Camberwell Citizen - Issue #7

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T H E

C A M B E R W E L L

CITIZEN YOUR GUIDE TO EVERYTHING LOCAL

S TAT E O F A N X I E T Y

How to manage stress and anxiety in uncertain times

WA S T E N O T

What you can do to reduce food waste

THE ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO COFFEE

A guide to inspire your next coffee choice

P L U S C ATC H U P O N W H AT ’ S H A P P E N I N G I N CAMBERWELL

ISSUE #7

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2 • THE CAMBERWELL CITIZEN • ISSUE #7

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THE CAMBERWELL CITIZEN • ISSUE #7 • 3

CONTENTS 4 • STATE OF ANXIETY

A Camberwell psychologist shares expertise and offers advice on how to manage stress and anxiety during uncertain times.

7 • WASTE NOT

Discover how much food waste is costing Australian households and what we can do to reduce our impact.

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Like many of you, I’ve spent the past couple of months working from home and adjusting to self-isolation measures.

8 • RECIPE AND PUZZLE

Whip up a delicious leek tart at home, or test your knowledge of Camberwell with the crossword puzzle.

9 • THE ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO COFFEE

Learn about the different types of coffee to inspire your next choice of Melbourne’s favourite hot beverage.

10 • CAMBERWELL CATCH-UP

Catch up on what’s been happening in the Camberwell precinct.

As we all settle into this strange new way of living, several of our stories will help you navigate the current challenges and hopefully offer some welcome distractions. Our main feature, State of anxiety, looks at why these uncertain times may be making you feel anxious. A psychologist shares her expertise and offers advice on how you can manage stress and anxiety going forward. These strange times have forced many of us to think about our consumption and to be more frugal, so our story Waste not couldn’t be more relevant. It looks at how much food waste costs Australian households each year and offers easy solutions for reducing our impact. Whether you’re a coffee connoisseur or a newcomer to Melbourne’s favourite hot beverage, we’ve got The essential guide to coffee to inspire your next order. For those of you seeking a pleasant distraction, head to page 8 where you’ll find a delicious recipe for a leek tart that you can easily whip up at home, as well as a fun crossword to challenge your knowledge of Camberwell. I hope you enjoy the reads.

Sharon Green Editor

EDITOR Sharon Green

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Steve de Niese JOURNALIST Benn Dorrington

CITIZEN

ADVERTISING, EDITORIAL AND DISTRIBUTION ENQUIRIES: citizen@assemblo.com

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Camberwell, Hawthorn, Hawthorn East, Glen Iris, Canterbury, Deepdene, Ashburton, Surrey Hills, Box Hill, Balwyn, Brighton.

PUBLISHER Assemblo Pty Ltd 322/282 Collins St, Melbourne, VIC 3000 assemblo.com ABN 88 143 206 508 Copyright 2020 Assemblo Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission is strictly prohibited. *Distribution cannot be guaranteed to entire suburb.


4 • THE CAMBERWELL CITIZEN • ISSUE #7

S TAT E O F A N X I E T Y Our mental health has been placed under enormous pressure from the coronavirus pandemic, with many of us struggling with the outbreak’s impact on our lives. Here’s how you can manage your anxiety during this challenging time.

The coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak has disrupted most parts of normal life, leaving many people feeling anxious and uncertain. Psychologist Kerry Athanasiadis, of Be You Psychology & Counselling in Camberwell, said feeling some anxiety right now was completely normal. “When there is a crisis or traumatic event or significant event like the one we’re going through now, people go into what are called fight, flight and freeze responses, which are body stress responses,” she said. The fight response sees people shift into making plans and taking action, while the flight response sends people into denial and avoidance. In freeze mode, people fall into a state of helplessness and depression. “Most people will cycle all three responses at some point. Some days you might be in action mode and others you might be feeling uncertain,” Ms Athanasiadis said. However, Ms Athanasiadis said we need to take steps to minimise that stress early on. “In the long term, we know that chronic stress does impact on our immune system,” she said. “When your body is constantly releasing cortisol into the blood stream, it can lower your immune defences over time. “I’m encouraging everyone to prioritise their mental health now — if people are constantly in fight, flight and freeze responses, it really does impact on your immune system over time.” One way to improve your mental health is to establish a daily routine. For people working from home or unable to leave the house, it’s important to maintain your normal routine. For example, if you usually go to the gym every day, then you should try to move your body at home in some way, whether it’s practising yoga or by doing a circuit of simple exercises. “When everything is changing around you, it’s about trying to maintain some kind of control over yourself,” Ms Athanasiadis said.

CITIZEN

You can help lower your stress levels by eating a healthy and balanced diet, getting at least eight hours sleep, and practising relaxation or meditation at home.

“ I N T H E L O N G T E R M , W E K N OW T H AT C H R O N I C S T R E S S D O E S I M PA C T O N O U R I M M U N E S Y S T E M ”

Psychologist Kerry Athanasiadis, of Be You Psychology & Counselling in Camberwell


THE CAMBERWELL CITIZEN • ISSUE #7 • 5

While guided meditation isn’t for everyone, it’s important to practice some form of relaxation such as taking a bath to calm your nervous system. One of the biggest challenges for many of us will be the loneliness that comes with social distancing, especially for older people and people living alone. “We need to be a little more creative to stay connected during these times,” Ms Athanasiadis said. Staying connected can be as easy as making a quick phone call, however some are catching up via a video call on FaceTime or hosting virtual dinner parties on Zoom and other video conferencing services. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other social media platforms also help people stay in touch with friends and family, however social media can be a double-edged sword. People should be mindful of getting their information from trusted sources and avoid reading too much negative news. “You can still use social media, it’s just how you use it,” Ms Athanasiadis said. “If you’re clicking on every single COVID-19 article, then you’re going to end up in a rabbit hole of anxiety. However, if you’re using it to stay connected with friends and family, then that’s a healthy way to use social media.” Ms Athanasiadis also challenged people to counter their negative biases, for even just a small moment each day. “We all naturally have a negativity bias,” she said. “Every day we’re being bombarded with negative information, so something that can help is spending a little time discussing some nice things that happened each day.” For anyone who is struggling with anxiety, professional mental health support might be the answer. Mental health support is also changing, with psychologists and counsellors like Ms Athanasiadis switching to phone and video counselling services in response to social distancing. People simply need a phone, iPad or computer with webcam capability to access video conference counselling, otherwise there is also phone counselling. Ms Athanasiadis said some people would find it difficult to open up at home due to privacy concerns. However, she advised that people could sit in their car or let the other people in your house know you were taking a private call and close the door. “We’re all trying to navigate this situation the best way we can, so it’s tough,” she said. “But people do need support, so we’re trying to make our services as flexible as we can during this time.” If you or someone you know is struggling with their mental health, immediate support is available from Lifeline. Call 13 11 14 or visit lifeline.org.au

FIND LOCAL COUNSELLING SUPPORT BE YOU PSYCHOLOGY & COUNSELLING

Phone: 0438 939 995 Visit: beyoupsychology.com.au NEXUS PSYCHOLOGY

Phone: (03) 9500 0751 Visit: nexuspsychology.com.au

YO U C A N H E L P L OW E R YO U R S T R E S S L E V E L S B Y E AT I N G A H E A LT H Y A N D B A L A N C E D D I E T, G E T T I N G AT L E A S T E I G H T H O U R S S L E E P, A N D P R A C T I S I N G R E L A X AT I O N O R M E D I TAT I O N AT H O M E .


6 • THE CAMBERWELL CITIZEN • ISSUE #7

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THE CAMBERWELL CITIZEN • ISSUE #7 • 7

WA S T E N O T Food waste costs Australian households thousands every year and is a major greenhouse gas emitter, but there are simple ways to reduce your impact.

Photo: Nikki To

Food waste is a major challenge in Australia, costing households thousands of dollars every year and placing enormous pressure on the environment. At home, we waste 298kg of food per person every year, making us one of the top five food‑wasting countries in the world, according to the National Food Waste Baseline. “Food waste is a really big problem in Australia and it’s a problem across many levels,” said Annika Stott, sustainability strategist at food rescue organisation OzHarvest. Wasting food is a costly business, with households binning between $2,200 and $3,800 worth of groceries every year. But food waste is not only a drain on the family purse, it’s also a serious environmental problem. “Food production takes a huge amount of water, energy, land and other precious resources that go into food that is never eaten,” Ms Stott said. “For example, throwing away one hamburger wastes the same amount of water as leaving the shower running for 90 minutes.” On top of squandering valuable materials, food waste is a major greenhouse gas emitter. Ms Stott said most food waste was sent to landfill, where it slowly rotted and emitted methane. In fact, food waste is responsible for eight per cent of greenhouse gas emissions globally, which is greater than the entire aviation sector. The total impact of food waste on the environment is so big that the World Economic Forum estimates that it is six times more damaging than plastic. While restaurants, farms and other food businesses throw away plenty of food, households are responsible for a third of all food waste in Australia every year. To fix our broken food system, organisations like OzHarvest and Foodbank have been encouraging people to think harder about food and how they handle it. “It’s all about reconnecting people to the value of food and making not wasting food a social norm,” Ms Stott said. “It’s about looking at what you have before you go shopping so you don’t buy extra, buying only what you need, storing food correctly and cooking up what you have.” Ms Stott said there were simple hacks to reduce food waste around the home such as dedicating a shelf in the fridge to food that needs to be eaten and remembering to freeze items before they go out of date. Here in the City of Boroondara, the council is tackling food waste by rolling out a new food and garden waste collection service from May. Food and garden waste will be composted into mulch and soil conditioner products instead of going to landfill, where it would rot and create harmful greenhouse gases. The move comes as food and garden waste makes up more than half the contents of the average Boroondara waste bin. As part of the new service, Boroondara residents will receive a new 120 litre green waste bin, as well as a benchtop kitchen caddy and compostable bags. Residents who already have a garden waste bin will be able to throw food waste into that bin. As our food system strains under the pressure of climate change, population growth and other issues, tackling food waste at home is something we can all do to play our part and feel more empowered.

Photo: OzHarvest

TIPS FOR REDUCING FOOD WASTE LOOK • Look at what you have • Check use-by dates • Plan your meals.

BUY • Buy only what you need • Make a shopping list at home • Avoid the deals.

STORE • Store food in airtight containers • Keep fruit and vegetables in the fridge • Freeze food near its use-by date.

COOK • Cook with what you have • Use up all ingredients • Repurpose your leftovers.

Annika Stott, sustainability strategist at food rescue organisation OzHarvest Photo: OzHarvest

For more tips, visit: ozharvest.org/fightfoodwaste


8 • THE CAMBERWELL CITIZEN • ISSUE #7

LEEK TART FROM PICARDY tin, then trim the edges and prick the base with a fork. Cover with cling film and refrigerate or freeze for at least 30 minutes.

Serves 6

INGREDIENTS: Shortcrust pastry • 200g plain white flour, plus extra for rolling • 60g cold butter, cubed • 40g cold lard or vegetable shortening, cubed • Pinch of salt • 2 tbsp ice-cold water

Melt the butter in a large shallow pan, add the leeks and leave them to sweat, uncovered, over a medium to low heat for 20–30 minutes until soft, stirring occasionally. If the leeks seem very watery after this time, cook until the liquid has reduced. Stir in the crème fraiche and beaten eggs, then season well with salt, pepper and nutmeg.

Filling • 1.25kg leeks, cut in half lengthways, washed and cut into 1cm slices • 75g butter • 300ml full-fat crème fraiche • 2 large eggs, lightly beaten • A few rasps freshly grated nutmeg • Salt and black pepper Many versions of this leek tart or pie, also known as Flamiche, hail from northern France’s Picardy region. Some have a top of puff pastry or brioche, or with added ingredients like cheese or lardons. This version by Rick Stein only needs a case of shortcrust pastry with plenty of leeks sweated down in butter, then bound with an egg and cream mixture, and baked. Delicious.

Preheat the oven 200°C/fan 180°C. Remove the pastry case from the fridge or freezer, line it with baking parchment and fill with baking beans. Bake it for about 10 minutes, then remove the paper and beans and continue to cook for another 4–5 minutes to allow the pastry base to dry out a little. Turn the oven down to 190°C/fan 170°.

METHOD: First make the pastry. Put the flour, salt, butter and lard in a food processor and process until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. Transfer it to a bowl and add enough of the water to make a smooth but not sticky dough. Put the dough on a floured work surface and roll it out to a circle about 28cm in diameter. Place the pastry in a 25cm loose-bottomed fluted tart

Fill the pastry case with the leek mixture and grate over a little nutmeg and black pepper. Bake the tart for 25–30 minutes, then serve warm or at room temperature. This is an edited extract from Rick Stein’s ‘Secret France’ (BBC Books, RRP $49.99), available now.

Photography by James Murphy

HOW WELL DO YOU KNOW CAMBERWELL? Test your local knowledge of the Camberwell shopping precinct.

1

3

2

4

ACROSS

DOWN

6 Where you would go when it's time for a new bike

1 A place where you can buy the latest novel

7 The council area that Camberwell resides in

2 A burger joint that gives back to the local community

8 A popular road that shares its name with a famous explorer

3 Camberwell's iconic movie theatre

9 Where you can enjoy a wine in a historic building

4 A Cretan-inspired restaurant housed in a former bank

11 A busy road shared by trams, cars and cyclists

5 Where you can find pre-loved fashion, homewares and other treasures

12 The one-stop shop for specialty papers and stationery

5 6

7 8

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9

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6 A shopping centre with more than 30 stores and restaurants

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14 A long-running pub known for its live entertainment

10 Where you can pick up the mail and get some printing done

14

15 A spot where travel and holidays begin

13 A place to pick up groceries and everyday items

15

13

Across: (6) Cycles Galleria, (7) Boroondara, (8) Burke, (9) Youngs Wine Rooms, (11) Riversdale, (12) Paper Republic, (14) Palace Hotel, (15) Helloworld Down: (1) Dymocks, (2) Grilld, (3) Rivoli, (4) Elyros, (5) Salvos, (6) Camberwell Place, (10) MBE, (13) Coles

CITIZEN


THE CAMBERWELL CITIZEN • ISSUE #7 • 9

THE ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO COFFEE

Melbourne is famous for its love of coffee, whether it’s your morning boost or your favourite pastime. Our daily coffee orders are becoming more and more refined though, as coffee lovers search for the perfect twist on their favourite beverage. “Customers will ask for new requests from us and, from my perspective, I’m happy to try something new,” said Ash Nathan, owner of CoffeeHead in

Camberwell. “The customer might teach me something new.” Mr Nathan, who roasts coffee onsite, said it was important to use roasted beans that had been carefully aged. “The basic things to do are: follow the aging process, weigh every shot, make sure to follow the recipe for each coffee, and keep your machine clean,” he said.

Here are some of the different coffees to try next time you place an order: SHORT MACCHIATO

RISTRETTO

If you ask for a short macchiato or short mac, you can expect a single shot of espresso with a dash of textured milk. Macchiato means ‘stained’ in Italian, so the drink was originally made with an espresso that was ‘stained’ with a dash of milk. You can also order a short mac topped up with milk to various levels.

A ristretto is a shot stopped 15 seconds into its pull rather than the general 30 seconds of a standard espresso. This uses less water and makes a smaller drink, which is more concentrated. Ristrettos are usually served as a double, offering a smoother, less acidic finish than normal espressos.

LATTE

MAGIC

A latte is normally made with a single or double shot of espresso, steamed milk and milk foam. It’s similar to a cappuccino except with less milk foam and more steamed milk. Lattes are typically larger than cappuccinos too.

To make a magic, pour steamed milk over a double ristretto up to the three‑quarter level of your standard cup. Magics are similar to flat whites except they have less milk and more coffee. This beverage has been a Melbourne secret for years, but it’s slowly gaining traction outside of Victoria.

LONG BLACK For a long black, pour two shots of espresso into hot water. This is also called an Americano and it’s as close to drip coffee as it gets. If you just want the espresso without the hot water, you can order a short black instead.

COLD DRIP Cold drip coffee is made by slowly dripping water into coffee grounds, which eventually releases a more intense and concentrated coffee. Baristas often use a cold drip tower, and the process can take anywhere from three to 24 hours for a full batch.

FLAT WHITE A flat white is made up of a single or double shot of espresso, a generous pour of velvety steamed milk, and a very thin layer of microfoam. While there is debate about whether the flat white was invented in Australia or New Zealand, there’s no contention that the specialty coffee is fast becoming popular around the world too.

FILTER COFFEE A filter coffee is a variation on drip coffee and involves pouring hot water over ground coffee to let it drip through a paper or reusable filter. Filter coffee is often served black and offers a less intense flavour profile than espresso.


10 • THE CAMBERWELL CITIZEN • ISSUE #7

ACCESS EXCLUSIVE OFFERS AND NEWS

CAMBERWELL C ATC H - U P

Once a month we send out an email newsletter that shares exclusive offers, competitions, local news and ‘Meet a Trader’ stories. It’s a great way to stay up to date on everything happening in Camberwell shopping precinct. Sign up at camberwellshopping.com.au

VIRTUAL BOOK CLUB Dymocks Camberwell is now hosting a regular virtual book club, where people can come together online to discuss their favourite books and authors. Guest authors have also been invited to contribute to the discussion to share stories about their books, how they got started as a writer and how they got published. Pre-purchase books, which can be home delivered, and get more details at ftbconline.eventbrite.com.au The past couple of months have been strange, to say the least, as we’ve all had to adjust to a different way of life. With self-isolation measures in place and many of us spending more time at home, we hope you’ve all managed to find creative ways to keep busy. In the meantime, many of our stores are still operating, just in different ways. The majority of restaurants and cafes are operating but are only allowed to provide home delivery, pick up or takeaway services. We encourage you to support our local food businesses as much as you can during this time – place a delivery order for dinner one evening or pick up your favourite meal, and enjoy a night off from cooking. Key supermarkets in Camberwell remain open including Woolworths, Coles and Aldi, as well as speciality food stores such as Camberwell Fresh Food Market, Coltivare, Rainbow Meats, The Source Bulk Foods and local bakeries, so you can continue to stock up on grocery items. Of course, local chemists and medical services also continue to operate so you can access the healthcare and medicine you need. And don’t forget about Camberwell’s many independently run businesses that make the precinct so unique. It’s the gift stores, bookshops, fashion boutiques, beauty salons and homeware stores that truly need your support during this time. If you have any birthdays, anniversaries or other special occasions coming up, consider purchasing a gift or voucher from one of these stores. We’d like to thank local residents for continuing to support shops in Burke Rd and the junction, and we look forward to seeing you back in our precinct when it is safe to do so. To stay up to date, and to view amended services and trading hours for businesses in Camberwell, visit camberwellshopping.com.au

CITIZEN

GET ONLINE TO GET FIT Several Camberwell businesses are committed to keeping you fit, with a range of online classes and workouts now available. Jessica Dewar Yoga holds live-streamed yoga classes and workshops, Life Ready Physio + Pilates offers online classes to help you maintain a strong body, and Anytime Fitness has more than 1000 workouts available via their Anytime Workouts App. To find more fitness businesses in Camberwell, visit: camberwellshopping.com.au/traders-directory


THE CAMBERWELL CITIZEN • ISSUE #7 • 11

SHOP SPOTLIGHT Highlights and happenings in the Camberwell shopping precinct.

BUTTER DISH EATERY HAS BEEN HARD AT WORK BRINGING SHOPPERS TASTY TAKEAWAY OPTIONS.

WINE LOVERS WILL REJOICE WITH THESE CURATED PACKS FROM EAST END WINE BAR.

LOOKING FOR A DINNER IDEA? CHARGRILL CHARLIE’S OFFERS A ‘GRAB AND GO’ ORDER SERVICE.

SHOP NEWS APOLOGUE

MERAKI

New to Camberwell, Apologue antiques and interiors showcase charismatic antiques, contemporary objects, and one-of-a-kind statement pieces. They believe your home should tell a story of who you are and be a collection of what you love.

Meraki recently opened in Camberwell and promises a mouth-watering menu of Greek cuisine and exceptional customer service. Ask about their takeaway and home delivery services.

949 Burke Rd

DYMOCKS

Shop 110B, Level 1, Camberwell Place shopping centre, 793 Burke Rd If you’re in need of things to do at home, Dymocks has a great selection of books, puzzles and games. They offer free local delivery to Camberwell, Hawthorn East and Glen Iris, and affordable shipping rates to other suburbs. To place an order, phone (03) 9882 0032 or email camberwell@dymocks.com.au

JESSICA DEWAR YOGA Level 1, 199 Camberwell Rd

Jessica Dewar Yoga is offering a range of classes online including live‑stream yoga, workshops, and on-demand classes. For pricing options and timetables, visit: jessicadewaryoga.com

MAIL BOXES ETC (MBE) 738 Burke Rd

MBE Camberwell is still open but operating as a ‘reduced contact business’. MBE can assist with printing, shipping, mailing and delivery services. Please call or email instead of physically visiting the store: (03) 9813 2200 or camberwell@mbe.com.au

722 Burke Rd

THE JUICERY

Shop 18A, Camberwell Fresh Food Market, 519 - 525 Riversdale Rd A juice bar called The Juicery is now operating from Camberwell Fresh Food Market. The store offers fresh, made-to-order juices created entirely from fresh fruit and vegetables.

THE WORKSHOP HAWTHORN 5 Russell St

If you’re not using your car as much at the moment, consider sending it to The Workshop Hawthorn for a service. If you are uncomfortable leaving home, a pick-up and delivery service is available at no extra cost. Phone (03) 9813 3032.

Many businesses in Camberwell are still operating, just in different ways. To view altered trading hours and operations for individual stores, visit: camberwellshopping.com.au

Camberwell Catch-up is sponsored by the Camberwell Centre Association. camberwellshopping.com.au


Businesses in Camberwell are still operating, just in different ways. With many businesses now offering takeaway, pick up, home delivery, and streaming services, Camberwell still has it all.

Find out more at camberwellshopping.com.au

Camberwell Shopping | Burke Road & The Junction

camberwellshopping.com.au


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