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CALIFORNIA HOMES

THE MAGAZINE OF ARCHITECTURE THE ARTS & DISTINCTIVE DESIGN

Showcase Houses PASADENA | SAN FRANCISCO

+

VACATION HOME

EAST COAST BEAUTIFUL

DISPLAY UNTIL SEPTEMBER 4, 2018


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Contents 68 HOUSE OF MANY COLORS

The 2018 San Francisco Decorator Showcase Text by Kendra Boutell

76 STORIED PAST

Melanie Coddington Reinvents A Historic San Francisco Victorian Text by Kendra Boutell Photography by Vivian Johnson

84 2018 PASADENA SHOWCASE HOUSE

Interior Designers Created Looks True To Their Own Design While Keeping Within The Contemporary Style Of This Home Designed By Reginald David Johnson In 1915 Text by Kavita Daswani Photography by Peter Christiansen Valli

94 A SCULPTED ESCAPE

Architect Michael G. Imber Conceived This Florida Vacation Home As A Block Of Marble To Be Sculpted The Result: Singularly Artful Architecture Text by Candace Ord Manroe Photography by Richard Powers

102 TRANSITIONAL MODERN IN ATHERTON

Designer Debbie Fogel Was Given Creative Control Over Her Client’s Ground-Up Build Text by Kavita Daswani Photography by Brad Knipstein

Features JULY/AUGUST 2018

David Bjorngaart of Bjorn Design’s Art designed the dining room at the San Francisco Decorator Showcase House and it echoes the colors of sea and land. A mobile by Julie Condon of hand blown glass, gemstones and crystals was installed above the walnut dining table. The walls focused on artwork from alumni of Marin’s Headlands Center for the Arts Program. Kyle Bunting’s hide rug represented an abstracted interpretation of the headland meadows. See story beginning on page 68. Photograph by Mariko Reed.

ABOVE

RIGHT The grand foyer at the Pasadena Showcase House was designed by Amy Peltier, owner of Peltier Interiors, Pasadena. The floors are black and white in a graphic pattern using Spanish marble. See story beginning on page 84. Photograph by Peter Christiansen Valli.

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W W W.C A L H O M E S M AG A Z I N E .CO M


Contents

110 69

56

36

Departments JULY/AUGUST 2018

39 56 NATURAL WONDER Pamela Pennington Feels She Was Born With The “Perfect Eye” For Design

30 CALENDAR

44

California Museums And Galleries BY CATHY MALY

Architects’ Houses California Contemporary: The Houses Of Grant C. Kirkpatrick And KAA Design REVIEWED BY KATHY BRYANT

39 NOTEBOOK 39 Visionary | Sam Hamilton 42 Places | Los Alcobas 44 Shop | Garde 46 Product | Hermès 48 Product | Mitchell Gold 50 Product | Bang & Olufsen 52 Cloth & Paper | Half Full

Dan And Patricia Hilton Have Enjoyed Enduring Success Building Beautiful Homes

BY KAVITA DASWANI

62 EVENTS & AFFAIRS

Exciting And Prestigious Events Throughout The State

BY CATHY MALY

110 WINE

The Syrah Sensibility

BY KENNETH FRIEDENREICH

112 TRAVEL

The Rubens At The Palace In London Treats Guests Like Royalty

BY KATHY BRYANT

20 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

BY KATHY BRYANT

58 HILTON BUILDERS

36 BOOKS

52


S O M E T I M E S T H E B E ST W AY TO V I S U A L I Z E YO U R N E X T K I T C H E N I S TO TO U C H, H E A R, A N D TA S T E I T.

Open drawers. Turn knobs. Light burners. Welcome to a showroom unlike any other– a dynamic space to test-drive appliances, take classes, and taste every delicious possibility.

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Editor’s Letter

Each year we are proud to present showcase houses in California and this issue you’ll read about the Pasadena Showcase House and The San Francisco Decorator Showcase, each reflecting a special time in California. The Pasadena Showcase whose proceeds from ticket sales are typically earmarked for musical organizations such as the Los Angeles Philharmonic, is a 12,277 square foot Altadena home named Overlook and designed by Reginald David Johnson in 1915. We chose an image from the entrance way for our cover. The San Francisco Decorator Showcase, raising funds to go directly to support the San Francisco University High School Financial Aid Program, opened its doors for the first-ever showcase event in San Francisco’s Marina District. The 1920 home was originally built by architect George McCrea. This home stopped traffic on Marina Boulevard this year. A. J. Oishi painted a Delaunay-esque mural on the white stucco façade of the 1920 Spanish Revival home. Titled “Eyes on Hue,” Oishi’s brilliantly colored concentric shapes and the house’s majestic views of the Bay, Golden Gate Bridge, Alcatraz Island and Marina Green influenced the contributing designers.

Contributors

PETER CHRISTIANSEN VALLI Photographing architecture and interiors has been Peter’s day job for more than thirty years. He has been fortunate to work with some of the best in design and publishing and always photographs the Pasadena Showcase House. In his free time he likes to help with non-profit organizations, especially child advocacy issues. It’s super easy for Peter to share his skills and he has great admiration for those who help. See his photography beginning on page 84.

BRAD KNIPSTEIN Brad Knipstein has been creating images since he was very young. If you ask him, he will tell you “I have been working on my portfolio since I was 12. When my grandmother gave me my first portfolio case to display my prints.” Of course that was back in the film days where he crafted black and white fiber prints in a closet turned darkroom at his family’s home. To this day he carries the same passion and enthusiasm for photography with him everywhere he happens to be. R. Brad Knipstein Studio is a full service studio. From finding locations to retouching to pre-press and everything in between, photo production is his business. See his photography beginning on page 102.

We hope you enjoy this issue, including our Florida “vacation home,” by architect Michael G. Imber. Michael has recently opened an office in San Francisco and busy designing beautiful homes in California. His Florida project is the perfect vacation home. Have a wonderful summer as we begin work on our September/ October issue including a glorious food and wine story and four beautiful homes in California. Susan McFadden Editor in Chief

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KENDRA BOUTELL Kendra Boutell recently joined Coupar Communications writing PR and marketing content for interior designers, architects, builders and luxury lifestyle retailers. In addition to being Editor at Large for California Homes Magazine, she contributes to other publications including the international BRIDGE FOR DESIGN. See Kendra’s stories beginning on page 68 and 76.


Letters

Great pool house cover for your May/ June issue. I would like to submit a project to California Homes and wondered how I address such a letter. Do you accept submissions from other states? Overall a lovely magazine! Jerry Martin Phoenix, AZ Editor: Yes we accept projects from other states. Send all submissions to editorial, California Homes, PO Box 8655, Newport Beach, CA 92658 I recently purchased your May/June issue at Barnes & Noble and wanted to let you know how much we have enjoyed the magazine. We’re fortunate to have such an outstanding publication representing California. I will subscribe. Elsbeth Del Pero Beverly Hills, CA Had a wonderful time reading the latest issue and want to congratulate you and the team at California Homes for producing such a beautiful vision of the homes in California. Roger Russell Newport Beach, CA Editor: We appreciate your encouraging words and enjoy receiving letters. Keep them coming.

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Calendar MUSEUMS & GALLERIES Architecture Studie, Judd Foundation, Marfa, Texas. Photograph by Elizabeth Felicella Esto, Judd Foundation

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

Elliott Hundley The high house low!, 2011 Wood, sound board, inkjet print on Kitakata, paper, pins, magnifying glass, photographs, plastic, metal 99 x 192 1/2 x 18 inches

THE BROAD – LOS ANGELES

The Broad presents A Journey That Wasn’t, a free exhibition opening June 30 that explores complex representations of time and its passage. The exhibition includes more than 50 works drawn from the museum’s collection of postwar and contemporary art and features more than 20 artists. The exhibition will bring back Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson’s highly popular The Visitors, 2012, for the first time since The Broad’s inaugural installation two years ago. More than half of the works in this collection exhibition will be on view for the first time at The Broad. For more information please call 213.232.6200 or visit www.thebroad.org.

SAN DIEGO MUSEUM OF ART

Nancy Lorenz Red Gold Pour Box, 2017 Red gold leaf, gesso, pigment, on paulownia box Photograph by Adam Reich

30 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

The San Diego Museum of Art is pleased to present Nancy Lorenz: Moon Gold, the first solo museum exhibition for the noted contemporary artist Nancy Lorenz. Organized by The San Diego Museum of Art, this exhibition comprises more than 85 works, some of which are inspired by Japanese masterpieces from the Museum’s permanent collection. Nancy Lorenz: Moon Gold will be on view through September 3, 2018. Lorenz is a New York-based artist celebrated for her sophisticated technique and luminous art. She uses materials such as mother-of-pearl inlay, lacquer, and gold leaf in painterly gestures to create outstanding works of art. For more information please call 619.232.7931 or visit www.sdmart.org.

Widely considered one of the most important American artists of the twentieth century, Donald Judd transformed the art world with his work in art, design, and architecture. This exhibition, Donald Judd - Specific Furniture, looks beyond Judd’s work in sculpture, which he called “specific objects,” to examine his furniture design as its own practice, independent from his artworks. Judd’s designs emerged out of a need for functional, simple, and agreeable furniture and were developed in response to what he saw as an absence of good and available pieces. This presentation brings together Judd’s furniture designs with works that he owned and drew inspiration from, as well as a selection of Judd pieces that visitors can use outside the gallery. Specific Furniture is on display until November 4, 2018. For more information please call 415.357.4000 or visit www.sfmoma.org.


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Calendar | MUSEUMS & GALLERIES

WHITNEY GALLERY AVRAN FINE ART – LAGUNA BEACH

Avran Fine Art distinguishes itself amongst the vibrant art scene in Laguna Beach by offering its clients a unique perspective on contemporary art for collectors and enthusiasts. The exquisitely edited gallery exhibits museum-quality glass sculpture, original paintings, and bronze sculpture. During the month of July and August 2018 join us for an “All Artists Reception” featuring 20 different artists in the gallery. The Avran Fine Art is open for 11 am to 7pm daily or by appointment. The gallery is located at 540 S. Coast Highway, Suite 106, Laguna Beach, CA 92651. For more information, please call 949.494.0900 or visit www.avranart.com.

ERIN HANSON GALLERY - SAN DIEGO

Re-discover your love for impressionism at The Erin Hanson Gallery. On display at the gallery is Erin’s latest collection, The Red Rock Show. Explore the dramatic landscapes of the West through the eyes of San Diego artist Erin Hanson. Experience the lush texture and rich colors of her original oil paintings; and take an adventure through the red rock scenery of Utah, Arizona and New Mexico. Discover the art that captures your passion. The collection (The Red Rock Show) will feature some rare 24k pieces. The gallery is located at 9705 Carroll Centre Road, San Diego, CA 92126. For more information please call 858.324.4644 or visit www.erinhanson.com 32 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

TOP

Marc Whitney Unmade Bed with White Sheets and Blue Blankets Original oil 24 x 30 inches MIDDLE

Marc Whitney Floral Bouquet 34 x 28 inches Original oil BOTTOM

Marc Whitney Seascape with Stormy Sky 44 x 48 inches Original oil LEFT

Erin Hanson Abiquiu Oil on canvas

The first Thursdays of every month the Whitney Gallery participates in the First Thursdays Art Walk in Laguna Beach. The art season in Laguna Beach flourishes year-round with First Thursdays Art Walk. This educational monthly art event, held on the first Thursday of every month from 6–9pm, celebrates the diverse cultural art scene of Laguna Beach and is free to the public. On display at the walk are paintings of Marc Whitney, he captures the private, visual experiences that define our daily lives and validate moments that matter; a morning cup of coffee, the rumpled sheets across a bed, a simple vase of flowers on a table, a beautiful view, Marc considers his paintings poeticSince his return to southern California, both collectors and artists have acknowledged him as one of the regions most talented painters of the Classical Realist Tradition. His paintings hang in numerous permanent and private collections worldwide. The Gallery is located at 305 Forest Avenue, Laguna Beach, CA 92651. For more information please call 949.497.4322 or visit www.marcwhitney.com.

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Calendar | MUSEUMS & GALLERIES

UC BERKELEY ART MUSEUM

THE GETTY, LOS ANGELES

The Greek philosopher Plato is one of the founding figures of Western civilization. His legacy encompasses ethics, politics, theology, and poetics. In this exhibition, some of today’s most celebrated artists consider Plato’s impact on the contemporary world. Through sculptures, paintings, drawings, and large-scale installations, they respond to his contribution to philosophy—from defining the ideal to understanding the human condition—while fostering the ultimate Platonic experience: contemplation. Participating artists: Paul Chan, Rachel Harrison, Huang Yong Ping, Mike Kelley, Jeff Koons, Joseph Kosuth, Paul McCarthy, Whitney McVeigh, Raymond Pettibon, Adrian Piper, and Michelangelo Pistoletto. For more information please call 310.440.7330 or visit www.getty.edu.

PASADENA MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA ART

The Pasadena Museum of California Art presents Grafton Tyler Brown: Exploring California on view until October 7, 2018. Grafton Tyler Brown (1841-1918) was a painter, graphic designer, and lithographer in the 19th century. A talented artist and entrepreneur, Brown was the only documented African American in his field in the western United States at the time. Grafton Tyler Brown: Exploring California will include approximately 45 paintings, prints, and objects from Brown’s oeuvre, including a breadth of imagery detailing the early development of California and the West. Grafton Tyler Brown The Golden Gate, 1887 Oil on canvas 30 x 20 inches

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For more information please call 626.568.3665 or visit www.pmcaonline.org.

On view through September 2, 2018, the Berkeley Art Museum presents, Way Bay 2. The second iteration of an innovatively organized exhibition of art, film, performance, poetry, and archival materials, Way Bay 2 continues our wide-ranging exploration of the creative energies that have emerged from the San Francisco Bay Area over two centuries. The exhibition features almost two hundred works by Bay Area artists and others whose work engages directly with the region’s geographic and cultural landscape. Dozens of works not seen in the first iteration of the exhibition are on view. For more information please call 510.642.0808 or visit www.bampfa@berkeley.org. ABOVE

Conrad Ruiz Overload, 2009 Watercolor on canvas 77 x 110 inches LEFT

Rosie Lee Tompkins Untitled, 1987 Mixed media 100 x 70 inches


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Books REVIEWED BY KATHY BRYANT

Architects’ Houses By Michael Webb Michael Webb’s new book, Architects’ Houses, features thirty houses designed by the architect/owners themselves. What is a bit surprising is how few architects actually do this, either because of the cost or lack of time. That makes this book important since it illustrates the creative processes architects go through to build houses free from clients’ concerns. As Webb says in the Introduction, “All the architects featured in this book share a keen appreciation of nature and the urgent need to reduce their carbon footprint. They have drawn upon a rich history of residential architecture and use their own houses as laboratories in which to test new ideas, products and technologies.” The middle of the book has a section entitled Drawing On The Past which explores Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello and works by Charles and Ray Eames, Toyo Ito and Frank Gehry. By doing this Webb uses architectural history as a lead-in to today’s creations and makes this book as an excellent reference work. For the main section of his book, Webb, a Los Angeles-based writer who has authored more than twenty books on architecture and design, selected thirty houses from around the world built in the last decade. All but one have been built from the ground up. As Webb says, “Although they are unique, there are common themes too. Inspiration comes from art, nature or other architects. There is an emphasis on the elemental: transparency, mass and void; raw surfaces enlivened by the play of light and shade.” Some of the architects’ houses featured are those by Norman Foster, Thom Mayne, Tod Williams and Bille Tsien. Architects’ Houses is a perfect book to use as a guide to the history of contemporary architecture. Besides the in-depth exploration of each of the houses, Webb has suggestions for further reading, a list of architectural treasures, some you can visit, and short biographies of each architect. Architects’ House By Michael Webb 304 pages; 350 color photographs Hardcover POB: US $50 ISBN: 978-1-61689-702-4 Princeton Architectural Press, New York

36 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


California Contemporary: The Houses of Grant C. Kirkpatrick and KAA Design By Grant Kirkpatrick In his new monograph, California Contemporary, Grant Kirkpatrick explains what a house is to him and why that influences his architectural designs. “To me, a house that is open to nature is a friendly house, a lived-in house. Call me a native Californian, but I can’t imagine living any other way,” he says. Illustrated beautifully in this tome is this guiding principle of his: working with nature makes it is possible to create something extraordinary. California Contemporary is a personal and holistic look into his architecture with over 160 color photographs. Featured are twentyfour custom homes that are intimate views into this award-winning architect’s creations. It’s not surprising that A-List celebrities including Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson, Matt Damon, fashion designer Paul Marciano and the Pritzker family have used Kirkpatrick and his firm, KAA Design. One of the featured properties in this highly personal book is his own property, Split Rock Ranch, set in a rambling vineyard in California’s Central Coast. Here he allowed structures on the property to evolve gradually. His architectural philosophies are woven into the reality of life on the ranch with pictures of his family, friends and their village life on the vineyard. Some of the other featured residences in California Contemporary include a nautically inspired home on the edge of the Pacific Ocean designed for two experienced sailors; an art collector’s home envisioned as a three-dimensional Richard Diebenkorn painting; a cantilevered hillside home above the lights of Los Angeles; and a “tree house” set on a plateau with gardens and outdoor entertainment spaces for a couple in the entertainment industry. As Kirkpatrick says, “It gives me a lot of joy to build homes that people love living in. It gives me even more joy when those homes also connect the owners with their love of nature — or even deepen it.” CH California Contemporary: The Houses of Grant C. Kirkpatrick and KAA Designs By Grant Kirkpatrick 256 pages; 160 color photographs Hardcover POB: US $55 ISBN: 978-1-61689-658-4 Princeton Architectural Press, New York

TOP LEFT The abundant colors of the sky and foliage inspired the architect and landscape design. ABOVE The home’s main living level comprises two wings anchored by a double-sided, glass-walled great room. LEFT Architect Grant C. Kirkpatrick. OPPOSITE TOP NOHO in Los Angeles by Thom Mayne is half-buried in a sloping site. The house and pool court are concealed behind vegetation. OPPOSITE BOTTOM An axial gallery tilts up from the entry to a staircase in the Tree House in Santa Monica by Buzz Yudell.

JULY/AUGUST 2018 | 37


My Montage Memory.

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Notebook VISIONARY

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PLACES

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WHAT’S NEW SHOP

“ONE OF MY FAVORITE THINGS ABOUT SUMMER

is bringing together family and friends for long, leisurely meals. I love the stress-free entertaining of serving everything family style on large stoneware platters and wood boards. I pour my favorite rose in stemless glasses to keep everything casual and usually have a few bottles on ice in a large ceramic bowl. The one thing that I always add is beautiful oversized linen napkins and candle light; this small touch of luxury makes all of my guests feel welcome and lets them know that they can relax and enjoy the warm summer evening.” - SAM HAMILTON

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PRODUCT

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CLOTH & PAPER

Summer Style

Sam Hamilton, Proprietress of the San Francisco Design and Culinary Emporium March is a Master at Merging the Two Worlds Together

JULY/AUGUST 2018 | 39


Notebook | VISIONARY

For product information please visit www.marchsf.com.

“The one thing that I always add is beautiful oversized linen napkins and candle light; this small touch of luxury makes all of my guests feel welcome and lets them know that they can relax and enjoy the warm summer evening.” - SAM HAMILTON

40 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


JULY/AUGUST 2018 | 41


Notebook | WHAT’S NEW PLACES

LAS ALCOBAS NAPA VALLEY

Five Star Luxury Resort in St Helena blending classic farmhouse style with contemporary curated luxury

A RECENT ADDITION TO NAPA VALLEY LAS ALCOBAS

is a perfect spot for an adult summer getaway. The eminent firm Yabu Pushelberg who endowed many of the hotel’s rooms with terraces that overlook the region’s lush wine-growing landscape designed the 68-room property. The Hotel restaurant Acacia House is a winemakermeeting place. Most likely you will spot a few local winemaking legends during your meal. The kitchen is helmed by acclaimed Chris Consentino. The menu is predicated on all that is light, fresh and locally sourced. Before heading out for a day at the wineries, have an Herb Tonic - an elixir concocted from apple, basil, cilantro, cucumber, spinach and ginger. The spa Atrio is located in a contemporary farmhouse with an apothecary in the entrance. They offer an extensive list of facial and body treatments. CH Las Alcobas Napa Valley, 1915 Main Street, St. Helena, CA 707.963.7000, www.lasalcobasnapavalley.com

42 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


Notebook | WHAT’S NEW SHOP 1.

URBAN BARN The innovative Los Angeles design shop Garde has opened a second location in Summerland

JUST IN TIME FOR SUMMER the much loved design duo Scotti Sitz and John Davidson have opened another outpost of their beloved Los Angeles design shop outside of Santa Barbara in the quaint coastal town of Summerland. The showroom is located in a historic 1921 Shaker inspired barn that they have transformed into the “Garde” look of minimalist global design. CH

Garde, 2280 Lillie Avenue, Summerland, CA 93067, 805.845.8384, www.gardeshop.com

3. Designed by Marcus Jacka of Non-Standard Furniture in England. Bowl is solid ash. The ash is turned while it is still green. The bowl is carefully dried using a unique process, to reveal the subtle internal form. The Rush Chair is a combination of steam-bent and turned English oak. The traditional rushwork seat is woven by a fourth-generation basket weaver in the north of England. 2. Vase Designed by John Born of Humble Ceramics in New York. 3. Marble pieces designed by Belgian designer Michael Verheyden. 1.

44 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

2.


It May Save Your Home From Fire

“Randy, your trail saved our home from the fire!”

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Notebook | PRODUCT

SUMMER GAMES Hermès Paddle Ball Boards are the Perfect Beach Accessory for the Design Enthusiast

JEUX D’ANIMAUX PADDLE BALL SET Set of two printed paddles and a ball www.hermes.com

46 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


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Notebook | PRODUCT

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A selection of our favorite pieces from the masters of modern home furnishings, Mitchell Gold

1. SlipcovereHunter Chair 2. Sloane Sofa 3. Major Chair with Geometric Perspective Wall Art

OFTEN REFERRED TO AS THE MASTERS OF MODERN

home furnishings, Mitchell Gold and Bob Williams have created a collection that is not only stylish but also comfortable and family friendly. The made in America upholstery is handcrafted in their 600,000 sq-ft factory, based in Taylorsville, North Carolina. Each piece is carefully bench-made by skilled artisans to create a work of art that will stand the test of time. CH Mitchell Gold and Bob Williams, www.mgbwhome.com

48 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


In wine there is truth. www.capoisetta.com


Notebook | PRODUCT

OFF THE WALL

BeoSound Shape is a wall-mounted wireless speaker system for design conscious music lovers – delivering immersive sound staging, a customizable design and integrated noise dampers for improved room acoustics. UNLIKE ANY OTHER SPEAKER SYSTEM, you define the size, shape, and color – even the sound performance according to your preferences. The modular tile concept behind BeoSound Shape is based on a single geometric shape, the hexagon. Each tile serves a function as speaker, amplifier or acoustic damper and can be pieced together in endless combinations and sizes, to serve rooms both big and small. BeoSound Shape is a uniquely flexible speaker system that can grow and evolve with the changing ways you live. Rearrange the tiles to form a new pattern, change the colors when you redecorate or add more tiles to boost sound performance or acoustic damping properties. CH

Bang & Olufsen South Coast Collection, Costa Mesa, 3323-B Hyland Avenue, 714.617.5817, www.bang-olufsensocal.com Bang & Ulufsen Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, 479 N. Rodeo Drive, 310.247.7785, www.bang-olufsensocal.com

50 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


Notebook | CLOTH & PAPER

ART & NATURE

Half Full Launches Wallpaper Collection Inspired by Nature KELLIE MENENDEZ AND ONDREA VICKLUND’S

mutual passion for art and nature formed the fabric of their friendship in art school and became the foundation for a budding business partnership. With backgrounds in fine art and illustration wallpaper featuring animals the co-founders admire felt like a natural first step for the artists, who draw or paint every design by hand. The collection features three wallpaper lines meant to evoke unique natural environments. Wild depicts animals most commonly found in nature, such as deer owls, mice, hummingbirds, kingfishers, and foxes. Endangered illustrates animals at risk of extinction, including black spider monkeys, black robins and rhinos. And Elements is a more abstract series of nature-inspired textures like feathers, scales, leaves, and waves. The company pays homage to the natural world by supporting conservation efforts that protect the future of the wildlife and wild environments it illustrates. CH San Francisco | 2 Henry Adams Street, Suite M-8 Los Angeles | ALT LA | 808 N. La Cienega Boulevard www.halffull.life

52 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


DESIGN IMPACTS LIFE Hire an ASID Orange County Designer to Change Yours

Schedule a one-on-one consultation with one of ASID OC Designers during our Designer For Hire chapter fundraiser for the special rate of only $75/hour for a 2 hour maximum ($300 Value) CALIFORNIA ORANGE COUNTY ASID is a not for profit organization

www.caoc.asid.org/designer-for-hire For Registration Details


Notebook | CLOTH & PAPER

The collection features three wallpaper lines meant to evoke unique natural environments.

The company pays homage to the natural world by supporting conservation efforts that protect the future of the wildlife and wild environments it illustrates. 54 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


1 9 8 8 to

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Designer Profile

NATURAL WONDER

Pamela Pennington feels she was born with the “perfect eye” for design BY KATHY BRYANT

ABOVE A California retreat cottage in Woodside. Photograph by Eric Zepeda. TOP RIGHT Founding principal Pamela Pennington. Photograph by Todd Grilli. RIGHT Remodeled Victorian kitchen updated into an eclectic and playful space with sky blue high gloss ceilings and modern fixtures. Photograph by Suzanna Scott. OPPOSITE TOP Textures and details from a classic contemporary home with a modernist twist. Photograph by Eric Zepeda. OPPOSITE BOTTOM A modern rusticbreakfast nook with sliding doors that connect the interiors to the spectacular views in Monte Sereno. Photograph by Eric Zepeda.

56 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

WHEN ASKED HOW SHE MANAGED TO thrive over forty years in the interior design field, Pamela Pennington laughed and said, “Stamina.” Pennington, the founding principal of Pennington Studios in Palo Alto, moved from Newport Beach in 1967 to Palo Alto so she could design interiors with a modern slant. “I loved modern furnishings like Danish designs and that was more accepted in northern California.” Pennington knew from childhood that she was destined to be a designer and was fortuitously born with a “perfect eye.” “I’m so visual, to the extreme. I can see immediately how a room should look with mass and balance. My job as a designer is to educate my clients to really look at things, not just react. We do full houses and get involved with the architecture during the building process.” Working with architects is Pennington’s favorite thing to do because then she can really deal with correct proportions and make necessary changes. “My passion is for interior architecture and I make sure that the rooms are the right canvas.” Sometimes doors need to be wider, ceilings need to be lowered, lighting needs to be altered. To her, the actual furnishings are important but it’s the architecture that makes the house livable. If the


“For me, the most fun is to have a client who is involved but listens. They may have a point of view that’s not mine, but I figure out how to make it work. We don’t rubber stamp projects.” - PAMELA PENNINGTON

architecture is right, people love their homes. She keeps the shell of the house in neutral colors and then layers in fabrics, furniture and lighting fixtures. “For me, the most fun is to have a client who is involved but listens. They may have a point of view that’s not mine, but I figure out how to make it work. We don’t rubber stamp projects,” says Pennington. Correct lighting is another aspect of the project that she’s nuts about. “There are so many types of lighting: task, full background, art, kitchen. You can change the mood of the house through lighting. An exciting thing today is decorative lighting. People now want stairwell lighting, special fixtures over the dining room table. Lighting can be the jewelry for the room.” Pennington takes her interior design business very seriously because of the intimate relationship that evolves with the clients. “How many other professions do you get to really know people and their lives? I love that aspect of the business.” As to the future, Pennington still gets excited to find new textiles, wallpapers that mimic murals, even light switches that fade into the wall. “I get a burst of energy when I find new products and innovations. I have a staff of six who work well together and I feel that they will carry on my legacy. I love to see my staff blossom.” And they will continue to do so with Pennington there as inspiration. CH www.pamelapenningtonstudios.com JULY/AUGUST 2018 | 57


Builder Profile

HILTON BUILDERS

Dan and Patricia Hilton have enjoyed enduring success building beautiful homes BY KAVITA DASWANI

HOUSES CONSTRUCTED BY HILTON BUILDERS have

graced the Orange County coastline for some 42 years, spanning every conceivable architecture style, from sprawling Mediterranean to sleek contemporary. The Newport Beach-based company, co-founded by Dan and Patricia Hilton, has been acclaimed for four decades for its solid and substantial custom homes - houses that are conceivably legacy properties, passed on from one generation to the next. Patricia Hilton says there are numerous keys to the company’s longevity and enduring success, starting from attentively listening to the needs and wants of prospective clients, working

58 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

closely with the architect on the project, to what she describes as total transparency. “We have an open book system, so the client can see the bids and understand why their house costs what it does,” she said. “Every single detail is listed.” As a result of this ongoing communication, costly change orders - the bane of every home building client - can be largely avoided. “We go through every detail of the house,” she said. “We sit down with them and go over the plans and ask about all these details. If you don’t do that, you end up having all these change

ABOVE A contemporary style is one of many that can be built by Hilton Builders, depending on the personal tastes and lifestyle of the client.


LEFT The indoor-outdoor lifestyle is one that is captured in many Hilton Builders homes. BELOW Graceful arches and beautiful stonework convey an elegant Southern Californian feel. BOTTOM RIGHT High ceilings and natural light allow for an airy spaciousness in this home.

“With construction, you get what you pay for and things need to be well made so they are safe, to code and built to last, but they still need to be reasonably priced.” - PATRICIA HILTON

orders, and that’s not the way we work.” Anticipating exactly how a family intends to live in the space is another crucial component of the Hilton Builders ethos. In addition to the considerable logistics involved with constructing the house, Hilton says that no detail is too small when it comes to the various interior spaces. For example, some clients may want a ‘showpiece’ kitchen that is hardly used. For others, the kitchen could be heart of the house and the family may require ample space for all their various cooking accoutrements. These are some of the personal factors that need to be taken into consideration. “Before you start, make a list of what you love and hate about where you currently live, right down to the details,”

JULY/AUGUST 2018 | 59


Builder Profile

BELOW A substantial kitchen with plenty of space for counter-dining is built for the home chef in mind.

“We have become friends with the majority of our clients because we treated them like we would want to be treated. We had open communication, we were considerate of the homeowners, we went above and beyond and made it fun for them.” - PATRICIA HILTON

she said. “You don’t want to have a house designed to omit a feature you love or include one you would rather live without. A mantle, for instance, can often not appear in contemporary designs yet that may affect many people’s holiday traditions. A dog door won’t be designed into a house unless you tell your architect or designer that you have a dog that requires one. This is the reason we like to truly get to know our clients, so we know what they would want before they even think to ask about something.” Hilton tells of one particular anecdote of a client who had a beautiful walk-in closet with 15-foot ceilings, with rods for her clothing scaling those heights. While that sounds lovely in principle, this client was 5’2”, and had to use a library-style ladder to retrieve a garment. Hilton

and her team did some research, and created an ingenious shelving system that allowed the client to pull down the high racks without having her feet leave the ground. In addition, she counsels people who are considering building or remodeling to ask plenty of questions of their potential builders, and cast a skeptical eye over seemingly low bids. “Any builder that tries to low ball bid and then up-charge should not be hired,” said Hilton “Your builder should make sure you know where every penny is going even before it is paid. Try to remember that if it seems too good to be true, it is. With construction, you get what you pay for and things need to be well made so they are safe, to code and built to last, but they still need to be reasonably priced.” And ultimately, said Hilton, it is that sort of clarity of communication, and integrity in their dealings, that has made the company a stalwart of the Orange County custom building landscape. CH www.hiltonbuilders.com


A PERSONAL

& P ROVO CAT I V E

TOUR OF THE

OREGON WINE SCENE

Available wherever fine books are sold or online at www.arcadiapublishing.com

AND

The History Press


Events & Affairs OUTSIDE LANDS MUSIC FESTIVAL

FESTIVAL OF ARTS On Thursday nights, indulge your senses at the “Art, Jazz, Wine and Chocolate” series this summer at Festival of Arts, July 12, 19 and 16th from 5:30–7:30pm. Sample a wide variety of Kendall-Jackson wines expertly selected to compliment and enhance the nuanced flavor of highend chocolates. The Festival’s casual and classy outdoor setting, together with the soulful sounds of jazz surrounded by fine art, creates an ideal evening for friends, sweethearts, and family. Concerts are free; Wine and Chocolate pairings (21 and over) are $20 in addition to Festival of Arts admission. Uncork your creativity this summer at the Festival of Arts with Wine and Painting Nights Saturdays, July 7-August 18, 2018. Enjoy a fun painting workshop, while surrounded by beautiful art. Beginners and all levels are invited and can take home their finished masterpiece. All supplies and complimentary wine or beverage are included. $75 fee per person, per class. For more information please call 800.487.3378 or visit www.foapom.com.

62 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

Outside Lands is one of the largest San Francisco events in August. This three-day music festival features more than seventy well-known artists on multiple stages, as well as local food, wine, and beer vendors. Each year it’s held in Golden Gate Park near the Polo Field. The highly anticipated Outside Lands Festival in San Francisco this year will take place August 10-12, 2018 on the western side of the city in Golden Gate Park. Chart-topping R&B star The Weeknd, acclaimed rock act Florence + The Machine and pop music icon Janet Jackson are this year’s headliners. Other performers include Future, Beck, Bon Iver, Huey Lewis & The News, Mac DeMarco, Father John Misty, Chromeo, BØRNS, The Growlers, Rex Orange County, ODESZA and many more. For more information please visit www.sfoutsidelands.com.

SAWDUST ART FESTIVAL Friday, June 29-September 2, 2018; open 10am-10pm daily. Art enthusiasts, collectors, and novice artists have come to the Sawdust since their beginning in 1966 for their mix of fine art and craft. Media include handblown and fused glass, painting, jewelry, surf art, ceramics, clothing and textiles, wood and metal sculpture, scrimshaw, photography, and so much more. Located in Laguna Beach, the world-renowned Sawdust Art Festival is a short walk from one of the most beautiful destination beaches in Orange County. Set in a cool 3-acre eucalyptus grove, the Sawdust is a picturesque and eccentric hand-built village featuring the fine art and craft of over 200 local artists. For more information please call 800.877.1115 or visit www.sandustfestival.org.


TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD CELEBRATION HONORING

ROCKY LAFLEUR SEPTEMBER 26, 2018 | 6:30 PM AT PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT THE HAROLD GRIEVE SCHOLARSHIP FUND ••••••• TICKETS AND INFORMATION www.HONORROCKY.com For sponsorship opportunities contact: Suzanne@suzannefurstinteriors.com For tribute book advertising contact: Lynn at goldlemay@aol.com PRESENTED BY ASID/LOS ANGELES


Events & Affairs KING TUT – CALIFORNIA SCIENCE CENTER

THE AMERICAN CRAFT SHOW The American Craft Show returns to San Francisco’s Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture on August 3–5, 2018. As the largest juried, fine craft show on the West Coast, the three-day show will showcase more than 250 of the top contemporary craft artists from across the country. Additionally, top artisanal food and drink purveyors will offer attendees a chance to unwind and relax while shopping. As part of the show’s popular Let’s Make showcase, which encourages show-goers to touch, feel, taste, and interact with the process of making, MONK Drinking Botanicals and McEvoy Ranch will be prominently on display. All the rage, MONK’s handcrafted, fresh-pressed juices, herbs, and organic CBD extracts are designed to relax, restore, and revitalize mind and body. While well-known for its organic, Tuscan-style extra virgin olive oil, McEvoy Ranch produces wine, olive oil-based body care and specialty foods at its beautiful family-owned estate in the hills west of Petaluma. For more info please call 612.206.3100 or visit www.craftcouncil.org.

13TH ANNUAL FINE ART FESTIVAL ArtWalk brings fine art outside under San Diego’s sunny skies to create the perfect viewing art under natural light and purchase artwork directly from the finest artists in the region. ArtWalk @ Liberty Station celebrates 13 years of bringing visual arts, music, and interactive art-making for families to San Diego in beautiful Ingram Plaza at the Arts District at Liberty Station. Once San Diego’s Naval Training Center, the Arts District at Liberty Station has blossomed into San Diego’s premier venue for the arts, museums, dining and entertainment. This fine art festival is part of the ArtWalk San Diego brand known for bringing together all facets of the arts in San Diego while promoting the experience of owning original art. We are looking forward to welcoming more than 200 international, national and local San Diego artists, showcasing every medium including painting, sculpture, glass work, fine jewelry, photography and more. Along with the art, attendees will also be able to enjoy live music, interactive art for kids and the kids at heart, street food options and a wine and beer pavilion. For more information please call 619.615.1090 or visit artwalksandiego.org. 64 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

To celebrate the 100-year anniversary of the discovery of King Tut’s tomb, the California Science Center proudly presents the world premiere ofKing Tut: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh–the largest King Tut exhibition ever toured! Discover over 150 authentic artifacts from King Tut’s celebrated tomb–60 of which have never traveled outside of Egypt, until now. In a dramatic new presentation, dazzling multimedia complements rare artifacts to take guests on an immersive journey of the pharaoh’s quest for immortality. Examine exquisite rings found on King Tut’s fingers, opulent jewelry that adorned his body, and the gold sandals placed on his feet upon burial. Discover how the scientific analysis of King Tut’s 3,300-year-old mummy has revealed new information about his health and lineage, and how cutting-edge technologies have played a role in discovering new tombs and analyzing existing ones in ways never before imagined. King Tut: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh in view at the California Science Center until Early January 2019. For more information please call 323.724.3623 or visit www.californiasciencecenter.org.

Laboratoriorosso, Viterbo/Italy


GATHERINGS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOM PASCUCCI

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LEGENDS 2018 California Homes Magazine and The Elegant Christopher Farr Showroom Host Architect Erik Peterson and Designer Barclay Butera Architect Erik Peterson and Designer Barclay Butera held a lively discussion with California Homes Editor, Susan McFadden on Outdoor Living at the recent LEGENDS, La Cienega Design Quarter. The theme for LEGENDS 2018 was Today’s Vision Tomorrow’s Home. The event was hosted by the Christopher Farr showroom on La Cienega with standing room only. After the event guests enjoyed Champagne and treats in the beautiful Christopher Farr patio.

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1 First row: Jennifer Convy, Courtney Pisarik, Laiza Cors, Barclay Butera and Lonni Paul, Second row: Steven Cooper, Charles Miller from Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting 2 Heidi Gerpheide, Publisher, California Homes Magazine 3 Liz Graves, Architect Erik Peterson, and Nicole Aronson 4 Joe Rainsford, Director at Christopher Farr and Jordan Charpentier Sales Associate

5 Christine Anderson, Communication Arts + Design PR with Gary Christensen Director of Mehraban 6 Post discussion guests enjoying Champagne on the Christopher Farr patio 7 Architect Erik Peterson, interior designer Barclay Butera, and Susan McFadden, Editorin-Chief of California Homes

JULY/AUGUST 2018 | 65


CALIFORNIA HOMES

THE MAGAZINE OF ARCHITECTURE THE ARTS & DISTINCTIVE DESIGN

Showcase Houses PASADENA | SAN FRANCISCO

+

VACATION HOME

EAST COAST BEAUTIFUL

PUBLISHED SIX TIMES A YEAR Jan/Feb Mar/April May/June July/Aug Sept/Oct Nov/Dec TO SUBSCRIBE www.calhomesmagazine.com 818.286.3103


FEATURES

JULY/AUGUST 2018

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David Nash’s wood sculpture “Sliced Egg” is silhouetted against a window in the Art Salon Dining Room. David Bjørngaard juxtaposed this with David Maisel’s provocative aerial photograph of Clifton, Arizona from the “The Mining Project.” Photograph by Mariko Reed.


THE 2018 SAN FRANCISCO DECORATOR SHOWCASE TEXT BY KENDRA BOUTELL

House of Many Colors


LEFT Spanish photographer Andrea Torres Balaguer’s portrait teases the viewer In the Ten Thousand Dreams master bedroom. Photograph by Jose Manuel Alorda.

T

HE 2018 S AN FRANCIS CO

Decorator Showcase stopped traffic on Marina Blvd this year. A.J. Oishi, in collaboration with Simon Breitbard Fine Arts, painted a Delaunay-esque mural on the white stucco facade of the 1930 Spanish Revival home. Titled “Eyes on Hue,” Oishi’s brilliantly colored concentric shapes and the house’s majestic views of the Bay, Golden Gate Bridge, Alcatraz Island and Marina Green influenced the contributing designers. David Bjørngaard of Bjørn Design’s Art Salon Dining Room echoed the colors of sea and land. Above the round walnut dining table, Bjørn installed a mobile by Julie Condon of hand blown glass, gemstones, and crystals. An unexpected substitute for a chandelier, the fixture resembled sea glass. Kyle Bunting’s hide rug represented an abstracted interpretation of the headland’s meadows. The walls focused on artwork from alumni of Marin’s Headlands Center for the Arts Program. Adjacent to the dining room, Ian Stallings’ Good Vibes Only kitchen and breakfast nook featured glossy cobalt cabinetry, and matching powder-coated appliances from BlueStar. In the sunken family room, Stallings grounded the area with a rainbow hued striped carpet by Paul Smith for the Rug Company. The Vladimir Kagan Omnibus sofa upholstered in a bold shade of saffron along with a pair of vintage Sia club chairs in midnight blue provided the perfect place to relax at the end of the day. Down the hall in the diminutive Tangerine 70 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


LEFT Luke

Butler’s acrylic-on-canvas painting “The End XXXI” surveys the dining table. Photograph by Mariko Reed. BELOW In the Unapologetically Pink Rosé Lounge, DeMuro Das, Ellipsis Copper Ring Mirror surmounts Valentin Loellmann’s Copper Console. Photograph by David Duncan Livingston.

LEFT For the Family Room, Ian Stallings selected “Fox” a grotesquely whimsical oil painting by Peter Opheim. Photograph by David Duncan Livingston.

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In the kitchen, Stallings matched the Farrow & Ball cabinet paint to the custom Blue Star Grey Blue appliances.

BELOW LEFT

BELOW RIGHT Jon De La Cruz grounded his tented The Lady Cave with a Custom Shag Moroccan by Mark Nelson Design. OPPOSITE In Dina Bandman’s Lemondrop Lullaby nursery she anchored the room with a vintage Oushak carpet sourced from Floor Design. (3) Photographs by Christopher Stark.


BELOW LEFT Textured linens on the walls and rich details underscore an elegant dining room, from Elizabeth Lamont of Room at the Beach. BELOW RIGHT The

dramatic light fixture and glass panels serve as a modern backdrop to the multi-purpose mezzanine. Design by Cabana Home Santa Barbara. OPPOSITE A chic and cozy reading nook will make guests never want to leave. Designed by June Scott Design.

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Down the hall in the diminutive Tangerine Dream Lounge, Willem Racké and Susan Lind Chastain chose a color palette of orange and cream. Inspired by an abstract painting from the 1960’s, Racké painted two focal walls a graphic design giving the illusion of infinity while Chastain fabricated drapes from Rosemary Hallgarten’s ombré textile to cocoon the room.

74 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


LEFT Caste’s Kintla Chair in pure bronze adds a sculptural not to the master bedroom. Photograph by Jose Manuel Alorda.

A.J. Oishi’s “Eyes on Hue,” the first exterior art installation for the San Francisco Decorator Showcase.

BELOW LEFT

For Willem Racké and Susan Lind Chastain’s Tangerine Dream Lounge, the walls were painted on muslin in Racké’s studio and then installed on site.

OPPOSITE

Dream Lounge, Willem Racké and Susan Lind Chastain chose a color palette of orange and cream. Inspired by an abstract painting from the 1960’s, Racké painted two focal walls a graphic design giving the illusion of infinity while Chastain fabricated drapes from Rosemary Hallgarten’s ombré textile to cocoon the room. The mid-century retreat mixed a settee by Guglielmo Veronesi circa the 1950s mixes with a vintage Jean Touret desk from the same era. Leaving Racké and Chastain’s Cointreau flavored room, visitors found Melanie Coddington’s Unapologetically Pink Rosé Lounge upstairs. The rose and aubergine lounge centered around Noble Goods hexagon shaped Shard Cocktail Table. The table constructed of a walnut base with white cast concrete top included brass inlaid rings to mimic wine stains. Coddington paired this with a mid-century style gondola sofa and a Milo Baughman swivel chair. Because the lounge was a walkthrough space to other rooms, she custom designed Fiona Curran’s Zap Area Rug, to compliment nearby color schemes. Touches of blue in the carpet related to Jeff Schlarb’s Ten Thousand Dreams Master Bedroom. Schlarb collaborated with Tracy Kendall Wallcovering for the indigo fringe wallpaper. A circular ottoman conjoined to the bed encouraged revelry beneath a chandelier of hand blown glass stars. From Ten Thousand Dreams to One Thousand and One Nights, the modernday Scheherazade escaped to Jon de la Cruz’s The Lady Cave. Cruz tented the lower room in Medina, an aqua ikat fabric from Jane Churchill. Deep channeled velvet banquettes and ottomans upholstered in sea blues and citrines added to the harem like ambiance. Not forgetting the infant of the home, Dina Bandman created the whimsical Lemondrop Lullaby nursery. Custom de Gournay wallcovering and drapery fabric in gender-neutral yellow and green enveloped the room. Bandman’s inspiration for the citrus-infused design came from Italian travels and California’s Mediterranean JULY/AUGUST 2018 | 75


Storied Past (2) PHOTOGRAPHS BY BRAD KNIPSTEIN

MELANIE CODDINGTON REINVENTS A HISTORIC SAN FRANCISCO VICTORIAN TEXT BY KENDRA BOUTELL | PHOTOGRAPHY BY VIVIAN JOHNSON


JULY/AUGUST 2018 | 77


78 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


For the tête-à-tête chaise, Coddington selected Zinc’s Hutton Moonbeam, a cotton velvet with metallic looking yarn woven through the ground cloth. Bolster pillows in Castel’s Ikat Satara adds punch.

LEFT

Designer Melanie Coddington lounging in her clients finished living room.

RIGHT

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H E O N C E G R A N D PA C I F I C H E I G H T S V I CT O R I A N H A D A

storied past. Designed by the Reid Brothers at the fin de siècle for an industrialist, Julia Morgan renovated the Classical Revival mansion in 1930. During the sixties, it became home to an arts patron. He often hosted friends, family, and the renowned in the formal living room, dining room, and parlor of the three-story estate. Guests included prima-ballerina Margot Fonteyn, principal dancer Rudolf Nureyev, soprano Leontyne Price, and Tonga’s King Taufa’ahau Tupou IV.“ By the time interior designer Melanie Coddington’s clients purchased the property, it was in a state of disrepair. Divided into four apartment units with small cramped rooms the couple, both real estate agents, saw its potential. With its Corinthian entryway columns, corbels, vaulted ceilings, bay windows, and generous park-like grounds, it was the perfect place to raise their two young daughters. The restoration of the house took over four years and resulted in an open functional floor plan. Coddington’s clients enjoy entertaining, and the designer set the tone at the entry. Sand colored walls highlight Julia Morgan’s dramatic carved wood floor to ceiling mirror. A French Modernist styled console from Newell Design and contemporary Italian nickel finished light fixtures update the space. Dakota Jackson’s Martini Bench upholstered in brown leather provides the perfect place to pause. In the adjacent living room, Coddington lacquered the walls bright white and the ceiling celestial blue. A sleek Carrera marble mantle centers the room. For upholstery, the designer flanked the fireplace with Ted Boener’s Cloudbox Sofa in pale blue flannel and a tête-à-tête chaise from A.Rudin. A sculptural polished chrome coffee table base with oval glass top visually floats. Ironies’ resin Cross Hatch Chandelier illuminates the area. In the bay window, Coddington placed a pair of mid-century styled lounge chairs covered in geometric square design velvet. She juxtaposed this with a circular ottoman upholstered in cream leather with nickel nailhead trim. Ascending the Julia Morgan-designed staircase to the master bedroom, the ethereal color palette of the main floor continues. Blue-grey textiles dress the Altura Arris bed with a tufted, upholstered headboard panel and bed rails covered in faux stingray. Jonathan Browning’s Ventoux Swing Arm Sconces allow for bedtime reading. At the foot of the bed, Madeline Stuart’s parcel gilt Balzac Bench adds a touch of glamour. Coddington added an azure lounge chair where her clients gaze out at the cityscape or quietly daydream. CH

JULY/AUGUST 2018 | 79


BELOW LEFT In the master bedroom, Sahco’s Avalon velvet upholstered a Yves Club Chair from Coup D’Etat. BELOW RIGHT The modern lines of the living room fireplace added a counterpoint to the Victorian architecture of the home.

In the grand entry, Bruno Rainaldi’s sphere pendant from Terzani casts a romantic glow during parties. Coddington companioned this with sconces fabricated from lengths of draped nickel chain.

OPPOSITE


Coddington upholstered the master bedroom’s headboard in Holly Hunt’s leather Stingray in Pearl River. A contemporary carpet from Start grounds the space.

LEFT

In addition to a generous interior square footage, the property sits on nearly 1/4 of an acre of land. The parklike grounds

OPPOSITE

Ascending the Julia Morgan-designed staircase to the master bedroom, the ethereal color palette of the main floor continues. 82 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


JULY/AUGUST 2018 | 83


2018 Pasadena Showcase House INTERIOR DESIGNERS CREATED LOOKS TRUE TO THEIR OWN DESIGN WHILE KEEPING WITHIN THE CONTEMPORARY STYLE OF THIS HOME DESIGNED BY REGINALD DAVID JOHNSON IN 1915 TEXT BY KAVITA DASWANI | PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETER CHRISTIANSEN VALLI


E

VERY YEAR FOR THE PAST 54 YEARS, thousands of people have traipsed through a stately mansion in Pasadena, gazing at the meticulously-curated interiors. The Pasadena Showcase House of Design has become among the most highly-anticipated design events in the Los Angeles area, a month-long event that serves to spotlight design, architecture and classical music; proceeds from ticket sales are typically earmarked for musical organizations such as the Los Angeles Philharmonic. The most recent showcase ran from April 22 - May 20 and attracted some 35,000 people.The 12,277 square foot Altadena home, named Overlook and designed by Reginald David Johnson in 1915, had been featured in 2002 under its previous owners. Fort his year’s showcase, designers were from all around Southern California, and were tasked with creating looks that were true to 86 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

their own individual aesthetics, while in keeping with the contemporary style of the home. “We wanted the house to have a cohesive look,” said Cynthia Lambakis, principal designer of Erderra Design Studio in Pasadena and interior advisor on the project. “They went off what the current homeowners had in the house.” These included significant pieces like a glass railing upstairs replacing a former Spanish iron railing, and dramatic lighting from Lindsey Adelman. Below are some highlights from the Showcase, together with input from the designers about their vision for their individual spaces.

GRAND FOYER BY AMY PELTIER, OWNER OF PELTIER INTERIORS, PASADENA “I walked into the space and my mouth hit the floor,” said Peltier. “The biggest impact comes from the black and white floors in a graphic, modern pattern using Spanish marble. There are blue and white vases, Chinoiserie chairs, a mahogany table, crisp


bright colors to cut through the black and white. It was a balance between the classical and the modern.”

KITCHEN BY JEANNE K. CHUNG, INC. APPLIANCES FROM FERGUSON BATH, KITCHEN & LIGHTING GALLERY IN PASADENA “The details make all the difference,” said Chung. “If you strip everything down to the base layer, it’s pretty neutral. But when you walk in, it doesn’t read as neutral at all. There are pops of color throughout, as in the malachite green throughout the kitchen, in accents on the vintage pottery, the banquette. The family room had Fornasetti black and malachite patterned wallpaper and we went off that.” Stainless steel cooking appliances from Wolf worked well with the unlacquered brass faucets, said Ruben Arroyo, showroom manager of Ferguson Bath, Kitchen and Lighting Gallery in

Pasadena. “More and more brass is making its way into modern designs to give a warm yet still cutting edge feel,” said Arroyo.

DINING ROOM BY ELIZABETH LAMONT, OWNER OF ROOM AT THE BEACH, MALIBU

“We wanted the room to be light-filled, like we were bringing the garden inside, to have serenity and piece. We started with a beautiful painting from Anne Neilson, an artist out of Dallas, which was the muse of the room. For the furnishings, we liked the juxtaposition of the soft furnishings mixed with the weft texture on the dining table’s lacquer top, the textured linen upholstering the walls, details like the acrylic handles on the buffet and beautiful hardware. We wanted it to be engaging, current, contemporary with a nod to

ABOVE Pops of a deep malachite green elevate the neutrality of the kitchen. Designed by Jeanne K. Chung, Inc. OPPOSITE Butler’s pantry off the kitchen wall continues with the malachite green. Designed by Jeanne K. Chung, Inc.

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BELOW LEFT Textured linens

on the walls and rich details underscore an elegant dining room, from Elizabeth Lamont of Room at the Beach. BELOW RIGHT The dramatic light fixture and glass panels serve as a modern backdrop to the multi-purpose mezzanine. Design by Cabana Home Santa Barbara. OPPOSITE A chic and cozy reading nook will make guests never want to leave. Designed by June Scott Design.


“We wanted the house to have a cohesive look,” said Cynthia Lambakis, principal designer of Erderra Design Studio in Pasadena and interior advisor on the project. “They went off what the current homeowners had in the house.” tradition. We even created place cards and used embroidered linens and china from Rosenthal for a mock dinner party with Arianna Huffington, Bill Gates and Harry Connick Jr.”

LIVING ROOM BY INTERIOR DESIGN WESTLAKE, WESTLAKE VILLAGE “Our vision for the crown jewel…the living room, was to create an upscale, chic, dramatic urban space,” said Genaro Lagdameo, director of design. “We hope that guests gasp when they see the dramatic floor-to-ceiling sheer panels that overlay the smokey paint color, designed to create a splendid, ethereal mood. To emphasize the European architecture of the home, the ceiling and its intricate face and crown molding is painted a subtle, metallic gold to create the Parisian feel of a grand salon.”

MEZZANINE BY CABANA HOME PRINCIPALS STEVE & CAROLINE THOMPSON, SANTA BARBARA “It’s funny to see how times have changed,” said Caroline Thompson. ‘Before we started, the owners are taken out some of the more traditional Spanish revival elements and replaced them. There was originally an iron railing between the barley-twist columns until glass panels were put in. And Lindsey Adelman’s fixtures are contemporary

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and set the tone for where we needed to go. We wanted to make sure we were respectful to the crown jewel, which was the light fixture visible from the entire foyer and mezzanine. A lot of the time mezzanines are just thoroughfares and don’t allow you time to pause, sit and read a book. This one was large enough at one end to be able to make a sitting area that someone could actually enjoy. The space is so gracious.”

POWDER ROOM BY LOUISE O’MALLEY, LOS ANGELES “I had the smallest space in the house so wanted to have a big punch. I knew the homeowner liked black and white so we went from there,” said O’Malley. “We upholstered the walls with a Jim Thompson fabric in black linen viscose, used a very cool solid marble vanity by Snyder Diamond and tiles from Walker Zanger. The sconces were from Rejuvenation. I wanted people to leave there going, ‘wow’.”

MASTER BEDROOM BY GREG PARKER OF PARKER WEST INTERIORS, PASADENA “We always take as many cues as possible from the architectural style of the home, which in this case was traditional but not overly decorative.


LEFT The master bedroom suite continued with the traditional design of the home, adding decorative zebra prints on a chair and ottoman. Design by Greg Parker of Parker West Design in Pasadena. BELOW The smallest room in the house needed to have a big punch, said Louise O’Malley, designer of the powder room. OPPOSITE The

dramatic floor-to-ceiling sheer panels that overlay the smoky paint color was designed to create a splendid, ethereal mood. Designed by Interior Design Westlake, Westlake Village.

There was an existing zebra-patterned Scalamandre wall covering in the vestibule going into the bedroom. It was our touchstone and we embraced it. A zebra-print ottoman is a fun reference to that. We got vintage pieces from Susanne Hollis in South Pasadena, including a British colonial reproduction bed. We also have small bedside tables with bone inlaid surfaces.”

THE TERRACE AND OUTDOOR ROOM BY GAD - GARDEN, DESIGN & ARCHITECTURE IN LAGUNA NIGUEL “We liked the turquoise for the outdoors because of the beautiful white architecture of the house,” said Giancarlo Tidelli, managing director of Tidelli Outdoor Living, Orange County.”The turquoise was a nice contrast and worked with the huge turquoise rug we created for the space. Tidelli furniture is made from a specific rope material that we manufacture in Brazil. It’s very sturdy. We used high-backed chairs which helped to fill the space. And a swing that is actually a mix of a swing and a hammock creates a nice outdoor experience. Our idea was to create a space that complements the aesthetic of the house but at the same time be useful for lounging, to be comfortable but also special for entertaining.”

GUEST HOUSE GARDEN BY JUNE SCOTT DESIGN, PASADENA “Our vision was to create a chic entry to the guest house and a secluded garden for guests to relax,” said Scott. “We used clipped greens and junipers that are typical of Mediterranean styles and brought in contemporary plants like Blue Palms with a silvery hue to give it a bit of an edge. A highlight is the series of cabanas to create a reading nook.” CH

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ABOVE Bright

turquoise was selected as an eye-catching counterpoint to the clean white exterior of the house. Furniture from Tidelli.

OPPOSITE Beautiful

pool in the garden is by Jeff Lokker of Huntington Pools in San Dimas. Garden architecture and design including the veranda, poolside garden and courtyard by Leo Cruz and Tatiana Mandelli of Tidelli, West Hollywood.


Interior designer Lynn Myers riffed on the Moroccan theme in the living room with an X-frame inlaid Syrian chair. She added mid-century masterpieces like the ebonized and gilt-trimmed Jansen commode. Visible from the Ocean Club, even the exterior’s side view is impressive with its clean sculpted façade that includes an octagonal window to the master bath and living room windows below it.


A Sculpted Escape ARCHITECT MICHAEL G. IMBER CONCEIVED THIS FLORIDA VACATION HOME AS A BLOCK OF MARBLE TO BE SCULPTED THE RESULT: SINGULARLY ARTFUL ARCHITECTURE TEXT BY CANDACE ORD MANROE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY RICHARD POWERS


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ABOVE An archway to the kitchen announces transition from the heavy plaster-over-concrete bones of the house to the lighter cypress custom kitchen cabinets beyond, says architect Michael G. Imber. The pendant fixture and gilt sunburst are antique. The massive marble table grounds the space without disturbing the cool white envelope of the Venetian plaster.de pro. OPPOSITE An architectural niche with a custom banquette illuminated with antique Spanish lanterns provides shade and intimacy on the pool courtyard.


The tower itself is a four-story element that terminates with an open terrace defined by obelisks originally intended for awnings. Moroccan furnishings include a bone-inlaid table and folding chairs. The vibrant fabrics on pillows— antique suzannis on the sofas and kilims on the floor—hold their own with the brash Florida sun while imbuing the terrace with a far-flung flavor.

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R OM ITS OBELISK- STUDDED

fourth-floor parapet to its Moorish-inspired arches and g l i st e n i n g w h i t e p l a st e r façade, Ocean Tower in Alys Beach, Florida, beckons its Mississippi homeowners with a castlemeets-Caribbean promise of exotic escape. It also lures potential clients to the work of architect Michael G. Imber, who not only designed the home, along with interior designer Lynn Myers, but was a part of the Duany Plater-Zyberk (DPZ) building team that developed the architectural style and building requirements of the new, walkable Alys Beach community. Unlike DPZ’s earlier Seaside, Alys Beach is the first “hurricane hardened” development on either coast. Every structure must be made of concrete block and finished in white plaster. Imber, a native Texan, launched his firm in San Antonio, home to the Alamo, the most famous Spanish Colonial mission with its sad, quixotic history. Two years ago, he opened a second office in San Francisco “after working in California for about 15 years.” The reason is simple. A Spanish Colonial architectural heritage connects California and Texas—and the architect with both. “Because of our shared cultural heritage, we were a natural fit,” he explains. Imber defines his work as a marriage of cultural history and modern lifestyle. But the Florida Panhandle’s dearth of signature architecture meant he and the DPZ building team would look farther afield for inspiration for Alys Beach homes including Ocean Tower. “I’ve always liked the provencial Roman architecture you encounter in southern Spain and North Africa. The simplest, most utilitarian structures continued to be built for thousands of years, changed only with nuances and subtleties.” Imber drew on that 98 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

Moorish influence for Ocean Tower, so “if someone from North Africa or even Rome saw this house, they could understand it. “Alys Beach invented a new aesthetic for an exotic locale,” he continues. “It feels as though it belongs, yet it feels fresh and new. It’s a difficult tightrope to walk.” He also credits the architecture of Antigua and Guatemala as influencing the community’s architectural syntax. T h e h o m e ow n e r s g a v e I m b e r c a r t e blanche—as much as one can have within a “form-based community. Alys Beach has a form-base code: an envelope of requirements that your building must meet,” explains Imber. In addition to the community ’s mandatory fortified concrete construction (30 to 40 percent pricier than stick-frame), Alys Beach had one unique additional requirement for Ocean Tower. Because of its location at a terminus, the building code mandated that Ocean Tower rise up four floors instead of three, to become a visual beacon. “Because of these givens, I saw the project as a sculptor sees a white block of marble—as a deductive process, rather than the additive process more typical of architecture,” Imber says. “It excited us to look at architecture in this new way.” The exterior is defined with curves and flourishes so crisply shaped they might have been fashioned with a sculptor’s chisel and rasp. Though defined, the silhouettes are far from ornate, each elevation drawing in the eye, but with visual language profoundly simple yet bold in its direct, clear-spoken articulation. Some of the most interesting architectural features are a solution to a problem. The obelisks on the tower were intended as sturdy supports for massive awnings, which the homeowners ultimately decided against. Instead, the obelisks remain as stand-alone decoration defining the fourth-floor terrace.

ABOVE From the white kitchen, the windows look out to the pastoral back yard where the clients like to sit outside on warm days enjoying white sangria.

Throughout, the designer accessorized with timeless celadon and white ceramics reflecting the home’s causal atmosphere.

LEFT


LEFT/ABOVE The master bedroom reflects the homeowners’ request that all decoration avoid beachy clichés. The Oly Studio modern tester bed stands in clean relief beneath a crystal Maison Jansen chandelier.

The south-facing front of the house has unobstructed views of the Florida Gulf.

OPPOSITE

“Alys Beach invented a new aesthetic for an exotic locale,” he continues. “It feels as though it belongs, yet it feels fresh and new. It’s a difficult tightrope to walk.” -MICHAEL G. IMBER

They recall the obelisks at the gateway to Alys Beach, integrating the house into the community. The richly fluid lines of the pool wall at the side of the house are another example of turning a liability into an opportunity. “In the middle of the e arl y design, we learned a transformer was on the lot,” recalls Imber. “We carved out a piece of our lot and used it to become a stairway going up and around the pool.” An outer wall shields the pool, which is circumscribed by an interior wall, also high and rhythmically shaped, that actually forms the pool’s banks. “All of the elements came 100 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

together as one interactive piece,” says Imber. Another challenge was how to embrace the ocean views, but not the ruthless southern exposure’s sun. In the living room, the solution was tall French doors divided by exterior white-plaster buttresses that help cut the heat while radiating the light back into the room. Every part of the process for Imber was fun. “The space draws one up, around, and through the lightfilled block—always to a view, and eventually to the open tower overlooking the town and sea,” says Imber. CH


Dining room chairs are by Robert Marinelli. Art by Uta Barth. OPPOSITE The

entry foyer includes Pac white custom art installation.


Henry curated the interior plants adjacent to the staircase in the entry. Lighting by Synergy Lighting and Espace Design. Custom glass panels in nature-inspired shades of blue and green from Dirk Maes at Maes Stained Glass.

LEFT

TRANSITIONAL MODERN in ATHERTON Spare yet striking landscaping by Tom Henry at Orchids de Oro befits the modern vibe of the house.

OPPOSITE

DESIGNER DEBBIE FOGEL WAS GIVEN CREATIVE CONTROL OVER HER CLIENT’S GROUND-UP BUILD

TEXT BY KAVITA DASWANI PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRAD KNIPSTEIN

DESIGNER ADALINE FAGEN FINDS A DREAM JOB ON THE COAST TEXT BY KAVITA DASWANI | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARY E. NICHOLS

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The famiy room includes a custom sectional by Twist Custom in Mokum fabric with a Pac White custom art instllation.

W

HEN DEBBIE FOGEL WAS TOLD,

by her client that she could have creative control over his ground-up build, it wasn’t just a platitude. Fogel, founder of Hermosa Beach-based Fogel Interiors, who runs the business with her daughter Jessica Fogel Scott, selected every single item in the 10,000 square foot house (which includes a guest house), all the way down to the smallest pillow on a child’s bed, and the dessert plates in the china cabinet. “Once I got going, I did every piece of fabric, every accessory,” said Fogel. Her daughter added, “There wasn’t a doorknob, furniture piece, paint color or fork that she didn’t pick out.” (Fogel Scott runs the operations and financial side of the business.) Fogel had previously worked on another home - a historical property in Los Angeles - for her client, Two days after the client, president of a Menlo Park-based 104 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

company, hired Fogel for the Los Angeles property, he bought what he envisioned would become his main home, a traditional estate in Atherton in Northern California. He was planning on tearing down the existing home and reconstructing it for himself and his daughters. He asked Fogel to create “a high quality, beautiful designer home that was also usable and livable,” said Fogel. “It needed to be a place where his girls could play and not worry about destroying something. No room was offlimits,” she said. With that mandate in place, Fogel and her client settled on an interior that could be described as ‘transitional modern’, a pleasing contrast to the traditional architectural style. The project took three years to complete from the purchase of the property, spanning the architectural process, permits, building and furnishing, and wrapped in 2017. It was important to Fogel that each room in the house have a standalone sensibility, with its own distinctive


Rug from Mansour. Pendants by Remains Lighting. Art includes a Damien Hirst butterfly piece and bench by Maxine Snyder.


The kitchen features a custom designed formal china cabinet with custom mesh panels built by Tony Shadle and Nanz Hardware.

BELOW LEFT

BELOW RIGHT Dining room includes Rober Marinelli chairs and a clock chandlier by Alison Berger. OPPOSITE Pallisandro blue slab for waterfall island. Altura bar stools and Kevin Reilly hanging light enhance the kitchen.


aesthete, and throughout, she found inspiration in the unlikeliest places. Like in the woven wood wallpaper that is the defining element of the master bedroom. “I saw it at the Ann Sacks showroom and knew that I had to use it somewhere,” she said of the dark walnut wood, where the material extends to the window frames. The walnut theme reappears in the home office, which Fogel describes as “masculine and dramatic but still modern and not old and stuffy. “I took an old-style library and made it current,” she said. The walnut ceiling of the room took months to design and produce, and is reminiscent of a starburst pattern, and the walls are of an embossed crocodile design, also from Ann Sacks. High-backed chairs are from Gregorius Pineo upholstered in velvet from Peggy Platner. Rugs in the study, as they are throughout the house, are from Mansour. By contrast, the living room is pale, soft and light; a painting from ‘Trees’, an oil on canvas work from the artist Yuroz is a dramatic counterpoint to the muted and calm tones in the space, where Fogel used a soft green combined with taupe for luxuriously inviting sofas from Gregorius

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Pineo made from mohair velvet from Great Plains) and elegant floor-length drapes by Rosemary Hallgarten. Similarly, she first selected a pair of mirrors for the dining room and then built the rest of the room around that. The Achille Mirrors from the French house of Pouenat, sourced from Holly Hunt, are three-dimensional. “When I first saw them, I thought the urchins were in the mirror,’ said Fogel. ‘But they actually sit outside them.” Beneath those is a walnut buffet custom-inlaid with brass by Altura, which picks up on the bronze and brass base of the dining table and the walnut detailing on the Robert Marinelli chairs. Atop the buffet is a series of five Micucci Murano bowls in various colors, which Fogel said afforded a handsome alternative to a more traditional plant, sterling piece or sculpture that might rest on the surface of a buffet. Fogel said that the Atherton home closely reflected her approach to interior design in general. “I tend to have a neutral palette, with always some sort of punch of color,” she said. “It’s kind of how my head designs.” CH


ABOVE Master sitting area includes an art installation by Victor Matthews. Hollly Hunt ottomans and a Christian Liagre sectional with custom pillows ad charm to the area. Rug from Mansour. LEFT Master bedroom includes bedding from Chaz Srevens. A woven walnut wall application is from Ann Sacks. The Holly Hunt bed and nightstands round out the room. Rug from Mansour and lamps from Thomas Lavin. OPPOSITE James Perse exterior furniture with custom pillows and Giati umbrellas add color to the back gardens.

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Wine

DECORDING THE GRAPE The Syrah Sensibility BY KENNETH FRIEDENREICH

BING CROSBY TRAVELED TO PARIS with his family in

October 1960. Although known for his gifts that produced three stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, few may not realize this crooner owed one quarter of the Pittsburgh Pirates for decades. Crosby had an avoidance conflict with the ballclub in that he would hide from the last licks in close games lest he jinx the fortunes of the Pirates. It is an admirable neurosis. In the year noted, Pittsburgh, the underdog, went seven games with the New York Yankees, who went on to cream the pitching of the home team that game. How the contest ended entered the annals of sports legend. But Crosby was in Paris. Further, he pioneered audio

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and video tape technology well before this, so he was supplied ABOVE Ricardo Herrera, Winemaker and Michael with a kinescope of said ballgame Baldacci, President. to his Paris suite. Having a dinner to attend, and given his peculiar LEFT Domaine Serene sports phobia, he never watched Grand Cheval, 8% Syrah the kinescope. and 20% Pinot Noir. It found its way after his estate was settled at his Hillsborough mansion, intact, in his wine cellar, a good place for regulated humidity and temperature. ESPN cast this game entire in 2007, 30 years after Crosby passed into history. Millions saw the famous Bill Mazaroski clout and Yogi Berra’s squat number 8 turned to the ivy as the World Series paycheck got smaller for Yogi’s team--and Casey Stengel lost his job. Maybe Crosby should have played the tape. As it happened Crosby had his own walk-off moment after 18 holes, and 17 years later, providing the long-lost tape saga and some Syrah synchronicity. Syrah is a varietal in the top ten of wine grapes now grown and used. Its moniker also is spelled “Shiraz,” a place name in Persia of old.


ABOVE Syrah fruit is usually dark and vines abundant in their fruit.

Baldacci’s Honey B Vineyard, Los Carneros, Napa Valley.

TOP RIGHT

LEFT Baldacci’s Allwin 2014

Syrah, Napa Valley.

Shiraz is the name as well for this varietal inustralia, where the Penfolds’ “Grange” is a world-class wine justly prized and just as justly pricey. It ages well, like Crosby’s videotape in the wine cellar. Syrah, notes Dan Paynter of Walla-Walla based Zerba Winery, “is a remarkably consistent variety no matter where on the planet it’s produced.” So, in a world of wines well made, Syrah will satisfy.” The varietal originated in southeastern France at Montpelier, where two hyper local varietals got it on in a monastic tryst. DNA

evidence compiled at UC Davis put to rest the Persian saga. This varietal is instrumental in the area flagship of the lower Rhone River Valley, known as Chateau Neuf de Pape, for which we can thank the Avignon popes of the 14th century. Syrah actually grew up river first, where it was called “Hermitage” and long prized in Cote Rotie and Crozes Hermitage in our time. This fruit is smaller than that grown in the warmer papal real estate. These vines are the most numerous Syrah planted followed by Australia, the USA, Argentina, Chile, South Africa, Switzerland, and not least by Sicily, where it dances with Nero D’Avola. A good partner, it also can fly solo. For example, the Dundee Hills Domaine Serene added 20% estate Pinot Noir to its Walla-Walla Syrah fruit to produce the 2014 Grand Cheval, honoring, literally, the owner’s grandfather and the horse he rode in upon, long ago in Minnesota. The unusual combinations of these two distinct varietals hits one at mid-palate and then rewards with a finish reminiscent of violets and chocolate as it leaves the stage. At $85 it is a pretty big stage. The Zerba Estate Syrah from 2013 exhibits the solidity and agreeability of this wine when made as a single varietal. It has nice balance of fruit and tannins, a stellar mid-palate effect filling the mouth, and then some chocolate and even coffee notes on the way down. At $45 it continues to deliver pleasure and value. The Syrah and Rhone Blends from the Central Coast, not to mention some exceptional Syrah inspirations from SoCal also please because they’re big enough to be reckoned in blends or standing alone. If you have missed Shira/Syrah in counties south of Santa Barbara, you might search them out. It is to Carneros, however, that fog sea-ventilated bit of Napa and Sonoma counties I return to with praise for the Baldacci Syrah from among their nearly 20 acres here. It is a magic wine place that breathes marine air encouraging longer maturation. The 2014 and 15 Syrah retail for $45 and please like more costly wines of their kind. They also explain Bing Crosby. When I tasted the wine at its Stags Leap home, I thought of the sound of Crosby, in his prime, like a low register in a B-flat clarinet. And not so much the sound, but its ebony resonance. Pair that to blueberries and damp San Pablo Bay breezes swirling about, and you now can appreciate how much Bing Crosby missed in Paris, while baseball was going on near the Allegheny River so long ago and far away. CH JULY/AUGUST 2018 | 111


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BELOW The Calvary Bar has been revamped and has a wide assortment of champagnes and whiskies. RIGHT The Edwardian facade of the Rubens at the Palace Hotel. BOTTOM RIGHT Indian curries are specialities in the Curry Room The grand entrance to the Rubens Hotel. OPPOSITE The Palace Lounge overlooks the Royal Mews. You might even get a glimpse of Queen Elizabeth leaving Buckingham Palace while you sip champagne.

PAST PRESENT

The Rubens at the Palace in London treats guests like royalty BY KATHY BRYANT

THE RECENT ROYAL WEDDING HAS MADE

things regal even more in style. So if you’re visiting London and would like a taste of what it feels like to be titled, stay at the Rubens at the Palace Hotel. Expect layers of history here. After all the building has been a neighbor to Buckingham Palace since the 1700s. But also expect 21st century service and amenities. Now, after a five-year, multi-million pound refurbishment, this hotel with an Edwardian facade is ready for royal occupancy. The Rubens overlooks the Royal Mews of Buckingham Palace and the queen’s back garden. You can sit at the window of the Palace Lounge and enjoy a Royal Afternoon Tea or champagne and watch the royal equerry and other dignitaries leave (even the Queen herself occasionally). The entrance to Buckingham Palace is a short walk away with its traditional changing of the guard. Or if you want a taste of modern London, you can walk across the street in the other direction from the hotel to Victoria Nova, a new two-billionpound development of 17 restaurants, shops, flats and offices. This area near Victoria Station used to be almost a slum, but now it’s

thriving. For a night out, visit the boutique Curzon Cinema or the historic Victoria Palace Theatre where Hamilton is booking through December 2018. But the main attraction is the hotel itself. In 1997, The Rubens became part of The Red Carnation Hotel Collection, a family-run company that has restored 17 hotels with

impressive heritages, turning them into five-star boutique hotels with contemporary conveniences. The Rubens has 162 rooms, suites and serviced apartments with the decor echoing historic regal colors like royal blue, red and gold. There are even miniature golden crowns in the carpeting. Marble bathrooms have been installed and 162 Murano-made chandeliers adorn ceilings. Our room had royal blue and white striped padded fabric on the walls, a blue Marano chandelier and even a portrait of Prince Charles. (I actually would have preferred Prince Harry.) To expand further on the royalty theme, there are 18 Royal Rooms that are cordoned off from the rest of the hotel rooms. Each of these rooms is in the style of a member of the British monarchy. They also have the best views of the Palace and gardens. The public spaces of The Rubens have also been upgraded. The Calvary Bar’s intense red color almost vibrates, especially when live music is being played nightly. Striking a different note is the aforementioned Palace Lounge where JULY/AUGUST 2018 | 113


Travel RIGHT Traditional

English fare like roast beef and local cheeses are served in the English Grill. BELOW Master suites feature genuine antiques and works of art. In fact, that is true throughout the hotel. MIDDLE The Leopard Bar is a favorite meeting place. BOTTOM Four-poster beds with luxurious linens are a special feature of the master suites.

“My philosophy of design is to be welcoming. There are so many different tastes in decor and I like variety. But the warmth of the welcoming staff is always the most important thing.” -BEA TOLLMAN

afternoon tea is served. This is the room that overlooks the Royal Mews. Adjoining this is the new Leopard Bar with more than 30 different champagnes and 200 whiskies. For a fine dining experience, there is The English Grill with a decor of polished silver, classic leather banquettes with service from tail-coated waiters. The menu features traditional English fare with a modern twist. Dishes are created from ingredients sourced from top English producers, including the Queen’s kitchen. I warily ordered the black pudding Scotch egg. I usually hate black pudding, but done this way it was delicious. I had the Barnsley lamb chop for my main course, that was quite tasty. For dessert we shared an English cheese plate that included such treats as Wigmore 114 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

English blue cheese, Rosary goat cheese and Stinking Bishop cow’s cheese. The newest eatery in the hotel is the Curry Room which uses recipes from the Oyster Box, a sister property in Durban, South Africa. It’s an intimate room that’s downstairs from the Cavalry Bar. The bbar restuarant next door to The Rubens is also owned by Red Carnation and has a contemporary menu with items like hamburgers and owner Bea Tollman’s cabbage salad. I bought her biography/recipe book and made the salad at home. It’s easy to make and delicious. The Rubens’ graphically shows their interest in sustainability with an 1100-foottall Living Wall adorning the side of the hotel overlooking Victoria Nova. It has over 10,000 herbaceous plants to add color, drama and air quality to the surrounding area. Plants are always on view at the Rubens, indoors as well outdoors, since every table has a rose bouquet on it. This is the concept of owner Stanley Tollman who loves flowers. After all, the name of the company is based on the red carnation he always wears in his lapel. As Bea Tollman, co-owner with her husband Stanley, says about the hotel, “My philosophy of design is to be welcoming. There are so many different tastes in decor and I like variety. But the warmth of the welcoming staff is always the most important thing.” CH www.rubenshotel.com www.redcarnation.com www.novasw1.com


GATHERINGS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY COREY SANDLER

NEWPORT HARBOR HIGH SCHOOL HOME & GARDEN TOUR Barclay Butera Interiors Hosts The Annual Afternoon Reception at its Newly Designed Newport Beach Showroom

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Barclay Butera Interiors, a proud sponsor of the Newport Harbor High School Home & Garden Tour, hosted the annual afternoon reception at its newly designed Newport Beach showroom, closing out the festive day of tours. Barclay Butera also celebrated the launch of his two new furniture collections with Lexington Home Brands and gave attendees the first look at his Newport and Brentwood collections. The event featured blue and white Ferrari gift bags from Farrow & Ball and the bar was sponsored by Ferguson, Bath, Kitchen & Lighting. Media coverage by California Homes Magazine.

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1 Barclay Butera Team 2 Ray Langhammer, Barclay Butera, Christine Phillips, Phil Haney and Fenton Carey

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3 Brendon Butera, Barclay Butera, Karen Butera and Robin Zollinger 4 Charles Miller and Barclay Butera

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WINE TASTING EVENT FOR DESIGNERS Caren Rideau of The Kitchen Design Group in Pacific Palisades and Julie Barba of Riedel Glassware Host a Great Evening Caren Rideau of The Kitchen Design Group in Pacific Palisades and Julie Barba of Riedel glassware recently hosted a wine tasting event for a select group of designers, clients and friends.Guests sipped rosé straight from Rideau’s Tierra y Vino winery in Santa Ynez. Flatbreads and a trio of Italian salads from Il Piccolo Ritrovo restaurant followed.Barba demonstrated that the right glassware is essential to bring out the best in wines.

ANN CHATILLON

1 Christine Anderson, Communication Arts + Design; Caren Rideau, The Kitchen Design Group; and Julie Barba of Riedel Glassware 2 Dana Nichols, Communication Arts + Design; Evan Kleiman, renowned restaurateur and host of KCRW’s “Good Food”; event co-host Caren Rideau, 116 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

owner of The Kitchen Design Group 3 Kitchen display at The Kitchen Design Group, Pacific Palisades, where the wine tasting evening was held. 4 Lee Ann Kriescher and Sandy Tat 5 Tim and Lisa Marschall of TMC General Contractors in Pacific Palisades


GATHERINGS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY COREY SANDLER

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UNDER THE COSTA MESA SUN Celebrating with Monark and California Homes Monark Premium Appliances and California Homes Magazine recently celebrated at the beautiful Monark showroom at South Coast Plaza while enjoying food by Chef Pascal Olhats and special libations. Sponsors included Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, Tidelli, Stark, SubZero Wolf Cove, Pascal Olhats, Hilton Builders and Swiss Watch Gallery and Fine Jewelry.

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5 1 Shea Diaz, Anne Dixon, Chris Arnold, Patricia Frisoni, Ben Elkin, Maricela Lopez and Gilberto Salmeron Monark Premium Appliances Team 2 Sponsor Lisa Liddi and John Bolduc Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams 3 Greg Bingham and Susie Atwood Smith Group 4 Sponsors first row: Leyla Finkle Swiss Watch Gallery and Fine Jewelry, Patricia Frisoni Monark Premium Appliances, Linda McCall California Homes Magazine, Patricia Hilton Hilton Builders, Susan McFadden California Homes Magazine and Dan Hilton Hilton Builders. Second row: Alessandra Mandelli Tidelli Outdoor Living and Lisa Gallegos Hilton Builders. Third row: Giancarlo Mandelli Tidelli Outdoor Living, Chris Arnold Monark Premium Appliances, Sean Graffia Sub Zero Wolf Cove and Denny Muusse Stark Carpet 5 Rick Fahmie Kitchen Expo, Adam Lundell Sliding Door Company, Mike Cassidy California Closets, Amy Creager Brion Jeanntte and Martha Grady Scott Grady Construction 6 Landon Ball and Blake Mitchell Barclay Butera Properties, Linda McCall California Homes Magazine. David Junk, Adam Rejino and Gabe Clark Bang & Olufsen 7 Dianne and Rick Allen Pure Elements, Kimberly Smith Crawford Custom Homes and Richard J. Krantz Richard Krantz Architecture, Inc 8 Chris Arnold Monark Premium Appliances, Pascal Olhats Pascal Chief/ Owner, Kim and Dick Crawford Crawford Custom Homes and Lucy Del Rey Porcelanosa

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JULY/AUGUST 2018 | 117


GATHERINGS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANN CHATILLON

CORONA DEL MAR HOME TOUR Barclay Butera Interiors Hosts The Corona Del Mar Home Tour

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California Homes was honored to cover the great kick-off event for Corona Del Mar Home Tour at the beautiful Barclay Butera Interiors showroom in Corona Del Mar. Guests toasted as the sun set with anticipation of the homes that will be on tour the this year. 3

C. S. WOO & SONS C.S. Woo & Sons Was Filled to Capacity While Guests Celebrated the New Showroom

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1 First row: Landon Ball, Blake Rajic, Garrett Calacci, and Chasen Lamarr. Second row: Jennie Grafus, Kelsey Tucker,Lauren Kirsch, Eliisa Stowell, Barclay Butera, Julie Kunz, Laiza Cors, Sam Slater and Ray Langhammer team from Barclay Butera Interiors and Barclay Butera Properties 2 Karla Joyce co-chair of CDM Home Tour Barclay Butera Barclay Butera Interiors and Wendy Braun co-chair of CDM Home Tour 3 Susan McFadden California Homes Magazine, Barclay Butera Barclay Butera Interiors and Linda McCall California Homes Magazine 4 Jen Cannon, Lisa Neal, Anita Moniuszko, Karen Lombardo and Laurie Martin

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C.S. Woo & Sons recently celebrated at a private reception to preview their newly renovated showroom at South Coast Collection. Guests previewed freshly curated furniture and accessories while enjoying hors d’oeuvres and cocktails. 1 Robert Wo Jr., Caroline and Bob Edward 2 Fenton Cary, Lynn and Chris Garrett 3 Mel Rose, Richard Allegre, April Osterhues and Vanessa Weeks 4 David Junk, Cindy Machado, Douglas Moore and Adam Rejino

118 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


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TRANSFORM YOUR ORDINARY TAP WATER INTO SOMETHING EXTRAORDINARY It goes without saying that your home has all the finest amenities. But what about your water? Pure Elements has created the ultimate custom HealthyHome Water Filtration System. Enjoy crystal clear water throughout your house for drinking, cooking, ice, bathing and cleaning. Water just doesn’t get any better than this.

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BRING LUXURY HOME

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JULY/AUGUST 2018

CALIFORNIA HOMES

VOLUME 22 NUMBER 5

Profile for California Homes Magazine

California Homes - July/August 2018  

California Homes - July/August 2018  

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