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Facing the World

MAGAZINE STAFF EDITORIAL STAFF

Chiara Peacock

Assistant Director of Development

Grace Rochfort

Communications Coordinator

Andrew Rutledge

Development Database Manager

Carly Slagel

Coordinator of Alumni & Parent Relations

CONTRIBUTORS

PHOTOGRAPHY

Stephanie Coldren Eric Cowell Shara Khon Duncan Justine Forrester

Larry Canner Photography

Academic Dean

Vince Lupo, Direction One, Inc.

Nicole Webster

Kerry Johnston Andrew Holmgren Alex Sloane Peggy Szczerbicki COPY EDITING

Fern Hill DESIGN

FatCat Studios, Inc.

Pamela Ossmus

Grace Rochfort

Director of Admission

Carly Slagel

Joseph McGraw

Whitney Wasson Photography

Director of Finance & Operations

Denise Fiorucci

Director of Human Resources

ADMINISTRATION Andrew Holmgren Head Master

Elizabeth Martin

Head of Lower School

Matthew Buck ’87

Craig Luntz

Director of Technology

Calvert students face the world head on. The skills they learn and the poise and self-assurance they gain at Calvert makes this possible. In order to prepare our students to be leaders, not only at our School, but in our community and in the world beyond, we need support for The Calvert Fund. Your gift will help our students learn to achieve great things, meet their goals, and become tomorrow’s leaders. This year’s Calvert Fund campaign began on July 1, 2016. To make a gift, please visit www.calvertschoolmd.org/give

Head of Middle School

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Fall 2016


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CONTENTS

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stay connected

F AC EBO O K c a lv er ts chool md

T WI T TE R @c a lver ts chool md

I NST AG RAM @c a lver t_s chool

VI MEO c a lv er ts chool md

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T h e a ter A r ts P rog r am Ta k es Cen ter Sta g e P re ser v in g th e Sp ir it o f Hilly er 's Leg a cy C a lv er t F a cu lty E xp er ien ce th e Wor ld

on the cover Middle School students, as Lord Farquaad and the Duloc dancers, perform “Welcome to Duloc” in Shrek the Musical, Jr. Photograph by Whitney Wasson

departments 12

a lu mni p ro files

12....Carol Campbell Haislip ’69

27....Josh Perry ’96

41....Tait Thorne ’15

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highlight s

14....around campus

22....parents' association

34....calvert fund

42....alumni

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mo v ing fo rw a rd a sk t he t ea c her new fa c es st a f f a w a rds c la ss no t es Fall 2016


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first impressions Andrew B.Holmgren, Head Master

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his past year, Calvert launched a new Middle School Leadership Program with great success. The idea behind this initiative was to provide real life opportunities to lead within the context of school life. The formal program begins in Seventh Grade, where each student is provided a semester-long discussion class on different types of leadership. In addition, small groups of students are given responsibility to run one school-wide activity. It might involve organizing and advertising one of our community service events, or perhaps serving as ambassadors at one of our many evening functions. In the Eighth Grade, students are given an opportunity to build on this experience and volunteer for our leadership committees, where again, they will be asked to lead the community in various activities. In addition to providing hands-on leadership at an age where children need this experience most, the program also aims to teach our children the process of leadership and to give them the confidence and experience to lead beyond the walls Our traditions are of Calvert. This new strong, our school program is just one is strong, and example of how Calvert enriches the our students and experience for our faculty continue students beyond the to strengthen the excellent academic program that has Calvert Way. defined our school for over one hundred years. As a small elementary and middle school program, one of Calvert’s greatest benefits is its ability to identify its students’ many potentials at a time in their lives when the unlimited possibilities of youth abound. Our role as educators is to nurture these potentials and to challenge our students to grow and expand in areas that may not initially be comfortable for them. How many gifted public speakers began their lives terrified of the podium? How many talented

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athletes initially shied away from the sport that would come to define them? How many students almost avoided a course that altered their academic trajectory because it seemed too difficult? Emerson once wrote, “there is no planet, sun, or star could hold you, if you but knew what you are.” Our program of enrichment, whether it be our rich athletic offerings, the chance to perform on stage, the challenge of public speaking, the chance to take on additional academic programs, or the opportunity to lead, is designed to help our young students to ‘know what they are.’ That is the power of an educational program focused solely on elementary and middle school children and is the enduring promise of a Calvert education. In the pages that follow, you will read about some of these programs. I hope that, like me, you too will take great pride in this generation of Calvert students as they take full advantage of the traditions that bind us all together. It is because of them, and all of you, that Calvert remains strong in an age defined by uncertainty in the world of independent schools. It is because of them and all of you that Calvert remains and will remain the best elementary and middle school program in the Baltimore area. Our traditions are strong, our school is strong, and our students and faculty continue to strengthen the Calvert Way. As always, thank you for your continued support. I hope that all of our families, alumni, and friends have a wonderful year. Thank you,

Andrew B. Holmgren Head Master


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board briefing James B. Stradtner, Chairman of the Board of Trustees

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s chairman of the Board of Trustees of Calvert School, I am well aware of the myriad of challenges and opportunities facing us and all private schools in the Baltimore metropolitan area. Chief among these challenges is maintaining a desired level of student enrollment. Year after year, we recognize that the number of students will fluctuate and the total will always be impacted by certain demographic, financial, and socioeconomic issues. We face these same challenges at Calvert School but we are pleased to report that our enrollment for the 2016-2017 school year has slightly increased from last year. Perhaps we are one of the few private schools in our area that can make that statement, and we plan to continue to have strong enrollment numbers in future years. In order to do that, we have to step back and carefully consider what the product and service is that we promise to prospective families and the outcome they want for their children. We continue to be very proud of the educational experience we offer to our students. Our school was founded on the basics of learning: reading, writing and arithmetic. We will never forsake these basics The Calvert and our great Calvert tradition, experience is but we will never perhaps the best cease to be on the expression of what cutting edge of new and better ways to we want for our improve what we students and their offer to our students and their families. families. For instance, we believe that the traditional Calvert School has moved on to become somewhat of a Calvert “Community Center.� We open our doors to students earlier in the day and stay open later in the day to accommodate the needs of our families. Our after school programs include not only athletics and clubs, but innovative tutorial and homework study areas.

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And we are seeing students beginning their Calvert experience at a younger age as in the wonderful Kiddie Calvert facilities we provide. The Calvert experience is perhaps the best expression of what we want for our students and their families. If we are successful in providing that, then we will have no problem in maintaining enrollment at our desired levels, and as a result of all that we do as a school and a community, our students will continue to have successful outcomes. These very successful outcomes mean that our Eighth Grade graduates go to the high schools and colleges of their choice. Because Calvert has an unwavering love and appreciation of our students, we strive to ensure that they will be successful at Calvert and well beyond. This Calvert experience is possible because we have an outstanding Head Master in Andrew Holmgren, and we have a dedicated community of faculty, staff, parents, trustees, alumni, and our volunteers who especially deserve our heartfelt thanks. Believe me, this is a collective effort on the part of so many people who have proven time and again that they have a passion for Calvert. To cite the first word in our Calvert motto, we foster curiosity, and we are curious individuals who are always seeking to continue to make Calvert the best possible community and educational experience that any student could ever encounter. Sincerely,

James B. Stradtner Chairman of the Board of Trustees


BOARD BRIEFING

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BOARD OF TRUSTEES 2016-2017

James B. Stradtner Chairman

Mark A. Dewire Vice Chairman

Edwin J. Insley Treasurer

H. Ward Classen ’71 Secretary

Patrick K. Cameron Curtis H. Campbell ’83 Felix J. Dawson Sarah Wesley N. Finnerty ’83 Mark L. Fulchino James R. Garrett ’55 Alex F. Gibson ’90 Gayle S. Kelly Heidi S. Kenny-Berman David S. Knipp Konstantine B. Mallas Redonda G. Miller, M.D. Courtney L. Otenasek Joshua R. Perry ’96 Lee H. Riley, III, M.D. Amy T. Seto Matthew W. Wyskiel, III ’81 TRUSTEE EX-OFFICIO

Andrew B. Holmgren

Patrick K. Cameron Pat Cameron is a principal in Ober|Kaler Finance and Business Groups and currently chairs all of Ober|Kaler’s transactional practices throughout the firm. Prior to stepping down in March 2011, He served for many years as a member of Ober|Kaler’s six-member Board of Directors and as Vice President and Secretary of the firm. Pat has also served for years as a member of the firm’s Compensation Committee. At Calvert, Pat serves as a member of the Finance Committee and recently served on the Class of 2016 Eighth Grade Gift Committee, raising funds to help renovate the Middle School library into a student learning space. Pat is the husband of Kate Tubman Cameron ’79 and the father of Kerry ’16 and Coco ’18. Pat received his B.A. from The Johns Hopkins University, his M.A. from The Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

Redonda G. Miller Dr. Redonda Miller is President of The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Prior to her appointment, Redonda served as Vice President of Medical Affairs for The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Senior Vice President of Medical Affairs for the Johns Hopkins Health System. She received her B.S. from The Ohio State University, her M.D. at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and her M.B.A. at The Johns Hopkins University Carey School of Business. Redonda and her husband Albert recently co-chaired The Calvert Fund campaign for the 2015-2016 school year. Under their leadership, The Calvert Fund reached its highest total to date. Redonda currently serves on the Calvert Health Committee and the Parent Ambassador Board. She is the mother of Francesca ’19 and Bianca ’23.

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Theater Arts Program Takes Center Stage by Chiara Peacock

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THEATER ARTS PROGRAM TAKES CENTER STAGE

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WHAT MANY CONTEMPORARY MEMBERS OF OUR COMMUNITY MIGHT BE SURPRISED TO LEARN IS THAT, BEYOND ITS REPUTATION FOR STRONG ACADEMICS, CALVERT ALSO HAS DEEP ROOTS IN ALL ASPECTS OF THE THEATRICAL ARTS.

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hen most people think of Calvert School, what comes to mind is an enduring tradition of outstanding academics that provide students with a remarkable scholastic foundation. Calvert students are known to stand out among their peer group, not only as scholars, but as leaders, known for their poise, maturity, and profound love of learning. What many contemporary members of our community might be surprised to learn is that, beyond its reputation for strong academics, Calvert also has deep roots in all aspects of the theatrical arts. Calvert’s founding Head Master, Virgil Hillyer, was, in fact, a passionate devotee of theatrical performances—in his time called “assemblies.” Dating back to the earliest years of the 20th century, Hillyer supervised weekly assemblies, which the students and teachers conceived and created, right down to the choreography, sets and costumes. Alumna Ann Williams Baldwin ’21 recalled in Calvert School: The First Century: “Mr. Hillyer was very enthusiastic about doing things that required you to dress up and imagine you were someone else.” Through the decades, Calvert has maintained this long-standing tradition of creating theatrical productions through Lower School class plays, which alumni of all ages remember fondly. Each year, students in Sixth through Tenth Age perform their class play in front of the entire Lower School and invited guests. Through these performances, our youngest students gain the important experience of speaking in front of a large crowd, while learning to project one’s voice, memorize lines and lyrics, and work together as a team.

Lower School students have a myriad of other opportunities to perform, including the Thanksgiving Assembly, the Geography Show, the traditional Lower School Holiday Sing-a-Long, and Grandparents’ Day. Beyond these large-scale performances, Calvert’s Lower Schoolers have opportunities to develop their public speaking skills beginning in Fifth Age when students present their Animal Reports to the delight of everyone present. Older students also demonstrate their classroom work in front of peers with the presentation of projects such as their State Reports and Famous American Reports, among others. Elizabeth Martin, Head of Lower School, says, “These projects provide another opportunity for teachers to work on oral presentation skills and articulation, and they give students a chance to think on their feet by answering questions.” Mrs. Martin states, “Throughout their Lower School years, students gain confidence and become more comfortable performing. By the time they reach Middle School, they are eager and ready to take on more demanding projects.” From its inception, the Middle School has exposed students to the performing arts. Initially, the program was run by Deirdre Marlowe, and drama was an elective class for Seventh and Eighth Graders, with each semesterlong class culminating in a play production. When Ms. Marlowe left Calvert, there were other teachers, primarily Mollie Williams ’82, who taught theater to Fifth and Seventh graders, putting on productions which incorporated music, comedy skits, and monologues. In 2014, Calvert’s Head Master, Andrew Holmgren along with Head of Middle School and Calvert

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THEATER ARTS PROGRAM TAKES CENTER STAGE

TODAY, ALL MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS PARTICIPATE IN THE THEATER ARTS PROGRAM IN FIFTH THROUGH SEVENTH GRADES, AND IT IS AN ELECTIVE ART CHOICE FOR EIGHTH GRADERS. alumnus, Matt Buck ’87, made the important decision to elevate Theater Arts to part of the School’s core curriculum. By doing so, a strategic plan was put into place to make theater an essential element of the School’s offerings alongside the other arts. Mrs. Martin notes, “Performance and presenting to an audience is so much a part of our school tradition. When Andrew arrived, he was committed to continuing that tradition by making the performing arts a priority for the whole school, Fifth Age through the Eighth Grade.” Today, all Middle School students participate in the Theater Arts Program in Fifth through Seventh Grades, and it is an elective art choice for Eighth Graders. According to Mr. Buck, the central objectives are to teach theater arts skills to every child and to develop an age-appropriate curriculum for each grade. While performance skills are central to the program, Calvert also has begun to emphasize the importance of the technical aspects of theater, such as lighting

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design, stage management, publicity, responsibility for props and costumes, and production design. When Mr. Holmgren and Mr. Buck decided to make this enhancement, they hired Alexis Tantau as Calvert’s Drama and Choir Teacher. With her background in opera and music performance, she was tasked with creating a Middle School Choir and producing the first Middle School musical. After the success of these ventures, Ms. Tantau’s position was made full-time during the 2015-2016 academic year, and she was commissioned to create a comprehensive Middle School Theater Arts curriculum. Ms. Tantau was thrilled to have this opportunity and states, “By having a Theater Arts Program as part of their core curriculum, in addition to the enjoyment of the craft itself, students gain transferable skills. For example, in music you learn to listen, in art you learn to see, and in theater you learn to respond, collaborate, and gain a sense of yourself in physical space. I try to make the classroom a place where students can use their imaginations in an unbridled fashion. Between the writing that we do and all of the various improvisational activities, students have a chance to make connections and try out different ideas they might not have a chance to explore in other courses.” Ms. Tantau notes, “When I first arrived at Calvert, I expected to have to pull Fifth Graders out of their shells. I quickly learned that Calvert students are wonderfully expressive readers. They have gained so much experience in their Lower School reading classes, and have had numerous opportunities for public speaking in their class plays.” The Middle School curriculum consists of the following: in Fifth Grade, students explore how stories can be told through the medium of theater, using fairytales and folktales from around the world. In Sixth Grade, students are exposed to theater history and to acting techniques—with an emphasis on nonverbal communication skills. Because Seventh Graders at Calvert study Shakespeare in their English classes, the Seventh Grade theater curriculum centers on the study and performance of Shakespeare. Students perform an abridged adaptation of a Shakespeare play as their culminating project. Ms. Tantau says,


THEATER ARTS PROGRAM TAKES CENTER STAGE

“When first studying Shakespeare, students are initially intimidated by the language; however, English teachers have reported that this year’s Seventh Graders already have a much better grasp of the material than in years past.” This kind of opportunity for cross-curricular connections is of particular value. “When Sixth Graders are studying Greek Theater in History while simultaneously performing a scene from Antigone in Theater class, they get to physically enter the space they are learning about,” states Ms. Tantau. This experience of creating a relationship between

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academics and theater arts also has its roots in Mr. Hillyer’s time. In Calvert School: The First Century, Evelyn Sharp McLanahan, who served on the faculty from 1926-1937, remembered, “Calvert’s assemblies were written by the teachers; one didn’t just go to the library to find a play. The teachers were expected to create original assemblies, and they were to enlarge upon the courses that were taught in that particular class.” Ms. McLanahan added, “The assemblies did the children worlds of good because they helped to give them self-esteem. The teachers were urged to have every child in the class participate, no matter how big or small the part.” Ms. Tantau echoes this philosophy when she says, “An important aspect of the program is that it gives each student the opportunity to act without the pressure to be the best. I think performing is extremely important because it stretches students and shows them they can do something they didn’t think they could. Inevitably, in every performance there is a child who seems shy at the beginning and then really steps up and embraces their role.” Mrs. Martin agrees: “Theater provides a different way to show your skills—memorization, self-expression—skills that are also important in the classroom. You are adding those elements to the student’s repertoire in a different way—which is all part of what makes a well-rounded student.” This past spring, following last year’s wellreceived debut musical, Oklahoma!, Calvert produced its second musical, Shrek the Musical, Jr. Mr. Buck notes, “We felt there was a huge need for that kind of program. The excitement felt by the

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alumni profile: Carol Campbell Haislip ’69

students is tremendous, and these musicals capture their imaginations and interest. The enormous participation—there were 41 cast members in this year’s production—affirms that the kids want and need this.” Ms. Tantau feels the benefit of having a Middle School musical is “because it’s fun—plain and simple.” She also asserts that “it provides a chance for different grade levels to interact and be on the same team. It’s lovely to see students form friendships with members of different grades.” In that spirit, the Theater Arts Program creates an opportunity to bring the Calvert community together. In preparation for Shrek the Musical, Jr., siblings, parents, and even Mr. Holmgren, pitched in and helped paint the sets. Mr. Buck notes, “One unexpected and fun benefit of the growth of our

Calvert’s Mrs. Manners Carol Campbell Haislip ’69 is in the midst of her busy season—though she doesn’t have much of a slow season these days. Over twenty years ago, Carol, along with her business partner, Cathy Hanson, founded what is now The International School of Protocol. At the time, Carol and Cathy had young daughters they wanted to enroll in a cotillion ballroom dance program, but there were no convenient classes. They took matters into their own hands. Carol and Cathy created My Lady’s Manor

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Middle School Theater Arts Program is that the teachers are beginning to get involved. This year, the faculty and staff put on a performance called The Faculty Follies where students got to see their teachers perform.” “Calvert is devoted to giving our students enrichment opportunities such as the Middle School Musical, and other experiences that have symbiotic relationships to their classwork,” states Mr. Buck. In the future, as Calvert’s Theater Arts Program evolves, it will be an exciting opportunity to explore the additional benefits this program will bring to Calvert School. Theater is an essential component of the School’s history. Its prominent place in today’s curriculum is just one more way to celebrate the vitality and unity of the Calvert community. ◀

camp’, but in the end want to come back for another week.” Carol also works in Baltimore City with high risk youth as well as with colleges, universities, and corporate programs. In addition to teaching, Carol certifies people worldwide to teach etiquette. Students from China, Turkey, Africa, Canada, Central America, and all across the U.S., either travel to Baltimore or are certified electronically. “There is a lot of variety in my schedule. I can Dancing, which they ran for eleven years at be dealing with four-year-olds one day and St. James Academy. After becoming certified working corporate programs the next, so it’s to teach etiquette in 1996, they began never dull.” teaching how to properly shake hands, Despite Carol’s packed schedule, she does look people in the eyes when speaking to find time to stay connected with some of her them, and make interesting conversation. Calvert classmates. “A lot of what I learned “We would give prizes for the best at Calvert is still my mantra today. You have conversationalists during break times, and control over the impression you leave with the kids loved it!” others, so make sure everything conveys that The program now includes all aspects impression: how you dress, how you speak, of etiquette, which can never be taught how you express yourself. If we all believed too soon. The four-year-olds use letter in the golden rule and treated people in the association, color, and role play with puppets. manner we wanted to be treated, we would “The kids come in thinking, ‘ugh manners all be better off.”


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highlights around campus

71.66

3,159

trees saved in the last year

gallons of gas saved in the last year

SOLAR SAVINGS

15.8 passenger vehicles driven for one year

Solar panels generated 106,

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437 kWh in the last year 02


HIGHLIGHTS: AROUND CAMPUS

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01 An eight-foot tall ant farm was installed in the Middle School Science Lab.

02 Tenth Agers Skype with students at ApostĂłlica in San Luis PotosĂ­, Mexico as a part of the Expedition Calvert program.

03 After renovations, 2 Oak Place opened in October with entertainment and meeting space downstairs and offices upstairs.

04 Calvert hosted the Middle School Leadership Summit for Baltimore area schools in February. Calvert Seventh and Eighth Graders presented and facilitated discussions.

05 Students pair up each semester for Buddy Day. In November, buddies made bouquets of tissue paper flowers that were donated to Meals on Wheels.

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HIGHLIGHTS: AROUND CAMPUS

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HIGHLIGHTS: AROUND CAMPUS

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01 Students enjoyed time playing in the snow after a record 29 inches fell in January.

02 Meet Cecilius, the Mighty Bee. Named after Lord Baltimore, Calvert’s new mascot flew to campus last fall.

03 During the May Buddy Day, students made beaded flag keychains that were sent, along with books, to Operation Paperback.

04 In the Middle School, students are utilizing EV3 LEGO robots to aid in scientific investigations as a data collection device. Read more about the robotics program at www.calvertschoolmd.org/ robotics

05 Robots invaded campus last fall. Our Beebots are designed for younger students to learn the basics of programming; however, they are popular with students of all ages!

Fall 2016


Preserving the Spirit of Hillyer's Legacy by Andrew Holmgren

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have a slight problem in my Lower School office—I share it with a ghost. Without provocation and much to my dismay, the two large ceiling fans that hang above my head are often turning on and off. This phenomenon has been taking place since I arrived at Calvert, and, to the best of my knowledge, long before. The office itself, for those who have not seen it, appears to have been dropped directly onto the corner of Tuscany and Canterbury from the pages of a Dickens novel. The room is large with hardwood floors and wood paneled walls. I even have two ‘secret

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doors,’ as the younger students call them, seamlessly hidden within the wood panels and betrayed only by their worn copper doorknobs. Were it not for the coffeemaker in the corner and the oversized computer monitor on my desk, one might expect to find one of those cruel-hearted Dickensian headmasters lurking within. Instead, you will find me, Calvert’s seventh Head Master (hopefully not cruel-hearted), and, as mentioned, a ghost. Imagining myself a sensible man, I first assumed that I had an electrical issue in the ceiling, but I received assurances that the electrical work had been


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“...THIS WAS A MAN WHO TOOK SOMETHING WELL-KNOWN AND WELL-WORN AND ADDED TO IT IN A WAY THAT NO ONE IN HIS TIME COULD HAVE IMAGINED. FOR OUR VIRGIL, THIS SOMETHING WAS THE EDUCATION OF YOUNG CHILDREN.” inspected, reviewed, taken apart, and reassembled—all without any indication of a problem. I was also told on each of these occasions that my lighting mishaps were, without doubt, the work of a spectral being. “What ghost?” I asked, figuring that I should at least have some understanding of my new office mate. “Well,” I was told on each occasion, “this is the Head Master’s office. It must be the ghost of Virgil Hillyer.” Now for some, the idea of sharing a space with a ghost might be upsetting, but oddly, I found it rather comforting. After all, this was our first Head Master, the man who shook the first hand, corrected the first folder paper, and designed the very building in which the office resides. Like his classical namesake, this was a man who took something well-known and well-worn and added to it in a way that no one in his time could have imagined. For our Virgil, this something was the education of young children. Dissatisfied with the norms of turn-of-thecentury education, Virgil set out to create a system of instruction that would help to redefine the way we view the elementary years. He believed that children had the capacity to do and learn more, that these early years were essential to the building blocks of learning, and that skills and fundamentals should never be assumed, but practiced and mastered. Virgil believed that each age required a specific pedagogical approach in order to best reach the child at that moment in their educational lives. This, of course, is why we have ‘Ages’ at Calvert. In addition to his commitment to teaching fundamentals and in lockstep with the idea that pedagogy must be a tailored fit to the age of a student, Head Master Hillyer had a deep reverence for the wonder of childhood. In truth, we need not look any further than our own building (built in the shape of an E for education) to find our evidence. We see it in the design of the auditorium and its whimsical benches, created to mimic the gargoyles found atop medieval cathedrals. We find it in the lockers and on the rooftop

finials. We even see it in our chandelier where we find images of witches and other fairy tale characters. Virgil’s appreciation for the joys of childhood extended into the classroom as well. Not only did he walk the hallways playing his violin to inspire the children, but in his Distinctive Features of a Calvert Education, Virgil wrote of creating a “game like spirit in all work—a spirit which gives interest and zest to the work….” There is no doubt that Mr. Hillyer was well ahead of his time in creating a system of education for Calvert students. A hundred years later, some things have changed and some have stayed the same. We still shake hands, but we do it in two buildings. We still teach Calvert script, but we also teach keyboarding. We still have Ages, but they transform into Grades in the Middle School. As much as the particulars of our practices may ebb and flow over the years, our commitment to teaching the fundamentals in an age appropriate manner and to the joys of childhood have remained consistently at the core of a Calvert education. In fact, these ideals have never been more central to our mission as we have now fully embraced the elementary and middle school model of educating students. No educational model better addresses the developmental needs of its students. Focusing exclusively on the educational needs of elementary and middle school students allows us to honor Mr. Hillyer’s commitment to developing a program that meets children where they are developmentally. This model provides a challenging curriculum, but in the context of a safe and nurturing environment. It permits us to offer leadership opportunities to our Middle School students at a time when they are naturally developing these skills and need the exposure, encouragement, and responsibility that come with being the oldest students in a school. Our model provides these same students with a chance to be role models for our youngest students, a practice we see every day in the life of our school. Focusing all of our resources on these crucial years in a child’s life allows us to hire teachers who specialize in

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PRESERVING THE SPIRIT OF HILLYER'S LEGACY

these ages and who appreciate the unique educational opportunities that present themselves during these foundational years. Every year, we witness another graduating class heading off to many excellent high schools. Our students have found great success beyond our walls as academics, athletes, artists and leaders. At Calvert, we understand that their success is due in large measure to our program and our talented teachers. We also know that this success is aided by the structure of our school. By allowing our boys and girls to grow, learn and mature in an elementary and middle school program, they are better equipped as Eighth Graders to choose a high school that fits them best. It also empowers our students with an opportunity to reinvent themselves at a time in their lives when such a reinvention is a healthy reflection of the young men and women that they have become. Finally, our structure allows us to provide a program that celebrates childhood, and in turn, allows our students to remain children for just a little

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bit longer. This benefit not only provides a respite from a world that increasingly cuts short the innocence of childhood, but it also reaffirms Virgil Hillyer’s commitment to provide a school centered on this magical time in all of our lives. Sometimes at night, when I am sitting in my office and the laughter and chatter of children has been replaced by the distant hum of the vacuum cleaner, I think of Virgil and all that he built on this spot. I wonder if he would be more proud of the traditions we have kept or the changes that we have made. I imagine both, as he was surely a traditionalist in his intent and a progressive in his approach. This is what made him a special person, and this is what makes Calvert a special place. I don’t know if my office is haunted. Being both a traditionalist and a progressive myself, I doubt it, but I am willing to entertain the possibility. I do know that Virgil’s spirit is alive and well at Calvert, and on those quiet evenings when I am alone with my wood paneling and my secret doors, I sometimes share my thoughts out loud and wait for the lights to flicker.◀


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highlights parents' association

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VOLUNTEERS EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE John DeLong President Jennifer Thompson Vice President Laura Davis Secretary Liz Bissett Courtney Brody Lower School Class Rep. Coordinators

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Theresa Hartman Sally Hoskins Middle School Class Rep. Coordinators

Alexa McCulloch '90 Mary Kay Nabit Alicia Schmidt Taste at Calvert Chairs

EVENT CHAIRS Nicki Boudreau Henryka Craig Used Uniform Chairs

Helen Anderson Jennifer Kennedy Faculty/Staff Appreciation Chairs

Crissy Berrier Kirsten Milano Grandparents’ Day Chairs

Tameika Lunn-Exinor Sarah Waters Calvert Day Chairs

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HIGHLIGHTS: PARENTS' ASSOCIATION

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01 Sheree Carter Chase & 06

Derrick Chase

02 Rania Rafailides, Peg Holmgren, Gillian Quinn, and Fawn Manning

03 Taste Co-Chairs Alicia Schmidt and Mary Kay Nabit

04 Peter Quinn and Mike Nguyen

05 Dylan D’Andrea ’22 completes a worksheet with his grandparents

06 Mehr Saluja ’25 with THANKS TO THE INCREDIBLE SUPPORT OF OUR PARENTS, TASTE AT

her grandparents

CALVERT AND THE USED UNIFORM SALES RAISED OVER $47,000

07 Lindley Berrier shows her

IN 2015-16 TO FUND PARENT EVENTS AND ALLOW THE CSPA TO GIVE A $25,000 GIFT TO THE CALVERT FUND.

artwork off to her grandmothers, Jill Link and Virginia Berrier

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moving forward graduation highlights

EIGHTH GRADE HONORS AND AWARDS REFLECTION SPEECH

THE GIRLS’ SPORTSMANSHIP AWARD

Talia E. R. Kolodkin

K. Rebecca Scott

THE ISAAC H. DIXON ACADEMIC AWARD FOR GIRLS

THE JAY FRANCE ’37 SPORTSMANSHIP AWARD

THE BOLTON ARTS AWARD

Rosina F. Beritela

Noah D. Y. Beecher

Shannon M. Quinn

THE EDWARD W. BROWN ACADEMIC AWARD FOR BOYS

THE GEORGE A. WHITING ATHLETIC TROPHY FOR GIRLS

THE HILLYER AWARD

Brendan P. Shelley

reflections

THE GEORGE A. WHITING ATHLETIC TROPHY FOR BOYS

THE CITIZENSHIP AWARD

Sydney A. Pinkett & Charles R. Klein

Daniel P. Kelly

Eleanor F. Little

THE BANNER AWARD

Rosina F. Beritela

Brendan P. Shelley


MOVING FORWARD

25

GRADUATING CLASS OF 2016: HIGH SCHOOL CHOICES Fotenie F. Apostolo St. Timothy's School

Celia A. Flannery Oldfields School

Eleanor F. Little McDonogh School

Allie Sachar McDonogh School

Noah D. Y. Beecher McDonogh School

Anna Rose Goldman Garrison Forest School

Mary P. Macdonald Baltimore City College

K. Rebecca Scott Park School of Baltimore

Rosina F. Beritela Dulaney High School

Kennedy L. Greene St. Timothy's School

J. Michael Mallas Gilman School

K. Kerry Cameron Roland Park Country School

Bridget J. Gregory Roland Park Country School

Austin Martin Calvert Hall College High School

Grant C. Carey Gilman School

Charles E. Hall St. Paul's School

Thomas G. Martinson II Gilman School

Peyton A. Cleverley McDonogh School

Benjamin H. Inglesby Park School of Baltimore

Sean M. McGonigle McDonogh School

Jalen I. Conaway Calvert Hall College High School

Daniel P. Kelly Calvert Hall College High School

George D. McGurkin Gilman School

Caroline E. Crawford St. Paul's School for Girls

Charles R. Klein Gilman School

Christabella O. Palumbi Park School of Baltimore

Celia E. Donner Garrison Forest School

Talia E. R. Kolodkin Park School of Baltimore

Geoffrey M. Peel Gilman School

John S. Finnerty Boys' Latin School of Maryland

Alexander M. Koster Gilman School

Sydney A. Pinkett St. Timothy's School

Tykara J. White Institute of Notre Dame

Eva L. Finney St. Paul's School for Girls

Keady S. Lally McDonogh School

Jesse D. Plank McDonogh School

Matthew J. Whitney Loyola Blakefield

Ava E. Flannery St. Timothy's School

Louise T. Lemken Roland Park Country School

Shannon M. Quinn Roland Park Country School

A. Jamison Wyskiel Roland Park Country School

Brendan P. Shelley St. Paul's School Maxwell A. Smith Baltimore City College Nora J. Smith Park School of Baltimore Johanna K. Suval Roland Park Country School Katherine R. Taylor Roland Park Country School Audrey G. Thompson Roland Park Country School Benjamin W. Vandiver Gilman School Susannah G. Webster McDonogh School

Fall 2016


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MOVING FORWARD

CLASS OF 2012: COLLEGE CHOICES Grace M. Adams Southern Methodist University

Unique L. Eaton Messiah College

Amalia Bilis Dickinson College

Mira D. Emmart Undecided

Andrew J. Brennan Washington & Lee University

Honora S. Feinberg Temple University

Edward A. Burchell III Fairfield University Nicholas M. Colantuono University of Maryland, Baltimore County Isabel M. Cooke Dickinson College Claiborne C. Crozier University of South Carolina Bridget B. Danko Marquette University Erica M. Dawson University of Michigan

William S. Field University of Pittsburgh Mitchell F. Ford, Jr. Amherst College Elizabeth A. Gallo Dickinson College Isa Garcia-Moreno Bates College Ava V. L. Geenen University of Chicago Makayla G. Gilliam-Price The New School (Fall 2017) John T. Harvey Harvard University (Fall 2017)

Jacqueline Lee Kelly University of North Carolina, Wilmington Eva R. King Colorado College Parker C. Knott University of Maryland Elizabeth G. Liotta Georgetown University Alexander Z. Liu Brown University Micah D. Manning Johns Hopkins University Anna G. McGinnis Colgate University Emma P. Moore College of Charleston

Meghan A. Quinn University of Richmond Ryan S. Rossello Furman University Joseph H. Sakai University of Maryland Anne Pearson Smith Washington & Lee University Barrett L. Sutley The Pennsylvania State University Margaret T. Swindell University of South Carolina Addison J. Thompson Pitzer College Charles E. Thorne IV Clemson University Jacob V. Warfield Cornell University

Matthew M. Moore The University of the Arts

C. Madison Williams Ohio Wesleyan University

Thomas R. Diehl University of Maryland

Krista K. Jiranek Trinity College

R. Jackson Morrill Yale University

Dima Zahan American University

Anna V. L. Dorsey College of William & Mary

Riggs P. Jones James Madison University

Edward J. Obrecht Tufts University

Kaitlyn K. Zink Elon University

reflections


alumni profile: Josh Perry ’96

27

It’s Never Too Early to Give Back In 2012, when Josh Perry ’96 moved back to Baltimore after finishing business school in Chicago, it was important to him to give back to the organizations that had helped him as a child – Baltimore Education Scholarship Trust (BEST), Calvert, and later, McDonogh. A proponent of education, Josh volunteered for youthcentered organizations including KIPP and Port Discovery. He also started attending Calvert alumni events and joined the alumni annual fund committee. “I didn’t fully appreciate how well Calvert prepared me until I got to college. At that point, I knew I had been part of something special. I want to make sure I helped others have that experience.” Josh’s enthusiasm for Calvert did not go unnoticed. In 2014, he was invited to join Calvert’s Board of Trustees where he serves on the Investment Committee and will assume the role of Chairman of the Investment Committee in 2017. Josh credits Calvert with preparing him to be successful by teaching him to approach people with respect and an expectation of reciprocity, which began with shaking the Head Master’s hand every day. He is also thankful that Calvert allowed him to be creative and curious. “As a kid, I was all over the map; I wanted to be a brain surgeon, magician, body builder, all sorts of things. I really appreciate now how Calvert allowed limitless curiosity.” Josh attended graduation in June where he “felt nostalgic about the way many things have stayed the same at Calvert (the white pants and the passing of the banner) and proud of how the School has evolved and grown stronger over the years.” He loves to see, up close, how Calvert traditions are preserved yet combined with innovation and new ideas to help the School move forward. As for his fellow alumni, Josh encourages everyone to get involved. “Regardless of profession or passion, your talents can be used to better the Calvert Community.”

You can ensure that Calvert School remains strong for future generations of students by making a gift from your estate. Please help us keep Calvert thriving far into the future by discovering a planned giving option that might be right for you. To learn more about the Hillyer Society, Calvert School’s planned giving society, or to notify us of your existing plans, please email calvertfund@calvertschoolmd.org

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reflections

teacher travels


TEACHER TRAVELS

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Calvert Faculty Experience the World

T

oday’s students, more than ever before, need to develop global competencies and an appreciation for different cultures and peoples to be successful in the future. Calvert teachers are encouraged to consider ways to increase their personal knowledge and understanding of other parts of the world to support curricular initiatives and best practices in instruction. Each year, Calvert teachers are able to apply for travel grants, made possible by generous alumni, to further their own education in a specific area of their curriculum. This year, four teachers were awarded travel grants that allowed them to stretch themselves personally, demonstrate lifelong learning to their students, and, ultimately, enhance their teaching.

Fall 2016


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reflections

C

HA

II WA

UBA

03


CH

04

AY

NORW

INA

01

Fall 2016


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TEACHER TRAVELS

01

China Justine Forrester Eighth Age Teacher Justine Forrester traveled to China for two weeks in June to learn more about China’s people and rich culture. Through her travels, Justine will be able to share authentic learning experiences with the Eighth Age students as they, too, travel to China via the Expedition Calvert geography program. “It is imperative that today’s young American students be educated with the understanding that China is, and will be, a significant influence in their lives,” Forrester says. In preparation for her trip, Justine acquired some basic Mandarin. Once there, she immersed herself in the language and took language lessons in Yangshuo. Justine photographed, hiked, and biked the varied terrain to experience firsthand the landforms of China. She also trekked 18 kilometers along a lesser-known section of the Great Wall over the course of two days. Justine visited the ancient Terracotta Warriors and

02

Longmen Grottoes to learn about important Chinese landmarks. She spent four days cycling and trekking through villages known for their rice paddies and terraces, cultivated by local farmers and plowed by water buffalo, to learn about rice cultivation. To discover more about the Chinese people, Justine biked through Beijing neighborhoods on a cycling tour, used public transportation, interacted with rural farmers on a homestay visit, and enjoyed a home-cooked meal. Justine’s excursion to China will provide invaluable enhancements to the Expedition Calvert curriculum, and, in turn, further inspire the Eighth Age students as they “travel the globe”—particularly their stop in China—for a journey they surely will not forget.

Hawaii Alex Sloane Alex Sloane, Middle School science teacher, traveled to Honolulu, Hawaii in June to take part in an in-depth study of one of the most diverse and vulnerable ecosystems on the planet—coral reefs. While there, she attended the Coral Reef Symposium held by the International Society for Reef Studies, which occurs once every four years and brings together scientists, policy-makers, and natural resource managers from around the world. The location of the conference allowed Alex to explore several reef systems and unique marine ecosystems while meeting with experts in the field. “These are invaluable experiences that I will share with my students,” says Alex. The second half of the Seventh Grade science curriculum is dedicated to the

diversity of living organisms on earth. She and her students explore the unique characteristics of the six biological kingdoms, with special focus on the extraordinary diversity and adaptations of plants and animals. “Students are always excited to learn about unfamiliar organisms with unusual survival mechanisms and symbioses,” says Alex. “Hawaii offers a wide range of climates and ecosystems that highlight many unique adaptations. This travel grant allowed me to increase my content knowledge of species’ diversity and inspired me to create new projects to enhance this portion of the curriculum.” Climate change is a pressing environmental issue with wide-reaching impacts around the globe. “It is likely that Calvert students will be faced with the effects of climate change during their lifetime. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance that we educate them on scientific research on climate change and encourage innovative thinking to find solutions,” says Sloane.


TEACHER TRAVELS

03

33

Cuba

Shara Khon Duncan Shara Khon Duncan, Lower School Spanish teacher, traveled to Cuba with the World Leadership School, an organization that works with K-12 schools to support 21st century learning by asking educators to explore the question: “Along with our core content, what skills and aptitudes will our students need to thrive in the future?” Today’s essential skills include critical thinking, communication, collaboration, adaptability, leadership, creativity, and knowledge of the most current technologies. Traveling with a group of teachers, Shara Khon spent ten days in Cuba learning about the culture and the people. According to the World Leadership School, with limited technology and access to the Internet, Cuba is a country that seems frozen in the past. Yet, it has made remarkable progress in art and education, boasting a 99.8 % literacy rate. There is also an exemplary healthcare system, which sends doctors around the world to aid marginalized populations. “Today’s students need to increase global skills

04

and competencies to be successful in the future,” says Shara Khon. “I am excited to bring back my Cuban experiences to Calvert.” On this unique trip, Shara Khon immersed herself in Cuban life, had conversations with Cuban teachers, and studied the history of Cuban education. She visited the Teatro de Elementos, the waterfalls at Parque El Nicho, a local food market, Finca Vigia (Ernest Hemingway's home), Museo de la Educación, the University of Havana, the Plaza de la Revolucion, and had the opportunity to snorkel at the Playa Giron. Additionally, Shara Khon was able to learn more about project-based learning practices that encourage self-directed learning by students and foster global experiences in both teachers and students. Shara Khon’s increased knowledge of studentdirected learning pedagogies and intercultural capabilities will support and enhance learning goals throughout the curriculum.

Norway, Denmark, and Sweden Peggy Szczerbicki

Tenth Age teacher, Peggy Szczerbicki, traveled to Norway, Sweden, and Denmark in late July to learn more about the Vikings and their exploration to the North American continent. The Tenth Age geography curriculum, Expedition Calvert, focuses on North America beginning with its earliest explorers, the Vikings. Through her travels, Peggy will bring rich experiences and insights to the student learning experience when they encounter the Vikings via Expedition Calvert. On her trip, Peggy visited the Viking Museum in Oslo where she was able to see the Oseberg ship, a longship that dates back to the year 800 A.D. In Copenhagen, Peggy visited the Viking Museum in Roskilde that houses five reconstructed longships dating back to 1,000 A.D. that were excavated from a neighboring fjord. The Viking longships were so advanced that they allowed the Vikings

to roam throughout Europe, Russia, North Africa, Baghdad, and North America 500 years before Columbus. “Climbing onto a Viking ship, studying artifacts from this time period, visiting stave churches (medieval wooden structures) decorated with the likes of Viking ship prows, and walking in the region of these explorers allowed me to make connections with the first explorers to North America,” says Peggy. “Vikings in Norse myths are familiar to many ten year-olds, but learning about the real people behind these stories will help bring this important history to life for our students,” she continues. As the Tenth Age students “travel” through North America with their Expedition Calvert passports in hand, they will certainly experience new wonders and knowledge about the Vikings’ exploration of North America with their travel guide, Mrs. Szczerbicki, by their side!

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highlights calvert fund

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02

03 07

reflections


HIGHLIGHTS: CALVERT FUND

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06

04

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01 Tom & May Blanchard 02 Classmates Luke Wilson ’97 and Lindsey Moore McGettigan ’97 participate in The Calvert Fund Spring Drive as phonathon callers and donors.

03 Blake Sheehan ’00, Josh Perry ’96, and Courtney Otenasek

04 Betsey Swingle Hobelmann ’87, Patty McCormick Klein ’86, Wesley Naylor Finnerty ’83, Jody Kent Lemken ’83, and Cristina Niccolini

05 Maree Tucker, Lindy Lord, and Matt Tucker ’87

06 Christine Kim-Ripley & Chris Ripley

07 Our first #BeeGiving Fall Drive was a tremendous success, raising $136,896 in 48 hours! Fall 2016


36

ask the teacher Eric Cowell, Middle School Science Teacher & Robotics Club Coordinator

What have you enjoyed most about your first year at Calvert? Working with the fantastic faculty. It is clear that Calvert’s teachers love what they do. They enjoy mentoring students and are open to collaboration and bouncing ideas off one another. It is always important to feel comfortable with the people you work with, and I have felt great about my colleagues here at Calvert since day one.

What has surprised you about the school or the students? First, the size of the campus. Coming from San Francisco where my school had its playgrounds on the rooftops, it’s fantastic to have the space at Calvert to move around and explore outside. There are so many places on campus where we can go for a lesson. Second, the students’ desire to learn is incredible. There have been several occasions during the past year when a lesson plan got put to the side because there were just too many good questions— questions that drove the learning and made the content easier to understand for everyone in the room. Such motivation is something that you do not always see at a middle school level.

How do you plan to build upon the excitement of the robotics program you helped establish? My hope is that students who took part in the robotics club this past year come back and work on their programming and engineering skills, which are practical 21st century skills to have. A goal I have for Calvert is to create a robotics team that would compete in LEGO’s First Lego League, a competition for students in grades 3-8. If we continue to have dedicated students in the Middle School, we could celebrate a robotics team as an equal to our athletic teams. But it also takes the time commitment of an athletic team, so I’m continuing to work on how that dream can become a reality.

What are your thoughts about the new science lab? The science lab has been an excellent space to work in. The aspect of the room I love the most is the giant, curved white board. There is space for everything I could ever want to write during a class, so students never have to worry about missing something because it had to be erased. Every detail, from the tables to the storage space, lends itself to building creative projects and having an active, engaged classroom. There’s also the ant farm, which is a great addition for brain breaks.

What are your hopes for the next school year? I hope to continue building on the great science foundation that was already in place when I arrived by adding additional dynamic and exciting content. I also hope that our students keep taking risks in their investigations, because that is what science is all about.


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new faces Rosane Aviles joins Calvert as the Development Administrative Assistant. For the past seventeen years, she has owned and operated a daycare business. She also volunteered on the Home and School Association at Immaculate Heart of Mary School.

Erin Edell joins our Fifth Age team. She has been teaching for seven years, with her most recent role being first grade teacher at Forest Knolls Elementary School. Erin holds a B.A. from the University of Delaware and an M.A. in Teaching, Early Childhood Education from Towson University.

Casey Briggs joins us as a Seventh Age Boys’ Homeroom teacher. Casey is a familiar face at Calvert having worked as a substitute teacher for many years. Casey has a B.A. in Elementary Education from Guilford College and spent several years teaching both locally and at Columbia Grammar and Prep School in New York City.

Mary Katherine Green is a familiar face in the Middle School having worked as a substitute teacher and Homework Center Aide. Mary Katherine will join us as a Library Aide and has a B.A. from Loyola University Maryland.

Christine Carosotto joins the Fifth Age team as an Assistant Teacher. Christine taught third, fourth, and fifth graders at a public school in New York for the past three years. She has a B.S. from New York University and is working toward an M.S. in Educational Studies from Bank Street College.

Katie Leonard joins us as our Middle School Art Teacher. Katie has been a long-term substitute teacher in our Lower School Art classroom. She has been teaching middle school art at Severn School for the past four years and prior to that was an Environmental Art Teacher at The Island School in the Bahamas. Katie has also served in the U.S. Peace Corps and has been a member of AmeriCorps. She received her B.F.A. from the Art Institute of Chicago.

Kathryn Campbell joins us as a Tenth Age Girls’ Homeroom teacher. Kathryn has been teaching third grade at Prospect Mill Elementary School the past eight years. She has served as their Grade Level Chair and as their Green School Leader. Kathryn has a B.S. in Elementary Education and an M.S. in Mathematics Education from Towson University.

Kim Daly joins us as a Fifth Grade Boys’ homeroom teacher. Kim has taught literacy and seventh grade English and has served as a homeroom teacher at Roland Park Country School over the last 11 years. Kim has a B.A. in Economics from Drew University and an M.A. in Teaching from Johns Hopkins University.

reflections

Melissa Libertini joins us as a Ninth Age Boys’ Homeroom teacher. Melissa has been teaching Third Grade at Riverdale Country School in the Bronx for the last four years. Prior to that, Melissa was a teacher at Gilman School for two years. Melissa has a B.A. and M.A. in Teaching from Loyola University Maryland.


NEW FACES

Paul Libertini joins us as a Tenth Age Boys’ Homeroom teacher. Paul comes to us from Horace Mann School in the Bronx where he has been teaching third grade. Paul has a B.A. and M.A. in Teaching from CUNY Queens College.

Kristin Randall joins the Lower School as an Eighth Age Girls’ Homeroom Teacher. She was a Middle School Homework Center Aide last year and has been volunteering as a tutor. She has a B.A. and B.S. from Washington and Lee University and is working on her M.A. in Teaching at Johns Hopkins University.

Kathy Cole Liotta ’79 returns to Calvert as Upper School Placement Coordinator. Kathy has served as a Calvert Trustee and was a Fifth Grade Boys’ Homeroom teacher. Kathy has a B.S. from Brown University and an M.A.T. from Simmons College.

Andrew Slade joins us as a Clapp Fellow teaching Latin alongside Mr. Norton and Mr. Holmgren. Andrew recently graduated with a B.A. in Classics from Davidson College where he also worked as an Assistant Teacher.

Rachel Minnis joins Calvert as a Fifth Age Teacher’s Assistant. She has been an intern at Cockeysville Middle School and a private tutor. Rachel has a B.S. from Towson University.

Ashley Vogelsang joins us as the Director of Marketing and Communications. She comes to us from Laureate Education where she was a Marketing Manager. Ashley has a B.S. and M.S. from University of Maryland University College.

Taylor Passalacqua joins Calvert as the Director of Co-Curricular Programs, a newly formed position in which she will manage all extracurricular and community events. Last year, she was a third grade teacher at Violetville Elementary Middle School. Taylor has a B.S. in Elementary Education from Towson University.

39

NEW POSITIONS ASSUMED Kelly Whitman ’00, Fifth Grade Dean Angel Menefee, Sixth Grade Dean Craig Bennett, Seventh Grade Dean

Sapana Patel joins the Calvert staff as a General Accountant. Previously, she worked at Connections Education where she was a staff accountant. She has a B.S. in Business Administration from Bowie State University.

Neal McMahon, Eighth Grade Dean Jay Parker, Director of Student Life

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staff awards

Faculty & Staff Awards The Deborah Dorsey Albert ’44 Award Paul E. Wareheim III, Assistant Head of Lower School, received The Deborah Dorsey Albert ’44 Award. Established in 1995, this award is given annually to the faculty member who has “made an outstanding contribution to the life and mission of Calvert School.”

SERVICE RECIPIENTS 30 YEARS Gretchen Louise Catlin

25 YEARS Patrick J. Shepherd

The Apgar Award for Excellence in Instruction

20 YEARS

Mary Kaitlyn O'Conor Gentry ’97, Middle School Learning & Support Coordinator, was presented The Apgar Award for Excellence in Instruction. This award is given annually to a faculty member who “has demonstrated the ability to motivate students’ interest, curiosity, and love of learning and the willingness to propose and apply new teaching concepts of methods that expand students’ horizons and potential.”

Kevin D. Lloyd Dona R. Pinkard

The Matthew ’06 and Abigail ’10 Young Memorial Award Jay M. Parker, Middle School Science Teacher, was the recipient of The Matthew ’06 and Abigail ’10 Young Memorial Award. Established in 2008, the award is given to that member of the faculty or staff who “contributes significantly to many areas of School life, displays care and concern for all members of the Calvert community, and possesses the intangible spirit that made Matt and Abby so special.”

The Class of 2006 Staff Award Elizabeth J. Albert, Assistant Director of Child Care, received The Class of 2006 Staff Award, which was established in 2005 and is given annually to the staff member who has provided exemplary service to Calvert School.

reflections

10 YEARS Cassandra N. Brooks ’79 Megan E. DeLorbe Henry A. McClain-Bey Patricia M. Pontier Margaret G. Whitman ’69 Jennifer A. Yapsuga


alumni profile: Tait Thorne ’15

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The first couple weeks of my Seventh Age year consisted of reviewing the goals of the year and how to stay organized. To my dismay, learning script was not a part of this. It was a painstaking wait each day, wondering and asking my teacher when we started the legendary Calvert script. Ms. Edson, who was a friend of my grandparents and knew me since I was very little, would tell me, “Soon Taiter, very, very soon.” “How soon?” I inquired. “Sooner than you think.” “Yes, Ms. Edson,” I mumbled doubtfully.

The Lessons We Learn Last year, Tait Thorne ’15 was given a writing assignment in his Ninth Grade English class. His story shows how the lessons he learned at Calvert have stayed with him.

“Life Is Not Fair” by Tait Thorne ’15 I was seven years old when I had my first epiphany about life. Back then, I was in first grade which was called Seventh Age. This was my third year at Calvert School after getting past Pilot and Sixth Age. My experience thus far at Calvert had been a very positive one. I had already learned simple addition and subtraction, plus limited reading skills. To me, this made me one intelligent young man. But what I was really looking forward to learning in Seventh Age was learning how to write in Calvert script. Calvert script was something that no other school knew how to do. I liked watching my two older brothers write because of all the elegant loops and curves in every word. In my mind, having good handwriting was a sign of age and wisdom; two things I really craved. Cale and Finn had already given me some quick pointers on how to write in Calvert Script. “Lower case letters only go halfway up to the line,” Cale would say. “Don’t cross your ‘t’s and dot your ‘i’s until the end of the sentence,” Finn advised. I thought I was so grown up now that I was using the skinny Mirado Black Warrior pencils to practice with instead of the thick, unwieldy, yellow Ticonderogas that I had used in years past.

Just as Ms. Edson said, we started learning how to write in this famed script. Each day brought a new letter. After each day, I would go home and write the letter I had learned that day for my mom to see. I was so proud of my growing knowledge of script that in other classes like math or art, I would search for ways to practice my newfound skill. Yet, once we got halfway through the alphabet, I learned something more important than any script in the entire world. One day, I opened my desk to find one of my Mirado Black Warriors missing. I was flabbergasted. How could one of my favorite pencils just disappear? I instantly approached Ms. Edson, telling her of my tragedy. She then handed me a thick, yellow Ticonderoga pencil. My response was, “But this isn’t fair.” She then said to me the four words I will remember for the rest of my life. “Life is not fair.” At that moment, I was so upset that she did not just place another Black Warrior pencil in my hand. But as I look back on it today, I now know how true Ms. Edson’s words were. I still think about her lesson almost every day. Looking back on my Seventh Age year, there are two things that I will never forget, both things giving full credit to Ms. Trini Edson. The first thing she taught me is the exquisite Calvert script that I still write in today. I still feel sophisticated using it. The second is that life is not fair and will not always go your way. But complaining and feeling sorry for yourself gets you nowhere. You cannot just expect another Mirado Black Warrior right away. I live my life on the foundation that I will give my best effort in everything with whatever I have in front of me, and find a way to write the most beautiful script, even if all I have is a thick, yellow Ticonderoga. Dedicated with love to Mrs. Trini Edson Crawford, former Seventh Age Boys teacher.

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highlights alumni

01

ALUMNI BOARD OF GOVERNORS

Kieran Fox ’79

PAST PRESIDENTS

Catherine Thomas Burnett ’81

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Rachel Arnot Rockwell ’91 President

Laura Killebrew Finney ’81

2014 –2016 Brooke Wheeler Rodgers ’91

Clemmie Miller ’81 Vice President

Chase Martin ’90 George Mumford ’90 Stasia Thomas Nardangeli ’93

Lexie Rich Mills ’90 Treasurer

John Avirett ’95

Chris Davis '94 Secretary

Matt Novak ’95

MEMBERS Hill Michaels ’51

Blake Sheehan ’00

Anne Gibbs Bartlett ’75

Brian Nelson ’13

reflections

Robert Law ’95

Matt Councill ’99

Rhane Jones ’13

2012 –2014 Kieran Fox ’79 2010 –2012 Patty McCormick Klein 2008 –2010 Curtis Campbell ’83 2006 –2008 Hill Michaels ’51 2005 –2006 Susan Quarnguesser Amiot ’79 2004 –2005 Matt Wyskiel III ’81

02


HIGHLIGHTS: ALUMNI

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03

05

04

01 Mimi Gibbs Piper ’51 and Dick Gatchell ’46 look at class photos during the Remember When Luncheon.

02 The 2015 Calvert Golf Classic winning team – Michael Thompson, B.G. Groff ’95, and Ian Shure (Todd Sody not pictured).

03 Brooke Wheeler Rodgers ’91 gives her final speech as the Calvert School Alumni Board President.

04 Girls from the Class of 2012 pose for a photo at their class's Holiday Luncheon.

05 Nancy Barnes Seligson ’81, Tom Cassilly ’35, and Head Master, Andrew Holmgren at the New York Regional Event.

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HIGHLIGHTS: ALUMNI

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02

FALL & WINTER ALUMNI EVENTS OCTOBER 26

DECEMBER 10

Philadelphia Regional Event Philadelphia Museum of Art

Class of 2013 Luncheon Middle School Atrium

NOVEMBER 20

JANUARY 22

High School Alumni Event Middle School Black Box Theater

Alumni Play Date Lower School Girls’ Gymnasium

DECEMBER 1

JANUARY 31

Reeves Art Collection Tour & Discussion 2 Oak Place, Calvert School

Alumni Science & Planetarium Event Lower School Science Room

reflections

03 SAVE THE DATE FOR

Alumni Weekend MAY 11 – 13, 2017

Classes ending in 2s and 7s are in reunion years. If you’d like to help plan your class’s gathering, email alumni@calvertschoolmd.org


HIGHLIGHTS: ALUMNI

04

05

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06

01 Boys from the Class of 2012 at their Holiday Luncheon

02 Members of the Class of 2015 cheered on the Ravens at the High School Alumni Event

03 Tolly Albert ’72, Al Lietzau IV, Al Lietzau V ’99, and Charlie Albert ’72 enjoy a round of golf at Hayfields Country Club

04 Steve Pizek, Gayle Kelly, Sue Ford, and Brian Kelly

05 Chase Martin ’90 enjoying time with some alumni children and grandchildren during the first-ever Alumni Play Date

06 Lucy Michaels ’61 with Ann Clapp at the Alumni Cocktail Party

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class notes

Clarence S. “Butsy” Lovelace ’34 On June 11, 2016, Calvert’s beloved friend and alumnus, Clarence “Butsy” Lovelace ’34 passed away just short of his 95th birthday on the Fourth of July. Butsy was a lifelong supporter of Calvert, always faithfully sending in Class Notes and giving generously to the School. In 2011, Butsy created a Charitable Gift Annuity, an estate gift that benefitted him during his lifetime and now will benefit the School in perpetuity. Butsy also gave Calvert two handcrafted wooden ship models of The Ark and The Maryland Dove that are shared with the Tenth Age when they study North America in Geography. We will miss Butsy for his wonderful sense of humor and strong commitment to Calvert.

1936

Terry Lacy writes, “I just turned 90, with the usual bang up Icelandic party with emcee, speeches (praise, of course), and friends who made up a small, but really excellent soprano alto chorus. They sang, among others, a song I had written in 1942.” She continues to translate and edit various legal and medical research papers to improve both the English and the presentation.

1938

Custis Wright is 91 and enjoys playing golf. “I’m the oldest player at Austin Country Club. I have a few informal social groups, two book clubs, a Ya Ya lunch get together, British Studies at UT, and safe classes” (post college classes for retirees).

Ann Field Clark passed away on May 26, 2016 at the age of 90. At her funeral, her son, Hacky Clark ’63, closed the eulogy he delivered by reading the poem that the faculty composed about Ann when she graduated from Calvert: She can dance like Pavlova With fairy grace;

1937

Mimi Marburg Brett turned 92 in April 2016. She shares, “I no longer drive myself or do any traveling. It’s amazing how much has changed since I was 90. I still felt young back then.” Her oldest son, Ted Mudge ’57 raises race horses in the countryside of Pittsburgh, PA.

reflections

She's sweet and winsome

Terry Lacy ’38, with brother, Bob Lacy at Lake Kleifarvatn.

And fair of face. A lass so charming We hate to lose, But she's been blessed with fairy shoes. We can't hope to hold her, We'll gaze from afar And bask in her glory When she is a star. Ann is survived by two sons, a daughter, a granddaughter, and two great grandchildren, including Hudson Short, who began Fifth Age this year.

1941

Joan Folger Fey visited Baltimore and Calvert with her daughter, Jennifer, and granddaughter, Sydney (11), for her 75th Calvert School Reunion in May. Jennifer continues her freelance computer interactive game design. Roger is now Senior Team Leader with Executive Health Resources;


CLASS NOTES

47

1945

Lewellys Barker has a wife, two daughters and one son, as well as five granddaughters and one grandson. He still works, not quite full-time, at his home office. He is very active and cycles 3,000-4,000 miles per year and kayaks both white and flat water. He enjoys photography, tennis and lots of reading, especially history, thanks to Calvert.

Ellie Harvey Kelly, Patsy Fitsgerald Ross, and Joan Folger Fey celebrate their 75th Calvert School Reunion.

Sydney has added flute to her curriculum and Colin (9), has extracurricular pursuits of soccer, baseball, and computer games. Joan writes, “I still seem to be here maintaining body, soul and house.”

1942

I get the chance to speak the language. I’ve been retired from Wall Street for three years and am finally learning to enjoy the freedom that brings.” Sue Devlin Peard writes, “sight loss through age-related Macular Degeneration makes it impossible to knit or sew. I still keep up with the garden as well as possible and enjoy great conversations with Frank, who is now 96 years old and is still driving!”

George Thomsen shares that his son, Lee Thomsen ’79, became Headmaster of Sacramento Country Day School on July 1, 2016.

1943

Jay Cooper and his wife still spend at least one month every year in Germany, continuing the relationships they formed while living and working there from 2007-2010. “Despite the current unrest, we plan to do a home exchange there this year. Being there is a great gift since Submit your Class Notes to alumni@calvertschoolmd.org

1946

Vinnie Lamont Rosenthal writes, “I am in my 80’s and not in good health. Therefore, my life is rather constrained. Walking and reading bad fiction is about as good as it gets here.”

Dorothy “Dottie” Sloan Atkinson ’44 Dottie Atkinson ’44, longtime supporter and alumna, passed away on December 22, 2015. During her lifetime, Dottie was a selfless contributor, giving at the School’s highest levels annually yet seeking little attention for her gifts. The month before Dottie passed away, Calvert was notified that Dottie had chosen Calvert as one of the three beneficiaries of her estate, creating a million dollar endowment to support students and families in need of financial aid. We are incredibly grateful to Dottie for her foresight and generosity. A gift of this magnitude, devoted to helping those families who could not otherwise afford a Calvert education, will make a significant impact on the lives of Calvert children for many years to come.

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1947

Diana Russell Deacon and her partner, Jade Williams, are living happily at Pennswood Village in Newton, PA. She has not found another Calvert graduate at Pennswood Village yet, but one 95 year-old friend studied with the Home Instruction course as a child when he was in western China with his missionary parents. Emita Brady Hill had her book, Bronx Faces and Voices: Sixteen Stories of Courage and Community released last year. She has since started two other oral history projects: an oral history of ball-room dancers and an oral history of the role of women in the local sustainable food movement in Northwestern Michigan. The New York Public Library Performing Arts Division and the Traverse City Public Library will archive the audio and transcripts of each project respectively. She has seven grandchildren. Her older daughter is a nurse practitioner in oncology at Yale, and her younger daughter ran a cooking school in Provence and is now a goat cheese maker. Her son is a professor of biology at Coastal University in South Carolina. Emita Brady Hill ’47

Members of the Class of 1951 get together for their 65th Calvert School Reunion.

Kitty Cromwell continues to work quietly for World Peace. “Time is speeding up and life is slowing down – love to all of my classmates.”

1950

Pickett Randolph shared that she was diagnosed with and had treatment for colon cancer three years ago. She received good news recently from her oncologist—no more scans or colonoscopies for a year. “I celebrated with a glorious chocolate cake, but as you know, you never turn your back on cancer!”

reflections

Frank Deford spoke at an Enoch Pratt Library program on May 24, 2016. He read excerpts from his new book, I’d Know That Voice Anywhere, a compilation of some of his weekly commentaries on NPR’s Morning Edition. Crossan O’Donovan ’51, Harvey Clapp ’51, Ann Clapp; Marion Parsons DeGroff ’51 and Ralph DeGroff were there, as well as Anne Dobbin Balliere ’53. Frank charmed his audience with his dry wit and fascinating topics. Crossan O’Donovan writes, “after cutting back to one day per week almost ten years ago, I completely retired from my pediatric practice last September. The practice I began as a solo pediatrician in 1971, has grown to a staff of ten practitioners and fifteen office staff today.” Crossan and his wife Brenda live in Dundalk and enjoy the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Everyman Theater, the Orioles, and the Hippodrome.

1952

1948

Kittie Frick Beyer still lives in Washington, D.C. and has a happy life, painting and keeping up with her children, grandchildren and friends.

1951

Pickett Randolph ’50 with the saddle cloth of The Pickett Factor, a friend’s race horse.

Page Dame lives in Quebec and visited Baltimore in April to attend a mini 1952 reunion lunch organized by George Michaels ’52. Randol Barker ’52 and Marie Claire Barker, Bobby ’52 and Kitty ’57 Harrison, Ken Marty ’52 and


CLASS NOTES

Susie Marty, and Woody Woodward ’52 and Ann Woodward attended. “We want to do this again, with more advance notice, and get as many classmates as we can. Much reminiscing and all of us remembered the words to ‘We Are Going Far From Calvert.’ Prophetic words indeed.”

1953

Hobie Fowlkes is proud to have two grandsons, George ’23 and Hobbie ’23 Mumford in the Eighth Age at Calvert.

Arizona State University Law School and is active in recruiting applicants to Vanderbilt Law School. Casey married in April 2015. Chris is working at a PR start up in Dallas but is headed to Business School in fall 2016. Libby lives in New York City and is pursuing a professional modern dance career.

1958

Susan Anderson Mason lives in Charlotte, N.C. and has been married to her husband, Graham for 15 years. She and her family traveled to Baltimore this summer to celebrate their birthdays.

1955

Martie Frick Symington Sanger will release her fourth nonfiction book this fall – Maryland Blood: An American Family in War and Peace, the Hambleions 1657 to the Present. She shares that she loves opera, antiquing, and movies, but “particularly I love my place overlooking the Western Run Valley and my old English Mastiffs.” Van Wolf, Jr. is still practicing environmental law, but at a reduced load. He is also an adjunct professor of Environmental Law at

recovering from a recent surgery. Through her treatment, she has remained herself. She enjoys taking two cruises per year – her last one from Sydney to Hong Kong. She knits, reads, and loves seeing and playing with her five grandchildren ages 8-18. She writes, “I still credit Calvert for a life-long love of learning and language. No better foundation for a well-rounded life.”

1964

Anne Peterson Conolly recently retired. Her first present to herself was a month of skiing in Colorado. “It’s wonderful to be outside every day and not checking work e-mails. I am not sure what the future holds, but am excited to get started.”

1969

Jim Garrett is happy to be serving as a new Calvert Trustee and to be able to watch from a closer perspective as his granddaughter, Anne Garrett Randolph ’23, goes through the ranks as a lower schooler.

1956

49

John Waters ’58, Liz Banta ’08, and Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Jim Stradtner.

1960

Dede deMuth Acer is moving in a new direction with real estate, focusing on neighborhoods and housing with an interest in vacant lots, blight, and derelict properties. She lives in Pittsburgh with her husband, Ken who has started his own company doing sales and marketing for growing companies. Their son, Will (23) is headed to Columbia University for an MFA in Creative Writing. Jasper (19) is a sophomore at Penn State. He is studying abroad in Barcelona and majoring in Vertebrate Physiology.

Gill Deford shares that “despite my age of 68, I have a 16 year old son, who is a sophomore in high school. Interesting experience because he’s a great guy!”

John Tompkins enjoys singing and playing guitar at church, babysitting his granddaughter, Caroline, and traveling to visit his children.

Elizabeth McCleary Primrose-Smith has been battling ovarian cancer since 2014 and is

Margie Garland Whitman is excited about a 50th Calvert School reunion in 2019—

Submit your Class Notes to alumni@calvertschoolmd.org

Fall 2016


50

class notes

classmates, please start planning now to be back at Calvert in May 2019. It is her tenth year as the Calvert nurse, and she still enjoys running, tennis, golf, hiking, reading, and traveling. “My 3 kids are all well. I have two Denison graduates and one sophomore there now. My daughter is moving to Colorado after teaching Spanish in New York City at a school just like Calvert, but all boys.” Jeannie Merrick Maddux ’72 with her family.

1970

Lisa Hopkins Wheeler shares, “while teaching French at Calvert in the early 80s, I met and married Mark Wheeler ’65. We moved a bit up and down the East Coast following his medical career, then to Paris in 2002. What was supposed to be a one year sabbatical became six.” They have been in New York since then and are planning to spend 2016-2017 in the village of Rochefort en Terre in Brittany.

1972

Jeannie Merrick Maddux is still living in the house she grew up in, so she has not gone too far. She shares, “I had a great sail this spring with my husband, Tom and two of my sons, Robby and Austin. My oldest son, Alex, is a school teacher in Louisville, KY. I hope all the girls in class of 1972 are doing well.”

1974

Bill Atkins published a book on the relatively new Patent Trial and Appeal Board, which operates out of the United States Patent and Trademark Office. It will be updated quarterly and reprinted annually.

reflections

1975

Elizabeth Swarm Cook loves running and has done seven marathons and twenty half marathons. She is also an avid gardener.

1979

Lee Thomsen became the new Head of School at Sacramento Country Day School in California on July 1, 2016. He writes, “much like Mr. Kirk did for us, the Head greets kids as they arrive in the carpool line.”

1981

Greg Bimestefer is living in the Denver area and works for DCB Construction Company. Jack Buchanan lives in Jackson, Wyoming where he has been for the past 20+ years. Jack is an accomplished mountain climber and is very skilled with a canoe and kayak. David Clapp lives in Baltimore with his wife, daughter, and son. David enjoys working

with his father in their family businesses. He also enjoys golfing, playing fantasy football, and socializing with many members of 1981. He and Matt Wyskiel ’81 enjoy playing paddle tennis with Richard Gatchell ’77, husband of Catherine Nes Gatchell ’81. Their team has won the inter club “A” division championship two of the past three years. David is Chairman of the Board of Sisters Circle, a Baltimore non profit organization that mentors and helps girls in middle school, high school, and college. Sandy Colhoun and his wife and daughter are moving to Maine since Sandy has accepted a new job with Colby College; his alma mater. Until recently, Sandy was the Director of Development at the New Hampton School in New Hampton, NH. Sackett Cook lives in Old Greenwich, CT with his wife, daughter and son. He works for Cramer Rosenthal McGlynn, a stock market investing firm in New York City. Sackett is a research analyst focusing on international equities. Sackett and his family enjoy occasional visits to Baltimore where he tries to see Calvert and Gilman classmates. Mark Cooper, his wife, and their three sons live in Scottsboro, Alabama where Mark works as a doctor. Mark runs his own family practice, which is so popular that it has as many families as he can handle. He enjoys occasional visits to Baltimore to see family and friends. Liam Culman lives in New York City; he enjoys being a father to his daughter, Ellie.


The Class of 1981 celebrates their 35th Calvert School Reunion.

Liam is the managing partner of Bigelow Sands LLC, which is involved in the art world, and he stays active playing squash. Liam is in close touch with Calvert classmates Matt Wyskiel ’81 and David Clapp ’81, and Liam enjoys seeing Clark Wight ’81 when Clark visits Nantucket most summers.

Andrew Meredith lives in Baltimore’s Ruxton neighborhood with his wife, Anne, and two boys. His older son, Michael ’20 is now in Fifth Grade at Calvert and his younger son, Matthew, is at Boys Latin. Andrew works with his dad at Merrill Lynch in Baltimore, and enjoys watching his boys play soccer and lacrosse.

Joby Gardner lives in the Chicago area and is a professor at DePaul University, teaching curriculum studies.

Brent Powell and his wife and two daughters and son live in Hopkinton, NH. Brent is head of the Upper School at the Derryfield School in Manchester, NH. Brent occasionally visits Baltimore to see family members, and he and Matt Wyskiel ’81 enjoy being in touch and getting together.

Doug Godine, his wife, two sons, and daughter live in Greenspring Valley. Doug enjoys coaching his children and others in lacrosse and basketball, and he is a partner in the Private Client Group at Brown Advisory in Baltimore. Eric Harlan lives in Baltimore with his wife and children; he is a partner at the Baltimore law firm of Shapiro, Sher, Guinot & Sandler. D. B. Hebb III lives in Pawtucket, Rhode Island with his wife and two sons (ages 18 and 16). He is working as a general practitioner in Coventry, RI which is about twenty minutes south of Providence. D. B. is in touch with Joby Gardner ’81, Sandy Colhoun’81, Mark Cooper ’81, and Bruce Taylor ’81. Alex Hoehn Saric is currently a senior vice president of Government Relations with Charter Communications in Bethesda, Maryland.

William Spencer is enjoying living on the Gulf Coast of Florida with his family. He also visits Baltimore to see his parents and sister. Bruce Taylor is Managing Director & CEO of Stanford Ignite at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. He is in charge of Stanford Ignite, the flagship global program of Stanford Graduate School of Business that teaches entrepreneurship and management to innovators who are interested in starting new ventures or are entrepreneurs within established companies. Rusty Ward and his wife and their children live in the house that Rusty and brother, Pete ’81, grew up in in Greenspring Valley. Rusty works for Harbor Investment

Submit your Class Notes to alumni@calvertschoolmd.org

Advisory as an investment advisor and is an accomplished golfer. Pete Ward and wife Lea Craig Ward ’80 and their two young boys live next door to Rusty ’81. Pete works for Ward Bolland Associates. Pete enjoys helping his sons in lacrosse. Clark Wight and his wife, two daughters, and his son are living near Perth, Australia. During several recent summers, Calvert classmates, Liam Culman ’81 and Matt Wyskiel ’81, have enjoyed seeing Clark on Nantucket when their schedules line up accordingly. In the past year, Clark did a long fundraising bike ride across Western Australia. Stocky Williams and his wife, son, and daughter live on Q Street in Washington, D.C. Stocky is the Executive Director of the Urban Land Institute Terwilliger Center for Housing. Matt Wyskiel lives just around the corner from Calvert with his wife, daughter and son. Matt is founder and owner of Skill Capital Management, an investment management firm that he started eight years ago. In addition to spending time with his children and wife, Matt enjoys helping local high school student athletes, especially football players, graduate and go to college. Matt is on the Calvert School Board of Trustees as well as the Children’s Scholarship Fund Baltimore and Next One Up. Fall 2016


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class notes

1989

Charles Lancaster, his wife, and two kids live in Washington D.C. He recently graduated from Georgetown University with an MBA. He is building office spaces for innovation and tech organizations in downtown D.C. and works for a private equity real estate fund. The Class of 1991 smile for a photo at their 25th Reunion.

1992

Evan Scott is currently a professor of Biomedical Engineering at Northwestern University teaching and doing research. “My research focuses on the application of nanomaterials for diverse immunotherapies and vaccine design. My funding currently comes from the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Health, and the American Heart Association, allowing my laboratory to function with four PhD students and four post-doctoral researchers.” His hobbies include traveling, running, reading, and cooking.

1996

Ru Belt shares, “I got engaged to my beautiful fiancé, Christina Forbes, a fellow actor and writer/producer and it was featured on Good Morning America!!”

Chris Ranier graduated from the University of Miami’s Frost School of Music and is a working music composer, producer, and sound engineer in Los Angeles. He is currently working with world renowned choreographers as a music composer for a dance company in addition to playing with various artists. He also writes and records for everything from film to music libraries.

B. G. Groff has been married to his wife, Laurie, for six years and they had a baby, Hailey James Groff, on January 16, 2016. He enjoys traveling for pleasure and does so often.

reflections

Lauren Aglubat Cox shares, “I’m the lucky mother to my one-year-old daughter, Charlotte. I wish we lived back in Maryland so she could attend Calvert and learn all of the wonderful school traditions that I still remember today.”

2000

1995

Alex Thomas lives in Marina del Ray, CA with her dog, Zeus and her fiancé, Max. She is senior counsel at Conifer Health Solutions and travels east to visit family and work in her Annapolis office. “My Calvert classmate, Julia Bainbridge ’95 will be part of my wedding party. We are truly life-long friends!”

1997

Ru Belt ’96 with fiancé, Christina Forbes.


2005

Annie Thomas has taken a new job after working as Katie Couric’s assistant for two years both at ABC and Yahoo. She is now an Associate Producer at Huffington Post.

2006

Andrew Koch graduated magna cum laude from Furman University in 2014 with a bachelor’s degree in music, organ performance. While at Furman, he was inducted into the Pi Kappa Lambda music honor society as well as Phi Beta Kappa. He now holds a master’s degree in sacred music from the University of Notre Dame and will pursue a doctorate in organ performance at the University of Washington. Evan Warnock returned last September from the Bristol Fellowship at Hamilton College. Through his awarded grant, he was able to travel to Finland, Japan, India and Uganda to research the development of changes in primary school architecture and spatial design. He will be entering back into the classroom with Teach For America in Boston.

2007

Ellen Meny now works as a reporter for KVAL News in Eugene, OR. She also hosts KVAL’s weekly food show, Tasty Tuesday. She shares that “every day is an adventure in the life of a broadcast reporter. I do it all—from breaking news to community events. I hop in a news car, film the story, interview people, and then rush back to the station to edit my story before appearing live on KVAL

Members of the Class of 2012 who volunteered at Calvert in the spring of 2016.

to present the story. It’s a hectic life, but an absolutely exciting one. My writing plays a large part in my job, and I have Calvert to thank for that.”

2008

Shannon Adams is currently at a summer research program at Boston’s Children’s Hospital in the Division of Newborn Medicine. She will be starting a pre-med postbaccalaureate program at Goucher College this fall. Josie George plays on the Women’s Lacrosse team at John Hopkins University and is also studying economics. She is Vice President of the Student Athlete Advisory Committee and a part-time tutor.

2009

Dwayne Peterkin is currently a senior at Wake Forest University where he is a member of Chi Psi Fraternity. He is active in several student organizations. During the past few years, he was a member of the Wake Forest spirit program as a cheerleader and is now a news and digital media intern for the University. Over the summer, he studied in Spain for five

Submit your Class Notes to alumni@calvertschoolmd.org

weeks. Dwayne is a communications major and entrepreneurship minor. Hobbies are dancing, martial arts, and cooking.

2010

Hannah Noyes attends Cornell University and is a member of the varsity Women’s Polo team.

2011

Winslow Gunning was the Coxswain on the Men’s Crew team at St. Lawrence University. Todd Iodice made Dean’s List with Distinction at Duke University for his fresh

2012

Andrew Brennan graduated with an honors diploma, and during his time at Boys’ Latin, he received the following accolades: Williams Scholar, National Honor Society, Randolph Macon Book Award, Excellence in Spanish Award, Curtis Carroll Davis ’34 English Award, Fall 2016


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class notes

State Merit Scholastic Certificate, and the Julian and Carolyn Smith Alumni Cup award. He also was Captain of the varsity soccer team and received the Jack Williams Cup for Sportsmanship. Andrew was also very active as a Senior Class Officer, Senior Prefect, Senior Retreat Leader, and as the Cystic Fibrosis Club Co-President. Isabel Cooke was Co-President of Friends’ Upper School and had a lead in the spring production of Oklahoma! This summer, she coached swimming at Swan Lake Swim Club and traveled with her family to Israel. Bridget Danko won Bryn Mawr’s Anne Pugh Award for Athletics and was Bryn Mawr’s nominee for the McCormick Unsung Hero Award. Tommy Diehl graduated from Gilman School, where he won the Alfred H. Weems, Jr. Memorial Track Award, the Indoor Track Award, and a Faculty Award. Unique Eaton is attending Messiah College in the fall on a full scholarship. Mitchie Ford graduated from Gilman School where he won the Squash Award. Elizabeth Gallo’s painting Fishers of Men received honorable mention at the Baltimore County Arts Guild showcase and will be the cover of the Garrison Forest Alumni Magazine. She also received the Margaret Webster Easter English Prize and the French Award at Garrison. Anna McGinnis won the Scholar Athlete Award at Bryn Mawr for maintaining honor roll while playing on at least two varsity sports teams. Gus Meny won several awards this year at Gilman. He was awarded the Cameron Debating Medallion, the Dr. John M. T. Finney, Sr. Debating Prize, the Sixth Form Speaking Prize, as well as a Faculty Award. reflections

Elizabeth Gallo ’12 award winning-artwork.

Madison Williams ’12

Matthew Moore graduated from Baltimore School for the Arts as a Vocal Arts Major. He is attending The University of the Arts in Philadelphia, PA with a concentration in Jazz Vocal Performance. He is cultivating his talents as a singer/songwriter, and his goal is at UArts is to become a singer/songwriter/music producer.

Barrett Sutley was named to the First Team All-Metro Boys’ Lacrosse, First Team All-MIAA Boys’ Lacrosse, and won the Unsung Hero Award of his McDonogh Lacrosse team for the 2016 season.

Jackson Morrill was named the Baltimore Sun’s Boys’ Lacrosse Player of the Year, made First Team All-Metro Boys’ Lacrosse, First Team All-MIAA Boys’ Lacrosse, and was named an Under Armour All-American. Tyler Pantle won the C. David Harris, Jr. Tennis Award at Gilman.

Jacob Warfield was nominated as St. Paul’s entry for the Cum Laude Society Paper contest, having the best senior capstone paper. The paper was on teacher student relationships in literature, particularly comparing the relationships in Narcissus and Goldmund by Hermann Hesse and A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines. He was also a National Merit Scholarship Finalist, National Cum Laude Society, and a State of Maryland Merit Scholastic Award.


Elena Benassi ’13 with classmates from Notre Dame Preparatory School on a service trip

2013

Elena Benassi traveled to a small town of Pigandi, Panama with a group of her classmates from Notre Dame Preparatory School in the spring. They built a court that will be used for many purposes in the community. Last year, she also traveled to Nicaragua and helped to run a soccer camp. “Service has really become an intrinsic part of my life. Opportunities to help people are opportunities to grow, opportunities for adventure. Those seven days I spent with the Panamanians saw the greatest adventure of my life. I communicated in a language I have yet to master, I saw the power of a simple court and the joy and togetherness it brings to a community. I lived as simply as I ever have, and I didn't find myself missing my phone or the luxuries of life in Baltimore. It was an adventure that I’ll never forget, and I look forward to many adventures in service to come.” Clayton Hebert won the Harvard Book Prize and the James L. Sinclair Memorial Scholarship Prize in Math and Science at Gilman.

Madison Moore is a senior at Friends School of Baltimore. She has been an active student volunteer at the National Aquarium in Baltimore for three years. Her goal is to become a marine biologist. In her junior year, she was inducted into the National Latin Honor Society, Friends Honor Roll (all years), and has received a Trustees Merit Award for her senior year. Brian Nelson and Matt Tomaselli ’13 were members of the winning debate team, Areopagus. Their team won the Mrs. J. Crossan Cooper Debating Cup at Gilman. Wade Oursler won the Tyler Campbell Lacrosse Cup at Gilman. Geary Stonesifer is currently attending boarding school in Switzerland and spent the winter term in Gstaad snow skiing. He also plays rugby in the fall and spring. He is a member of the Student Board at Rosey and writes for the school newspaper. He and his friends spend their weekends in Geneva.

out hundreds of applicants for a spot in the District Attorney’s Justice Academy (DAJA). This is a program for 26 high school juniors who are interested in the field of law and social justice. During the spring semester, the DAJA students met twice monthly to participate in highly engaging and thought provoking seminars led by legal experts. They then were placed in a paid internship over the summer. At the conclusion of the program, the students present a persuasive oral argument. This Academy teaches teens about the many facets of the justice system while encouraging critical thought and civic engagement. Matt Tomaselli won several awards this year at Gilman. He was a member of the winning debate team—Aeropagus, and they won the Mrs. J. Crossan Cooper Debating Cup. He also received the Brown University Alumni Book Award and the University of Virginia Jefferson Book Award. Cole Zaharris was inducted into the Cum Laude Society at St. Paul’s School for Girls.

Zac Sydow currently lives in the San Francisco Bay Area of California. He beat

Submit your Class Notes to alumni@calvertschoolmd.org

Fall 2016


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class notes

2014

Kendall Kurlander is currently a McDonogh junior. Last fall, she helped create the “Play Nice” project that honored the 100th game between McDonogh and Gilman’s football teams. She was captain of the field hockey team and played lacrosse as well. Kendall is a student tour leader for perspective families. Mac Webster was awarded the Franklin W. Andrews, Jr. Golf Trophy at Gilman. Crinny Woloson is currently a student at McDonogh School. She plays field hockey, lacrosse, and squash. Her brother, Dodge ’16 goes to Gilman and Oscar ’19 attends Calvert.

2015

Carter Stonesifer is currently attending boarding school in Switzerland and spending the winter term in Gstaad snow skiing.

Class of 2014 girls who attend Roland Park Country School holding up class rings during the Ring Day Ceremony for sophomores.

Wynter Tracey played center on the JV Basketball team at Phillips Exeter Academy, as well as a crew member on the Novice team. She also won a Spanish Award. She writes, “I really enjoy Exeter and have met a lot of amazing people.” Margaux Trexler volunteers at the Baltimore Station; helps families with disabled children through the organization REST Day; writes for The Week, McDonogh’s newspaper; and swims at Mariner Swim Club.

FORMER FACULTY Ms. Victoria T. Strand had her first picture book published in spring 2016. What's for Dinner, Mom? is offered on Amazon. Mrs. Maxine Thompson enjoys spending time with her nine grandchildren and traveling.

Olivia Verbic is involved in many community service activities at McDonogh School. She started a club with a friend where they visit the Baltimore Station downtown and plan fun activities with the veterans. She is also very involved in athletics playing tennis, squash and lacrosse.

IN MEMORIAM The following Calvert School alumni passed away between July 1, 2015 and July 31, 2016. We continue to remember them in our hearts. Mrs. Dorothy Sloan Atkinson ’40 Mrs. Grace Thomsen Babcock ’45 Mr. Thomas H.G. Bailliere, Jr. ’51 Mrs. Jennifer Cook Casner ’77 Mrs. Ann Field Clark ’38 Mr. P. McEvoy Cromwell ’43 Mrs. Marianna Daly Edmunds ’30

reflections

Dr. Anne Gordon Keidel ’56 Mrs. Melissa Temsook Knott ’94 Mr. Norris Lankford ’48 Mr. Clarence S. Lovelace ’34 Mr. Samuel McLanahan III ’53 Mr. Edward Murray ’33 Dr. Sifford Pearre, Jr. ’46

Ms. Priscilla Randolph ’40 Mrs. Joanne Winkenwerder Rienhoff ’50 Mrs. Harriet Rich Sheehy ’36 Mrs. Juliana Clark Watts ’34 Mr. John Weikart ’32 Mr. E. Randolph Wootton, Jr. ’54


Facing the World

MAGAZINE STAFF EDITORIAL STAFF

Chiara Peacock

Assistant Director of Development

Grace Rochfort

Communications Coordinator

Andrew Rutledge

Development Database Manager

Carly Slagel

Coordinator of Alumni & Parent Relations

CONTRIBUTORS

PHOTOGRAPHY

Stephanie Coldren Eric Cowell Shara Khon Duncan Justine Forrester

Larry Canner Photography

Academic Dean

Vince Lupo, Direction One, Inc.

Nicole Webster

Kerry Johnston Andrew Holmgren Alex Sloane Peggy Szczerbicki COPY EDITING

Fern Hill DESIGN

FatCat Studios, Inc.

Pamela Ossmus

Grace Rochfort

Director of Admission

Carly Slagel

Joseph McGraw

Whitney Wasson Photography

Director of Finance & Operations

Denise Fiorucci

Director of Human Resources

ADMINISTRATION Andrew Holmgren Head Master

Elizabeth Martin

Head of Lower School

Matthew Buck ’87

Craig Luntz

Director of Technology

Calvert students face the world head on. The skills they learn and the poise and self-assurance they gain at Calvert makes this possible. In order to prepare our students to be leaders, not only at our School, but in our community and in the world beyond, we need support for The Calvert Fund. Your gift will help our students learn to achieve great things, meet their goals, and become tomorrow’s leaders. This year’s Calvert Fund campaign began on July 1, 2016. To make a gift, please visit www.calvertschoolmd.org/give

Head of Middle School

reflections

Fall 2016


105 Tuscany Road, Baltimore, MD 21210

PHOTOGRAPH BY BRENDAN SHELLEY ’16

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Profile for Calvert School

Reflections 2016  

Reflections 2016