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CALIFORNIA HOMES

THE MAGAZINE OF ARCHITECTURE THE ARTS & DISTINCTIVE DESIGN

Ode to

Summer Editor’s Choice

Kitchens

CARMEL VALLEY LAGUNA BEACH SAN FRANCISCO PALM SPRINGS

Pools &

Pool Houses


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Contents 66 COOL, CALM & COLLECTED IN LAGUNA BEACH

Designer Carolyne Ferguson, Architect Scott Laidlaw and Builder Brian Lewotsky Transform A Family’s Cottage Into A Relaxed Blend of Contemporary and Traditional Elements Text by Johnelle Walker Photography by Mark Lohman

74 SETTING THE STAGE Designers Sheldon Harte and John Henry Kaufman of Harte Brownlee & Associates Return A Provencal-style Home In Carmel Valley To It’s French Roots Text by Abigail Stone Photography by Grey Crawford

82 P  ALM SPRINGS MODERNISM WEEK SHOW HOUSE The Christopher Kennedy Compound Show House Brings Unique Style To A Midcentury Home Text by Vanessa Kogevinas Photography by Grey Crawford

92 PRESIDIO HEIGHTS TUDOR GOES MODERN

Features

The 2015 San Francisco Decorators Showcase Text by Kendra Boutell

SUMMER 2015

Designer Eche Martinez’s Gentleman’s Private Lounge, at the 2015 San Francisco Decorators showcase, was inspired by John Singer Sargent’s painting “ Dr. Pozzi at Home.” Martinez imagined a modern day dandy’s lair. Against a dark grey shell, the designer installed a three panel mural comprised of blown-up images from a pastoral etching. A Danish Modern settee by Fritz Henningsen anchored the space flanked by a pair of Sylvan Bubble Table lamps. See story beginning on page 92. Photograph by Christopher Stark & Styling, Rosy Fridman

ABOVE

RIGHT Designer Carolyne Ferguson, architect Scott Laidlaw and builder Brian Lewotsky transformed a family’s cottage into a relaxed blend of contemporary elements, including the kitchen. Kitchen cabinets were custom designed by Ferguson. Laidlaw was instrumental in the trusses located above the kitchen and living space. The team decided to tear the wall down separating the kitchen, living room and dining room providing a gorgeous backdrop of brilliant blues from the Pacific Ocean. Modern lighting by Circa Lighting and Marsh Electric is mixed with the crisps white beams. The countertops are made of zinc and the island is a thick Calacatta Gold Premium Marble from Marbolis with contrasting metal stools. The team created a unique balance in the kitchen with a two column refrigerator and freezer units and Thermador range stove in between, complete with a steamer – a healthy alternative to the microwave. Carolyn added a white washed brick wall to give extra texture and bring out the blue hues throughout the living room. See story beginning on page 66. Photograph by Mark Lohman

W W W.CA L H O M E S M AG A Z I N E .CO M

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Contents

44 54

Departments SUMMER 2015

16 CALENDAR California Museums and Galleries

54

BY JOHNELLE WALKER

21 NOTEBOOK 21 Visionary | David Wiseman Reinterprets Nature’s Patterns 24 Product | Kitchen Curated by Kathy Geissler Best and Erin Calihan of KB Design 28 What’s New Showrooms 30 Cloth & Paper

28

34 BOOKS REVIEWED BY CANDACE ORD MANROE

44 POOLS

48

The Enviorment of California Pools BY VANESSA KOGEVINAS

48 EVENTS & AFFAIRS

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Windsor Smith Homefront: Design for Modern Living By Windsor Smith and Forward by Gwyneth Paltrow

Exciting And Prestigious Events Throughout The State BY JOHNELLE WALKER

52 ARTIST PROFILE

Bradford Stewart: The Musician’s Painter

BY KATHY BRYANT

54 FOOD & WINE

Synder Diamond And California Homes Host Chef Josiah Citrin BY KATHY BRYANT

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MANOLO

LANGIS

60 KITCHENS The Kitchen Is The Center Of The House

BY CANDACE ORD MANROE

104 WINE Green Medal BY KENNETH FRIEDENRICH

108 CONTACTS 109 AD INDEX 110 TRAVEL Chewton Glen: Quintessential English Style BY KATHY BRYANT

16


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Editor’s Letter

Contributors

We love summer here in California, once it really begins. That is usually not until after the 4th of July, but then it is smooth sailing all the way into October. Our Indian Summers are my favorite. The light is changing and we’re all fairly mellow from a slow down during July and August. For our panel during LCDQ Legends in May at the Janet Yonaty showroom, we discussed how Californians like to entertain. We asked the question: is the dining room obsolete? Are we now using the kitchen as a major social stage for entertaining, along with the family room? I know most homes being built today still include formal dining rooms in the plans, but I also realize that here in California we like our outdoor kitchens and area for entertaining. Since kitchens are such an important part of our homes today we have included in this issue, some of our favorites .The kitchen on the cover happens to be part of an editorial on designer Carolyne Ferguson’s project in Laguna Beach. This photograph just happened to turn out so well we decided to do a kitchen cover. Why not? Seems apropos. From Carmel Valley to La Jolla we have covered some of California’s most beautiful homes. Have a wonderful California Summer.

GREY CRAWFORD Grey Crawford became interested in photography during his families summer vacations. His father taking out his Rolliflex, light meter, and taking pictures. It was all magic to Grey at a young age. After high school he pursued that magic studying at Rochester Institute of Technology. Returning to Southern California Grey started photographing architecture and interiors. He soon became involved with the editorial world working initially for LA Style one of the first lifestyle magazines in the LA area. From there Grey worked with Architectural Digest, Elle Décor, Metropolitan Home, House Beautiful and several book publishers. Grey continues to seek that magic, telling the story of our built environment. See his photography for the Palm Springs story on page 82.

Mark Lohman is a freelance photographer who specializes in interiors, architecture, gardens, and travel. Mark’s work has appeared in numerous magazines including California Homes, Veranda, Coastal Living, Cottage Style, HGTV Magazine, and many books showcasing the design work of Barclay Butera. He lives with his wife, interior designer Janet Lohman, in Los Angeles, California. See his photography for the Laguna Beach story on page 66.

Susan McFadden Editor in Chief

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MARK LOHMAN

ABIGAIL STONE

Abigail Stone is a New York-born, Los Angelesbased, globally-curious freelance lifestyle writer, journalist and blogger for online and print covering trends, design, personalities, food, social media, television, film, travel and technology for such publications as The Hollywood Reporter, Apartment Therapy, California Brides and Traditional Home. A former talent agent and film producer, she also works with The Los Angeles Design Festival. See her story on Carmel Valley beginning on page 74.


Introducing

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& OUT

HOME F UR NISHINGS

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s a n f ra n c i s c o 3 0 2 4 f i l l m o re s t re e t @ u n i o n 415.383.0201

www .cabanahome. com


CALIFORNIA HOMES

THE MAGAZINE OF ARCHITECTURE THE ARTS & DISTINCTIVE DESIGN

est. 1971 Wayne and Dona Leicht Laguna Beach, California

Type is:

SU MM E R 201 5

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Heidi Gerpheide Susan McFadden ART DIRECTOR Megan Keough EDITOR-AT-LARGE Kendra Boutell PUBLISHER

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

ART EDITOR

WINE EDITOR

Vanessa Kogevinas Kathy Bryant Kenneth Friedenreich

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Kathy Bryant Candace Ord Manroe Abigail Stone Johnelle Walker

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Patrik Argast Grey Crawford Robin Ganter Photography Christopher Stark & Styling, Rosy Fridman Art Gray Margot Hartford Nick Johnson Rob Jordan David Duncan Livingston Mark Lohman PreviewFirst Kim Sargent Patrick Turner Dominique Vorillon

DIRECTOR OF

Johnelle Walker

OPERATIONS

SENIOR ACCOUNT Marlene Locke REPRESENTATIVE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Heather Bryden Dee Ann Newkirk

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Letters Available through your

I am so happy I picked up a copy of your Spring issue and turned to the editorial on the dinner party hosted by Kathryn M. Ireland, and catered by Chef Lulu Powers. The story saved me from dinner party meltdown. It was my turn to host my dining group and Chef Lulu’s menu and Ms. Ireland’s beautiful story served as my inspiration. I tried Chef Lulu’s grilled citrus lamb chops, along with pee wee potatoes and the friess salad. The lamb hops were divine and all my guests asked for the recipe. The hit of the party was the rosemary-mint infused meringue roulade. What a delight. Thank you for saving me. Richard Mason Redondo Beach, CA The story on David Duncan Livingston’s home in Mill Valley was wonderful. I have seen Mr. Livingston’s photography in magazines in the past and it is interesting to see his own home and family. The interior design by his wife, Florence Choux Livingston did reflect their taste. Simple, sophisticated yet warm and inviting. What a wonderful family. Doreen Massey Sacramento, CA

designer or architect at

LAGUNA DESIGN CENTER 23811 Aliso Creek Road, Suite 155 Laguna Niguel 92677 949.362.8160

www.customhardware.net

Project2:Layout 1

3/17/11

2:35 PM

Page 1

I’ve seen your magazine and discovered a wine column in the midst of all your beautiful homes. Decoding the Grape is a good read. It is funny, thought provoking and has a broad reach, (ergo, wine areas other than California). With accompanying photos, it makes going to wine country worth the trip. As a Sommelier and industry professional for 32 years, it’s nice to read about wine for the fun of it. Keep it coming. Doc Wilson Portland, OR Finally had time to really read your Winter issue and wanted to pass on my thoughts on your Travel section. The story on Cambria was beautifully written and as a native Californian I think you should be doing more travel on our great State. Love the magazine and think it is a great reflection of our California lifestyle. Janice Johnston Venice, CA

SUMMER 2015 | 15


Calendar MUSEUMS & GALLERIES PASADENA MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent is the first full scale survey of the American artist Corita Kent’s rich and varied career as a graphic artist, designer, teacher, feminist, and civil rights activist on view June 14th through November 1st, 2015. Covering over 30 years of her work, the exhibition reflects on her combined passion for faith and politics. Kent became one of the most popular graphic artists of the 1960s and 1970s, and her images remain iconic symbols that address the larger questions and concerns of that turbulent time. Her printmaking was a populist medium to communicate the world around her, and her designs were widely disseminated through billboards, book jackets, illustrations, posters, gift cards and T-shirts.

THE HUNTINGTON LIBRARY

Between Modernism and Tradition: British Works on Paper, 1914-1948 is on view through September 21, 2015. Early 20th century modernism in Britain drew its inspiration from avant-garde art movements in France, Germany, and Italy (especially Cubism and Futurism) and took on its own unique form called Vorticism, a dynamic style of jarring colors and bold lines that embraced modernity and machine age. This exhibition of about 24 drawings, watercolors and prints drawn from the Huntington’s collections, explores the great range of artistic styles employed by British artists through a period of dramatic social upheaval and change. Corita Kent E eye love, 1968 Silkscreen print on paper 23 x 23 inchesPresented by Collection: Corita Art Center, Immaculate Heart Community, Los Angeles, CA. Photograph by Arthur Evans, courtesy of the Tang Museum at Skidmore College

For more information please call 626.405.2100 or visit www.huntington.org.

For more information please call 626.568.3665 or visit www.pmcaonline.org.

SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART

László MoholyNagy Composition, n.d. (ca. 1922-23). Paper collage on paper 12 x 11 inches Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Gift of Mrs. Charlotte Mack

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On display July 5th through September 27,th 2015, The Paintings of Moholy-Nagy: The Shape of Things to Come explores how the practice of painting served as the means for Hungarian artist László Moholy-Nagy to imagine generative relationships between art and technology. He is now recognized as one of the most influential members of Germany’s Bauhaus. Active in America from 1937 until his death in 1956, MoholyNagy’s art is typically linked to the photogram and the ‘telephone pictures’ that he famously ordered from a factory and displayed in a notorious exhibition held in Berlin in 1922. However, the driving force behind this exhibition is the relatively unrecognized yet meaningful paintings he created throughout his career. For more information please call 760.346.5600 or visit www.psmuseum.org.

John Minton (1917–1957) Derelict Farm Machinery, 1948 Pen, black ink and watercolor, with touches of white heightening The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

Gwen John (1876–1939) Rue Terre Nueve, Meudon, ca. 1920 Watercolor over pencil on paper The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens


Calendar | MUSEUMS & GALLERIES GUSFORD GALLERY Anja Van Herle Starstruck Acrylic and Swarovski Crystals on Panel 24 x 24 inches

Anthony Hunter Big Pinky White Brush Strokes Slashed Through the Middle of the Painting Painting Gloss Paint on Canvas with Pink Tray Frame 64.5 x 54.5 inches

JOANN ARTMAN GALLERY

Lost in Translation Too is a dynamic showcase of international contemporary artists: Belgian-born Anja Van Herle; Alberto Murillo from Spain; British painter Anthony Hunter; and Mexico-city based artist Pedro Bonnin. Though the styles represented in this exhibition range from abstract expressionism to hyperrealism, these artists all incorporate influences from their home cultures into works that transcend barriers of geography and language.

Gusford features Los Angeles based artist Adam Mars’ archetypal text-based paintings, which address the contemporary social experience. Through pithy witticisms, his series Once Upon a Time, We Weren’t Stalkers captures the cultural shift in relationships between people, technology and images. With keen insight, amusing awareness, and nostalgic sentiments Mars reflects on the human condition before internet and social media painting slogans like: Good Lay, Bad Texter; Carpal Tinder Syndrome; I Loved You, Then I Googled You; and Take Me Back to the Oregon Trail on urban brick panels, veiled in candy sprinkles. Mars completed his MFA from OTIS College of Art and Design in 2007 and his work has been shown at institutions throughout California including the Laguna Art Museum, Torrance Art Museum and Cal State Long Beach. His work is at the gallery this summer and coming this fall to their new location. The Gallery is located at 616 N. La Brea Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90036. For more information please contact 323.452.9563 or visit www.gusfordgallery.com.

The Gallery is located at 326 N. Coast Highway, Laguna Beach, CA 92651. For more information please contact 949.510.5481 or visit www.joanneartmangallery.com.

WILLIAM TURNER GALLERY

The William Turner Gallery is pleased to present Ed Moses: Now And Then. Since the 1950s, Moses has been at the heart of the L.A. art scene. Today, his work graces the collections of most of the nation’s major museums and is regarded by many as a cultural treasure. Moses is a painter and mutator - a mark maker and maverick, whose practice is one of ceaseless reinvention. At 89, Moses remains a quintessential rebel, having resisted being tied to any one movement for the entirety of his career. This exhibition will survey work from his Post-War movement to a selection of brand new paintings.

Ed Moses Stares Dwn, 2015 Oil on canvas 80 x 70 inches 18 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

The Gallery is located at 2525 Michigan Avenue E-1, Santa Monica, CA 90404. For more information please contact 310.453.0909 or visit www.williamturnergallery.com.

TOP

Adam Mars The Last Offline Lovers, 2014 Spray paint and candy sprinkles on faux brick panel 21.5 x 24 inches Courtesy of the artist and GUSFORD Los Angeles BELOW

Adam Mars, 2014 Photograph by Edgar Nelson Obrand


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Notebook VISIONARY

|

PRODUCT

| WHAT’S NEW |

David Wiseman Reinterprets Nature’s Patterns

CLOTH & PAPER

LOS ANGELES ARTIST David Wiseman’s designs explore both nature and decorative arts history, bringing new visions to both. As he says, ”As early as I can remember, I have been interested in drawing patterns--geometries that repeat to create structures, tiles and borders, as well as abstracting trees and flowers to create flourishes and symbols.”

SUMMER 2015 | 21


Notebook | VISIONARY COUNTERCLOCK WISE FROM LEFT TO RIGHT:

Unique collage side table in bronze with glass top, column table in bronze with porcelain cherry blossoms and glass top, vignette of selected work, Jali bowl in bronze, turtle box in polished bronzeedition of twelve and two artist proofs, signed and numbered. exernatiam vel ipsa aligen.

Designs of nature used to be a part of architectural ornamentation and wall decorations, but the 20th-century Modernism movement attempted to get rid of all superfluous design. Wiseman’s works are an attempt of bring the beauty and mystery of the natural world back into daily life. He edits and reworks these natural influences to enhance modern interiors. His love of different cultures, from Papuan to Viennese to Japanese, is found in his works and make them perfect for almost every contemporary environment. CH www.dwiseman.com

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To create your signature look visit: baldwinhardware.com

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Notebook | PRODUCT 2. BACKSPLASH

Only a small square footage is required behind the cooktop, so splurge on your favorite tile just behind the cooktop. If budget is tight, mix with more budget priced tiles elsewhere.

1. REFRIGERATION

Fisher&Paykel CoolDrawer under counter refrigeration with freezer flexibility. It can change from refrigerator to freezer to wine cooling based on your daily needs. Great for Holidays and parties. www.fisherpaykel.com

3. CABINET LIGHTING

Add LED lighting strips inside cabinets with custom designed sandblasted glass doors. This will give the illusion of more space without revealing cabinet contents.

KITCHEN ESSENTIALS Eight Favorite Kitchen Products from the San Francisco based designers Kathy Geissler Best and Erin Calihan of Kathy Best Design

4. TABLEWARE

Kathy Best Design | www.kathybestdesign.com

24 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

One of our favorite stores for accessories is March on Sacramento Street in San Francisco. The beautiful March tableware is hand glazed and hand painted, and available with a monogram. www.marchsf.com


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Notebook | PRODUCT 5. COUNTERTOP

Neolith Estatuario offers the best imitation of Calacatta marble on the market. It is man made, does not stain and is more durable than quartz. www.neolith.com

6. ROOM LIGHTING

Choose a fabulous chandelier for the center of the kitchen, either over an island or eating area. This does not have to be expensive, but sets the style and mood of the room. A favorite of ours is Branching Discs by Lindsey Adelman found at The Future Perfect, San Francisco. www.thefutureperfect.com.

7. SEATING

Add a banquette for casual eating. This encourages family dining together. It also provides an opportunity to add design with fabric. Check out amazing outdoor fabrics on the market for iron clad design statement. Fiddlesticks from Perennials one of our many favorites. www.perennialsfabrics.com

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8. APPLIANCES

Thermador Pro Grand with blue interior has a separate cooktop from the oven so that kitchen counter is continuous. www.thermador.com


THE MAKINGS OF A MEMORABLE EVENING.

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Notebook | WHAT’S NEW SHOWROOM

MASTER CRAFTSMEN

Soane Britain Opens First West Coast Studio In San Francisco

OVER THE LAST 17 YEARS , Founder and Creative Director, Lulu

Lytle has been the dynamic force behind Soane Britain, creating beautiful furnishings that have become defined by their exquisite craftsmanship, elegant proportions and deliciously English sense of the exuberant. Working exclusively with British master craftsmen that excel in traditional crafts such as iron forging, rattan weaving, precision engineering, upholstery and saddlery, Soane Britain is able to draw on the expertise of over 40 specialists workshops around Great Britain, ensuring the highest quality of craftsmanship and materials. Among the furniture on view will be the celebrated Simplified Crillon Chair alongside the dramatic Stag Centre Table, Nureyev Trolley and Large Ripple Console.

2 Henry Adams Street, San Francisco, California CA 94103 415.590.3260 | www.soane.com | San Francisco Design Center, Showplace M-47

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Notebook | CLOTH & PAPER

LOOP BLACK

LEAF SLATETE

CLEAN & CRISP

A New Line Of Hand-screen Printed Textiles From Caroline Cecil Textiles THE NEW ARTISANAL LINE from Caroline Cecil is fresh, graphic and reflects the designers experience with brands like Carolina Herrera, Isaac Mizrahi, Peter Fasano and Angela Adams. She brings her unique approach to classic artisanal techniques with a nod to the current runway trends. www.carolinececiltextiles.com. Available through the De Sousa Hughes showroom.

San Francisco Design Center, 2 Henry Adams Street, No. 220. www.desousahughes.com

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N

Natural swimming pools (NSPs) offer environmentally-conscious consumers a responsible alternative to traditional swimming pools. No chemicals, sterilizers, or mechanical devices are used. With U.S. patents for the biological cleaning of swimming pool water, NSPs designed by California BioNova® Natural Pools are completely chemical-free, ecologically harmonious, and produce clear, clean water that is healthful and safe for swimmers and the environment. “Natural swimming pools use far less energy, have a smaller carbon footprint, and are more sustainable than traditional chemical pools,” says California BioNova® CEO Troy Becker . “NSPs promote biodiversity, restore native habitats, and can be seamlessly integrated with the surrounding landscape.”

California BioNova®

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Notebook | CLOTH & PAPER LOOP DENIM

INK STRIPE

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BRIDGE SLATE

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Books REVIEWED BY CANDACE ORD MANROE

Windsor Smith Homefront: Design for Modern Living By Windsor Smith Forward by Gwyneth Paltrow You think you know a designer. You publish her work in a magazine. You facilitate a panel at the Pacific Design Center on which she is a participant. You are a respectful admirer. Until you read her first book. Then you are star-struck. That’s what happened as I perused “Windsor Smith Homefront: Design for Modern Living,” the first book from Los Angeles interior designer Windsor Smith. I always knew Smith’s work was a little different—a little more architectural, objectoriented, and dramatic than most; well short of the over-the-top; and seemingly a little less pattern- and fabric-centric. Then I flipped through the work showcased in this gorgeous tome and felt something akin to heart emojis flicker through my mind. Or soul. Seeing her work in toto was that moving. Apparently, I’m in good company. The book’s forward by Gwyneth Paltrow is a testament to Smith’s similar affect on her, expressed eloquently, even breathlessly. First words: “I fell in love with Windsor Smith before I ever laid eyes on her.” While looking for real estate on the Internet, Paltrow did a virtual tour of a Brentwood home Smith had 34 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

designed, built, and decorated herself, in the self-taught designer’s new venture into house construction. Writes Paltrow: “When I saw this particular house, I felt something more than my usual covetousness. I felt the seas shift and the sky change.” She toured the house in person on her next trip to L.A. “As I walked through the front door onto a beautiful reclaimed stone floor from an old church somewhere in Peru, and absorbed the gentle shades of gray, I knew something deep and wonderful. I was home.” The qualities Smith brings to her homes are clear reflections of her past. She entered the design business from “the trenches,” selling antiques in West Hollywood. Not just any antiques, but massive architectural remnants hand-picked on scouring trips across France. “My somewhat impractical mantra was: ‘If it doesn’t weigh over a thousand pounds, I won’t buy it.’” She repurposed those pieces, transforming enormous doors into pier mirrors, and rearranging preconceived concepts of how we should live. She calls herself a “lifestyle architect” and insists she’s not so much interested in creating beautiful rooms as she is in changing how we live in them. As evidenced by the projects featured in this book, she is on the right path. With glossy black doors and black paneling, she injects a new daring to our living areas. Rich navy blue becomes a livable as taupe. The presentation of art is elevated to an art

form. And objects—like none other—own their spaces, as stylish women own their clothes. For a horse property, Smith suggests the ultimate luxury is at the tangent of sport, lifestyle, and beauty. (Oddly, one of the photos shows a dressage horse standing in the tile-floor center hallway. Another shot shows that same hallway furnished with a table dressed for dinner.) While the selected designs reinforced some of my beliefs about Smith, they changed others. The color chapter, for example, is proof that Smith is as adept with fabrics as she is objets d’art. I couldn’t help but think, as I scrutinized her designs, that her training as a dancer influences her work. The pacing of the objects, the way they bring the eye up then down, the way they fill the “stage,” their grace—all point to the dancer’s art. Do I sound breathless? Maybe I have more in common with Paltrow than I thought. After meditating on this book, it’s almost impossible not to be in a little in love with Windsor Smith. And besides the book’s well-curated selection of dreamy spaces, there’s another quality to recommend it: The writing (Meredith Strang channeling Smith) is superb. Windsor Smith Homefront: Design for Modern Living By Windsor Smith Forward by Gwyneth Paltrow Rizzoli International Publications, Inc. 256 pages Hardcover ISBN13:978-0847843626 $50.00 US/$50.00 CAN


KAREN LEHRER ART & INSIGHT www.KarenLehrer.com

WINTER 2014-15 | 35


Calendar

Armin Hansen Salmon Trawlers Oil on canvas 47 x 53 inches Monterey Museum of Art, gift of Jane and Justin Dart

THE CROCKER ART MUSEUM, SACRAMENTO

Armin Hansen Monterey Fishermen Oil on canvas 15 x 24 inches Collection of Donna and Mark Salzberg

From June 28th through October 11th, 2015 Armin Hansen: The Artful Voyage will be on exhibition in Sacramento, chronicling Hansen’s artistic legacy through nearly 100 paintings, etchings, other works on paper and rare decorative arts. Hansen (1886-1957) a San Francisco native, painted his signature fisher folk and the sea, as well as lush still lifes, spirited rodeo scenes, and loosely rendered landscapes. Often described as an Impressionist, Hansen captured the raw power and vitality of the Pacific and those who sailed it, rejecting gentility to focus on humanity’s symbiotic relationship with nature by using broad masses of color, dynamic compositions and eliminating superfluous detail. For more information please call 916.808.7000 or visit www.crockerartmuseum.org.

36 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


The

Moroccan Collection by Michael Kourosh True to their Bedouin influences, the Moroccan Collection's monochromatic and richly-colored geometric designs come together to create a fresh, youthful, and one of a kind rug series. Each piece is a work of art that adds a pop of relish to any room.

The

Santa Barbara Sofa Collection Santa Barbara Sofa

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Calendar

Edward S. Curtis Pottery Burner, 1926 Photograph

BOWERS MUSEUM, SANTA ANA

Adams, Curtis and Weston: Photographers of the American West is on view now through November 29th, 2015. The exhibition documents the changing landscape of the west and the art of photography through time as well as through the lenses of three of the most celebrated 20th century American photographers: Ansel Adams, Edward S. Curtis and Edward Weston. Forty-two portraits, landscapes and various subjects ranging from the years 1905 to 1967 are on display including landscapes from Adams’ Yosemite National Park collection dedicated to wilderness preservation. For more information please call 714.567.3600 or visit www.bowers.org.

Edward S. Curtis The Apache, c. 1907 Photograph

July 5 - August 31, 2015 140 Fine Ar tists, Live Music, Workshops, Events + More! Michael Hermann Gina Lunn

Elaine Cohen

LagunaFestivalofArts.org

650 Laguna Canyon Road, Laguna Beach, CA 92651 949.494.1145 Open Daily 10am – 11:30pm $7-$10 *Early Closings: July 5 at 6pm, August 29 at 3:30pm

Jeff Horn

38 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


Available Exclusively Through Los Angeles Egg & Dart Home 525 N. La Cienaga Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 Tel 310.652.0425

Phoenix Alexander Sinclair 7350 N. Dobson Rd Scottsdale, AZ 85256 Tel 480.423.8000

Seattle Michael Folks 5701 Sixth Avenue S. Suite #254 Seattle, WA 98108 Tel 206.762.6776

San Fransisco Hadleigh Home 101 Henry Adams, Street #245 San Francisco, CA 94103 415.863.8815

Denver MODA Antica Showroom 595 S. Broadway Suite #118-W Denver, CO. 80209 Tel 303.733.9003


Calendar

calendar

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20

Laguna Art Museum In his first museum exhibition, renowned potter Adam Silverman creates a series of installations ranging from displays of his pots in various settings to video pieces. The theme that runs through Adam Silverman: Clay and Space is the relation of art to nature. Silverman brings to his pottery both an architectural sensibility and a keen response to natural forms and materials —the spiral growth of sea shells, the textures of coral and barnacles, the rhythms of the tide, waves and seaweed, clay and wood. The exhibition will take place at the Laguna Art Museum beginning October 27 through January 19, 2014.

SKIRBALL CULTURAL CENTER, For more information please LOS ANGELES call 949.494.8971 or visit

www.lagunaartmuseum.org Rock & Roll Billboards of the Sunset Strip displays rare images by photographer Robert Landau of iconic billboards that dominated Images from Adam Silverman: Clay andof Space the heart the Los Angeles music scene from the late 1960s to Photos courtesy of Adam Silverman early 1980s and is on view until August 16th, 2015. Taken when Adam Silverman Landau was just a teen, the collection of over 20 photographs Portrait trace the Photo by phenomenon Katrina Dickson of rock billboard advertising from its inception in 1967 with the promotion of the Doors’ debut album to the advent of MTV in the 1980s.

For more information please call 310.440.4500 or visit www.skirball.org. CALenDAr COnTInueD On PAge 44

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DE YOUNG LEGIONInteriors OF HONOR FINE CP INTERIOR DESIGNS | Beautiful for Living

ARTS MUSEUMS OF SAN FRANCISCO

Now on view through July 19th, 2015 from the Metropolitan Museum of Art is High Style: The Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection, which looks at gowns, accessories and other styles by some of the most influential designers of the last one hundred years including Chanel, Givenchy, Dior, Charles James and more. The exhibition traces the evolution of fashion in the 20th century reflecting on tastes and transformationsPrincipal throughout the decades. Designer

Christine Prescott

For more information please Allied call 415.750.3600 or visitASID Member www.legionofhonor.famsf.org.

Steven Arpad (French,

Hungary, 1904-1999) PALM SPRINGS • LOSborn ANGELES

Shoe prototype (evening pump), 1939 Silk satin, gold kidskin, and wood Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Arpad, 1947 (2009.300.1145). Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

760.321.4908 Charles James (American, born Great Britain, 1906-1978) “Clover Leaf” ball gown, 1953 Silk satin, faille, and shantung with lace Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Josephine Abercrombie, 1953 (2009.300.784) Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

cdesign4you@gmail.com

The ASID California Palm Springs/ Inland Chapter is a community of residential and commercial designers driven by a passion for design, and committed to the belief that interior design has the power to positively change people’s lives. Our designers create functional, inspiring, livable spaces that exceed expectations.

Morraika Simonds, Allied ASID, for An Interior Motive Designs/ Photo courtesy of Yasin Chaudhry

www.asidpsi.org

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS california palm springs/inland

SUMMER 2015 | 41

FEBRUARY 2013

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19


Calendar

Phil Dike Wave Variation, 1974 Watercolor on paper 21-1/2 x 29-1/2 inches From the collection of Diane and E. Gene Crain

LAGUNA ART MUSEUM

Phil Dike Wave Echo, 1972 Watercolor on paper 21-1/2 x 29-1/2 inches From the collection of Diane and E. Gene Crain

Phil Dike: The Wave Series and Malibu Set Series, 1968-1981 from the collection of Diane and E. Gene Crain is on view June 27th until September 27th, 2015. Approximately 24 works of watercolor beach scenes by renowned Southern California artist Phil Dike (1906-1990) display his semiabstract interpretations of the sea, beach, and beach life. Dike worked at Disney Studios in the 1930s on such classic animations as Snow White and the Seven Dwarves and Fantasia, and later taught at the fabled Chouinard Art Institute in L.A. before becoming a professor at Scripps College and Claremont Graduate School. This exhibition focuses on the mature style he developed in the 1960s, when he began to powerfully express his passion for the sea. For more information please call 949.494.8971 or visit www.lagunaartmuseum.org.

42 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


Virginia Beahan Pink Chair, Salton Sea Beach, 2013 Archival pigment print Courtesy the artist and Joseph Bellows Gallery.(184) © CSG CIC Glasgow Museums Collection. Courtesy American Federation of Arts. Center; 1911.G.3

Virginia Beahan Burning Fields Before Planting, Near Calipatria CA, 2013 Archival pigment print. Courtesy the artist and Joseph Bellows Gallery.

THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, SAN DIEGO

Virginia Beahan: Elegy for an Ancient Sea is on exhibition in La Jolla starting July 25th through September 6th, 2015 showing haunting photographs of the Salton Sea. Eighty-five miles east of San Diego, it stretches across the Imperial and Coachella Valleys and is California’s largest lake created in 1905 as a result of an engineering accident. When irrigation canals were dug to feed water from the Colorado River into the valley, flooded water rushed into the historically dry lakebed. The newly formed lake experienced a tourism boom in the 1950s and 60s but is now shrinking and increasing in levels of salinity. Beahan’s collections of images bring a nuanced eye to its layered history and precarious present. For more information please call 858.454.3541 or visit www.mcasd.org.

SUMMER 2015 | 43


Pools

PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID DUNCAN LIVINGSTON

CALIFORNIA POOL TALK

THE ENVIRONMENT OF CALIFORNIA POOLS BY VANESSA KOGEVINAS

POOLS AND POOL HOUSES are an inte-

gral part of California living by virtue of the climate and provide countless hours of enjoyment, but what goes into building them and what considerations are key, especially in the current drought? The first point of order is to assess if the site can accommodate them. “The biggest design challenge is the available space for the pool and pool house,” says architect Paul

44 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

Brant Williger, “and if there is an existing main house that is able to relate to the new pool and structures in a deliberate way. You don’t just put it wherever it will fit!” Architect Andrew Skurman shares, “One of the most important things to review when building a pool is what will its purpose be? Lap or recreational? Children and/or adult usage? Will the pool have a hot tub— integrated or stand alone?” All of these

factors affect the shape, depth and materials used. The same is true for the interior designer of a pool house. “The biggest consideration with the interior design of a pool house is also how will the rooms be used,” says interior designer Meg Joannides of MLK Studio. “A pool house can function as anything from a place to entertain clients to a place for kids to hang out.” Durable materials and finishes should be used for


PHOTOGRAPH BY NICK JOHNSON

Antiqued French limestone was selected for the deck of an infinity pool designed by architect Paul Brant Williger that captures expansive views of the Pacific Ocean in Malibu. LEFT The pool house of a 1933 Paul Williams estate in Beverly Hills—redesigned and renovated by architect Paul Brant Williger—is positioned as a focal point of the main house. OPPOSITE Architect Andrew Skurman integrated three distinct outdoor living areas giving out onto the pool of an American Colonial-style house in Northern California. ABOVE

longevity reducing future renovations, and furnishings should be comfortable and solid, yet without sacrificing style.   A point of paramount importance in California is the now four-year drought. Yet according to numbers published by Metrostudy – a company that tracks real estate data -- the drought has not affected pool construction. In fact, permits for new pool construction in California rose 2.5% in 2014 to the year prior. PHOTOGRAPH BY DOMINIQUE VORILLON

SUMMER 2015 | 45


Pools

“AN INTERESTING IDEA IS THE USE OF STRATEGICALLY PLACED PLANTS THAT DON’T REQUIRE A LOT OF WATER AS WIND BREAKS TO REDUCE POOL WATER EVAPORATION.” —ANDREW SKURMAN

To help ease the effects of the continuing popularity of building pools on during the drought, certain regulations have been put into place by select California counties, such as requiring pool covers. Heightened awareness in the planning stages is also contributing in a positive way. “The current trend is to build shallow pools as a way to promote conservation,” says Skurman. “The key is to find ways to halt evaporation and keep a consistent level of water in the pool without having to regularly refill it.”   “A pool cover is the best water conservation measure that can be used to limit evaporation,” says Williger. “New pools are designed with the pool cover track hidden under the coping and existing pools can be remodeled to accommodate a cover.” Not to mention the positive aspects in safety and debris maintenance.   Taking it one step further careful landscaping can contribute to responsible pool care. “An interesting idea is the use of strategically placed plants that don’t require a lot of water as wind breaks to reduce pool water evaporation,” notes Skurman.   Pools and pool houses will always be a part of California’s culture and regardless of the climate, drought or no drought, there are ways to reduce their impact on the environment and build responsibly.  CH

LEFT Grace Design creates a natural stone path and a variety of drought tolerant plants to turn a small space into a welcoming oasis.

PHOTOGRAPH BY ART GRAY

46 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


PHOTOGRAPH BY ART GRAY

LEFT The pool house’s Fleetwood sliding doors afford it a seamless indoor/outdoor connection. A bluestone island, Gaggenau appliances and Flos lighting complete the space. BELOW Teak and metal barstools and teak outdoor furniture—all from David Sutherland. OPPOSITE A Southern California pool house and deck by interior designer Meg Joannides and architect Hagy Belzberg, boasts an outdoor bluestone and teak bar, at once offering durability and style.

SUMMER 2015 | 47


Events & Affairs Farm To Fork, Sacramento

Octavio Valencia and the Sacramento Convention & Visitors Bureau, 2014.

Foodies and agricultural enthusiasts should clear their calendars this fall from September 10th through the 27th, 2015 for Sacramento’s annual Farm to Fork Celebration. The event promises fresh food activities throughout the region starting with Farm to Fork Restaurant Weeks presented by Lexus. Sacramento’s best restaurants are showcased with special events, farm-to-fork menus, and opportunities to meet farmers, winemakers and brewers who make the area a culinary powerhouse. Legends of Wine by Lexus will follow, giving wine lovers a unique chance to sample and discover Sacramento’s most celebrated wines, selected by two culinary geniuses: Darrell Corti and David Berkley. Guests will sip a wide array of award winning varietals paired and presented with artisan cheeses and local delights. On September 26th the festival will take place with interactive booths from local growers, cooking demonstrations, a kids zone, live music and regional eateries. It ends with a Gala on September 27th where diners can enjoy a locally sourced meal prepared by thirty top area chefs. For more information please call 916.808.7777 or visit www.farmtofork.com.

The San Francisco Fall Antiques Show October 22nd through October 25th, 2015 the Fort Mason’s Festival Pavilion in San Francisco will host the annual Fall Antiques Show with this year’s Time After Time theme celebrating how time applies to all art and antiques. The Loan Exhibition will feature the evolution, design and beauty of timepieces from across time. Sixty dealers from around the world will offer an extraordinary range of fine and decorative arts representing all styles and periods including American, English, Continental, and Asian pieces. The show launches with an Opening Night Preview Gala on October 21st and 100 percent of proceeds will benefit Enterprise for High School Students, a San Francisco based non-profit organization that engages and empowers Bay Area students to develop skills for their future through job readiness training, employment and career exploration. For more information please call 415.989.9019 or visit www.sffas.org.

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Tom Swimm Geary Street Oil on canvas 15 x 18 inches Art-To-Go Artist Fund at Festival of Arts | $850

Art-To-Go The Artists Fund at the Festival Of Arts is presenting its Art-To-Go fundraising collection of more than 70 original donated art works available online now and on the festival grounds starting July 5th through August 31,st 2015 while supplies last. The proceeds will support artists in need. Awards for exceptional works will be posted throughout the summer including ‘People’s Choice’ and ‘Best in the Theme: Happiness is...’ assigned by juror Susan McFadden, Editor in Chief of California Homes. Each buyer will qualify to enter a prize drawing for a two-night stay at The Tides Inn, located in Laguna Beach, CA. For more information please call 949.612.1949 or visit www.theartistsfund-foa.org.


| www.DLSLifeStyle.com


Events & Affairs THE FESTIVAL OF ARTS OF LAGUNA BEACH One of the nation’s oldest and most highly acclaimed juried fine arts shows, the festival has offered a breathtaking showcase for artists and enthusiasts for over eighty years. It features a wide variety of media such as paintings, photography, printmaking, sculpture, jewelry, handcrafted wood and furniture, ceramics, glass, and more - all by 140 of Orange County’s finest artists starting July 5th and running through August 31st, 2015. The Pageant of the Masters at the festival’s outdoor amphitheatre is renowned in its artistry and theatrical illusion of living pictures. The production takes place nightly under the stars with a professional orchestra, live narration, intricate sets, sophisticated lighting and hundreds of dedicated volunteers. Pageant tickets are available for purchase through the festival. For more information please call 800.487.3378 or visit www.foapom.com.

Michael Ward Tower Zero Acrylic on cigar box 8 x 10 x 2 inches Art-To-Go Artist Fund at Festival of Arts | $180

Michael Hermann & Gina Lunn, Glass Work For the past ten years, this dynamic duo has been sculpting beautiful and timeless glass using traditional Venetian techniques (trade secrets adopted from the Muranese culture). Hermann began his career as an apprentice at the Art of Fire, a contemporary glassblowing studio in Maryland and continued sessions at Red Deer in Alberta, Canada. Lunn launched her glass career with master workshops on the West Coast and studying at Palomar College in San Marcos. Hermann makes elegant goblets etched with colorful and fluid designs, and Lunn specializes in sculpting the human body, rendering each figure with balance, precision and abstraction.

Mariana Nelson, Fiber Arts Nelson is a fiber artist who transforms discarded materials and plastic waste into compelling pieces of art to raise environmental awareness to the amount of waste we produce on a regular basis. Born and raised in Newport Beach, CA, she later moved to San Francisco where she spent 15 years of her life amidst an art community that also created ‘found art’ recycling used materials. Adopting a Japanese practice known as ‘temari,’ Nelson began wrapping discarded materials in colorful displays that conceal the so-called ‘trash.’ For more information please call 800.487.3378 or visit www.foapom.com.

50 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


CALIFORNIA HOMES

THE MAGAZINE OF ARCHITECTURE THE ARTS & DISTINCTIVE DESIGN

Ode to

Summer CARMEL VALLEY LAGUNA BEACH SAN FRANCISCO PALM SPRINGS

Editor’s Choice

Kitchens

Pools &

Pool Houses

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Artist Profile

BRADFORD STEWART: THE MUSICIAN’S PAINTER

Music And Art Have Been An Important Part of This Artist’s Life BY KATHY BRYANT

JOHN COLTRANE’S JAZZ FILLS Bradford Stewart’s art studio as he adds layer after layer of

paint on the over-sized canvas. “Music helps me get in a special mind set. I then can use my right brain, my creative side,” says Stewart, explaining the way music inspires him. Music and art have been an important part of Stewart’s life since he was a young child. He enjoyed doing drawings when he was little while listening to the jazz records his father, Kipp Stewart, was playing as he designed furniture. His father worked with Charles Eames, so creativity was an important part of Stewart’s life from the beginning. “I knew I wanted to be a musician and a composer. And I had a successful career doing that,” he says. “But about twenty years ago I found that being on the road all the time as a musician was hard work. I had to do something creative, so I started to paint. Both music and art are similar in that you create something from nothing.”

52 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

ABOVE TOP

Lavender Skies 4 x 8 feet Mixed Media on Aluminum Panel Indoor/Outdoor ABOVE BOTTOM

Surfing Costa Rica 3 x 8 feet Mixed Media on Aluminum Panel Indoor/Outdoor


Red Sea 6 x 8 feet Mixed Media on Aluminum Panel Indoor/Outdoor

“PEOPLE REACT TO THE PAINTINGS EMOTIONALLY.”

PHOTOGRAPH BY ROBIN GANTER PHOTOGRAPHY

—BRADFORD STEWART

Stewart’s bold paintings have the energy and rhythm that’s found in his music. “Sometimes I have thirty or forty layers of paint on a work. To me that’s a very similar process to composing music and orchestration.” Stewart feels that the layers of pearlescent colors give depth to the works since they reflect light back from the surface, almost like the shimmer on the sun-lit ocean. “I keep changing and experimenting all the time. I get bored doing the same thing.” Stewart’s latest challenge has been in the area of aluminum art for the outdoors. “My father pioneered high-end teak furniture and designs for the outdoors so I grew up around the indoor/outdoor idea. I realized that the missing element in outdoor rooms was art. My large outdoor paintings were successful from the beginning. Now I’m working on free-standing, more sculptural works.” His aluminum artwork is UV protected and engineered to meet all weather conditions. The layers of reflective paints are coated with layers of protectant resins which cause the paintings to change colors with the light of the day or night. Although Stewart’s paintings are abstracts, people look at them and see waterfalls, landscapes and other realistic scenes. “People react to the paintings emotionally,” he explains. “They often report that the paintings are very moving and invoke a deep emotional response akin to what good music will do for one’s soul.” His clients are so enamored with his works that most buy in multiples. “I rarely sell only one painting.” Positioned together in a room, Stewart’s works arouse feelings almost dance-like with their vibrant color palette and rhythm. In fact, one of his latest projects was done in partnership with Art Director John Kosh. They have created an art/ballet video, “Ballet in Abstract,” that has been sent to major museums and may also be seen on Stewart’s website. And so the up-to-the-minute vitality and creativity of Bradford Stewart continues with no end in sight. CH www.bradfordstewart.com

SUMMER 2015 | 53


Food & Wine

PURE

INSPIRATION

Synder Diamond And California Homes Host Chef Josiah Citrin BY KATHY BRYANT

|

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MANOLO LANGIS

NOTHING IS MORE INSPIRATIONAL to an

amateur cook than to watch an expert chef in action. For a lucky group of architects who are part of the Institute of Classical Architecture and Art (ICAA) and some A-List interior designers this was the case when Chef/Owner Josiah Citrin of Melisse in Santa Monica demonstrated his flair for making steak and mushrooms. His demonstration took place on a BlueStar range in the Santa Monica showroom of Snyder Diamond. “I have been using BlueStar at home for quite some time now,” Citrin says. “I first found out about their products from a friend and have been using the range at my house ever since.” Citrin likes the power from the burners and the way the oven contains the heat at an accurate temperature. “But, most of all, I like the way it looks. 54 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


Wonderful hors d’oeuvres served from his restaurant, Melisse in Santa Monica. OPPOSITE Chef Josiah Citrin during his food demonstration at Snyder Diamond. SUMMER 2015 | 55


Food & Wine

ABOVE Russ Diamond, President of Snyder Diamond, and John Novella of BlueStar, take a moment to admire a showroom prototype of the BlueStar range Josiah Citirin cooked on for the special occasion. RIGHT Citrin prepared one of his favorite meals to make at home: steak with braised kale and mushrooms topped with chimichurri sauce..

“Kitchens are the meeting places and many dining rooms are there mainly for aesthetics.” —RUSS DIAMOND

56 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


COUNTER CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT TO RIGHT Designer Susan Cohen, Russ Diamond and architect Marc Appleton; Josiah Citrin’s dessert course; acoustic music by Vahagni; Designer Huma Sulaiman, Marc Appleton and Christine Anderson; Dana Nichols and Roxie Sarhangi; kitchen design specialist Laurie Haefele and Josiah Citrin.

SUMMER 2015 | 57


Entertaining Food & Wine Designers Huma Sulaiman and Chris Barrett were among the guests who witnessed Citrin’s cooking demo. MIDDLE Citrin answered questions from the group about the benefits of copper cookware and the best oils to cook with at home. BOTTOM Architect Winston Chappell, Designer Krista Everage and Snyder Diamond’s Jeff Chojnacki. LEFT

“At the Snyder Diamond demo, I made steak with Portobello mushrooms. I showed the guests that it’s best to cook your meat on medium high with a little bit of garlic, butter and thyme, turning often. As for the mushrooms, you should slowly braise them in vegetable stock and olive oil.” For this by-invitation-only event, guests were greeted at the door with flutes of Champagne and hors d’oeuvres prepared by Melisse Restaurant. Besides Citrin’s cooking demonstration, Russ Diamond, owner of Snyder Diamond, spoke on the latest appliances available “We have demonstrations at our showrooms often and people learn a lot from these demos,” says Russ Diamond. “I saw people jotting down notes while Josiah Citrin talked.” Diamond feels that boutique products like BlueStar ranges are the way of the future for people serious about cooking. “It seems to be a trend that people are into cooking, especially since kitchens are getting larger and multi-functional. Kitchens are the meeting places and many dining rooms are there mainly for aesthetics.” BlueStar ranges are not only restaurant quality, but can also be customized to fit most decors, which is what high-end customers want. “You get a great look as well as professional performance.” CH 58 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


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Kitchens

KITCHEN COMES FIRST The Kitchen Is The Center Of The House

PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID DUNCAN LIVINGSTON

BY CANDACE ORD MANROE

IN THE ‘80s , THE KITCHEN BECAME the hub of the home. Great rooms—and islands— were the novelty of the ‘90s and a staple of the 2000s. Especially in California, homes became ever more back-centric, with the kitchen pushing out to the great room and dining room, all of which pushed out to the pool or back garden. Now, mid-way through the second decade of the 2000s, there’s yet another shift: Instead of being the afterthought, as in—we’ll get to that later, in a redo—the kitchen has risen to a place of primacy among the home’s priorities. It’s informing the rest of the architecture of the home. “A home’s windows, millwork, flooring, and ceiling are all looking to the kitchen for 60 | CALIFORNIA HOMES

architectural cues,” says international kitchen designer Mick de Giulio, “because, as the most important space, it is the one now being designed first.” After importance, the biggest trend is personalization. “Hoods are becoming personal statements instead of the generic, functional-only elements they’ve been in the past,” says CoCo Harper, marketing director of Jackson Design Remodeling. Wood floors, still the most popular flooring in high-end kitchens, aren’t the same old ebony. They take a more inclusive, anything goes attitude, with no single finish dominating. Subway tiles remain the subtle go-to for backsplashes, but they’re giving way to whimsical vintage tiles, sleek stone panels that slide

open as appliance garages, and other more personal choices. Finally, color is making a comeback, but as bright blasts in neutral spaces, not as a more pervasive palette. Commercial grade appliances are coveted. Refrigeration and heating drawers are both on the rise, along with steam, convection, and pizza ovens. CH

ABOVE The Italian stainless steel cabinets are Arclinea. The kitchen includes a 48-inch Wolf range and two ovens.


PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID DUNCAN LIVINGSTON

The Marin County Kitchen Of A Former Chef And His Wife Teams Industrialism With Softness IT WAS A GIVEN THAT THE KITCHEN remodeling for the former chef of a hot L.A. restaurant include A-list appliances like a Wolf range, SubZero fridge, and a Miele dishwasher, to start—and all stainless steel cabinets, countertops, hood, and other commercial features, to finish. “But his wife’s taste is more traditional,” says Ballon Studio’s principal and interior architect Sabra Ballon. “She showed me clippings she liked of rustic houses in France and country designs in Napa. My goal was to satisfy both husband and wife.” As part of a larger remodeling, Ballon expanded the back of the house and knocked out the header between the kitchen and dining room. This opened up the two areas into one seamless space while capturing a few extra feet overhead. That new openness broadened

the canvas on which she could introduce warming touches to shake off the commercial chill of so much steel and satisfy both partners. “The wife got features like the dining room curtains and furniture and the interesting wrought-iron bar stools, while the husband got the more industrial working features of the kitchen itself.” The sink, in deference to his needs, is welded to the surrounding stainless steel countertop so “the entire area can receive an industrial-level cleaning with no seams or grout getting in the way,” Ballon explains. Also, all cabinets and drawers are free of any protruding hardware—both pulls and knobs—in another concession to the chef. “All the surfaces feel flat so that, when he is flying around the kitchen, his jacket won’t get caught on the hardware.” Details like custom drawer inserts accommodate all the gadgets he acquired during his years as an executive for Williams-Sonoma. Others, like 30-inch-deep cabinets (versus the standard 24 inches) allow a double row of pots

ABOVE Sub-Zero refrigeration was a must-have on the chef’s list of essentials. Depth of the sink is 14 inches; cabinets are an extra-deep 30 inches.

and pans to be stored inside. And because the greater cabinet depth means the countertops also gain 6 inches, “a row of appliances can be kept against the wall while still leaving plenty of work area.” The grade of the cabinetry was a compromise between husband and wife. “He wanted to go with stainless steel from a kitchen supply store,” laughs Ballon, who wooed the chef over to finer Arclinea cabinets designed by Antonio Citterio. “Because the kitchen is part of the great room, we came up with something less rough and industrial that works for them both.” Likewise, the thick Carrera marble countertop on the island is as easy on the eye as it is functional for rolling out pastries. Repeated as the backsplash, the richly veined marble envelopes the room in elegance. SUMMER 2015 | 61


Kitchens A Kitchen Overlooking The Napa Valley Was Renovated To Improve Storage And Enhance The Home’s Casual Elegance With Beautiful Hand-finishes UNLIKE THE MAJORITY of wine country homes, the thirty-acre property known as “Dancing Hares” in the Napa Valley is the full-time residence of its owners, who moved there after working in the computer industry. They designed their home as a contemporary version of a Tuscan farmhouse, but after living in it for a while, realized they needed to rethink the kitchen. “Originally, there was no island,” says designer Edward Lobrano, who worked with architect Howard Backen on the space. “They needed more cabinet space for storage.” The new island, chock-full of drawers and cabinets, was painted a rich green to become a centerpiece of the kitchen. An iron pot rack hangs above it, dripping copper pots and pans, to underscore the island as a focal point. The island’s cool green hue becomes more noticeable in context with its complementary color, red, which was hand-stenciled onto the walnut plank floor in a checkerboard pattern alternating with creamcolored squares. “Our faux-finish artist hand-painted each cream square so that it looks like you see the wood grain peeking through. That’s all done with paint. She faux-boised each square,” says Lobrano. The same attention to craftsmanship was brought overhead to the grid of antique ceiling beams, which were all beautifully glazed for a rich but mellow look. Lightweight Sonoma cast stone on the fireplace and pizza oven are almost the identical color. Cabinets also pick up the buttery hue, while the stove’s custom hood and backsplash are a deeper burnished copper.

Kitchen designed by Edward Lobrano and Howard Backen. Appliances include a Viking Range, a Sub-Zero refrigerator, and a Miele dishwasher. Both the rotisserie oven and pizza oven are favorite features of the homeowners.

LEFT

PHOTOGRAPH BY KIM SARGENT

62 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


PHOTOGRAPH BY PREVIEWFIRST

Ocean Views From A Big Kitchen Bay Window Make This 1950s’ La Jolla Remodel Both The First And Forever Home For Its Young Owners DIAMONDS IN THE ROUGH can be easily overlooked, but not so this La Jolla ranch house untouched since the 1950s. Especially from the kitchen, its sparkle was unmistakable: The blue Pacific glinted in the sunlight, signaling a forever pact with its prospective young owners who’d never purchased a home of their own. “She’s from France and he’s from Britain, and they immediately fell in love with the views,” says Jennifer Pinto, one of the interior designers with Jackson Design and Remodeling, which gutted the kitchen and remodeled the entire property for the couple. One of the first improvements made by the Jackson team was to maximize the view with an enormous bay window. “Before, the kitchen was tiny and closed off,” recalls Pinto. While the remodeled airy style resonates as California casual, its undertones are French. “The homeowner has a great sense of style and influenced the materials we selected. The black and white palette is a nod to her Frenchness,” says the designer. The wide plank wood flooring also has a rustic character suggestive of the Cote d’Azur, and the

farmhouse sink might as easily outfit a kitchen in Provence. As a gemologist, however, the homeowner had no interest in camouflaging her kitchen beneath a veil of rusticity. “She wanted splashes of bright turquoise throughout the house.” Chairs pull up to the breakfast table in a blast of blue. A turquoise door opens to a food pantry near the stove. “She chose metal hardware for the cabinets that has a slight bevel, like jewelry, and the funky, geometric feel of the barstools also is an expression of her personality.” Stainless steel Italian appliances are “less bulky than most, while also being very simple and professional.” Years ago in Copenhagen, the couple had fallen in love with light fixtures while shopping in a showroom. “It took some research, but we were able to find them for the area above the island,” Pinto says. Though they had never owned a home, the couple had been thinking of what they wanted for years. “They had a whole file of magazine clippings,” laughs the designer. Now with their roots planted in La Jolla, “it’s family time all the time. They never want to leave this home.”

The Kohler sink, an updated version of a traditional farmhouse sink, scrubs any residue of slickness from the streamlined Italian appliances for a more authentically casual style. Clear glass inserts in the upper cabinets break up the white. The Italian stainless steel hood is unusually narrow and feminine. Hardware on the white cabinets is polished stainless pulls.

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PHOTOGRAPH BY PATRICK TURNER

Kitchens

The Small Kitchen In A Casa Pequeña In Santa Barbara Lives Large And True To Its Vibrant Spanish Roots WHEN A SANTA BARBARA ESTATE from the glory days of California’s Spanish Revival architecture, c.-1920, was parceled off and sold its separate ways, its intact garage was soon transformed into a private 2,000-square-foot residence. A Hollywood costume designer and her artistic male other bought the casita about seven years ago and began stamping it with their own colorful personalities. She, especially, cloaked it in the authentic dress of an early-19th-century Spanish-style home, much as she would costume a character playing a señorita in a film. “The kitchen was really the last piece of the home that they remodeled, and because of its dysfunctional floor plan, it was where they needed the most help,” says architect / interior designer Cass Ensberg, of Ensberg Jacobs Design, whose firm works to bring out the best of the architecture rather than impose a signature style. The new design involved removal of a small enclosed porch to rebuild and extend it 42 inches into the garden resulting in this larger

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kitchen without a dividing wall, all at one floor level, and with one higher consistent ceiling height. Making appropriate and beautiful spaces that work is a hallmark of Ensberg Jacobs Design – as is working with talented artist clients for the necessary teamwork that is satisfying and fun! The client found the many decorative elements including the two kinds of Mexican tiles for the backsplash design.” The client also found the traditional wroughtiron chandelier made by a Mexican artist to hang above the new butcher-block table / island made from salvaged components. “He didn’t make it custom for this kitchen, but the long, rectangular fixture was perfect,” says Ensberg. Unlike many clients in the area, these did not want a sweeping change. “Instead, they really wanted to return the kitchen to something more authentic to when the structure was built.” They wanted to retain the original cabinets, but they were funky and didn’t work with the new layout or for a dishwasher – which the kitchen did not have – so new cabinets were made in the original style. The sink was replaced with a new

farmhouse sink below the original, retained Kitchen window. Other classic architectural details were incorporated like the niche and shelves to display the owner’s beautiful Mexican pottery. The niche was created where the refrigerator had been recessed and took valuable space from the Laundry Room on the other side of the wall. The new design enhances the kitchen while greatly improving the Laundry Room function. “I think people get in trouble all the time in this town by going too big. The beauty of this kitchen is that it keeps its original charming scale – and it is super efficient and functional.” Says Ensberg. Small is good – like the little inglenook that the owner brilliantly outfitted with a colorful serape and pillows to make it a delightful and inviting place to hang out or nap in the warmth of the sun streaming in from the garden patio just outside. “And one of the details I love the most is that the countertop field tile doesn’t exactly match the porcelain color of the farm sink! So cool and authentic!” observes Ensberg.


GE Monogram: Stove and Dishwasher refrigerator by Electrolux. The kitchen chandelier is a new piece made by Raul Flores in the traditional style. The new Kitchen design celebrates and provides for display of the owner’s collection of Bauerware and early California and Mexican pottery. BELOW The small chandelier in the Inglenook is an old piece that the owner found from the Attic Consignment Shop and then refurbished with paint.

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PHOTOGRAPH BY PATRICK TURNER

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A reclaimed antique beam by Vintage Timberworks and authentic cobblestone add texture to the elegant dining area with painted French chandelier by Jacqueline Nicolas. OPPOSITE A friendly Dutch door opens up to this Laguna Beach cottage with floors 66 | CALIFORNIA HOMES from Exquisite Surfaces.


Cool, Calm & Collected

IN LAGUNA BEACH

DESIGNER CAROLYNE FERGUSON, ARCHITECT SCOTT LAIDLAW AND BUILDER BRIAN LEWOTSKY TRANSFORM A FAMILY’S COTTAGE INTO A RELAXED BLEND OF CONTEMPORARY AND TRADITIONAL ELEMENTS TEXT BY JOHNELLE WALKER | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK LOHMAN

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A second archway opens from the entry into the living room, which faces the front of the house and includes French doors that open onto a porch. The room’s dropped ceiling beams become coffered as they skim around the perimeter.

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and partial interior walls of this newly remodeled beach home once paved the streets of Metropolitan areas like New York and Chicago before they came to rest by the sea. Builder Brian Lewotsky mentions, “the darker shades come from years of tar and traffic that touched each stone” that appropriately adds a subtle depth to the home and serves as a constant reminder of the hard work it took to create this little piece of heaven in Southern California. It seems very fitting considering the family started in Boston before they left the hustle and bustle of the city to find this gem in the late 90s. “It turned out to be a wonderful opportunity for our family and we obviously acclimated for we are still here and love it,” say the owners. When they decided to update the space, “they envisioned an east coast home with some contemporary elements to match their inviting and unassuming style.” When interior designer Carolyne Ferguson of Carolyne Ferguson Design was asked to join the team she explains, “the home started as a minimal remodel and then it grew with an abundance of great ideas from all of us, which included myself, the owners, builder Brian Lewotsky, and architect Scott Laidlaw of Laidlaw Schultz Architects. Our team met several hours weekly for a year and half to come up with this causal yet elegant concept.”

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ABOVE The front outdoor patio furniture provides state-ofthe-art comfort from Gardenology, Newport Beach.


BELOW Crisp whites, warm beige, deep and soft blues accented throughout the living area with shimmering Juxtaposition Home’s mercury style lamps give it a relaxed yet radiant feel.

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The guest room lets in natural light from the outdoor patio matched with a garden scene by watercolorist Marilyn Chambers and a warm antique chest from Pine Trader Antiques in Summerland, CA.

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“I THOROUGHLY ENJOY BEING INVOLVED WITH THE INTERIOR STRUCTURE OR ‘BONES’ OF MY CLIENT’S HOME. IT IS TRULY A PASSIONATE, PERSONAL EXPERIENCE FOR ME.” —CAROLYNE FERGUSON Their collaborative efforts definitely made an impact. The team decided to tear the wall down separating the kitchen, living room, and dining room boasting a gorgeous backdrop of brilliant blues from the Pacific Ocean. It is now one open, inviting room perfect for catching up after a long day at work or socializing with friends at a dinner party. The family loves to entertain and the home displays a warm, social aspect throughout. The entrance features a diamond design of antique white marble and bleu de savoie limestone by Exquisite Surfaces matched with a Dutch door setting a convivial and graceful tone upon arrival. Ferguson is no stranger to the casual yet chic lifestyle of Orange County, designing homes independently for over twenty years many of which she has partnered with her husband, a building contractor. She is a master of incorporating natural tones with a clean fresh feeling while dispersing pops of color, interesting artwork and collectibles throughout a home. Ferguson adds, “I loved that the owners were willing to let me take some risks integrating traditional style with a soft contemporary touch in selections of lighting fixtures and furniture. They also welcomed my favorite French/Gustavian painted furniture pieces, which are my forte.” The interior structure of the home is textured and diverse. Kitchen cabinets were custom designed by Ferguson as well as the display and closet spaces. “Laidlaw was instrumental in the trusses located above the kitchen and living space, as well as for the idea to include the outdoor cobblestone in the dining room,” she says. Upon reviewing the architectural plans from Laidlaw, Ferguson began to picture in her mind how the space could be transformed, “I thoroughly enjoy being involved with the interior structure or ‘bones’ of my client’s home. It is truly a passionate, personal experience for me.” A single reclaimed antique beam from Vintage Timberworks over the dining room was left natural to complement the high ceilings and painted French chandelier by Jacqueline Nicolas of Corona del Mar. A bit of eclecticism is mixed in with crisp white painted wood paneling, Boston library wall sconces by Circa Lighting and modern cable lighting supplied by Marsh Electric in the kitchen. The countertops are made of zinc and the island is a thick Calacatta Gold Premium from Marbolis with contrasting metal stools.

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Ferguson created a unique balance in the kitchen with a two column refrigerator and freezer units and Thermador range stove in-between, complete with a steamer - a healthy alternative to the microwave, all provided by Renwes Sales. Carolyne added a white grout washed brick wall to give extra texture and bring out the deep blue hues throughout the living room. Bonny Neiman Driftwood consoles adorned with seashells, mercury style lamps, family portraits, and succulents stand on opposite sides of the white linen Cisco sofa and blue and beige chairs. The delicate and feminine guest bedroom room features Broderick Shelter upholstered beds from Serena and Lily and soft linen bedding from Gardenology of Newport Beach. An antique pine chest from Pine Trader Antiques separates the room with an original watercolor by Marilyn Chambers of Nantucket, MA. A hanging antique style painted lantern by Jacqueline Nicolas, custom mirrored bi-fold closet doors by Carolyne Ferguson Design, and windows looking out to the front garden and patio give the room a light, airy feel. The master bathroom opens up on two sides with painted aqua marine antique wood shutter doors suspended by iron barn door hardware. Jeffrey Court’s white marble tiles line the floors leading to a deep white soaking tub and separate steam shower. A collection of calming blues, grays, crème, white and pine surround the master bedroom. An antique painting by Venetia Epler gifted from Ferguson hangs near the bed capturing the diverse array of ocean shades that the owners wake up to every morning when they look out their window and where they reflect to watch the sunset at night. CH

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LEFT The master bedroom and bath are separated by a painted aqua marine antique wood shutter door suspended by iron barn door hardware that is also replicated on the other side of the bath, adding an inspiring burst of color to the serene rooms.


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SETTING THE STAGE DESIGNERS SHELDON HARTE AND JOHN HENRY KAUFMAN OF HARTE BROWNLEE & ASSOCIATES RETURN A PROVENCAL-STYLE HOME IN CARMEL VALLEY TO ITS FRENCH ROOTS TEXT BY ABIGAIL STONE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREY CRAWFORD

The terrace offers a variety of seating options. Michael Taylor’s Bay sofa and Cord Wing chairs from Walter’s Wicker create an outdoor living room while Michael Taylor’s Bay Lounge chairs cluster around the firepit. The fabric is from Perennials. The landscaping, sculpted from plants indigenous to the area, evokes the French countryside.


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“We’re creating backdrops for people to live their lives.” —SHELDON HARTE

“We’re creating backdrops for people to live their lives,” says interior designer Sheldon Harte of Harte Brownlee & Associates who worked with his colleague John Henry Kaufman to redesign this French Colonial-style home in Quail Meadows in the Carmel Valley. The previous owner had ignored the home’s architectural cues in favor of something “prim and proper,” remembers Harte. The clients, a retired couple who love to play golf and entertain, wanted a comfortable “easy to live with” retreat more in keeping with the home’s Provençal vibe. When Harte first saw the house “the walls were covered in a paint that had a gold metallic tint”. So he and Kaufman started by stripping down the interiors. After treating the walls to look like raw plaster, they brought in artist Maria Trimbell to paint delicate frescos. Flimsy fixtures were replaced with new lighting, much of it custom-made by Paul Ferrante. Furniture, some of it designed by Harte Brownlee, including the headboards in the bedrooms and the bookcases in the library, takes the house “back to its roots.” Natural fabrics layer the rooms with texture, underlining the home’s rustic, approachable aesthetic.

ABOVE In the entry hall, a trio of jade disc sculptures from Formations frames the landscape. “They layer the view and almost feel like binoculars,” says Harte.

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ABOVE In the dining room, a table that came with the house is surrounded by Dessin Fournir’s Lena side chairs. Slipcovers, made from Travers Tazza embroidered linen, cover the host chairs. A custom chandelier by Paul Ferrante hangs from a ceiling embellished by artist Maria Trimbell. Although the door surround that connects the dining room with the living room seems original to the house, it’s a custom design by Harte Brownlee. The paintings are by Kathy Jones, a Laguna Beach artist.

A sofa by Jasper, a daybed from Formations and two Dessin Fournir club chairs with star ottomans from Gibson via Paul Ferrante lead the group of seating around the majestic stone fireplace in the living room. Antique wine screw floor lamp from Lee Stanton. Clarence House embroidered linen draperies and Conrad Shades. LEFT

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ABOVE Custom-made linens created from Jim Thompson fabric top a limed oak custom designed headboard by Harte Brownlee. The matching nightstands are from Harte Brownlee. The bedside lamps are by Paul Ferrante.

RIGHT Taking color cues from an adjoining guest bathroom, a custom headboard, upholstered in Rogers and Goffigon fabric, graces a bed draped in custom linens. The bedside lamps are by Gregorius Pineo, the night tables are by Harte Brownlee. The carpet is by Hart’s Rug & Carpet in Costa Mesa.

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BELOW The sofa is upholstered in lambswool plaid from Pollack and Associates. The walls are covered in Middleton Mocha tweed from PhillipJeffries. The draperies were custom made of Byron embroidered wool from Schumacher. The deep modern Moroccan rug is from Harts Rug and Carpet. The custom bookcases are from Harte Brownlee.

Because the clients’ time at the house extends through fall, they wanted one room that was “a nesting place to watch TV,” says Harte. Harte’s response was the library. With its sofa clad in lambswool plaid by Pollack and Associates, its walls sheathed in Phillip Jeffries’ Middleton Mocha wool tweed, Schumacher’s Byron embroidered wool draping the windows and a “thick Moroccan rug you can sink your toes into,” the room exudes cozy. In warmer weather, the focus

is on the patio, which mixes chairs from Walter’s Wicker with pieces from Michael Taylor’s Bay collection and offers up the opportunity to enjoy the “sensational view.” For Harte, who is now working on the couple’s Newport Beach home, it’s all about giving clients wonderful spaces in which to enjoy themselves. The stage is set. Let the beautiful life begin. CH SUMMER 2015 | 81


Palm Springs Modernism Week Show House

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Design firm Paletteur commissioned Warner Bros. Studio Facilities to create a custom sculpture for the living room patio. Lee Jofa fabrics are used for Henry Hall sofas. Stone and wood stools by Kreoo. Lounge chairs by Gaga & Design. RIGHT Michael Berman brought the pool terrace to life with his Brown Jordan ‘Luna’ outdoor furniture collection in a custom green. Outdoor textiles by Brown Jordan.

THE CHRISTOPHER KENNEDY COMPOUND SHOW HOUSE BRINGS UNIQUE STYLE TO A MIDCENTURY HOME

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TEXT BY VANESSA KOGEVINAS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREY CRAWFORD U X U R I O US I S WA L K I N G O U T O N A B A C K PAT I O

whose white porcelain tile melts into the green of an expansive golf course as your eye is drawn up to the San Jacinto mountains and impossibly crisp blue sky framing them. Behold The Christopher Kennedy Compound show house held for a second year in conjunction with Modernism Week Palm Springs 2015. For this year’s project, sponsored by California Homes and Traditional Home, thirteen designers from across the country were assembled to bring their unique style and talent to a 2,500 square foot midcentury house, which drew over 3,000 visitors and raised close to $100,000 for Modernism Week and architectural preservation efforts in the Palm Springs area.

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“FOR THE POOL AND PATIO I WANTED TO SET THE TONE FOR THE ENTIRE HOME...WITH POPS OF COLOR AND COMBINING MIDCENTURY MODERN STYLE WITH THE CLASSIC PALM SPRINGS LAID-BACK LIFESTYLE.” —MICHAEL BERMAN

ABOVE Christopher Kennedy, namesake of the show house and owner of the property, selected Bellmont Cabinet Co., Silestone by Cosentino countertops, Sub-Zero and Wolf through Ferguson appliances, and a LaCantina Doors pocketing window for the kitchen. OPPOSITE The master bedroom terrace by Linda Allen was graced with her Live. Anywhere. Collection outdoor wireless lamps, Giati Designs outdoor furniture, FLOR rug tiles and a painting by Bradford Stewart.

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“To ensure cohesion in the house, I set a color palette of blues and greens—inspired by the grass, water and sky—and requested a lighthearted design approach,” says owner and namesake of the project Christopher Kennedy. “I felt the home should be easy and light, while not taking itself too seriously. Then, each designer interpreted the narrative in their own unique manner.” Michael Berman’s design for the pool terrace at the front of the residence welcomed the visitor. “I wanted to set the tone for the entire home,” he says, “with pops of color and combining midcentury modern style with the classic Palm Springs laid-back lifestyle.” In the living room, Trip Haenisch also evoked the midcentury modern style of the area using “furniture from or inspired by prolific designers of the past such as Hans Wegner, Jean-Michel Frank and Jean Royère,” he notes.


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ABOVE For the guest bedroom, Grace Home Furnishings chose a Jim Thompson wallcovering, a bed and drapery from Grace Home Collection, a Surya rug, and an Interlude Home bench. LaCantina Doors give out onto the patio. RIGHT A vignette from the guest bedroom. Guest bath (not pictured) designed by Tabitha Evans. OPPOSITE TOP The dining room by Nancy Price boasted a dining table and chairs from the Nancy Price Interior Design Antiques division, a Julian Chichester chandelier and a Maya Romanoff wallcovering. OPPOSITE BOTTOM Trip Haenisch combined sophisticated, unexpected and laid-back pieces including a custom sofa, tufted chair and daybed by THA, a Hans J. Wegner chair, a coffee table from Hollywood at Home, a Mansour rug and a ceiling light by Jason Koharik.

Nancy Price’s adjoining dining room—separated by a custom Trip Haenisch maple wood screen—boasted a charcoal colored wood veneer paper. “I wanted to create warmth and depth of design,” she says. The kitchen, which features an integrated catering kitchen, was designed by Christopher Kennedy and basked in green. “Green is my favorite color,” he shares, “and I decided to bring back avocado kitchens!” Grace Home Funrishings made a splash with their signature turquoise sea blue in the guest room. “We were inspired by the blues and greens of the natural environment,” says Roger Stoker, who with partner Michael Ostrow, achieved their goal of a “comfortable, inviting and fun room.” SUMMER 2014 | 87


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ABOVE In the master bath, Marlaina Teich used Phillip Jeffries wallcovering to contrast with the Duravit vanities and mirrors. Tile flooring (throughout house) from Bedrosians. LEFT The den by Parker Kennedy featured a Hartmann & Forbes wallpaper juxtaposed with bright pieces – a Parker Kennedy Living chartreuse sideboard chest and a red lamp from Barbara Cosgrove. OPPOSITE Mark Cutler used Robert Allen fabrics and wallcoverings in the master bedroom. A writing desk from JF Chen is paired with a Pantone chair from Dwell. Mark Cutler Design table lamp.

Connecting patios grace the living room, dining room and guest room—all three of which were dressed by Gino Castaño and David Lasker of Palettuer. A unique sculpture offered a jaw-dropping moment that in “framing the view allowed the expansive space to become an intimate lounge cocktail area,” notes Castaño. On the master bedroom and den patios, Linda Allen went for a “‘make you smile’ outdoor living room showcasing fun color blocks – periwinkle, navy and lemon,” she says. A den by Lance Jackson and David Ecton of Parker Kennedy Living offered a bright yet smoky sexy vibe dictated by the Robert Allen Design fabric on the vintage sectional sofa. “We drew our inspiration from Alexander McQueen couture fashions,” says Ecton. For the master bedroom, Mark Cutler aimed to “capture the moment in time that was a clash between modernism and the new traditionalism that was coming back to the desert,” he notes, “drawing inspiration from epic designers like Steve Chase and Michael Taylor.” SUMMER 2015 | 89


Marlaina Teich’s design for the master bath was a lovely compliment. “I wanted to create a modern space with subtle excitement by combining contrasting textures with a shot of bold color,” she explains. The adjacent master closet by Kennedy “embraced the necessary dropped ceiling by adorning it with butterfly wallpaper,” he says. For the powder room, Vanessa De Vargas drew inspiration “from Hollywood glamour and from old school Palm Springs designs,” she notes. “I wanted the space to illicit a ‘wow, this could have been this here all along’ reaction.” Rounding out the property was Bobby Berk’s outdoor lounge. “I wanted to create an area that would become the spot where everyone hung out at night,” he says. And indeed it was. Of course, without the support of sponsors a high-end show house is impossible. This year’s roster included the generosity of Ferguson, LaCantina Doors, Sub-Zero and Wolf, Art House, Crestron, Dornbracht, Architectural Blue, Bedrosians Tile & Stone, Benjamin Moore Paint, Cosentino, Landscape Illuminators and Robert Allen, among many. A successful show house is the fleeting and great fusion of many talents and entities that produce something special in the design world, brimming with creativity, inspiration, history, fun and philanthropy. The Christopher Kennedy Compound distinctly delivered all. CH 90 | CALIFORNIA HOMES


The entry features a mosaic from Tilebar. Property renovated by ArtHouse Design. OPPOSITE TOP Bobby Berk’s outdoor lounge welcomed guests with a Galanter & Jones heated sofa and chairs, a Real Flame outdoor fireplace and a living wall by Opiary. OPPOSITE BOTTOM Vanessa De Vargas matched a Jeff Andrews for Astek Inc. wallpaper with an Alape sink and Dornbracht plumbing fixtures in the powder room.

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Presidio Heights Tudor Goes Modern THE 2015 SAN FRANCISCO DECORATORS SHOWCASE

PHOTOGRAPH BY MARGOT HARTFORD

TEXT BY KENDRA BOUTELL

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Cecillie Starin’s inspiration for Street Soirée came from a past San Francisco Decorator Showcase room. Orlando Diaz-Azcuy’s 1998 Grand Dining Room featured grisaille wallpaper as a panel screen. Starin updated the look with Ian Ross’ street art. LEFT On the dining table, Starin mixed hand finished organic shaped dinnerware with a succulent centerpiece from Living Green.


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PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID DUNCAN LIVINGSTON

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began its life as the Rosenberg House in Presidio Heights. Built in 1917, famed architect Julia Morgan designed the concrete and timbered Elizabethan style mansion for Abraham Rosenberg. Born in Calaveras County, Rosenberg’s German parents immigrated to California during the Gold Rush. The son found his fortune in dried fruits not precious metals. Active in the arts, Rosenberg and his wife Alice invited musicians, writers, and artists for soirees in their home. Honoring the houses past patronage, interior designer Cecilie Starin’s first floor Street Soirée juxtaposed gritty street art with timeless elegance. San Francisco artist Ian Ross painted the dining room’s murals with black and white abstractions of flora. Against this canvas Starin centered a tree root base dining table from Groundwork Group and bleached neo-classical styled dining chairs upholstered in ebony patent leather. A gilded Rococo mirror from Aedicule reflected the collision of urban reality and city splendor.

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ABOVE For the family room Kathleen Navarra selected Gregorius Pineo’s Dordogne side chairs covered in Jim Thompson’s Lacquer fabric for the dining nook. The entertainment wall displayed abstract works on paper by Sausalito artist Tracey Kessler.


Navarra contrasted a white gesso wooden chandelier from Paul Ferrante with a cocoa colored La Cornue Hotte Ch창teau Hood. Perpendicular to the cerused oak and marble kitchen island a wood and metal high table with bar stools covered in Nobilis fabric provided a spot for casual eating.

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PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID DUNCAN LIVINGSTON


In the Master Bedroom Will Wick flanked a 19th century Venetian gilded mirror with midcentury Italian sconces from Adesso. A luxurious white faux Chinchilla fur from Beacon Hill covered the custom kidney shaped sofa companioned with a Lens Coffee Table from Eccola.

PHOTOGRAPH BY PATRIK ARGAST

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PHOTOGRAPH BY PATRIK ARGAST

ABOVE A whimsical French mid-century sconce from Bourgeois Bohème illuminated an Italian mid-century desk from Battersea. Wick accessorized from his own collation along with Metamorphic Rock bookends from The Future Perfect. OPPOSITE For the bed, Wick upholstered the channeled headboard in an ivory alpaca, which he paired with a cream cashmere and chocolate velvet duvet. On the vintage nightstand Wick placed a burl and brass double gourd lamp from the Kriest Collection finished with a lavender fez shaped shade.

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PHOTOGRAPH BY ROB JORDAN/ROBJPHOTOS.COM

TINEKE TRIGGS DREW INSPIRATION FROM A 1960S FASHION MAGAZINE COVER. THE GRAPHIC BLACK AND WHITE PATTERNED FLOOR TILES IN HER EN VOGUE SALON ECHOED THE GRAFFITI ART OF THE STREET SOIRÉE.

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Down the hall from the dining room, Kathleen Navarra created a contemporary kitchen and great room. She unified the spaces by painting the ceiling pale teal in a high gloss finish. The kitchen featured crisp white cabinetry and Calcutta marble counters contrasted by chocolate grasscloth walls and walnut flooring. The verre églomisé backsplash by Villafranca Studio and La Cornue Chateau oven added embellishment. In the great room Navarra layered warm browns and cool blues with accents of hot pink. For the family pet, a bed alcove nestled under the stairs, complete with a rural scene by decorative artists Katherine Jacobus and Linda Horning. Ascending the stairs to the second floor, Eche Martinez’s Gentleman’s Private Lounge beckoned. Inspired by John Singer Sargent’s painting “Dr. Pozzi at Home,” Martinez imagined a modern day dandy’s lair. Against a dark gray shell, the designer installed a threepanel mural comprised of blown-up images from a pastoral etching. A Danish Modern settee by Frits Henningsen anchored the space flanked by a pair of Sylvan Bubble Table Lamps. The seductive tone of the lounge continued in the adjacent master bedroom by Will Wick. Wick balanced the verdant green walls with lush ivory drapes, bedding, and carpet. Accents of ethereal pink and lavender give the room a feminine touch. For the master bath and dressing room, Tineke Triggs drew inspiration from a 1960s fashion magazine cover. The graphic black and white patterned floor tiles in her En Vogue Salon echoed the graffiti art of the Street Soirée. CH


PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRISTOPHER STARK & STYLING, ROSY FRIDMAN

ABOVE Eche Martinez found his man at an art supplies store for his Gentleman’s Private Lounge. Decorative artist Willem Racké refinished the mannequin in turquoise to complement the Sylvan lamps. OPPOSITE Zia Priven’s dramatic Palermo chandelier crowned Tineke Triggs En Vogue Salon bath. Framing the oval freestanding tub, Carolyn Ray’s hand dyed ombre drapery fabric embellished with hardware from Houlès.

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Gatherings 1

Decorative Art Society of Orange County (DARTS) Celebrates Its 20th Anniversary Internationally known interior designer, Timothy Corrigan served as Honorary Host when the Newport Beach based Decorative Arts Society of Orange County celebrated its 20th anniversary with a lunch, held at Big Canyon Country Club, featuring table top designs created by notable guest designers. Event Underwriters included Lugano Diamonds, Rogers Gardens and South Coast Plaza. Twenty-two tabletop designers included Barclay Butera, Peter Dunham, Kathryn M. Ireland, Diane Johnson, Sheri Murphy, Suzanne Rheinstein and Hutton Wilkenson. The Decorative Arts Society is a not-for-profit membership group committed to improving the lives of women and children in Orange County by investing in organizations and programs via an annual community grant program. By June 2015 DARTS will have given nearly $2 million back to the community.

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1 Tabletop Design by Sheldon Harte and John Henry Kaufman of Harte Brownlee Associates.

9 Table designed by 503 Found.

2 John Henry Kaufman and Sheldon Harte.

11 Tabletop by Designer Timothy Corrigan.

3 Decorative Arts Society members Darlene Manclark, Diane Johnson, Hyla Bertea and Carole Steele.

12 Honorary Host of the Event, Timothy Corrigan.

4 Decorative Arts Society of OC President, Mary Anna Jeppe. 5 Randy Boyd of Thurston Boyd and his tabletop design.

10 Interior Designer John Beneck and tabletop design.

13 Barclay Butera Tabletop. 14 DARTS Members Marion Palley and Sharon Henwood.

6 Kathryn M. Ireland’s tabletop featuring her own fabrics.

15 Co Chairs of the Big Canyon Country Club event Ann Dennis and Linda Colton.

7 Tabletop Design by Elizabeth Benefield.

16 Table designed by Sheri Murphy.

8 Hutton Wilkinson at his tabletop.

17 Ruben Flores of Laguna Nursery at his Tabletop.

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Wine

Benziger’s Biodynamic Tram Tours. Photograph by MJ Wickam. opposite Sheep are an integral part of Benziger’s Biodynamic Farming. Photograph by Jennifer Seekon.

Green Medal Excuse Me, Waiter, But My Wine Is Green By Kenneth Friedenreich

an email news release arrived to inform this editor that California had presented its first ever “Green Medal.” This award divides four ways and perhaps you, as I have also consumed some wines flying winners’ respective flags. It recognizes wineries less for what’s in the bottle, but how it was made in a sustainable way. And like the man in the Moliere comedy who never realized he had been speaking prose his entire life, we have had eco-friendly libations in our stems for a long while without appreciating the fact. In addition to a sponsoring trade publication, the award occurs through the efforts of a sustainable wine interest group and the San Francisco-based California Wine Institute. The most telling of what follows is the list of 16 grower and vintner associations. It features AVAs from Temecula north to Sonoma County with many rest stops in between. In other words, the recognition has wide industry mojo and support.

T h i s pa st A p ril

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According to the Institute’s information director, Gladys Horiuchi, the award takes its current iteration for two principal reasons that may at first seem counter-intuitive. “Producers and retailers respond to the market’s preferences though the response may take shape gradually,” she points out. “Wine drinkers for a very long time have focused on wine and food.” This is natural, too, because wine rites are built about complementary pairings with dishes. This interest continues unabated. But Horiuchi adds: “Our research revealed that 34% of wine consumers cared very much about the environmental impacts of winemaking itself.” In this the consumer went beyond seeing ‘organic’ printed on the label. She explains. “These folks were interested in the ecology of farming, of producing and packaging the wine, its transport and how the winemakers got along with their neighbors.” All this to a cynic may sounds like kumbaya Kool-Aid until one considers the economic impact of the wine industry overall. California ranks fourth worldwide as a wine producer even though it’s not a sovereign nation. Oeno-tourism is the second largest attraction in the state after Disneyland. The state has over 4,000 wineries presently. So, even the dim must assert that California’s wine business has plenty of influence on how the state can best be perceived by others in our country, not merely for its size, but the quality of its attitude to its primary trade— making wine and selling lots of it. The reader may think. “Organic schmorganic. Milk is organic. Apples are organic. Wine comes from grapes. So they’re organic. So what’s all this sustainable stuff got to do with it? And while you’re explaining, give me back my corkscrew.” Simply put sustainable farming is analogous to what accountants call “good practices.” A restaurant owner

does not have to encourage staff to utilize all ingredients purchased for food preparation that do not violate other codes. Restaurant kitchens waste little. It represents sustainability in food preparation. So sustainable farming pays attention to detail from even before the planting of the first vine. Oenologists have identified factors that encourage production of wine grapes before they’re glimmers in anyone’s wine cave. Beforehand, growers learned from experience. Now that experience is measurable with good results such as disease resistance, cluster density, ripening time, and profitable yield. Sustainable farming is, as Henry Luce once said of all business, “a future calculation.” The commitment begins with staying on message. The fairness disease so endemic to our recognition culture— even a wallflower is Queen of the Prom—was avoided by consolidating different groups into one judging organization. This avoided clutter and cross purposes. As if to make the point, the awards were announced to the public at a UC Davis luncheon. UCD is to wine study as Stratfordon-Avon is to Shakespeare. Presumably the wines served came out of sustainably farmed properties. And the envelope, please: LEADER AWARD, given to the vineyard or winery that excels in the “3 E’s” of sustainability—environmentally sound, socially equitable and economically viable. Winner: Fetzer Vineyards--founded 1968 this company has integrated sustainable wine practices up and down its corporate metabolism. ENVIRONMENT AWARD, given to the vineyard or winery that best demonstrates Environmental Stewardship through maximized environmental benefits from implementing sustainable practices. Winner: Benziger Family Winery. With all of its estate properties Demeter Certified Biodynamic, this family winery created SUMMER 2015 | 105

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Wine

“These folks were interested in the ecology of farming, of producing and packaging the wine, its transport and how the winemakers got along with their neighbors.” —Gladys Horiuchi “Farming for Flavors,” which was third party certified by Stellar in 2007 before other sustainability certifications were available. COMMUNITY AWARD, given to the vineyard or winery that is a Good Neighbor & Employer using the most innovative practices that enhance relations with employees, neighbors and/or communities. Winner: Nord Vineyard Services. With 400 acres of family partnership vineyards at 10 locations throughout Napa Valley, Nord Vineyards recognizes that the long-term viability of the vineyards requires sustainable business and farming practices. Nord frequently invites professionals and the public to its vineyards, including hosting hundreds of neighbors as part of Napa Grape growers’ and Napa Valley Vintners’ “Afternoon in the Vineyards.” BUSINESS AWARD, given to the vineyard or winery that best demonstrates Smart Business through efficiencies, cost savings and innovation from implementing sustainable practices. Winner: Trinchero Family Estates. Committed to environmental stewardship, charitable giving and responsibility, Trinchero Family Estates is being recognized

for efficient and innovative sustainability practices that serve as a model for the wine industry. Part of their distinction applies to their trucking, plotting routes to save fuel, time, and wear and tear on their fulfillment. Moving a palate of wine may not be as sexy as wine served at sunset on the terrace, but the wine had to get there. So it can become part of the sustainable paradigm. All such criteria—esoteric or consumer friendly--could readily become self-serving buzzwords and phrases. For instance, consumers read “Fresh from Concentrate” on juice containers as “fresh.” American enterprise relies on consensual lies that in certain ways are more truthful than plain facts. The sustainable practices that distinguish the four winners and myriad other wineries will not necessarily show up on the flavor profile or risk reducing other enjoyments in the bottle. But I am glad to know the commitment is there. When you stand next in front of a wine display counter as long as a stretch of I-5, remember these properties and the people who tend them. Kudos. CH

above left Selection of the wines from the four winners of the California Green Medal Sustainable Winegrowing Leadership Awards (Leftright): Tribute from Benziger Vineyards (Environment Award); Fetzer Vineyards (Leader Award); Trinity Oaks from Trinchero Family Estates (Business Award) and Nord Estates Wines from Nord Vineyard Services (Community Award). above right Nord Vineyards in Napa Valley, CA.

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Gatherings Photography by Elaine Lee photography and getty images for P.S. ARTS

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The 28th Annual Los Angeles Modernism Show & Sale Benefiting P.S. ARTS, Celebrates Opening Night VIPS From The Worlds of Design, Art, Fashion and Entertainment Celebrated A First Look At The Premiere Show The Los Angeles Modernism Show & Sale kicked off on Friday, April 24th at 3LABS in Culver City with its annual Opening Night Party, to raise money for P.S. ARTS, a local nonprofit organization dedicated to improving children’s lives through arts education. The Opening Night event was supported by Boxed Water is Better, Delta Air Lines, Firestone Walker Brewing Company, Leslie and Bill McMorrow, The Resnick Family Foundation, Rrivre Works Inc. and The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Foundation. 2

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1 Architect Dax Miller and Diane Von Furstenberg Image Director Alexandra von Furstenberg. 2 Los Angeles Modernism Show & Sale entrance. 3 Jeffrey Alan Marks. 4 Chaz Guest and Lisa Butler. 5 Guest with Charles Phoenix and Mitch Cowley with guest 6 Actress, Challen Cates. 7 P.S. Arts Committee member Judy Chang.

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8 Nathan Turner and guest. 9 Atmosphere on opening night. 7

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Contacts Pages 66-73 COOL, CALM & COLLECTED Architecture: Scott Laidlaw | Laidlaw Schultz Architects 3111 Second Avenue Corona del Mar, CA 92625 949.645.9982 www.lsarchitects.com Builder: Brian Lewotsky | Brain Lewotsky Company, Inc. 1911 Rolling Stone Lane Tustin, CA 92780 714.730.3750 www.blewcoinc.com Interior Design: Carolyne Ferguson Design P.O. Box 11567 Newport Beach, CA 92658 949. 874.1105 www.carolynefergusondesign.com COVER Carolyne Ferguson Design www.carolynefergusondesign.com Circa Lighting www.circalighting.com Renwes Sales www.renwessales.com Thermador www.thermador.com Page 66-67 Exquistite Surfaces www.xsurfaces.com Jacqueline Nicolas www.jnicolas.com Vintage Timberworks www.vintagetimber.com Page 68-69 Bonny Neiman www.bonnyneiman.com Cisco www.ciscohome.net Gardenology www.gardenology.com Juxtaposition www.juxtaposition.com Page 70-71 Gardenology www.gardenology.com Jeffrey Court www.jeffreycourt.com Pine Trader Antiques www.pinetrader.com Serena and Lily www.serenaandlily.com Venetia Epler www.artprice.com Pages 74-81 SETTING THE STAGE Interior Design: Sheldon Harte and John Henry Kaufman | Harte Brownlee & Associates 962 Glenneyre Street Laguna Beach, CA 92651 949.494.8343 www.hartebrownlee.com

Pages 74-75 Michael Taylor www.michaeltaylordesigns.com Parennials www.perennialsfabrics.com Walters Wicker www.walterswicker.com Pages 76-77 Formations www.formationsusa.com Harte Brownlee & Associates www.hartebrownlee.com Maria Trimbell www.mariatrimbell.com Paul Ferrante www.paulferrante.com Page 78-79 Clarence House www.clarencehouse.com Dessin Fournir www.dessinfournir.com Formations www.formationsusa.com Kathy Jones www.kathyjonesstudio.com

www.michaelbermanlimited.com Gino Castano and David Lasker of Paletteur www.paletteur.com Page 84-85 Bellmont Cabinet Co www.bellmontcabinets.com Bradford Stewart Painting www.bradfordstewart.com FLOR rugs www.flor.com Giati Designs www.giati.com LaCantina Doors www.lacantinadoors.com Linda Allen www.lindaallendesigns.com Silestone www.silestoneusa.com Sub-Zero www.subzero-wolf.com Page 86-87 Roger Stoker & Michael Ostrow of Grace Home Furnishings www.gracehomefurnishings.com

Lee Stanton www.leestanton.com

Hollywood at Home www.hollywoodathome.com

Maria Trimbell www.mariatrimbell.com Paul Ferrante www.paulferrante.com

Jim Thompson www.julianchichester.com

Travers www.uniquefabrics.com Page 80-81 Gregorius Pineo www.gregoriuspineo.com Hart’s Rugs and Carpets www.hartsrugs.com Jim Thompson www.jimthompson.com Michael Taylor www.michaeltaylordesigns.com Phillip Jeffries www.phillipjeffries.com

Julian Chichester www.julianchichester.com

LaCantina Doors www.lacantinadoors.com Mansour Rug www.mansourrug.com Maya Romanoff www.mayaromanoff.com Nancy Price www.nancypriceinteriors.com Tabitha Evans www.tabithaevansdesign.com Trip Haenisch www.triphaenisch.com Page 88-89

Pollack and Associates www.pollackassocaites.com Rogers and Goffigon www.rogersandgoffigon.com

Barbara Cosgrove www.barbaracosgrovelamps.com

Schumacher www.rogersandgoffigon.com Pages 82-91 PALM SPRINGS MODERNISM WEEK SHOW HOUSE Interior Design: Christopher Kennedy | Home Furnishings and Design 1590 South Palm Canyon Drive Palm Springs, CA 92264 760.325.3214 www.christopherkennedy.com Page 82-83 Brown Jordan www.brownjordan.com Henry Hall www.henryhalldesigns.com Michael Berman

Duravit www.duravit.us

Bedrosians www.bedrosians.com

Dwell Studio www.dwellstudio.com Hartman & Forbes www.hfshades.com JF Chen www.jfchen.com

Lance Jackson and David Ecton of Parker Kennedy Living www.parkerkennedyliving.com Linda Allen www.lindaallendesigns.com Mark Cutler www.markcutlerdesign.com

Phillip Jeffries www.phillipjeffries.com Page 92-93 Presidio Heights Tudor Goes Modern The 2015 San Francisco Decorators Showcase Cecilie Starin www.ceciliestarin.com Ian Ross www.ianrossgallery.com Living Green www.livinggreen.com Orlando Diaz-Azcuy www.odada.net Page 94-95 Aedicule www.aedicule.com Gregorious Pineo www.gregoriuspineo.com Jim Thompson www.jimthompsonfabrics.com Kathleen Navarra www.navarradesign.com La Cornue Hotte Chateau Hood www.lacornueusa.com Nobilis www.nobilis.fr Paul Ferrante www.paulferrante.com Tracey Kessler www.traceykessler.com Page 96-97 Adesso www.adessoimports.com Beacon Hill www.beaconhilldesign.com Eccola www.eccolaimports.com Will Wick www.wickdesign.com Page 98-99 Bourgeois Boheme www.bobointeriors.com The Future Perfect www.thefutureperfect.com Page 100-101 Carolyn Ray www.carolynray.com Eche Martinez www.echemartinez.com Houles www.houles.com Tineke Triggs www.adlsf.com Villafranca Studio www.villafrancastudio.com Will Wick www.wickdesign.com Willem Racke www.willemrackestudio.com Zia Priven www.ziapriven.com

Marlaina Teich www.mtdny.com

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Travel

Chewton Glen This Five Star Country House Hotel is Quintessential English By Kathy Bryant

ABOVE Chewton Glen is an 18th century house, remodeled in the 1890s, that is set on the southern edge of the 900,000-acre New Forest. Today it is a five-star privately owned luxury country house hotel and spa and a member of Relais & Chateaux.

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o r y e a r s w e ’ d wa n t e d t o v i s i t the five-star privately owned Chewton Glen in Hampshire, England. Since 1966 this country house hotel and spa has been on every list of “bests,” including in 2014 as the best UK Holiday Hotel by Conde Nast Traveller. Our dreamed-of vacation started out on a typically English note with rain pouring down as we landed at Heathrow Airport. Luckily for us, we had booked a limo through Chewton Glen to drive us the hour and a half trip from the airport to the hotel. That was one time a splurge was perfect, since we were whisked away quickly and by the time we drove unto the 130-acre grounds the sun was out and we were ready to settle in and enjoy the legendary hotel. The existing 18th-century house that holds the hotel was remodeled in the 1890s and abuts the 900,000 acre New Forest, created in 1079 by William the Conqueror

as a hunting area. In 1966 the Skan family purchased the hotel and began modernizing it, a program that continues to this day. This sensitive updating honors the property’s past while being firmly in the 21st century. When we entered the country house, we felt the history immediately, especially in the bar with its dark wood, red drapery and leather armchairs and in the lounge. However, we were soon off to a newer part of Chewton Glen: one of six Treehouse Suites, opened in 2012. Looking more like a building you’d find on safari in Africa, our treehouse sat high on stilts completely removed from the hotel proper overlooking the New Forest. We had arrived there via a golf buggy that took us up a path to our suite. The land the Treehouses sit on had been previously untouched. It is a designated green belt and near an area of high ecological value and important trees. The Treehouses are even positioned to get a sunset every evening. One thing for sure. Not even royalty living in the 18th

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above Voted the UK’s favorite spa retreat, the spa features an indoor swimming pool, aromatherapy saunas and crystal steam rooms as well as a pool bar and lounge with a healthy menu option. right The antique furnishings in the hotel harken back to the house’s past.

century had the luxury we had in the treehouse. Contemporary in design both inside and out, it had a different feeling from the hotel, although the nubby topof-the-line fabrics were in traditional warm English colors like tan, green and orange. Natural building materials used were oak, stone from the nearby Jurassic Coast, zinc and copper. The treehouse had every convenience, including a kitchenette and a hot tub on the deck, which, unfortunately, we didn’t use. There is patio furniture on the deck too, so it was easy to imagine sitting out there and enjoying a warm day with a view of the forest. It wasn’t raining but it was cozier staying inside by the woodburning fireplace. Later we summoned the buggy to take us to dinner at Vetiver Restaurant, which was packed with locals even though it was a Sunday night. Taking advantage of local game, I had grouse for dinner while my companion enjoyed the tasty halibut. Vetiver specializes in local foods and their Executive Head Chef, Luke Matthews, uses game from the New Forest, local fruit vegetables and seafood. SUMMER 2015 | 111

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Travel

CALIFORNIA HOMES

THE MAGAZINE OF ARCHITECTURE THE ARTS & DISTINCTIVE DESIGN

RIGHT Al fresco wine picnic set from tasting room and gift shop Wine:Taste. BELOW The old schoolhouse on Main Street reinvented as an art gallery.

Ode to

Summer CARMEL VALLEY LAGUNA BEACH SAN FRANCISCO PALM SPRINGS

Editor’s Choice

Kitchens

Pools &

DISPLAY UNTIL AUGUST 1, 2015

Pool Houses

The Treehouse Suites are the latest addition to Chewton Glen and look out of the New Forest. LEFT The decor of the Treehouse Suites is contemporary unlike the main house. Warm colors, fireplaces and verandas make these suites perfect getaways for families and couples. BELOW A breakfast is delivered in the morning to guests at the Treehouses so that they don’t need to travel down to the main house.

ABOVE

Although we didn’t wake up that early, at 7:30 am breakfast quietly arrived in our dumb waiter and was a feast of smoked salmon, assorted breads, muesli and fresh fruit. There was a high-tech coffee maker in the room for regular coffee or cappuccino. After breakfast we took the 20-minute walk to the beach and then walked around the extensive grounds. A bit tired, we then went to the spa for Linda Meredith facials and a quick lunch in the spa restaurant, which features organic salads. The Romanesque ozone-treated indoor swimming pool here is an attraction by itself. There is much to do in the area, including walks through the New Forest, a visit to the Jurassic Coast or exploration of nearby towns and villages. There are also many activities offered by the hotel like clay pigeon shooting, tennis, croquet and golf among others. All in all there was way too much to see and do during our stay so we hope that a return trip is in our future. CH www.chewtonglen.com

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Subs@CalHomesMagazine.com CALIFORNIA HOMES®, The Magazine of Architecture the Arts & Distinctive Design (ISSN 1088-7172) is published quarterly (Winter; Spring; Summer; Fall) by McFadden-Bray Publishing Corporation, 417 31st Street, Suite B, Newport Beach, CA 92663. Copyright 2014 by Michael and Susan McFadden. All rights reserved in all countries. CALIFORNIA HOMES® is a trademark of McFadden-Bray Publishing Corporation. Periodicals postage paid at Newport Beach, CA and additional mailing offices. Basic subscription rate is one year (four issues) for $22 in USA. Single copy $5.99. Postmaster: Send address changes to California Homes, P.O. Box 8655, Newport Beach, CA 92658. Printed in the United States of America. CALIFORNIA HOMES

Volume 19 Number 2

Summer 2015

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www.pinetrader.com 2345 Lillie Avenue Summerland, CA 93067 805.845.2618 | 805.245.1998

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