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CALIFORNIA HOMES

THE MAGAZINE OF ARCHITECTURE THE ARTS & DISTINCTIVE DESIGN

LA Style

Practical Beauty SAN FRANCISCO

fresh Design MARTYN LAWRENCE BULLARD LAUREN EVANS MITCHELL HOLLANDER SHIRLEY ROBINSON STUDIO VARA

DISPLAY UNTIL MARCH 5, 2018

Palm Springs MIDCENTURY


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Contents 66 PRACTICAL BEAUTY

Designer Shirley Robinson Rebuilds A Home In Pacific Heights Text by Kendra Boutell Photography by Brad Knipstein 76 A CERTAIN POINT OF VIEW A Modernist Mindset Is Etched In Stone On A

Hillside Overlooking Sunset Boulevard Text by Candace Ord Manroe Photography by Lisa Romerein

86 DESERT DECADENCE

With A Rock And Roll Edge, Designer Martyn Lawrence Bullard Reimagines A Palm Springs Midcentury Gem Text by Dawn Moore Photography by Tim Street-Porter

94 THE GREAT WALL

Studio Vara of San Francisco Creates A Contemporary Home Text by Kavita Daswani

Photography by Matthew Millman

102 TUDOR STYLE REVISED

Lauren Evans Interiors Transforms A Dark

Tudor Into A Light, Airy And Chic Family Home Text by Kavita Daswani

Photography by Ryan Garvin

Features JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018

ABOVE In the dining room of a Hillsborough home art advisor, Tm O’Connor selected the Raimonds Staprans blue painting. The playful hand-blown globes of a Bocci fixture add a splash of color over a custom walnut table with a durable Corian top, equally suitable for family dinners or Lego projects, with a custom credenza fabricated by GO Build Studio. See story beginning on page 94. Photograph by Matthew Millman. UPPER RIGHT The living room of the Mitchell Hollander home in Los Angeles looks over the city. Painting on the right wall is “Leap of Faith” by Paul Ecke. The large scale of the living room’s tufted single-piece U-shape sofa required a crane to hoist it into the room, while the white suede sofa’s tassled pillows are covered in a hand painted Scalamandre fabric. See story beginning on page 76. Photograph by Lisa Romerein. LOWER RIGHT In the Pacific Heights living room designed by Shirley Robinson, Suzanne McClelland’s vibrant painting Action Figure: Julian Assange Head Only $60, leaps from the wall. The house melds contemporary art with classic mid-century furnishings. See story beginning on page 66. Photograph by Brad Knipstein.

16 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

WWW.CALHOMESMAGAZINE.COM


Contents

32

110

40

Departments JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 32 CALENDAR California Museums And Galleries BY CATHY MALY

37 NOTEBOOK 37 Visionary | Michael Smith 40 Showroom | Porcelanosa & Knoll 44 Product | Modern Round Up 48 Cloth & Paper | Lux Silk & Mohair

50 INDUSTRY PROFILE

50 18 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

Sky Frame: The Art of Glass

BY CAREY WILLIAMS

52 DESIGNER PROFILE

Intimate Luxury Interiors

BY KATHY BRYANT

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BEVIN BLACH

56 INDUSTRY PROFILE

Albertini Italian Windows

BY KAVITA DAWSANI

PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMIT GERON

58 BOOKS Palm Springs: A Modernist Paradise

PHOTOGRAPHS/TEXT BY

TIM STREET-PORTER

REVIEWED BY KATHY BRYANT

62 EVENTS & AFFAIRS

Exciting And Prestigious Events Throughout The State

BY CATHY MALY

110 TRAVEL

Designer Martyn Lawrence Bullard’s Exotic Twist On Hotel Californian

BY DAWN MOORE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DOUGLAS

FRIEDMAN


101 Henry Adams Street No. 270 • San Francisco CA 94103 415.863.7183 • dunkirksf.com


Editor’s Letter

2017 was certainly a year of too much of everything for California. Great amounts of rain, floods, then months of drought and finally the fires. But with the new year comes a fresh start and we’re ready to celebrate. Designers, architects and builders are busy rebuilding homes lost in the fires and we anticipate another prosperous and exciting time for our state. You may notice that we have two different covers for this issue: one for Southern California and one for Northern California. This isn’t something we will do each issue, but we could not decide on the Jan/Feb 2018 cover so we chose two of our favorites, including designer Mitchell Hollander’s own home in Los Angeles and a San Francisco Pacific Heights home designed by Shirley Robinson. The homes featured in our first issue for 2018 highlight fresh new designers and architects. However, we could not do an issue for the Palm Springs Modernism Show and Sale without a stunning house in the desert by iconic designer, Martyn Lawrence Bullard. Here’s to a new year filled with health, happiness and prosperity. We thank you our readers for your continued support . Susan McFadden Editor in Chief

Contributors

LISA ROMEREIN Los Angeles-based photographer, Lisa Romerein, specializes in architecture, interiors, food, product, and lifestyle. Some of her clients include: Monique Lhuillier, Giannetti Home, Rose Tarlow, House Beautiful, Veranda, Architectural Digest, Rizzoli, Martha Stewart Living, Sunset, Dwell, Luxe, HGTV, Better Homes & Gardens, Coastal Living. Lisa was the principal photographer for Diane Keatons new book, “The House That Pinterest Built”, and is now collaborating on books with Ferguson and Shamamian Architects, Giannetti Home and the exterior designer, Scott Shrader. See Lisa’s photography featured on the cover story beginning on page 76.

DAWN MOORE Dawn Moore is a writer, designer and marketing consultant who escaped corporate retail to live in a pre-fab of her own design atop California’s bohemian Topanga Canyon. A native Angeleno raised by film industry parents, her firm Moore About… offers consulting to the design and luxury retail industries. She has been published in California Homes, C Magazine, Santa Barbara Magazine, Palms Springs Life and Distinction Magazine at the LA Times and can be spotted careening around town in her 1959 Corvette. See Dawn’s Midcentury Palm Springs story beginning on page 86 and her travel story beginning on page 110.

KENDRA BOUTELL Kendra Boutell recently joined Coupar Communications writing PR and marketing content for interior designers, architects, builders and luxury lifestyle retailers. In addition to being Editor at Large for California Homes Magazine, she contributes to other publications including San Francisco’s Nob Hill Gazette and the international BRIDGE FOR DESIGN. See Kendra’s story on a Pacific Heights home beginning on page 66.

20 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


Letters

What a spectacular issue. Finally a pub that knows how to be dramatically impactful with the opening ad spread portfolio. Graphically the magazine is so appealing. It is chock full of great information, the classiest gift guide and an edit well that made me dream of living in California. Your team certainly pulled it out in this issue. Gregory W. Sweeney Chicago, IL

I picked up my last issue at a newsstand off Pico near Fox Studios. You produce such a lovely magazine. Dick Mason Redondo Beach, CA

I thought your article on Marc Appleton’s own home in Santa Barbara beautiful. What a great layout on one of our most important architects. Jonathan Logan San Francisco, CA

Really liked the Nov/Dec 2017 issue. Just purchased it at Whole Foods in Mill Valley. The Marc Appleton story is superb. Dori Stevens

interior design

home furnishings online

w w w.c a b a n a h o m e .c o m

in-store santa barbara

Mill Valley, CA

JAN/FEB 2018 | 21


CALIFORNIA HOMES

THE MAGAZINE OF ARCHITECTURE THE MAGAZINE OF ARCHITECTURE THE ARTS & DISTINCTIVE DESIGN THE ARTS & DISTINCTIVE DESIGN

JANUARY/FE RUA 201 87 NOVE MBE R/ DBEC E MRY BER 201

PUBLISHER PUBLISHER

ART DIRECTOR ART DIRECTOR

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Heidi Gerpheide Gerpheide Heidi Susan McFadden Susan McFadden

Megan Keough Keough Megan EDITOR-AT-LARGE Kendra KendraBoutell Boutell EDITOR-AT-LARGE ART EDITOR ART EDITOR

KathyBryant Bryant Kathy

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Kavita Daswani Kristen Castillo Candace Manroe KavitaOrd Daswani Dawn Moore Vanessa Kogevinas Carey DawnWilliams Moore

Caroline Ryder CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Carrie Storke Williams

Bevin Blach

Douglas Friedman CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Ryan Garvin Jim Brady Amit Geron Kilho Park Photography

Knipstein Ryan Brad Garvin Photography Matthew Manolo Millman Langis Romerien DavidLisa Duncan Livingston TimMatt Street-Porter Walla

A ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER SSOCIATE PUBLISHER Linda LindaMcCall McCall ORANGE COUNTY/SAN DIEGO ORANGE COUNTY/SAN DIEGO DIRECTOR OF SALES Kimberely KimberelyVeley Veley DIRECTOR OF SALES NORTHERN CALIFORNIA NORTHERN CALIFORNIA SENIOR ACCOUNT SENIOR ACCOUNT

MarleneLocke Locke Marlene

REPRESENTATIVE REPRESENTATIVE

NEWSSTAND CONSULTANT NEWSSTAND CONSULTANT JOHN PONOMAREV, CLEAR CHOICE CONSULTING JOHN PONOMAREV, CLEAR CHOICE CONSULTING

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

Cathy Maly Maly Cathy EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING OFFICES EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING OFFICES

949.640.1484 949.640.1484 SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION

California Homes HomesMagazine Magazine California PO Box Box 15056 15056 PO N. Hollywood, Hollywood,CA CA91615-5056 91615-5056 N. MCHcs@magserv.com MCHcs@magserv.com 818.286.3103 818.286.3103

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VOLUME 21 22 · ·NUMBER NUMBER 51 VOLUME


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COMING 2018 52 RESIDENCES 1, 2 & 3 BEDROOMS CONDOS & TOWNHOMES 869 – 1,945 SQ FT

Prices, terms, promotions, features, options, floor plans, elevations, designs, specifications, square footages, and descriptions are subject to change without notice. Prices shown refer to the standard house and the plan and do not include any optional features, upgrades or lot premiums. Square footages are approximate and may vary in construction and depending on the standard measurement used. EHOF II Redondo Beach, LLC (“Owner”) reserves the right to make changes to its home plan and the project design and layout. Any information such as but not limited to community or neighborhood benefits, features, descriptions, open spaces, and school information are not guaranteed, are subject to change or modification at any time. Owner does not guarantee that any specific level of energy utility costs or savings will be achieved or maintained. All renderings and floor plans are an artists’ conceptual drawings and will vary from the actual plans and homes as built. Home images, colors and sizes are approximate for illustration purposes only and may not represent the standard homes in the community. Images show model homes displaying options/upgrades and upgraded landscaping which may be available at predetermined stages of construction for additional charges. Models also display many decorator items and furniture which are not available for purchase. Visit the community or speak to our representative for additional important disclosures for the community and the home. Images do not reflect any racial preference. Maps may not be to scale. Equal Housing Opportunity. Information sources: http://www.visitredondo.com/ and http://thewaterfrontredondo.com/. Offered via Terra Nova Professionals CA BRE 01142554.


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Calendar MUSEUMS & GALLERIES THE J. PAUL GETTY MUSEUM, LOS ANGELES

Golden Kingdoms, a major international loan exhibition featuring more than 300 masterpieces, traces the development of luxury arts in the Americas from about 1000 BC to the arrival of Europeans in the early sixteenth century. Recent investigation into the historical, cultural, social, and political conditions under which such works were produced and circulated has led to new ways of thinking about materials, luxury, and the visual arts from a global perspective. The exhibition has been co-organized by the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Getty Research Institute, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This exhibition is part of Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, a far reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles, taking place through January 2018 at more than 70 cultural institutions across Southern California. Pacific Standard Time is an initiative of the Getty.

MONTEREY MUSEUM OF ART

For more information please call 310.440.7330 or visit www.getty.edu.

Unknown Burial Mask, 525-550 Moche Copper, gold, gilt copper, shell, stone 7 x 8 x 4 inches Museo de Sitio Chan Chan, Ministerio de Cultura del Perú Accession No. EX.2017.2.224

Watercolor has been used by California artists since before the turn of the 20th century, when many first began to live and work on the Monterey Peninsula. Early California artists such as William Ritschel and Percy Grey were trained in the traditional European watercolor technique of creating highly detailed pencil sketches and meticulously filling them in with color. In this space you will find examples of the early European style, the later California School of watercolor, and more recent works depicting cities, beaches, and vast landscapes.

LEFT

Veronica De Jesus George Kuchar, 2011 Mixed media on paper 10 15/16 x 13 5/8 inches FAR LEFT

Veronica De Jesus Michael Jackson, 2009 Color pens on paper 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches

For more information please call 831.372.5477 or visit www.montereyart.org. ABOVE

George Booth Post Old Captain’s House, 300 Pennsylvania, SF, Watercolor on paper FAR LEFT

Esther Bruton, Untitled (Landscape) Watercolor on paper 16.5 x 19 inches

BERKELEY ART MUSEUM

A series of 239 drawings by the contemporary artist Veronica De Jesus, who has deep roots in the Bay Area, receives its first comprehensive presentation at the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA). Created between 2004 and 2016, the Memorial Drawings series commemorates the lives of artists, writers, and other notable individuals— including both internationally prominent figures and local community members in the Bay Area, where De Jesus lived prior to her move to Los Angeles in 2016. The latest installment in BAMPFA’s MATRIX Program—which introduces Bay Area audiences to exceptional voices in contemporary art—Veronica De Jesus / MATRIX 268 is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition, and will be on view at the Berkeley Art Museum through February 26, 2018. For more information please call 510.642.0808 or visit www.bampfa.org.

32 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


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MOSAICS

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Calendar | MUSEUMS & GALLERIES LEFT

Greg Miller Hero Acrylic Paint, Collage on Panel 85.5 x 86.5 inches BELOW

Greg Miller. American Woman Acrylic Paint, Collage, Flag on Panel 74 x 52 inches

ALTMAN SIEGEL – SAN FRANCISCO Liam Everett presents Fais semblant qu’on n’est pas ici, a solo exhibition of new paintings and sculpture which will include a raised floor similar to the artist’s recent installation at SFMOMA. Building on investigations explored in his 2017 SECA Art Award, Everett will present a new body of work that unfolds interrelated systems and interpretations of support. Fais semblant qu’on n’est pas ici, which translates to pretend we are not here, continues along these investigative threads; the physical act of supporting a painting, the routine practices an artist undertakes daily, as well as pedagogical rituals shaped through rehearsal. The exhibition is on display until March 3, 2018. Altman Siegel is located at 1150 225th Street, San Francisco, CA 94107. For more information please call 415.576.9300 or visit www.altmansiegel.com. LEFT

JOANNE ARTMAN GALLERY –LAGUNA BEACH

JoAnne Artman Gallery, presents: Deconstructing Allusion II: Featuring Greg Miller now through January 28th, 2018. The passage of time as well as the impermanence and transitory nature of collective memory are both felt in the work of Greg Miller, who constructs as well as deconstructs our perception of social history through the ephemera of the golden age of the print media. JoAnne Artman Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of recent work in which Miller layers and reconstructs this imagery of mid-century American consciousness in clever, incongruous juxtapositions that are a life-like, contemporary approach to Pop.

Untitled (On the corner), 2017 Oil, acrylic, ink, alcohol, salt on linen 78 x 56 inches BELOW LEFT

Stephen Maffin With Determination Fresco on burlap 24 x 24 inches BELOW RIGHT

Stephen Maffin Shadow of a Doubt Fresco on burlap 24 x 24 inches

The JoAnne Artman Gallery is located at 326 N Coast Hwy, Laguna Beach, CA 92651. For more information please call 949.510.5481 or visit www.joanneartmangallery.com.

SUE GREENWOOD FINE ART – LAGUNA BEACH

Sue Greenwood Fine Art is please to announce a collection of works by exceptional artists. This exhibition will run from January 17 through February 26, 2018 and will be a group show of five artists: Lucy Gaylord, Cathy Rose, Tyson Grumm, Marianne Kolb and Stephen Maffin. The opening reception will take place at the gallery on Thursday, February 1st. Sue Greenwood Fine Art Gallery is located at 330 North Coast Highway, Laguna Beach. For more information please call 949.494.0669 or visit www.suegreenwoodfineart.com.

34 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


My Montage Memory.

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B E V E R LY H I L L S

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Notebook VISIONARY

|

WHAT’S NEW SHOWROOMS

MICHAEL S. SMITH IS A CALIFORNIA NATIVE

who has become globally recognized and an admired voice in the design industry. Distinguished by a deep respect for tradition filtered through a modern lens, the Michael S. Smith ethos is more of a perspective than a definable style. Michael brings together many talents and elements, often choosing top collaborators, calling on his discerning eye, curatorial knowledge and multicultural sensibility to weave a harmonious whole for each environment or collection.

|

PRODUCT

|

CLOTH & PAPER

California Native

Michael S. Smith has become a Globe Trotting Ambassador of Style who is still a California boy at heart JAN/FEB 2018 | 37


Notebook | VISIONARY CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT TO RIGHT Maplton Four Poster Bed. Bangalore Floral by Jasper Fabrics. The Widespread Sink Faucet Town Hall Collection. Michael S Smith for Kallista. Michael S. Smith for Kallista Town Hall Collection

In his interior projects—residences, hotels and commercial spaces—Michael takes an individual approach to each, listening intently to the requirements of each individual client, understanding how rooms will be lived in and used, incorporating colors, texture, objects and works of art, then crafting a holistic design that meets these goals. Michael thinks of each project as a story, a story he and his clients will tell together. It’s an organic process that’s always unique. He takes a similar path in designing the Jasper Collection of furniture, fabrics, leathers, wallcoverings and accessories, letting the designs develop naturally. Michael’s inspiration is the past, informed by the present. This ability to seamlessly blend the historic and the modern is his particular gift, and results in lines designed to enhance and enlighten many types of environments. He takes the same approach when designing for other brands. In addition to presenting the full Jasper Collection, the Jasper Showroom also offers an array of distinctive lines by artisans from around the world. Smith has created an environment where one can shop for every room in a house in an easy, elegant way. Showcasing Michael’s favorite designs by others, the available collections are all part of the Michael S. Smith vocabulary and reflect his signature use of traditional forms and 38 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

international accents, each piece carefully curated by Michael and defined by its own creative integrity. While Michael Smith’s design work is ever evolving, there are overarching concepts that unify the collections and colleagues within the Michael S. Smith Inc family. An artful amalgam of the historic and the modern. A reverence for objects, motifs and craftsmanship of the past. A recognition that the most sophisticated design solution is often the simplest. A belief that beautiful, elegant, and luxurious objects can exist in environments of warmth and comfort. These qualities are reflected in every object that bears the Michael S. Smith name. CH www.michaelsmithinc.com


LissĂŠ

Available through your architect or designer at Laguna Design Center 23811 Aliso Creek Road, Suite 155, Laguna Niguel 92677 www.customhardware.net


Notebook | WHAT’S NEW SHOWROOMS

PORCELANOSA

Global Tile, Bath, Hardwood and Kitchen Emporium Introduces Two New Locations

PORCELANOSA has recently opened two new showrooms located in San Diego and Walnut Creek. With a luxurious selection of tile, bath, hardwood and kitchen collections the showrooms display full vignette installations and feature detailed product libraries that contain samples of all of their products. Visit either showroom to meet with their talented design consultants and bring your project to life.

40 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

PORCELANOSA SAN DIEGO

8996 Miramar Road, Suite 100, San Diego, CA 92126 858.322.6012, www.porcelanosa-usa.com

PORCELANOSA WALNUT CREEK

1401 N. Broadway Walnut Creek, CA 94596 952.952.7430, www.porcelanosa-usa.com


Notebook | WHAT’S NEW SHOWROOMS

KNOLL HOME DESIGN SHOP

Connecting Los Angeles Design Enthusiast with Modern Legacy DESIGNED BY LOS ANGELES-BASED architectural firm Johnston Marklee, the new 4000 square foot space captures the modern spirit of Knoll, focusing on creative lifestyle inspiration for Los Angeles natives and its international audience. “Los Angeles interior designers set the benchmark for modern with a special passion for stunning materials and finishes,” noted Knoll design director, Benjamin Pardo. It will offer the full selection of Knoll designs, including new collections and introductions from designers such as David Adjaye, Mark Krusin, and David Rockwell, as well as classics from Eero Saarinen, Florence Knoll, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and Harry Bertoia. Unique customization options include thousands of high-end finishes, KnollTextiles fabrics and Spinneybeck leathers for residential and home office applications. CH

314 North Robertson Boulevard, Los Angeles, www.knoll.com

42 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


PRIVATE SILICON VALLE Y ESTATE

307 Olive Hill Lane, Woodside Offered at $10,995,000 | www.307OliveHill.com

Hugh Cornish 650.566.5353 hcornish@cbnorcal.com License# 00912143

Erika Demma 650.740.2970 edemma@cbnorcal.com License# 01230766


Notebook | PRODUCT MAGNI COLLECTION

The Penta chair and sofa highlight a delicate rose gold plated base. The cleanly upholstered form accentuates the supple curves of this contemporary take on a mid-century concept. The Eclipse coffee table features dark oil rubbed bronze exterior with a satin bronze interior. Handcrafted in Southern California. www.magnihomecollection. com Available through showrooms: San Francisco | De Sousa Hughes, www.desousahughes.com, Los Angeles & Orange County | Thomas Lavin, www.thomaslavin.com

DESIGN

ESSENTIALS

Statement pieces to use as a starting point for your next design project BUBBLE SOFA

Designed by Sacha Lakic for Roche Bobois the entirely padded sofa was inspired by the designers love for luxury cars and motorbikes. www.roche-bobois.com

SANTORI

The essential cocktail table from Mitchell Gold works well with modern or traditional themes. www.mitchellgold.com 44 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


60 YEARS OF ADVENTURE AND DISCOVERY


Notebook | PRODUCT

PALOS DRESSER

Designed by Michael Berman for Theodore Alexander in walnut veneer, bronze finish mouldings and steel base shagreen embossed leather drawers with spruce finish brass handles. Available at Loggia in San Francisco, 101 Henry Adams Street, No. 430, 415.863.2101, www.loggiashowroom.com

COLTON SOFA

A Mitchell Gold sofa in blood orange velvet is a great design starting point for a room. www.mitchellgold.com

LIFT SIDEBOARD & BAR

Designed by Sacha Lakic for Roche Bobois with a sexy electric opening with lifting system to reveal the interior bar storage will bring out your inner Bond. www.roche-bobois.com

TRACK SIDEBOARD

A statement piece from Roche Bobois designed by Luigi Gorgoni has two aligned doors in thick oak veneer with a grooved and stained finish. www.roche-bobois.com

46 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


Paul Ecke Fractal 12 2

mixed media on panel 48” x 48” x 3.75” 931 Calle Negocio, Suite M • San Clemente, CA 92673 • 9 4 9 . 3 9 5 . 83 6 4 paulecke.com


Notebook | CLOTH & PAPER

1

2

ROMANCE REVISITED

3

4

Traditional printing techniques and archival discoveries produced with a firm foot in the present make these fabric selections adaptable to a wide range of interiors.

1. VENEZIA

A new collection from the boutique Los Angeles showroom that specializes in artisanal textiles and trims. Janet Yonaty, www.janetyonaty.com, 8642 Melrose Avenue, West Hollywood

2. DUSK GARLAND

Depicting a blooming garland this romantic fabric was constructed using traditional warp printing. Jim Thompson, www.jimthomponfabrics.com

3. MAJORELLE

Inspired by French furniture designer Louis Marjorelle, this pattern has been skillfully reworked from a turn of the century archive. Jim Thompson, www.jimthomponfabrics.com

4. FLORIENTAL

Old world elegance using 18th century damasks and warp printing techniques. Jim Thompson, www.jimthomponfabrics.com Jim Thompson Fabrics are available through the following showrooms: San Francisco | Shears & Window 101 Henry Adams Street No. 452 Los Angeles | Kneedler-Fauchere 8687 Melrose Avenue No. 8600 48 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


F E B RUA RY 16 - 19 , 2 018 PA L M S P R I N G S C O N V E N T I O N C E N T E R

85 Premier national and international decorative and fine arts dealers presenting all design movements of the 20th century F E B R U A R Y 16 | P R E V I E W G A L A Friday Benefiting Modernism Week $85 in advance

| 6–9 pm

| $100 at the door | Tickets at modernismweek.com

F E B R U A R Y 17 - 19 | S H O W & S A L E Saturday

| 10 am–6 pm

Sunday

| 10 am–5 pm

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Sculptural and monolithic, this residence integrates into the Viennese landscape, offering an outstanding view from the upper floor dressing area. Architecture by Project 101. BELOW A downtown Manhattan penthouse frames the skyline in full floor-to-ceiling panes utilizing Sky-Frame’s frameless sliding doors with only slightly more than a 3/4 inch profile view. Architecture by UNStudio.

PHOTOGRAPH BY BRIGIDA GONZALEZ

Industry Profile

THE ART OF GLASS

Poetry in Motion from Switzerland to Culver City THE BEAUTY OF A GLASS HOUSE

is in its 360 degree unobstructed views, and seamless blending with the natural elements. It’s always been an architectural marvel, and a benchmark of purist modernism. Much like an iconic Larry Bell sculpture, it’s a sublime minimal statement that glorifies pure geometric form. When Philip Johnson designed the famous Glass House in New Caanan, CT in 1949, he stunned the architectural world, and created questions about maintenance, insulation, durability, breakability, security–and of course, privacy. It was a landmark moment in architecture, and remains so, to this day. Today, glass has truly become a 50 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

singular art form. It’s not the same product it once was: Sky-Frame, a Switzerland company whose U.S. branch is in Culver City, is creating state-of-the-art aluminum sliding glass door systems that can be motorized and contain a self-cleaning track that disappears quietly into the pockets of the home. The glass material is so advanced that it’s nearly impossible to discern that there is any sort of barrier protecting the resident from the great outdoors. A view, not a window, is their motto, as there is hardly a trace of hardware in sight. According to Beat Guhl, CEO and founder of Sky-Frame, “I have always been fascinated by the challenge offulfilling ‘impossible’ customer

PHOTOGRAPH BY IWAN BAAN

BY CAREY WILLIAMS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY SKY-FRAME


ABOVE Two stories of triple-glazed Sky-Frame 3 windows overlook the pool at this Rome villa, designed by Italian architect Roberta Giordano Sorisi. LEFT The new SkyFrame Pivot is a large-scale glass door with an axis that opens with a gentle push.

wishes. With Sky-Frame, ‘a view, not a window’ is an apt description in keeping with the concept of free-flowing space championed by Le Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe, which is the ideal context for our products. Instead of inserting a window into a wall, the whole wall becomes a window.” It seems many of the cutting-edge architects around the world, including Sir Norman Foster, Steven Ehrlich, Hagy Belzberg and Shubin Donaldson are looking for the perfect ‘view’ for their clients and have incorporated Sky-Frame glass into their residential and commercial projects for its sophisticated technology and versatility, including highly curved and angular glass doors, and the new Pivot door. CH www.sky-frame.com JAN/FEB 2018 | 51


Designer Profile

A glimpse of ILI’s extensive resource and finish library at their studio. OPPOSITE TOP This is the central part of the studio where things happen when the design team discusses their upcoming creative projects. OPPOSITE BOTTOM Kari Arendsen, Founder and Principal Designer of Intimate Living Interiors.

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PAST PRESENT

Kari Arendsen, Principal Designer of Intimate Living Interiors, is inspired by her families’ past achievements to create 21st century environments BY KATHY BRYANT | PHOTOGRAPHY BY BREVIN BLACH

“WHEN I DESIGN A HOUSE I try to give the clients an increased quality of life and well-being,” says Kari Arendsen, founder and principal designer of Intimate Living Interiors (ILI) in Solana Beach. “Our environment affects us; think of the difference between sitting in traffic and lounging near a mountain stream.” This idea of creating homes that increase the well-being of the owners is critical to her designs. Whether it’s a monochromatic design or one brimming with color, Arendsen never loses sight of the fact that the home must be comfortable and have a security that’s grounded in the clients’ lifestyle. “Our clients are drawn to our look, which is clean and coastal,” she says. And drawn they are since Arendsen and her team, including Tory Peterson and JAN/FEB 2018 | 53


Designer Profile

The lounge part of Little ILI where more collaborations take place. ABOVE

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Katie Hock, are working on four ground-up projects and one extensive remodel in Rancho Santa Fe. Besides those, there are a house in Montana and Central America. Working directly with architects, Arendsen and her team of artisans and trade people extract information on a personal level about the clients. “We make changes based on that,” she continues. “Sometimes it might be the view out the window or the art collection, among other considerations.” Arendsen attributes her love for layered design to her upbringing. Her father is a third-generation builder, her mother an artist, her-late grandmother part of the NASA team that put a man on the moon and her grandfather was a civil engineer who developed Temecula.. “I grew up with rich textiles, furnishings and antiques,” she

remembers. “Design is in my genes. It goes deep and wide. I don’t go in and out of trends,”she says. ILI’s latest venture is Little ILI, an expansion of her design studio of 12 years. Little ILI is a by-appointment retail space within her studio where clients can relax with coffee and a juice bar while browsing through curated items that Arendsen and her crew have acquired on their travels. “It’s a good place to get inspired,” she says. “A portion of the profits go to charitable programs for children.” When asked to describe her design aesthetic, Arendsen doesn’t hesitate. “We blend the reclaimed with the refined; the unexpected with the essential.” A perfect summation. CH www.intimatelivinginteriors.com


THE 54TH ANNUAL PASADENA SHOWCASE HOUSE OF DESIGN HOUSE & GARDEN TOUR

APRIL 22 - MAY 20, 2018

the 50th annual pasadena showcase HOURS OF ENTRY house of Sunday, design Saturday, Tuesday through Thursday

10:00 am – 4:00 pm (Property closes promptly at 6:00 pm)

Friday

house & garden 10:00 am – 9:00 pm tour (Property closes promptly at 9:00 pm)

- May 11, April 13 Mondays Closed 2014 TICKET PRICES Prime Time Tickets: Pasadena Showcase House for the Arts is a California 501(c)3 corporation. $40 online or by phone $45 at the House Regular Tickets: $35 online or by phone $40 at the House

Don’t miss our shops, restaurant, bar and complimentary garden tour! To Order Tickets visit www.pasadenashowcase.org or call 714.442.3872 $5 off with Promo CodeJAN/FEB CALHOMES 2018 | 55


Industry Profile ARCHITECTURE BY PERI DAVIDOVICH ARCHITECTS

ALBERTINI ITALIAN WINDOWS

This Company Has Been Helping to Create Beautiful Homes for Sixty-Three Years BY KAVITA DASWANI | PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMIT GERON

AS EUROPE WAS RECOVERING from the devastation of the second

World War, an Italian craftsman named Francesco Albertini recognized the demand for building materials as his country was in the throes of reconstruction. So in 1954, Albertini opened a small workshop on the periphery of Verona where he hand-crafted windows, doors and sliding systems. Gradually, builders from outside Verona were visiting Albertini’s shop, stocking up on his carefully constructed pieces for their homes.

56 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

Sixty-three years on, there has been almost no deviation from Albertini’s core vision. What has shifted, however, is the company’s world view. “That has changed dramatically,” said Marco Albertini, third generation scion of the company. “It used to be a small shop in a little town for the local market. But in the 1990’s, with the reconstruction in Germany after the Berlin Wall came down, my father expanded our manufacturing and exporting outside Italy.”


ARCHITECTURE BY PITSOU KEDEM

“That’s where we differentiate from our competitors,” Albertini said. “We are limited only by your imagination.”

ARCHITECTURE BY SADE DAGAN

Marco Albertini is CEO at AlbertiniIWD, LLC in Orange County, the US-based arm of the company his grandfather founded, and recalls that the brand’s first US project was in 1996 - a home in Pebble Beach Working across the pond, he says, has had its own set of requirements. In the US, said Albertini, “people demand a much higher level of customer service. “And they expect that even after the delivery of the product, with requirements for maintenance and upkeep.” Albertini and his team have more than risen to the challenge. The brand’s windows and doors (they specialize in sliding doors) grace some of the most gracious and impressive homes across the Californian landscape. Architects and builders gravitate towards the brand for what Albertini describes as its signature “classic Italian look”: traditional bronze clad frames, streamlined windows, dramatic dimensions. In one house, recalls Albertini, the doors were 21-feet tall. Their much anticipated steel line launches in January, a dramatic option for modern and minimalist styles. His team works directly with architects to realize their vision for the house, with as much detail paid to doors and windows as to any other element. “That’s where we differentiate from our competitors,” he said. “In a way, we are helping to create homes for the clients directly.” CH www.italianwindows.com JAN/FEB 2018 | 57


Books REVIEWED BY KATHY BRYANT | PHOTOGRAPHY BY TIM STREET-PORTER

Palm Springs: A Modernist Paradise

Photographs and text by Tim Street-Porter Foreword by Trina Turk For those in love with mid-century modern architecture and its fabled houses in Palm Springs, this is the book for you. Tim Street-Porter has captured the allure of the city as a modernist destination in his inimitable style that makes this world come alive. Street-Porter, one of the world’s most celebrated architecture and design photographers, has been photographing the 58 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

architecture gems of Southern California since he arrived here from his native Britain in the late 1970s. He has authored six books as both a writer and a photographer, with this Palm Springs’ book being his latest. With the San Jacinto Mountains as a backdrop, these featured modernist homes, some first constructed in the 1930s, are a testimony to all the famous and not-so-famous people who have lived here. Luckily many of the city’s modernist homes have recently been restored. The book profiles some amazing homes like the Annenberg Estate, the Cody Glass House, the Ford House, Sunnylands and the Kaufmann House. Works by important interior designers such as Martyn Lawrence Bullard, T.H. Robsjohn Gibbings, Darren Brown and fashion designer Trina Turk, who also wrote the foreword to the book, are highlighted. Turk’s maritime-inspired home, The Ship of the Desert, is one of the photographed houses. Palm Springs: A Modernist Paradise richly documents these historic houses so cleverly that the reader is ready to have a quick swim and martini in one of these houses, if not actually, but, at least, in spirit. Palm Springs: A Modernist Paradise Photographs and text by Tim Street-Porter Foreword by Trina Turk 224 pages; 250 color photographs Hardcover: US $75; Canada $100 ISBN: 978-0-8478-6187-3 Rizzoli New York


Cody Glass house. ABOVE Davis house. LEFT Kaufmann house. OPPOSITE

JAN/FEB 2018 | 59


Calendar | MUSEUMS & GALLERIES LEFT

John James Audubon The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America Philadelphia, 1845-1848 hand colored lithographs

SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY–JOHN AND PEGGY MAXIUMS GALLERY

THE BROAD MUSEUM– LOS ANGELES

Artist Jasper Johns (b. 1930), who rose to prominence with his paintings of flags, targets and other familiar objects, will be the sole subject of a special exhibition at The Broad in early 2018. Johns’ 60-­ year career of work will be presented in the most comprehensive survey in the U.S. in two decades. Jasper Johns: Something Resembling Truth is the first major survey of the artist’s work to be shown in Los Angeles, and will be on view at The Broad Feb. 10, 2018 through May 13, 2018. A collaboration with the Royal Academy, London, Jasper Johns: Something Resembling Truth will feature more than 100 of the artist’s most iconic and significant paintings, sculptures, prints and drawings, many never before exhibited in Los Angeles.

Wild Things Audubon’s North American Mammals now open through June 4, 2018 at the John and Peggy Maxiums Gallery. The artist and naturalist, John James Audubon, famous for his work on the birds of America produced the outstanding work on North American mammals in the 9th century. While America’s animals were discovered over a period of time going back to the 1600’s, they were not described and illustrated in one publication until Audubon and his co-author, the Reverend John Bachman published the Imperial Folio of quadrupeds. At the time, information was scarce and much of western America was still poorly known. The project proved challenging partly because of the nocturnal habits of many mammals. Ultimately, 150 hand-colored lithographs were printed and published between 1845 and 1848. These beautiful and rare prints are will be on display in the Maximus Gallery. For more information please call 805.682.4711 or visit www.sbnature.org LEFT

Marie Thibeault Ark, 2017 Oil on canvas 78 x 72 inches

For more information, please 213.232.6200 call or visit www.thebroad.org. ABOVE

Jasper Johns Summer, 1985 Encaustic on canvas. 74 x 50 inches LEFT

Jasper Johns Target, 1961 Encaustic and collage on canvas 65 x 65 inches

PASADENA MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA ART

The Feminine Sublime presents large-scale works by five Los Angeles-based female painters: Merion Estes, Yvette Gellis, Virginia Katz, Constance Mallinson, and Marie Thibeault. The artists upend traditional ideas of the sublime—a theme historically used by male painters to represent the domination of man’s reason over nature and the “other”—with new feminist and environmentalist perspectives, using challenging aesthetics, formal inventiveness, and provocative imagery to forge a new understanding of the rapidly changing environment as well as the sublime. The Feminine Sublime is on view until June 3, 2018. For more information please call 626.568.3665 or visit www.pmcaonline.org.

60 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


Premiering During Modernism Week 2018

Presented by the producers of the Palm Springs Modernism Show & Sale

40 exhibitors showcasing cutting-edge modern design and technology Dynamic, energy efficient building materials Cutting-edge appliances and electronics Smart home technology and security Hand-crafted furniture Design accessories Contemporary art and photography Tastings by GE Monogram in its stunning state-of-the-art kitchen filled with cutting edge new cooking technology

February 16-19, 2018 Palm Springs Convention Center Saturday 10 am–6 pm Sunday 10 am–5 pm Monday 10 am–4 pm

presenting sponsor

DOLPHIN PROMOTIONS

Preview Gala Friday 6–9 pm Benefiting Modernism Week $85 in advance | $100 at the door Tickets at modernismweek.com

One Ticket, Two Shows $20 weekend admission includes Palm Springs Modernism Show & Sale Tickets at psmoderndesign.com or at the door

sponsors

CHICAGO | 708.366.2710

FLORIDA | 954.202.1955

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Events & Affairs WESTWEEK 2018 PDC’s annual Spring Market is the West Coast’s showcase for global design. Each March, WESTWEEK debuts an array of luxury furnishings and interior resources crafted by today’s foremost design innovators. The two-day event, on Wednesday, March 21 and Thursday, March 22, features keynote programs, product introductions and showroom happenings, complemented by presentations from the nation’s leading shelter publications, editors and tastemakers. WESTWEEK attracts 3,000+ trade professionals from across the West and around the globe. This year’s theme, DESIGN IS GLOBAL, should provide a compelling, dynamic and multi-faceted platform opportunity from which to build a variety of concepts and potential participants. For more information please 310.657.0800 call or visit www.pacificdesigncenter.com.

Modernism Week – Palm Springs Modernism Week announced today that it has added many exciting new events to its schedule. The 11-day event in the Palm Springs area of Southern California will take place February 15-25, 2018, and will highlight midcentury modern architecture, art, interior and landscape design, and vintage culture. The newly added events include a panel and home tour produced by Atomic Ranch magazine, a tour of the rarely-seen Raymond Loewy House, a fashion show, tours of the first-ever Modernism Week Showcase Home, a Palm Desert home tour, film screenings, talks, tours and many other events. All events are open to the public and tickets are now on sale at modernismweek.com. For more information please visit modernismweek.com.

The Seventh Annual North San Diego County Adobe Home Tour Attendees on the Seventh Annual North County Adobe Home Tour, occurring on Sunday, March 18, 2018 from 10:30 AM to 4 PM will visit five semi-rural Escondido homes that celebrate not only the beauty of their surroundings, but also the master builders who made North San Diego County a haven of mid-century adobe homes. This year’s tour proudly highlights the architectural contributions of several builders: Forrest Holly; Hyrum Arrowsmith in collaboration with Don M. Burton; George Patterson; Weir Bros. Construction Co.; and Robert Weir (brother of Jack and Larry). All shared a passion for the challenges, historic place and beauty of adobe homes. For more information please visit www.adobehometour.com.

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DESIGN IMPACTS LIFE Hire an ASID Orange County Designer to Change Yours

Schedule a one-on-one consultation with one of ASID OC Designers during our Designer For Hire chapter fundraiser for the special rate of only $75/hour for a 2 hour maximum. CALIFORNIA ORANGE COUNTY ASID is a not for profit organization

www.caoc.asid.org/designer-for-hire For Registration Details


The Ultimate Celebration of Midcentury Architecture, Design and Culture Palm Springs, California

February 15-25, 2018

Supporting Preservation, Education, and Neighborhoods.

Tickets and information

modernismweek.com Major

Grand

Premier

2018 sponsors as of November 27, 2017. Photos by Jake Holt Photography, Lance Gerber and David A. Lee. Modernism Week is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization.

Media


FEATURES JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018

CH


Practical Beauty DESIGNER SHIRLEY ROBINSON REBUILDS A HOME IN PACIFIC HEIGHTS TEXT BY KENDRA BOUTELL PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRAD KNIPSTEIN

Robinson commissioned master metal worker Wyatt Ellison to fabricate her custom staircase banister for the entry. She selected Stark Carpet for the classic stair runner.

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In the living room, a Nepalese silk carpet from the Robinson Finishes rug collection grounds the space. To bring light and reflection into the room the ceiling was finished with a polished Italian veneered plaster.

JAN/FEB 2018 | 67


For the kitchen, Robinson sourced the Estremoz Rosa marble from Da Vinci Marble. A pair of Waterworks’ Marlon ceiling mounted pendants with sculptural glass shades affords task lighting.

OPPOSITE

"Comfort to my mind is as much visually as physically determined.” – VAL ARNOLD

I

N T E R I O R D E S I GNE R SH I R L E Y

learned at the feet of a master. As a child in San Francisco, she sat beneath the piano listening to the late Val Arnold advise her mother on their home’s interior. Arnold, one of the most influential California designers of the seventies and eighties, crafted spaces that were both glamorous and comfortable. A recent project in Pacific Heights by his one-time protégée, Robinson, reflects this fusion of beauty and practicality. Originally built in 1910, the house required a complete gut and rebuild. Robinson utilized both her design firm Robinson Interiors Group and her decorative arts company Robinson Finishes to accomplish the massive endeavor. She collaborated with DomA Architects and general contractors Thompson Suskind LP. for the architecture and construction of the shingle style five-story residence. From the excavated basement to the added penthouse, Robinson painted the rooms in shades of cream. Entering the foyer, a lyrical curved staircase with metal railing greets visitors. Nestled against the wall an elliptically shaped dresser by Dutch furniture maker Patrick Schols echoes the curvilinear form of the stairs.

68 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

R O B I NS O N

The ground floor living room features panoramic views of the Marina, San Francisco Bay, and the Golden Gate Bridge. Robinson centered the conversation group on a contemporary mantel fabricated from Calacatta Vagli marble. A large mid-century crescent sofa by Harvey Propper anchors the space juxtaposed by a pair of Milo Baughman chrome T-Back Cube lounge chairs. For a coffee table, Robinson installed a trio of Brazilian Jacaranda and laminate tables from the sixties. German sculptor Julian Voss-Andreae’s stainless steel, “Female Sentinel” stands guard over the room. In the dining room, the designer paired two modern classics, a vintage Robsjohn-Gibbings walnut dining table with Tommi Parzinger’s upholstered T-Back dining chairs. A two-tiered chandelier of hand-rolled metal rings and veiled glass bricks illuminates the area. Robinson surmounted the faux bois finished mantel with minimalist artist Robert Mangold’s 1994 color aquatint, “Curved Plane/Figure.” On the perpendicular wall, New York artist James Casebere’s interpretation of suburbia, “Landscape with Houses” contrasts with the sophistication of an elegant bar cart. Upstairs from the public spaces, the master suite enjoys the same iconic San Francisco views as the ground floor. To frame the changeable sea and skyscapes, Robinson designed a custom ombrè drapery fabric. A dramatic Rococo styled upholstered bed rests on a muted overdyed rug from Tony Kitz Gallery. The room like the rest of the home is both glamorous and comfortable. Robinson’s mentor Arnold once said, “Comfort to my mind is as much visually as physically determined.” CH


JAN/FEB 2018 | 69


BELOW LEFT In a hallway, Robinson installed a Hepplewhite-style mahogany bow-front sideboard. She contrasted this with Richard Diebenkorn’s 1988 monotype image from Berggruen Gallery. BELOW LEFT For the exterior, the designer specified Alaska Yellow Cedar shingle siding accented with custom white trim paint. BELOW RIGHT The powder room highlights one of Robinson Finishes hand painted wallpapers. The sepia toned toile depicts iconic San Francisco landmarks.


JAN/FEB 2018 | 71


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ABOVE The house showcases contemporary art. Robinson worked with art consultant Laura Smith Sweeney to acquire pieces like James Casebere’s “Landscape with Houses” in the dining room. OPPOSITE A minimalist mantel from Okell’s Fireplace with faux-bois treatment by Robinson Finishes centers the dining room. The flanking windows feature natural hand woven shades from Conrad.

JAN/FEB 2018 | 73


In the master bath, white marble acts as the backdrop for Kohler’s under-mount oval sink. Pendant light fixture, towels and tabouret are from Anthem. In a corner of the master bedroom Sergio Rodrigues’ mid-century lounge chair from Almond & Co. provides occasional seating. A stacked faceted crystal table lamp from Epoca adds a touch of glamour.

OPPOSITE


JAN/FEB 2018 | 75


A CERTAIN POINT OF VIEW

A MODERNIST MINDSET IS ETCHED IN STONE ON A HILLSIDE OVERLOOKING SUNSET BOULEVARD TEXT BY CANDACE ORD MANROE PHOTOGRAPHY BY LISA ROMERIEN

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Mitch Hollander designed the modern architecture and interior of his and partner Michael Mooney’s Los Angeles home around their art collection. Swivel metal grates dramatize the approach to the sleek glass front door. The sculpture, “Abundance,” by June Burton stands sentinel outside. The view inside is Jill Daniels’ “Predestined.”


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Transition from the media room’s quiet gray suede walls to the patio dining area is softened by the outdoor wall’s Sunbrella fabric that mimicks stone.

LEFT

The large (17x14) scale of the living room’s tufted single-piece U-shape sofa required a crane to hoist it into the room. The white suede sofa’s tassled pillows are covered in a handpainted Scalamandre fabric. A French door (c. late1800s) that actually opens hangs above the understated cleanlined fireplace that looks into the entry on the other side. A glasswall bridge above the room maximizes light and views.

OPPOSITE

A

T 1 0 , 0 0 0 S Q UA R E F E E T,

the crisp-lined brushed and chiseled limestone home of Mitch Hollander and Michael Mooney is a monumental testament to one man’s vision. With a business degree from Berkeley and a mind-blowing, seemingly impossible void of design credentials, Mitch designed not only the architecture—a 4-story (including rooftop terrace) exploration of natural light and teasing axial views—but also the interior design, which he built entirely around the couple’s art collection. He designed all of the custom furnishings including U-shaped seamless sofas (“I don’t like sectionals, but I like their horseshoe shape”) of such a scale that a crane was required to hoist them into place. He even designed the landscape, both soft and hard.

“Because this project took so long and I put so much of myself into it, I can’t imagine ever giving up the house,” says Mitch, who has designed other homes for the couple, as well as a few for friends. But this one is special—and its creation, especially painstaking. Obtaining a building permit from the City of Los Angeles was a plodding process that stretched to a year and a half. Before it was razed, a much smaller house (only 1,900 square feet) had occupied the site since 1958. City engineers required some convincing that a new home more than five times that size was even feasible for the property. Once the go-ahead was obtained, pressure was intense to make the site stable. “It took a full year just to grade the lot—40 caissons, 30-feet deep, were required,” recalls Mitch. Construction on the house itself entailed another four years. Even a cursory glance clarifies why: Features include a glass elevator, black column “spider leg” exterior accents that jut out from the limestone and drop to the ground, and a four-story floating staircase that crests at the rooftop terrace. Art—both


sculptures, canvases, and objets d’art—are purposefully niched for optimal effect. From the entry hall, the view is a 30-foot stone wall commanded by two vertically mounted paintings (only one is pictured); down a 40-foot hallway, the eye is delighted by an egg sculpture at one end and an African wedding cape mounted on a manniquin at the other. “I wanted there to be a ‘wow’ factor every time you turn a corner or look straight ahead.” And so it goes, with no space overlooked or deemed unworthy for art appreciation. On the master patio, three fired-ceramic dresses by a Park City artist Mitch discovered on a ski trip dangle from a stone overhang. “I wanted them to suggest dresses hanging from a clothesline,” he explains. “I didn’t want it to be too serious.” He even extended herculean effort to positioning an object from antiquity in the below-ground guest apartment, where a carved stone sculpture from

Bali now stands serenely after being deposited in situ via crane. To optimize the lot size, Mitch dug down for the subterranean guest apartment. “I’m really big on bringing in natural light,” he notes, “ so the solution for the underground quarters was to add a huge window [that looks into the deep blue water of ] the infinity pool outside.” The moody, watery view introduces an ethereal quality that’s the antithesis of a typical basement room. The dramatic pool window also brightens the gym. “When you’re downstairs, you really don’t know you are underground,” Mitch says. He designed the tucked-away apartment with the couple’s children and grandchildren in mind. “Between us, we have three children and six grandchildren. I wanted them to have a sense of privacy and escape when they visit.” At the other vertical extreme, the rooftop terrace—in effect, the fourth floor—“feels like you’re in a treehouse. Because we’re in the glen, we have


BELOW

The kitchen’s 19-foot island incorporates the breakfast table. Hollander placed a white leather bench beneath the island for the idea of a waterfall.

OPPOSITE A firepit warms another single-piece U-shape sofa in the main patio. The wood sculpture is crafted from an African tree; Hollander altered its look by changing it from a vertical to horizontal mounting.

trees all over—green foliage on both sides.” Capturing that natural atmosphere was the essence of Mitch’s design concept. “I conceived this house, built into a granite hillside, as an extension of the natural topography. In my mind, it’s a bridge that extends to the infinity pool and the ocean beyond.” To maximize the location’s rustic beauty, he utilized massive window walls that dissolve the boundary between indoors and out. The rocky hillside topography in the dining room is presented like art within the windows’ black-stained frames. A 20-foot-long Murano glass fixture in the shape of a square bisects the view. “The fixture is unexpected because it’s not horizontal—it doesn’t span the length of the 14-foot glass table.” The elongated fixture looks as good from above as it does from below. “I wanted something that would look equally good when you’re peering down from the bridge that’s above the dining and living rooms,” Mitch explains. He discovered the style of the fixture on a trip to Venice, and artisans worked

with him to create it in multiple squares. Installation took two weeks—and scaffolding. Michael, a management consultant who was executive vice president and chief financial officer for EMI Records’ North American operations for 14 years and senior vice president for Allegan Pharmaceuticals for 12 years before that, had no problem extending Mitch design carte blanche. “We’ve been together long enough that I know any misgivings I might have about any of his [design] decisions will be proven wrong,” he laughs. Mitch can’t really explain how, with no formal training, he conceives his designs. “In my mind, I see it, and I draw it.” He credits some of his gift to his early exposure growing up amid the beautifully designed homes of multigenerations of California family. “And I was lucky to have had a contractor who never said no!” CH NOV/DEC 2017 | 81


Dan Corbin’s “View Point” commands interest in a guest hallway.

OPPOSITE

BELOW Michael Moody’s long career as an executive in the music industry is reflected in his home office. The desk is from EMI, where he was executive vice president and CFO. Its massive size required a helicopter to transport it in and out of the recording company. Even the pool table is streamlined.

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“I conceived this house, built into a granite hillside, as an extension of the natural topography. In my mind, it’s a bridge that extends to the infinity pool and the ocean beyond.” – MITCH HOLLANDER

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FAR LEFT June Burton’s “Abundance.”

The master patio features “Dresses” by Jen Harmon Allen. Hollander displayed them to suggest a clotheline. A glass inset suffuses light to the space below.

LEFT

The master bath’s art includes “Sunflowers” by Georgi Andovov, and Tyler Burton’s “Bound by Beliefs.”

BELOW LEFT

BELOW “I designed every space to include a view. When you’re sitting in the tub, you can look out at the view,” says Hollander.


Desert Decadence TEXT BY DAWN MOORE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY TIM STREET-PORTER 86 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


WITH A ROCK AND ROLL EDGE, DESIGNER MARTYN LAWRENCE BULLARD REIMAGINES A PALM SPRINGS MIDCENTURY GEM ABOVE The dramatic entrance features a front-loaded pool and towering marble-wrapped fireplace and chimney both indoors and out. Brown Jordan outdoor furniture with RH bean bag chairs make for comfortable sitting areas and poolside dining. JAN/FEB 2018 | 87


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E V E R Y O N E I N H O L L Y W O O D has gravitated back to Palm Springs very much the way the stars did in the 40s and 50s,” says interior design super star Martyn Lawrence Bullard, “so this house wa s d e s i g n e d f o r t h a t st y l e o f w e e ke n d entertaining.” On a Coachella weekend with friends and clients Miriam and Stanley Rothbart, Martyn Lawrence Bullard was asked to take a look at a classic Alexander house Miriam had spotted for sale in the historic Vista Las Palmas neighborhood. Two days later, the Rothbarts were in escrow and the reimagining began. Built in 1952, the 3400 square foot home is a coveted example of the now iconic desert

architecture built by the visionary construction company during the 50s and 60s. “This house is interesting – like a lot of Alexander houses the pool is in the front as part of the main landscaping. So we really made that feel very powerful by leveling the terrain and maximizing the view.“ The challenge was to open up the original floor plan and ratchet up the glam factor. Materials like bookmatched marble wrapping the fireplace inside and out, Turkish marble bathrooms, terrazzo floors, and mirrored walls combine to evoke a modernist Bacchanal heaven. The central kitchen was opened to integrate the living experience then wrapped around into the screening room, so now does double duty as the indoor bar. “The real bar is in the pool, so I really upped the ante for that Sinatra-era look. You swim up to the seating, plunk yourself down and have a cocktail,” the LA-based Brit says. The home’s 1970s rock vibe though, was driven by the wife’s passion


OPPOSITE A de Sede 70s sectional sofa invites at the far end of the living room. Black and white photography of 70s and 80s rock bands decorate the walls in a salon style gallery. Vladimir Kagan slipper chairs are grouped around the marble clad fireplace for more intimate gatherings. BELOW LEFT Paul Evans “Cityscape� chair is covered in a Moore and Giles emerald green Leather and sits next to a Charles Hollis Jones lucite console in the screening room.

A 1970s Mangiarotti lamp sits on top of the patchwork leather upholstered side table of the vintage de Sede sofa. A 60s Cassina marble table from the Palm Springs vintage store Christopher Anthony holds coffee table books and a 60s Pierre Cardin glass vase from the Martyn Lawrence Bullard Atelier. BELOW RIGHT

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“It’s all about capturing the Palm Springs spirit – but it’s also about capturing today’s experience,” notes Martyn Lawrence Bullard. Mission accomplished.

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ABOVE Black Caesar stone sits on top of white lacquer cabinets in the kitchen. Viking appliances add a modern touch while the mirrored back splash is a nod to the homes mid century roots. LEFT In the dining room , the ceiling is covered in ‘ Mirror, Mirror ‘ Silver Mica paper from Martyn Lawrence Bullard Atelier and creates the illusion of a very tall ceiling. Paul Evans “Cityscape” chairs cluster around a vintage Pace chrome table found at Modern Way on Palm Canyon and 1960’s oil paintings with a bold yellow theme complete the scene.

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ABOVE The master bedroom’s 70s‘ Stallone bed ‘ by Charles Hollis Jones with Karl Springer nightstands. A Milton Avery image of Marilyn Monroe is a nod to Palm Springs connection with Hollywood while the Herb Ritts photos give a fashion edge to the collection . RIGHT The powder room is wrapped in a Turkish striped marble from Ann Sacks and painted in Benjamin Moore’s Deep Space gray.

for the period and is a nod to her past life in the music management business. A collection of black and white photographs from the era was curated by Lawrence Bullard including images of David Bowie, Lynyrd Skynyrd and the New York Dolls, and reflect the homeowners’ love of the genre. Keeping the black and white palette throughout makes the exuberant use of wall to wall mirrors - even as a backsplash in the kitchen - seem like a 21st century innovation. In fact, the abundant reflective surfaces are the striking hallmark of the home’s edgy yet playful energy. “It’s all about capturing the Palm Springs spirit – but it’s also about capturing today’s experience,” notes Lawrence Bullard. Mission accomplished. CH 92 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


BELOW The stepdown-swimup bar and BBQ area is located on the far side of the pool, creating yet another destination point to enjoy the views of the San Jacinto mountain scape. The white powder coated bar stools are by Brown Jordan.

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the GREAT WALL

STUDIO VARA OF SAN FRANCISCO CREATES A CONTEMPORARY HOME TEXT BY KAVITA DASWANI | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATTHEW MILLMAN

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BELOW Lush landscaping and a luxurious pool deck are framed by a wall of 12-foot tall steel windows from Hope’s Windows and Doors, pulling the outdoors into this generous great room. Art advisor Tom O’Connor selected the Raimonds Staprans blue painting. The playful hand-blown globes of a Bocci fixture add a splash of color over a custom walnut table with a durable Corian top, equally suitable for family dinners or Lego projects, with a custom credenza fabricated by GO Build Studio.

T

adjacent to the kitchen of an 8,800 square foot house in Hillsborough was more or less done, except for one glaring thing; there was “an enormous blank wall,” said architect Maura Abernethy. “The client wanted something colorful, but we hadn’t found it yet.” But then Abernethy came across a striking pair of six foot by six foot works by German-born, Brooklynbased artist Markus Linnenbrink. The art was going to be the opening exhibit at Art Basel Miami. So Abernathy emailed a photo of the room to her client, with the paintings Photoshopped onto its walls. “I told her she had eight hours to decide, sight unseen.” H E G R E AT R O O M

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The client took one look at the Photoshopped image, and gave her resounding approval - the piece now pride of place in a sprawling home, set on two wooded acres, that has no end of lovely things to look at. For the project, which took three years to complete, Abernethy worked with Chris Roach, her co-founder in their San Francisco architecture and design firm Studio VARA. Together, they created a contemporary house that, said Abernethy, “now embraces the landscape”. “When the family bought it, they likened it to a 1980s mall,” said Abernethy. “It had very little connection from inside to outside. They like modern architecture, but didn’t want to change the front facade. So we had to build a new house around a traditional facade, one that would feel like it had a singular note.”


The pair of Markus Linnenbrink paintings are a focal point in the living room. Sofas and corner coffee table in the living room are all custom, as are the leather ottoman, walnut bench and console behind the sofa. The lamp is from Phase Design. Customized rug from Tai Ping and walnut stools from Blu Dot.

LEFT

BELOW A pair of Prandina Notte copper pendants hang over the enormous island topped with a single slab of Calacotta Oro. Cerused white oak on the island base and cabinets are balanced by a marble backsplash and white lacquered uppers.

“We tried to create places where you can see all the way through the house from inside to out, down the corridors, and with rooms that light up in a way that you look at the house as part of the outdoor space.” – CHRIS ROACH, STUDIO VARA

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Photography by Edward Burtynsky. Rice Fields #4. Wall sconces by Jonathan Browning. Console by Hellman-Chang. Bronze sculpture by Adam P. Gale. Light by Jonathan Browning. Custom rug by Tai Ping. Custom console by Joseph Jeup. Bronze sculpture by Adam P. Gale, table lamp by Jiun Ho. Bronze door custom by Hope’s Windows and Doors.

OPPOSITE

The light and airy master bedroom marries coastal driftwood tones with a winning juxtaposition of crisp white furnishings, millwork and rich hardwood floors and beams. The wing chair in the bedroom is from Hickory Chair, available at Witford Home.

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JAN/FEB 2018 | 99


BELOW Dry-stacked bluestone walls under a low-slung steel roof weave the guest house into the landscape, while generous glazing opens the interiors to a gently cascading terrace and pool deck. OPPOSITE A David Maisel photograph is the backdrop for an Adam P Gale sculpture which picks up on the dark bronze of a custom steel and marble coffee table by Chris French. The bronze punctuates an otherwise softly monochromatic palette with a high-contrast moment of drama. Tall sheers in silk fabric extend the height of the small original windows and bring a sense of proportion and balance to the room. Porta Romana table lamps. Custom sofa and cushions. Mattaliano crushed velvet chairs.

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Roach and his team essentially “scooped out the back of the house”, he said. The stucco, stone and steel incorporated onto the back, as well as the newly-built pool house, reflect the style of the existing front facade. The contractor on the project was South San Francisco company Dijeau Poage Construction. The interiors, similarly, needed to convey an avant-garde aesthetic while still being warm and welcoming enough for a busy family with three young sons. The family travels extensively, and often entertains groups of all sizes, and were seeking a space that was “sleek and cosmopolitan but not urban” she said. “We saved a lot of the rooms from inside the original, but stripped them bare, refreshed them and tried to find a unifying aesthetic that was contemporary but still had a level of craft, detail and texture that you might find in a more traditional home,” said Roach. The kitchen and great room are the heart of the house, filled with plenty of natural light filtering in through the large glass windows, and overlooking the grassy backyard and pool. “We tried to create places where you can see all the way through the house from inside to out, down the corridors, and with rooms

that light up in a way that you look at the house as part of the outdoor space,” he said. “That way, the house feels connected with the beautiful property.” That openness provides a counterpoint to the “more intimate and private upstairs areas you would see in a traditional home,” said Roach. Signature pieces include a custom-made bronze and stone coffee table in the living room -which Abernethy said required seven men to bring it in. The client also sought out “playful and interesting lighting that other people didn’t have.” The great room wall, as it turned out, wasn’t the only large space that had to be filled. For the kitchen, Abernethy envisioned the largest island she had ever created - it had to be 10 feet by 8 feet, and be carved out of one solid chunk of marble. Despite her longtime relationship with Italian stone importer Pietra Fina, in Hayward, California, she knew that those dimensions would be a stretch. “But then I got a photograph from them, of this giant block of marble, with a note saying, ‘we found it’” said Abernethy. “It took ten men to get it in.” CH

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Tutor Style Revised

LAUREN EVANS INTERIORS TRANSFORMS A DARK TUDOR INTO A LIGHT, AIRY AND CHIC FAMILY HOME TEXT BY KAVITA DASWANI PHOTOGRAPHY BY RYAN GARVIN

Rug by Madeline Weinrib, matching Rococo Louis XV Fauteuil-like armchairs are custom upholstered in Lee Jofa fabric. Lounge chair and ottoman by Crate & Barrel, custom upholstered in De Sousa Hughes fabric. Fretwork pillow from Plum Furniture.Tufted cocktail ottoman from Oly Studio, custom upholstered in Gaul Searson leather. Hearth stone is Calacatta marble from Da Vinci marble. Blue and white pottery from Williams-Sonoma Home.

LEFT

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Living room mirror from Mirror Image Home. Wall sconces by Circa Lighting.

LEFT

BELOW Living room navy velvet couch from Nathan Turner. Artwork is a commissioned abstract by Britt Bass Turner. Side tables by Serena & Lily and custom lamps from The Natural Light.

T

HE FIRST THING THAT STRUCK

Lauren Evens when she saw the 2,500 square foot house in Burlingame was how the exterior - a charming, Tudor style - felt so disconnected from the interior. “You don’t have to absolutely mirror the exterior and the interior,” she said. “But there should be some sort of cohesiveness. I walked into this house, and the walls were a mustard yellow or purple. It was dark and Tuscan. There were exposed beams, which can be gorgeous in other spaces, but here it made everything dark. There was a lot of funky stuff going on.” The design brief came organically; to turn “that dark space into something lighter and brighter and slightly more English, to bring the outside in.” Evans recalled her time spent in England, where she noticed the underpinnings of British interior style as “comfort, color and storage. That was my kick start.” A year later, Evans - founder of San Francisco Bay-area

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based Lauren Evans Interiors - had transformed the place into a light, airy, chic and cozy home for her clients, at the time a couple with two small children and a third on the way. The interiors had to be almost entirely stripped. One wall was taken down to create an arch. And the landscaping underwent a complete transformation, going from unwelcoming concrete to a lush, floral-filled area where the family is now able to entertain elegantly. Certainly, entertaining at the house - which was built in 1929 - is important to the family, and something that Evans herself a mother of three - had to think about as she selected colors, fabrics and furnishings. “It was still important to the homeowners that there would be more formal areas, with the ability to entertain without jeopardizing style,” she said. But for the popular common spaces - like the kitchen and dining room - Evans had to be particularly mindful about having a trio of little children on the furniture; her initial idea to cover the breakfast nook chairs in a pretty oatmeal linen had to be rethought. “You can’t have oatmeal linen in a place where there are


Custom dining table by Loggia, chairs by RH, custom upholstered in Schumacher fabric. Rug from Williams-Sonoma Home. Chandelier from Circa Lighting.

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ABOVE A corner of the light, bright kitchen. BELOW In the breakfast nook, the custom made table is matched with chairs from Ballard Designs. Pillow and Roman shade fabric from Kravet. BELOW RIGHT While Evans says she is “not a big fan of the color yellow… there was something about this Kravet fabric that seemed light, airy and sophisticated.”

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Counter top made from Calacatta marble from MSI. Tile by Integrated Resources Group. Akdo Hardware from RK International and lighting from Visual Comfort. ABOVE Roman shades in fabric from Kravet and plants add a dash of color. BELOW The landscape architecture was designed by Seed Studio, and landscape construction done by Paul Fitzgerald of Fitzgerald Landscapes. LEFT

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Custom bed from Robert Allen. Chandelier by Pottery Barn. Shade fabric from De Sousa Hughes. Pillow fabric from Schumacher and the rug is from Barbara Barry.

LEFT

“ It was very important to the homeowner that the bedroom, unlike the rest of the house, felt entirely serene and remained untouched by any pops of color,” said Evans. “It was my goal to make this space feel calm, soothing and comfortable. It was also important to me that the monochromatic color scheme be paired with varied layers of textured textiles. I love the juxtaposition of the linens, cottons and cowhide paired with the silk pillow fabric and rich tailored pillow trims.”

OPPOSITE

children,” she said. So she picked out fabrics covered by spill-repellent Crypton. Throughout the home, she selected patterned rugs that could hide a stain or two. “Wool was our friend,” she said of her textile choices. “It’s a fabulous, natural material that is sturdy. And hide is great too. Also, wherever I could, I put custom-made glass toppers. From my own experience, I know that forks sometimes get stabbed into tabletops.” A clever addition to the living room is a Nathan Turner couch in deep navy velvet, where the family can relax without fears of leaving behind stains. Similarly, Evans introduced pops of color throughout, sometimes in the most surprising ways. The family had a console that was in a drab brownish-green wood, but Evans loved the aesthetic of it. So she 108 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

stripped it down and slapped on a hot, bright fuchsia lacquer, added new hardware, and the piece now anchors the home’s entryway. “We had that approach everywhere, whether in a piece of artwork or furniture, to have a pop of color in chartreuse, plum or navy. The only exception to that would be the master bedroom, with a more subtle pretty porcelain below, and where we wanted everything to be monochromatic and soothing.” And one of the most satisfying components of the project - transforming a bonus room into something of a ‘man cave’. To convey a masculine sensibility, Evans selected geometric prints on the lamp shade and pillow fabric, a faux fur throw, heavy woven drapery for a space that is “comfortable, inviting and warm.” True to form, the ‘man cave’ is also a second family den, where the kids also hang out. CH


JAN/FEB 2018 | 109


Travel

THE REBIRTH OF

HOTEL CALIFORNIAN

Designer Martyn Lawrence Bullard’s exotic twist on a Santa Barbara landmark

BY DAWN MOORE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN

UPON CHECKING INTO A HOTEL, tradition dictates a stop at the front desk. However, traditions are

merely suggestions at the Hotel Californian. Hence, no front desk. Which is of little interest anyway when gazing at the startling black and white chevron coffered ceiling or intricately tiled floor. If in fact you are staying, a hotel representative can swipe your credit card, create a key and check you in from an iPad while you stay nestled in an oversized modernist wingchair. Owner Michael Rosenfeld knew exactly what he wanted when he embarked on the reinvention of this 1925 Santa Barbara landmark. And he knew AD100 designer Martyn Lawrence Bullard could deliver his vision - a heady mix of provenance, luxury and glam while still embracing the city’s storied Mediterranean architecture. His wildly successful collaboration with Martyn on another fabled hotel, The Colony

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In the original hotel building lobby, a Portuguese library table “suggests” a reception desk with MLB custom designed Bugatti-style mirrors and Morrocco-meetsmidcentury custom floor tiles. ABOVE


By the Numbers 1,000,000 tiles used 27 tile patterns 121 rooms 3000 guests a month 425 average square feet in guest rooms 10 dishes at Blackbird featuring seafood 800 Mashrabiya panels 1 unique shade of Moroccan blue in the spa Marjorelle 250 steps to the beach ABOVE The hotel’s entrance captures Santa Barbara’s Mediterranean architecture accented with Moorish black and white marble tiles. LEFT In the ballroom, seven different MLB-designed wallpapers for Schumacher were decoupaged together to create a Marrakech palatial-style wall treatment. Custom designed limestone fireplace.

NOV/DEC 2017 | 111


Travel

In one of four different themed bedrooms, the signature encaustic tile work Bullard used throughout the hotel creates another layer of pattern against his leather upholstered beds and bronze cobra wall sconces. ABOVE

RIGHT The custom-tiled pool deck boasts the most sweeping ocean views of any hotel in Santa Barbara, with deep lounging beds and pillows inspired by Bullard’s travels to Africa.

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The spa’s domed ceiling was painted to resemble Yves Saint Laurent’s Marrakesh villa, Marjorelle - for which the spa is named. Floors and fountain pedestal are covered in a traditional mosaic of Zelig tile imported from Fez.

LEFT

Palms in Palm Springs proved their chemistry was both an experiential and financial success. “The direction Michael and Martyn took together was to create something special that is part of Santa Barbara yet unique,” notes general manager Warren Nocon. “They agreed that everywhere you turn should have an air of quality. And surprise.” Rich in textures and patterns, the color palette is strikingly monochromatic with accents of warm terra cotta, brass and the gleaming wood of custom Mashrabiya panels. “The hotel’s look was derived from the architectural spirit of Santa Barbara, but to feel sexier and more modern,” Martyn says. “So, I looked to a Moroccan flavor with furniture influenced by the 1950s Italian masters like Gio Ponti.” This Italian-riviera-meets-Americanriviera by way of Tangiers aesthetic is at once fantastical and familiar. However, fully realizing Rosenfeld’s vision for this waterfront destination meant adding two buildings to the complex creating a bustling paseo. The master plan was executed by the Santa Barbara-based architectural firm of Design ARC with Lawrence Bullard’s influence apparent in details like oil-rubbed bronze fixtures and tile risers. Even the two hotel restaurants - Blackbird (yes, after the Beatles’ song) and Goat Tree (named for the famed Moroccan goats that graze in trees) - are wrapped in a theatrical black and gold geometry. But the crown jewel of this property is undoubtedly the spa. A signature Lawrence Bullard dream-like experience; both sexy and exotic yet soothing. “Spas should be a space that transports you somewhere you can be relaxed; serene and magical. A sanctuary with an element of fantasy,” say Lawrence-Bullard. And as planned, the Hotel Californian delivers an experience that will dazzle the most seasoned world traveler. CH www.thehotelcalifornian.com JAN/FEB 2018 | 113


GATHERINGS 1

2

ICAA SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA The 2017 Legacy Dinner Honors Jeff Hyland

3

The Southern California Chapter of the institute of Classical Architect and Arts honored Jeff Hyland, architectural historian, (he is the author of The legendary Estates of Beverly Hills, a 428 page journey inviting readers into some of the most celebrated and historic homes of Beverly Hills), and the co-founder and President of Hilton & Hyland, at a dinner held at the California Club in Los Angeles, made possible by Suzanne Rheinstein. Legacy dinner co-chairs included Elizabth Dinkel and Jaime Rummerfield. Proceeds from the event will benefit the ICAA Southern California Chapter’s education and scholarship programs. 4

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1 Reggie Sully, Elizabeth Dinkel (Dinner co-chair), Suzanne Rheinstein, Jaime Rummerfield (Dinner co-chair) and Ron Woodson 2 Banquet room with Doc Williamson (chapter president) welcoming the guests. 3 Rick Hilton and Jeff Hyland 4 Jeff and Lori Hyland

114 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

5 Shane Mahan and Jeff Hyland 6 Jim Hanley and Winston Chappell 7 Rocky Lafleur, Suzanne Rheinstein, and Tim Barber 8 Guest dancing in the banquet room.


Travel


GATHERINGS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRIS DARNELL 1

CORONA DEL MAR HOME TOUR This Event Is The Premier Tour Of Orange County The Corona del Mar Home Tour 2017 attracted over 2,000 attendees, giving them the opportunity to take a rare glimpse behind the closed doors of some of Newport Beach’s most beautiful homes. The tour featured six homes, breakfast at Fashion Island, (Le Pain Quotidien), lunch at Sherman Gardens in Corona del Mar and the day concluded at Bliss Home Design with a cocktail party. Over $220,000 was raised in the one day event. This event has raised a significant amount of money for student programs at CdM Middle and High School. The PTA benefits every student and includes funding for a new student resource center on campus, funding for the equipment required to establish a student run TV station called Trident TV, and also direct teacher grants for items needed in the classroom such as iPads and musical instruments. 3

1 Garrett Calacci of Waterpointe Homes, CDM Home Tour CoChair Kameron Radovanovic and Ray Langhammer of Barclay Butera Interiors, Barclay Butera 2 Sharon Kalili and Patricia Ford 3 Lisa Neal and Brandy Habermehl

2

A JEWEL OF A NIGHT Swiss Watch Gallery & Fine Jewelers Partners With California Homes

1

Swiss Watch Gallery & Fine Jewelers with shops at Mission Viejo, had their Annual VIP soiree hosted by California Homes Magazine. Client sipped on Veuve Clicquot and holiday martinis as they indulged in delicious small bites. The main attraction was the exquisite hand crafted jewelry that sparkled with yellow and pink diamonds. There were also exclusive one of a kind Swiss time pieces and many lucky guests went home with something to celebrate. 2

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1 Anita Borrrelli, Dave and Genelle Schlotterbeck and Patricia Hilton 2 Namvar Mokri, Kelly Ordos and Sahar Pugh

116 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

3 Katie Pond and Susan Maples 4 Kathleen Bashian, Shirley Waters and Sharon Moss


GATHERINGS BARCLAY BUTERA INTERIORS CELEBRATES Barclay Butera Corona del Mar One Year Anniversary

3

Barclay Butera Interiors in Corona del Mar celebrated its one year anniversary during the annual CDM Christmas Walk. A meaningful celebration for Barclay Butera as he helped his mother open her design studio in that same location over 25 years ago. It was a special celebration with friends and family. 2

4

1 1 Blair Chu, Lauren Kirsch, Barclay Butera, Sam Slater, Laiza Altaf and Ray Langhammer 2 Cyndie Martin, Barclay Butera, Natalie Graham, Ray Langhammer, Wendy Cassidy and Wendy Elliott

1

3 Barclay Butera Interiors party decor. 4 A big supporter of CASA of Orange County, Barclay Butera welcomed The Kids of CASA OC to raise money for abused and neglected children by selling festive ornaments to attendees.

CHARTER 100 This charity Provides Mentoring And Educational Scholarships The Charter 100 members, guests and scholars gather at the Big Canyon Country Club for their annual Holiday luncheon. Charter 100 is a charitable organization comprised of a group of women who provide mentoring and educational scholarships to improve the lives of single mothers from the CARE Program at Irvine Valley College. The women cope daily with the financial stress of raising a family while completing their education with the goal of becoming self-sufficient. 3

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1 Charter 100 Contessa Level members honored in a special photo at the Holiday luncheon 2 Charter 100 Scholarship recipients Dawn Murphy, Brenda Villasenor, Rosa Rodriguez, Marina Munoz, Homa Diniarian, Erin Calvert, Danielle Richmond 3 Patricia Hilton, Jill Gradishar, Dee Sampson and Cecilia Goodman 4 Members and guests listened to scholarship recipient, Rosa Rodriguez, express her heartfelt gratitude and appreciation for how Charter 100 is changing her life. 5 Gingerbread crème brûlée with toasted marshmallow and gingerbread man provided by Big Canyon Country Club

JAN/FEB 2018 | 117


GATHERINGS 1

HOLIDAY DINING Orange County Builders Join California Homes For An Elegant Dinner At The Island Hotel California Homes Magazine recently hosted a holiday dinner party for Orange County builders at the Island Hotel in Newport Beach. Special cocktails and wines were served on the patio followed by dinner in the Duke room. The event was hosted by Editor-in-Chief and owner, Susan McFadden and Associate Publisher Linda McCall. 3

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1 Associate Publisher, California Homes Linda McCall, Patricia Hilton of Hilton Builders and Susan McFadden, Editor-in-Chief, California Homes 2 Kim Crawford, Richard Crawford and Kimberly Smith all of Crawford Custom Homes 3 Tables were set for the holidays 4 Newport Beach architects Laura Oatman and Homer Oatman 5 Denny Muusse of Stark Carpets 6 Giancarlo Mandelli, Tidelli, Mike Reeves and

Greg Hawkins of Corbin Reeves Construction, Ray Langhammer of Barclay Butera, Nick Buchanan of Cape Point, Barclay Butera, Barclay Butera Interiors and Eloy Selles of Porselanosa 7 Kim Crawford and Kimberly Smith of Crawford Custom Homes 8 Giancarlo Mandelli and Alessandra Mandelli of Tidelli 9 Mike Reeves, Corbin Reeves Construction, Nick Buchanan of Cape Point and Greg Hawkins of Corbin Reeves


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SPADINA TAUPE R UG ROOM DESIGN BY KIRSTEN KELLI LLC

2870 Pershing Street Hollywood, FL 33020 954.925.3500 STARKCARPET.COM


JAN/FEB 2018

CALIFORNIA HOMES

VOLUME 22 NUMBER 1

Profile for California Homes Magazine

California Homes - January/February 2018  

California Homes - January/February 2018  

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