition. “Coming out of Prohibition, you could put fermented grain in a still and have vodka tomorrow,” says Joly. “Whiskey needs at least two years in a barrel.” The general flattening of the American palette also gave vodka an edge over a more dynamic spirit like gin. “The American palette was primed for [vodka’s] lightness,” says Joly. “We developed a fear of flavor.”

A N EW GOLDEN AGE

It’s not that Americans lost their taste buds altogether; the popularity of shows like The French Chef in the early sixties spoke to a national craving for the finer things. But nobody seemed overly concerned with reviving the cocktail. “In 1987, you couldn’t find a cocktail menu in New York,” says Dale DeGroff. This comes as a shock to anyone who knows how difficult it is to throw an olive in most American cities these days and have it land more than 100 meters from a martini menu. Those of us who are happy about this proliferation of well-crafted drinks have DeGroff to thank.

MODERN MIXOLOGY You don’t have to go out for a great cocktail. Make the perfect drink at home with these new spins on classic cocktails, courtesy of some of the best mixologists in the business.

Dale DeGroff’s Manhattan East

Brian Miller’s Joan Crawford Martini

WHAT YOU NEED:

WHAT YOU NEED:

2 oz.Woodford Reserve Bourbon 1 oz. Canton Ginger Liqueur .5 oz. dry saké (Look for the Junmai Daiginjo classification on the label.) 2 Dashes Gary Regan’s Orange Bitters No. 6 1 Flamed Orange Peel Stir the bourbon, ginger liqueur, saké, and bitters with ice. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass and garnish with the flamed orange peel. Author and teacher Dale DeGroff is the former bartender for New York’s legendary Rainbow Room.

2 oz.Tanqueray Ten Gin .75 oz. Dolin Dry Vermouth .5 oz. Strega Liqueur 1 Grapefruit Twist Gently stir (don’t shake!) the gin, vermouth, and liqueur and strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with a grapefruit twist. Brian Miller is a bartender at Death & Company in New York City.

Damian Windsor’s Fitzgerald Daiquiri

(Yes, a daiquiri—it’s not what you think). WHAT YOU NEED:

1.5 oz. Brugal Rum .75 oz. Fresh Squeezed Lime Juice .5 oz. Simple Syrup 1 Barspoon Branca Menta Liqueur Spoon the Branca Menta into a chilled cocktail glass. Place the rest of the ingredients in a shaker, add ice, and shake vigorously. Fine strain into the cocktail glass. Damian Windsor is the chief mixologist at the Roger Room in Los Angeles.

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Charles Joly’s Old Martinique Old Fashioned WHAT YOU NEED:

2 oz. Rhum Favorite Vieux Rum 1 Demerara Sugar Cube 1 Dash Regan’s Orange bitters 2 Orange Slices 2 Maraschino Cherries Place the sugar cube in the bottom of an old fashioned glass. Place one orange slice with skin removed and one maraschino cherry in the glass. Dash with bitters and add a bit of rum. Muddle to break up the sugar cube and combine ingredients. Add the largest pieces of ice available. Add rum and stir a bit to chill. Garnish with a skewered orange slice and cherry. Charles Joly is the chief mixologist at The Drawing Room in Chicago.

As a bartender for New York’s famed Rainbow Room in the late eighties, DeGroff took a gourmet approach to mixing drinks, incorporating culinary techniques from the kitchen and updating his menu throughout the year to capitalize on seasonal ingredients. Today, such practices are almost common. In 1987, they were unheard of. But for all this cocktail innovation, the rule has always been to honor the past when contemplating the future. “You have to understand the classics if you want to build on them,” says Brian Miller, bartender at New York cocktail bar Death & Company. This expansion on the classics has been helped, in no small measure, by the people doing the drinking. “People are savvier about cocktails,” says Miller, “especially with all the blogs and people writing about cocktails now. People are demanding more from their drinks.” Miller makes an essential point: It is easier than ever to be an aficionado, not just of cocktails but of anything. To keep up, Charles Joly incorporates subtle touches like edible flowers and baby horseradish spears, which he buys from an organic farm in Ohio, in his drinks. There are also more premium artisanal spirits on the market than ever before. Just as micro-brewed beer has enjoyed a renaissance during the past decade, so too have smaller, independently produced gins and rums and bourbons. Of course, as anyone who has ever confronted the disturbing proliferation of apple-tinis can tell you, newer is not necessarily better. “It’s like a hit song,” says Miller. “You want something that’s going to endure.” Dale DeGroff has faith that those looking back on the cocktail’s current moment will see it that way. “This is a new golden age, without a doubt,” he says. “There are more culinary possibilities now than there have been since the 19th century.” The best bartenders are constantly making connections between what’s happening now and what was happening during the cocktail’s last golden age, as if they have responsibility to both live up to and expand upon what came before. “The cocktail is so rooted in our culture,” says DeGroff. “It’s an individualistic drink for an individualistic society. We had ingredients coming from the old world and from the new world and we threw them all in a drink. The cocktail is almost a metaphor for us because America is such a blend of people. It’s almost poetry.”


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A well-constructed Old Fashioned suddenly seems oldfashioned no more.

A true daiquiri eschews all hints of the frozen slush so often found in its more recent iterations.

The classic Manhattan can be concocted of either Rye or Bourbon..

Although the gin purists lament its main ingredient, the vodka martini continues to be a very popular cocktail.


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HOME FRONT/FOOD

Mariel’s Peach Slush

Swing into summer with one of Mariel Hemingway’s favorite recipes

“I admit I’m something of a mad scientist in the kitchen,” says Mariel, “always combining different foods, and I know that one of the ‘rules’ of food combining is that one should always eat melons by themselves. So, when I first thought up this recipe, I was like, ‘I wonder if I can do this?’ But foods from the same season just naturally go together and are energetically in tune with each other. That why’s my cookbook is broken up into seasons. So, if you start putting those seasonal flavors together they can actually enhance each other and it can be really good. With the peach and watermelon, I think they work together well because the watermelon is so watery and the peach has such a rich consistency, that when they mix, it’s just delicious.”

S E RV E S 2

2 peaches, pitted 2⁄ cup cut seedless watermelon 3 1 cup ice cubes 1 scoop (about 2 tablespoons) whey protein isolate powder 2 cups sparkling water Mint sprigs for garnish Place peaches, watermelon, ice cubes, and protein powder in a blender and puree until smooth. Add sparkling water and pulse to combine. Pour into two glasses, garnish with mint sprigs, and enjoy! For flavor, fiber, and loads of vitamin C, blend in a few mint leaves or a quarter cup of raspberries.

Recipe taken from MARIEL’S KITCHEN, HarperCollins Publishers, 2009


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HOME FRONT/ACCESSORIES

Things ToLove

As summer heats up, we offer an array of products to pique your fancy

1. Windows 2010 Trove, an ingenious design company known for its natureinspired products, has launched its first line of window films.Whether for looks or privacy,Trove’s window film is a simple and innovative way to add a touch of personal style to any room. Made with translucent vinyl, the film is self-adhesive and offered in three textures: Linen, Rice Paper, and Frost, each of which provides varying degrees of opacity. Installation of Trove’s window film is simple with Trove’s special installation kit, and the film can be easily removed with no leftover residue. www.trove.com; pricing based on size of window to be covered


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2.

3.

4.

2. Coffee and ‘Crema’ Bialetti offers Brikka, a unique stovetop espresso maker that makes it possible to prepare espresso with “crema.”Thanks to a special patented pressure-controlled valve, you can now enjoy the rich and intense flavor of a creamy coffee just like one from the Italian coffee bar. To sum it up in a word… yum. www.bialetti.com $49.95 to $54.95 (two to four cups)

3. Color at Your Fingertip Meet Ben® … an iPhone application that, with the tap of a key, lets you snap a picture of any color inspiration and instantly match it to one of the more than 3,300 hues that comprise Benjamin Moore’s color system. Intuitive and easy-to-use, you simply glide a finger across the digital photo taken with the iPhone’s built-in camera, zoom into a color, and tap the “match” key. In just seconds, a strip of colors will appear below the photo, with the closest paint match highlighted. A simple shake of the phone and Ben will provide up to four coordinating colors, creating an entire harmonizing palette based on the original selection. Favorites can be saved and enlarged to the size of the iPhone screen for easier viewing. www.benjaminmoore.com; $free

5.

4. Pillow Talk With a rich heritage in bold florals and prints, Liberty of London brings its vivid design aesthetic to Target, offering an array of affordable fashion and accessories as well as an assortment of gardening and home items, like these decorative pillows, filled with 100% feather and covered in polyester. www.target.com; $16.99-$19.99

5. Cool as a Cucumber Made of heat-resistant borosilicate glass, these vessels guarantee that their contents will remain hot for a longer period of time while the glass itself remains cool to the touch. They are as beautiful as they are functional and are also available in tumblers, mugs, and a variety of other sizes. Great for hot or cold—show off that perfect froth on your cappuccino or the fresh fruit in your sangria. www.bodum.com; $19.95 to $49.95 (in sets of two to six)

6.

6. Bowled Over Inspired by the colors of nature, Norpro’s snack and hors d’oeuvre bowls are made from the finest wood, hand dyed, laminated together, and hand turned. A blend of functionality and aesthetics, the bowls come in 2-oz., 4-oz., 8-oz., 16-oz., and 24-oz. sizes. www.norpro.com; $10.99 to $29.99

CAMBRIA


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Word

On the Street

The latest news and notes about Cambria and the world beyond

What’s It Worth? The housing market seems to be stabilizing at last. Prices in March 2010 were up .4% over last year’s numbers, with only the West, which dropped 7.9%, showing a decline from 2009.

Cambria Cares Last fall, Cambria acted as presenting sponsor for the “Hats On for Awareness” fundraising party and live auction at Andrew Richards Designs in Toronto, Canada, to benefit the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH). The event, which was held in conjunction with the Toronto International Film Festival, brought in nearly $47,000 and included such notable guests as Cheryl Tiegs, Miss Universe Canada, and HGTV’s Ambrose Price. Enza Checchia, co-chair of the event and owner of the Toronto-based decorating studio Decorenza, says Cambria’s sponsorship was instrumental in making the event a success. And for Checchia, all that support for CAMH has a personal significance, as she lost her own father Giovanni to undiagnosed depression at a young age. “So many people when they’re suffering from mental illness or depression feel like they’re unseen or incognito,”

46

HAT’S ON ATTENDEES INCLUDED (FROM LEFT): Mariana

Valente (Miss Universe Canada), Reena Greene, co-chair Enza Checchia, and Cheryl Tiegs.

Checchia says.“I never want anybody to go through that and to not know what’s going on.” So, to promote her cause and raise awareness of those feelings of being undercover or invisible to society, she decided upon the fundraiser’s special “Hats On” theme. For its part, Cambria helped by raising both the event’s visibility and its coffers, says Cambria Canada District Manager and event co-chair Sara Rooney.“We donated several quartz countertop slabs and a kitchen redesign to the live auction,” Rooney explains.“And with [Cambria celebrity spokesperson] Cheryl attending, we brought a lot of visibility and attention to the event.” Rooney adds,“As a company, we get involved in many goodwill projects and this was a great initiative that we hope to be doing again next year.”

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Club Cambria Pittsburgh In early April, an all-new, all-inclusive Club Cambria private suite opened at PNC Park, the home of Major League Baseball’s Pittsburgh Pirates. Located on the third-base side of the infield, the spacious, open-floor-plan club includes a full-service bar, nine flat-screen TVs, a private suite attendant, and stunning views of the ballpark as well as the Pittsburgh skyline beyond it. To showcase Cambria’s natural quartz, the club features a variety of the company’s products on its countertops, tabletops, banquettes, walls, and floor tiles. “Club Cambria provides an additional outstanding option for fans who want a luxury experience for entertaining clients, customers, and friends,” notes Pirates President Frank Coonelly. This new Club Cambria at PNC Park joins a roster of six other luxury Cambria suites Through March of this year, scattered across major Seattle’s Sea-Tac Airport led North American sports the nation with an on-time venues and follows the arrival rate 87.02%. The one opening of a Club Cambria this past August at the John to avoid? Newark, with a LaBatt Centre in London, dismal on-time rate Ontario, Canada.

Airport

ENVY

of 65.94%.


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Did You Know? Pure quartz is roughly 10 times harder than marble and up to twice as hard as granite. Only gemstones like diamonds, rubies, sapphires, and topazes are harder than pure quartz.

Bonfyre Grill Cambria Gets Haute At Fashion Week El Paseo 2010 in Palm Desert, California, Cambria debuted its latest dress composed primarily of the company’s natural quartz products. The design, created by Christopher Straub, a contestant from Project Runway’s Season 6, features hundreds of semi-circular quartz tiles in four different Cambria colors—Minai, Waverton,Talbot Gray, and Snowdon White—attached to a black canvas sheath.

The recently opened Bonfyre Grill in Madison,Wisconsin, features an installation of superbly crafted 6-cm chiseled edge Cambria (Burnbury) on its bar. Fabricated by Temple Construction and installed by Ideal Builders (both of Madison), the bar complements the contemporary decor of the restaurant, which features American cuisine, including hand-cut, wood-fired steaks and chops, fresh seafood, rotisserie chicken, and more.

University of Minnesota Contest Winner Cambria’s first Design Challenge was held at the University of Minnesota’s College of Design, with 35 students asked to plan a kitchen redesign using only Cambria quartz surfaces. The students’ plans were judged based on the most creative use of Cambria on multiple applications (countertop, backsplash, wall cladding, flooring, tiling, etc.). The winner was Alissa Wylie (right) with second and third place awards going to Karen Garrido and Colin Nelson, respectively.

Lifestyles Winners Cambria’s Design Challenge for students was mirrored by the company’s Lifestyles Contest for professionally installed kitchens using Cambria’s distinctive quartz countertops. The winner was Emilio and Anna-Marie Raimondo for the stunning kitchen shown above in St. Catharines, Ontario, and featuring Whitehall on the kitchen countertops and backsplash, Sussex on the kitchen island and fireplace, and Oakhampton in the powder room.


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L A ST L O O K

“I mixed in a lot of luxe materials in the kitchen and the Cambria stripes became like the icing on the cake.”

CAMBRIA DESIGN CENTER, PALM DESERT, CALIFORNIA

in kennedy’s kitchen design, he centers the Zen-like space with a sleek, contemporary island, the sides of which he has wrapped in eight-inchwide bands of Cambria quartz. His innovative solution satisfies both form and function, adding interesting horizontal detail to an otherwise imposing monolith of vertical woodgrain, while also building in an extra layer of protection against dings and kicks.

Now and Zen with interior designer christopher kennedy When Cambria made plans to open a new 4,000-square-foot Design Center in Palm Desert, Calif., it was no surprise that sales director Candice Knox selected up-and-coming local interior designer Christopher Kennedy, 33, to contribute a kitchen and bathroom design to the showroom. In the process, Kennedy adhered to three favorite principles, all of which have broad applicability to kitchen design in general, to wit: don’t be afraid to mix materials “I like designing spaces that have a livable kind of luxury and a warm, textural modernism,” he says. “So, I put in two different kinds of exotic wood, mixed copper tiles with the stovetop’s glass backsplash, mixed the island’s raised glass countertop with the stainless steel poles, and then added the dramatic Cambria stripes.” pay attention to the details “Much like in many private homes, the island is one of the first things you see as you approach the kitchen space and I didn’t want to leave the back of it untreated, and I also wanted to inspire the consumer to think about how to use this material [Cambria] differently,” Kennedy explains. be bold in smaller spaces “Playing off unexpected materials or doing something graphic with them, like the horizontal quartz stripes, these kinds of ideas can really translate well in a small room or a space with less natural light,” Kennedy notes. “It gives you a wonderful opportunity to take risks that you might not otherwise take in a larger space.”

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CHRISTOPHER KENNEDY , an acclaimed LEEDaccredited designer who favors using environmentally sustainable products in his work, has been featured in prominent publications like the Los Angeles Times and Architectural Digest.


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Publishing Partner

CAMBRIA USA

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PRESIDENT

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EVP SALES + MARKETING

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MANAGING EDITOR

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CONTRIBUTORS

Max Berry Jill Kirchner Simpson

PHOTOGRAPHY CREDITS: Cover: Jeff Katz/JeffKatzPhotography.com; page 1 (left to right): Jeff Katz/JeffKatzPhotography.com; ©Kindra Clineff; ©Masterfile; page 3 (left to right): Matthias Hoffman/StockFood Creative/Getty images; Courtesy Barn Light Electric; no credit; ©Paul Johnson/iStockphoto; no credit; page 5 (clockwide from top left): Ikea; ©Donna Griffith Photography; Walnut Wallpaper; page 6 (clockwise from top left): Courtesy Shelly Amoroso Design; Courtesy Shelly Amoroso Design: BarnLightElectric.com; no credit; page 7: (clockwise from top left): ©Neil Davis/EWA stock; duravit.us; Jeffrey Cross; page 8 (clockwise from top left): Odegardinc.com; roomandboard.com; dwr.com; Odegardinc.com; page 9 (clockwide from top left): dwr.com; plumcreekmercantile.com; no credit; Getty; page 12 (copper sink): coppersinksonline.com; page 12 (cabinet pulls): The Brass Handle; page 15 (left to right): rawganique.com; KORwater.com; Leland Bobbe/Getty Images; ecotimber.com; Patagonia.com; page 16: ©Masterfile; page 17 (left to right): Chris Tein/Stockbyte/Getty Images; Stockbyte/Getty Images; beyond foto/Getty Images; page 19 (top): ©Masterfile; page 20: (bottom): ©Masterfile; page 23: ©Masterfile; pages 24–29 (all): Jeff Katz/JeffKatzPhotography.com; pages 30–33 (all): ©Kindra Clineff; pages 34–36 (all): Brandon Barré; page 37: Troy Theis Photography/Collinstock; page 38: Melanie Acevedo/Food Pix/Getty Images; page 39: Annabelle Breakey/ Photodisc/Getty Images; page 41 (clockwise from top left): Matthias Hoffman/StockFood Creative/Getty images; Andreas Bricco/Foodpix; Nola Lopez/Graphisstock/Images.com; Lew Robertson/StockFood Creative/Getty Images; page 43: Jeff Katz/JeffKatzPhotography.com; page 44: Trove.com; page 45 (clockwise from top left): bialetti.com; Target.com; BenjaminMoore.com; Bodum.com; norpro.com; page 47 (dress): kaminskyproductions.com; page 48 (all): J. Rockwell Seebach.


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The Beauty of Stone K The Durability of Quartz

The Beauty of Stone K The Durability of Quartz

CambriaUSA.com Š Cambria 2010

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