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Spectemur 2018 TERM 1


Contents From the Headmaster’s Desk ................................................................3 Student Profile .....................................................................................4 Respectful Relationships .......................................................................5 Courage to Care ...................................................................................7 Youth in Philanthropy ...........................................................................8 Solar Installation ...................................................................................8 Destinations of the Class of 2017 ..........................................................9 House Music ......................................................................................10 News Around the School ....................................................................12 Congratulations ................................................................................. 22 Staff Profile ....................................................................................... 29 From the Archives ............................................................................. 30 The Performing Arts at Camberwell Grammar ......................................31 Sport ................................................................................................ 34 Staff Profile ....................................................................................... 36 Foundation AGM ............................................................................... 37 Community Connections .................................................................... 38 OCGA Annual General Meeting ...........................................................41 OCGA Battle of the Decades .............................................................. 42 OCGA Dinner .................................................................................... 43 Old Boy Profiles................................................................................. 45 News of Old Boys .............................................................................. 49 Obituaries ..........................................................................................51

Camberwell Grammar School 55 Mont Albert Road, Canterbury Victoria Australia 3126 P.O.Box 151 Balwyn VIC 3103 T: +61 3 9835 1777 F: +61 3 9836 0752 www.cgs.vic.edu.au 2


Spectemur | Term 1 2018

From the Headmaster’s Desk There is a post which has been doing the rounds of social media recently in which a mother bemoans the modern parent’s lot:

HOW TO BE A PARENT IN 2017: Make sure your children’s academic, emotional, psychological, mental, spiritual, physical, and social needs are met while being careful not to over stimulate, underestimate, improperly medicate, helicopter, or neglect them in a screen-free, processed-foods-free, plastic-free, body-positive, socially conscious, egalitarian but also authoritative, nurturing but fostering of independence, gentle but not overly permissive, pesticide-free two-storey, multilingual home preferably in a cul-de-sac with a backyard and 1.5 siblings spaced at least two years apart for proper development. Also, don’t forget the coconut oil.

HOW TO BE A PARENT IN LITERALLY EVERY GENERATION BEFORE OURS: Feed them sometimes.

While the comparison may be a little simplistic, it does resonate. It does feel sometimes that we overcomplicate things. With all the best intentions in the world, as parents, we can all fall into the trap of giving our children too much, of trying to protect them from as much pain and as many obstacles as we can. Even if we know that this is not always the best thing to do, the temptation and pressure to do it can be enormous. We want the best for them. The problem is, that instead of children who are always gloriously happy and grateful for our tireless efforts, we can find ourselves dealing with young people who lack the resilience and display a sense of entitlement. Overcoming obstacles and working through difficult times are essential to the development of inner toughness and grit. We should not underestimate our children’s capacity to work through difficult issues. As parents, our job is sometimes to get out of the way, and to let our children work some things out for themselves.

“ Overcoming obstacles and working through

difficult times are essential

to the development of inner toughness and grit.”

At the same time, our ‘feeding’ of them can extend beyond mere food – we can feed them ideas, and values and expectations, and give them the space to nurture and develop those things in their minds. In that sense, the privilege and responsibility of education includes the development and shaping our students’ values. If can do that, we will have a lasting influence on their development as adults. What good is being educated if that education is not directed toward a greater social good? If all our students wish to do beyond school is to gather personal wealth, we have surely failed them.

As we have seen from the student-driven anti-guns movement in the United States, young people do have the potential to be inspirational and instructional when their passion and clarity of vision gives purpose and direction, and when they come together in common voice. They can call out hypocrisy and double standards with laser clarity. And they have enormous capacity for good, when it is simply expected of them. We see it in our own students when they get behind something like ‘The World’s Greatest Shave’ and far exceed any of the expectations we might have placed on them. We see it when they get excited about trying to save the planet and prompt their School to undertake a large solar power installation. We see it in simple, small acts of kindness they offer to each other in passing. Raising and educating children can be a frightening, frustrating and thankless task. It is also the most important thing we do, and if we do it well, we can make the world a better place. Dr Paul Hicks Headmaster

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Student Profile Q&A with Jack Fitzgerald, School Captain Firstly, can you share a little bit about yourself and your background. I joined Camberwell Grammar School in 2010, as a Year 4 student. My short time in Norge gave me so many opportunities that have helped shape who I am today. Opportunities like sport, which, through various programs I was nurtured and taught by really involved people. Sport became a large part of my life, alongside my education, and eight years later, as I look to finish my secondary schooling, that balance of sport and education is something I am going to make the most of this year. Sport is one of my biggest passions, and it drives me in my self-improvement. Why do you think the role of School Captain is important to Camberwell Grammar School? Nowadays, a school is so much more than a place of learning; it has a place in the broader community. That’s why having a Captain is important, regardless of who fills that role. We have an obligation to the people who support us, and those who rely on our support. The Captain isn’t the person who makes the big decisions or the one who wins all of the awards; at Camberwell, it’s the man who will lead a microcosm of today’s youth to progression in the community.

What does being the School Captain mean to you? Being School Captain is a tremendous honour, because it means a lot more than the badge, tie or title. Camberwell has offered me so many opportunities by way of tours, events and an unparalleled sense of comradery, that only an environment like this can create. I believe I owe the School something in return, so in my final year, I want to give back to the community that gave me so much over the years, and that’s what makes this role truly special. It’s true, anyone can make a difference, but to do so in my final year, and to know that current and future students will benefit from the initiatives, precedents and opportunities we created, is something that brings me great joy. What do you think makes a great leader? I don’t believe there is a set definition of a great leader. To me, it is someone who does the role required of them. There are certain qualities I believe all good leaders should have: approachability, loyalty, the ability to listen and communication skills, but the way one applies these qualities, and the degree to which they apply them, varies from person to person, job to job and environment to environment. What advice would you give your younger peers about being or becoming a leader? There are three words I have for those younger than me, who are looking to make a genuine change: GO FOR IT! Age shouldn’t inhibit your ability to make a difference, and in fact, we are told the youngest voices carry the furthest. If there is something you think should be changed, speak up and be the catalyst of change you want to see. Do you have a specific person, leader or hero that you look up to? Being so into sports, I have and continue to look up to athletes as my source of inspiration. From soccer stars who have left war-torn nations to achieve their dreams, to boxers who overcame difficult childhoods – I believe there is a lot to learn from athletes. At the same time, I believe, whilst having a hero is important, we also should create our own impression in the world, and striving to live someone else’s life isn’t a valuable use of one’s time. What do you think people admire about you as a leader? I honestly have no idea, if I am to be perfectly honest. There is nothing special about me, and I guess that, in itself makes me different. Sometimes, I feel as if leaders are too perfect. I’m fallible, I’ve made plenty of mistakes, and it is that about me which makes me approachable. I don’t

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believe I fit the same mould of the people that came before me, and I don’t think that diminishes either myself or my predecessors. Do you think people are born leaders, or can they be developed? The notion that a leader is born goes against the core principal of leadership. A leader isn’t the person who has the badge, their own office, or the highest paying job, it’s someone who is willing to make a difference when called upon, and that can come from anybody. I truly believe anyone can be a leader, and if you haven’t demonstrated your leadership to the world, it’s not because you can’t, but you simply haven’t had the opportunity to do so yet. Do you think being School Captain will help your future? A lot is said about how important leadership is, but to say I was Captain of Camberwell Grammar School is meaningless unless I can put the leadership I learnt in that role into practice in the world. What I believe will help me is the lessons I learnt along the way. In the short time I’ve been in the role, I have developed (or at least tried to) my people skills to better understand, not just my peers, but my fellow leaders. The 2018 Prefect Group is very talented across all aspects of the School, and, using their expertise has helped make my job easier. What are your aspirations for life after school? I haven’t given it much thought. Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “The only person you’re destined to be, is the person you decide to be,” and so whilst I can’t say where I will end up, or what I will be doing in 10, 20 or 30 years’ time, I’d like to think I’ve achieved something that made a difference to at least one person’s life. If you were the Headmaster, what would be your first school initiative? I suppose my first initiative would be to achieve what I set out as my goal for this year: to bridge the gaps between Junior, Middle and Senior School, in order to improve the culture at our school. It’s not something you can change in one day, a week or perhaps even a year. but if I can leave the School with all of the ingredients to create an environment where a Year 12 student could interact with a Year 6 student, and a Year 8 student could interact with the Junior School boys, then my time as Headmaster would have been well spent.


Spectemur | Term 1 2018

Respectful Relationships Camberwell Grammar School is proud to be a partner school in the Victorian Government’s Resilience, Rights and Respectful Relationships Project. The project ‘supports schools and early childhood settings to promote and model respect, positive attitudes and behaviours – and to teach our children how to build healthy relationships, resilience and confidence’. These goals align perfectly with the Camberwell Grammar School Cross-School Development Committee, which has been focusing on the identification of the positive character traits that support a respectful environment and the best way to disseminate this information for input from, and delivery to, the School community. Integral components of the program include gender, identity and positive gender relationships.

Junior School In the Junior School, all teachers seek to develop positive character traits in our students that will contribute to a respectful community cultivating healthy relationships. Through explicit teaching and implicit reinforcement, using opportunities such as Assemblies, behaviour management, special events and impromptu teachable moments, the goal is to foster the character traits we value, so as to form a strong base as they continue to develop their social, emotional and positive relationship skills in Middle School and Senior School. All Junior School staff endeavour to contribute to this development, with age-appropriate activities such as ‘bucket fillers’ at Year 1, study of character strengths at Years 2, 3 and 4, and projects on leadership at Year 5. Mrs Diane Collins Deputy Head of Junior School (Administration)

Middle School In the Middle School, the Personal and Social Development curriculum works to foster and encourage the boys’ understanding of their own identities, as well as navigating and managing their friendships and interactions. The five curriculum pillars that form the foundation for what the boys learn are: Respectful Relationships, Emotional Intelligence, Healthy Living, Digital Citizenship and Study Skills. It is through each of these areas in Years 6, 7 and 8, that the boys develop an understanding of their own personal strengths, how to relate to others and how to meaningfully contribute to society, both within and beyond the School environment. The boys also gain understanding of society’s influence on their lives through engagement with the media. The latter part of Year 8 marks the culmination of their journey in the Middle School, where, as emerging adolescents, they embark upon a new pathway of personal growth toward their senior years. Ms Laura Dubberley English and History Teacher/Middle School Personal and Social Development Co-ordinator

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Senior School Throughout the senior years, ideas around Respectful Relationships are identified, discussed and demonstrated through the House system and explicitly taught within the Personal and Social Development classes at Year 9 and 10. Students complete a selfassessed and peer-assessed questionnaire designed by Swinburne University that helps them to identify strengths and weaknesses in their emotional intelligence – a key branch of the Respectful Relationships program. Students also focus on a range of issues around health, identity, stress and study skills, with an emphasis on positive coping strategies and making informed decisions by seeking help through appropriate channels. In Year 11, students participate in a leadership 6

course that is designed to give them practical experience managing a range of scenarios and improving their own leadership style. The Year 11 cohort also participates in a full-day conference in June, under the banner of ‘Respect for Self and Others’. Keynote speaker, Dr Justin Coulston, challenges the students to act with integrity and call out disrespect when they see it. This is followed by a series of workshops covering a variety of active and philosophical topics such as mindfulness, Pilates, gratitude and emotional self-control, which are designed to equip students with a range of techniques as they head into their final year of VCE. Mr David Rayner Deputy Head of Senior School

The School’s senior executive and all teaching staff completed an audit at the commencement of the school year, with questions pertaining to our culture and environment, leadership, teaching and learning, community partnerships and support for staff and students. This proved to be invaluable and has helped to frame a future-focused strategy for the Cross-School Development Committee as we seek to further embed Resilience, Rights and Respectful Relationships into all areas of school life. Mr Rob French Deputy Head/Head of Senior School


Spectemur | Term 1 2018

Courage to Care

“ All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing.” Courage to Care visited Camberwell Grammar School in February, to deliver their program to Year 8. The workshop provided a perfect introduction to support students as we began the English novel, The Boy in Striped Pyjamas. Courage to Care is an organisation which seeks to educate students about the many forms of bullying, victimisation and the unfathomable acts of the Nazi regime in World War II. Their goal is to promote ‘Upstander Behaviour’ in the face of bullying and prejudice. They emphasise this in a quote: “All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing.” The Courage to Care presentation began with a concise introduction about the group’s purpose. This was followed by a short documentary about the Holocaust. It explained detailed accounts of bullying and victimisation, and showed the course of events leading up to Germany’s solution: a horrifying part of human history where more

than six million Jews, disabled, homosexuals, prisoners of war, communists and ‘enemies of the state’ were sent to concentration camps, where they would be starved and worked past their limits, only to be gassed, executed or beaten to death. It also told of the stories of heroes and survivors of the holocaust. After this film was shown, Gilah, a survivor of the holocaust, told us about her experiences of survival. She proceeded to talk about the extremely meagre food rations, and health issues, along with hiding from supporters of the Nazi party and the Gestapo. The most compelling part of her talk was the ordinary people who stood up and did incredible things. Without their support, she would not be with us today. Finally, we were divided into small groups of 10 to 12, and participated in a series of interactive activities, led by individuals from the Courage to Care team. These activities highlighted the numerous figures and organisations, who

helped to save the Jews and victims of the Holocaust from capture and extermination. The stories included those of ‘survivors’ such as ‘Sempo’ Sugihara,’ local heroes’ such as Oskar Schindler and ‘rescuers’ such as Lydia and Johannes Huygens. The entire workshop was exceptionally moving and motivating — inspiring us to be ‘upstanders’, not ‘bystanders’, proving that ordinary people can become heroes through simple yet brave acts of humanity. Andrew Bishop Year 8 Vincent Chen Year 8 Charles Lewis Year 8 Daniel Strojek Year 8

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Youth in Philanthropy

Camberwell Grammar School has been proudly involved in the Lord Mayor’s Charitable Foundation, Youth in Philanthropy program since 2012. The program is aimed at introducing students to philanthropic ideals and to the many charitable organisations that exist within our society. The eye-opening part of the program is the significant volume of charities that exist that mainly rely on grants from different organisations, such as the Lord Mayor’s Foundation and the tireless work of volunteers. A student who was instrumental in our involvement in the program last year, has kindly offered an insight into the program and the reasons why he originally became involved. Mr Andrew Warne Head of Commerce

A Student’s Perspective I got involved in the 2017 Youth in Philanthropy program for a number of reasons. Hearing about it at Assembly sparked my interest, and I was very keen to see what it was all about. Upon discovering that it involved allocating money to a number of charities, I really wanted to take part in it. I have always enjoyed charity work, and

helping those in need. Ultimately, I decided to take part in this wonderful initiative to give it a go and try new things. After all, how many people can say they were a philanthropist at sixteen? Having a desire to promote the welfare of others is a quality that is very important. Not only does it encourage empathy, but it also enables you to take part in new experiences that you may not otherwise be able to. Having the skill to allocate money wisely to charities is something that you learn over time but by having the opportunity to try this now may give me the skills necessary for future decision making. Regarding the types of charities I would like to support, the main ones are those relating to youth homelessness and the environment. Through the program last year, our group targeted environmental charities, campaigning for the preservation of wildlife and parkland. These charities included the Australian Youth Climate Coalition, the Conservation Foundation and the Port Phillip Eco Centre. These charities are all important and can have a positive effect on our society as the environment is something that we all share and need for our survival, so it is paramount it is preserved.

If I ever have the opportunity to take part in this activity again, I would do it without hesitation. I strongly recommend the Youth in Philanthropy program to anyone who is willing to take part in a very worthwhile and rewarding experience. Lachlan Melville Year 11 I got involved in the program because it was quite different to anything I had been involved with previously. I had heard from the boys in the previous year that it was a really worthwhile program, and a good introduction into philanthropy. Philanthropy is important and especially relevant to us seeing as we’ve been given a private school education and live in a first world country, and it provides an opportunity to mitigate the many inequalities in the world. I would like to help charities such as the Lighthouse Foundation and the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre, as they support some of the most vulnerable members of our society and are very close to home. Lachlan Doig Year 11

Solar Installation final stage (including final sign-off by CitiPower) to be completed over the next month or so.

Following on from building an ‘environmentally smart’ Sports Centre, Camberwell Grammar School has made a further and significant contribution to its sustainability commitment – with the installation of an 888 kilowatt rooftop solar plant. Covering all available roof space, this is equivalent to about 200 home installations and meets nearly 40% of the school’s electricity needs. Over the last Christmas Break, a team from Gippsland Solar installed the first stage, with the 8

This is a large solar installation project – particularly so in the education sector. As an educational institution, we are committed to social responsibility – in our actions and in what we teach. The ‘grown-ups’ can’t take all the credit, though. Our Senior School students, through their ‘Towards 2050’ sustainability initiatives, were also very keen to see this commitment made and provided very valuable input. A particularly inspiring element of this initiative is how Camberwell Grammar School will include ‘solar in the curriculum’ through all levels in the School – in STEM and beyond. The Grade 5 classrooms are going ‘off the grid’, so the boys in Junior School will gain first-hand experience in solar and battery management. In parallel with this work, Camberwell Grammar School continues to look for opportunities to reduce power consumption.

Introducing LED lighting, installing movement sensors (to manage lighting more dynamically during the day) and better managing our heating and air conditioning systems are some recent initiatives. On another front, Camberwell Grammar School is working on waste management. Minimising land fill and maximising recycling are key elements of this initiative – with a new bin system being installed over the Term 1 break. Equally important is driving down the amount of waste created – particularly plastics. To further cement Camberwell Grammar School’s sustainability commitment, the Headmaster recently created the role of ‘Sustainability Co-ordinator’. Mr Will Hone (English and History) has taken on this additional leadership responsibility – to guide and inspire us to further reduce our impact on the environment. Mr Chris Lloyd Business Manager


Spectemur | Term 1 2018

destinations of the class of 2017 Camberwell Grammar School is very proud of the achievements of our recent leavers, detailed below: The table below shows the destinations of the Class of 2017, with all those seeking an offer and receiving one by the conclusion of the VTAC second round. Of the 12 students who received second round offers (7%), one had not received an earlier offer, some had rearranged their preference order and a significant number received higher preferences, including an additional four first preferences. To date, 83% of applicants have received their first or second preference, with 93% receiving their third preference or higher, both of which exceed the outcomes of the Class of 2016. Together, Monash University (54) and The University of Melbourne (57) account for 66% of the offers received by the 2017 cohort, though The University of Melbourne continues to attract our highest achieving students (95+) with 25 offered places there, compared to 20 to Monash. Interestingly, both RMIT and Swinburne continue to attract more of our students, and have replaced Deakin as our third and fourth most popular institutions respectively.

This table highlights the fields of study that students will be pursuing this year. Management and Commerce continues to top the list as the most popular area of study with 44% of offers, Natural and Physical Sciences is a distant second with 20% of offers, and Society and Culture (which accounts for the Arts and Law courses) follows next with 18% of offers.

“ This table highlights the

fields of study that students

will be pursuing this year.�

Of the students who successfully applied to interstate institutions, three are known to have accepted offers elsewhere in Australia; one will undertake Medicine at The University of Adelaide, another will study

Arts at The Australian National University and the third will undertake Business at The University of New South Wales as part of his ADFA training. Four students are still awaiting the outcome of their applications to schools in the United States.

DESTINATION BY INSTITUTION 2018

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

Institution

Number

% of offers

% of offers

% of offers

% of offers

% of offers

Deakin

11

7

9

10

9

10

La Trobe

4

2

4

5

4

3.5

Monash

54

32

29

27

31

37

RMIT

20

12

10

8

5.5

6

Swinburne

17

10

7

6

5

6

University of Melbourne

57

34

35

35.5

35.5

30

Other Vic Universities

1

0.5

1

0

3

0.5

TAFE/VET

2

1

1.5

4

6

4.5

Private providers

1

0.5

2

0.5

1

1.25

Interstate (Adelaide, UNSW) 2

1

1.5

4

2

1.25

Total offers

100

100

100

100

100

168

DESTINATION BY FIELD OF STUDY Fields of Study

2018

2017

2016

2015

Agriculture, Environmental

2

2

3

4

Architecture & Building

12

6

7

4

Creative Arts

20

10

15

6

Education

1

4

2

3

Engineering

15

17

17

12

#Health

13

20

18

12

IT

11

9

6

11

Management & Commerce

74

69

51

67

*Natural & Physical Sciences

33

36

47

43

**Society & Culture

30

39

35

34

Total 211 (168 students), as double degrees count in more than one field of study # This includes offers in Medicine (5), Pharmacy (1) and Physiotherapy (1) *This includes offers in Biomedicine (11) and Science (27) **This includes offers in Arts (23) and Law (3) *For the class of 2017, as of Monday 12 March

Mrs Lynette Reiger Careers Counsellor

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house music The 52nd annual Senior School House Music Competition was the first House event of the year. Each House had to prepare and perform three items, two choral items and the other, an instrumental item. Of the choral repertoire, one of the pieces was to be an operatic work. This challenging requirement proved to generate an impressive performance from each House – whether it was adopting the bel canto technique, astutely enunciating the lyrics, or characterising the piece with increased levels of rigour and vivacity. The event provided an opportunity for the School to be unified, not only in the individual House performances, but also when the entire Senior School came together to sing their hearts out in the School and Sports Songs, as well as the ‘Anthem from Chess’. This year’s special guest adjudicator was Ms Rowena McDowell, who provided the boys with a plethora of scores and comments, as well as her insight into the importance that music has for individuals, and the collective identity. We were privileged to have a guest

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adjudicator of such operatic expertise to deliver such judicious comments. Each House sang with passion, commitment and unity, which was an accurate representation of the School community as a whole. Something which was made abundantly clear was that each student had fun and enjoyed themselves up on the stage, which eventuated in the night being much more than a mere contest. That being said, the House Music Competition must remain true to its name, and as all competitions do, must produce a clear winner. Commendable for their triumph, it was Steven House who were the victors and walked away with the shield on the night. Congratulations to Steven House for their success, and to all Houses for their tenacity and exuberance, which resulted in a night of splendour and of gusto. Emre Cakmakcioglu Captain of Music


Spectemur | Term 1 2018

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news around the school Year 4 Camp On Wednesday 14 February, Year 4 left for camp at the Coastal Forest Lodge in Anglesea. The purpose of the camp, was for students to make new friends, and to welcome new boys to the School. Here are what some of the Year 4 boys had to say about camp and their experiences.

“That’s not a yabby… it’s a rock,” shouted Ari. Next, I heard Mr Appleyard exclaim, “Yabbies are cannibals!” This made me wonder what it would be like to see a big yabby eat a smaller yabby. The murky water made it impossible to tell what creatures were lurking beneath. I thought the first night of Year 4 Camp would be boring, but it turned out to be the best night ever! Joseph Ni Year 4A Clunk! Clunk! My shoes thudded on the steps. “Will these stairs ever end?” I thought to myself. Finally, we were at the top. As I stepped outside, a gush of wind hit my face. I hesitated. I cautiously managed to walk to the other side of the balcony. “Phew!” I sighed. The top of the lighthouse was not what I expected. Hamish Mitchell Year 4A

“Duh-dum. Duh-dum. Duh-dum,” I sang to Edward. But before I could finish, I felt an impressive tug of the rope and I shouted, “We got a yabby!” Christian Pham Year 4B I was getting tired, so I had a rest without my partner knowing. I was quite proud of myself. Glug, glug, glug. “What’s wrong?” I shouted. “I think we are stuck in the mud,” exclaimed my trusty comrade. “They’re getting closer,” he shouted. I start paddling, like a bull charging out of the ring. Caleb Jack Year 4B “Yay!” Everyone cheered as we jumped off the bus at Point Roadknight in Anglesea. A thudding sound met my ears, as the stampede of kids moved towards the beach. Suddenly we stopped, and everyone stared at the enormous waves. William Kemp Year 4B Mr Andrew Crosby Year 4B Teacher and Mr Brendan Peisley Year 4A Teacher

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Year 5 Camp In Year 5, the School holidays quickly came to an end, as we prepared to head to Camp Weekaway in Benloch. We were all raring to go! Camp Weekaway provided Year 5 boys with their first opportunity to develop and display their leadership skills in preparation for their time as leaders of the Junior School. Throughout the three days of activities, which included team initiatives, mountain biking, canoeing, flying fox, mazes and a walk and lunch at Hanging Rock, the boys showed teamwork, whilst building and nurturing friendships. Miss Kelly Day Year 5 Teacher As we walked to the Initiative Course, I heard the cracking and crunching of the thin brown sticks, and the breeze blowing the leaves, which sounded like a whistle. Tommy Ramsay Year 5B The Maze was quite tricky. It felt like we were running around in circles. One minute you were in the right corner, the other minute you were in the left corner! Nicholas Lysikatos Year 5A

The Maze had twisting turns, complex paths and many dead-ends. Kye and I tried our best to find the flags.

Splash, went the puddle, as I drove through it with the Camp’s mountain bike. It was a very bumpy ride!

Austin Dai Year 5B

Rory Vallence Year 5B

Soon it is my turn. As I was getting suited up, I kept getting more nervous. Three, two, one and I was off! I felt like Tarzan, swinging on a vine!

“ In Year 5, the School holidays

James Doyle Year 5A The flying fox made me feel like a bird, shooting across the skyline over the water. Nikolas Casale Year 5B

quickly came to an end, as

we prepared to head to Camp Weekaway in Benloch. We were all raring to go!”

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Year 7 Camp Year 7 took their annual pilgrimage to Lord Somers halfway through Term 1 – a wonderful tradition that extends over 80 years. The camp is strategically placed in the Term 1 calendar to allow boys to establish the foundation of lifelong friendships. Each Form group was supervised by their Form teacher, Lord Somers staff and another staff member from Camberwell Grammar School, thereby extending the boys’ support network at school for years to come. The Camp consisted of a rotation of meaningful and exciting activities designed to push the boys comfort zones, requiring teamwork, problem solving and a collaboration of group strengths for successful completion. The activities included: SUP Boarding, kayaking, marine discovery, snorkelling, morning runs, surf lifesaving, beach awareness, initiative exercises, raft building, screen printing, and cultural ceremonial activities including making traditional bracelets and playing the bongos/drums. Amongst all that, there were also night time activities including charades, games, theatre sports, trivia and a movie night. All of the boys contributed to the broader running of the camp, including kitchen duty and maintenance of their dorms – which were all completed exceptionally well (with some coaching). A major focus of the Camp was for the boys to understand more about themselves and that they are not alone when it comes to the challenges that they face. Realising individual strengths beyond the classroom has always been a powerful method of bringing groups of people together and growing self-confidence. We were truly blessed to have done so in a blissful beachside location like Somers. Mr Troy Stanley Head of Middle School

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Spectemur | Term 1 2018

Year 8 Surf Camp The weather forecast was picture-perfect for our two-day Year 8 Surf Camp. All Year 8s departed at 9.00am, and caught a bus to their separate locations. For us, it took approximately two hours to get to Ocean Grove. By the time everyone had stepped off the bus, they were all itching to get into the water and surf. Classes 8B, 8R, 8S and 8C enjoyed the surf at Ocean Grove Main Beach. Classes 8B and 8R, spent their first day surfing, and 8S and 8C spent their first day doing surf lifesaving related activities. This involved important skills like First Aid and rescue, as well as fun activities like boogieboarding and flag relays. Everyone thoroughly enjoyed their time surfing; for some, it was their first time catching a wave. For others, it was a good

chance to improve on their skills. The waves were not overly huge, but, perfect for beginners. At least once, everyone stood up on a board. After three hours of catching nonstop waves and participating in fun activities, it was finally time to get onto the bus and go to our accommodation. Year 8B stayed at Bancoora Surf Lifesaving Club, where we learnt that the Club is named after a famous shipwreck. In the afternoon, 8B enjoyed playing cricket, billiards and Frisbee. All of the activities made us hungry, so everyone worked together to cook a wellearned feast. Once we had finished dinner, we went for a walk along the calm beach, and rummaged for washed-up objects. As night fell, we sat on the sand and reflected, looking out to sea. When we arrived back at Bancoora from our nightly walk, everyone enjoyed a good night’s sleep.

Mr Burke woke us up early, ready for a big day ahead. We left Bancoora around 8.00am and stopped on the way to pick up 8R, before arriving at Ocean Grove Main Beach. When we arrived at the beach, we prepared ourselves for an awesome day of surf lifesaving activities. Everyone enjoyed their activities; amongst the favourites were beach flags, boogie-boarding, and learning how to save a life. Then we enjoyed some fish and chips for lunch. After lunch, we packedup and left the beach and arrived safely (but tired), back at school in the afternoon. A big thanks to the teachers and instructors who organised everything, and gave up their time to help us to catch some waves. I’m sure everyone had a great time, and many of us will return to the sea in the years to come, looking for that perfect wave to catch. Josh Davidson and Alexander Bokas Year 8B

15


Viking Longhouses The Viking Age is still a fascinating period to study for Year 8s in the Middle School. Using recycled materials, Year 8B built a miniature model of a Viking Longhouse. Innovation and ingenuity directed some students to make a detachable roof, to show what the inside of a Longhouse would look like.

smoky and smelly room in winter; very different to the Year 8 classrooms – heated, spacious and well-ventilated. Mr Shaun Burke Middle School Head of Operations

In their models, they demonstrated an open fire place, benches for sleeping, and a small room at the end to house animals during the long winters. It would have been a very noisy,

“ The competition witnessed the breaking of multiple records, including the

World Record in 5x5x5 Cube ”

Melbourne Rubik’s Cube Days Camberwell Grammar School hosted the Melbourne Rubik’s Cube Days Competition, where competitors gather to quickly solve cube puzzles. The competition had multiple events running over two days in the Performing Arts Centre Foyer. The competition witnessed the breaking of multiple records, including the World Record in 5x5x5 Cube, Continental Record in 4x4x4 Cube, National Record in 4x4x4 Cube Blindfolded, and Continental Records in the 16

3x3x3 Cube Blindfolded events. One of our boys, Ming Kim Low (Year 12), also achieved his personal best in the 3x3x3 Cube Blindfolded event. The boys who participated were Ming Han Low (Year 8), Ming Jin Low (Year 10) and Ming Kim Low (Year 12). Mr Chi Keen Low (1987)


World’s Greatest Shave Congratulations to all of our students and staff members who raised money for the World’s Greatest Shave. inspired by Mrs Amanda Kollosche, who declared early her intention to donate her hair for wigs for cancer patients and shave her hair. Steven House Prefects led the charge, inspiring many of their peers to raise money and to volunteer to shave their hair too. I also offered to undergo the clippers if the boys managed to raise $12,000 – in the end they raised $28,792 to support the battle against leukemia. Dr Paul Hicks Headmaster

17


Junior School SoirÊe It is not an easy task to perform as a soloist. Playing a musical instrument to a large audience is something many of us would consider with trepidation, yet each term, the young musicians of Junior School eagerly submit their forms, giving the details of the piece they will play at the Soiree. The popularity of this term’s Soiree indicates that 2018 will be a musically busy year. From Prep to Year 5, students performed with confidence and musical interpretation, indicating the care they give to their practice. Solo performances on piano, violin, cello, flute and trumpet gave interesting variety with music from Johann Sebastian Bach to Hard Rock Blues.

18

For many students, it was their first concert. One student performed his own piano composition and others showed their experience and sophistication as they performed the music of Chopin and Faure. It is rewarding to have so many boys share their love of their music learning with their audience. Mrs Helen Thomas Assistant Director of Music — Junior School


Year 7 Mums and Sons Breakfast On Thursday 15 March, over 120 mothers and their sons attended our Year 7 Mums and Sons Breakfast in the Performing Arts Centre foyer. Our guest speakers were Leeshan Navaneetharaja (Year 8) and School Captain Jack Fitzgerald (Year 12). Here is an excerpt from the School Captain’s speech: Good morning Dr Hicks, Mr Stanley, mothers and, of course, boys of Year 7. I want to first thank you for having me here today. My time in Middle School has come and gone, so it’s nice to know that you were brave enough to have me back.

Five years ago, I sat where you are sitting today, with my mum beside me. She again is with me today; I guess some things never change. But it also demonstrates something that I think teenagers and young men can often overlook; the support of our parents, our mothers in particular. I’ll reveal a secret about myself, and my mum can attest to this; I was never an angel as a kid. But in spite of it all, my mother stuck with me, always there when I needed her most. Boys, I encourage you, look at the person next to you, your mother – that is the best support network you will ever have, not just in school, but in life. Cherish it. I arrived at Camberwell Grammar School in 2010, when I was a younger, shorter and much cuter Year 4 student. So, come the Year 7 induction, I had that advantage of knowing the School, some teachers, and I had already established a friendship group. But with Year 7 comes over 100 new classmates, and with that, new personalities, and experiences. I want to address the boys who went through Junior School at Camberwell. I trust that so far, you’ve established contact with these “outsiders” and have become friends with them. Now, to the new boys. I know it may seem daunting; the new uniforms, teachers, boys, environment, but the opportunities at this school are second-to-none. To make the most of your time at this place, you simply must

“do”. Do things that challenge you, do things that scare you, do things that make you want to arrive at school every day. Homework or tests may get you down, but I promise you, if you try new things, if you “do”, you’ll forget all about the homework. Of course, don’t forget your homework! I don’t need Mr Cathcart yelling at me because his entire class said I told you not to do it. I could stand here for hours, telling you about what Middle School and Senior School have to offer, but it’s a unique experience for everyone. Personally, Year 7 introduced a regimented sporting program for summer, winter and spring sports. For others, it created opportunities to discover art or music or drama. I think too often we forget what school is all about; teaching and nurturing us to become productive men of the world. Whilst academia is important, our time in school is as much about the experiences we share, as it is about the education we receive. Take the pulling up your socks, a highly contentious issue I know… You are being asked to pull them up, not because it benefits your education, but because it hopefully instils in you the idea to always be respectful of whatever uniform you come to wear in the future because of what it stands for and the institution it represents. I hope you have been able to take something out of this today. Remember, the key to this entire place is to get out there and do it! 19


Junior School House Games The Junior School was buzzing with energy as students and teachers moved through the School participating in the House Games Afternoon, planned by the Year 5 students. It was a chance for the Year 5 cohort to showcase all that they had learnt during the Term 1 leadership process, and it was clear that they had come a long way. In preparing for the day, the Year 5 boys learned about the importance of taking on roles in a team. It was not about everyone being a leader, but about knowing when to listen and support others. An integral part

20

of the learning was in communicating clear instructions to a range of audiences. The boys quickly discovered it was not quite as easy as expected. Regardless of the challenges met, the Year 5s persevered and excelled in creating a range of wonderful activities. Teamwork was key, not only for the Year 5s, but for every student participating. Some of the activities included a team relay, Rob the Nest and Trust Walk. There was also Pipe Ball, where the boys had to pass a tennis ball along the green through connecting pipes or Circle Ball where the ball had to be passed to each person in the circle without the same person having the ball twice. It was a fantastic afternoon for all. Miss Kelly Day Year 5 Teacher


Derham House Chapel Service On Wednesday 14 March, School Chaplain Rev Charles Butler conducted the very first Derham House Chapel Service for the year, in the All Souls Chapel.

“ Those of us in the

Camberwell Grammar School Drumline had

a short but thorough workshop session with Ralph.”

Ralph Nadar Workshop It goes without saying that Ralph Nader is incredible at what he does and we’ve been lucky enough to have this world-famous percussion extraordinaire come to our school. He has a detailed style that’s a joy to watch and listen to. Those of us in the Camberwell Grammar School Drumline had a short but thorough workshop session with Ralph, where he taught us a fun little routine which we have since incorporated into our usual Drumline practice. The fun didn’t stop there – as Ralph had been staying here in Australia with the D2 Drumline (founded and directed by our own Drumline director, Campbell Phillips), he collaborated with both D2 and an amazing selection of drummers and musicians to put on an extraordinary concert at the Grant Street Theatre on the night of Tuesday 6 of March. Again, we have been very lucky to experience what he does and even with the short time we had with him, our drumming abilities have been greatly enriched.

An Easter Message

Henry Koswig Year 11

Rev Charles Butler Chaplain

In Chapel, we were reflecting on Jesus at the Last Supper and looking at the Easter window. Jesus began the Passover by taking the role of a servant or slave and got down on His knees and washed His disciples’ feet. Why have we so often left this action of service out of our Liturgies and Easter Services? At a time in the world when many world leaders just blow their own trumpet, what a contrast is our Lord, The King Who Washes Feet. Let us continue to choose servant leadership, rejoicing in new life, the gift of our risen Saviour, Jesus Christ. Amen.

21


congratulations SCHOLARS OF THE SCHOOL

KENNETH ATOCK MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

VICTORIAN UNDER 18 LACROSSE TEAM

Monash University helps high-achieving secondary school students develop and excel, both academically and personally. Based on mid-year results from 2017, Nicholas Browne (Year 11), Thomas Lee (Year 11) and Michael Pham (Year 11) were selected as Monash Scholars for 2017-2019. Congratulations Nicholas, Thomas and Michael.

Congratulations to Aksel Salins (Year 11), and Jake Brown (Year 12), who were the joint recipients of the Kenneth Atock Memorial Scholarship for Science. This scholarship was given to the School in a bequest from Mr Kenneth Atock, an Old Boy. It is awarded to students for their academic performance in the Sciences, to promote and encourage scientific education with the emphasis upon studies of outer space and rocketry amongst scholars attending Camberwell Grammar School.

Congratulations to Ethan Hausler (Year 12), who was selected in the Victorian Under 18 Lacrosse Team and will be competing in South Australia during the Easter holidays.

YEAR 12 SCHOLARS Travis Barton James Bickerdike Jake Brown Ryan Campbell Benjamin Chesler Michael Donaldson Richard Han Matthew Kautsky Rashay Kotecha

Charles Li Ming Kim Low Darcy MacCuspie Adam Moore James Saligari Anthony Stewart WeiHoong Tan Michael Tan

KOOYONG STUDENT PRIZE The Kooyong Student Prize is an award to recognise students in the electorate of Kooyong, for general excellence, leadership, and their contribution to the community. Students were selected using the following criteria:

THE COMEBACK KID Down 2:5 to win 6:5, Alec McDougall (Year 8) had a victorious win on the JTO tennis courts.

JUNIOR SCHOOL 2018 EXECUTIVE COUNCIL From the 21 boys nominated to stand for election to the Year 5 Executive Council, ten were elected. All nominated boys are congratulated for their nomination and recognition as leaders by their peers. Christopher Khong Ross Armstrong Hamish Wishart James Mills Kye Yoshimura

Charlie Adams George Karametos Arya Noor Ashwin Lagana Edward Wang

1: Excellence in academic and extra-curricular pursuits; 2. Leadership amongst his peers; 3. A strong commitment to upholding the school’s values and strengthening the community at large.

UNDER 15 NATIONAL HOCKEY CHAMPIONSHIPS

Congratulations to Michael Donaldson (Year 12) and Henry Wu (2017) who were the recipients of the 2017 Kooyong Prize from Camberwell Grammar School.

Congratulations to Angus Oldham (Year 9) who was selected to represent Victoria at the Under 15 National Hockey Championships in Wollongong in March.

AUSTRALIAN OPEN BALL KIDS

ATHLETIC STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS

Congratulations to Ryan Box (Year 11) and Aidan Chu (Year 11), on being selected to be Ball Kids at the Australian Open. Ryan was the flag bearer in the women’s finals and Aidan in the men’s finals. Aidan was awarded the “Top Ball Kid” prize and was selected to be a Ball Kid at the French Open this May.

Congratulations to Dilina DeSilva (Year 12) and Kai Sapolu (Year 8), who competed in the Athletic State Championships in February.

GEOGRAPHY TEACHERS’ ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA Each year, the Geography Teachers’ Association of Victoria award VCE Certificates of Excellence, recognising student achievement in the study of Geography, and in acknowledgement of the professionalism and dedication of their Geography teachers. Congratulations to the following students, who were recognised for their achievements in VCE Geography in 2017: Riley Anderson (2017) Joel Kleiman (Year 12)

22

Dilina DeSilva EVENT

PLACE

QUALIFYING TIME

400m

1st

54.26 (Australian Junior Qualifying – 1:01:14)

200m

1st

22.55 (Australian Junior Qualifying – 22.84)

400m

2nd

49.82 (Australian Junior Qualifying – 51.14)

AUSTRALIAN FENCING CHAMPIONSHIPS Congratulations to Darcy MacCuspie (Year 12), who competed in the Australian Under 20 Fencing Championships and the Oceania Fencing Federation Under 20 Fencing Championships earlier this year.

Kai Sapolu FUTSAL CHAMPIONSHIPS

EVENT

PLACE

QUALIFYING TIME

Congratulations to Niko Verrios (Year 11), who recently competed in, and won, the national Futsal championships at the AIS in Canberra.

Hammer Throw

2nd

29.96m (Australian Junior Qualifying – 28.00m)

Pole Vault

1st

2.60m (Australian Junior Qualifying – 2.00m)


Spectemur | Term 1 2018

UNDER 18 NATIONAL HOCKEY CHAMPIONSHIPS Congratulations to Nicholas Gooden (Year 11) and the Victorian U18 Boys who won the Gold medal at the Under 18 Australian Hockey Championships in Launceston last week, with a 2-1 win in the Grand Final over Queensland Maroon.

JUNIOR SCHOOL INTER-HOUSE SWIMMING CARNIVAL On Friday 2 March, all Year 3, 4 and 5 boys competed in the Junior School Inter-House Swimming Carnival in the Camberwell Grammar School Sports Complex. Special congratulations go to the Year 5 Clifford/ Steven freestyle relay team that broke the record, previously held by Clifford/ Steven (2.41.3) with a new time of 2.40.9.

Congratulations go to the following boys who achieved multiple first places: YEAR 3

YEAR 4

YEAR 5

Thomas Torre

Luke Mason

William Watson

Sean Verghese

Melvin Zhang

Nicholas Lysikatos

Thomas Pritchett Alex Tong Louis Zhang

23


YEAR 11 RESULT

NAME

HOUSE

Gold

Matthew McKenna

Bridgland

Silver

Harley Beechey

Summons

Bronze

Charlie Harper

Robinson

RESULT

NAME

HOUSE

Gold

David McColl

Summons

Silver

Harry McLeod

Clifford

Silver

Tom Lombardi

Schofield

Bronze

Sean Kennedy

Schofield

YEAR 12

YEAR 9

JARRETT CUP POINTS HOUSE

1

26

Derham Schofield

RESULT

NAME

HOUSE

2

24

ATHLETIC NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS

Gold

Zac Johnson

Steven

3

22

Summons

Dilina DeSilva (Year 12) finished fifth in his Under 18 200m final at the National Championships on Thursday 15 March. Congratulations Dilina.

Silver

Nick Robinson

Clifford

4

20

Macneil

Bronze

Flynn Chable

Clifford

5

19

Clifford

6

14

Bridgland

7

12

Steven

8

8

Robinson

SENIOR SCHOOL HOUSE ATHLETICS On Tuesday 13 March, all Senior School students took part in the Senior School House Athletics at the Bill Sewart Reserve. Congratulations to the following boys for their places:

24

PLACE

YEAR 10 RESULT

NAME

HOUSE

Gold

Lachlan Evans

Schofield

Gold

Alex Wilson-Brown

Summons

Silver

Taran Laurence

Derham

Silver

Oliver Spalding

Steven

YEAR 9 YEAR 10

YEAR 11

YEAR 12

1st

Derham Schofield

Derham

Summons

2nd

Macneil Steven

Schofield

Clifford

3rd

Clifford

Summons

Macneil

Derham


NATIONAL AGE SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS

NAME

EVENT (10 YEARS)

RESULT

NAME

EVENT (12 YEARS)

RESULT

Congratulations to Lewis Clarke, Yanning Zhang, Cody Greenwood and Gregory Kerdemelidis (all Year 8), who qualified for the National Age Swimming Championships in Sydney in April.

Melvin Zhang

Butterfly (50m)

2nd Overall

Michael Chen

Breaststroke (50m)

2nd Heat

NAME

EVENT (11 YEARS)

RESULT

NATIONAL TRIATHLON CHAMPIONSHIP

1st Overall

Congratulations to Mr John Allen, who was one of 2,000 triathletes that competed in the National Triathlon Championship in Southport, Gold Coast. As an Age Group competitor, he won his division and was awarded the Australian Champion. John will compete on the same course, in the World Triathlon Championships, to be held on the Gold Cost this September. This will be the tenth time he has been selected in the Australian team.

William Watson 4x50m Free Relay

2018 BEACHSIDE DIVISIONAL SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS On Friday 9 March, a team of six Junior and Middle School boys competed in the Beachside Division Swimming Championships held at Oakleigh Pool. Congratulations to the following boys on their performances at the event: Nicholas Wang (Year 5B), Ross Sykiotis (Year 5A), William Watson (Year 5A), Arya Noor (Year 5B), Melvin Zhang (Year 4A) and Michael Chen (Year 6P). Special congratulations to William Watson, Nicholas Wang, Arya Noor and Ross Sykiotis who qualified for the Southern Metro Regional Championships, to be held at MSAC on Wednesday 28 March.

“ The team performed

Butter y (50m)

3rd Overall

Freestyle (50m)

3rd Overall

Nicholas Wang 4x50m Free Relay

1st Overall

Backstroke (50m) Ross Sykiotis

4x50m Free Relay

1st Overall

Backstroke (50m) Arya Noor

4x50m Free Relay

1st Overall

2018 AGSV Swimming Championship On Monday 19 March, 25 Junior and Middle School boys competed in the 2018 AGSV Swimming Championship held at the Melbourne Sports and Aquatic Centre (MSAC). The team performed strongly on the day, with a total of 21 top three finishes out of 37 events on the day. We would like to congratulate all team members and special congratulations go to the following placegetters: 10 YEARS NAME

EVENT

PLACE

TIME

strongly on the day, with a

Melvin Zhang

50m Freestyle ‘A’

2nd

39.23

50m Butterfly ‘A’

3rd

46.29

out of 37 events on the day ”

Isaac Chen

total of 21 top three finishes

4x50m Medley Relay

3rd

3.20.9

50m Freestyle ‘C’

2nd

42.73

50m Backstroke ‘B’

2nd

51.74

4x50m Medley Relay

3rd

3.20.9

50m Freestyle ‘A’

2nd

43.63

50m Backstroke ‘B’

2nd

46.72

4x50m Medley Relay

3rd

3.20.9

Samuel Li

4x50m Medley Relay

3rd

3.20.9

Kaan Ong

50m Breaststroke

2nd

57.16

4x50m Freestyle Relay ‘B’

3rd

3.12.5

Mark Wu

4x50m Freestyle Relay ‘B’

3rd

3.12.5

Louis Zhang

4x50m Freestyle Relay ‘B’

3rd

3.12.5

Riley Austin

4x50m Freestyle Relay ‘B’

3rd

3.12.5

Max McCool

25


11 YEARS NAME William Watson

Nicholas Wang

Rick Liu Arya Noor

Ross Sykiotis

EVENT

PLACE

TIME

4x50m Medley Relay ‘A’

1st

2.54.3

50m Freestyle ‘A’

1st

33.66

50m Butterfly ‘A’

1st

40.25

4x50m Freestyle Relay ‘A’

2nd

2.32.3

4x50m Medley Relay ‘A’

1st

2.54.3

4x50m Freestyle Relay ‘A’

2nd

2.32.3

50m Backstroke ‘B’

1st

46.53

4x50m Medley Relay ‘A’

1st

2.54.3

50m Breaststroke ‘B’

1st

49.69

4x50m Medley Relay ‘B’

2nd

2.45.3

4x50m Freestyle Relay ‘B’

3rd

3.21.3

50m Freestyle ‘B’

3rd

38.28

4x50m Freestyle Relay ‘A’

2nd

2.32.3

4x50m Medley Relay ‘A’

1st

2.54.3

50m Butterfly ‘B’

3rd

55.38

Nikolas Casale

4x50m Freestyle Relay ‘B’

2nd

2.45.3

4x50m Medley Relay ‘B’

3rd

3.21.3

Nicholas Lysikatos

4x50m Freestyle Relay ‘B’

2nd

2.45.3

4x50m Medley Relay ‘B’

3rd

3.21.3

4x50m Freestyle Relay ‘B’

2nd

2.45.3

4x50m Medley Relay ‘B’

3rd

3.21.3

EVENT

PLACE

TIME

Jonathan Chong

12 YEARS NAME

26

Michael Chen

50m Breaststroke ‘A’

3rd

46.86

Frederick Hughes

50m Breaststroke ‘B’

2nd

49.90

Australasian Badminton Championships Congratulations Benjamin Chen (Year 9) for being selected to represent Victoria at the 2018 Under 17 Australasian Badminton Championships which will be held in Invercargill, New Zealand in April. We wish him great success.

Music Achievements Congratulations to the musicians (from left to right) who successfully completed their Diplomas. It is a huge achievement for any musician to be awarded their Associate in Music, Australia (A.Mus) or Licentiate in Music, Australia (L.Mus), and even more so during their school years. Lucas Liu (Year 11) A.MusA Violin Darby Lee (Year 8) A.MusA Cello Wilson Zhu (Year 9) A.MusA Violin Joseph Pang (Year 9) A.MusA Piano Trevor Henley (Director of Music, 1987-2016) Emre Cakmakcioglu (Year 12) L.MusA Viola Ethan Liu (Year 12) A.MusA Violin Matthew Wu (Year 10) A.MusA Viola Edward Wu (Year 11) A.MusA Violin Also congratulations to Victor Weihan Zhou (Year 9), who was awarded the Elizabeth Stainkamph Memorial Prize for the best combined result in Grade Five Theory and Grade Eight Piano examinations.


Spectemur | Term 1 2018

AGSV Swimming Finals

EVENT Open 200m Freestyle U13 4x50m Medley Relay

PLACE 3rd 2nd

U14 4x50m Medley Relay

2nd

Special congratulations to all swimmers were part of relay teams to break School Records and to those who broke Individual School Records. There were a total of nine School Records broken on the night. Overall the team finished third with 243.5 points, behind Ivanhoe (second – 267.5 points) and Mentone (first – 288 points).

U15 4x50m Medley Relay

3rd

U16 4x50m Medley Relay

3rd

“ There were a total of

U13 50m Breaststroke U14 50m Breaststroke U15 50m Breaststroke U16 50m Breaststroke U14 50m Butterfly U15 50m Butterfly

1st 2nd 1st 3rd 1st 1st

James Harker (Year 9) Brandon Petherbridge (Year 9) Dylan Lay (Year 10) Jasper Fodor (Year 10) Peter Zhao (Year 10) Matthew Power (Year 10) Lachlan Nguyen (Year 7) Lewis Clarke (Year 8) Gregory Kerdemelidis (Year 8) Jasper Fodor (Year 10) Lewis Clarke (Year 8) Yanning Zhang (Year 8)

U14 50m Freestyle U15 50m Freestyle

2nd 1st

Gregory Kerdemelidis (Year 8) Alexander Hillman (Year 9)

U16 50m Freestyle U14 50m Backstroke U15 50m Backstroke

3rd 1st 2nd

Dylan Lay (Year 10) Yanning Zhang (Year 8) Alexander Hillman (Year 9)

U16 50m Backstroke U13 4x50m Freestyle Relay

2nd 1st

U14 4x50m Freestyle Relay

1st

U15 4x50m Freestyle Relay

1st

Dylan Lay (Year 10) James Kerferd (Year 7) Blake Pahos (Year 7) Lachlan Nguyen (Year 7) Sebastian Beck (Year 7) Lewis Clarke (Year 8) Cody Greenwood (Year 8) Gregory Kerdemelidis (Year 8) Richard Luo (Year 8) Brandon Petherbridge (Year 9) Yanning Zhang (Year 8) James Harker (Year 9) Alexander Hillman (Year 9)

Well done to the boys for their hard work across the season and congratulations on a very successful night of swimming at MSAC on Friday 16 March. There were some great individual results from our swimmers, including Yanning Zhang (Year 8), Alexander Hillman (Year 9), Dylan Lay (Year 10) and Connor Xu (Year 11), but in the end it was a great team performance.

nine School Records

broken on the night.”

COMPETITOR Connor Xu (Year 12) James Kerferd (Year 7) Lachlan Nguyen (Year 7) Blake Pahos (Year 7) Sebastian Beck (Year 7) Cody Greenwood (Year 8) Gregory Kerdemelidis (Year 8) Lewis Clarke (Year 8) Richard Luo (Year 8) Alexander Hillman (Year 9) Yanning Zhang (Year 8)

TIME 2m 00.80s 2m 23.89s

2m 05.24s (School Record)

2m 08.28s

2m 02.77s (School Record)

39.75s 35.13s 33.47s 34.42s 28.99s 27.05s (School Record) 27.85s 25.70s (School Record) 26.02s 29.25s 30.96s (School Record) 30.95s 2m 01.45s

1m 53.83s (School Record)

1m 51.02s (School Record)

27


7A Summer Season Congratulations to 7A Basketball, 7A Cricket and 7A Tennis, who went through the summer season undefeated.

Victorian Little Athletics Championship Congratulations to Sebastian Beck (Year 7) who recently competed in the Victorian Little Athletics Championships. Sebastian won all three of his events and broke three long standing U13 Camberwell Grammar School Records in the process.

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Event

Time

Previous School Record

100m

12.59s

12.72, 2009

200m

25.33s

25.7, 1974

Triple Jump

11.09m

0.98m, 1984

“ Sebastian won all three of his events and

13 Camberwell

broke three long standing U

Grammar School Records in the process.�


Staff Profile Mrs Helen Thomas Helen came to Camberwell Grammar School as Junior School Music teacher in 1996, which coincided with the opening of the Performing Arts Centre, a building with which her career has been intertwined. Helen’s work takes her from Junior School to Music School, meaning some long walks, but wonderful opportunities to engage as both a musician and a teacher. Music plays an important part of every student’s life in Junior School. From the youngest students embarking on their musical life, to the more experienced instrumentalists, boys are eager to sign up for Soirées held each term. Boys sing in every Assembly, in every music class, and the strong culture of singing that exists throughout the School is evident from the earliest years. Helen is a long-standing member of the Ashton-Smith Singers, so singing is not only part of her professional career, but a pleasurable and rewarding part of her life

outside of school. The Ashton-Smith Singers present a variety of concerts throughout the year, particularly at Christmas and New Year’s Eve. Helen has performed at the Sydney Opera House backing international artists. She enjoys studio recording for movie soundtracks, TV ads, CDs and major events such as the AFL Grand Final. As with all members of the music staff, Helen brings her performance experience to her work with students. It also makes her realise how fortunate the students at the School are to have such wonderful performance opportunities and facilities. From large scale concerts, drama and musical productions, soirées and choral services at St Mark’s Church, to musical items and massed singing at weekly assemblies, she and her students are constantly learning about performance and she loves watching students grow and develop through that process and achieve the satisfaction that also comes with it.

Helen also plays a major role in introducing the youngest students in the School to the world of instrumental music, guiding their choices and helping them to enjoy and benefit from regular music practice. To give purpose to that learning they move into ensemble music quickly to share their music making and have the opportunity to perform in front of others. Helen finds creating small chamber music groups for advanced musicians very exciting. Helen derives much joy from watching students who began their musical life in Junior School, performing in the many orchestras, bands, ensembles and choirs in Senior School, many of them going on to be truly stellar performers. She draws inspiration from the exceptional expertise of her colleagues and finds great satisfaction in being valued as both a teacher and musician.

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from the archives One of the joys of receiving material from Old Boys and their families is receiving information about their post-school life, as it is often the case that we are able to document the school career of a particular student in great detail, but know very little about their life thereafter. Accordingly, any donations that reflect these post-school years provide the Archives with valuable information about the subsequent working and family life of our many thousands of Old Boys.

Cadet Donald Watt in 1944.

Mrs Pamela Watt of Bendigo has recently donated much material about her late husband Donald Watt, a student at CGS from 1942-44 under a Parents’ Association full scholarship. This donation included CGS cufflinks, badges and Donald’s school reports for those years, stretching from ‘Sub-interim’ to Form VI. Young Donald was a very focused student, his reports indicating ‘commendable’ results, although teamed with a warning in 1942: ‘Still at the top, although competition is becoming keener.’ Nevertheless, his grades remained consistently well above the ‘Form Average’ in every subject and he continued to be assessed in 1944 as ‘a good worker’. These traits would endure into his working life of forty-two years in the Department of Defence, from which Mr Watt retired in 1991 as Regional Superintendent (Navy Engineering Support), where he had been a significant contributor to the development of propellant manufacture. Like many other Grammarians, Donald had been well qualified to serve in the military and/or its associated bureaucracy through service in the Cadet Unit of his old school. As a cadet sergeant in receipt of several Certificates of Merit, Young Donald had impressed his superiors in 1943-44 in ‘instructional knowledge’, although his ‘word

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of command must be improved.’ Clearly, when one examines his post-school career, his word was clearly finessed and the confidence that the wartime Army expressed in Donald Watt’s ability as an instructor would be fulfilled in the decades following the war. Not all Old boys were so inclined to cadet service in these years - Richard Brinkman (1961) of Athelstone, South Australia, wrote to me earlier this year mentioning that he had been able as a Form III student in the late-Fifties to avoid compulsory cadet service ‘wherein I would have had to charge, screaming with a bayonet at straw figures’. The highlight of his six years at Camberwell Grammar had been of a more subdued nature, when he had markedly contributed to the historical compendium prepared by his classmates under the direction of the well-respected Mr G.H. France, Senior History Master (195664). Mr Brinkman has generously donated a copy of this compendium, The Strong and the Weak: the story of our national origins, which was circulated amongst the school community in a limited edition from November 1958. It is an impressive document with student contributions intended to provide ‘a clear and fresh account of the fascinating childhood of this nation’. These Form III historians certainly did so, beginning with the ‘Discovery of the Great South Land’ by the Dutch in 1605 and ending with the move ‘Towards SelfGovernment’ in the mid-nineteenth century. Naturally enough, any twenty-first century reader will wonder about the general exclusion and occasional dismissal of the original inhabitants of the continent from this historical survey, but this is simply an indication of the changing nature of historiography and, in my estimation, in no way detracts from the

Geoffrey Bedford’s badge, c.1913.

quality of the scholarship demonstrated in The Strong and the Weak. The volume is very well-researched and very well-written – even six decades later, it remains a credit to its dozens of Form III contributors and to Glynn France, an Englishman and Oxford graduate who had come late to the teaching profession following military service in the wartime British Army and later as a war crimes investigator. Richard Brinkman remains justifiably proud of his role in the publication of this volume and its addition to our Heritage Collection is invaluable. It is appropriate that the preface of the volume quotes the wisdom of Thomas Carlyle: ‘In books lies the soul of the whole past time.’ Mrs Barbara Bedford, archivist of Guide Dogs Victoria recently visited the Camberwell Grammar Archives and was impressed with our modern facilities. Barbara and her husband Marten (son of Old Boy Geoffrey Bedford, 1915) have been very generous in donations to our Heritage Collection, including passing on a unique CGS badge from those early years. I am particularly pleased to receive items such as this, pieces that have not previously been collected in our archives. As the School moves steadily towards the milestone of a centuryand-a-half, future generations will hold such items in great esteem. Thank you again to those who have remembered their old school. Dr David Bird School Archivist

“ Any donations that reflect these post-school years

provide the Archives with

valuable information about the subsequent working The Strong and the Weak, 1958.

and family life of our many thousands of Old Boys.”


The Performing Arts at Camberwell Grammar MODEST BEGINNINGS AND CREDITABLE MANNERS, 1886-1914 This article is the first in an edited series detailing the history of the performing arts at Camberwell Grammar, 1886-1986. It will be followed by others accounting the history in later decades. The whole, expanded work – “The Realisation of Dreams” – will be published in a single volume in due course. “The farce could be summed up by stating that everything was very much mixed, but all came right in the end.” Press reports on a featured piece of the inaugural school concert, June 1898. The initial advertisements leading up to the opening in February 1886 of the new school – the Camberwell Grammar School – at St. John’s in Burke Road, Camberwell, made no mention of the performing arts. It was promised that the offered course of instruction would ‘embrace all the subjects necessary for a boy’s complete education’, but the subjects enumerated thereafter were practical ones, chiefly Arithmetic, Hand-writing, Spelling and Dictation. Only ‘Reading aloud’ may have offered some immediate attraction to any boy (or parent) inclined to thespian or musical pursuits, but these were early days. The initial ‘Speech Day’ in December 1886 at the Hawthorn Town Hall suggested that ‘the minds of the lads had been carefully tended’ as the prospectus of February had promised, but the greatest cheer gained by the new Headmaster/Principal on that afternoon followed his suggestion that ‘the school had held its own in the cricket and football field’. However, there still needed to be a place for the performing arts if the School was ever to produce young ‘gentlemen’. Accordingly, the second Speech Day, in December 1887, had at least opened with a ‘programme of recitations’ undertaken by ‘Mr MacCully’s elocution class’, a meagre acknowledgement of cultural pursuits, but one that nevertheless marks the modest beginnings of performing arts at the fledgling School. It was augmented on the third Speech Day, in December 1888, by ‘a well arranged programme of pianoforte solos and recitations’, all delivered in ‘a creditable manner’. There at least seemed some slim, incipient hope for the performing arts and the following year combined both elocution and instrumental numbers, again in what was considered ‘a most creditable style’. The 1890s too seemed generally promising in the beginning, but an economic downturn would soon gradually turn matters sour. The 1890 Speech Night at the Hawthorn Town Hall (chaired by Mayor F. Gillman Esq.) was a notable one - Miss Nellie Veitch (an itinerant coach of recitation) was presented on that December evening with a handsome gold bangle ‘as a token of the esteem in

Form V, the ‘educated gentlemen’ of Camberwell Grammar at Fermangah Road, 1890.

which that lady is held as an instructor to the elocution class’. The evening displayed evidence of her fine work through various recitations, including that of “Lochinvar” from the works of Walter Scott by thirteen-year-old Robert McGuigan (1895). The programme was a very full one of piano solos and recitations, notably including the performance of “The King and the Troubadour”, an account of the partnership of Richard the Lion-Heart (played by Mr John McIntosh of Auburn) and Blondel the minstrel (played by Mr William Gallagher) – both men were future school parents. Boys were restricted to less prominent roles, such as the promising McGuigan as the malevolent Prince John – the two female roles were played respectively by Alexander Dick (Margaretta) and Claude Kennedy (the Dame), according to the common dramatic practice of the time whereby it was not quite respectable for young ladies to adorn the stage. The subsequent Speech Day activities of December 1891 featured a piano solo (“Talisman”) by the Year 9 student Sidney Bracey (1892) in yet another ‘creditable manner’, followed by the theatrical performance of “Tortured Tutors”, an event which caused ‘considerable amusement’. Even the generally unmusical cadets got into the act by performing recitations and songs following their skillful military display. There now seemed a definite place, albeit a meagre one, at Camberwell Grammar for those boys attracted to the performing arts. The School was by now under the new joint management of Principals A.S. Hall and W.A. Gosman, but there was no escaping economic decline and enrolments began to fluctuate markedly through the 1890s. The retiring Headmaster A.B. Taylor (1886-91) had been a finelytuned entrepreneur, but he was not a man of extended culture. Nor did the hungry 1890s

Speech Night programme, 1890, featuring “The King and the Troubadour”.

seem to offer much promise of any significant evolution of culture at the School other than the clownish, almost gymnastic, nature exhibited at the end of 1891. Accordingly, 1892-93 offered new courses in the practical areas of Shorthand and First-Aid, but no noticeable acceleration of cultural activities until the Speech Day on a Monday evening in December 1893. Here, militia ‘Captain’ Hall began his ‘Headmaster’s Report’ at the Hawthorn Town Hall with a veiled apology about the loss of ‘only eight or ten boys’, sombrely concluding that numbers were not the only criterion of success. Prizes were

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then presented without any of the distraction, or consolation, of performances or recitals. Talented boys were forced to wait another year before they could take to the stage of the Hawthorn Town Hall in the following December of 1894; then, Donald Gaunson (1894) and the son of a former staff member performed a Chopin piano and cello duet, Walter Terry (1895) performed a recitation and the evening concluded with a ‘sprightly farce’ entitled “Who’s Who”, which featured five boys (one of whom stage managed) in their ultimate or penultimate years at the School. The evening was judged by one local journalist as ‘most successful’, marking the beginning of the competent self-management of cultural presentations by the pupils themselves, a theme that would be notable in later years. Hall and Gosman were at least sufficiently distinguished by the end of 1895 to be described as ‘cultured’ by the chairman of the Speech Day activities, Captain T. McWhee, but numbers were continuing to fall at the Fermanagh Road campus - by Term One, 1896, only thirty-four remained; within a year enrolment hit the rock bottom of thirty-three. Not surprisingly, there was scope for only a ‘small but excellent’ cultural programme at the end of 1896, when a guest artist performed a violin solo and fifteen-year-old Archibald Smart (1899) performed a flute solo. Yet, there did not seem much to sing or pipe about as the century drew to a close, even if enrolments gradually began to recover. In the meantime, Gosman had bailed out at Easter 1897, leaving Alfred Hall as the unchallenged master of the School, where he would remain for almost three decades at the new, improved St. John’s site (and later further up Burke Road from 1908). Although sport and academic achievement remained the School’s areas of focus in the late-1890s, Hall’s first solo Speech Night at the close of 1897 did nevertheless feature ‘a good programme of instrumental and vocal music given by friends and pupils of the school’, ameliorating any lingering sense of economic depression. The following year, 1898, even marked something of a turning point in the School’s hitherto casual approach to the arts with the first official ‘School Concert’ (and the last under this precise title for a generation) – perhaps the Headmaster saw the opportunity for something of a cultural renascence under his guidance. An innovative ‘Sports Concert’ (something of a contradiction in terms), also known as the ‘School Concert’, was held on Thursday evening, 23 June 1898, at the Shire Hall, Camberwell. Earlier advertisements in the local press had predicted and promised ‘an enjoyable’ and ‘very inviting’ evening; the subsequent delivery did not disappoint. The evening featured ‘songs by leading local 32

and other artists, assisted by a number of old pupils’, all taking part in ‘a selection from “Pickwick Papers” and an amusing farce’ – the latter piece was entitled “A Model Young Bachelor”. Both items had utilised large numbers of current students, for example George Manders (1899), Norman Blagdon (1903) and Randolf Lycett (1901; Gallery of Achievement – he later represented Britain in the Davis Cup and played in Wimbledon finals, 1919-23). This gifted trio combined to offer a recital entitled “Turning the Tables”, described as ‘cleverly given’ and as having shown a ‘good deal of pains’ in its preparation. Old Boy Melville Gray (1893) also performed a violin solo, the School now having formed the habit of inviting talented former scholars to take to the stage on official occasions. Amongst them was Reginald Gyton (1897), who performed ‘comic songs’. The whole evening was described in the Camberwell and Hawthorn Advertiser as ‘a thorough success, both as to talent and from a financial point of view’ – ‘all came right in the end’. Headmaster Hall proudly announced on the evening that all had been arranged by Old Boys themselves and soon he promised that the concert would become an annual event. It did not, but the ground had nevertheless been prepared for the strikingly successful concerts of later decades. Accordingly, the December 1898 Speech Day featured a comprehensive performance (again at the Shire Hall) of ‘quartettes [sic], songs, gramophone selections’ (an early example of Camberwell Grammar’s eagerness to embrace cutting-edge technology) and an Old Boy farce, “Do You Know Me Now?”, again starring the talented Reginald Gyton. That 1898 inaugural School Concert had been judged so successful that it was repeated with gusto in the following year, now being referred to as the ‘Old Boys’ Annual Concert’; seats could be reserved for the down-payment of sixpence. This second ‘Annual Sports Concert’ in July 1899 at the Shire Hall was another financial success - musical items such as “Will-o’-the-Wisp” and the patriotic “Beneath the Union Jack” were followed by more very innovative ‘phonograph selections’ and further Old Boy farces - “The Amateur Mesmerist” and “Rooms for Two” - the latter allowing one Grammarian, Richard Lewis (1888), to take the part of ‘the Landlady’. Expecting boys to play a female part on stage was a quite common practice at the time; it would be another half-century before young ladies (from Camberwell Church of England Girls’ Grammar School and Fintona) were invited to take appropriate, feminine parts in any Camberwell Grammar dramatic performance. These July 1899 performances were received with ‘hearty applause’, as were those that followed on the December Speech Day –

Speech Night programme, 1901, featuring the return of the popular ‘ventriloquial sketches’.

the grandest such occasion in the School’s thirteen-year history. Here, an outside guest, Miss Aida Hill, performed violin and flute solos which were ‘greatly appreciated by lovers of good music’. Old Boy Alexander Groube (1893) and that very talented, fourteenyear-old student George Manders provided what was regarded as ‘the most popular part of the whole entertainment’ with a mouthorgan duet. Young Manders later received considerable applause for the ‘very clever rendering’ of his part in the dialogue “The Australian all Abroad” – coincidentally, his life would soon be sacrificed, abroad, in the Great War when serving as a Lieutenant in the British Army in Mesopotamia, a colossal global struggle that still seemed unimaginable in 1899. Yet, at the time of this event, the Empire had been involved for two months in another colonial war against the South African Boer republics, and the 1899 Speech Day evening appropriately closed with an ‘enthusiastic’ rendering of the National Anthem – “God Save the Queen”. There would soon be at least two Old Grammarians serving as ‘Soldiers of the Queen’ in this faraway conflict. For an unknown reason there had been no Sports or Old Boys concert in 1900 (nor would there be in the immediate, following years). Headmaster Hall did, however, preside over an inaugural “School Picnic” at Dandenong Creek in December on the day before the annual Prize-Giving/ Speech Day evening at the Shire Hall. Miss Margaret Gosman (the spinster sister of the former Principal) was now a regular performer on such occasions and gave


a pianoforte solo; the duo of Groube and Manders repeated their previous year’s triumph with another mouth-organ duet – the audience demanded and received ‘a hearty encore’. For the first time, the evening also presented ‘ventriloquial sketches’ (sic) and a ‘comedietta’ (“A Deal in Horseflesh”) which featured four current students, including Norman Vial (1902) as “Fairey” and the sixteen-year-old Rob McKinley as “Polly”. McKinley would share the same wartime fate as Manders, being later killed in action as a Lieutenant in the AIF on the Western Front in 1917. Manders, now fifteen-years old, had shared the distinction of being the 1900 proxime accessit with Francis Derham (1901), who would go on in the World War to become Camberwell Grammar’s most decorated and celebrated veteran. A new century came on 1 January 1901 and a new nation. Enrolment at Camberwell Grammar was again over 100 for the first time since 1890 and over fifty new boys would join in the coming year – there was a touch of optimism in the air as the population of the district also began to rise, although traffic congestion at railway level crossings on Burke Road was causing some concern. Keith Murdoch (1903; Gallery of Achievement) was Dux of the School and his ‘excellent work’ was suitably recognised on Speech Night, 13 December 1901. The Kew Mercury noted that a ‘creditable’ musical programme had been offered on that Friday evening, the indispensable Miss Gosman playing accompaniments to the gymnastic displays. She also performed a Chopin Nocturne and the programme of the night had been an ebullient one with dialogues from Shakespeare’s “King John” and from the favoured “Pickwick Papers” by Dickens. This was the first time that the Bard featured on a Camberwell stage – it would not be the last. The press reports of 1902 were briefer, referring only to an unspecified Speech Night ‘entertainment’ that was enjoyed by all - it was probably of a similar nature to that of 1903, which outlined a ‘part song for male voices’ and a pianoforte solo by Old Boy Hugh MacRow (1900). This was followed by a humorous recital on “The Story of a Motor Car”, a new method of transport that many were confident would never overtake the recent, innovative ‘freedom machine’, the bicycle. Tom Bolton, in his last year at the School, performed a piano solo at the Shire Hall in December 1904, an evening that was chiefly notable for the first (and last) school performance of a ‘Coon song’ (“Lulu”) by Miss Madge Paul – this was a musical genre that sought to present a stereotyped image of African-Americans, in a style later perfected by Al Jolson. Miss Paul was enthusiastically

The whole School, 1907 – many of these boys were talented performing artists, but their opportunities were limited in these years.

encored by her Camberwell audience. 1905 too seems to have been a culturally barren year and the school population had dipped back to 79, but this depletion did not prevent the performance of a “Villa Marie” orchestra under Miss Campbell on Prize Night, Friday 21 December 1906 – the first occasion on which the annual speech/prize-giving night of the School had featured an orchestra. However small and diverse Miss Campbell’s assembled group may have been, an event that foreshadowed the substantial school concerts of a much later era, where the boys themselves would be the players. Unfortunately, these modest practices of recent times did not continue through the remaining years of peace, at a time when the School commemorated its milestone, twenty-fifth anniversary in 1911. Unfortunately, Camberwell Grammar had not cemented much of a reputation for the performing arts at any time during that quarter-century – even if A.S. Hall had kept the cultural flame alight at the St. John’s campus and at the new Burke Road campus from 1908, it was only a flicker in these early years of Federation. Attention had been more focused on more practical matters of expansion, construction and hygiene. The last year at St. John’s (1907), for example, was marked more by anticipation of the intended move to the new campus rather than by any notable cultural achievement. When the new Burke Road buildings and Principal’s residence were officially opened on Friday afternoon, 14 February 1908, toasts were given to ‘the health of the principal and success to the school’ and it was a new beginning, but not one that brought about any greater degree of concentration on the arts. The Jubilee edition of the Grammarian in 1936

suggested that a Dramatic Club had been formed in 1908, but there is no other record of such an organisation. In the first Speech Night of the new era in December, the ‘Principal’ preferred to concentrate on the extensive building programme and, by the following year, Hall stated his intention of giving ‘prominence to the teaching of science’, not something that gave encouragement to any cultural pursuits. There certainly was a great deal of artistic potential amongst the student body, which doubled from 1908 to 1914 (from 121 to 251), but it remained largely untapped, despite an ‘interesting programme’ having been given on Speech Night, 13 December 1910. There was now an unexplained gap in performing arts at the School - the Prize Night of 1913, the last of those golden years of peace prior to the global deluge, was one that afforded merit to the School’s prominence in ‘combined sports and cricket’ and to the prize-winning cadet corps, but not to any piano soloists, musicians, poets, dramatists or even more modestly talented practitioners of the ‘Coon song’ genre. The cultural atmosphere of the School had been thrown back twenty years, a disappointing end to a period that had offered promise to the performing arts. The performing arts at Camberwell Grammar School had experienced modest success since 1886, but they now faced an uncertain future. At a time of what soon became a lifeand-death struggle in Europe, the performing arts were relegated to a minor role in the minds of many. The dreams of that small body of Camberwell performing artists were put on hold for the duration, even if in August 1914 the conflict did not appear likely to endure much more than one campaigning season. Dr David Bird School Archivist 33


sport

Congratulations to our Summer Associated Grammar Schools of Victoria (AGSV) premiership teams of Table Tennis and Badminton. Both teams defeated Ivanhoe Grammar, in what were two very close matches. From those teams, several students made AGSV selection in the annual match against the best of the APS: Otto Zhao (Year 9), Benjamin Chen (Year 9) and Jason Tran (Year 11) in Badminton and Michael Tan (Year 12, Captain), Ethan Tang (Year 10) and Nathan Shi (Year 10) in Table Tennis. A few other sports came close to premiership glory with the Orienteering squad finishing second to Scotch and Firsts Basketball fourth, while the Triathlon and Kayaking squads narrowly missed claiming the ultimate goal finishing in second place. Firsts Tennis were sixth and Firsts Cricket ninth (both with very young squads, looking to build into next season).

Well done to Sean Kennedy (Year 12, Volleyball emergency), Vihaan Narayana (Year 11, Cricket) and Harry McLeod (Year 12, Basketball) on being named in their respective AGSV teams. Squash had six teams in the Victorian Squash Pennant Competition, with the Second Division teams leading the way. Lawn Bowls entered two teams into the Bob Poulton Competition, with our First Division Team finishing runners up in a close final to Assumption College.

Congratulations to all of the award winners for the 2017/18 Summer Season. 8A Tennis won the Arthur’s Cup, 8A Cricket won the Friends of Cricket Best Team Award and 10C Mitre won the Friends of Basketball Best Team Award. The final event on the summer sporting calendar was the AGSV Swimming Finals at MSAC. Congratulations to the entire team for placing third. This is the third year in a row the team has finished third. A special congratulations and thank you to Coach Mr Hamish Meachem and Captain Connor Xu (Year 12). Well done to Yanning Zhang (Year 8), Connor Xu (Year 12), Dylan Lay (Year 10), Gregory Kerdemelidis (Year 8), Lewis Clarke (Year 8) and Alexander Hillman (Year 9) on their performances on the evening. We now move into the winter season with the famous KAO supporting Firsts Soccer and Year 7 and 8 Football. Thank you for your support of the summer season and I look forward to seeing you around the grounds in winter. Mr Jamie Watson Director of Sport

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Staff Profile Q&A with Head of Middle School, Mr Troy Stanley CAN YOU TELL US A LITTLE BIT ABOUT YOU AND YOUR BACKGROUND?

WHAT WERE YOUR FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF CAMBERWELL GRAMMAR SCHOOL?

I was born in Melbourne and moved to Sydney when I was three. My passion for the South Melbourne Bloods has carried over from those days, so I am a big Sydney Swans fan. I am the eldest of two boys and we both attended Newington College in Sydney. I was lucky enough to find a job there after finishing my undergraduate university degree and a couple of seasons of cricket in the UK. At Newington, I taught 7-12 PDHPE, English Electives and was heavily involved in co-curricular activities including cricket, rugby, athletics and cadets.

“Spectemur Agendo” — By Our Deeds, may we be known. Most schools have a motto, but there are few in my experience that are lived through the actions of the students and staff on a regular basis. The School’s fresh facilities are a strong draw card, but the actions of the industrious boys and collegial staff sing much louder.

In 2007 I taught at Dulwich College in London, which would certainly be the best professional development I have experienced. I married my high school sweetheart Brie, on Noosa Beach in 2005 and we are very lucky to have three kids of whom we are very proud, Noa (8), Sage (6) and Kingston (5). WHAT DREW YOU TO TEACHING? My mother is a nurse and now works as a teacher/librarian and counsellor at a small primary boarding school in Bowral and my paternal grandfather was a Principal — so I guess you could say teaching is in my DNA. Looking back, I am so happy that I chose this path as I am excited to go to work almost every day. WHAT MADE YOU WANT TO AIM FOR A SENIOR ROLE IN A SCHOOL? I have been very fortunate to have had several strong professional mentors who have coached me along the way. I am most grateful that they steered and encouraged me towards this path. I vividly recall an address from an Old Boy at my last school by the name of Ben Adler. He was guest speaker at an Academic Assembly and the Dux of the School five years earlier. Amongst some salient points, a key message that resonated with me was when he quoted Primo Levi, “If not you, who? If not now, when?” From that moment, I started to look at my career path a little more seriously and thankfully some doors opened for me.

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IS THERE A TEACHER WHO INSPIRED YOU AS A CHILD? My Year 5 teacher, Ross Turner has always been a significant influence in my life. His genuine care, dedication to his job and willingness to support me and stay in touch is something that I aspire to. DID YOU ENJOY YOUR TIME AT LORD SOMERS CAMP? Yes! A significant highlight for me was our sunrise jogs on the beach with Mr Wyatt, Mr Stein and a keen group of early risers. As we jogged along the hard sand at low tide, thoroughbred racehorses galloped at great pace along the beach and dolphins darted through the waves only 20m from shore. The setting at Lord Somers provides the perfect recipe to forge lifelong bonds and it was very rewarding to see these friendships in their very early stages. HERO, HARDSHIP AND HIGHLIGHT? Hero: My dad, he has always been innovative with his career. He opted for work opportunities in his final years of school. Whilst he made a very successful career as an entrepreneur, setting up several businesses, he was adamant that education played a big part in my life and would not have it any other way. He is the most selfless person I know and that has become a character trait that I highly admire. I feel that we are never free, until we are truly grateful for all that we have and do our best to help others in need.

Hardship: Dad battled cancer when I was in Year 9. He won that battle, but the challenges we all faced as a family through that time tested each of us and brought us much closer as a result. My brother is my best mate and I think that stems from the struggles we fought together. My mum was our rock through that time and her strength and positivity at this critical time of my development is a lesson I have attempted to replicate throughout my career in pastoral care. Highlight: Moving to Melbourne with my family and starting a new life together at Camberwell Grammar School is certainly a highlight right now. Working with a team of staff who share the same passion and enthusiasm for teaching in the middle years, has been inspiring. WHAT DO YOU LIKE MOST ABOUT TEACHING YOUNG MEN/BOYS? Living in a very connected world, we are influenced more rapidly than ever before. Without a sound rudder, we can be easily influenced in the wrong direction. I am motivated to instil a positive moral compass amongst the students in my care, whilst building their capacity and desire to positively influence others. Most of the time, boys down play their strengths because they come easily and subsequently think little of them. Little do they realise that often, the things they find easy, are major challenges for others. Understanding their strengths allows boys to drop their insecurities and become comfortable with who they are.


Foundation AGM

On Monday 19 March at 6.30pm, the Foundation Annual General Meeting was held in the Camberwell Room. Here is an excerpt from Matthew Forwood’s (1984) speech given on the night: Yogi Berra (his real name) was a US major league baseball player who played 19 seasons with the New York Yankees then became a successful manager and a coach. With regard to predictions he said, “It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future”. Despite Yogi’s comments I am going to make some predictions about the future of energy. Those predictions are firstly that the future will be electric, including transport. Further predictions are that electricity itself will be: Distributed: A good example of distributed energy is solar PV rooftop systems. More than 1.3 million Australian houses have these systems in place, which represents a highly distributed and disperse system. And more and more factories, schools, shopping centres and businesses are installing rooftop solar as well. In fact, Camberwell Grammar School is currently installing them, at 888kW, which will be the largest solar PV system installed in a school in Australia. Renewable: For the last two years there have been more renewable plants installed globally compared to thermal generation. And over that time, the number of coal projects in the permitting and planning stages has fallen by 59%. This is being driven primarily by economics — wind and solar are now cheaper to build than coal or gas, while nuclear is hugely expensive. In Australia a dozen coal fired power stations have closed largely due to cost reasons over the last decade and not a single new coal plant has been built. In places like China there is also serious concern about air pollution and health effects from burning coal.

With storage: As the energy system becomes more reliant on renewables, which are intermittent, there will be a greater need for storage. In South Australia, the world’s largest lithium ion battery system was commissioned on Friday 1 December 2017. And it only took 100 days to build. There is also rising interest in pumped hydro for storage with the Snowy 2.0 proposal as well as multiple private sector proposals for South Australia. Two way: There is currently a trial in progress to remotely control the timing of use of 5,000 swimming pool pumps in Australia. In total there are more than 1.4 million swimming pools in Australia, and these pools use approximately 10% of the average demand on the residential grid. If all the pool pumps and filters were on at once, they would use up to 3700MW of energy – the equivalent of more than two Hazelwood-sized power stations running at capacity – so there is huge potential to both reduce the amount of energy used and better manage pools for the wider benefit. Transport: Electric cars are already a commercial reality with more than one million on the roads in China. All the major car manufacturers are either developing electric vehicles or already have them on offer. Large, long haul electric buses are also now technically viable. Australia’s total bus fleet is about 25,000 to 30,000. In China there are already 400,000 large electric buses on the road. And electric long-haul trucks are being trialled in the USA by Tesla. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America’s greatest inventor. He

developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Near the end of his life he said: “We are like tenant farmers chopping down the fence around our house for fuel when we should be using Nature’s inexhaustible sources of energy — sun, wind and tide. I’d put my money on the sun and solar energy. What a source of power! I hope we don’t have to wait until oil and coal run out before we tackle that.”

Attendees Lyndal Barrington Suzy Chandler (Current Staff) Gillian Forwood Matthew Forwood (1984) Peter Forwood Rob French (Current Staff) Deb Gallacher Alan Haintz Leona Haintz Jim Hare Fiona Hare Paul Hicks (Headmaster) Susan Hicks James Howard (1987) Anthony Jude Kerryn Jude Chris Kelly (1969) Andrew Lane (1979) Chris Lloyd (Current Staff)

Ross Munro (1948) Anne Neil Michael Neilson (1981) Glenn Pountney (Current Staff) Mary Pountney Gavin Powell (1980) Lisa Powell Barrie Provan Harvey Sowerby Stephanie Sowerby Troy Stanley (Current Staff) Jo Thomson Christopher Thorn (1981) Ros Thorn Lynn Turner (Current Staff) Graeme Wensor (Current Staff)

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community connections Year of the Dog Celebrations To celebrate the Year of the Dog, on the Wednesday 14 February, all students from Year 5 to Year 8, and all of the Year 9 and 10 Chinese language students, plus 14 visiting students from Xi’an, as well as 150 students from Camberwell Girls’ Grammar School, Ryton Girls and Genazzano, enjoyed a wonderful performance by Shanghai Youth Art Troup in the Performing Arts Centre. The Shanghai Youth Art Troup was invited by Melbourne City Council to perform for Chinese New Year celebrations in Chinatown. This was the only performance given to school students in Melbourne. All the students thoroughly enjoyed the show, as well as the interaction with the performers afterwards.

PLUS Finds A New Home For Old Uniforms Have you ever wondered what happens to the uniform donations that cannot be sold in the Pre-Loved Uniform Shop (PLUS)? As 2018 has heralded the complete transition to the new Camberwell Grammar School Sports Uniform, this has seen an abundance of old sports uniform stock in PLUS, only some of which can be sold for training kit. 38

Fortunately, the PLUS Convenors have been able to form an alliance with charity organisation, Missionvale. A network of volunteers from Missionvale took our uniforms overseas, and our first donations arrived at a school in South Africa late last year. The School were in need of uniforms — especially for young boys.

It was wonderful to receive a letter of thanks and some beautiful photos of the children proudly wearing their Camberwell Grammar School uniforms! Ms Tracey Guorgi PLUS Convenor


Welcome Functions In the first few weeks of Term 1, the Parents’ Association held Welcome Functions for the Junior, Middle and Senior School parents in the Camberwell Room.

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Year 7 Parents’ Dinner On Saturday 24 March, the Year 7 Representatives hosted a Year 7 Parents’ Dinner at Bangkok Terrace restaurant in Hawthorn East.

Summons House Gelati Day Thank you to all students and teachers who pitched in and purchased our delicious Gelati for the Summons House annual Gelati Day fundraiser on Friday 9 March (Junior School and Senior School) and Wednesday 14 March (Middle School). Chocolate, lemon and strawberry all sold out quickly, and we raised $1037.41 which will be donated to the Lighthouse Foundation charity. Lighthouse Foundation provides homeless young people with a home and a support network, including therapeutic care to get them back on their feet. Ryan Campbell Summons House Prefect

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Spectemur | Term 1 2018

ocga ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING The Old Camberwell Grammarians’ Association Annual General Meeting was held on Tuesday 6 March in the Camberwell Room. The current OCGA Committee was re-elected. The guest speaker was Matthew Smith (1993), who spoke passionately about his work as CEO of Wanta Aboriginal Corporation. Wanta Aboriginal Corporation was established in 2013 to support and enable new opportunities and a brighter future for Indigenous youth living in remote communities.

Attendees Ross Munro (1948) Gregory Taplin (1961) Irving Lenton (1962) Russell Sturzaker (1968) David Arnold (1973) Warren Edney (1975) Campbell Dickinson (1981) Stuart Cran (1984) Matthew Forwood (1984) James Howard (1987) Andrew Lane (1979) Matthew Smith (1993) Nick Schildberger (1997) Ed Banks (2003) Jonathan Wong (2006) Jonathan Gumley (2006) Julian Giovannucci (2011) Suzy Chandler, Director of Development Paul Hicks, Headmaster Chris Lloyd, Business Manager Cindy Parker, Development Office Ken Schwab, Current Staff

Honorary Life Members JAMES HOWARD (1987) James Howard has been involved with the OCGA since 1996, giving 20 years of outstanding service. First as a Committee Member and then recently as President. James has also been actively involved in the Old Camberwell Grammarians’ Football Club. James currently has two boys at Camberwell Grammar School, making them the third generation to attend the School. 41


ocga battle of the decades The annual Battle of the Decades Tennis Tournament was once again played in perfect conditions on Friday 2 March, on the grass at Kooyong Lawn Tennis Club. We were thrilled to have a new group of Old Boys from 2008/2009 join us, to ensure all decades were represented. The Battle of the Decades Tennis Tournament is a round robin tournament. Each participant plays five matches, each time with a different partner against a different pair. Individual scores are recorded after each match and attributed to the players decade. The decade scores are then divided by the number of players representing their decade, and the decade with the highest average wins. Congratulations to Tom Owen (2013) for achieving the highest score on the day of 68. The Old Boys from the 70s were victorious in taking out the Perpetual Cup for the winning decade. The 70s were represented by Chris Jensen (1974), Jeff Rimington (1974) Peter Owen (1978) and Andrew Lane (1979). Thank you to Cam Dickinson (1981) for kindly organising the courts at Kooyong. The evening finished with drinks, dinner and presentations in the Winter Room. It would be great to see more players from the 90s play next year.

Attendees Chris Jensen (1973) Jeff Rimington (1974) Peter Owen (1978) Andrew Lane (1979) Cam Dickinson (1981) Mark Eades (1984) Peter Karlson (1984) Ian MacLean (1985) Campbell Sorell (1986) Brad Leitch (1983) Andrew Ellett (1994) Cyrus Aftasi (2003) Matthew Louey (2008) William Cranwell (2009) Matthew Defina (2009) Ben Sutu (2009) Michael Wilkinson (2009) Tom Owen (2013) Dan Straw (2016) Anthony Coxon (Past Parent)

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Spectemur | Term 1 2018

OCGA Dinner The OCGA Dinner 2018 was once again held in the Camberwell Room of the Sports Centre. Amongst the attendees there were two fathers and sons from the de Kretser and Lenton families. The de Kretsers and Lentons also have a third generation currently attending Camberwell Grammar School. We were joined by four sets of brothers – Bellairs, Schofields, Richards and Bennies. Trevor Henley and his nephew Andrew also attended. The event was opened by the President of the OCGA, Mr Matthew Forwood (1984), the Loyal Toast and Toast to Australia was given by Prof David de Kretser AC (1956), 2017 School Captain Nelson Zhao (2017) said Grace and Master of Ceremonies was Mr Nicholas Schildberger (1997). Dr Paul Hicks gave his Headmaster’s Welcome, and the Toast to the School was made by Mr Irving Lenton (1962). Calling of the Years was given by Mr Chris Kelly (1969), and Mr Irving Lenton (1962) was acknowledged as the oldest Old Boy in attendance having started at Camberwell in 1948. The School Song and Sports Song were led by Mr Ben Bishop (1996) and accompanied by Nelson Zhao (2017). Ben then invited Trevor Henley (Past Staff) to lead a rousing rendition of Anthem from Chess.

HERE IS AN EXCERPT FROM MR IRVING LENTON’S (1962) TOAST TO THE SCHOOL: When I was asked to propose tonight’s Toast to the School, the first thing I asked myself was, “What do I mean by the term ‘School’; what exactly am I asking people to remember?’ Is it the buildings? Is it the Green Hut where in the 1950s Max Howell produced the School plays and where Ron Quinn taught his own inspired version of Intermediate Mechanical Drawing, which saw every boy in the class enjoy his lessons but fail the end-of-year exam? Or is it the Memorial Hall in the 1980s which was nearly destroyed by fire after the Persian Carpet Auction, when a boy, known but still nameless, got rid of his cigarette by butting it out down the back of the old red couch at the back of the stage? Or maybe it is the Colin Black Performing Arts Complex which holds some of my fondest memories? Perhaps, as I recall my school days – and tonight is all about nostalgia – Camberwell certainly had its own semi-divisive issues. One of these, which has been all over the popular press recently, was hair length. We had ours back in the early 70s when the School Marshal, known today by the more euphemistic title of Administration Officer, had the task of conducting those deemed to have an inappropriate head of hair down to the barber. The School Marshall really enjoyed this part of the school week. He would drive the long-haired ones to Bourke Road, tell the barber to take his time and then retire to the nearby Palace Hotel for an hour or so. When David Dyer relaxed the hair length rules, few could understand why the School Marshal was so bitterly disappointed!

What does the term ‘School’ mean to me? A difficult question because my association with Camberwell Grammar has been as a student from 1948 to 1962, as a parent from 1981 to 1987, as a current grandparent and as a member of the School Council from 1982 to 2009. As a student, I lived through the Timpson era. The School was small by today’s standards but there was a real connection with teachers who embraced a culture of caring and support and a willingness to go the extra mile to push the boundaries. Tom Timpson was a compassionate man and was much loved by students and teachers alike. In the early 1950s, Camberwell Grammar was a feeder school for Scotch College, Melbourne Grammar and Carey. It was a far cry from what it is today: academic standards were lower, facilities poorer and there was little money available to maintain and construct buildings. The 1960s to 1980s embraced the Dyer era. There was a dramatic lift in academic achievement and quality of teaching staff. Facilities were upgraded - Norge was acquired with funds from the sale of broad acres in Blackburn. Kingussie was added to the campus and the Sports Centre, Mark 1, was constructed.

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Michael Daniel (Current staff) Mark de Kretser (1983) David de Kretser AC (1956) James Fazzolari (2006) Campbell Finney (2006) Matthew Forwood (1984) Bill Gray (1967) Jonathan Gumley (2006) Irwin Hau (1998) Trevor Henley (1969) Andrew Henley (2006) Trevor Henley (Past Staff) Paul Hicks (Headmaster) Susan Hicks James Howard (1987) Tyson Jeffery (2006) Chris Kelly (1969) Scott Kemeny (2006) After having a stint on Parent Association, Foundation and Old Boys Committee, I was invited to take a post on the School Council. Our role was to create a vision of Camberwell Grammar development to ensure that there was adequate funding to facilitate that development. Financial modelling gave us the confidence to go forward and to minimise risk. Succeeding David Dwyer was Colin Black. Black upheld the high academic standard and was more supportive of the Old Boys who, under the leadership of Graeme Ballard, powered on to have relevance by boosting their revenue and creating a capital base which today exceeds $1,000,000. The iconic Performing Arts Complex was constructed and the School Council set in place a master plan for construction of new buildings which has culminated in the construction of the Sports Centre Mark 2. Succeeding Colin Black, Paul Hicks took the reins. His era has upheld all of the values which have become the hallmark of what Camberwell Grammar stands for today. The School has seen a return to the era of compassion. Under his governance, the School has completed the Master Plan with the completion of the amazing Sports Complex and the acquisition of further properties bordering the campus. It has been a privilege to serve the School and to have had fun with my old school friends, Bruce Wilson and Graeme Ballard, who supported me on the Old Boys Committee and School Council.

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In closing, I would like to refer to Ian Hansen’s, ’By Their Deeds; A Centenary History of Camberwell Grammar School-1886 – 1986’.

Aidan Kennedy (2015) Moses Khor (Current staff) Andrew Lane (1978)

‘Camberwell Grammar School sets great store by order and achievement. But here is a boy whose academic progress is flagging. He is an able youth but his extra-school living is messy. He needs money to maintain school status among his peers and takes a parttime job which eats into his time and energy. He gets into debt. And the school discovers the root of his problem and discharges the debt. Whether this generosity will salvage his examination prospects is almost beside the point. He has been given a ring on his finger and shoes on his feet. He knows the meaning of compassion. He has been the recipient of a hundred-year-old inheritance.’

Irving Lenton (1962)

Please be upstanding and raise your glasses in a toast to Camberwell Grammar School.

Edward Schofield (1996)

Attendees

Peter Lenton (1987) John Mills (1984) Matthew Morley (2006) Michael Neilson (1981) Peter Owen (1981) Cindy Parker (Development Office) Geoffrey Pike (1975) Tomas Richards (2006) Steven Richards (2008) Nick Schildberger (1997)

Andrew Schofield (1998) Ken Schwab (Current staff) Duncan Scorer (2006)

John Allen (Current staff)

Lucas Smithers (2006)

David Bellairs (1965)

Laurie Stafford (1964)

Garry Bellairs (1969)

James Thackray (2006)

Alister Bennie (2007)

Ian Thomlinson (1961)

Hamish Bennie (2007)

Cameron Turner (2006)

David Bird (Current staff)

David Wagner (1981)

Ben Bishop (1996)

Paul Wheelton AM, KSJ (1973)

Shaun Burke (Current staff)

Mark Will (1978)

Suzy Chandler (Director of Development)

Bruce Wilson (1964)

Chris Charge (1965)

Nelson Zhao (2017)


Spectemur | Term 1 2018

old boy profiles Paul Wheelton AM KSJ (1973) Having arrived in Australia in the early 1950s as Ten Pound Poms, Paul Wheelton’s parents valued education. Paul was the youngest of four children, and by the time Paul was ready to start Secondary School, they made the decision to borrow the money to give him a private school education at Camberwell Grammar School. Paul never forgot the advantage he had been given over his siblings and the quality education he had been given. In 1970, Camberwell Grammar School started an outreach program as part of its Community Service activities, and Paul became involved in an initiative to assist migrant children in an after-school program in inner Melbourne on Friday afternoons. This activity had a profound influence on Paul’s values going forward.

Obtaining a job and career through a connection made at Camberwell Grammar School, Paul went on to build a successful business in the car rental industry, and about 25 years ago began to make corporate and personal social responsibility a cornerstone of his life. As Chair of Life Education in Victoria for nearly 20 years, Paul oversaw the education of 150,000 plus primary children in the State each year, being visited by Healthy Harold. Delivering a strong health, drug and alcohol message, Paul is still actively involved in Life Education. The Bali Children Foundation began 15 years ago and Paul has been chair since its inception. They currently educate 3,800 children from remote, disadvantaged villages in English and computer skills, which virtually guarantees them employment in Bali’s rapidly expanding tourism industry. Paul spends 90% of his time now in the not for profit sector, and wears many hats. Paul

is a member of the Ministerial Council for Volunteers, and Deputy Chair of the Order of Australia Association. Through Wheelton Philanthropy, he supports many causes with a focus on gender inequality. Paul is the only Australian male member of the New York based Women Moving Millions Organisation, with each member making a commitment of US $1 million to women and girls’ education.

“ I have had a wonderful and rewarding career.”

Jason Blake (1991) In late 1990s, I was living in Townsville. Having just returned from holidays on the African continent, I was looking for a new adventure. My brother, having just been posted to the Army’s Survival Wing in Darwin, recapped larger than life stories of one of his part-time Reserve Instructors who was a Sergeant in the Northern Territory Police. In May 1998, my own journey in the Northern Territory Police began, as well as a number of my own adventures working in General Duties, Drugs and Organised Crime, and in more recent times Financial and Economic Crime. I once read that police work is Sisyphean in nature (for those, like me, who are not current with their Greek mythology, Sisyphus was the naughty Greek King, sent to the underworld to push a very large rock up a hill, only to have it roll back down and having to do the task repeatedly) and although, at times, immensely difficult, challenging and problematic, dealing with people in the very worst of circumstances, I have had a wonderful and rewarding career. I have travelled to some magnificent locations throughout the Territory, met some fascinating characters and have been given the opportunity for sponsored postgraduate studies.

In 2013, I was part of a team investigating government fraud involving concessions paid to seniors to offset travel expenses. The broader police operation, which is still ongoing, initially focused on a small travel agent business in an industrial area of Darwin. Little did we know the ramifications of those investigations, which ultimately resulted in the resignation of the then Police Commissioner John McRoberts, who has since been committed to stand trial in the Northern Territory Supreme Court over the charge of attempting to pervert the course of justice. Given the matter is still before the courts, I shall avoid specifics and broadly comment on the lessons learnt through difficult periods. Don’t underestimate the importance of family and friends; having a solid support base is

critical when you are confronted with difficult decisions. Failure is part of the journey; we try to mitigate against it, and we don’t like it, but it will happen. Own the mistake and move on. Keep moving forward. Don’t ever get bogged down with the decision or the moment, accept the call and play the long game. Sometimes you have to stand up and make the call, even when it is contrary to popular opinion and you are the lone voice in the wilderness. And finally, be happy. Sometimes we need to shift the perspective; things can usually always be worse, and sometimes we need to focus on the moment. The travel agent was convicted in the Supreme Court in December 2015 and sentenced to three years imprisonment.

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who have different upbringings, personal circumstances, aspirations, educational backgrounds and values is advantageous. For instance, I was being taught by a group of young homeless children how to be more creative, think out-of-the-box and be resourceful. I have been applying these teachings in my own life. Keep in mind, I was supposed to be the teacher in this instance.

Chirag Lodhia (2009) Throughout school, at home and travels with my family, I was exposed to the general concepts of social and economic disparities, giving and organised charity, which were always enjoyable experiences. When I was young, my parents suggested if I was to ever to make a decent life for myself, I ought to help others. They never forced or expected it; they said it had to come voluntarily. In a nutshell, those elements helped form my interest in the not-for-profit (NFP) sector. During university, I became a Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) Volunteer, and volunteered in campaigns for different organisations.

One experience led to another, and now I’m the Director of Positively Transforming World (PTW) – an organisation dedicated to improving health and education. As the Director of PTW, I’m involved in the ‘business end’ of PTW and the development of the organisation. Aside from this, my role is to learn and understand the people and communities affected by poor health and education, and implement solutions. As such, I spend most of my time with the people we’re helping. My role as PTW’s Director is voluntary. Balancing PTW commitments with two other volunteer jobs, full-time work and further study is a struggle, but all of the activities are still beneficial. Spending time with people

After spending time with many South Sudanese youth and learning about their community, I now have a stronger understanding of it, such that when I watch negative media items, I am better able to filter the information and exclude anything that seems skewed, biased or sensational. I have found the more diverse my experiences and learning is, the better able I am to tackle life and the world. The more I teach or assist others with what I’m (hopefully) good at, the more others teach and assist me in areas that they’re good at, typically areas in which I need to improve anyway. Seeing eye-to-eye with different communities is the way to create a better world for all, and is something that I personally feel is worth volunteering for.

Matthew Smith (1993) One of my first roles after leaving University was as the Sport and Recreation Officer for the Sacred Heart Mission, which gave me the opportunity to work with disadvantaged people and to provide them with meaningful engagement in their lives. From there, I moved into a role working with the overarching organisation that provided these opportunities to over 150 welfare organisations in Victoria, Reclink Australia.

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My passion for Indigenous affairs began at Reclink when we established a homeless football league in Central Australia and I decided to move to Katherine and work for the AFLNT which evolved into a senior management position in Darwin. After leaving Darwin, I was employed as the National Program Manager for Indigenous programs at World Vision when I met a colleague working for the Northern Territory Department of Education who approached me about establishing a Sports Academy in Yuendumu.

I operated the Yuendumu Sports Academy for three years and also expanded operations to two other communities, while also setting up Wanta Aboriginal Corporation (AC). I now sit in a stand alone position as CEO of Wanta AC. I am firmly of the belief that we need to nurture the high level of talent and potential in remote Indigenous communities by supporting their educational journey, as Year 12 attainment in remote Australia is only at 14%. I feel obligated and privileged to work in this area and improve this outcome.


Steve Clifford (1976) Of course, it’s true that we only have one life to live. But the big question, “How can I best use my time on this planet?” is a worthwhile one to keep asking throughout your life. My father, Bruce Clifford had a focus throughout his life of giving back to the community. In fact, he spent several decades on the Camberwell Grammar School Council helping with its finances and strategy. Clifford House is named after him. Thanks to my father, I’ve had a strong interest in social justice since my teenage years – from community volunteering at Camberwell Grammar School on a Friday afternoon, through to organising social activities at Parkville Youth Justice Precinct. But I never expected to end up working in the Not For Profit (NFP) sector. From my time at Camberwell Grammar School, I went to law school and ended up working at law firm, Allens – for almost 30 years. As the years passed, I noticed that I was increasingly enjoying things such as pro bono legal work, growing a moustache in November, and even wearing a tutu to raise funds for charity. Being Chairman of the firm’s charity committee also helped me learn about the inspiring work of many wonderful NFPs.

Eventually I decided that it was time to give back to the community. In late 2013 I embarked on a transition journey into the NFP sector, having 171 coffee meetings along the way. I have a lot of curiosity so it was a fascinating process – quizzing a heap of NFP CEOs, executives, board members and others with my list of questions. After all of those coffees, I ended up in senior management roles at Whitelion (focusing on youth justice) and then Save the Children Australia (focusing on Indigenous families). Now I am the CEO of Doxa. From its inception almost 50 years ago, Doxa has grown to support over 7,000 disadvantaged young people in Victoria each year by providing a range of educational programs and pathways to employment. Doxa is always looking for corporates with a big heart who can provide our young people with work experience and mentoring – a powerful combination, as I know from my own personal experience as a Doxa Mentor. People often ask what it’s like working in the Not For Profit sector in comparison to the corporate world. The short answer is that it’s harder than I thought, and more complex –

often because of the number of stakeholders involved. But it is definitely a satisfying way to use your time on the planet – if you can find your passion. There’s a saying in the NFP sector: “We don’t care what you know – until we know that you care.” My advice to those who feel they would like to give back in some way, is to spend a little time discovering where your passion lies – is it disadvantaged youth, guide dogs, the environment? When you read the daily news, what is it that makes you angry or upset? Talk to friends and family, do some online research, try some volunteering. You might just find that it will change your life!

Phil Connor (1968) I started working in non-profit nearly 37 years ago. It wasn’t my initial career choice, as I had been teaching for nine years in both public and private schools in Australia. In the beginning, working at YMCA Camping in the United States was a way to develop my skills in Outdoor Education and also a way to enhance my career in education. However, my career change often elicited many odd questions back home: “That must be, um, rewarding?” folks would say, or they would ask, “Is that a real job?” I think most people saw working in the non-profit world as either volunteerism, part-time or seasonal work. Then, about five years into it, the perspective changed. By this time, the number of nonprofits in the United States had grown and the YMCA was one of the leading and largest non-profits focusing on Youth Development, Healthy Living and Social Responsibility. The growth in non-profits, in particular the YMCA, has continued, and working in the non-profit world suddenly took on a different persona, and the questions were more about

the impact my work had on the lives we touched. I believe it finally made sense why someone would be interested in changing the world. “Oh!” they would say. “That must be so rewarding!” As an early adopter of a non-profit career, I’m tempted to scoff at this surge of interest—but as a fundraiser and now the Chief Executive Officer of one of the largest independent YMCA Camps in the country, I’d much rather leverage it. The fact is, non-profits can offer fantastic opportunities for individuals who are willing to work hard to make the world a better place. The primary job of a leader is to motivate people to accomplish more together than they could alone, and as a YMCA Chief Executive Officer, the job of motivating others is made easier by the mission that guides us, the cause that inspires us, and the stories of the impact we have on the lives we touch. Finally, as the Chief Executive Officer of Becket-Chimney Corners YMCA, I am uniquely positioned to lead and see the

impact that YMCA camping makes every day in the lives of people we serve. Our motto is; “Changing Lives for Good”. I hold a position of influence in the community and play an important role in maintaining the historic traditions of the Camps.

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Sam Cooke (2012) When push came to shove at the end of Year 12 and the question, “What am I going to do after school” needed answering, I was fortunate enough to receive good advice from a variety of people who helped me work out what I was good at, what I enjoyed and what I wanted to achieve in a career. The result was studying to be a paramedic. I applied for the Bachelor of Paramedicine course at the Australian Catholic University (ACU) and was accepted through the Early Achievers Program. In this program, you are accepted before final exams, based on the merits of your previous academic, sporting, leadership and community involvement. Post a quick 12-month GAP year, I started at the ACU City Campus and completed the threeyear degree, which encompasses all aspects of pre-hospital emergency medicine through theoretical and practical knowledge, as well as clinical placements with Ambulance Victoria. At the end of the three years, I could apply to numerous services in Australia as well as internationally. After being accepted by a few services, Ambulance Victoria stood out compared to others for their scope and standard of practice, technology and training.

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My current position is as a Qualified Ambulance Paramedic with Ambulance Victoria. Ambulance Victoria is a statebased organisation responsible for providing emergency response, care, and transport to all Victorians. To grasp truly what the role involves is impossible from an article such as this; however, as an overview, Paramedics work a rotating, shift work roster. Generally, the shorter shifts run for ten hours and the longest for 14 hours. The finish time is never guaranteed, as you might be dispatched to a job in the last ten minutes that results in hours of overtime. You respond to emergencies within the community, from medical cases to traumatic cases of all sorts. The cross section of patients is as varied as society’s definition of the word “emergency”, as you really do see everyone and everything. Being a state based and not-for-profit organisation does not change the structure of the company. It still has a Board and CEO, multiple areas with clear hierarchies and defined roles, with numerous avenues for self-improvement and career advancement both in the clinical and managerial sides of the service.

Although there are many companies in the not-for-profit sector whose sole purpose is to serve the wider community, Ambulance Victoria is in a unique position as although it is centred around emergency responses, other areas such as community education and engagement, non-emergency transport and the continual funding and involvement in the wider medical community for research and continual improvement, allow Ambulance Victoria to positively affect change to the wider community via many avenues. Working for a not-for-profit organisation has allowed me to fulfil what I searched for back in Year 12. I’m doing something I’m good at, I’m doing something I enjoy, and through my work, I am able to help people.

“ The cross section of patients is as varied as society’s definition of the word “ emergency ” ,

as you really do see everyone and everything.”


Spectemur | Term 1 2018

News of old boys Carols by Candlelight Michael Tan (Year 12), Harry Dempsey (2016), Christian Chene (Year 12) and Michael Koswig (2016) performed at the 2017 Carols by Candlelight, led by Camberwell Chorale conductor, Douglas Heywood OAM.

Camberwell Grammar School Generations

A CHANCE MEETING IN FRANCE — THE BROWNS

THE HOWARDS

Last September, the Brown family travelled to France and Italy. While in Provence, they treated themselves to a meal at a Michelin star restaurant called Le Bistrot de Lagarde. Le Bistrot de Lagarde is in a remote part of the valley, with an altitude of 1,100 metres, and is housed in a former military bunker.

James Howard (1987) Carson Howard (Year 10) Tim Howard (Year 7) Doug Howard (1961)

While talking to the waiter, a young man called Hugo Leonis, he mentioned that he had been to Australia on exchange in 2013/2014 and had spent a few weeks in an Australian school. Of course, upon further questioning it turned out that the School he had spent his few weeks at was Camberwell Grammar School. He was astounded to learn he was talking with three generations from that exact same school.

THE TAPLINS Chris Taplin (1991) Logan Taplin (Year 8) Greg Taplin (1961)

THE FRAMPTONS

THE CHESHIRES

Timothy Frampton (1978) Liam Frampton (2014) James Frampton (2017)

Michael Cheshire (1963) James Cheshire (1989) Max Cheshire (Year 8)

Iain Brown (1987) Cameron Brown (1992) Edward Brown (1988) Campbell Brown (Year 11) Doug Brown (1962)

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Esplanade Hotel — Andy Mullins (1992) and Matt Mullins (1991) The Mullins brothers plan on bringing one of the most famous pubs back to life, the Esplanade Hotel, by November 2018. Sand Hill Road started in May 2000 when Andy and Matt, and two mates, Doug Maskiell

and Tom Birch, quit their day jobs in finance and marketing, pooled their money and took over the lease of the Commercial Club Hotel in Fitzroy. To date, they have built a total of nine pubs.

for over 20 years and inspired me to have a go at each of the languages encouraged at the School. An understanding of each of these languages is a valuable asset: French, the European Union’s lingua franca and language of former French colonies as well as of France; Chinese, the language of the power centre of Asia; Indonesian, that of our fast-developing neighbour and Latin, which assists in the understanding of Western syntax and the structure of our own English language.

Further Language Studies Edan Runge (2015) Camberwell Grammar has a long tradition of promoting foreign language study, which is becoming more important in the modern era with internet communication at our fingertips and technology rapidly reaching previously isolated communities. My mother has taught Indonesian at Camberwell Grammar School

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Camberwell Grammar School language teachers are fantastic advocates for language learning, providing the tuition and support necessary to surmount what seems, unfortunately increasingly, to be too difficult a task for some students. But the worth of learning a language goes beyond an increase in your Year 12 study score. Being able to speak a foreign language significantly increases possibilities, whether they are career-based or for the benefit of overseas travel. Speaking to someone in their own language goes a long way to facilitating strong relationships, peace and understanding in our conflict-stricken world.

Current and Former First XI Captains Train Together Premier Cricketers, Andrew Young (2016) and James Horn (2017), are pictured with Sam Garrard (Year 11). Once a season, the boys from Premier Cricket return back to their home clubs to train, and Andrew and James chose to come back to Camberwell.

As a student of Indonesian, French and Spanish, I have become fascinated by foreign cultures, food and societies and hope to contribute to Australia’s understanding and relationship with countries who speak these languages and their understanding of Australia in my future career. Thanks to the sensational education I received at Camberwell and the teachers to whom I am greatly indebted, I have been able to further my language studies at Melbourne University, which has first-class facilities for numerous languages. I also hope to continue tutoring and study overseas during the next year of my Bachelor Degree. I encourage students to take advantage of the study and travel opportunities available at Camberwell Grammar School, having had the time of my life during the School’s French Cultural Tour and a volunteering trip to Bali after VCE. To any student hesitating to further their language studies at school, I recommend engaging with your teachers, who will always be keen to provide their advice and assistance, and considering how much greater your postschool prospects will be with the capacity to speak a language other than English.


Spectemur | Term 1 2018

Mac Hill (2016) “Bonjour, je m’appelle Mac! Ça va?” “Uhhh, bless you?” So went my first attempt to practise any French whatsoever with my parents, all the way back in Year 7. Things have come a long way since then, but I still remember how excited I was to start learning another language, despite how nervous I was coming to a new place with all these people I’d never met in my life. After an uphill battle to pick French over Chinese heading into Year 8, I never looked back. I can honestly say that French was one of two classes (alongside my other language, Latin) that I unequivocally looked forward to every day that I had it. There’s a special camaraderie that comes with studying any subject at high school, born out of the mutual anxiety about whatever assessment task is coming up, and French was no exception.

Studying any language really is a unique experience, one which can broaden your horizons like few other areas of study can. As I was unable to pick any languages in my first year at university, this sentiment only grew stronger after I finished my time at Camberwell Grammar School. Whether it was dissecting classic films in French, or deciphering what a poet from thousands of years ago, I gained experiences from learning a language that I’d never get anywhere else. Looking to the future, I’m expecting to pick up French at university again in 2018. I’m excited just thinking about returning to a subject which has done so much for me. I would wholeheartedly encourage anyone even vaguely considering studying a language at Camberwell Grammar School to grab their opportunity with both hands, and I thank all the language teachers at the School for their efforts to make such study possible.

OUR CGS BABIES

Announcements David Sciola (2003) and Stacey Sciola were very pleased to welcome baby Madeleine Lee Sciola earlier this year. Congratulations to Cameron Turner (2006) and Louise Walters, who were married in Sorrento on Thursday 22 February. The couple are pictured here with James Turner (2008), James Smith (2006), Jonathan Wong (2006) and Johnathan Gumley (2006).

Obituaries It is with great sadness that we record the deaths of members of the Camberwell Grammar School community since the last edition of Spectemur.

Gajan Karunanandan (2001)

Christine Wilson

1983 - 2017

Passed away in January 2018

John Antonov (2008)

Wife of Old Boy Bruce Wilson (1964),

1990 - 2018

and Old Boy Andrew Wilson (1990)

Mother of Old Boy James Wilson (1988) 51


Calendar 2018 2017 APRIL

JULY

Sunday 29 – OCGA 50 Year Chapter Luncheon (pre-1958)

Friday 27 – 25 Year Reunion (1993)

Sunday 21 – Lawn Bowls Day, MCC Bowling Club, Hawthorn

AUGUST

MAY

Thursday 2 – WA Network Function

Tuesday 1 – OCGA Committee Meeting * Friday 4 – 10 Year Reunion (2008) Tuesday 8 – ACT Network Function Friday 11 – OCGA Golf Challenge, Kew Golf Club

Friday 3 – SA Network Function Tuesday 7 – OCGA Committee Meeting * Friday 24 – OCGA 30 Year Reunion (1988) Friday 31 – OCGA Generations Photo

Thursday 17 – QLD Network Function Friday 18 – NSW Network Function Thursday 31 – OCGA Art Exhibition Gala Opening

JUNE Friday 15– 20 Year Reunion (1998) Thursday 21 – Roystead Society and Gallery of Achievement Dinner

SEPTEMBER

Wednesday 24 – Cufflink Presentation

NOVEMBER Thursday 15 - 5 Year Reunion (2013) Wednesday 21 – 60+ Years Reunion (pre 1958)

DECEMBER Tuesday 4 – OCGA Committee Meeting and Sponsor Thank You *

Friday 7 – 40 Year Reunion (1978) Thursday 13 – OCGA Vocational Dinner

OCTOBER

* All OCGA Committee Meeting are at 7.00pm in the Development Office, Camberwell Grammar School

Tuesday 9 – OCGA Committee Meeting * Saturday 13 – Open Day Tuesday 16 – OCGA CBD Networking Breakfast

2018 INFORMATION MORNINGS, SCHOOL TOURS AND OPEN DAY Venue is the Performing Arts Centre. Parking Gate 1 or Gate 5.

INFORMATION MORNINGS (Includes a Tour of the School) Date

Time

Tour Areas

Saturday 16 June

10.00am

All Levels

Saturday 11 August

10.00am

All Levels

Saturday 10 November

10.00am

All Levels

OPEN DAY Date

Time

Saturday 13 October

10.00am to 2.00pm

SCHOOL TOURS Date

Time

Tour Areas

Tuesday 1 May

9:00 am to 10:00 am

All Levels

Tuesday 24 July

9:00 am to 10:00 am

All Levels

Profile for Camberwell Grammar School

Spectemur Term 1, 2018  

Spectemur Term 1, 2018